Science.gov

Sample records for compounds so-called microbial

  1. [Assessment of so called organic trace compounds in drinking water from the regulatory, health and aesthetic-quality points of view, with special consideration given to pharmaceuticals].

    PubMed

    Dieter, H H; Mückter, H

    2007-03-01

    More than 2500 chemically defined substances are approved as drugs in Germany. Unlike agricultural pesticides, these biologically active structures are not used in open environmental compartments and therefore their environmental toxicological data base is not nearly as complete. Nevertheless, some of them become environmental contaminants after their intended use. Therefore, from the viewpoint of environmental health protection, there are gaps in their health-related environmental risk assessment. Organic trace compounds that lack an adequate toxicological database, and their mixtures, in drinking water can be safely regulated and provisionally assessed by combining the "similar joint action" addition rule with the recommendation of the Federal Environment Agency of March 2003 "Assessing the presence of substances in drinking water without (adequate) toxicological database from the health point of view". The general precautionary value (Gesundheitlicher Orientierungswert GOW1=0.10 microg/l), which is a recommendation for weakly to not genotoxic compounds, re presents a workable compromise between preventive health protection, water management considerations and aesthetic quality claims (purity). Compliance with this value in the long term will only be possible if the chemical and biological degradation of pharmaceuticals and their metabolites in waste water and waste water treatment plants is effectively improved. Alternatively, there is the risk of drinking water degenerating into a sink for highly mobile, polar and persistent compounds. Their elimination at a stage as late as technical drinking water treatment would be neither close to the initial cause nor justifiable in terms of technical effectiveness. The risk assessment of their byproducts would give rise to further uncertainties. Possible conflicts with the therapeutic quality must be solved by developing substitute products which are environmentally sound.

  2. The So-Called 'Face on Mars'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 13 April 2002) The Science The so called 'Face on Mars' can be seen slightly above center and to the right in this THEMIS visible image. This 3-km long knob, located near 10o N, 40o W (320o E), was first imaged by the Viking spacecraft in the 1970's and was seen by some to resemble a face carved into the rocks of Mars. Since that time the Mars Orbiter Camera on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft has provided detailed views of this hill that clearly show that it is a normal geologic feature with slopes and ridges carved by eons of wind and downslope motion due to gravity. A similar-size hill in Phoenix, Arizona resembles a camel lying on the ground, and Phoenicians whimsically refer to it as Camelback Mountain. Like the hills and knobs of Mars, however, Camelback Mountain was carved into its unusual shape by thousands of years of erosion. The THEMIS image provides a broad perspective of the landscape in this region, showing numerous knobs and hills that have been eroded into a remarkable array of different shapes. Many of these knobs, including the 'Face', have several flat ledges partway up the hill slopes. These ledges are made of more resistant layers of rock and are the last remnants of layers that once were continuous across this entire region. Erosion has completely removed these layers in most places, leaving behind only the small isolated hills and knobs seen today. Many of the hills and ridges in this area also show unusual deposits of material that occur preferentially on the cold, north-facing slopes. It has been suggested that these deposits were 'pasted' on the slopes, with the distinct, rounded boundary on their upslope edges being the highest remaining point of this pasted-on layer. In several locations, such as in the large knob directly south of the 'Face', these deposits occur at several different heights on the hill. This observation suggests the layer once draped the entire knob and has since been removed from all but the north

  3. The So-Called 'Face on Mars'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 13 April 2002) The Science The so called 'Face on Mars' can be seen slightly above center and to the right in this THEMIS visible image. This 3-km long knob, located near 10o N, 40o W (320o E), was first imaged by the Viking spacecraft in the 1970's and was seen by some to resemble a face carved into the rocks of Mars. Since that time the Mars Orbiter Camera on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft has provided detailed views of this hill that clearly show that it is a normal geologic feature with slopes and ridges carved by eons of wind and downslope motion due to gravity. A similar-size hill in Phoenix, Arizona resembles a camel lying on the ground, and Phoenicians whimsically refer to it as Camelback Mountain. Like the hills and knobs of Mars, however, Camelback Mountain was carved into its unusual shape by thousands of years of erosion. The THEMIS image provides a broad perspective of the landscape in this region, showing numerous knobs and hills that have been eroded into a remarkable array of different shapes. Many of these knobs, including the 'Face', have several flat ledges partway up the hill slopes. These ledges are made of more resistant layers of rock and are the last remnants of layers that once were continuous across this entire region. Erosion has completely removed these layers in most places, leaving behind only the small isolated hills and knobs seen today. Many of the hills and ridges in this area also show unusual deposits of material that occur preferentially on the cold, north-facing slopes. It has been suggested that these deposits were 'pasted' on the slopes, with the distinct, rounded boundary on their upslope edges being the highest remaining point of this pasted-on layer. In several locations, such as in the large knob directly south of the 'Face', these deposits occur at several different heights on the hill. This observation suggests the layer once draped the entire knob and has since been removed from all but the north

  4. [So-called medullary fibromas of the kidney].

    PubMed

    Postnov, Iu V; Perov, Iu L; Gribunov, Iu P

    1978-01-01

    This is the first description in the national literature of morphology of the so-called medullar fibromas of the human kidney which are considered to be hormonally-active (producing prostaglandines) tumours or tumour-like focal hyperplasias of interstitial cells of the kidney medullary layer.

  5. Developmental venous anomalies (DVA): the so-called venous angioma.

    PubMed

    Lasjaunias, P; Burrows, P; Planet, C

    1986-01-01

    Following a review of the literature it is possible to demonstrate the "normality" of the so called venous angiomas. They should be named Developmental Venous Anomaly (DVA). They illustrate in their two extreme types (superficial and deep) the hemodynamic equilibrium of the transcortical venous drainage in the periependymal zones. Venous ectasias and varices which can be encountered, associated with DVA constitute an acquired feature in relation to a venous outlet obstacle. The sinus pericranii represents an extracerebral DVA, but also corresponds to a normal variation. As any extreme anatomical variant, each DVA corresponds to a weak situation which may express itself clinically; only rare situations justify a radical treatment.

  6. [Reviewing the so-called ″Living Will″].

    PubMed

    Agulles Simó, Pau

    2010-01-01

    Cases like those of Terry Schiavo or Eluana Englaro have given rise to a lot of discussions at all levels. What both of them have in common is that, beyond the reasons given for terminating their lives and the methods used to achieve it, their destiny was not decided by them. This has resulted in a lot of heated debates in the public sphere as well as in the juridical, political, medical and speculative-ethical fields. Many people have been led to ask themselves: ″Wouldn't a better solution have been found if the desire of both persons had been known without any shadow of doubt, in the case that they had foreseen the situation in which they eventually found themselves in?″. The concept of the so-called Living Will appears to be a good solution for such cases. However, in the years in which attempts have been made to introduce this into practice, important ethical questions regarding end-of-life situations have come up: Can everything in my life, including when and how I die, be part of a legacy? Is a person who enjoys good health in a position to autonomously determine how he would like to be treated if, in an uncertain future, he ends up in a situation where he is incapable of communicating his wishes? Is the ordinary citizen capable of domineering the multiplicity of treatments, diagnosis and prognosis which medical science has to offer? Is it the same thing to forego a complicated treatment as to renounce artificial feeding and hydration? This article examines all these arguments, offering at the same time the case for and the case against the so-called Living Will. PMID:20886910

  7. Insight into the so-called spatial reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Kokubo, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Jun; Fukuda, Eriko; Shigaki, Keizo

    2013-10-01

    Up to now, there have been a great number of studies that demonstrate the effect of spatial topology on the promotion of cooperation dynamics (namely, the so-called "spatial reciprocity"). However, most researchers probably attribute it to the positive assortment of strategies supported by spatial arrangement. In this paper, we analyze the time course of cooperation evolution under different evolution rules. Interestingly, a typical evolution process can be divided into two evident periods: the enduring (END) period and the expanding (EXP) period where the former features that cooperators try to endure defectors' invasion and the latter shows that perfect C clusters fast expand their area. We find that the final cooperation level relies on two key factors: the formation of the perfect C cluster at the end of the END period and the expanding fashion of the perfect C cluster during the EXP period. For deterministic rule, the smooth expansion of C cluster boundaries enables cooperators to reach a dominant state, whereas, the rough boundaries for stochastic rule cannot provide a sufficient beneficial environment for the evolution of cooperation. Moreover, we show that expansion of the perfect C cluster is closely related to the cluster coefficient of interaction topology. To some extent, we present a viable method for understanding the spatial reciprocity mechanism in nature and hope that it will inspire further studies to resolve social dilemmas.

  8. Insight into the so-called spatial reciprocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Kokubo, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Jun; Fukuda, Eriko; Shigaki, Keizo

    2013-10-01

    Up to now, there have been a great number of studies that demonstrate the effect of spatial topology on the promotion of cooperation dynamics (namely, the so-called “spatial reciprocity”). However, most researchers probably attribute it to the positive assortment of strategies supported by spatial arrangement. In this paper, we analyze the time course of cooperation evolution under different evolution rules. Interestingly, a typical evolution process can be divided into two evident periods: the enduring (END) period and the expanding (EXP) period where the former features that cooperators try to endure defectors’ invasion and the latter shows that perfect C clusters fast expand their area. We find that the final cooperation level relies on two key factors: the formation of the perfect C cluster at the end of the END period and the expanding fashion of the perfect C cluster during the EXP period. For deterministic rule, the smooth expansion of C cluster boundaries enables cooperators to reach a dominant state, whereas, the rough boundaries for stochastic rule cannot provide a sufficient beneficial environment for the evolution of cooperation. Moreover, we show that expansion of the perfect C cluster is closely related to the cluster coefficient of interaction topology. To some extent, we present a viable method for understanding the spatial reciprocity mechanism in nature and hope that it will inspire further studies to resolve social dilemmas.

  9. The last word on the so-called 'Rowell's syndrome'?

    PubMed

    Antiga, E; Caproni, M; Bonciani, D; Bonciolini, V; Fabbri, P

    2012-05-01

    To date, 71 patients having the so-called 'Rowell's syndrome' (RS) have been reported in the literature. However, most of them did not show all the clinical and serological features first described by Rowell and co-workers in 1963. Moreover, since then, subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) has been identified and the diagnostic criteria as well as the clinical features of erythema multiforme (EM) defined. Accordingly several authors have questioned the existence of RS over the past years. In the present paper, the main clinical, histopathological and immunopathological features of both SCLE and EM are described and all of the cases of RS reported in the literature are also reviewed in depth. A real association between discoid LE and EM was present only in a minority of cases and could be considered a mere coincidence. As for other associations, e.g. those between CLE and lichen planus or psoriasis, the coexistence of CLE and EM does not justify the framing of a separate syndrome as suggested by Rowell et al. PMID:22170759

  10. The So-called 'Face on Mars' at Night

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This pair of THEMIS infrared images shows the so-called 'face on Mars' landform viewed during both the day and night. The nighttime THEMIS IR image was acquired on Oct. 24, 2002; the daytime image was originally released on July 24, 2002. Both images are of THEMIS's 9th IR band (12.57 microns), and they have been geometrically projected for image registration. The 'face on Mars' is located in the northern plains of Mars near 40o N, 10o W (350 o E). This knob can be seen in the daytime image because of the temperature differences between the sunlit (warm and bright) and shadowed (cold and dark) slopes. The temperature in the daytime scene ranges from -50 oC (darkest) to -15 oC (brightest). At night many of the hills and knobs in this region are difficult to detect because the effects of heating and shadowing on the slopes are no longer present. The temperatures at night vary from approximately -90 oC (darkest) to -75 oC (warmest). The nighttime temperature differences are due primarily to differences in the abundance of rocky materials that retain their heat at night and stay warm. Fine grained dust and sand cools of more rapidly at night. The circular rims and eject of many of the craters in this region are warm at night, showing that rocks are still present on the steep walls inside the craters and in the ejecta material that was blasted out when the craters formed. Some craters have cold (dark) material on their floors in the night IR image, indicating that fine-grained material is accumulating within the craters. Many knobs and hills, including the 'face' have rocky (warm at night) material on their slopes and ridges.

    The THEMIS infrared camera provides an excellent regional view of Mars - these images cover an area 32 kilometers (20 miles) by approximately 50 kilometers (30 miles) at a resolution of 100 meters per picture element ('pixel'). The scenes are tilted differently because the Odyssey orbit is

  11. BIOCHEMICAL STUDIES ON SO-CALLED SYPHILIS ANTIGEN.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, H; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1911-01-01

    of tissue is very variable. (c) Substances Soluble in Ether, Alcohol, and Aceton.-In this group are found varying amounts of fatty acids, both saturated and unsaturated, some neutral fats, cholesterin and many unidentified lipoidal bodies. This group causes either hemolysis or inhibition, of hemolysis. In other words, it is anticomplementary as well as hemolytic in the majority of preparations. At the same time, in some preparations it is, to a certain extent, antigenic. This great variation in the amounts of these substances in given extracts renders their presence in the antigen preparation undesirable. It is not denied, however, that, when added in adequate quantities, some of these substances may improve the activity of the antigenic lipoids. (d) Substances Insoluble in Aceton.-This group of substances consists of phosphatids. The best known among them is, of course, lecithin. Besides lecithin, however, there must be various other phosphatids present in this fraction. It will be noticed that the precipitate formed by mixing the ethereal solution with aceton contains a certain amount of lipoids insoluble in ether as well as in alcohol. Before the fractionation in aceton, all lipoids were soluble in ether or ethyl alcohol. Further analytical work on the nature of the phosphatids contained in this fraction is necessary. This fraction, in general, is more constant in amount in the various liver extracts. Biologically considered, it is the most important. It is usually non-hemolytic, frequently anticomplementary, but much more strongly antigenic than the other fractions. The antigenic strength varies with different preparations, being almost absent in the extracts derived from fatty livers. An aceton insoluble fraction may be strongly antigenic without any other auxiliary effects, or may be accompanied by an anticomplementary property. This fraction does not cause the so-called non-specific reaction with an active human serum. For these reasons it is recommended (as

  12. Microbial production of scent and flavor compounds.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Austin L; Desai, Shuchi H; Atsumi, Shota

    2016-02-01

    Scents and flavors like those of fresh oranges are no longer limited to just the natural product. Fruit, flower, and essential oil scents have found place in cosmetics, soaps, candles, and food amongst many common household products. With their increasing global demand and difficulty in extractation from the natural source, alternative methods of their production are being sought. One sustainable method is to employ microorganisms for the production of these high value compounds. With the tools of metabolic engineering, microorganisms can be modified to produce compounds such as esters, terpenoids, aldehydes, and methyl ketones. Approaches and challenges for the production of these compounds from microbial hosts are discussed in this review.

  13. MICROBIAL METABOLISM OF AROMATIC COMPOUNDS I.

    PubMed Central

    Tabak, Henry H.; Chambers, Cecil W.; Kabler, Paul W.

    1964-01-01

    Tabak, Henry H. (Robert A. Taft Sanitary Engineering Center, Cincinnati, Ohio), Cecil W. Chambers, and Paul W. Kabler. Microbial metabolism of aromatic carbon compounds. I. Decomposition of phenolic compounds and aromatic hydrocarbons by phenol-adapted bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 87:910–919. 1964.—Bacteria from soil and related environments were selected or adapted to metabolize phenol, hydroxy phenols, nitrophenols, chlorophenols, methylphenols, alkylphenols, and arylphenols when cultured in mineral salts media with the specific substrate as the sole source of carbon. A phenol-adapted culture (substrate-induced enzyme synthesis proven) was challenged in respirometric tests with 104 related compounds; probable significant oxidative activity occurred with 65. Dihydric phenols were generally oxidized; trihydric phenols were not. Cresols and dimethylphenols were oxidized; adding a chloro group increased resistance. Benzoic and hydroxybenzoic acids were oxidized; sulfonated, methoxylated, nitro, and chlorobenzoic acids were not; m-toluic acid was utilized but not the o- and p-isomers. Benzaldehyde and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde were oxidized. In general, nitro- and chloro-substituted compounds and the benzenes were difficult to oxidize. PMID:14137630

  14. Microbial cycling of volatile organic sulfur compounds.

    PubMed

    Lomans, B P; van der Drift, C; Pol, A; Op den Camp, H J M

    2002-04-01

    Microbial cycling of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs), especially dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and methanethiol (MT), is intensively studied because these compounds play an important role in the processes of global warming, acid precipitation, and the global sulfur cycle. VOSC concentrations in freshwater sediments are low due to the balance between the formation and degradation of these compounds. These reactions occur for the greater part at the oxic/anoxic interphase of sediment and water column. In contrast to marine ecosystems, where dimethylsulfoniopropionate is the main precursor of MT and DMS, in freshwater ecosystems, VOSCs are formed mainly by methylation of sulfide and to a lesser extent from the degradation of S-containing amino acids. One of the major routes for DMS and MT formation through sulfide methylation is anaerobic O-demethylation of methoxylated aromatic compounds. Inhibition studies have revealed that the major part of the endogenously produced MT and DMS is degraded anaerobically by methanogens. The major bacterial groups involved in formation and consumption of VOSCs are described. PMID:12022467

  15. Constructivism, the so-called semantic learning theories, and situated cognition versus the psychological learning theories.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Juan José; Rodríguez Moneo, María

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, the perspective of situated cognition, which gave rise both to the pragmatic theories and the so-called semantic theories of learning and has probably become the most representative standpoint of constructivism, is examined. We consider the claim of situated cognition to provide alternative explanations of the learning phenomenon to those of psychology and, especially, to those of the symbolic perspective, currently predominant in cognitive psychology. The level of analysis of situated cognition (i.e., global interactive systems) is considered an inappropriate approach to the problem of learning. From our analysis, it is concluded that the pragmatic theories and the so-called semantic theories of learning which originated in situated cognition can hardly be considered alternatives to the psychological learning theories, and they are unlikely to add anything of interest to the learning theory or to contribute to the improvement of our knowledge about the learning phenomenon.

  16. ["Lump them all together?" Critical remarks on the psychoanalysis of so-called "destructive cults"

    PubMed

    Kraus, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Contributions to the psychoanalysis of so-called "destructive cults" are reviewed and criticized for several overgeneralizations. In order to gain a full understanding of religious feelings and commitments it is necessary to distinguish between different qualities of regression in a religious context. Religious groups differ in their "psychological offers" and therefore tendencywise in their members' personality structures, too. With regard to destructive developments of religious groups we must consider that collective projective identification with these groups can encourage such trends. Empirical results concerning commitments to so-called "destructive cults" are highly dependent on paradigms and research methods. In their entirety they rather contradict the assumption that the majority of these groups' members has severe personality disorders. As a consequence of the current status of research and discussion, religiosity should be respected as a complex domain of human experience that, despite the possibility of mixing with psychopathological tendencies, should not necessarily lose its creative potential. PMID:11781889

  17. The History of the So-Called Lense-Thirring Effect, and of Related Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, Herbert

    Some historical documents, especially the Einstein-Besso manuscript from 1913, an extensive notebook by H. Thirring from 1917, and the correspondence between Thirring and Einstein in the year 1917 reveal that most of the merit for the so-called Lense-Thirring effect of general relativity belongs to Einstein. Besides telling this "central story" of the effect, I give a short "prehistory", with contributions by E. Mach, B. and I. Friedlaender, and A. Föppl, followed by the later history of the problem of a correct centrifugal force inside a rotating mass shell, which was resolved only relatively recently.

  18. [How fastidious are the so-called non-fastidious neisseriae? (AUTHOR'S TRANSL)].

    PubMed

    Fahr, A M; Berger, U

    1975-01-01

    75 strains of all the so-called non-fastidious Neisseria species were examined for their ability to grow on blood and nutrient agar at temperatures between 22 degrees C and 45 degrees C. The result was that only Neisseria mucosa var. mucosa, N. catarrhalis, N. ovis and N. canis grow sufficiently on nutrient agar at 22 degrees C. N. lactamica has an even narrower range of of growth (30-37 degrees C) than meningococci. Therefore, the statement in Bergey's Mnaual that the saprophytic neisseriae can be separated from the pathogenic species by their minor needs for temperature and media should be corrected.

  19. [Reflex dystrophy following so-called whiplash injury of the cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Bühring, M

    1984-01-01

    In bad cases of whiplash injury of the cervical spine the post-accidental course is complicated by pain, vegetative dysfunctional syndromes and by psychic and psychiatric disorders over many years. There is no satisfactory concept to understand the pathophysiology of these processes. The paper deals with the possibility of a reflex dystrophy. Sympathetic reflex dystrophy syndromes are seen principally in patients with joint, tendon or vascular lesions. In case of whiplash injury, it would concern the cervical spine itself as well as visceral organs including the central nervous system. For the CNS the lymphostatic encephalopathy is a well defined entity. Above all, a reflex dystrophy develops on the basis of a special personality structure. In case of psychic and psychiatric complaints after whiplash injury patients with a so called Sudeck-personality should not be suspected to aggravate; in contrast, especially in these patients complications by reflex dystrophy are credible. Consequences for the assessment and for rehabilitation are discussed. PMID:6475217

  20. Gravitropism in Phycomyces: violation of the so-called resultant law - evidence for two response components.

    PubMed

    Göttig, M; Galland, P

    2014-01-01

    We investigated gravitropic bending of sporangiophores of the zygomycete fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus in response to centrifugal accelerations to test the so-called resultant law of gravitropism ('Resultantengesetz'; Jahrbuch der wissenschaftlichen Botanik, 71, 325, 1929; Der Geotropismus der Pflanzen, Gustav Fischer, Jena, Germany, 1932), which predicts that gravitropic organs orient in a centrifuge rotor parallel to the stimulus vector resulting from the centrifugal acceleration and gravity. Sporangiophores of wild-type strain C171 carAcarR and of several gravitropism mutants were subjected for 7 h to centrifugal accelerations in a dynamic range between 0.01 and 3 × g. The stimulus-response curves that were obtained for C171 carA carR, C2 carA geo and C148 carA geo madC were complex and displayed two response components: a low-acceleration component between 0.01 and 0.5 × g and a high-acceleration component above 0.5 × g. The low acceleration component is characterised by bending angles exceeding those predicted by the resultant law and kinetics faster than that of the second component; in contrast, the high-acceleration component is characterised by bending slightly below the predicted level and kinetics slower than that of the first component. Sporangiophores of the wild-type C171 centrifuged horizontally displayed the opposite behaviour, i.e. low accelerations diminished and high accelerations slightly enhanced bending. Further proof for the existence of the two response components was provided by the phenotype of gravitropism mutants that either lacked the first response component or which caused its overexpression. The tropism mutant C148 with defective madC gene, which codes for a RasGap protein (Fungal Genetics Reports, 60 (Suppl.), Abstract # 211, 2013), displayed hypergravitropism and concomitant deviations from the resultant law that were twice as high as in the wild-type C171. Gravitropism mutants with defects in the genes madF, madG and

  1. Microbial removal of hazardous organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, H.; Rittman, B.E.

    1982-03-01

    An in-depth evaluation of the potential for microorganisms to remove anthropogenic organic compounds, mainly priority pollutants and related compounds, is presented. The evaluation indicates that use of properly selected populations of microbes, and the maintenance of environmental conditions most conducive to their metabolism, can be an important means of improving biological treatment of organic wastes. One major theme is that microorganisms not normally associated with biological waste treatment have potential advantages when the removal of anthropogenic compounds is the goal. An extensive summary of examples of anthropogenic compounds and microorganisms that can attack them is presented in tabular form. A second table lists the selective uses of microorganisms for removal of different anthropogenic compounds. (KRM)

  2. Salient lesions in domestic ruminants infected with the emerging so-called Schmallenberg virus in Germany.

    PubMed

    Herder, V; Wohlsein, P; Peters, M; Hansmann, F; Baumgärtner, W

    2012-07-01

    The so-called Schmallenberg virus (SBV), first detected in a German town of the same name in October 2011, is a novel emerging orthobunyavirus in Europe causing malformations and severe economic loss in ruminants. This report describes lesions in 40 sheep, 2 goats, and 16 cattle naturally infected with SBV as determined by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The most common macroscopic changes were arthrogryposis, vertebral malformations, brachygnathia inferior, and malformations of the central nervous system, including hydranencephaly, porencephaly, hydrocephalus, cerebellar hypoplasia, and micromyelia. Histologic lesions included lymphohistiocytic meningoencephalomyelitis in some cases, glial nodules mainly in the mesencephalon and hippocampus of lambs and goats, and neuronal degeneration and necrosis mainly in the brain stem of calves. Micromyelia was characterized by a loss of gray and white matter, with few neurons remaining in the ventral horn in calves. The skeletal muscles had myofibrillar hypoplasia in lambs and calves. The lesions of SBV-associated abortion and perinatal death are similar to those attributed to Akabane virus and other viruses in the Simbu group of bunyaviruses. PMID:22610033

  3. New interpretation of the so-called Nubian strata in northeast Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Klitzsch, E.H.; Squyres, C.H.

    1988-08-01

    Stratigraphical interpretation of the so-called Nubian Sandstone of Egypt and northern Sudan have led to new ideas on the structural and paleogeographical development of northeast Africa. The strata formerly comprised under the term Nubian Sandstone include sediments from Cambrian to Paleocene age. Based on field work and paleontological investigations during the last 10 years, these strata can be subdivided into three major cycles, each characterizing a certain structural situation of northeast Africa. The first or Paleozoic cycle comprises strata of Cambrian to Early Carboniferous age. These strata were deposited during a period of generally northern dip of northeast Africa; continental sediments transported northward interfinger with marine strata resulting from southward transgressions. Sediments of the second cycle were deposited during and after Gondwana and northern continents collided, which caused updoming of large areas of Egypt and bordering areas to the west and east. As a result, most of Egypt became subject to erosion; transgressions remained near the present northern edge of the continent, and purely continental deposition took place in northern Sudan and bordering areas in Chad and Libya. The resulting strata are similar to the Karroo of East Africa. Strata of the third cycle were deposited after Pangea began to disintegrate. Northeast Africa now had a generally northern dip again, and consequently deposition was controlled - as during the first cycle - by northward drainage and southward transgressions. This last cycle began during Late Jurassic time.

  4. [Differential indications for so-called "lateral release" in treatment of chondropathia patellae].

    PubMed

    Schultz, W; Buhmann, H W; Leib, S

    1996-03-01

    The success rate of the operation of lateral release for pain caused by the patella is reported as being between 14% and 99%. The choice between arthroscopic or open procedures does not seem to affect the results. The wide ranges of results probably reflects differences in patients selection or the method and investigations of follow up. The early term outcome usually show better results than long term follow up. This study evaluates the indications for the operation of lateral releases and discusses the result of 36 out of a total of 42 patients who were follow up for 3 years later surgery. We found that an insufficiency of dysplasia of the vastus medialis, the laxity of the capsule and soft ligaments, and a strong lateral retinaculum were important factors in the indication for this procedure. The quadriceps angle was also of prime importance, but the minor forms of patellar dysplasia played only a minor role. In the so-called hyperpression syndrome, where the patella has a strong tendency to move laterally, the simple lateral release is the single most successful operation. The indication for procedures additionally to the lateral release is examined. We found that in a case with an insufficiently guided patella, a weak capsule and ligaments, an additional capsule roughing should be performed. The presence of early degenerative changes in the joint predisposes to poor results in operations such as abrasion and pride drilling. The results in our study were assessed using the Lysholm score. Our results show that the most successful technique was the combination of an arthroscopy and an extraarticular open operation controlled by arthroscopic means. This technique was not associated with major complications such as haemarthrosis and consecutive prolonged postoperative rehabilitation. Overall we achieved a rate of 83% of good or satisfactory results at more than 3 years using the indications and techniques described above.

  5. MICROBIAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION RATES AND EXPOSURE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the results from a study that examined microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) emissions from six fungi and one bacterial species (Streptomyces spp.) commonly found in indoor environments. Data are presented on peak emission rates from inoculated agar plate...

  6. Microbial growth on C1 compounds

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, M. B.; Quayle, J. R.

    1967-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the incorporation of carbon from [14C]formaldehyde and [14C]formate by cultures of Pseudomonas methanica growing on methane. 2. The distribution of radioactivity within the non-volatile constituents of the ethanol-soluble fractions of the cells, after incubation with labelled compounds for periods of up to 1min., has been analysed by chromatography and radioautography. 3. Radioactivity was fixed from [14C]formaldehyde mainly into the phosphates of the sugars, glucose, fructose, sedoheptulose and allulose. 4. Very little radioactivity was fixed from [14C]formate; after 1min. the only products identified were serine and malate. 5. The distribution of radioactivity within the carbon skeleton of glucose, obtained from short-term incubations with [14C]methanol of Pseudomonas methanica growing on methane, has been investigated. At the earliest time of sampling over 70% of the radioactivity was located in C-1; as the time increased the radioactivity spread throughout the molecule. 6. The results have been interpreted in terms of a variant of the pentose phosphate cycle, involving the condensation of formaldehyde with C-1 of ribose 5-phosphate to give allulose phosphate. PMID:6030306

  7. [Nicotinamidase and the so-called pyrazinamidase in mycobacteria; the simultaneous occurrence of both activites (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tarnok, I; Pechmann, H; Krallmann-Wenzel, U; Röhrscheidt, E; Tarnok, Z

    1979-07-01

    Nicotin- and the so-called pyrazinamidase (in the following: "pyrazinamidase") have been found in strains of four mycobacteria species, M. fortuitum, M. gastri, M. bovis and M. microti. These findings are in contradiction to those summarized in Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology (1974). The reason for the discrepancies is that the original method (Bönicke, 1961) for amidase determination has not taken the following aspects into consideration: a) The inducibility of the nicotin- and "pyrazinamidase" (example: M. fortuitum); b) The temperature sensitivity of these enzymes (M. gastri); c) The light sensitivity of nicotinamidase (in photochromogenic M. gastri strains); d) The optimal substrate concentration which must be at least 4 mM instead of 0,8 mm. The following consequences can be drawn for the taxonomy and biochemistry of the tested organisms: e) The species status of M. gastri should be annuled. The main difference between M. gastri and M. kansasii consists only of the non-agglutinability of M. gastri by anti-M. kansasii serum. "Pyrazinamidase" and also nitrate reductase (Tarnok et al., in press) are positive in strains of both species; f) M. bovis possesses nicotin- and "pyrazinamidase" as M. tuberculosis too. Thus, these two species are more closely related than suggested earlier; g) Till now, no Mycobacterium has been found showing nicotinamidase without "pyrazinamidase" activity (or vice versa). It seems to be very probable that nicotinamidase, an enzyme of low substrate specificity, is able to hydrolyze several compounds with a nicotinamide-like structure such as pyrazinamide. Thus, we suggest the annulment of the term pyrazinamidase or the employment of quotation marks ("pyrazinamidase") to show the fictitious value of this designation. PMID:506551

  8. Microbial desulfurization of organic sulfur compounds in petroleum.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, T; Izumi, Y

    1999-01-01

    Sulfur removal from petroleum is important from the standpoint of the global environment because the combustion of sulfur compounds leads to the production of sulfur oxides, which are the source of acid rain. As the regulations for sulfur in fuels become more stringent, the existing chemical desulfurizations are coming inadequate for the "deeper desulfurization" to produce lower-sulfur fuels without new and innovative processes. Biodesulfurization is rising as one of the candidates. Several microorganisms were found to desulfurize dibenzothiophene (DBT), a representative of the organic sulfur compounds in petroleum, forming a sulfur-free compound, 2-hydroxybiphenyl. They are promising as biocatalysts in the microbial desulfurization of petroleum because without assimilation of the carbon content, they remove only sulfur from the heterocyclic compounds which is refractory to conventional chemical desulfurization. Both enzymological and molecular genetic studies are now in progress for the purpose of obtaining improved desulfurization activity of organisms. The genes involved in the sulfur-specific DBT desulfurization were identified and the corresponding enzymes have been investigated. From the practical point of view, it has been proved that the microbial desulfurization proceeds in the presence of high concentrations of hydrocarbons, and more complicated DBT analogs are also desulfurized by the microorganisms. This review outlines the progress in the studies of the microbial desulfurization from the basic and practical point of view.

  9. Multiple microbial activities for volatile organic compounds reduction by biofiltration.

    PubMed

    Civilini, Marcello

    2006-07-01

    In the northeast of Italy, high volatile organic carbon (VOC) emissions originate from small-medium companies producing furniture. In these conditions it is difficult to propose a single, efficient, and economic system to reduce pollution. Among the various choices, the biofiltration method could be a good solution, because microbial populations possess multiple VOC degradation potentials used to oxidize these compounds to CO2. Starting from the air emissions of a typical industrial wood-painting plant, a series of experiments studied in vitro microbial degradation of each individual VOC. Isolated strains were then added to a laboratory-scale biofiltration apparatus filled with an organic matrix, and the different VOC behavior demonstrated the potential of single and/or synergic microbial removal actions. When a single substrate was fed, the removal efficiency of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa inoculated reactor was 1.1, 1.17, and 0.33 g m(-3) hr(-1), respectively, for xylene, toluene, and ethoxy propyl acetate. A VOC mixture composed of butyl acetate, ethyl acetate, diacetin alcohol, ethoxy propanol acetate, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, toluene, and xylene was then fed into a 2-m(3) reactor treating 100 m3 hr(-1) of contaminated air. The reactor was filled with the same mixture of organic matrix, enriched with all of the isolated strains together. During reactor study, different VOC loading rates were used, and the behavior was evaluated continuously. After a short acclimation period, the removal efficiency was > 65% at VOC load of 150-200 g m(-3) hr(-1). Quantification of removal efficiencies and VOC speciation confirmed the relationship among removal efficiencies, compound biodegradability, and the dynamic transport of each mixture component within the organic matrix. Samples of the fixed bed were withdrawn at different intervals and the heterogeneous microbial community evaluated for both total and differential compound counts. PMID:16878585

  10. Immense Essence of Excellence: Marine Microbial Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Ira; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Oceans have borne most of the biological activities on our planet. A number of biologically active compounds with varying degrees of action, such as anti-tumor, anti-cancer, anti-microtubule, anti-proliferative, cytotoxic, photo protective, as well as antibiotic and antifouling properties, have been isolated to date from marine sources. The marine environment also represents a largely unexplored source for isolation of new microbes (bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes, microalgae-cyanobacteria and diatoms) that are potent producers of bioactive secondary metabolites. Extensive research has been done to unveil the bioactive potential of marine microbes (free living and symbiotic) and the results are amazingly diverse and productive. Some of these bioactive secondary metabolites of microbial origin with strong antibacterial and antifungal activities are being intensely used as antibiotics and may be effective against infectious diseases such as HIV, conditions of multiple bacterial infections (penicillin, cephalosporines, streptomycin, and vancomycin) or neuropsychiatric sequelae. Research is also being conducted on the general aspects of biophysical and biochemical properties, chemical structures and biotechnological applications of the bioactive substances derived from marine microorganisms, and their potential use as cosmeceuticals and nutraceuticals. This review is an attempt to consolidate the latest studies and critical research in this field, and to showcase the immense competence of marine microbial flora as bioactive metabolite producers. In addition, the present review addresses some effective and novel approaches of procuring marine microbial compounds utilizing the latest screening strategies of drug discovery. PMID:21116414

  11. Microbial cycling of volatile organic sulfur compounds in anoxic environments.

    PubMed

    Lomans, B P; Pol, A; Op den Camp, H J M

    2002-01-01

    Microbial cycling of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSC) is investigated due to the impact these compounds are thought to have on environmental processes like global temperature control, acid precipitation and the global sulfur cycle. Moreover, in several kinds of industries like composting plants and the paper industry VOSC are released causing odor problems. Waste streams containing these compounds must be treated in order to avoid the release of these compounds to the atmosphere. This paper describes the general mechanisms for the production and degradation of methanethiol (MT) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS), two ubiquitous VOSC in anaerobic environments. Slurry incubations indicated that methylation of sulfide and MT resulting in MT and DMS, respectively, is one of the major mechanisms for VOSC in sulfide-rich anaerobic environments. An anaerobic bacterium that is responsible for the formation of MT and DMS through the anaerobic methylation of H2S and MT was isolated from a freshwater pond after enrichment with syringate as a methyl group donating compound and sole carbon source. In spite of the continuous formation of MT and DMS, steady state concentrations are generally very low. This is due to the microbial degradation of these compounds. Experiments with sulfate-rich and sulfate-amended sediment slurries demonstrated that besides methanogens, sulfate-reducing bacteria can also degrade MT and DMS, provided that sulfate is available. A methanogen was isolated that is able to grow on DMS as the sole carbon source. A large survey of sediments slurries of various origin demonstrated that both isolates are commonly occurring inhabitants of anaerobic environments.

  12. Microbial Turnover of Fixed Nitrogen Compounds in Oceanic Crustal Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, B.; Wankel, S. D.; Glazer, B. T.; Huber, J. A.; Girguis, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Oceanic crust is the largest aquifer on Earth, with a massive volume of seawater advecting through the basaltic crust. The microbiome of this deep marine subsurface biosphere has been estimated to be substantial, and consequently their metabolic activity may have major influences on global biogeochemical cycles. While earlier and recent studies provide insight into the microbial community composition of oceanic crustal fluids, information on the microbial ecophysiology is broadly missing. Therefore, to investigate the microbial transformation of fixed nitrogen compounds in crustal aquifer fluids, fluids were sampled from different horizons of two neighbouring CORK (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit) observatories at the North Pond sediment pond. This site is located on the western flank of the Mid Atlantic Ridge and is characterized by relatively young oceanic crust and cold fluids. The crustal fluids contain oxygen and nitrate, which potentially both may serve as electron acceptor for respiration. In a multidisciplinary approach we combined stable isotope incubations, determination of the natural isotopic compositions and plan to analyse relevant functional genes from a metagenomic dataset to investigate the nitrogen cycling at North Pond. The turnover of fixed nitrogen in oceanic crustal fluids may have important implications for the understanding of the global nitrogen cycle.

  13. Glycoproteomics using so-called ‘fluid-biopsy’ specimens in the discovery of lung cancer biomarkers. Promise and challenge

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing Kay; Gabrielson, Ed; Askin, Frederic; Chan, Daniel W; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the number one cancer in the US and worldwide. In spite of the rapid progression in personalized treatments, the overall survival rate of lung cancer patients is still suboptimal. Over the past decade, tremendous efforts have been focused on the discovery of protein biomarkers to facilitate the early detection and monitoring lung cancer progression during treatment. In addition to tumor tissues and cancer cell lines, a variety of biological material has been studied. Particularly in recent years, studies using fluid-based specimen or so-called “fluid-biopsy” specimen have progressed rapidly. Fluid specimens are relatively easier to collect than tumor tissue, and they can be repeatedly sampled during the disease progression. Glycoproteins have long been recognized to play fundamental roles in many physiological and pathological processes. In this review, we focus the discussion on recent advances of glycoproteomics, particularly in the identification of potential protein biomarkers using so-called fluid-based specimens in lung cancer. The purpose of this review is to summarize current strategies, achievements and perspectives in the field. This insight will highlight the discovery of tumor-associated glycoprotein biomarkers in lung cancer and their potential clinical applications. PMID:23112109

  14. Adaptation of Aquatic Microbial Communities to Quaternary Ammonium Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ventullo, Roy M.; Larson, Robert J.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of long-chain (C12 to C18) quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) on the density, heterotrophic activity, and biodegradation capabilities of heterotrophic bacteria were examined in situ in a lake ecosystem. Monoalkyl and dialkyl substituted QACs were tested over a range of concentrations (0.001 to 10 mg/liter) in both acute (3 h) and chronic (21 day) exposures. In general, none of the QACs tested had significant adverse effects on bacterial densities in either acute or chronic studies. However, significant decreases in bacterial heterotrophic activity were noted in acute studies at QAC concentrations from 0.1 to 10 mg/liter. Chronic exposure of lake microbial communities to a specific monoalkyl QAC resulted in an adaptive response and recovery of heterotrophic activity. No-observable-effect level in the adapted populations was >10 mg/liter. Chronic exposure also resulted in significant increases in the number and activity of bacteria capable of biodegrading the material. The increase in biodegradation capability was observed at low (microgram per liter) concentrations which are approximately the same as realistic environmental levels. In general, our studies indicated that exposure of lake microbial communities to QACs results in the development of adapted communities which are less sensitive to potential toxic effects and more active in the biodegradation of these materials. PMID:16346991

  15. Effect of two sweating simulation methods on clothing evaporative resistance in a so-called isothermal condition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yehu; Wang, Faming; Peng, Hui

    2016-07-01

    The effect of sweating simulation methods on clothing evaporative resistance was investigated in a so-called isothermal condition (T manikin  = T a  = T r ). Two sweating simulation methods, namely, the pre-wetted fabric "skin" (PW) and the water supplied sweating (WS), were applied to determine clothing evaporative resistance on a "Newton" thermal manikin. Results indicated that the clothing evaporative resistance determined by the WS method was significantly lower than that measured by the PW method. In addition, the evaporative resistances measured by the two methods were correlated and exhibited a linear relationship. Validation experiments demonstrated that the empirical regression equation showed highly acceptable estimations. The study contributes to improving the accuracy of measurements of clothing evaporative resistance by means of a sweating manikin. PMID:26542017

  16. Effect of two sweating simulation methods on clothing evaporative resistance in a so-called isothermal condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yehu; Wang, Faming; Peng, Hui

    2016-07-01

    The effect of sweating simulation methods on clothing evaporative resistance was investigated in a so-called isothermal condition ( T manikin = T a = T r ). Two sweating simulation methods, namely, the pre-wetted fabric "skin" (PW) and the water supplied sweating (WS), were applied to determine clothing evaporative resistance on a "Newton" thermal manikin. Results indicated that the clothing evaporative resistance determined by the WS method was significantly lower than that measured by the PW method. In addition, the evaporative resistances measured by the two methods were correlated and exhibited a linear relationship. Validation experiments demonstrated that the empirical regression equation showed highly acceptable estimations. The study contributes to improving the accuracy of measurements of clothing evaporative resistance by means of a sweating manikin.

  17. The antiperinuclear factor and the so-called antikeratin antibodies are the same rheumatoid arthritis-specific autoantibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Sebbag, M; Simon, M; Vincent, C; Masson-Bessière, C; Girbal, E; Durieux, J J; Serre, G

    1995-01-01

    The so-called antikeratin antibodies (AKA) and the antiperinuclear factor (APF) are the most specific serological markers of RA. Using indirect immunofluorescence, AKA label the stratum corneum of various cornified epithelia and APF the keratohyalin granules of human buccal mucosa epithelium. We recently demonstrated that AKA recognize human epidermal filaggrin. Here, we report the identification of the major APF antigen as a diffuse protein band of 200-400 kD. This protein is seen to be closely related to human epidermal (pro) filaggrin since it was recognized by four antifilaggrin mAbs specific for different epitopes, and since the APF titers of RA sera were found to be correlated to their AKA titers and to their immunoblotting reactivities to filaggrin. Immunoabsorption of RA sera on purified epidermal filaggrin abolished their reactivities to the granules of buccal epithelial cells and to the 200-400-kD antigen. Moreover, antifilaggrin autoantibodies, i.e., AKA, affinity purified from RA sera, were shown to immunodetect the 200-400-kD antigen and to stain these granules. These results indicate that AKA and APF are largely the same autoantibodies. They recognize human epidermal filaggrin and (pro) filaggrin-related proteins of buccal epithelial cells. Identification of the epitopes recognized by these autoantibodies, which we propose to name antifilaggrin autoantibodies, will certainly open new paths of research into the pathophysiology of RA. Images PMID:7539459

  18. The so-called "Spanish model" - Tobacco industry strategies and its impact in Europe and Latin America

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To demonstrate the tobacco industry rationale behind the "Spanish model" on non-smokers' protection in hospitality venues and the impact it had on some European and Latin American countries between 2006 and 2011. Methods Tobacco industry documents research triangulated against news and media reports. Results As an alternative to the successful implementation of 100% smoke-free policies, several European and Latin American countries introduced partial smoking bans based on the so-called "Spanish model", a legal framework widely advocated by parts of the hospitality industry with striking similarities to "accommodation programmes" promoted by the tobacco industry in the late 1990s. These developments started with the implementation of the Spanish tobacco control law (Ley 28/2005) in 2006 and have increased since then. Conclusion The Spanish experience demonstrates that partial smoking bans often resemble tobacco industry strategies and are used to spread a failed approach on international level. Researchers, advocates and policy makers should be aware of this ineffective policy. PMID:22151884

  19. Intraductal carcinoma of salivary gland (so-called low-grade cribriform cystadenocarcinoma) arising in an intraparotid lymph node.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, Ilan

    2011-09-01

    Since the first description of an entirely intraductal epithelial proliferation of salivary gland by Chen in 1983 as an "intraductal carcinoma", there have been several dozen reported cases with the same and various additional names including "low-grade salivary duct carcinoma", "low-grade cribriform cystadenocarcinoma" and "carcinoma in situ" of salivary gland. These refer to a combination of nests and cysts of varying size formed by a cellular proliferation resembling atypical ductal hyperplasia or ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast. The lesions are generally entirely intraductal with low, intermediate or high-grade dysplasia. Occasional benign tumors of salivary gland, particularly Warthin tumor and rare salivary carcinomas may arise within an intraparotid lymph node. In addition, intraparotid lymph nodes are a routine location for metastatic disease. A case of a 59-year-old female with a parotid mass is described, which grossly had the appearance of a Warthin tumor. Microscopically, it was an entirely intranodal proliferation of cells with diffuse AE1/AE3 and S100 positivity. The nests and cysts were completely surrounded by a rim of non-neoplastic myoepithelial cells, which were positive for CK14, p63, SMA, MSA and calponin. The tumor cells were negative for these markers. The cells were only focally positive for AR and BRST-2. They showed negligible MIB-1 staining. This report describes, for the first time, an entirely intranodal location for a low-grade intraductal carcinoma (so-called low-grade cribriform cystadenocarcinoma).

  20. Widespread non-microbial methane production by organic compounds and the impact of environmental stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Ping; Chang, Scott X.; Chen, Hua; Han, Xing-Guo

    2013-12-01

    Non-microbial methane (CH4) production is more pervasive in nature than previously thought, but it has received less attention than microbial CH4 production. Non-microbial CH4 is produced commonly by an instantaneous reaction involving organic compounds under environmental stresses, without enzymatic catalysis by methanogenic archaea. In addition to the widely known sources of non-microbial CH4, i.e., energy usage, biomass burning, and geological emissions, non-microbial CH4 emissions from plants, animals, fungi, soils, and surface waters of oceans have been recently reported. In most ecosystems, microbial and non-microbial CH4 production co-occur and/or alternate depending on the conditions, and thus CH4 emission in terrestrial ecosystems represents a mixture of microbial and non-microbial CH4 production. Global CH4 emission was estimated at 582 Tg yr- 1 over the 2000-2004 period, where geological sources of non-microbial CH4 were not included. When geological sources are included, total emissions will likely not increase but its partition among the individual sources would change, and emissions of non-microbial CH4 might account for approximately 40% of the global total. This fraction would slightly increase if non-microbial CH4 emissions of plants, animals, fungi and soils in terrestrial ecosystems and surface waters of oceans are considered, although no global estimates for those fractions currently exist. The stable isotope signatures of C and H in CH4 may be a useful tool for identifying the source of CH4. Based on this review of the literature, we conclude that non-microbial CH4 production may occur in any organism or dead organic matter when organic compounds are exposed to environmental stresses.

  1. Characterization by volatile compounds of microbial deep spoilage in Iberian dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Martín, Alberto; Benito, María J; Aranda, Emilio; Ruiz-Moyano, Santiago; Córdoba, Juan J; Córdoba, María G

    2010-08-01

    In the present study, volatile compounds of spoiled dry-cured Iberian ham with deep spoilage or "bone taint" were analyzed and correlated with level of spoilage and the microorganisms detected. Volatile compounds extracted by a solid phase micro-extraction technique were assayed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The spoiled hams were evaluated sensorially, and the correlations among volatile compounds, spoilage level, and microbial counts were studied. The spoiled hams had higher concentrations of hydrocarbons, alcohols, acids, esters, pyrazines, sulfur compounds, and other minor volatile compounds than unspoiled hams. The sensorial analysis showed that the spoilage level of hams correlated with several volatile compounds, most of them associated with Gram-positive catalase positive cocci and Enterobacteriaceae counts. Cyclic compounds such as cyclohexanone, some ethers, and pyrazines should be considered as indicators to monitor incipient microbial deep spoilage in the elaboration of this meat product.

  2. A conceptual framework for an ecosystem services-based assessment of the so-called "emergency stabilization" measures following wildfire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, Sandra; Prats, Sergio; Ribeiro, Cristina; Verheijen, Frank; Fleskens, Luuk; Keizer, Jacob

    2015-04-01

    Wildfires have become a major environmental concern in many Southern European countries over the past few decades. This includes Portugal, where, on average, some 100 000 ha of rural lands are affected by wildfire every year. While policies, laws, plans and public expenditure in Portugal continue to be largely directed towards fire combat and, arguably, to a lesser extent fire prevention, there has only recently been increasing attention for post-fire land management. For example following frequent and several large wildfires during the summer of 2010, so-called emergency stabilization measures were implemented in 16 different burnt areas in northern and central Portugal, using funds of the EU Rural Development Plan in Portugal (PRODER). The measures that were implemented included mulching (i.e. application of a protective layer of organic material), seeding and the construction of log barriers. However, the effectiveness of the implemented measures has not been monitored or otherwise assessed in a systematic manner. In fact, until very recently none of the post-fire emergency stabilization measures contemplated under PRODER seem to have been studied in an exhaustive manner in Portugal, whether under laboratory or field conditions. Prats et al. (2012, 2013, 2014) tested two of these measures by field trials, i.e. hydro-mulching and forest residue mulching. The authors found both measures to be highly effective in terms of reducing overland flow and especially erosion. It remains a challenge, however, to assess the effectiveness of these and other measures in a broader context, not only beyond overland flow and sediment losses but also beyond the spatio-temporal scale that are typical for such field trials (plots and the first two years after fire). This challenge will be addressed in the Portuguese case study of the RECARE project. Nonetheless, the present study wants to be a first attempt at an ecosystem services-based assessment of mulching as a post

  3. INFLUENCE OF SURFACTANTS ON MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants have the ability to increase aqueous concentrations of poorly soluble compounds and interfacial areas between immiscible fluids, thus potentially improving the accessibility of these substrates to microorganisms. However, both enhancements and inhibitions of biodegrad...

  4. Using So-Called Mind-Body Practices to Promote Youths' Well-Being: Reflections on Therapeutic Outcomes, Strategies, and Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renshaw, Tyler L.

    2016-01-01

    The present article provides commentary on this pioneering special issue covering the usefulness of so-called mind-body practices with youth and in schools. I begin by addressing the way we talk about this approach to practice, describing a few undesirable consequences that can follow from using the mind-body moniker adopted from the world of…

  5. Microbial degradation of lignin-derived compounds under anaerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Colberg, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Lignin is the second most abundant form of organic carbon in the biosphere. Recent laboratory studies indicate that a large fraction of polymeric lignin is incompletely degraded by aerobic lignolytic microorganisms and is subsequently released as lignin fragments of reduced molecular size. If such lignin-derived compounds become available in the anaerobic environment, they may serve as potential sources of organic carbon for organisms which release methane precursors. The methanogenic bacteria, in turn, serve as terminal members of the anaerobic food chain, and thus, limit the accumulation of organic carbon in anaerobic sinks. This thesis presents evidence to suggest that lignin-derived compounds which have molecular sizes greater than those of single-ring aromatic compounds (MW > 200) are anaerobically biodegradable to methane. This research involved development of selective enrichment cultures capable of utilizing oligolignols as sole carbon sources. Radiolabeled water-soluble catabolites, released during aerobic lignin degradation by the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium, were subjected to anaerobic degradation. The second phase of work involved capillary gas chromatographic analyses of enrichment cultures fed a /sup 14/C-labeled, lignin-derived substrate of average molecular weight 600. 2-Bromoethanesulfonic acid was used to inhibit methane formation and enhance buildup of metabolic intermediates, resulting in the accumulation of volatile fatty acids, phenylacetate, benzoate, catechol, 3-phenyl-propionate, vanillin, syringic acid, vanillic acid, ferulic acid, and caffeic acid. A conceptual model for the anaerobic degradation of two- and three-ring lignin fragments is proposed which overlaps both the ferulate and benzoate degradation pathways at the level of single-ring aromatic compounds.

  6. Microbial transformations of natural organic compounds and radionuclides in subsurface environments

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.

    1985-10-01

    A major national concern in the subsurface disposal of energy wastes is the contamination of ground and surface waters by waste leachates containing radionuclides, toxic metals, and organic compounds. Microorganisms play an important role in the transformation of organic compounds, radionuclides, and toxic metals present in the waste and affect their mobility in subsurface environments. Microbial processes involved in dissolution, mobilization, and immobilization of toxic metals under aerobic and anaerobic conditions are briefly reviewed. Metal complexing agents and several organic acids produced by microbial action affect mobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals in subsurface environments. Information on the persistence of and biodegradation rates of synthetic as well as microbiologically produced complexing agents is scarce but important in determining the mobility of metal organic complexes in subsoils. Several gaps in knowledge in the area of microbial transformation of naturally occurring organics, radionuclides, and toxic metals have been identified, and further basic research has been suggested. 31 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. Green tea yogurt: major phenolic compounds and microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Amirdivani, Shabboo; Baba, Ahmad Salihin Hj

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate fermentation of milk in the presence of green tea (Camellia sinensis) with respect to changes in antioxidant activity, phenolic compounds and the growth of lactic acid bacteria. Pasteurized full fat cow's milk and starter culture were incubated at 41 °C in the presence of two different types of green tea extracts. The yogurts formed were refrigerated (4 °C) for further analysis. The total phenolic content was highest (p < 0.05) in air-dried green tea-yogurt (MGT) followed by steam-treated green tea (JGT) and plain yogurts. Four major compounds in MGTY and JGTY were detected. The highest concentration of major phenolic compounds in both samples was related to quercetin-rhamnosylgalactoside and quercetin-3-O-galactosyl-rhamnosyl-glucoside for MGTY and JGTY respectively during first 7 day of storage. Diphenyl picrylhydrazyl and ferric reducing antioxidant power methods showed highest antioxidant capacity in MGTY, JGTY and PY. Streptococcus thermophillus and Lactobacillus spp. were highest in MGTY followed by JGTY and PY. This paper evaluates the implementation of green tea yogurt as a new product with functional properties and valuable component to promote the growth of beneficial yogurt bacteria and prevention of oxidative stress by enhancing the antioxidant activity of yogurt. PMID:26139940

  8. Microbial Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Stachybotrys chartarum growing on Gypsum Wallboard and Ceiling tile

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study compared seven toxigenic strains of S. chartarum found in water-damaged buildings to characterize the microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) emissions profile while growing on gypsum wallboard (W) and ceiling tile (C) coupons. The inoculated coupons with their sub...

  9. Discovery of New Compounds Active against Plasmodium falciparum by High Throughput Screening of Microbial Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Moreno, Guiomar; Cantizani, Juan; Sánchez-Carrasco, Paula; Ruiz-Pérez, Luis Miguel; Martín, Jesús; el Aouad, Noureddine; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Tormo, José Rubén; González-Menendez, Víctor; González, Ignacio; de Pedro, Nuria; Reyes, Fernando; Genilloud, Olga; Vicente, Francisca; González-Pacanowska, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Due to the low structural diversity within the set of antimalarial drugs currently available in the clinic and the increasing number of cases of resistance, there is an urgent need to find new compounds with novel modes of action to treat the disease. Microbial natural products are characterized by their large diversity provided in terms of the chemical complexity of the compounds and the novelty of structures. Microbial natural products extracts have been underexplored in the search for new antiparasitic drugs and even more so in the discovery of new antimalarials. Our objective was to find new druggable natural products with antimalarial properties from the MEDINA natural products collection, one of the largest natural product libraries harboring more than 130,000 microbial extracts. In this work, we describe the optimization process and the results of a phenotypic high throughput screen (HTS) based on measurements of Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase. A subset of more than 20,000 extracts from the MEDINA microbial products collection has been explored, leading to the discovery of 3 new compounds with antimalarial activity. In addition, we report on the novel antiplasmodial activity of 4 previously described natural products. PMID:26735308

  10. Microbial and hydrodynamic characterization of a compost biofilter BTX compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Rho, D.; Tahraoui, K.; Juteau, P. |; LeDuy, A.

    1995-12-31

    The degradation of toxic aromatic compounds, such as benzene, toluene and xylenes (BTX) in gaseous effluents was studied in a modular biofilter. The reactor was made of two columns separated by a grid. Each column was filled with a mixture of a commercial composted chicken manure and peat moss blend. The effluent gas was prehumidified and the temperature of the bed was maintained around 23{degrees}C. The biofilter was operated at a superficial gas velocity ranging from 10 to 100 m{sup 3}m{sup -2}h{sup 1} and at BTX organic load up to 90 g m{sup -3}h{sup -1}. Special attention was paid to the influence of the superficial gas velocity and the organic load on the filter bed`s elimination capacity. The bed hydrodynamic was also studied in order to determine the gas phase dispersion parameter. The performance and operational criteria of the biofilter were analyzed on the basis of water activity and water content. Respiration (i.e. CO{sub 2} production and O{sub 2} consumption) of the filter bed throughout a biofiltration experiment was followed using a radio-respirometric test and a respirometer.

  11. Microbial extraction of sulfur from model coal organosulfur compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Purdy, R.F.; Ward, B.; Lepo, J.E.

    1991-12-31

    Several hundred bacterial cultures isolated from a variety of natural sites were screened for their ability to desulfurize the model coal organosulfur compounds, dibenzothiophene (DBT) and DBT-sulfone. A sulfur-stress assay, in which DBT-sulfone was the only bioavailable source of sulfur, was used to screen and select for organisms that selectively desulfurized the organic-sulfur substrate. Only two new isolates, UMX9 and UMX3, and strain IGTS-8, a Rhodococcus rhodochrous provided by the Institute for Gas Technology (Chicago, USA.) as a reference culture, would grow on DBT or DBT-sulfone as a sole source of sulfur. Under sulfur-stress conditions, a desulfurized product identified as 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-phenylphenol) was detected only for UMX9 and IGTS-8. Biodesulfurization activity for all three organisms occurred only for growing cultures, and was depressed by free sulfate, although more so for UMX3 and IGTS-8 than for UMX9. None of the three cultures exhibited good growth on DBT, DBT-sulfone, or 2-phenylphenol as sole sources of carbon. Taxonomic studies revealed UMX3 to be similar to IGTS-8, whereas UMX9 only exhibited Rhodococcus-like features. Comparative tests for carbohydrate utilization revealed that only UMX9 would grow on glucose, and that only IGTS-8 would grow on L-arabinose. Assays of biodesulfurization activity as a function of temperature or pH revealed further differences between UMX9 and UMX3/IGTS-8. Under optimized assay conditions for each organism, UMX9 exhibited up to 30% greater biodesulfurization activity than did IGTS-8 and UMX3, which were similar in activity.

  12. [Effects of Organic and Inorganic Slow-Release Compound Fertilizer on Different Soils Microbial Community Structure].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Yuan, Ting; Gu, Shou-kuan; Wang, Zheng-yin

    2015-04-01

    As a new style fertilizer, slow-control release fertilizer had been an important subject in recent years, but few researches were about soil microbial community structure diversity. Phospholipid fatty acid method was used to determined the microbial community structure diversity of acid soil and slight alkaline soil applied with slow-release compound fertilizer (SRF), chemical fertilizer (CF) and common compound fertilizer (CCF) at the 10th, 30th, 60th and 90th day under the constant temperature incubation condition. Results indicated that various bacteria (i. e 13:0, i14:0,14:0, i15:0, a15:0, i16:0, 16:12OH, 16:1w5c,16:0, i17:0, a17:0, cy17:0, 17:02OH, i18:0, 18:0 and cy19:0w8c), two actinomycetes (10Me17:0 and 10Me18:0) and only one fungus (18:1 w9c) were detected in two soils after applying slow-release compound fertilizer and other fertilizers during the whole incubation period. SRF could significantly increase the fungi PLFA content by 8.3% and 6.8% at the early stage (the 10th day and 30th day) compared with CF, as well as significantly increase by 22.7% and 17.1% at the late stage (the 60th day and 90th day) compared with CCF in acid soil. SRF significantly increased bacteria, fungi and gram positive bacteria compared with CF and CCF in incubation period (except at the 30th day) in slight alkaline soil. SRF could significantly improve the ratio of normal saturated fatty acid and monounsaturated fatty acid at the 30th day and 90th days in acid soil compared with no fertilizer (CK), CF and CCF, while as to slight alkaline soil, SRF was significantly greater than that of CK, CF and CCF only at the 60th day. SRF could significantly decrease the ratio of iso PLFA and anteiso PLFA in acid soil (in 30-90 days) and slight alkaline soil (in 10-60 days). For two soils PLFA varieties, contents and ratios of microbial community, slow-release compound fertilizer increased soil microbial PLFA varieties and contents, and decreased the influence to microbial survival

  13. Microbial communities related to volatile organic compound emission in automobile air conditioning units.

    PubMed

    Diekmann, Nina; Burghartz, Melanie; Remus, Lars; Kaufholz, Anna-Lena; Nawrath, Thorben; Rohde, Manfred; Schulz, Stefan; Roselius, Louisa; Schaper, Jörg; Mamber, Oliver; Jahn, Dieter; Jahn, Martina

    2013-10-01

    During operation of mobile air conditioning (MAC) systems in automobiles, malodours can occur. We studied the microbial communities found on contaminated heat exchanger fins of 45 evaporators from car MAC systems which were operated in seven different regions of the world and identified corresponding volatile organic compounds. Collected biofilms were examined by scanning electron microscopy and fluorescent in situ hybridization. The detected bacteria were loosely attached to the metal surface. Further analyses of the bacteria using PCR-based single-strand conformation polymorphism and sequencing of isolated 16S rRNA gene fragments identified highly divergent microbial communities with multiple members of the Alphaproteobacteriales, Methylobacteria were the prevalent bacteria. In addition, Sphingomonadales, Burkholderiales, Bacillales, Alcanivorax spp. and Stenotrophomonas spp. were found among many others depending on the location the evaporators were operated. Interestingly, typical pathogenic bacteria related to air conditioning systems including Legionella spp. were not found. In order to determine the nature of the chemical compounds produced by the bacteria, the volatile organic compounds were examined by closed loop stripping analysis and identified by combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Sulphur compounds, i.e. di-, tri- and multiple sulphides, acetylthiazole, aromatic compounds and diverse substituted pyrazines were detected. Mathematical clustering of the determined microbial community structures against their origin identified a European/American/Arabic cluster versus two mainly tropical Asian clusters. Interestingly, clustering of the determined volatiles against the origin of the corresponding MAC revealed a highly similar pattern. A close relationship of microbial community structure and resulting malodours to the climate and air quality at the location of MAC operation was concluded.

  14. Effects of furan derivatives and phenolic compounds on electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catal, Tunc; Fan, Yanzhen; Li, Kaichang; Bermek, Hakan; Liu, Hong

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive fuel source for MFCs due to its renewable nature and ready availability. Furan derivatives and phenolic compounds could be potentially formed during the pre-treatment process of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, voltage generation from these compounds and the effects of these compounds on voltage generation from glucose in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were examined. Except for 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (5-HMF), all the other compounds tested were unable to be utilized directly for electricity production in MFCs in the absence of other electron donors. One furan derivate, 5-HMF and two phenolic compounds, trans-cinnamic acid and 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid did not affect electricity generation from glucose at a concentration up to 10 mM. Four phenolic compounds, including syringaldeyhde, vanillin, trans-4-hydroxy-3-methoxy, and 4-hydroxy cinnamic acids inhibited electricity generation at concentrations above 5 mM. Other compounds, including 2-furaldehyde, benzyl alcohol and acetophenone, inhibited the electricity generation even at concentrations less than 0.2 mM. This study suggests that effective electricity generation from the hydrolysates of lignocellulosic biomass in MFCs may require the employment of the hydrolysis methods with low furan derivatives and phenolic compounds production, or the removal of some strong inhibitors prior to the MFC operation, or the improvement of bacterial tolerance against these compounds through the enrichment of new bacterial cultures or genetic modification of the bacterial strains.

  15. Microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil by compound-specific stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zemin; Shen, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xi-Chang; Liu, Weiping; Yang, Fangxing

    2015-09-15

    To assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil, attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin was investigated by compound-specific stable isotope analysis. The variations of the residual concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of alpha-cypermethrin were detected in unsterilized and sterilized soils spiked with alpha-cypermethrin. After an 80 days' incubation, the concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin decreased to 0.47 and 3.41 mg/kg in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, while those decreased to 1.43 and 6.61 mg/kg in the sterilized soils. Meanwhile, the carbon isotope ratios shifted to -29.14 ± 0.22‰ and -29.86 ± 0.33‰ in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, respectively. The results revealed that microbial degradation contributed to the attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin and induced the carbon isotope fractionation. In order to quantitatively assess microbial degradation, a relationship between carbon isotope ratios and residual concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin was established according to Rayleigh equation. An enrichment factor, ϵ = -1.87‰ was obtained, which can be employed to assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin. The significant carbon isotope fractionation during microbial degradation suggests that CSIA is a proper approach to qualitatively detect and quantitatively assess the biodegradation during attenuation process of alpha-cypermethrin in the field.

  16. Microbial colonization of biopolymeric thin films containing natural compounds and antibiotics fabricated by MAPLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristescu, R.; Surdu, A. V.; Grumezescu, A. M.; Oprea, A. E.; Trusca, R.; Vasile, O.; Dorcioman, G.; Visan, A.; Socol, G.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Mihaiescu, D.; Enculescu, M.; Chifiriuc, M. C.; Boehm, R. D.; Narayan, R. J.; Chrisey, D. B.

    2015-05-01

    Although a great number of antibiotics are currently available, they are often rendered ineffective by the ability of microbial strains to develop genetic resistance and to grow in biofilms. Since many antimicrobial agents poorly penetrate biofilms, biofilm-associated infections often require high concentrations of antimicrobial agents for effective treatment. Among the various strategies that may be used to inhibit microbial biofilms, one strategy that has generated significant interest involves the use of bioactive surfaces that are resistant to microbial colonization. In this respect, we used matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) involving a pulsed KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns, ν = 10 Hz) to obtain thin composite biopolymeric films containing natural (flavonoid) or synthetic (antibiotic) compounds as bioactive substances. Chemical composition and film structures were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Films morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The antimicrobial assay of the microbial biofilms formed on these films was assessed by the viable cell counts method. The flavonoid-containing thin films showed increased resistance to microbial colonization, highlighting their potential to be used for the design of anti-biofilm surfaces.

  17. Newly Discovered Paleocene and Eocene Rocks near Fairfield, California, and Correlation with Rocks in Vaca Valley and the So-Called Martinez Formation or Stage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brabb, Earl E.; Ristau, Donn; Bukry, David; McDougall, Kristin; Almgren, Alvin A.; Saul, LouElla; Sanfilippo, Annika

    2008-01-01

    Discovery of a 3-foot thick sandstone bed with abundant Turritellid gastropods of late Paleocene age about 4 miles northeast of Fairfield and on the southwest flank of Cement Hill, Solano County provides an opportunity to reevaluate the relationships of lower Tertiary formations in this part of California. Cement Hill is named for travertine deposits in and on top of sandstone of Late Cretaceous age. In this report, the current study area where the Paleocene fossils were recently discovered is referred to as lower Cement Hill and is located in section 7 of the U.S. Geological Survey Fairfield North 7.5-minute quadrangle, Township 5 North, Range 1 West. Lower Cement Hill is about 23 miles north of the so-called Martinez 'formation' or stage area (Weaver and others, 1941) of late Paleocene age near Martinez. The Martinez 'formation' and stage have played a significant role in the development of early Tertiary stratigraphy in this part of California. The discovery of correlative rocks at Cement Hill was unsuspected and may be helpful in defining the extent of this so-called formation or stage. Coccolith identification and correlations are by David Bukry, foraminifer identifications and correlations by Alvin Almgren and Kristin McDougall, gastropod identification and correlation by LouElla Saul, and Radiolaria identifications and correlations are by Annika Sanfilippo.

  18. Organic chemistry of basal ice - presence of labile, low molecular weight compounds available for microbial metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lis, Grzegorz P.; Wadham, Jemma L.; Lawson, Emily; Stibal, Marek; Telling, Jon

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies show that subglacial environments previously thought to be devoid of life contain a host of active microbial organisms. Presence of liquid water due to overburden pressure, the release of nutrients from chemical erosion of bedrock, and the potential carbon sources in overridden sediments facilitate life in this extreme environment. However, little is still known of concentrations and diversity of labile organic compounds essential for sustaining microbial metabolism in subglacial environments. Three subglacial ecosystems that considerably differ in range and amount of available organic compounds were selected for this study 1-Engabreen, northern Norway, overlying high-grade metamorphic rocks with low organic carbon content; 2-Finsterwalderbreen, Svalbard, overriding ancient black shales with a relatively high carbon content yet recalcitrant to microbiological consumption; and 3-Russell Glacier in western Greenland with recently overridden quaternary organic rich paleosols. Basal and pressure ridge ice samples were collected and subsequently analysed for low molecular weight organic compounds, with the emphasis on volatile fatty acids, carbohydrates and amino acids. The highest concentration of labile organic compounds in Greenland basal ice suggest that recently overridden paleosols have the greatest potential for sustaining microbial populations present within and underneath basal ice. The high concentration of "ancient" organic carbon in basal ice from Finsterwalderbreen, Svalbard, doesn't correlate with the presence of labile organic compounds. This indicates the inability of microbes to digest recalcitrant kerogen carbon in cold temperatures. In all three investigated environments, concentrations of labile organic compounds are elevated in basal ice with a high debris content. Until recently, most models of the global carbon cycle tend to neglect the pool of subglacial organic carbon as little is known about the range and concentrations of

  19. ADAPTATION OF AQUIFER MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES TO THE BIODEGRADATION OF XENOBIOTIC COMPOUNDS: INFLUENCE OF SUBSTRATE CONCENTRATION AND PREEXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies were conducted to examine the adaptation response of aquifer microbial communities to xenobiotic compounds and the influence of chemical preexposure in the laboratory and in situ on adaptation. Adaptation and biodegradation were assessed as mineralization and cellular inc...

  20. The Rise of Complexity: Cell Signaling Compounds in Pavilion Lake Microbialites and Temperate Zone Microbial Community Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turse, C.; Schulze-Makuch, D.; Lim, D.; Laval, B.; Irwin, L.

    2010-04-01

    A distinctive assemblage of freshwater calcite microbialites was studied at Pavilion Lake, British Columbia, Canada, using standard microbial methods, morphological observations, PLFA analysis, and biochemical analysis to identify cell-signalling (quorum sensing) compounds.

  1. Energetic Limitations on Microbial Respiration of Organic Compounds using Aqueous Fe(III) Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naughton, H.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Soil organic matter constitutes up to 75% of the terrestrial carbon stock. Microorganisms mediate the breakdown of organic compounds and the return of carbon to the atmosphere, predominantly through respiration. Microbial respiration requires an electron acceptor and an electron donor such as small fatty acids, organic acids, alcohols, sugars, and other molecules that differ in oxidation state of carbon. Carbon redox state affects how much energy is required to oxidize a molecule through respiration. Therefore, different organic compounds should offer a spectrum of energies to respiring microorganisms. However, microbial respiration has traditionally focused on the availability and reduction potential of electron acceptors, ignoring the organic electron donor. We found through incubation experiments that the organic compound serving as electron donor determined how rapidly Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 respires organic substrate and the extent of reduction of the electron acceptor. We simulated a range of energetically favorable to unfavorable electron acceptors using organic chelators bound to Fe(III) with equilibrium stability constants ranging from log(K) of 11.5 to 25.0 for the 1:1 complex, where more stable complexes are less favorable for microbial respiration. Organic substrates varied in nominal oxidation state of carbon from +2 to -2. The most energetically favorable substrate, lactate, promoted up to 30x more rapid increase in percent Fe(II) compared to less favorable substrates such as formate. This increased respiration on lactate was more substantial with less stable Fe(III)-chelate complexes. Intriguingly, this pattern contradicts respiration rate predicted by nominal oxidation state of carbon. Our results suggest that organic substrates will be consumed so long as the energetic toll corresponding to the electron donor half reaction is counterbalanced by the energy available from the electron accepting half reaction. We propose using the chemical

  2. A novel aromatic oil compound inhibits microbial overgrowth on feet: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Misner, Bill D

    2007-01-01

    Background Athlete's Foot (Tinea pedis) is a form of ringworm associated with highly contagious yeast-fungi colonies, although they look like bacteria. Foot bacteria overgrowth produces a harmless pungent odor, however, uncontrolled proliferation of yeast-fungi produces small vesicles, fissures, scaling, and maceration with eroded areas between the toes and the plantar surface of the foot, resulting in intense itching, blisters, and cracking. Painful microbial foot infection may prevent athletic participation. Keeping the feet clean and dry with the toenails trimmed reduces the incidence of skin disease of the feet. Wearing sandals in locker and shower rooms prevents intimate contact with the infecting organisms and alleviates most foot-sensitive infections. Enclosing feet in socks and shoes generates a moisture-rich environment that stimulates overgrowth of pungent both aerobic bacteria and infectious yeast-fungi. Suppression of microbial growth may be accomplished by exposing the feet to air to enhance evaporation to reduce moistures' growth-stimulating effect and is often neglected. There is an association between yeast-fungi overgrowths and disabling foot infections. Potent agents virtually exterminate some microbial growth, but the inevitable presence of infection under the nails predicts future infection. Topical antibiotics present a potent approach with the ideal agent being one that removes moisture producing antibacterial-antifungal activity. Severe infection may require costly prescription drugs, salves, and repeated treatment. Methods A 63-y female volunteered to enclose feet in shoes and socks for 48 hours. Aerobic bacteria and yeast-fungi counts were determined by swab sample incubation technique (1) after 48-hours feet enclosure, (2) after washing feet, and (3) after 8-hours socks-shoes exposure to a aromatic oil powder-compound consisting of arrowroot, baking soda, basil oil, tea tree oil, sage oil, and clove oil. Conclusion Application of this

  3. Electromagnetic signals generated in the solid Earth by digital transmission of radio-waves as a plausible source for some so-called `seismic electric signals'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, V.-N.; Boyer, D.; Le Mouël, J.-L.; Chouliaras, G.; Stavrakakis, G. N.

    1999-07-01

    Claims by the VAN group [Varotsos, P., Alexopoulos, K., 1984. Physical properties of the variations of the electric field of the earth preceding earthquakes, I. Tectonophysics 110, 73-98, and later works] to have developed a short-term earthquake prediction technique in Greece continue to arouse contentious debates [Claims of success in using geoelectrical precursors to predict earthquakes are criticized and defended, 1998. Letters, Phys. Today 51 (6), 15-100; Great debates in seismology: the VAN method of earthquake prediction, 1998. Eos 79, 573-580]. This is partly because of the unknown origin of the so-called `seismic electric signals' (SES) precursors. Their particular characteristics are not those of the usual electromagnetic noise (cultural noise) or of the natural electromagnetic field (magnetotelluric field). In this paper, we show that transient electric signals looking like SES can be generated by digital transmitters of the radio-telecommunication network. Such signals have been observed in different regions of the world, including Greece and Vietnam. Their characteristics have been analyzed in a broad band of frequencies (10 -3-10 3 Hz) in the Ioannina, Greece, site which is considered as the most `sensitive area' of the VAN network. It is concluded that some of the signals recorded at this site and identified as SES are probably of artificial origin, and that the criteria used by the VAN group are not sufficient to guarantee that the so-called SES are not man-made. Without an extended and thorough study of the ambient electromagnetic noise in a broad band of frequencies and better information about the electrical properties of the deep structure beneath the monitoring station, earthquake predictions issued on the basis of signals recorded by the VAN network are of dubious significance.

  4. Broad spectrum anti-microbial compounds producing bacteria from coast of Qingdao bays.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Naseem; Li, Meng; Mirani, Zulfiqar Ali; Wang, Jingxue; Lin, Hong; Buzdar, Muhammad Aslam

    2015-03-01

    Anti-microbial resistance burden and hazard associated with chemical treatment of infections demanded for new anti-microbial natural products. Marine associated microorganisms are the enormous source of bioactive compounds. In this study we have isolated 272 marine bacteria among them 136 (50%) were antagonistic to at least one of the four pathogenic strains Listeria monocytogenes, Vibrio cholerae, E. coli and S. aureus. Only two strains exhibited antibacterial activity against all four test strains, which were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing as Bacillus sp. DK1-SA11 and Vibrio sp. DK6-SH8. Marine isolate DK1-SA11 has potential to resist boiling temperature and pH 2-12. Furthermore cell free extract (CFE) inhibited all test organisms including superbug MRSA and pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Marine isolate Bacillus sp. DK1-SA11 could be a potential combatant for the battle of drugs and bugs.

  5. Broad spectrum anti-microbial compounds producing bacteria from coast of Qingdao bays.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Naseem; Li, Meng; Mirani, Zulfiqar Ali; Wang, Jingxue; Lin, Hong; Buzdar, Muhammad Aslam

    2015-03-01

    Anti-microbial resistance burden and hazard associated with chemical treatment of infections demanded for new anti-microbial natural products. Marine associated microorganisms are the enormous source of bioactive compounds. In this study we have isolated 272 marine bacteria among them 136 (50%) were antagonistic to at least one of the four pathogenic strains Listeria monocytogenes, Vibrio cholerae, E. coli and S. aureus. Only two strains exhibited antibacterial activity against all four test strains, which were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing as Bacillus sp. DK1-SA11 and Vibrio sp. DK6-SH8. Marine isolate DK1-SA11 has potential to resist boiling temperature and pH 2-12. Furthermore cell free extract (CFE) inhibited all test organisms including superbug MRSA and pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Marine isolate Bacillus sp. DK1-SA11 could be a potential combatant for the battle of drugs and bugs. PMID:25730803

  6. Biotransformation of furanic and phenolic compounds with hydrogen gas production in a microbial electrolysis cell

    DOE PAGES

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Pavlostathis, Spyros G.

    2015-10-27

    In this study, furanic and phenolic compounds are problematic byproducts resulting from the decomposition of lignocellulosic biomass during biofuel production. This study assessed the capacity of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) to produce hydrogen gas (H2) using a mixture of two furanic (furfural, FF; 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, HMF) and three phenolic (syringic acid, SA; vanillic acid, VA; and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, HBA) compounds as the sole carbon and energy source in the bioanode. The rate and extent of biotransformation of the five compounds, efficiency of H2 production, as well as the anode microbial community structure were investigated. The five compounds were completelymore » transformed within 7-day batch runs and their biotransformation rate increased with increasing initial concentration. At an initial concentration of 1,200 mg/L (8.7 mM) of the mixture of the five compounds, their biotransformation rate ranged from 0.85 to 2.34 mM/d. The anode coulombic efficiency was 44-69%, which is comparable to wastewater-fed MECs. The H2 yield varied from 0.26 to 0.42 g H2-COD/g COD removed in the anode, and the bioanode volume-normalized H2 production rate was 0.07-0.1 L/L-d. The major identified fermentation products that did not transform further were catechol and phenol. Acetate was the direct substrate for exoelectrogenesis. Current and H2 production were inhibited at an initial substrate concentration of 1,200 mg/L, resulting in acetate accumulation at a much higher level than that measured in other batch runs conducted with a lower initial concentration of the five compounds. The anode microbial community consisted of exoelectrogens, putative degraders of the five compounds, and syntrophic partners of exoelectrogens. The H2 production route demonstrated in this study has proven to be an alternative to the currently used process of reforming natural gas to supply H2 needed to upgrade bio-oils to stable hydrocarbon fuels.« less

  7. Biotransformation of furanic and phenolic compounds with hydrogen gas production in a microbial electrolysis cell

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Pavlostathis, Spyros G.

    2015-10-27

    In this study, furanic and phenolic compounds are problematic byproducts resulting from the decomposition of lignocellulosic biomass during biofuel production. This study assessed the capacity of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) to produce hydrogen gas (H2) using a mixture of two furanic (furfural, FF; 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, HMF) and three phenolic (syringic acid, SA; vanillic acid, VA; and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, HBA) compounds as the sole carbon and energy source in the bioanode. The rate and extent of biotransformation of the five compounds, efficiency of H2 production, as well as the anode microbial community structure were investigated. The five compounds were completely transformed within 7-day batch runs and their biotransformation rate increased with increasing initial concentration. At an initial concentration of 1,200 mg/L (8.7 mM) of the mixture of the five compounds, their biotransformation rate ranged from 0.85 to 2.34 mM/d. The anode coulombic efficiency was 44-69%, which is comparable to wastewater-fed MECs. The H2 yield varied from 0.26 to 0.42 g H2-COD/g COD removed in the anode, and the bioanode volume-normalized H2 production rate was 0.07-0.1 L/L-d. The major identified fermentation products that did not transform further were catechol and phenol. Acetate was the direct substrate for exoelectrogenesis. Current and H2 production were inhibited at an initial substrate concentration of 1,200 mg/L, resulting in acetate accumulation at a much higher level than that measured in other batch runs conducted with a lower initial concentration of the five compounds. The anode microbial community consisted of exoelectrogens, putative degraders of the five compounds, and syntrophic partners of exoelectrogens. The H2 production route demonstrated in this study has proven to be an alternative to the currently used process of reforming natural gas to supply H2 needed to

  8. Inhibitory Effect of Furanic and Phenolic Compounds on Exoelectrogenesis in a Microbial Electrolysis Cell Bioanode

    DOE PAGES

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Pavlostathis, Spyros G.

    2016-09-09

    Furanic and phenolic compounds are 20 lignocellulose-derived compounds known to inhibit to H2- and ethanol- producing microorganisms in dark fermentation. Bioelectrochemical conversion of furanic and phenolic compounds to electricity or H2 has recently been demonstrated as a productive method to use these compounds. However, potential inhibitory effect of furanic and phenolic compounds on exoelectrogenesis in bioelectrochemical systems is not well understood. This study systematically investigated the inhibitory effect of furfural (FF), 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), syringic acid (SA), vanillic acid (VA), and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (HBA) on exoelectrogenesis in the bioanode of a microbial electrolysis cell. A mixture of these five compounds atmore » an increasing initial total concentration from 0.8 to 8.0 g/L resulted in current decrease up to 91%. The observed inhibition primarily affected exoelectrogenesis, instead of non-exoelectrogenic biotransformation pathways (e.g., fermentation) of the five compounds. Furthermore, the parent compounds at a high concentration, as opposed to their biotransformation products, were responsible for the observed inhibition. Tests with individual compounds show that all five parent compounds contributed to the observed inhibition by the mixture. The IC50 (concentration resulting in 50% current decrease) was estimated as 2.7 g/L for FF, 3.0 g/L for HMF, 1.9 g/L for SA, 2.1 g/L for VA and 2.0 g/L for HBA. Nevertheless, these compounds below their non-inhibitory concentrations jointly resulted in significant inhibition as a mixture. Catechol and phenol, which were persistent biotransformation products of the mixture, inhibited exoelectrogens at high concentrations, but to a lesser extent than the parent compounds. Recovery of exoelectrogenesis from inhibition by all compounds was observed, except for catechol, which resulted in irreversible inhibition. The reversibility of inhibition, as well as the observed difference in recovery

  9. A Novel Method for Analyzing Microbially Affiliated Volatile Organic Compounds in Soil Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhs, C. V.; McNeal, K. S.

    2010-12-01

    A concerted, international effort by citizens, governments, industries and educational systems is necessary to address the myriad environmental issues that face us today. The authors of this paper concentrate on soil environments and, specifically, the methods currently used to characterize them. The ability to efficiently and effectively monitor and characterize various soils is desired, allows for the study, supervision, and protection of natural and cultivated ecosystems, and may assist stakeholders in meeting governmentally-imposed environmental standards. This research addresses soil characterization by a comparison of four methods that emphasize a combination of microbial community and metabolic measures: BIOLOG, fatty acid methyl-ester analysis (FAME), descriptive physical and chemical analysis (moisture content, pH, carbon content, nutrient content, and grain size), and the novel soil-microbe volatile organic compound analysis (SMVOC) presented in this work. In order to achieve the method comparison, soils were collected from three climatic regions (Bahamas, Michigan, and Mississippi), with three samples taken from niche ecosystems found at each climatic region (a total of nine sites). Of interest to the authors is whether or not an investigation of microbial communities and the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by microbial communities from nine separate soil ecosystems provides useful information about soil dynamics. In essence, is analysis of soil-derived VOCs using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) an effective method for characterizing microbial communities and their metabolic activity of soils rapidly and accurately compared with the other three traditional characterization methods? Preliminary results suggest that VOCs in each of these locales differ with changes in soil types, soil moisture, and bacterial community. Each niche site shows distinct patterns in both VOCs and BIOLOG readings. Results will be presented to show the

  10. Biological technologies for the removal of sulfur containing compounds from waste streams: bioreactors and microbial characteristics.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Zhang, Jingying; Lin, Jian; Liu, Junxin

    2015-10-01

    Waste gases containing sulfur compounds, such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, thioethers, and mercaptan, produced and emitted from industrial processes, wastewater treatment, and landfill waste may cause undesirable issues in adjacent areas and contribute to atmospheric pollution. Their control has been an area of concern and research for many years. As alternative to conventional physicochemical air pollution control technologies, biological treatment processes which can transform sulfur compounds to harmless products by microbial activity, have gained in popularity due to their efficiency, cost-effectiveness and environmental acceptability. This paper provides an overview of the current biological techniques used for the treatment of air streams contaminated with sulfur compounds as well as the advances made in the past year. The discussion focuses on bioreactor configuration and design, mechanism of operation, insights into the overall biological treatment process, and the characterization of the microbial species present in bioreactors, their populations and their interactions with the environment. Some bioreactor case studies are also introduced. Finally, the perspectives on future research and development needs in this research area were also highlighted.

  11. Microbial community response to addition of polylactate compounds to stimulate hexavalent chromium reduction in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Eoin L; Joyner, Dominique C; Faybishenko, Boris; Conrad, Mark E; Rios-Velazquez, Carlos; Malave, Josue; Martinez, Ramon; Mork, Benjamin; Willett, Anna; Koenigsberg, Steven; Herman, Donald J; Firestone, Mary K; Hazen, Terry C

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of bioimmobilization of Cr(VI) in groundwater at the Department of Energy Hanford site, we conducted a series of microcosm experiments using a range of commercial electron donors with varying degrees of lactate polymerization (polylactate). These experiments were conducted using Hanford Formation sediments (coarse sand and gravel) immersed in Hanford groundwater, which were amended with Cr(VI) and several types of lactate-based electron donors (Hydrogen Release Compound, HRC; primer-HRC, pHRC; extended release HRC) and the polylactate-cysteine form (Metal Remediation Compound, MRC). The results showed that polylactate compounds stimulated an increase in bacterial biomass and activity to a greater extent than sodium lactate when applied at equivalent carbon concentrations. At the same time, concentrations of headspace hydrogen and methane increased and correlated with changes in the microbial community structure. Enrichment of Pseudomonas spp. occurred with all lactate additions, and enrichment of sulfate-reducing Desulfosporosinus spp. occurred with almost complete sulfate reduction. The results of these experiments demonstrate that amendment with the pHRC and MRC forms result in effective removal of Cr(VI) from solution most likely by both direct (enzymatic) and indirect (microbially generated reductant) mechanisms.

  12. Clinicopathologic spectrum of the so-called calcifying odontogenic cysts: a study of 21 intraosseous cases with reconsideration of the terminology and classification.

    PubMed

    Li, Tie-Jun; Yu, Shi-Feng

    2003-03-01

    The so-called calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) represents a heterogeneous group of lesions that exhibit a variety of clinicopathologic and behavioral features. Because of this diversity, there has been confusion and disagreement on the terminology and classification of these lesions. We reviewed the clinicopathologic features of 21 intraosseous cases that were previously diagnosed as COC or under related diagnostic terms. Based on the biologic behavior, the lesions of the present series were divided into three subgroups: cyst, benign tumor, and malignant tumor. Sixteen cases (nine men and seven women) proved to be unicystic lesions with (five cases) or without associated odontoma. The lining epithelium of the cystic lesions fulfilled the histologic criteria for COC proposed by the World Health Organization, and their overall clinicopathologic features were consistent with that of developmental odontogenic cysts. The age of patients from the cyst group peaked at the second decade. The maxilla was affected more often (69%) than the mandible, with a predilection for the canine-premolar region (62.5%). Thirteen patients with follow-up information revealed no recurrence following enucleation. The four cases in the benign tumor group had variable clinicopathologic features. Two cases were solid tumors consisting of ameloblastoma-like sheets of odontogenic epithelium that contained ghost cells/calcification foci and juxtaepithelial dentinoid. Both patients experienced multiple recurrences following conservative surgeries. The other two lesions contained typical areas of COC and other types of odontogenic tumors (one ameloblastoma and one odontogenic myxofibroma). All four lesions occurred in the mandible and were relatively large. In the present series one case identified as malignant tumor arose from a previously benign COC. The tumor shared some features of COC (ghost cell foci and dystrophic calcification) but also had prominent mitotic activity, nuclear and

  13. Microbial use of gas phase organic compounds in the surface ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrieta, Jesus M.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Monserrat Sala, M.; Dachs, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Large diffusive air-sea fluxes of gas-phase organic carbon (GOC) have been identified, indicating that the ocean may be a major sink for these compounds. However, little is known about the fate of these GOC compounds entering the surface ocean. We report efficient use of atmospheric GOC by marine prokaryotes at different locations in the NE Subtropical Atlantic Ocean, the Arctic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. Our results indicate that between 2 to 27% of the prokaryotic carbon demand was supported by GOC. Between 1 and 94% of the GOC entering the ocean was consumed by prokaryotes depending on locations, thus sustaining a disequilibrium, which drives the transfer of GOC from the atmosphere into the ocean. The magnitude of this, previously unnoticed, microbial GOC utilization stresses the need for incorporating the oceanic uptake of gaseous organic carbon into the global carbon budget.

  14. Becker muscular dystrophy-like myopathy regarded as so-called "fatty muscular dystrophy" in a pig: a case report and its diagnostic method.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Aihara, Naoyuki; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Kousaka, Shinichi; Nagafuchi, Tsuneyuki; Ochiai, Mariko; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Asai, Tetsuo; Oishi, Koji

    2014-03-01

    We describe a case of human Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD)-like myopathy that was characterized by the declined stainability of dystrophin at sarcolemma in a pig and the immunostaining for dystrophin on the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. The present case was found in a meat inspection center. The pig looked appeared healthy at the ante-mortem inspection. Muscular abnormalities were detected after carcass dressing as pale, discolored skeletal muscles with prominent fat infiltrations and considered so-called "fatty muscular dystrophy". Microscopic examination revealed following characteristics: diffused fat infiltration into the skeletal muscle and degeneration and regeneration of the remaining skeletal muscle fibers. Any lesions that were suspected of neurogenic atrophy, traumatic muscular degeneration, glycogen storage disease or other porcine muscular disorders were not observed. The immunostaining for dystrophin was conducted and confirmed to be applicable on FFPE porcine muscular tissues and revealed diminished stainability of dystrophin at the sarcolemma in the present case. Based on the histological observations and immunostaining results, the present case was diagnosed with BMD-like myopathy associated with dystrophin abnormality in a pig. Although the genetic properties were not clear, the present BMD-like myopathy implied the occurrence of dystrophinopathy in pigs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a natural case of myopathy associated with dystrophin abnormalities in a pig.

  15. Volatile organic compound production and consumption by microbial plankton communities on the NOAA WACS cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannoni, S. J.; Halsey, K.; Thrash, J. C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Graus, M.

    2013-12-01

    Information about biological sources and sinks of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the ocean surface could result in a better understanding of the underlying causes of variation in air/sea VOC fluxes, and potentially could alter predictions about the impact of climate change on ocean surface ecology and air/sea interactions. The goal of this work was to measure rates of biological production, oxidation and assimilation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by microbial plankton communities along the WACS cruise transect from Boston to Bermuda in August 2013. Tangential flow filtration was used to concentrate microbial plankton communities for incubation in environmentally controlled dynamic stripping chambers under simulated ocean surface layer conditions. Gas streams exiting the chambers were monitored in real time with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). In separate experiments aliquots of plankton suspensions were incubated with 14C-methanol, 14C-TMAO, and 14C-pyruvate, and the assimilation of 14C into biomass and the production of 14C-CO2 were measured. Results showed that the highly productive George's Bank plankton community has a high capacity for methanol and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) oxidation. Biomass was estimated by counting cells. The rate of incorporation of methanol-carbon into biomass was only 21% of the rate of methanol oxidation to CO2. Similar results were observed for TMAO. These experiments also allowed estimates of kinetic constants for both compounds. The half-saturation constants (Ks) for methanol oxidation were similar in natural populations collected at George's Bank and the Sargasso Sea (12.8 and 9.9 μM, respectively). Interestingly, the Ks values for TMAO oxidation were an order of magnitude lower than for methanol in plankton communities sampled from both sites (0.5 and 0.3 μM, respectively). These results provide additional evidence that microbial plankton have a high capacity for oxidation of these low

  16. Mechanisms and strategies of microbial cometabolism in the degradation of organic compounds - chlorinated ethylenes as the model.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Zhu, Xiangcheng; Chen, Wenting; Duan, Zhibing; Wang, Lin; Zhou, Ya

    2014-01-01

    The universal microbial cometabolism provides us with an effective approach to remove man-made xenobiotics. However, the cometabolic bioremediation of toxic organic compounds has not been widely initiated due to the obscure underlying fundamentals in the studies or applications of microbial cometabolism. This review summarizes the current research trends in mechanistic understanding of microbial cometabolism, especially with regard to its potential applications. The crucial factors including key enzyme, enzyme inhibition, toxic effects and energy regulation are discussed, which all significantly contribute to the cometabolic bioremediation of pollutants. The presented review of chlorinated ethylene cometabolism in this overview has further confirmed the fundamentals and hypotheses mentioned above, and thus cometabolism of chlorinated ethylenes has been regarded as a role model of pollution remediation technology using microbial cometabolism. The subsequent prospective research should provide insights into the ambiguous mechanism of microbial cometabolism and help us to develop more efficient bioremediation of progressive pollution.

  17. Effects of natural compounds on microbial safety and sensory quality of Fior di Latte cheese, a typical Italian cheese.

    PubMed

    Gammariello, D; Di Giulio, S; Conte, A; Del Nobile, M A

    2008-11-01

    This work presents a preliminary study to assess the efficiency of plant essential oils as natural food preservatives in Fior di Latte cheese. Selected compounds were directly dissolved into Fior di Latte brine. Packaged Fior di Latte samples were stored at 10 degrees C for about 6 d. The cell loads of spoilage and useful microorganisms were monitored to calculate the microbial acceptability limit. Results show that some tested compounds were not acceptable by the panel from a sensorial point of view. Most compounds did not affect the microbial acceptability limit value to a great extent, and only a few such as lemon, sage, and thyme markedly prolonged the microbial acceptability limit of the investigated fresh cheese. Moreover, the above active agents exerted an inhibitory effect on the microorganisms responsible for spoilage without affecting the dairy microflora.

  18. Microbial turnover and incorporation of organic compounds in oil sand mining reclamation sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappé, M.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2013-12-01

    Microorganisms play an important role in the development of new soils and in the reclamation of disturbed landscapes. Especially in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils their ability to degrade organic matter and pollutants makes them essential to re-establish full ecosystem functionality. Microbes are also involved in the mobilization of nutrients for plant growth and in the production of greenhouse gases. Reclamation sites from oil sand mining activities in Alberta, Canada, contain residual bitumen as well as other hydrocarbons. So, these areas provide a great opportunity to study microbial degradation of residual contaminants from oil sand. To get an impression of degradation rates as well as metabolic pathways, incubation experiments were performed in the lab. We measured microbial turnover (catabolic metabolism) and incorporation (anabolic metabolism) rates of different common organic compounds in samples from differently treated reclamation sites - with plant cover and without plant cover. About 10 g of sample material was suspended in 10 mL of a solution that mimics the in-situ concentration of dissolved ions. Radioactively labelled 14C-acetate was added as a common substrate, whereas 14C-naphthenic acid was chosen to investigate the microbial community's capability to utilize a typical hydrocarbon pollutant in oil sand tailings as a nutrient source. To test for the influence of fertilizers on microbial activity, phosphate, nitrate and potassium were added to some samples in different combinations. Incubations were run over two different time periods (7 and 14 days). At the end of each incubation experiment, the amount of produced 14CO2, 14C incorporated into the cells and the remaining unreacted 14C in the slurry were measured. First results show that most of the added 14C-acetate is used for respiration as it is mostly released as 14CO2. In upper soil layers only about 3% of 14C is incorporated into cells, whereas in deeper horizons with lower cell abundances

  19. Subclass distribution of IgG antibodies to the rat oesophagus stratum corneum (so-called anti-keratin antibodies) in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Vincent, C; Serre, G; Basile, J P; Lestra, H C; Girbal, E; Sebbag, M; Soleilhavoup, J P

    1990-07-01

    Serum IgG, labelling the stratum corneum of the rat oesophagus epithelium, so-called anti-keratin antibodies (AKA) constitute the most specific marker for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, we investigated 31 IgG AKA-positive rheumatoid sera and 21 control sera from patients with non-rheumatoid inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The serum level of IgG1,2,3 and 4 was determined by radial immunodiffusion and the subclass distribution of IgG AKA by a three-step semi-quantitative immunofluorescence assay using standard monoclonal antibodies specific for each of the four human IgG subclasses. In the rheumatoid sera, the serum level of IgG1 was found to be significantly increased and the level of IgG2 significantly decreased with regard to the control sera, while the levels of IgG3 and 4 as well as total IgG were in the normal range. IgG1,2,3, and 4 AKA were detected in 27 (87%), 6 (19%), 4 (13%) and 11 (35%) of the 31 rheumatoid sera, respectively, and were found to be independent of the clinical and biological indices of the disease. In spite of inter-individual heterogeneity, two predominant profiles were distinguished: IgG1 (alone) and IgG(1 + 4), which together represented 18 sera (58%). The large predominance of IgG1 AKA and the quasi-absence of IgG2 AKA suggest that the recognized antigen may be partly comprised of protein. Moreover, the high frequency of occurrence of IgG4 AKA might result from chronic exposure to the eliciting antigen, which could be a genuine autoantigen since we demonstrated that it is also present in the stratum corneum of human epidermis.

  20. Secretion of interleukin-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor by spindle cell sarcoma complicating Castleman's disease (so-called 'vascular neoplasia').

    PubMed

    Kakiuchi, Chihiro; Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Hitoshi; Katano, Harutaka; Ishiko, Tositaka; Mukai, Hiroyuki; Kogi, Mieko; Kasuga, Naoki; Takeuchi, Kengo; Yamane, Kenichi; Fukayama, Masashi; Mori, Shigeo

    2002-06-01

    So-called 'vascular neoplasia' (VN) is a rare tumour of unknown origin that complicates hyaline vascular type Castleman's disease (CD). This paper reports a case of VN complicating CD of hyaline vascular type, in which neoplastic cells were shown to secrete interleukin-6 (IL-6) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In this case, VN first occurred in the retroperitoneum of a 60-year-old male. The lesion showed typical morphology, with three distinct areas: (1) a lymph node-like area with regressively transformed lymph follicles showing hyaline vascular changes and with a hypervascular interfollicular region filled with slit-like vascular channels; (2) an area composed of spindle cell sarcoma; and (3) an area showing angiolipomatous hamartoma. A proportion of the cells in the spindle cell area showed severe pleomorphism. Subcutaneous recurrence after 8 months was composed purely of pleomorphic spindle cells. A karyotypic analysis of the recurrent tumour showed 47, XXY with some instability. Supernatant from primary culture contained high levels of IL-6 and VEGF, suggesting high secretion of these cytokines from neoplastic cells. Immunohistochemically, p53 overexpression was identified only in the pleomorphic spindle cells of the primary lesion and metastatic tumour. No features suggestive of vascular origin were shown on immunohistochemical or electron microscopic analysis of the neoplastic cells. Human herpesvirus type 8 was not detected by immunohistochemistry or PCR analysis. High levels of IL-6 and/or VEGF have been reported to play a role in CD. This is the first case report that clarifies the site of such cytokine production, showing the possibility of CD as a paraneoplastic phenomenon.

  1. [Possibilities for modifying risk factors for chromosome abnormalities--advantages of the so-called "triple" marker studies in comparison with pure "maternal age screening"].

    PubMed

    Holzgreve, W; Schloo, R; Veress, L; Schlegel, W; Tercanli, S; Schneider, H P

    1994-01-01

    We have offered the so-called "triple-marker screening" since May 1991 to all patients who came for prenatal care and did not select an invasive procedure primarily. First evaluation of 5210 cases revealed that 3.7% were test-positive for neural tube defects, 13.8% for Down's syndrome and 0.5% for both at the same time. The explanation for the comparatively high "test-positive" rate of 13.5% is the maternal age distribution with the median at 31.4 years. The highest number of women selecting triple-marker determinations was in the age group of 35 years. We detected 16 cases of Down's syndrome and in this group the majority of women was below 35 years. The decision of women to have an invasive procedure was obviously very much influenced by the actual risk assessment, because amniocentesis was chosen by 72/85 (84.8%) of women with a risk of more than 1:50, 192/290 (66.2%) of women in the risk category of 1:51 to 1:200 and 182/333 (54.6%) in the risk category of 1:201 to 1:400. The follow-up is not yet complete, but there is already good evidence for the efficiency of the screening program. Triple-marker screening also proved predictive in 10 cases of trisomy 18 and 8 cases of triploidy in this series. As a cut-off value we chose the risk of 1:386 which is equivalent to the odds of a 35 year old to have a child with Down's syndrome at birth.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7871918

  2. Diffusive sampling and measurement of microbial volatile organic compounds in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Araki, A; Eitaki, Y; Kawai, T; Kanazawa, A; Takeda, M; Kishi, R

    2009-10-01

    Microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOC), chemicals emitted from various microorganisms, in indoor air have been of concern in recent years. For large field studies, diffusive samplers are widely used to measure indoor environments. Since the sampling rate of a sampler is a fundamental parameter to calculate concentration, the sampling rates of eight MVOC with diffusive samplers were determined experimentally using a newly developed water-bubbling method: air was supplied to the MVOC-solutions and the vapor collected in an exposure bag, where diffusive and active samplers were placed in parallel for comparison. Correlations between the diffusive and active samplings gave good linear regressions. The sampling rates were 30-35 ml/min and the detection limits were 0.044-0.178 microg/m(3), as determined by GC/MS analysis. Application of the sampling rates in indoor air was validated by parallel sampling of the diffusive and active sampling method. 5% Propan-2-ol/CS(2) was the best solvent to desorb the compounds from absorbents. The procedure was applied to a field study in 41 dwellings. The most frequently detected compounds were hexan-2-one and heptan-2-one, with 97.5% detection rates and geometric mean values of 0.470 and 0.302 microg/m(3), respectively. This study shows that diffusive samplers are applicable to measure indoor MVOC levels. Practical Implications At present, there are still limited reports on indoor Microbial Volatile Organic Compounds (MVOC) levels in general dwellings and occupants' health. Compared with active sampling methods, air sampling using a diffusive sampler is particularly advantageous for use in large field studies due to its smallness, light-size, easy-handling, and cost-effectiveness. In this study, sampling rates of selected MVOC of the diffusive sampler were determined using the water-bubbling method: generating gases by water-bubbling and exposing the diffusive and active samplers at the same time. The obtained sampling rates

  3. A simple, rapid, sensitive method detecting homoserine lactone (HSL)-related compounds in microbial extracts.

    PubMed

    Singh, Maya Prakash; Greenstein, Michael

    2006-04-01

    A simple, rapid, sensitive microtiter plate method detecting N-acyl homoserine lactone (HSL)-related compounds was established using an Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain harboring a traG::lacZ/traR reporter gene responsive to HSLs. This strain did not produce its own HSL, but the traG::lacZ reporter gene was induced only when its transcription activator TraR detected a cognate exogenous HSL. Therefore, the assay was expected to be highly specific for HSL-related compounds. Induction of the reporter gene, leading to production of beta-galactosidase enzyme, was measured by using two different beta-galactosidase substrates, X-gal and Galacton-Star, for colorimetric and chemiluminometric detection, respectively. The screen was validated in both the 96-well and 384-well plate formats, and extracts derived from 696 different microbial isolates, mostly unidentified actinomycetes isolated from diverse locations, were tested. Crude extracts of 81 (11.64%) cultures tested positive for HSL-related compounds, and an additional 34 (4.8%) crude extracts showed a moderate to weak signal for HSLs. Data from the fractionated samples, however, suggested a much higher prevalence of HSL signals in these extracts. Of 144 crude extracts fractionated into 10 individual samples at a 10x concentration, 72 (50%) cultures tested positive for HSLs. Six cultures were active only in the crude extract, 18 were active both in crude and one or more of their fractions, and an additional 48 were active in just one or more of their fractions. This finding may be the first to suggest such a high prevalence of HSL-signals found in nature, and a large number of actinomycetes in our collection appeared to produce HSL-related compounds.

  4. Probiotics function mechanistically as delivery vehicles for neuroactive compounds: Microbial endocrinology in the design and use of probiotics.

    PubMed

    Lyte, Mark

    2011-08-01

    I hypothesize here that the ability of probiotics to synthesize neuroactive compounds provides a unifying microbial endocrinology-based mechanism to explain the hitherto incompletely understood action of commensal microbiota that affect the host's gastrointestinal and psychological health. Once ingested, probiotics enter an interactive environment encompassing microbiological, immunological, and neurophysiological components. By utilizing a trans-disciplinary framework known as microbial endocrinology, mechanisms that would otherwise not be considered become apparent since any candidate would need to be shared among all three components. The range of neurochemicals produced by probiotics includes neurochemicals for which receptor-based targets on immune and neuronal elements (intestinal and extra-intestinal) have been well characterized. Production of neurochemicals by probiotics therefore allows for their consideration as delivery vehicles for neuroactive compounds. This unifying microbial endocrinology-based hypothesis, which may facilitate the selection and design of probiotics for clinical use, also highlights the largely unrecognized role of neuroscience in understanding how microbes may influence health.

  5. Production of a High Efficiency Microbial Flocculant by Proteus mirabilis TJ-1 Using Compound Organic Wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xia, Siqing; Zhang, Jiao

    2010-11-01

    The production of a high efficiency microbial flocculant (MBF) by Proteus mirabilis TJ-1 using compound organic wastewater was investigated. To cut down the cost of the MBF production, several nutritive organic wastewaters were selected to replace glucose and peptone as the carbon source and the nitrogen source in the optimized medium of strain TJ-1, respectively. The compound wastewater of the milk candy and the soybean milk was found to be good carbon source and nitrogen source for this strain to produce MBF. The cost-effective culture medium consists of (per liter): 800 mL wastewater of milk candy, 200 mL wastewater of soybean milk, 0.3 g MgSO4ṡ7 H2O, 5 g K2HPO4, 2 g and KH2PO4, pH 7.0. The economic cost for the MBF production can be cut down over a half by using the developed culture medium. Furthermore, the utilization of the two wastewaters in the preparation of culture medium of strain TJ-1 can not only save their big treatment cost, but also realize their resource reuse.

  6. Physico-chemical parameters, bioactive compounds and microbial quality of thermo-sonicated carrot juice during storage.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Flores, Héctor E; Garnica-Romo, Ma Guadalupe; Bermúdez-Aguirre, Daniela; Pokhrel, Prashant Raj; Barbosa-Cánovas, Gustavo V

    2015-04-01

    Thermosonication has been successfully tested in food for microbial inactivation; however, changes in bioactive compounds and shelf-life of treated products have not been thoroughly investigated. Carrot juice was thermo-sonicated (24 kHz, 120 μm amplitude) at 50 °C, 54 °C and 58 °C for 10 min (acoustic power 2204.40, 2155.72, 2181.68 mW/mL, respectively). Quality parameters and microbial growth were evaluated after processing and during storage at 4 °C. Control and sonicated treatments at 50 °C and 54 °C had 10, 12 and 14 d of shelf-life, respectively. Samples sonicated at 58 °C had the best quality; microbial growth remained low at around 3-log for mesophiles, 4.5-log for yeasts and molds and 2-log for enterobacteria after 20 d of storage. Furthermore, thermo-sonicated juice at 58 °C retained >98% of carotenoids and 100% of ascorbic acid. Phenolic compounds increased in all stored, treated juices. Thermo-sonication is therefore a promising technology for preserving the quality of carrot juice by minimising the physicochemical changes during storage, retarding microbial growth and retaining the bioactive compounds.

  7. Physico-chemical parameters, bioactive compounds and microbial quality of thermo-sonicated carrot juice during storage.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Flores, Héctor E; Garnica-Romo, Ma Guadalupe; Bermúdez-Aguirre, Daniela; Pokhrel, Prashant Raj; Barbosa-Cánovas, Gustavo V

    2015-04-01

    Thermosonication has been successfully tested in food for microbial inactivation; however, changes in bioactive compounds and shelf-life of treated products have not been thoroughly investigated. Carrot juice was thermo-sonicated (24 kHz, 120 μm amplitude) at 50 °C, 54 °C and 58 °C for 10 min (acoustic power 2204.40, 2155.72, 2181.68 mW/mL, respectively). Quality parameters and microbial growth were evaluated after processing and during storage at 4 °C. Control and sonicated treatments at 50 °C and 54 °C had 10, 12 and 14 d of shelf-life, respectively. Samples sonicated at 58 °C had the best quality; microbial growth remained low at around 3-log for mesophiles, 4.5-log for yeasts and molds and 2-log for enterobacteria after 20 d of storage. Furthermore, thermo-sonicated juice at 58 °C retained >98% of carotenoids and 100% of ascorbic acid. Phenolic compounds increased in all stored, treated juices. Thermo-sonication is therefore a promising technology for preserving the quality of carrot juice by minimising the physicochemical changes during storage, retarding microbial growth and retaining the bioactive compounds. PMID:25442602

  8. Microbial Communities and Bioactive Compounds in Marine Sponges of the Family Irciniidae—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hardoim, Cristiane C. P.; Costa, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Marine sponges harbour complex microbial communities of ecological and biotechnological importance. Here, we propose the application of the widespread sponge family Irciniidae as an appropriate model in microbiology and biochemistry research. Half a gram of one Irciniidae specimen hosts hundreds of bacterial species—the vast majority of which are difficult to cultivate—and dozens of fungal and archaeal species. The structure of these symbiont assemblages is shaped by the sponge host and is highly stable over space and time. Two types of quorum-sensing molecules have been detected in these animals, hinting at microbe-microbe and host-microbe signalling being important processes governing the dynamics of the Irciniidae holobiont. Irciniids are vulnerable to disease outbreaks, and concerns have emerged about their conservation in a changing climate. They are nevertheless amenable to mariculture and laboratory maintenance, being attractive targets for metabolite harvesting and experimental biology endeavours. Several bioactive terpenoids and polyketides have been retrieved from Irciniidae sponges, but the actual producer (host or symbiont) of these compounds has rarely been clarified. To tackle this, and further pertinent questions concerning the functioning, resilience and physiology of these organisms, truly multi-layered approaches integrating cutting-edge microbiology, biochemistry, genetics and zoology research are needed. PMID:25272328

  9. Preliminary assessment of a model to predict mold contamination based on microbial volatile organic compound profiles.

    PubMed

    LeBouf, Ryan F; Schuckers, Stephanie A; Rossner, Alan

    2010-08-01

    Identification of mold growth based on microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) may be a viable alternative to current bioaerosol assessment methodologies. A feed-forward back propagation (FFBP) artificial neural network (ANN) was developed to correlate MVOCs with bioaerosol levels in built environments. A cross-validation MATLAB script was developed to train the ANN and produce model results. Entech Bottle-Vacs were used to collect chemical grab samples at 10 locations in northern NY during 17 sampling periods from July 2006 to August 2007. Bioaerosol samples were collected concurrently with chemical samples. An Anderson N6 impactor was used in conjunction with malt extract agar and dichloran glycerol 18 to collect viable mold samples. Non-viable samples were collected with Air-O-Cell cassettes. Chemical samples and bioaerosol samples were used as model inputs and model targets, respectively. Previous researchers have suggested the use of MVOCs as indicators of mold growth without the use of a pattern recognition program limiting their success. The current proposed strategy implements a pattern recognition program making it instrumental for field applications. This paper demonstrates that FFBP ANN may be used in conjunction with chemical sampling in built environments to predict the presence of mold growth.

  10. Microbial volatile organic compounds in moldy interiors: a long-term climate chamber study.

    PubMed

    Schuchardt, Sven; Strube, Andrea

    2013-06-01

    The present study simulated large-scale indoor mold damage in order to test the efficiency of air sampling for the detection of microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs). To do this, a wallpaper damaged by condensation was stored in a climate chamber (representing a hypothetical test room of 40 m(3) volume) and was inoculated with 14 typical indoor fungal strains. The chamber ventilation conditions were adjusted to common values found in moldy homes, and the mold growth was allowed to continue to higher than average values. The MVOC content of the chamber air was analyzed daily for a period of 105 days using coupled gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). This procedure guarantees MVOC profiling without external factors such as outdoor air, building materials, furniture, and occupants. However, only nine MVOCs could be detected during the sampling period, which indicates that the very low concentrated MVOCs are hardly accessible, even under these favorable conditions. Furthermore, most of the MVOCs that were detected cannot be considered as reliable indicators of mold growth in indoor environments.

  11. Variable emissions of microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) from root-associated fungi isolated from Scots pine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäck, Jaana; Aaltonen, Hermanni; Hellén, Heidi; Kajos, Maija K.; Patokoski, Johanna; Taipale, Risto; Pumpanen, Jukka; Heinonsalo, Jussi

    2010-09-01

    Soils emit a large variety of volatile organic compounds. In natural ecosystems, measurements of microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) exchange rates between soil and atmosphere are difficult due to e.g. the spatial heterogeneity of the belowground organisms, and due to the many potential sources for the same compounds. We measured in laboratory conditions the MVOC emission rates and spectra of eight typical fungi occurring in boreal forest soils. The studied species are decomposers ( Gymnopilus penetrans, Ophiostoma abietinum), ectomycorrhizal ( Cenococcum geophilum, Piloderma olivaceum, Suillus variegatus, Tomentellopsis submollis) and endophytic fungi ( Meliniomyces variabilis, Phialocephala fortinii). The MVOC emissions contained altogether 21 known and 6 unidentified compounds whose emission rates were >0.1 μg g(DW) -1 h -1. The most abundant compounds were the short-chain carbonyl compounds (acetone and acetaldehyde). The greatest carbonyl emissions were measured from P. olivaceum (1.9 mg acetone g(DW) -1 h -1) and P. fortinii (0.114 mg acetaldehyde g(DW) -1 h -1). Terpenoid emissions (isoprene, mono- and sesquiterpenes) were detected from some fungal cultures, but in relatively small amounts. We conclude that soil micro-organisms can potentially be responsible for significant emissions of volatiles, especially short-chain oxygenated compounds, to the below-canopy atmosphere.

  12. Changes in the Structure of the Microbial Community Associated with Nannochloropsis salina following Treatments with Antibiotics and Bioactive Compounds.

    PubMed

    Geng, Haifeng; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary B; Lane, Todd W; Sale, Kenneth L; Yu, Eizadora T

    2016-01-01

    Open microalgae cultures host a myriad of bacteria, creating a complex system of interacting species that influence algal growth and health. Many algal microbiota studies have been conducted to determine the relative importance of bacterial taxa to algal culture health and physiological states, but these studies have not characterized the interspecies relationships in the microbial communities. We subjected Nanochroloropsis salina cultures to multiple chemical treatments (antibiotics and quorum sensing compounds) and obtained dense time-series data on changes to the microbial community using 16S gene amplicon metagenomic sequencing (21,029,577 reads for 23 samples) to measure microbial taxa-taxa abundance correlations. Short-term treatment with antibiotics resulted in substantially larger shifts in the microbiota structure compared to changes observed following treatment with signaling compounds and glucose. We also calculated operational taxonomic unit (OTU) associations and generated OTU correlation networks to provide an overview of possible bacterial OTU interactions. This analysis identified five major cohesive modules of microbiota with similar co-abundance profiles across different chemical treatments. The Eigengenes of OTU modules were examined for correlation with different external treatment factors. This correlation-based analysis revealed that culture age (time) and treatment types have primary effects on forming network modules and shaping the community structure. Additional network analysis detected Alteromonadeles and Alphaproteobacteria as having the highest centrality, suggesting these species are "keystone" OTUs in the microbial community. Furthermore, we illustrated that the chemical tropodithietic acid, which is secreted by several species in the Alphaproteobacteria taxon, is able to drastically change the structure of the microbiota within 3 h. Taken together, these results provide valuable insights into the structure of the microbiota

  13. Changes in the Structure of the Microbial Community Associated with Nannochloropsis salina following Treatments with Antibiotics and Bioactive Compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Geng, Haifeng; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary B.; Lane, Todd W.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Yu, Eizadora T.

    2016-07-26

    Open microalgae cultures host a myriad of bacteria, creating a complex system of interacting species that influence algal growth and health. Many algal microbiota studies have been conducted to determine the relative importance of bacterial taxa to algal culture health and physiological states, but these studies have not characterized the interspecies relationships in the microbial communities. Here we subjected Nanochroloropsis salina cultures to multiple chemical treatments (antibiotics and quorum sensing compounds) and obtained dense time-series data on changes to the microbial community using 16S gene amplicon metagenomic sequencing (21,029,577 reads for 23 samples) to measure microbial taxa-taxa abundance correlations. Short-termmore » treatment with antibiotics resulted in substantially larger shifts in the microbiota structure compared to changes observed following treatment with signaling compounds and glucose. We also calculated operational taxonomic unit (OTU) associations and generated OTU correlation networks to provide an overview of possible bacterial OTU interactions. This analysis identified five major cohesive modules of microbiota with similar co-abundance profiles across different chemical treatments. The Eigengenes of OTU modules were examined for correlation with different external treatment factors. This correlation-based analysis revealed that culture age (time) and treatment types have primary effects on forming network modules and shaping the community structure. Additional network analysis detected Alteromonadeles and Alphaproteobacteria as having the highest centrality, suggesting these species are “keystone” OTUs in the microbial community. Furthermore, we illustrated that the chemical tropodithietic acid, which is secreted by several species in the Alphaproteobacteria taxon, is able to drastically change the structure of the microbiota within 3 h. Lastly, taken together, these results provide valuable insights into the structure

  14. Changes in the Structure of the Microbial Community Associated with Nannochloropsis salina following Treatments with Antibiotics and Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Haifeng; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary B.; Lane, Todd W.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Yu, Eizadora T.

    2016-01-01

    Open microalgae cultures host a myriad of bacteria, creating a complex system of interacting species that influence algal growth and health. Many algal microbiota studies have been conducted to determine the relative importance of bacterial taxa to algal culture health and physiological states, but these studies have not characterized the interspecies relationships in the microbial communities. We subjected Nanochroloropsis salina cultures to multiple chemical treatments (antibiotics and quorum sensing compounds) and obtained dense time-series data on changes to the microbial community using 16S gene amplicon metagenomic sequencing (21,029,577 reads for 23 samples) to measure microbial taxa-taxa abundance correlations. Short-term treatment with antibiotics resulted in substantially larger shifts in the microbiota structure compared to changes observed following treatment with signaling compounds and glucose. We also calculated operational taxonomic unit (OTU) associations and generated OTU correlation networks to provide an overview of possible bacterial OTU interactions. This analysis identified five major cohesive modules of microbiota with similar co-abundance profiles across different chemical treatments. The Eigengenes of OTU modules were examined for correlation with different external treatment factors. This correlation-based analysis revealed that culture age (time) and treatment types have primary effects on forming network modules and shaping the community structure. Additional network analysis detected Alteromonadeles and Alphaproteobacteria as having the highest centrality, suggesting these species are “keystone” OTUs in the microbial community. Furthermore, we illustrated that the chemical tropodithietic acid, which is secreted by several species in the Alphaproteobacteria taxon, is able to drastically change the structure of the microbiota within 3 h. Taken together, these results provide valuable insights into the structure of the microbiota

  15. Dolly, the so-called clone.

    PubMed

    Mittwoch, Ursula

    2003-02-01

    The word 'clone' is in the forefront of scientific terms that are familiar to the general public. But what exactly does it mean? Suprisingly, there is no simple answer, for different scientists are using the term for different entities.

  16. The So-Called Japanese Passive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Irwin

    The principal claim of this paper is that the Japanese passive consists of two different constructions, each derived from a distinct deep structure and each having associated with it a distinct set of syntactic and semantic properties. One of these constructions, the "adversative passive," implies that the grammatical subject of the sentence is…

  17. Dolly, the so-called clone.

    PubMed

    Mittwoch, Ursula

    2003-02-01

    The word 'clone' is in the forefront of scientific terms that are familiar to the general public. But what exactly does it mean? Suprisingly, there is no simple answer, for different scientists are using the term for different entities. PMID:12586944

  18. Characterization of microbial and chemical composition of shuttle wet waste with permanent gas and volatile organic compound analyses.

    PubMed

    Peterson, B V; Hummerick, M; Roberts, M S; Krumins, V; Kish, A L; Garland, J L; Maxwell, S; Mills, A

    2004-01-01

    Solid-waste treatment in space for Advanced Life Support, ALS, applications requires that the material can be safely processed and stored in a confined environment. Many solid-wastes are not stable because they are wet (40-90% moisture) and contain levels of soluble organic compounds that can contribute to the growth of undesirable microorganisms with concomitant production of noxious odors. In the absence of integrated Advanced Life Support systems on orbit, permanent gas, trace volatile organic and microbiological analyses were performed on crew refuse returned from the volume F "wet" trash of three consecutive Shuttle missions (STS-105, 109, and 110). These analyses were designed to characterize the short-term biological stability of the material and assess potential crew risks resulting from microbial decay processes during storage. Waste samples were collected post-orbiter landing and sorted into packaging material, food waste, toilet waste, and bulk liquid fractions deposited during flight in the volume F container. Aerobic and anaerobic microbial loads were determined in each fraction by cultivation on R2A and by acridine orange direct count (AODC). Dry and ash weights were performed to determine both water and organic content of the materials. Experiments to determine the aerobic and anaerobic biostability of refuse stored for varying periods of time were performed by on-line monitoring of CO2 and laboratory analysis for production of hydrogen sulfide and methane. Volatile organic compounds and permanent gases were analyzed using EPA Method TO15 by USEPA et al. [EPA Method TO15, The Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Ambient Air using SUMMA, Passivated Canister Sampling and Gas Chromatographic Analysis,1999] with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and by gas chromatography with selective detectors. These baseline measures of waste stream content, labile organics, and microbial load in the volume F Shuttle trash provide data for waste

  19. Characterization of microbial and chemical composition of shuttle wet waste with permanent gas and volatile organic compound analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, B. V.; Hummerick, M.; Roberts, M. S.; Krumins, V.; Kish, A. L.; Garland, J. L.; Maxwell, S.; Mills, A.

    2004-01-01

    Solid-waste treatment in space for Advanced Life Support, ALS, applications requires that the material can be safely processed and stored in a confined environment. Many solid-wastes are not stable because they are wet (40-90% moisture) and contain levels of soluble organic compounds that can contribute to the growth of undesirable microorganisms with concomitant production of noxious odors. In the absence of integrated Advanced Life Support systems on orbit, permanent gas, trace volatile organic and microbiological analyses were performed on crew refuse returned from the volume F "wet" trash of three consecutive Shuttle missions (STS-105, 109, and 110). These analyses were designed to characterize the short-term biological stability of the material and assess potential crew risks resulting from microbial decay processes during storage. Waste samples were collected post-orbiter landing and sorted into packaging material, food waste, toilet waste, and bulk liquid fractions deposited during flight in the volume F container. Aerobic and anaerobic microbial loads were determined in each fraction by cultivation on R2A and by acridine orange direct count (AODC). Dry and ash weights were performed to determine both water and organic content of the materials. Experiments to determine the aerobic and anaerobic biostability of refuse stored for varying periods of time were performed by on-line monitoring of CO2 and laboratory analysis for production of hydrogen sulfide and methane. Volatile organic compounds and permanent gases were analyzed using EPA Method TO15 by USEPA et al. [EPA Method TO15, The Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Ambient Air using SUMMA, Passivated Canister Sampling and Gas Chromatographic Analysis,1999] with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and by gas chromatography with selective detectors. These baseline measures of waste stream content, labile organics, and microbial load in the volume F Shuttle trash provide data for waste

  20. Characterization of microbial and chemical composition of shuttle wet waste with permanent gas and volatile organic compound analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, B. V.; Hummerick, M.; Roberts, M. S.; Krumins, V.; Kish, A. L.; Garland, J. L.; Maxwell, S.; Mills, A.

    2004-01-01

    Solid-waste treatment in space for Advanced Life Support, ALS, applications requires that the material can be safely processed and stored in a confined environment. Many solid-wastes are not stable because they are wet (40-90% moisture) and contain levels of soluble organic compounds that can contribute to the growth of undesirable microorganisms with concomitant production of noxious odors. In the absence of integrated Advanced Life Support systems on orbit, permanent gas, trace volatile organic and microbiological analyses were performed on crew refuse returned from the volume F "wet" trash of three consecutive Shuttle missions (STS-105, 109, and 110). These analyses were designed to characterize the short-term biological stability of the material and assess potential crew risks resulting from microbial decay processes during storage. Waste samples were collected post-orbiter landing and sorted into packaging material, food waste, toilet waste, and bulk liquid fractions deposited during flight in the volume F container. Aerobic and anaerobic microbial loads were determined in each fraction by cultivation on R2A and by acridine orange direct count (AODC). Dry and ash weights were performed to determine both water and organic content of the materials. Experiments to determine the aerobic and anaerobic biostability of refuse stored for varying periods of time were performed by on-line monitoring of CO 2 and laboratory analysis for production of hydrogen sulfide and methane. Volatile organic compounds and permanent gases were analyzed using EPA Method TO15 by USEPA et al. [EPA Method TO15, The Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Ambient Air using SUMMA, Passivated Canister Sampling and Gas Chromatographic Analysis, 1999] with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and by gas chromatography with selective detectors. These baseline measures of waste stream content, labile organics, and microbial load in the volume F Shuttle trash provide data for waste

  1. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry: online and rapid determination of volatile organic compounds of microbial origin.

    PubMed

    Romano, Andrea; Capozzi, Vittorio; Spano, Giuseppe; Biasioli, Franco

    2015-05-01

    Analytical tools for the identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by microbial cultures have countless applications in an industrial and research context which are still not fully exploited. The various techniques for VOC analysis generally arise from the application of different scientific and technological philosophies, favoring either sample throughput or chemical information. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) represents a valid compromise between the two aforementioned approaches, providing rapid and direct measurements along with highly informative analytical output. The present paper reviews the main applications of PTR-MS in the microbiological field, comprising food, environmental, and medical applications.

  2. Compound-specific Isotope Analysis of Cyanobacterial Pure cultures and Microbial Mats: Effects of Photorespiration?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Summons, R. E.

    2006-01-01

    Microbial mats are considered modern homologs of Precambrian stromatolites. The carbon isotopic compositions of organic matter and biomarker lipids provide clues to the depositional environments of ancient mat ecosystems. As the source of primary carbon fixation for over two billion years, an understanding of cyanobacterial lipid biosynthesis, associated isotopic discriminations, and the influence of physiological factors on growth and isotope expression is essential to help us compare modern microbial ecosystems to their ancient counterparts. Here, we report on the effects of photorespiration (PR) on the isotopic composition of cyanobacteria and biomarker lipids, and on potential PR effects associated with the composition of various microbial mats. The high light, high O2 and limiting CO2 conditions often present at the surface of microbial mats are known to support PR in cyanobacteria. The oxygenase function of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase can result in photoexcretion of glycolate and subsequent degration by heterotrophic bacteria. We have found evidence which supports an isotopic depletion (increased apparent E) scaled to O2 level associated with growth of Phormidium luridum at low CO2 concentrations (less than 0.04%). Similar to previous studies, isotopic differences between biomass and lipid biomarkers, and between lipid classes were positively correlated with overall fractionation, and should provide a means of estimating the influence of PR on overall isotopic composition of microbial mats. Several examples of microbial mats growing in the hydrothermal waters of Yellowstone National Park and the hypersaline marine evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja Sur Mexico will be compared with a view to PR as a possible explanation of the relatively heavy C-isotope composition of hypersaline mats.

  3. Stable soil organic carbon is positively linked to microbial-derived compounds in four plantations of subtropical China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Liu, S.; Chang, S. X.; Wang, J.; Shi, Z.; Huang, X.; Wen, Y.; Lu, L.; Cai, D.

    2013-11-01

    Indigenous broadleaf plantations are increasingly being developed to substitute pure coniferous plantations to increase biodiversity and soil fertility in subtropical China. To assess how plantation types affect soil organic carbon (SOC) chemical composition, we used the solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with cross-polarization and magic-angle spinning (CPMAS-NMR) technique to analyze SOC and litter C chemical compositions in a coniferous (Pinus massoniana) and three broadleaf (Castanopsis hystrix, Michelia macclurei and Mytilaria laosensis) plantations in subtropical China. Soil microbial community composition and biomass were investigated with the phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and chloroform fumigation-extraction methods, respectively. The SOC chemical composition varied with plantation type, with 34% of the SOC found in the alkyl C fraction in the P. massoniana plantation compared to < 28% in the broadleaf plantations. The amount of total PLFAs, bacterial and particularly the gram-positive bacterial population size, and microbial C / N ratio were correlated with the alkyl C content and alkyl C / O-alkyl C ratio. However, the soil alkyl C content was not correlated with the recalcitrance of leaf litter or fine roots. We thus suggest that the stable SOC composition could be attributable to the contribution of microbial-derived C compounds, rather than leaf litter or fine root quality or a direct flux of C from recalcitrant litter materials to more stable SOC pools.

  4. Microbially mediated phosphine emission.

    PubMed

    Roels, Joris; Huyghe, Gwen; Verstraete, Willy

    2005-02-15

    There is still a lot of controversy in literature concerning the question whether a biochemical system exists enabling micro-organisms to reduce phosphate to phosphine gas. The search for so-called 'de novo synthesised' phosphine is complicated by the fact that soils, slurries, sludges, etc., which are often used as inocula, usually contain matrix bound phosphine (MBP). Matrix bound phosphine is a general term used to indicate non-gaseous reduced phosphorus compounds that are transformed into phosphine gas upon reaction with bases or acids. A study was carried out to compare the different digestion methods, used to transform matrix bound phosphine into phosphine gas. It was demonstrated that caustic and acidic digestion methods should be used to measure the matrix bound phosphine of the inoculum prior to inoculation to avoid false positive results concerning de novo synthesis. This is especially true if anthropogenically influenced inocula possibly containing minute steel or aluminium particles are used. The comparative study on different digestion methods also revealed that the fraction of phosphorus in mild steel, converted to phosphine during acid corrosion depended on the temperature. Following these preliminary studies, anaerobic growth experiments were set up using different inocula and media to study the emission of phosphine gas. Phosphine was detected in the headspace gases and its quantity and timeframe of emission depended on the medium composition, suggesting microbially mediated formation of the gas. The amount of phosphine emitted during the growth experiments never exceeded the bound phosphine present in inocula, prior to inoculation. Hence, de novo synthesis of phosphine from phosphate could not be demonstrated. Yet, microbially mediated conversion to phosphine of hitherto unknown reduced phosphorus compounds in the inoculum was evidenced. PMID:15713333

  5. Microbial toxicity of the insensitive munitions compound, 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN), and its aromatic amine metabolites.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jidong; Olivares, Christopher; Field, Jim A; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2013-11-15

    2,4-Dinitroanisole (DNAN) is an insensitive munitions compound considered to replace conventional explosives such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). DNAN undergoes facile microbial reduction to 2-methoxy-5-nitroaniline (MENA) and 2,4-diaminoanisole (DAAN). This study investigated the inhibitory effect of DNAN, MENA, and DAAN toward various microbial targets in anaerobic (acetoclastic methanogens) and aerobic (heterotrophs and nitrifiers) sludge, and the bioluminescent bacterium, Aliivibrio fischeri, used in the Microtox assay. Aerobic heterotrophic and nitrifying batch experiments with DAAN could not be performed because the compound underwent extensive autooxidation in these assays. DNAN severely inhibited methanogens, nitrifying bacteria, and A. fischeri (50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) ranging 41-57μM), but was notably less inhibitory to aerobic heterotrophs (IC50>390 μM). Reduction of DNAN to MENA and DAAN lead to a marked decrease in methanogenic inhibition (i.e., DNAN>MENA≈DAAN). Reduction of all nitro groups in DNAN also resulted in partial detoxification in assays with A. fischeri. In contrast, reduction of a single nitro group did not alter the inhibitory impact of DNAN toward A. fischeri and nitrifying bacteria given the similar IC50 values determined for MENA and DNAN in these assays. These results indicate that reductive biotransformation could reduce the inhibitory potential of DNAN.

  6. Effects of ethanol-based fuel contamination: microbial community changes, production of regulated compounds, and methane generation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Denice K; Lapara, Timothy M; Novak, Paige J

    2010-06-15

    Ethanol-based fuels are becoming more heavily used, increasing the likelihood of ethanol-based fuel spills during transportation and storage. Although ethanol is well-known to be readily biodegradable, very little is known about the effects that such a spill might have on an indigenous microbial community. Of particular concern is that ethanol contamination could stimulate the growth of organisms that can generate regulated compounds and/or produce explosive quantities of methane gas. A column-based study was performed to elucidate the potential impacts of ethanol-based fuel (E85) on the indigenous microbial community during a simulated fuel spill. A continuous dilute supply of E85 resulted in profound shifts in both the bacterial and archaeal communities. The shift was accompanied by the production of high concentrations of volatile fatty acids and butanol, a compound that is regulated in groundwater by some states. Results also indicated that a continuous feed of dilute E85 generated explosive levels of methane within one month of column operation. Quantitative PCR data showed a statistically significant increase in methanogenic populations when compared to a control column. The elevated population numbers correlated to areas of the column receiving a sustained carbon load. Toxicity data indicated that microbial growth was completely inhibited (as evidenced by absence of ethanol breakdown products) at ethanol levels above 6% (v/v). These data suggest that ethanol from ethanol-based fuel can be readily degraded, but can also produce metabolic products that are regulated as well as explosive levels of methane. The core of an E85 spill may serve as a long-term source of contamination as it cannot be degraded until significant dilution has occurred.

  7. Determination of unique microbial volatile organic compounds produced by five Aspergillus species commonly found in problem buildings.

    PubMed

    Gao, Pengfei; Korley, Frederick; Martin, Jennifer; Chen, Bean T

    2002-01-01

    This study identified unique microbial volatile organic compounds (UMVOCs) produced by five Aspergillus species (A. fumigatus, A. versicolor, A. sydowi, A. flavus, and A. niger) cultivated on malt extract agar and gypsum board. The hypothesis was that UMVOCs can be used to predict the presence of Aspergillus species. During the cultivation humidified air was continually supplied and evenly distributed through each of the culture flasks. Volatile metabolites were collected using Tenax TA tubes on Days 8, 16, and 30 after inoculation. The volatile metabolites were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy after thermal desorption. Nine compounds recognized as UMVOCs--3-methyl-1-butanol; 2-methyl-1-propanol; terpineol; 2-heptanone; 1-octen-3-ol; dimethyl disulfide; 2-hexanone; 3-octanone; and 2-pentylfuran--were found on the cultures in detectable amounts. The first two compounds were detected at the highest frequency when combining both media. The first four compounds were found to be the dominant UMVOCs on gypsum board, which could be used as chemical markers of the common Aspergillus species grown indoors.

  8. Anaerobic subsurface soil microcosms: The effect of anthropogenic organic compounds on microbial communities

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The experiments were divided into two phases. Phase One was designed to select enzymatic activity and biomass estimation methodologies that would work well under the conditions encountered in the microcosms. Phase Two was designed to determine the effect of pollutants on the structure and activity of the indigenous microbial community by using those methods proved sensitive and efficient in Phase One. In Phase Two the microcosms were divided into three groups: control, biotic chemical, and abiotic chemical. The chemical groups received additions of three organic pollutants in varying concentrations: phenothiazine, chloronapthalene, and polychlorinated biphenyl. Microbial activity was monitored in all groups using the following enzyme assays and biomass estimates: amylase, dehydrogenase, esterase, phosphatase, protease, soil protein concentration, acridine orange direct counts, aerobic and anaerobic plate counts. Diversity indices based on gross morphology and Gram stains were computed for all plate counts. Redox potential and pH were also monitored. Significant differences were seen among groups in specific assays on specific sample dates. However, values fluctuated with time due to successional changes in the microbial consortia which made it difficult to detect changes due solely to pollutant effects.

  9. [On Atomic Nuclear Fusion Processes at Low-Temperatures. An Enhancement of the Probability of Transition through a Potential Barrier Due to the So-Called Barrier Anti-Zeno Effect].

    PubMed

    Namiot, V A

    2016-01-01

    It is known that in quantum mechanics the act of observing the experiment can affect the experimental findings in some cases. In particular, it happens under the so-called Zeno effect. In this work it is shown that in contrast to the "standard" Zeno-effect where the act of observing a process reduces the probability of its reality, an inverse situation when a particle transmits through a potential barrier (a so-called barrier anti-Zeno effect) can be observed, the observation of the particle essentially increases the probability of its transmission through the barrier. The possibility of using the barrier anti-Zeno effect is discussed to explain paradoxical results of experiments on "cold nuclear fusion" observed in various systems including biological ones. (According to the observers who performed the observations, the energy generation, which could not be explained by any chemical processes, as well as the change in the isotope and even element composition of the studied object may occur in these systems. PMID:27192844

  10. [On Atomic Nuclear Fusion Processes at Low-Temperatures. An Enhancement of the Probability of Transition through a Potential Barrier Due to the So-Called Barrier Anti-Zeno Effect].

    PubMed

    Namiot, V A

    2016-01-01

    It is known that in quantum mechanics the act of observing the experiment can affect the experimental findings in some cases. In particular, it happens under the so-called Zeno effect. In this work it is shown that in contrast to the "standard" Zeno-effect where the act of observing a process reduces the probability of its reality, an inverse situation when a particle transmits through a potential barrier (a so-called barrier anti-Zeno effect) can be observed, the observation of the particle essentially increases the probability of its transmission through the barrier. The possibility of using the barrier anti-Zeno effect is discussed to explain paradoxical results of experiments on "cold nuclear fusion" observed in various systems including biological ones. (According to the observers who performed the observations, the energy generation, which could not be explained by any chemical processes, as well as the change in the isotope and even element composition of the studied object may occur in these systems.

  11. Microbial air-sampling equipment, part 2: experiences of compounding pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Mixon, Bill; Cabaleiro, Joe; Latta, Kenneth S

    2008-01-01

    The most recent changes to Chapter 797 of the United States Pharmacopeia-National Formulary initiated an intense controversy about the frequency of cleanroom air sampling that is required to prevent the contamination of sterile preparations. For compounders who must purchase an air sampler to use in the cleanroom, choices abound. This article summarizes discussions from compounding pharmacists and their experiences with air sampling devices.

  12. Engineering Microbial Cells for the Biosynthesis of Natural Compounds of Pharmaceutical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Jeandet, Philippe; Vasserot, Yann; Chastang, Thomas; Courot, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Microbes constitute important platforms for the biosynthesis of numerous molecules of pharmaceutical interest such as antitumor, anticancer, antiviral, antihypertensive, antiparasitic, antioxidant, immunological agents, and antibiotics as well as hormones, belonging to various chemical families, for instance, terpenoids, alkaloids, polyphenols, polyketides, amines, and proteins. Engineering microbial factories offers rich opportunities for the production of natural products that are too complex for cost-effective chemical synthesis and whose extraction from their originating plants needs the use of many solvents. Recent progresses that have been made since the millennium beginning with metabolic engineering of microorganisms for the biosynthesis of natural products of pharmaceutical significance will be reviewed. PMID:23710459

  13. Microbial communities and transformation of carbon compounds in bog soils of the taiga zone (Tomsk oblast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodnitskaya, I. D.; Trusova, M. Yu.

    2009-09-01

    Two types of bogs were studied in Tomsk oblast—Maloe Zhukovskoe (an eutrophic peat low-moor bog) and Ozernoe (an oligotrophic peat high-moor bog). The gram-negative forms of Proteobacteria were found to be dominant and amounted to more than 40% of the total population of the microorganisms investigated. In the peat bogs, the population and diversity of the hydrolytic microbial complex, especially of the number of micromycetes, were lower than those in the mineral soils. The changes in the quantitative indices of the total microbiological activity of the bogs were established. The microbial biomass and the intensity of its respiration differed and were also related to the depth of the sampling. In the Zhukovskoe peat low-moor bog, the maximal biomass of heterotrophic microorganisms (154 μg of C/g of peat) was found in the aerobic zone at a depth of 0 to 10 cm. In the Ozernoe bog, the maximal biomass was determined in the zone of anaerobiosis at a depth of 300 cm (1947 μ g of C/g of peat). The molecular-genetic method was used for the determination of the spectrum of the methanogens. Seven unidentified dominant forms were revealed. The species diversity of the methanogens was higher in the oligotrophic high-moor bog than in the eutrophic low-moor bog.

  14. Performance evaluation of a continuous-flow bioanode microbial electrolysis cell fed with furanic and phenolic compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Pavlostathis, Spyros G.

    2016-07-04

    Furanic and phenolic compounds, formed during the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass, are problematic byproducts in down-stream biofuel processes. A microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) is an alternative technology to handle furanic and phenolic compounds and produce renewable hydrogen (H2). In this study, we evaluated the performance of a continuous-flow bioanode MEC fed with furanic and phenolic compounds at different operating conditions. All hydraulic retention times (HRTs) tested (6-24 h) resulted in complete transformation of the parent compounds at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 0.2g L-1 per d and applied voltage of 0.6 V. Increasing the OLR to 0.8 g L-1more » per d at an HRT of 6h resulted in an increased H2 production rate from 0.07 to 0.14 L Lanode 1 per d, but an OLR of 3.2 g L-1 per d did not lead to a higher H2 production rate. Significant methane production was observed at an OLR of 3.2 g L-1 per d. The lack of increased H2 production at the highest OLR tested was due to a limited rate of exoelectrogenesis but not fermentation, evidenced by the accumulation of high acetate levels and higher growth of fermenters and methanogens over exoelectrogens. Increasing applied voltage from 0.6 to 1.0V at an OLR of 3.2 g L-1 per d and HRT of 6h enhanced exoelectrogenesis and resulted in a 1.7-fold increase of H2 production. Under all operating conditions, more than 90% of the biomass was biofilm-associated. Lastly, the present study provides new insights into the performance of continuous-flow bioelectrochemical systems fed with complex waste streams resulting from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass.« less

  15. Comparison of the morphology of alkali–silica gel formed in limestones in concrete affected by the so-called alkali–carbonate reaction (ACR) and alkali–silica reaction (ASR)

    SciTech Connect

    Grattan-Bellew, P.E.; Chan, Gordon

    2013-05-15

    The morphology of alkali–silica gel formed in dolomitic limestone affected by the so-called alkali–carbonate reaction (ACR) is compared to that formed in a siliceous limestone affected by alkali–silica reaction (ASR). The particle of dolomitic limestone was extracted from the experimental sidewalk in Kingston, Ontario, Canada that was badly cracked due to ACR. The siliceous limestone particle was extracted from a core taken from a highway structure in Quebec, affected by ASR. Both cores exhibited marked reaction rims around limestone particles. The aggregate particles were polished and given a light gold coating in preparation for examination in a scanning electron microscope. The gel in the ACR aggregate formed stringers between the calcite crystals in the matrix of the rock, whereas gel in ASR concrete formed a thick layer on top of the calcite crystals, that are of the same size as in the ACR aggregate.

  16. [Four cases of pulmonary tuberculosis resembling pulmonary abscess with a so-called niveau-like shadow in a medical school hospital: discussion concerning the formation mechanism of niveau-like shadows].

    PubMed

    Kobashi, Y; Niki, Y; Kawane, H; Matsushima, T

    1996-04-01

    Four cases of pulmonary tuberculosis resembling pulmonary abscess radiographically were reviewed from their clinical features, chest X-ray and chest CT, and the mechanism of formation of so-called niveau-like shadows was discussed. Only one case showed a newly formed tuberculous cavity with air fluid level on chest X-ray, however, even in this case, the possibility of the infection with tubercle bacilli of an emphysematous bulla of the lung could not be completely excluded as several bulla were found on chest CT. The remaining three cases showed a slightly different mechanism of the formation of niveau-like shadows. Namely, mycobacterium tuberculosis spread into an existed bulla and a tubercle bacilli infected bulla was formed. Regarding the clinical features, no remarkable findings were detected and we could find no differences with common tuberculosis. Based on these experiences, the presence of pulmonary tuberculosis resembling the shadow of pulmonary abscess should be emphasized. PMID:8683908

  17. Effect of sweating set rate on clothing real evaporative resistance determined on a sweating thermal manikin in a so-called isothermal condition (T manikin = T a = T r).

    PubMed

    Lu, Yehu; Wang, Faming; Peng, Hui; Shi, Wen; Song, Guowen

    2016-04-01

    The ASTM F2370 (2010) is the only standard with regard to measurement of clothing real evaporative resistance by means of a sweating manikin. However, the sweating set-point is not recommended in the standard. In this study, the effect of sweating rate on clothing real evaporative resistance was investigated on a 34-zone "Newton" sweating thermal manikin in a so-called isothermal condition (T manikin = T a = T r). Four different sweating set rates (i.e., all segments had a sweating rate of 400, 800, 1200 ml/hr ∙ m(2), respectively, and different sweating rates were assigned to different segments) were applied to determine the clothing real evaporative resistance of five clothing ensembles and the boundary air layer. The results indicated that the sweating rate did not affect the real evaporative resistance of clothing ensembles with the absence of strong moisture absorbent layers. For the clothing ensemble with tight cotton underwear, a sweating rate of lower than 400 ml/hr ∙ m(2) is not recommended. This is mainly because the wet fabric "skin" might not be fully saturated and thus led to a lower evaporative heat loss and thereby a higher real evaporative resistance. For vapor permeable clothing, the real evaporative resistance determined in the so-called isothermal condition should be corrected before being used in thermal comfort or heat strain models. However, the reduction of wet thermal insulation due to moisture absorption in different test scenarios had a limited contribution to the effect of sweating rate on the real evaporative resistance. PMID:26150329

  18. Effect of sweating set rate on clothing real evaporative resistance determined on a sweating thermal manikin in a so-called isothermal condition (T manikin = T a = T r).

    PubMed

    Lu, Yehu; Wang, Faming; Peng, Hui; Shi, Wen; Song, Guowen

    2016-04-01

    The ASTM F2370 (2010) is the only standard with regard to measurement of clothing real evaporative resistance by means of a sweating manikin. However, the sweating set-point is not recommended in the standard. In this study, the effect of sweating rate on clothing real evaporative resistance was investigated on a 34-zone "Newton" sweating thermal manikin in a so-called isothermal condition (T manikin = T a = T r). Four different sweating set rates (i.e., all segments had a sweating rate of 400, 800, 1200 ml/hr ∙ m(2), respectively, and different sweating rates were assigned to different segments) were applied to determine the clothing real evaporative resistance of five clothing ensembles and the boundary air layer. The results indicated that the sweating rate did not affect the real evaporative resistance of clothing ensembles with the absence of strong moisture absorbent layers. For the clothing ensemble with tight cotton underwear, a sweating rate of lower than 400 ml/hr ∙ m(2) is not recommended. This is mainly because the wet fabric "skin" might not be fully saturated and thus led to a lower evaporative heat loss and thereby a higher real evaporative resistance. For vapor permeable clothing, the real evaporative resistance determined in the so-called isothermal condition should be corrected before being used in thermal comfort or heat strain models. However, the reduction of wet thermal insulation due to moisture absorption in different test scenarios had a limited contribution to the effect of sweating rate on the real evaporative resistance.

  19. Effect of sweating set rate on clothing real evaporative resistance determined on a sweating thermal manikin in a so-called isothermal condition ( T manikin = T a = T r)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yehu; Wang, Faming; Peng, Hui; Shi, Wen; Song, Guowen

    2016-04-01

    The ASTM F2370 (2010) is the only standard with regard to measurement of clothing real evaporative resistance by means of a sweating manikin. However, the sweating set-point is not recommended in the standard. In this study, the effect of sweating rate on clothing real evaporative resistance was investigated on a 34-zone "Newton" sweating thermal manikin in a so-called isothermal condition ( T manikin = T a = T r). Four different sweating set rates (i.e., all segments had a sweating rate of 400, 800, 1200 ml/hr•m2, respectively, and different sweating rates were assigned to different segments) were applied to determine the clothing real evaporative resistance of five clothing ensembles and the boundary air layer. The results indicated that the sweating rate did not affect the real evaporative resistance of clothing ensembles with the absence of strong moisture absorbent layers. For the clothing ensemble with tight cotton underwear, a sweating rate of lower than 400 ml/hr•m2 is not recommended. This is mainly because the wet fabric "skin" might not be fully saturated and thus led to a lower evaporative heat loss and thereby a higher real evaporative resistance. For vapor permeable clothing, the real evaporative resistance determined in the so-called isothermal condition should be corrected before being used in thermal comfort or heat strain models. However, the reduction of wet thermal insulation due to moisture absorption in different test scenarios had a limited contribution to the effect of sweating rate on the real evaporative resistance.

  20. Formation and emission of volatile polonium compound by microbial activity and polonium methylation with methylcobalamin.

    PubMed

    Momoshima, N; Song, L X; Osaki, S; Maeda, Y

    2001-07-15

    We observed biologically mediated emission of Po from culture solution inoculated sea sediment extract and incubated under natural light/dark cycle condition or dark condition the emitted Po compound would be lipophilic because of effective collection in organic solvent. Sterilization of the culture medium with antibiotics or CuSO4 completely suppressed growth of microorganisms and resulted in no emission of Po, indicating biological activity of microorganisms is responsible for formation and emission of volatile Po compound. Po emission also occurred when seawater was used as a culture medium. Our finding indicates a possibility of biotic source for atmospheric Po in the environment, which has been believed to be originated from abiotic sources. We compared emission behavior of Po and S in the culture experiments, the elements belong to XVI group in the Periodical Table, and consider that their emission mechanisms involved would be different though the emission of both elements is supported by biological activity of microorganisms. One of the chemical forms of S emitted was confirmed to be dimethyl sulfide (DMS) but that of Po is not known. Methylation experiments of Po with methylcobalamin demonstrated a formation and emission of volatile Po compound. The methylation of Po with methylcobalamin might be related to the observed Po emission in the culture experiments.

  1. Microbial utilization of sugars in soil assessed by position-specific labeling and compound-specific 13C-PLFA-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostel, Carolin; Dippold, Michaela; Glaser, Bruno; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    For the transformation of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) in soil, which is an important process in the turnover of organic matter, microbial utilization is one of the most important processes. Position-specific labeling combined with compound-specific 13C-PLFA-analysis allows a closer look on the mechanisms of LMWOS transformation in soil. We assessed short- (3 and 10 days) and long-term (half year) transformations of monosaccharides by adding position-specifically 13C labeled glucose and ribose to soil in a field experiment conducted on an agriculturally used luvisol located in north-western Bavaria. We quantified the microbial utilization of the different functional groups by 13C-analysis of microbial biomass with the chloroform-fumigation-extraction method (CFE). 13C-PLFA analysis enabled us to distinguish individual microbial groups and compare their C-utilization. Preferential degradation of glucoses C-3 and C-4 respectively C-1 position enabled differentiation between the two main hexose metabolic pathways - glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway. Microbial groups revealed different incorporation of specific C positions into their PLFA. The highest incorporation was reached by the prokaryotic gram- negative groups. The application of position-specifically labeled substances, coupled with compound-specific 13C-PLFA analysis opens a new way to investigate the microbial transformations of LMWOS in soil. Observing single C atoms and their utilization by specific microbial groups allow conclusions about the mechanisms and kinetics of microbial utilization and interaction between these groups and therefore will improve our understanding of soil carbon fluxes.

  2. Methanogenic degradation of lignin-derived monoaromatic compounds by microbial enrichments from rice paddy field soil

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Souichiro; Chino, Kanako; Kamimura, Naofumi; Masai, Eiji; Yumoto, Isao; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic degradation of lignin-derived aromatics is an important metabolism for carbon and nutrient cycles in soil environments. Although there are some studies on degradation of lignin-derived aromatics by nitrate- and sulfate-reducing bacteria, knowledge on their degradation under methanogenic conditions are quite limited. In this study, methanogenic microbial communities were enriched from rice paddy field soil with lignin-derived methoxylated monoaromatics (vanillate and syringate) and their degradation intermediates (protocatechuate, catechol, and gallate) as the sole carbon and energy sources. Archaeal community analysis disclosed that both aceticlastic (Methanosarcina sp.) and hydrogenotrophic (Methanoculleus sp. and Methanocella sp.) methanogens dominated in all of the enrichments. Bacterial community analysis revealed the dominance of acetogenic bacteria (Sporomusa spp.) only in the enrichments on the methoxylated aromatics, suggesting that Sporomusa spp. initially convert vanillate and syringate into protocatechuate and gallate, respectively, with acetogenesis via O-demethylation. As the putative ring-cleavage microbes, bacteria within the phylum Firmicutes were dominantly detected from all of the enrichments, while the dominant phylotypes were not identical between enrichments on vanillate/protocatechuate/catechol (family Peptococcaceae bacteria) and on syringate/gallate (family Ruminococcaceae bacteria). This study demonstrates the importance of cooperation among acetogens, ring-cleaving fermenters/syntrophs and aceticlastic/hydrogenotrophic methanogens for degradation of lignin-derived aromatics under methanogenic conditions. PMID:26399549

  3. Heterotrophic activity and biodegradation of labile and refractory compounds by groundwater and stream microbial populations.

    PubMed Central

    Ladd, T I; Ventullo, R M; Wallis, P M; Costerton, J W

    1982-01-01

    The bacteriology and heterotrophic activity of a stream and of nearby groundwater in Marmot Basin, Alberta, Canada, were studied. Acridine orange direct counts indicated that bacterial populations in the groundwater were greater than in the stream. Bacteria that were isolated from the groundwater were similar to species associated with soils. Utilization of labile dissolved organic material as measured by the heterotrophic potential technique with glutamic acid, phenylalanine, and glycolic acid as substrates was generally greater in the groundwater. In addition, specific activity indices for the populations suggested greater metabolic activity per bacterium in the groundwater. 14C-labeled lignocellulose, preferentially labeled in the lignin fraction by feeding Picea engelmannii [14C]phenylalanine, was mineralized by microorganisms in both the groundwater and the stream, but no more than 4% of the added radioactivity was lost as 14CO2 within 960 h. Up to 20% of [3'-14C]cinnamic acid was mineralized by microorganisms in both environments within 500 h. Both microbial populations appear to influence the levels of labile and recalcitrant dissolved organic material in mountain streams. PMID:7125651

  4. Characterization of soluble microbial products (SMPs) in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) treating synthetic wastewater containing pharmaceutical compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongqing; Trzcinski, Antoine Prandota; Kunacheva, Chinagarn; Stuckey, David C; Liu, Yu; Tan, Soon Keat; Ng, Wun Jern

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the behaviour and characteristics of soluble microbial products (SMP) in two anoxic-aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs): MBRcontrol and MBRpharma, for treating municipal wastewater. Both protein and polysaccharides measured exhibited higher concentrations in the MBRpharma than the MBRcontrol. Molecular weight (MW) distribution analysis revealed that the presence of pharmaceuticals enhanced the accumulation of SMPs with macro- (13,091 kDa and 1587 kDa) and intermediate-MW (189 kDa) compounds in the anoxic MBRpharma, while a substantial decrease was observed in both MBR effluents. Excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence contours indicated that the exposure to pharmaceuticals seemed to stimulate the production of aromatic proteins containing tyrosine (10.1-32.6%) and tryptophan (14.7-43.1%), compared to MBRcontrol (9.9-29.1% for tyrosine; 11.8-42.5% for tryptophan). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed aromatics, long-chain alkanes and esters were the predominant SMPs in the MBRs. More peaks were present in the aerobic MBRpharma (196) than anoxic MBRpharma (133). The SMPs identified exhibited both biodegradability and recalcitrance in the MBR treatment processes. Only 8 compounds in the MBRpharma were the same as in the MBRcontrol. Alkanes were the most dominant SMPs (51%) in the MBRcontrol, while aromatics were dominant (40%) in the MBRpharma. A significant decrease in aromatics (from 16 to 7) in the MBRpharma permeate was observed, compared to the aerobic MBRpharma. Approximately 21% of compounds in the aerobic MBRcontrol were rejected by membrane filtration, while this increased to 28% in the MBRpharma. PMID:27479293

  5. Anti microbial and anti-oxidant properties of the isolated compounds from the methanolic extract from the leaves of Tectona grandis

    PubMed Central

    Nayeem, Naira; Karvekar, MD

    2011-01-01

    The compounds Gallic acid (GA), rutin(R), quercitin (Q), ellagic acid (EA) and sitosterol(S) were isolated from the methanolic extract of the leaves of Tectona grandis. These compounds were subjected to antimicrobial and antioxidant activity. The zone of inhibition of isolated compounds was evaluated by cup plate method against bacteria i.e. Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Eschericia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and fungi Candida albicans. The anti oxidant activity of the extract and the isolated compounds were evaluated by using 1, 1-Diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH). Rutin has shown significant anti microbial activity against both the gram positive and gram negative bacteria when compared to the other compounds. The results of the anti oxidant activity revealed that quercitin showed good activity followed by rutin gallic acid, ellagic acid and sitosterol. The difference in both these activities of the isolated compounds was attributed to the number and position of the phenolic OH groups PMID:24826018

  6. Nature of Phosphorus Compounds Fueling Microbial Life in Deep-Sea Sediments at North Pond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defforey, D.; Paytan, A.

    2012-12-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient that can be limiting in some environments. Despite its critical importance for life, many components of its cycle, including phosphorus uptake and cycling in deep-sea sediments, remain unclear. Understanding phosphorus cycling in open ocean sediments is crucial, since a significant portion of Earth's prokaryotes thrives in this environment. However, little is known about the nature of phosphorus compounds these microorganisms are taking up or the mechanisms used. This study aims to identify the specific phosphorus forms within the labile and refractory sedimentary phosphorus pools that "fuel" the deep biosphere at North Pond, an isolated sediment pond on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic ridge. Sediment samples were collected from four boreholes drilled during the IODP expedition 336. Sedimentary phosphorus compounds are characterized using sequential extractions (SEDEX), which separate them into distinct reservoirs. In addition, solution phase 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to further characterize phosphorus forms. We hypothesize that phosphorus in deep sub-seafloor sediments has low bioavailability and is mainly present in mineral phases.

  7. The Impact of Proteolytic Pork Hydrolysate on Microbial, Flavor and Free Amino Acids Compounds of Yogurt.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinzhong; Hua, Baozhen; Xu, Zhiping; Li, Sha; Ma, Chengjie

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of proteolytic pork hydrolysate (PPH) on yoghurt production by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. Fresh lean pork was cut into pieces and mixed with deionized water and dealt with protease, then the resulting PPH was added to milk to investigate the effects of PPH on yoghurt production. The fermentation time, the viable cell counts, the flavor, free amino acids compounds, and sensory evaluation of yoghurt were evaluated. These results showed that PPH significantly stimulated the growth and acidification of the both bacterial strains. When the content of PPH reached 5% (w/w), the increased acidifying rate occurred, which the fermentation time was one hour less than that of the control, a time saving of up to 20% compared with the control. The viable cell counts, the total free amino acids, and the scores of taste, flavor and overall acceptability in PPH-supplemented yoghurt were higher than the control. Furthermore, the contents of some characteristic flavor compounds including acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and esters were richer than the control. We concluded that the constituents of PPH such as small peptide, vitamins, and minerals together to play the stimulatory roles and result in beneficial effect for the yoghurt starter cultures growth. PMID:27621698

  8. RobOKoD: microbial strain design for (over)production of target compounds

    PubMed Central

    Stanford, Natalie J.; Millard, Pierre; Swainston, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable production of target compounds such as biofuels and high-value chemicals for pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and chemical industries is becoming an increasing priority given their current dependency upon diminishing petrochemical resources. Designing these strains is difficult, with current methods focusing primarily on knocking-out genes, dismissing other vital steps of strain design including the overexpression and dampening of genes. The design predictions from current methods also do not translate well-into successful strains in the laboratory. Here, we introduce RobOKoD (Robust, Overexpression, Knockout and Dampening), a method for predicting strain designs for overproduction of targets. The method uses flux variability analysis to profile each reaction within the system under differing production percentages of target-compound and biomass. Using these profiles, reactions are identified as potential knockout, overexpression, or dampening targets. The identified reactions are ranked according to their suitability, providing flexibility in strain design for users. The software was tested by designing a butanol-producing Escherichia coli strain, and was compared against the popular OptKnock and RobustKnock methods. RobOKoD shows favorable design predictions, when predictions from these methods are compared to a successful butanol-producing experimentally-validated strain. Overall RobOKoD provides users with rankings of predicted beneficial genetic interventions with which to support optimized strain design. PMID:25853130

  9. The Impact of Proteolytic Pork Hydrolysate on Microbial, Flavor and Free Amino Acids Compounds of Yogurt

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jinzhong; Hua, Baozhen; Xu, Zhiping; Li, Sha; Ma, Chengjie

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of proteolytic pork hydrolysate (PPH) on yoghurt production by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. Fresh lean pork was cut into pieces and mixed with deionized water and dealt with protease, then the resulting PPH was added to milk to investigate the effects of PPH on yoghurt production. The fermentation time, the viable cell counts, the flavor, free amino acids compounds, and sensory evaluation of yoghurt were evaluated. These results showed that PPH significantly stimulated the growth and acidification of the both bacterial strains. When the content of PPH reached 5% (w/w), the increased acidifying rate occurred, which the fermentation time was one hour less than that of the control, a time saving of up to 20% compared with the control. The viable cell counts, the total free amino acids, and the scores of taste, flavor and overall acceptability in PPH-supplemented yoghurt were higher than the control. Furthermore, the contents of some characteristic flavor compounds including acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and esters were richer than the control. We concluded that the constituents of PPH such as small peptide, vitamins, and minerals together to play the stimulatory roles and result in beneficial effect for the yoghurt starter cultures growth.

  10. The Impact of Proteolytic Pork Hydrolysate on Microbial, Flavor and Free Amino Acids Compounds of Yogurt

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jinzhong; Hua, Baozhen; Xu, Zhiping; Li, Sha; Ma, Chengjie

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of proteolytic pork hydrolysate (PPH) on yoghurt production by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. Fresh lean pork was cut into pieces and mixed with deionized water and dealt with protease, then the resulting PPH was added to milk to investigate the effects of PPH on yoghurt production. The fermentation time, the viable cell counts, the flavor, free amino acids compounds, and sensory evaluation of yoghurt were evaluated. These results showed that PPH significantly stimulated the growth and acidification of the both bacterial strains. When the content of PPH reached 5% (w/w), the increased acidifying rate occurred, which the fermentation time was one hour less than that of the control, a time saving of up to 20% compared with the control. The viable cell counts, the total free amino acids, and the scores of taste, flavor and overall acceptability in PPH-supplemented yoghurt were higher than the control. Furthermore, the contents of some characteristic flavor compounds including acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and esters were richer than the control. We concluded that the constituents of PPH such as small peptide, vitamins, and minerals together to play the stimulatory roles and result in beneficial effect for the yoghurt starter cultures growth. PMID:27621698

  11. Microbial conversion of glycerol to 1,3-propanediol and related compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, D.C.; Held, A.M.; Zhu, Mei-Ying

    1995-12-01

    Glycerol is a co-product of the conversion of vegetable oils and animal fats to soap, fatty acids, fatty acid esters and biodiesel fuel. We have investigated the use of both native and recombinant microorganisms for the conversion of glycerol to more valuable products. Fed-batch fermentations of glycerol by Klebsiella pneumoniae gave over 50 g/L of 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD, trimethylene glycol) with high volumetric productivity. Escherichia coli containing genes for glycerol dehydratase and 1,3-PD oxidoreductase from K. pneumoniae also gave 1,3-PD from glycerol, but at a lower level than the native organism. Experiments with the recombinant E. coli have provided insights into ways to improve 1,3-PD production in both the recombinant and native organism and to modify the pathway for the production of compounds such as 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde and dihydroxyacetone.

  12. Bioactive compounds produced by gut microbial tannase: implications for colorectal cancer development

    PubMed Central

    López de Felipe, Félix; de las Rivas, Blanca; Muñoz, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    The microorganisms in the human gastrointestinal tract have a profound influence on the transformation of food into metabolites which can impact human health. Gallic acid (GA) and pyrogallol (PG) are bioactive compounds displaying diverse biological properties, including carcinogenic inhibiting activities. However, its concentration in fruits and vegetables is generally low. These metabolites can be also generated as final products of tannin metabolism by microbes endowed with tannase, which opens up the possibility of their anti-cancer potential being increased. Patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) display an imbalanced gut microbiota respect to healthy population. The recent use of next generation sequencing technologies has greatly improved knowledge of the identity of bacterial species that colonize non-tumorous and tumorous tissues of CRC patients. This information provides a unique opportunity to shed light on the role played by gut microorganisms in the different stages of this disease. We here review the recently published gut microbiome associated to CRC patients and highlight tannase as an underlying gene function of bacterial species that selectively colonize tumorous tissues, but not adjacent non-malignant tissues. Given the anti-carcinogenic roles of GA and PG produced by gut tannin-degrading bacteria, we provide an overview of the possible consequences of this intriguing coincidence for CRC development. PMID:25538697

  13. In situ stimulation vs. bioaugmentation: Can microbial inoculation of plant roots enhance biodegradation of organic compounds?

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsley, M.T.; Metting, F.B. Jr.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Seidler, R.J.

    1993-06-01

    The use of plant roots and their associated rhizosphere bacteria for biocontainment and biorestoration offers several advantages for treating soil-dispersed contaminants and for application to large land areas. Plant roots function as effective delivery systems, since root growth transports bacteria vertically and laterally along the root in the soil column (see [ 1,2]). Movement of microbes along roots and downward in the soil column can be enhanced via irrigation [1-4]. For example, Ciafardini et al. [3] increased the nodulation and the final yield of soybeans during pod filling by including Bradyrhizobium japonicum in the irrigation water. Using rhizosphere microorganisms is advantageous for biodegradation of compounds that are degraded mainly by cometabolic processes, e.g., trichloroethylene (TCE). The energy source for bacterial growth and metabolism is supplied by the plant in the form of root exudates and other sloughed organic material. Plants are inexpensive, and by careful choice of species that possess either tap or fibrous root growth patterns, they can be used to influence mass transport of soil contaminants to the root surface via the transpiration stream [5]. Cropping of plants to remove heavy metals from contaminated soils has been proposed as a viable, low-cost, low-input treatment option [6]. The interest in use of plants as a remediation strategy has even reached the popular press [7], where the use of ragweed for the reclamation of sites contaminated with tetraethyl lead and other heavy metals was discussed.

  14. Inhibition of microbial growth by ajoene, a sulfur-containing compound derived from garlic.

    PubMed

    Naganawa, R; Iwata, N; Ishikawa, K; Fukuda, H; Fujino, T; Suzuki, A

    1996-11-01

    Ajoene, a garlic-derived sulfur-containing compound that prevents platelet aggregation, exhibited broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. Growth of gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Mycobacterium smegmatis, and Streptomyces griseus, was inhibited at 5 micrograms of ajoene per ml. Staphylococcus aureus and Lactobacillus plantarum also were inhibited below 20 micrograms of ajoene per ml. For gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Xanthomonas maltophilia, MICs were between 100 and 160 micrograms/ml. Ajoene also inhibited yeast growth at concentrations below 20 micrograms/ml. The microbicidal effect of ajoene on growing cells was observed at slightly higher concentrations than the corresponding MICs. B. cereus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were killed at 30 micrograms of ajoene per ml after 24 h of cultivation when cultivation was started at 10(5) cells per ml. However, the minimal microbicidal concentrations for resting cells were at 10 to 100 times higher concentrations than the corresponding MICs. The disulfide bond in ajoene appears to be necessary for the antimicrobial activity of ajoene, since reduction by cysteine, which reacts with disulfide bonds, abolished its antimicrobial activity.

  15. Bioprocess design for the microbial production of natural phenolic compounds by Debaryomyces hansenii.

    PubMed

    Max, Belén; Tugores, Francisco; Cortés-Diéguez, Sandra; Domínguez, José M

    2012-12-01

    Debaryomyces hansenii NRRL Y-7426 metabolised ferulic acid into different phenolic compounds using a factorial design where glucose concentration (in the range of 1-20 g/L), peptone concentration (2-20 g/L) and yeast extract concentration (0.2-10 g/L) were the independent variables. The interrelationship between dependent and operational variables was well fitted (R (2) > 0.95) to models including linear, interaction and quadratic terms. Depending on the glucose and nitrogen concentrations, which redirected the metabolism, the major degradation products were 1,226.2 mg 4-vinyl guaiacol/L after 72 h (molar yield of 86.0 %), 1,077.8 mg vanillic acid/L after 360 h (molar yield of 91.1 %) or 1,682.6 mg acetovanillone/L after 408 h (molar yield of 98.8 %) in fermentations carried out with 2,000 mg ferulic acid/L. Other metabolites such as vanillin, vanillyl alcohol or 4-ethylguaiacol were present in lower amounts. PMID:23076573

  16. [So-called initial description of phantom pain by Ambroise Paré. "Chose digne d'admiration et quasi incredible": the "douleur ès parties mortes et amputées"].

    PubMed

    Keil, G

    1990-02-10

    In his (1552 (1554?) "Harquebusses and other guns" tractate the French surgeon, Ambroise Paré (1510-1590) described the post-amputation syndrome-considered to be the first description of this syndrome--which, on hermaneutic analysis, proves surprisingly complete: Paré differentiated pre-amputation pain ("la douleur ès parties mortes") from post-operative symptoms; he differentiated stump pain from phantom-limb sensations ("faux sentiments"), and he succeeded in distinguishing pain-free exteroceptive sensations--the so-called phantom-limb sensation--from phantom-limb pain proper ("la douleur ès parties amputées"). He characterised the psychogenic pain syndrome ("se plaigner fort"), described protracted, intermittent and delayed courses, as also exogenous modulating factors which--e.g. the weather ("les causes froides")--exacerbate the situation, or--e.g. massage--can also ameliorate it. Furthermore, he made use of psychological factors to combat pain, and rejected the use of multiple peripheral surgery to treat pain. He proposed two neurological models to explain the etiology of phantom-limb pain, one postulating peripheral changes in stump nerves, the other, involving memory, suggesting a cerebral origin, and locating algogenesis in the brain.

  17. From microbial biomass compounds to non-living soil organic matter - Microbial biomass as a significant source for soil organic matter formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miltner, A.; Kindler, R.; Hoffmann-Jäniche, C.; Schmidt-Brücken, B.; Kästner, M.

    2009-04-01

    Soil organic matter is one of the most important pools of the global carbon cycle. Recently, it has been suggested that microbial biomass is a significant source for the formation of refractory organic matter. We tested the relevance of this source by incubation of soil with 13C-labeled Escherichia coli cells. We traced the labeled carbon in fatty acids and amino acids, both in the microbial biomass and in the bulk soil. We also localized cells and their debris by scanning electron microscopy. Although we could not detect any living cells after 100 days, about 50% of the carbon remained in the soil after 224 days. The amount of label in the fatty acids indicated that microbial lipids were degraded faster than the bulk microbial biomass. Their labeling pattern showed that they were redistributed from E. coli to the microbial food web and from the living biomass to non-living soil organic matter. In contrast, the label in the total amino acids did not decrease significantly during incubation. Proteins are thus surprisingly stable in soil, but they also shifted from microbial biomass to non-living soil organic matter. The scanning electron micrographs showed only isolated intact microbial cells in our soil, but patches of organic material of unknown origin which are about 20 - 50 nm2 in size were quite abundant. Dying microbial cells therefore are a significant carbon source for the formation of refractory organic material, but the morphology of the cells changes during degradation, as cell structures cannot be found frequently in soils.

  18. Pellitorine, a potential anti-cancer lead compound against HL6 and MCT-7 cell lines and microbial transformation of piperine from Piper Nigrum.

    PubMed

    Ee, Gwendoline Cheng Lian; Lim, Chyi Meei; Rahmani, Mawardi; Shaari, Khozirah; Bong, Choon Fah Joseph

    2010-04-05

    Pellitorine (1), which was isolated from the roots of Piper nigrum, showed strong cytotoxic activities against HL60 and MCT-7 cell lines. Microbial transformation of piperine (2) gave a new compound 5-[3,4-(methylenedioxy)phenyl]-pent-2-ene piperidine (3). Two other alkaloids were also found from Piper nigrum. They are (E)-1-[3',4'-(methylenedioxy)cinnamoyl]piperidine (4) and 2,4-tetradecadienoic acid isobutyl amide (5). These compounds were isolated using chromatographic methods and their structures were elucidated using MS, IR and NMR techniques.

  19. Characterization of Crew Refuse Returned from Shuttle Missions with Permanent Gas, Volatile Organic Compound, and Microbial Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, B.; Hummerick, M.; Roberts, M.; Krummins, V.; Kish, A.; Garland, J.; Maxwell, S.; Mills, A.

    In addition to the mass and energy costs associated with bioregenerative systems for advanced life support, the storage and processing of waste on spacecraft requires both atmospheric and biological management. Risks to crew health may arise from the presence of potential human pathogens in waste or from decay processes during waste storage and/or processing. This study reports on the permanent gas, trace volatile organic and microbiological analyses of crew refuse returned from shuttle missions STS-105, 109 and 110. The research objective is to characterize the biological stability of the waste stream, to assess the risks associated with its storage, and to provide baseline measures for the evaluation of waste processing technologies. Microbiological samples were collected from packaging material, food waste, bathroom waste, and bulk liquid collected from the volume F waste container. The number of culturable bacteria and total bacteria were determined by plating on R2A media and by Acridine Orange direct count, respectively. Samples of the trash were analyzed for the presence of fecal and total coliforms and other human-associated bacteria. Dry and ash weights were determined to estimate both water and organic content of the materials. The aerobic and anaerobic bio-stability of stored waste was determined by on-line monitoring of CO2 and by laboratory analysis of off-gas samples for hydrogen sulfide and methane. Volatile organic compounds and permanent gases were analyzed using EPA method TO15 with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and by gas chromatography with selective detectors . This study establishes a baseline measure of waste composition, labile organics, and microbial load for this material.

  20. Effect of Mineral and Organic Soil Constituents on Microbial Mineralization of Organic Compounds in a Natural Soil †

    PubMed Central

    Knaebel, David B.; Federle, Thomas W.; McAvoy, Drew C.; Vestal, J. Robie

    1994-01-01

    This research addressed the effect of mineral and organic soil constituents on the fate of organic compounds in soils. Specifically, it sought to determine how the associations between organic chemicals and different soil constituents affect their subsequent biodegradation in soil. Four 14C-labeled surfactants were aseptically adsorbed to montmorillonite, kaolinite, illite, sand, and humic acids. These complexes were mixed with a woodlot soil, and 14CO2 production was measured over time. The mineralization data were fitted to various production models by nonlinear regression, and a mixed (3/2)-order model was found to most accurately describe the mineralization patterns. Different mineralization patterns were observed as a function of the chemical and soil constituents. Surfactants that had been preadsorbed to sand or kaolinite usually showed similar mineralization kinetics to the control treatments, in which the surfactants were added to the soil as an aqueous solution. Surfactants that had been bound to illite or montmorillonite were typically degraded to lesser extents than the other forms, while surfactant-humic acid complexes were degraded more slowly than the other forms. The desorption coefficients (Kd) of the soil constituent-bound surfactants were negatively correlated with the initial rates of degradation (k1) and estimates of 14CO2 yield (Po) as well as actual total yields of 14CO2. However, there was no relationship between Kd and second-stage zero-order rates of mineralization (ko). Microbial community characteristics (biomass and activity) were not correlated with any of the mineralization kinetic parameters. Overall, this study showed that environmental form had a profound effect on the ultimate fate of biodegradable chemicals in soil. This form is defined by the physicochemical characteristics of the chemical, the composition and mineralogy of the soil, and the mode of entry of the chemical into the soil environment. PMID:16349465

  1. Identification of chlorinated solvents degradation zones in clay till by high resolution chemical, microbial and compound specific isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Damgaard, Ida; Bjerg, Poul L; Bælum, Jacob; Scheutz, Charlotte; Hunkeler, Daniel; Jacobsen, Carsten S; Tuxen, Nina; Broholm, Mette M

    2013-03-01

    The degradation of chlorinated ethenes and ethanes in clay till was investigated at a contaminated site (Vadsby, Denmark) by high resolution sampling of intact cores combined with groundwater sampling. Over decades of contamination, bioactive zones with degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA) to 1,2-cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and 1,1-dichloroethane, respectively, had developed in most of the clay till matrix. Dehalobacter dominated over Dehalococcoides (Dhc) in the clay till matrix corresponding with stagnation of sequential dechlorination at cis-DCE. Sporadically distributed bioactive zones with partial degradation to ethene were identified in the clay till matrix (thickness from 0.10 to 0.22 m). In one sub-section profile the presence of Dhc with the vcrA gene supported the occurrence of degradation of cis-DCE and VC, and in another enriched δ(13)C for TCE, cis-DCE and VC documented degradation. Highly enriched δ(13)C for 1,1,1-TCA (25‰) and cis-DCE (-4‰) suggested the occurrence of abiotic degradation in a third sub-section profile. Due to fine scale heterogeneity the identification of active degradation zones in the clay till matrix depended on high resolution subsampling of the clay till cores. The study demonstrates that an integrated approach combining chemical analysis, molecular microbial tools and compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) was required in order to document biotic and abiotic degradations in the clay till system.

  2. Furry pet allergens, fungal DNA and microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) in the commercial aircraft cabin environment.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xi; Lindgren, Torsten; Guo, Moran; Cai, Gui-Hong; Lundgren, Håkan; Norbäck, Dan

    2013-06-01

    There has been concern about the cabin environment in commercial aircraft. We measured cat, dog and horse allergens and fungal DNA in cabin dust and microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) in cabin air. Samples were collected from two European airline companies, one with cabins having textile seats (TSC) and the other with cabins having leather seats (LSC), 9 airplanes from each company. Dust was vacuumed from seats and floors in the flight deck and different parts of the cabin. Cat (Fel d1), dog (Can f1) and horse allergens (Equ cx) were analyzed by ELISA. Five sequences of fungal DNA were analyzed by quantitative PCR. MVOCs were sampled on charcoal tubes in 42 TSC flights, and 17 compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with selective ion monitoring (SIM). MVOC levels were compared with levels in homes from Nordic countries. The weight of dust was 1.8 times larger in TSC cabins as compared to LSC cabins (p < 0.001). In cabins with textile seats, the geometric mean (GM) concentrations of Fel d1, Can f1 and Equ cx were 5359 ng g(-1), 6067 ng g(-1), and 13 703 ng g(-1) (GM) respectively. Levels of Fel d1, Can f1 and Equ cx were 50 times, 27 times and 75 times higher respectively, in TSC cabins as compared to LSC cabins (p < 0.001). GM levels of Aspergillus/Penicillium DNA, Aspergillus versicolor DNA, Stachybotrys chartarum DNA and Streptomyces DNA were all higher in TSC as compared to LSC (p < 0.05). The sum of MVOCs in cabin air (excluding butanols) was 3192 ng m(-3) (GM), 3.7 times higher than in homes (p < 0.001) and 2-methyl-1-butanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol concentrations were 15-17 times higher as compared to homes (p < 0.001). Concentrations of isobutanol, 1-butanol, dimethyldisulfide, 2-hexanone, 2-heptanone, 3-octanone, isobutyl acetate and ethyl-2-methylbutyrate were lower in cabin air as compared to homes (p < 0.05). In conclusion, textile seats are much more contaminated by pet allergens and fungal DNA than leather

  3. Furry pet allergens, fungal DNA and microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) in the commercial aircraft cabin environment.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xi; Lindgren, Torsten; Guo, Moran; Cai, Gui-Hong; Lundgren, Håkan; Norbäck, Dan

    2013-06-01

    There has been concern about the cabin environment in commercial aircraft. We measured cat, dog and horse allergens and fungal DNA in cabin dust and microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) in cabin air. Samples were collected from two European airline companies, one with cabins having textile seats (TSC) and the other with cabins having leather seats (LSC), 9 airplanes from each company. Dust was vacuumed from seats and floors in the flight deck and different parts of the cabin. Cat (Fel d1), dog (Can f1) and horse allergens (Equ cx) were analyzed by ELISA. Five sequences of fungal DNA were analyzed by quantitative PCR. MVOCs were sampled on charcoal tubes in 42 TSC flights, and 17 compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with selective ion monitoring (SIM). MVOC levels were compared with levels in homes from Nordic countries. The weight of dust was 1.8 times larger in TSC cabins as compared to LSC cabins (p < 0.001). In cabins with textile seats, the geometric mean (GM) concentrations of Fel d1, Can f1 and Equ cx were 5359 ng g(-1), 6067 ng g(-1), and 13 703 ng g(-1) (GM) respectively. Levels of Fel d1, Can f1 and Equ cx were 50 times, 27 times and 75 times higher respectively, in TSC cabins as compared to LSC cabins (p < 0.001). GM levels of Aspergillus/Penicillium DNA, Aspergillus versicolor DNA, Stachybotrys chartarum DNA and Streptomyces DNA were all higher in TSC as compared to LSC (p < 0.05). The sum of MVOCs in cabin air (excluding butanols) was 3192 ng m(-3) (GM), 3.7 times higher than in homes (p < 0.001) and 2-methyl-1-butanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol concentrations were 15-17 times higher as compared to homes (p < 0.001). Concentrations of isobutanol, 1-butanol, dimethyldisulfide, 2-hexanone, 2-heptanone, 3-octanone, isobutyl acetate and ethyl-2-methylbutyrate were lower in cabin air as compared to homes (p < 0.05). In conclusion, textile seats are much more contaminated by pet allergens and fungal DNA than leather

  4. Fabrication of a Microbial Biosensor Based on QD-MWNT Supports by a One-Step Radiation Reaction and Detection of Phenolic Compounds in Red Wines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seul-Ki; Kwen, Hai-Doo; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2011-01-01

    An Acaligense sp.-immobilized biosensor was fabricated based on QD-MWNT composites as an electron transfer mediator and a microbe immobilization support by a one-step radiation reaction and used for sensing phenolic compounds in commercial red wines. First, a quantum dot-modified multi-wall carbon nanotube (QD-MWNT) composite was prepared in the presence of MWNT by a one-step radiation reaction in an aqueous solution at room temperature. The successful preparation of the QD-MWNT composite was confirmed by XPS, TEM, and elemental analysis. Second, the microbial biosensor was fabricated by immobilization of Acaligense sp. on the surface of the composite thin film of a glassy carbon (GC) electrode, which was prepared by a hand casting method with a mixture of the previously obtained composite and Nafion solution. The sensing ranges of the microbial biosensor based on CdS-MWNT and Cu2S-MWNT supports were 0.5–5.0 mM and 0.7–10 mM for phenol in a phosphate buffer solution, respectively. Total concentration of phenolic compounds contained in commercial red wines was also determined using the prepared microbial immobilized biosensor. PMID:22319395

  5. Preliminary assessment of microbial communities and biodegradation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in wetlands at Cluster 13, Lauderick Creek area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Voytek, Mary A.; Spencer, Tracey A.

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of the microbial communities and biodegradation processes for chlorinated volatile organic compounds was con-ducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in wetlands at the Cluster 13, Lauderick Creek area at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The U.S. Geological Survey collected wetland sediment samples from 11 sites in the Lauderick Creek area for microbial analyses, and used existing data to evaluate biodegradation processes and rates. The bacterial and methanogen communities in the Lauderick Creek wetland sediments were similar to those observed in a previous U.S. Geological Survey study at the West Branch Canal Creek wet-land area, Aberdeen Proving Ground. Evaluation of the degradation rate of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and the daughter compounds produced also showed similar results for the two wetlands. How-ever, a vertical profile of contaminant concentra-tions in the wetlands was available at only one site in the Lauderick Creek area, and flow velocities in the wetland sediment are unknown. To better evaluate natural attenuation processes and rates in the wetland sediments at Lauderick Creek, chemi-cal and hydrologic measurements are needed along ground-water flowpaths in the wetland at additional sites and during different seasons. Nat-ural attenuation in the wetlands, enhanced biore-mediation, and constructed wetlands could be feasible remediation methods for the chlorinated volatile organic compounds discharging in the Lauderick Creek area. The similarities in the microbial communities and biodegradation pro-cesses at the Lauderick Creek and West Branch Canal Creek areas indicate that enhanced bioreme-diation techniques currently being developed for the West Branch Canal Creek wetland area would be transferable to this area.

  6. Single-walled carbon nanotube release affects the microbial enzyme-catalyzed oxidation processes of organic pollutants and lignin model compounds in nature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Qin, Xiaosheng; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-11-01

    The question how microbial enzyme-catalyzed oxidation processes of organic pollutants and lignin model compounds (LMCs) are affected by the release of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) into the environment remains to be addressed at the molecular level. We have, therefore concentrated the effects of SWCNT on some important properties associated with enzyme activity and function during microbial oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo(a)pyrene, acenaphthene and anthracene), LMCs (2,6-dimethoxyphenol, guaiacol and veratryl alcohol) and β-hexachlorocyclohexane, including the behaviour of water molecules, hydrogen bonds (HBs) and hydrophobic interactions (HYs) between ligand and the enzyme, and conformational dynamics in N- and C-terminus. Our study revealed that SWCNT significantly affected the behaviour of water molecules within 5 Å of both these substrates and their respective enzymes during oxidation (p < 0.01), by increasing or decreasing the water number near them. SWCNT tended to significantly enhance or reduce the stability of atom pairs that formed the HBs and HYs (p < 0.01). N- and C-terminus conformations underwent transitions between positive and negative states or between positive state or between negative state in all analyzed complexes. Significant conformational transitions were found for all C-terminus, but only for a part of N-terminus after the inclusion of the SWCNT. These results showed that SWCNT release would significantly affect the microbial enzyme-catalyzed processes of organic pollutants and LMCs in nature. PMID:27529386

  7. Single-walled carbon nanotube release affects the microbial enzyme-catalyzed oxidation processes of organic pollutants and lignin model compounds in nature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Qin, Xiaosheng; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-11-01

    The question how microbial enzyme-catalyzed oxidation processes of organic pollutants and lignin model compounds (LMCs) are affected by the release of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) into the environment remains to be addressed at the molecular level. We have, therefore concentrated the effects of SWCNT on some important properties associated with enzyme activity and function during microbial oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo(a)pyrene, acenaphthene and anthracene), LMCs (2,6-dimethoxyphenol, guaiacol and veratryl alcohol) and β-hexachlorocyclohexane, including the behaviour of water molecules, hydrogen bonds (HBs) and hydrophobic interactions (HYs) between ligand and the enzyme, and conformational dynamics in N- and C-terminus. Our study revealed that SWCNT significantly affected the behaviour of water molecules within 5 Å of both these substrates and their respective enzymes during oxidation (p < 0.01), by increasing or decreasing the water number near them. SWCNT tended to significantly enhance or reduce the stability of atom pairs that formed the HBs and HYs (p < 0.01). N- and C-terminus conformations underwent transitions between positive and negative states or between positive state or between negative state in all analyzed complexes. Significant conformational transitions were found for all C-terminus, but only for a part of N-terminus after the inclusion of the SWCNT. These results showed that SWCNT release would significantly affect the microbial enzyme-catalyzed processes of organic pollutants and LMCs in nature.

  8. The impact of yeast starter cultures on the microbial communities and volatile compounds in cocoa fermentation and the resulting sensory attributes of chocolate.

    PubMed

    Batista, Nádia Nara; Ramos, Cíntia Lacerda; Dias, Disney Ribeiro; Pinheiro, Ana Carla Marques; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2016-02-01

    Theobroma cacao seeds are the main raw material for chocolate production. During their fermentation, a succession of microorganisms are responsible for the physicochemical changes occurring in the pulp and inside the beans. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of yeast inoculation (Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFLA CA11, Pichia kluivery CCMA0237, and Hanseniaspora uvarum CCMA0236) on the profile of the volatile compounds and microbial communities in cocoa fermentation. The resulting chocolate was also evaluated by temporal dominance of sensations (TDS) analyses. The dominant microorganisms during spontaneous fermentation were S. cerevisiae, H. uvarum, H. guilliermondii, Lactobacillus fermentum, Pediococcus sp., and Acetobacter pasteurianus. Similarly, S. cerevisiae, P. kluyveri, Candida sp., Pediococcus sp., and A. pasteurianus were the predominant microorganisms assessed by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) in inoculated fermentation. Sixty-seven volatile compounds were detected and quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) at the end of fermentation and chocolates. The main group of volatile compound found after the inoculated and spontaneous fermentations was esters (41 and 39 %, respectively). In the chocolates, the main group was acids (73 and 44 % from the inoculated and spontaneous fermentations, respectively). The TDS analyses showed a dominance of bitter and cocoa attributes in both chocolates. However, in the inoculated chocolate, lingering fruity notes were more intense, while the chocolate produced by spontaneous fermentation was more astringent. Thus, the inoculation of yeast influenced the microbial profile, which likely affected the volatile compounds that affect sensory characteristics, resulting in chocolate with dominant bitter, cocoa, and fruity attributes. PMID:27162390

  9. Evidence for differential effects of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene and other munitions compounds on specific subpopulations of soil microbial communities

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, M.E.; Manning, J.F. Jr.

    1998-11-01

    The effects of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and other munitions compounds on indigenous microbial communities in several soils were examined. Culturable heterotrophs, concentrations of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and basal respiration rates exhibited slight negative correlations with high TNT and 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB) levels. Heat-shock-resistant culturable heterotrophs, percentage of gram-positive soil isolates, mole percent of branched PLFA, and 10Me18:0 (tuberculostearic acid) were observed to be significantly lower in highly contaminated soils. Total soil nitrogen levels were positively correlated with high TNT and TNB concentrations, whereas total soil carbon exhibited no significant correlation with either compound. Multivariate analysis of PLFA data resulted in distinct separation of soils with respect to their degree of contamination, with specific signature PLFAs for gram-positive bacteria, fungi, and protozoa being negatively associated with high contaminant levels. Apparent concentrations of TNT resulting in 50% reductions in indicators of gram-positive populations were much higher than values from pure culture experiments, possibly as a result of low bioavailability due to sorption onto clay and soil organic matter. Few effects of other munitions compounds were observed. Closer examination of a highly contaminated soil revealed that the number of culturable heterotrophs growing on 0.3% molasses plates decreased by 50% when 67 {micro}g TNT/ml was added to the medium; a 99% decrease was observed for soil contaminated with less than 20 {micro}g TNT/g. Highly contaminated soil harbored a greater number of organisms that were able to grow on plates amended with greater than 10 {micro}g TNT/ml. Gram-positive isolates from both soils demonstrated marked growth inhibition when greater than 8--16 {micro}g TNT/ml was present in the culture medium. These results indicate that chronic exposure to munitions compounds can dramatically alter soil microbial

  10. A yearly spraying of olive mill wastewater on agricultural soil over six successive years: impact of different application rates on olive production, phenolic compounds, phytotoxicity and microbial counts.

    PubMed

    Magdich, Salwa; Jarboui, Raja; Rouina, Béchir Ben; Boukhris, Makki; Ammar, Emna

    2012-07-15

    Olive mill wastewater (OMW) spraying effects onto olive-tree fields were investigated. Three OMW levels (50, 100 and 200 m(3)ha(-1)year(-1)) were applied over six successive years. Olive-crop yields, phenolic compounds progress, phytotoxicity and microbial counts were studied at different soil depths. Olive yield showed improvements with OMW level applied. Soil polyphenolic content increased progressively in relation to OMW levels in all the investigated layers. However, no significant difference was noted in lowest treatment rate compared to the control field. In the soil upper-layers (0-40 cm), five phenolic compounds were identified over six consecutive years of OMW-spraying. In all the soil-layers, the radish germination index exceeded 85%. However, tomato germination test values decreased with the applied OMW amount. For all treatments, microbial counts increased with OMW quantities and spraying frequency. Matrix correlation showed a strong relationship between soil polyphenol content and microorganisms, and a negative one to tomato germination index.

  11. Rapid evaluation technique to differentiate mushroom disease-related moulds by detecting microbial volatile organic compounds using HS-SPME-GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Radványi, Dalma; Gere, Attila; Jókai, Zsuzsa; Fodor, Péter

    2015-01-01

    Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to analyse microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) of mushroom disease-related microorganisms. Mycogone perniciosa, Lecanicillum fungicola var. fungicola, and Trichoderma aggressivum f. europaeum species, which are typically harmful in mushroom cultivation, were examined, and Agaricus bisporus (bisporic button mushroom) was also examined as a control. For internal standard, a mixture of alkanes was used; these were introduced as the memory effect of primed septa in the vial seal. Several different marker compounds were found in each sample, which enabled us to distinguish the different moulds and the mushroom mycelium from each other. Monitoring of marker compounds enabled us to investigate the behaviour of moulds. The records of the temporal pattern changes were used to produce partial least squares regression (PLS-R) models that enabled determination of the exact time of contamination (the infection time of the media). Using these evaluation techniques, the presence of mushroom disease-related fungi can be easily detected and monitored via their emitted MVOCs.

  12. Microbial Transformation of Bioactive Compounds and Production of ortho-Dihydroxyisoflavones and Glycitein from Natural Fermented Soybean Paste

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Changhyun

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been a great deal of remarkable interest in finding bioactive compounds from nutritional foods to replace synthetic compounds. In particular, ortho-dihydroxyisoflavones and glycitein are of growing scientific interest owing to their attractive biological properties. In this study, 7,8-ortho-dihydroxyisoflavone, 6,7-ortho-dihydroxyisoflavone, 3',4'-ortho-dihydroxyisoflavone and 7,4'-dihydroxy-6-methoxyisoflavone were characterized using microorganism screened from soybean Doenjang. Three ortho-dihydroxyisoflavones and glycitein were structurally elucidated by 1H-NMR and GC-MS analysis. Furthermore, bacterial strains from soybean Doenjang with the capacity of biotransformation were screened. The bacterial strain, identified as Bacillus subtilis Roh-1, was shown to convert daidzein into ortho-dihydroxyisoflavones and glycitein. Thus, this study has, for the first time, demonstrated that a bacterial strain had a substrate specificity for multiple modifications of the bioactive compounds. PMID:25513748

  13. Microbial transformation of bioactive compounds and production of ortho-dihydroxyisoflavones and glycitein from natural fermented soybean paste.

    PubMed

    Roh, Changhyun

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been a great deal of remarkable interest in finding bioactive compounds from nutritional foods to replace synthetic compounds. In particular, ortho-dihydroxyisoflavones and glycitein are of growing scientific interest owing to their attractive biological properties. In this study, 7,8-ortho-dihydroxyisoflavone, 6,7-ortho-dihydroxyisoflavone, 3',4'-ortho-dihydroxyisoflavone and 7,4'-dihydroxy-6-methoxyisoflavone were characterized using microorganism screened from soybean Doenjang. Three ortho-dihydroxyisoflavones and glycitein were structurally elucidated by 1H-NMR and GC-MS analysis. Furthermore, bacterial strains from soybean Doenjang with the capacity of biotransformation were screened. The bacterial strain, identified as Bacillus subtilis Roh-1, was shown to convert daidzein into ortho-dihydroxyisoflavones and glycitein. Thus, this study has, for the first time, demonstrated that a bacterial strain had a substrate specificity for multiple modifications of the bioactive compounds. PMID:25513748

  14. Compound-specific 15N stable isotope probing of N assimilation by the soil microbial biomass: a new methodological paradigm in soil N cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charteris, A. F.; Knowles, T. D. J.; Michaelides, K.; Evershed, R. P.

    2015-10-01

    A compound-specific nitrogen-15 stable isotope probing (15N-SIP) technique is described which allows investigation of the fate of inorganic- or organic-N amendments to soils. The technique uses gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) to determine the δ15N values of individual amino acids (AAs; determined as N-acetyl, O-isopropyl derivatives) as proxies of biomass protein production. The δ15N values are used together with AA concentrations to quantify N assimilation of 15N-labelled substrates by the soil microbial biomass. The utility of the approach is demonstrated through incubation experiments using inorganic 15N-labelled substrates ammonium (15NH4+) and nitrate (15NO3-) and an organic 15N-labelled substrate, glutamic acid (15N-Glu). Assimilation of all the applied substrates was undetectable based on bulk soil properties, i.e. % total N (% TN), bulk soil N isotope composition and AA concentrations, all of which remained relatively constant throughout the incubation experiments. In contrast, compound-specific AA δ15N values were highly sensitive to N assimilation, providing qualitative and quantitative insights into the cycling and fate of the applied 15N-labelled substrates. The utility of this 15N-AA-SIP technique is considered in relation to other currently available methods for investigating the microbially-mediated assimilation of nitrogenous substrates into the soil organic N pool. This approach will be generally applicable to the study of N cycling in any soil, or indeed, in any complex ecosystem.

  15. Screening of microbial volatile organic compounds for detection of disease in cattle: development of lab-scale method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The quest to find unique marker volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with human, livestock and wildlife diseases (Ellis et al., 2014) requires development of diagnostic non-invasive point-of-care tools and field surveillance technologies and strategies. The objective of this research was to ...

  16. Detection of volatile compounds produced by microbial growth in urine by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS).

    PubMed

    Storer, Malina K; Hibbard-Melles, Kim; Davis, Brett; Scotter, Jenny

    2011-10-01

    Selected ion flow tube-mass spectrometry has been used to measure the volatile compounds occurring in the headspace of urine samples inoculated with common urinary tract infection (UTI)-causing microbes Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, or Candida albicans. This technique has the potential to offer rapid and simple diagnosis of the causative agent of UTIs.

  17. Microbial growth on C1 compounds. Incorporation of C1 units into allulose phosphate by extracts of Pseudomonas methanica

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, M. B.; Quayle, J. R.

    1966-01-01

    1. Incubation of cell-free extracts of methane- or methanol-grown Pseudomonas methanica with [14C]formaldehyde and d-ribose 5-phosphate leads to incorporation of radioactivity into a non-volatile product, which has the chromatographic properties of a phosphorylated compound. 2. Treatment of this reaction product with a phosphatase, followed by chromatography, shows the presence of two compounds whose chromatographic properties are consistent with their being free sugars. 3. The minor component of the dephosphorylated products has been identified as fructose. The major component has been identified as allulose (psicose) on the basis of co-chromatography, co-crystallization of the derived phenylosazone and dinitrophenylosazone with authentic derivatives of allulose and behaviour towards oxidation with bromine water. 4. It is suggested that the bacterial extracts catalyse the condensation of a C1 unit identical with, or derived from, formaldehyde with ribose 5-phosphate to give allulose 6-phosphate. 5. Testing of hexose phosphates and pentose phosphates as substrates has so far shown the reaction to be specific for ribose 5-phosphate. 6. The condensation reaction is not catalysed by extracts of methanol-grown Pseudomonas AM1. 7. A variant of the pentose phosphate cycle, involving this condensation reaction, is suggested as an explanation for the net synthesis of C3 compounds from C1 units by P. methanica. PMID:5965346

  18. Pilot-scale study on nitrogen and aromatic compounds removal in printing and dyeing wastewater by reinforced hydrolysis-denitrification coupling process and its microbial community analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Ren, Hongqiang; Yin, Erqin; Tang, Siyuan; Li, Yi; Cao, Jiashun

    2015-06-01

    Aiming to efficiently dispose printing and dyeing wastewater with "high organic nitrogen and aromatic compounds, but low carbon source quality", the reinforced anaerobic hydrolysis-denitrification coupling process, based on improved UASB reactors and segregated collection-disposition strategy, was designed and applied at the pilot scale. Results showed that the coupling process displayed efficient removal for these two kinds of pollutants (nitrogen and aromatics), since the concentration of NH3-N (shortened as ρ (NH3-N)) < 8 mg/L, ρ (TN) < 15 mg/L with long-term stability for the effluent, and both species and abundances of aromatics reduced greatly by UASBs according to GC-MS. Microbial community analysis by PCR-DGGE showed that Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria were the dominant communities in the bioreactors and some kinds of VFAs-producing, denitrifying and aromatic ring opening microorganisms were discovered. Further, the nirK and bcrA genes quantification also indicated the coupling process owned outstanding denitrification and aromatic compound-degrading potential, which demonstrates that the coupling process owns admirable applicability for this kind of wastewater treatment.

  19. Microbially Mediated Biodegradation of Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5- Triazine by Extracellular Electron Shuttling Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Man Jae; Finneran, Kevin T.

    2006-01-01

    The potential for humic substances to stimulate the reduction of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) was investigated. This study describes a novel approach for the remediation of RDX-contaminated environments using microbially mediated electron shuttling. Incubations without cells demonstrated that reduced AQDS transfers electrons directly to RDX, which was reduced without significant accumulation of the nitroso intermediates. Three times as much reduced AQDS (molar basis) was needed to completely reduce RDX. The rate and extent of RDX reduction differed greatly among electron shuttle/acceptor amendments for resting cell suspensions of Geobacter metallireducens and G. sulfurreducens with acetate as the sole electron donor. AQDS and purified humic substances stimulated the fastest rate of RDX reduction. The nitroso metabolites did not significantly accumulate in the presence of AQDS or humic substances. RDX reduction in the presence of poorly crystalline Fe(III) was relatively slow and metabolites transiently accumulated. However, adding humic substances or AQDS to Fe(III)-containing incubations increased the reduction rates. Cells of G. metallireducens alone reduced RDX; however, the rate of RDX reduction was slow relative to AQDS-amended incubations. These data suggest that extracellular electron shuttle-mediated RDX transformation is not organism specific but rather is catalyzed by multiple Fe(III)- and humic-reducing species. Electron shuttle-mediated RDX reduction may eventually become a rapid and effective cleanup strategy in both Fe(III)-rich and Fe(III)-poor environments. PMID:16957213

  20. Pubic inguinal pain syndrome: the so-called sports hernia.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Marta; Bombini, Grazia; Campanelli, Giampiero

    2014-03-01

    The "sportsman's hernia" commonly presents as a painful groin in those sports that involve kicking and twisting movements while running, particularly in rugby, football, soccer, and ice hockey players. Moreover, sportsman's hernia can be encountered even in normally physically active people. The pain experienced is recognized at the common point of origin of the rectus abdominis muscle and the adductor longus tendon on the pubic bone and the insertion of the inguinal ligament on the pubic bone. It is accepted that this chronic pain caused by abdominal wall weakness or injury occurs without a palpable hernia. We proposed the new name "pubic inguinal pain syndrome." In the period between January 2006 and November 2013 all patients afferent in our ambulatory clinic for chronic groin pain without a clinically evident hernia were assessed with medical history, physical examination, dynamic ultrasound, and pelvic and lumbar MRI. All patients were proposed for a conservative treatment and then, if it was not effective, for a surgical treatment. Our etiopathogenetic theory is based on three factors: (1) the compression of the three nerves of the inguinal region, (2) the imbalance in strength of adductor and abdominal wall muscles caused by the hypertrophy and stiffness of the insertion of rectus muscle and adductor longus muscle, and (3) the partial weakness of the posterior wall. Our surgical procedure includes the release of all three nerves of the region, the correction of the imbalance in strength with the partial tenotomy of the rectus and adductor longus muscles, and the repair of the partial weakness of the posterior wall with a lightweight mesh. This treatment reported excellent results with complete relief of symptoms after resumption of physical activity in all cases. PMID:24526429

  1. The So-called ``Bar'' in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, HongSheng; Evans, N. Wyn

    2000-12-01

    We propose that the off-centered ``bar'' in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is an unvirialized structure slightly misaligned with, and offset from, the plane of the LMC disk. The small displacement and misalignment are consequences of recent tidal interactions with the Small Magellanic Cloud and the Galaxy. This proposal, although radical, is consistent with the kinematics of the LMC and the near-infrared star count maps from the Deep Near-Infrared Survey and the 2 Micron All-Sky Survey and, in particular, with the reported 25°-50° inclination range of the LMC and the east-west gradient of distance moduli of standard candles. Contributions to LMC microlensing come mainly from the mutual lensing of stars in the disk and the ``bar.'' The predicted microlensing optical depth is at levels comparable to observation, even without including contributions from MACHOs. Observational tests are suggested to discriminate between our misaligned offset ``bar'' model and the conventional picture of an off-centered planar bar.

  2. On the So-Called "Science-Religion" Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wayne G.

    1973-01-01

    Contends that theology and science deal with different kinds of concerns. Conflict between these two branches of knowledge arises when these concerns are confused with each other and a new unpopular hypothesis begins to question hitherto unquestioned explanations. (PS)

  3. [Comments on the definition of so-called "new addictions"].

    PubMed

    Wiesbeck, G A; Täschner, K L

    1993-06-01

    To apply the term "addiction" to non-substantial addiction-like behavior is both problematic and useful. It is problematic because the uncritical application of the term has led to an inflation of addictions. If everything is called addiction the term is losing its predicative power and is getting meaningless. In the field of non-substantial addicted behavior we have been given the chance to study the phenomenon addiction in "pure" form without disturbing influences of any substance. To apply the term "addiction" to non-substantial addicted behavior is possible in principle. Von Gebsattel 1954 and Giese 1962 have already referred to this. However, it requires well-defined criterias. A strictly composition of the term would be recommendable. PMID:8333099

  4. [Comments on the so-called "feeling of hysteria"].

    PubMed

    Haas, J P

    1988-02-01

    By interpreting the concept of "hysteria feeling" as a manifestation of countertransference the author attempts to clarify the physician's dilemma in dealing with hysterical patients. "Hysteria feeling" is a complex of feelings in the physician as he develops increasing doubts about the authenticity of the patient's experiences and behaviour. By recognizing and interpreting the hysteria feeling, the negative course of confusion-involvement-doubt and disappointment can be transformed into a positive object relation. PMID:3362262

  5. Proving possession of drugs in so-called body stuffers.

    PubMed

    Püschel, Klaus; Bachmann, Dirk

    2007-02-01

    In 2001 a new policy for dealing with drug traffickers was introduced in Hamburg. Any person suspected of having swallowed drugs in order to hide the evidence is taken to the Institute of Legal Medicine where the drugs will be recovered by pharmacologically induced vomiting. This method has proved to be safe and successful as drugs were recovered in nearly two-thirds of the cases. The offenders were predominantly male Africans 16-25 years old.

  6. Transport of chemical and microbial compounds from known wastewater discharges: Potential for use as indicators of human fecal contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glassmeyer, S.T.; Furlong, E.T.; Kolpin, D.W.; Cahill, J.D.; Zaugg, S.D.; Werner, S.L.; Meyer, M.T.; Kryak, D.D.

    2005-01-01

    The quality of drinking and recreational water is currently (2005) determined using indicator bacteria. However, the culture tests used to analyze for these bacteria require a long time to complete and do not discriminate between human and animal fecal material sources. One complementary approach is to use chemicals found in human wastewater, which would have the advantages of (1) potentially shorter analysis times than the bacterial culture tests and (2) being selected for human-source specificity. At 10 locations, water samples were collected upstream and at two successive points downstream from a wastewaster treatment plant (WWTP); a treated effluent sample was also collected at each WWTP. This sampling plan was used to determine the persistence of a chemically diverse suite of emerging contaminants in streams. Samples were also collected at two reference locations assumed to have minimal human impacts. Of the 110 chemical analytes investigated in this project, 78 were detected at least once. The number of compounds in a given sample ranged from 3 at a reference location to 50 in a WWTP effluent sample. The total analyte load at each location varied from 0.018 μg/L at the reference location to 97.7 μg/L in a separate WWTP effluent sample. Although most of the compound concentrations were in the range of 0.01−1.0 μg/L, in some samples, individual concentrations were in the range of 5−38 μg/L. The concentrations of the majority of the chemicals present in the samples generally followed the expected trend:  they were either nonexistent or at trace levels in the upstream samples, had their maximum concentrations in the WWTP effluent samples, and then declined in the two downstream samples. This research suggests that selected chemicals are useful as tracers of human wastewater discharge.

  7. What (So-Called) Low-Performing Schools Can Teach (So-Called) High-Performing Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Richard F.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author examines successful schools with high concentrations of poor and minority children--those in which students were doing as well as or better than those in affluent schools on statewide standardized tests--to see what they were doing to improve the level of instruction in their classrooms. These high-performing,…

  8. Bioavailability of Heavy Metals in Soil: Impact on Microbial Biodegradation of Organic Compounds and Possible Improvement Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Olaniran, Ademola O.; Balgobind, Adhika; Pillay, Balakrishna

    2013-01-01

    Co-contamination of the environment with toxic chlorinated organic and heavy metal pollutants is one of the major problems facing industrialized nations today. Heavy metals may inhibit biodegradation of chlorinated organics by interacting with enzymes directly involved in biodegradation or those involved in general metabolism. Predictions of metal toxicity effects on organic pollutant biodegradation in co-contaminated soil and water environments is difficult since heavy metals may be present in a variety of chemical and physical forms. Recent advances in bioremediation of co-contaminated environments have focussed on the use of metal-resistant bacteria (cell and gene bioaugmentation), treatment amendments, clay minerals and chelating agents to reduce bioavailable heavy metal concentrations. Phytoremediation has also shown promise as an emerging alternative clean-up technology for co-contaminated environments. However, despite various investigations, in both aerobic and anaerobic systems, demonstrating that metal toxicity hampers the biodegradation of the organic component, a paucity of information exists in this area of research. Therefore, in this review, we discuss the problems associated with the degradation of chlorinated organics in co-contaminated environments, owing to metal toxicity and shed light on possible improvement strategies for effective bioremediation of sites co-contaminated with chlorinated organic compounds and heavy metals. PMID:23676353

  9. Bioavailability of heavy metals in soil: impact on microbial biodegradation of organic compounds and possible improvement strategies.

    PubMed

    Olaniran, Ademola O; Balgobind, Adhika; Pillay, Balakrishna

    2013-05-15

    Co-contamination of the environment with toxic chlorinated organic and heavy metal pollutants is one of the major problems facing industrialized nations today. Heavy metals may inhibit biodegradation of chlorinated organics by interacting with enzymes directly involved in biodegradation or those involved in general metabolism. Predictions of metal toxicity effects on organic pollutant biodegradation in co-contaminated soil and water environments is difficult since heavy metals may be present in a variety of chemical and physical forms. Recent advances in bioremediation of co-contaminated environments have focussed on the use of metal-resistant bacteria (cell and gene bioaugmentation), treatment amendments, clay minerals and chelating agents to reduce bioavailable heavy metal concentrations. Phytoremediation has also shown promise as an emerging alternative clean-up technology for co-contaminated environments. However, despite various investigations, in both aerobic and anaerobic systems, demonstrating that metal toxicity hampers the biodegradation of the organic component, a paucity of information exists in this area of research. Therefore, in this review, we discuss the problems associated with the degradation of chlorinated organics in co-contaminated environments, owing to metal toxicity and shed light on possible improvement strategies for effective bioremediation of sites co-contaminated with chlorinated organic compounds and heavy metals.

  10. Nanoporous microscale microbial incubators.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhifei; Girguis, Peter R; Buie, Cullen R

    2016-02-01

    Reconstruction of phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing reveals abundant microbial diversity that has not been cultured in the laboratory. Many attribute this so-called 'great plate count anomaly' to traditional microbial cultivation techniques, which largely facilitate the growth of a single species. Yet, it is widely recognized that bacteria in nature exist in complex communities. One technique to increase the pool of cultivated bacterial species is to co-culture multiple species in a simulated natural environment. Here, we present nanoporous microscale microbial incubators (NMMI) that enable high-throughput screening and real-time observation of multi-species co-culture. The key innovation in NMMI is that they facilitate inter-species communication while maintaining physical isolation between species, which is ideal for genomic analysis. Co-culture of a quorum sensing pair demonstrates that the NMMI can be used to culture multiple species in chemical communication while monitoring the growth dynamics of individual species. PMID:26584739

  11. Anti-Adhesive Activity of Cranberry Phenolic Compounds and Their Microbial-Derived Metabolites against Uropathogenic Escherichia coli in Bladder Epithelial Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    de Llano, Dolores González; Esteban-Fernández, Adelaida; Sánchez-Patán, Fernando; Martínlvarez, Pedro J; Moreno-Arribas, Maria Victoria; Bartolomé, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    Cranberry consumption has shown prophylactic effects against urinary tract infections (UTI), although the mechanisms involved are not completely understood. In this paper, cranberry phenolic compounds and their potential microbial-derived metabolites (such as simple phenols and benzoic, phenylacetic and phenylpropionic acids) were tested for their capacity to inhibit the adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) ATCC®53503™ to T24 epithelial bladder cells. Catechol, benzoic acid, vanillic acid, phenylacetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid showed anti-adhesive activity against UPEC in a concentration-dependent manner from 100-500 µM, whereas procyanidin A2, widely reported as an inhibitor of UPEC adherence on uroepithelium, was only statistically significant (p < 0.05) at 500 µM (51.3% inhibition). The results proved for the first time the anti-adhesive activity of some cranberry-derived phenolic metabolites against UPEC in vitro, suggesting that their presence in the urine could reduce bacterial colonization and progression of UTI. PMID:26023719

  12. Fusarium oxysporum and its bacterial consortium promote lettuce growth and expansin A5 gene expression through microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) emission.

    PubMed

    Minerdi, Daniela; Bossi, Simone; Maffei, Massimo E; Gullino, Maria Lodovica; Garibaldi, Angelo

    2011-05-01

    Fusarium oxysporum MSA 35 [wild-type (WT) strain] is a nonpathogenic Fusarium strain, which exhibits antagonistic activity to plant pathogenic F. oxysporum isolates. The fungus lives in association with a consortium of ectosymbiotic bacteria. The WT strain, when cured of the bacterial symbionts [the cured (CU) form], is pathogenic, causing wilt symptoms similar to those of pathogenic F. oxysporum f. sp. lactucae. Both WT and CU MSA 35 strains produce microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs), but with a different spectrum. In vitro dual culture assays were used to assess the effects of the MVOCs produced by WT and CU strains of F. oxysporum MSA 35 on the growth and expansin gene expression of lettuce seedlings. An increase in the root length (95.6%), shoot length (75.0%) and fresh weight (85.8%) was observed only after WT strain MVOCs exposure. Leaf chlorophyll content was significantly enhanced (68%) in WT strain MVOC-treated seedlings as compared with CU strain volatiles and nontreated controls. β-Caryophyllene was found to be one of the volatiles released by WT MSA 35 responsible for the plant growth promotion effect. Semi-quantitative and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assays indicated a significant difference in the expansin gene expression level between leaf (6.7-fold) and roots (4.4-fold) exposed to WT strain volatiles when compared with the CU strain volatiles and those that were nonexposed.

  13. What Plurals and Compounds Reveal about Constraints in Word Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaensch, Carol; Heyer, Vera; Gordon, Peter; Clahsen, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Morphological systems are constrained in how they interact with each other. One case that has been widely studied in the psycholinguistic literature is the avoidance of plurals inside compounds (e.g. *"rats eater" vs. "rat eater") in English and other languages, the so-called "plurals-in-compounds effect." Several…

  14. Microbial denitrogenation of fossil fuels.

    PubMed

    Benedik, M J; Gibbs, P R; Riddle, R R; Willson, R C

    1998-09-01

    The microbial degradation of nitrogen compounds from fossil fuels is important because of the contribution these contaminants make to the formation of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and hence to air pollution and acid rain. They also contribute to catalyst poisoning during the refining of crude oil, thus reducing process yields. We review the current status of microbial degradation of aromatic nitrogen compounds and discuss the potential of microbial processes to alleviate these problems.

  15. A composite microbial agent containing bacterial and fungal species: Optimization of the preparation process, analysis of characteristics, and use in the purification for volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhuowei; Lu, Lichao; Kennes, Christian; Ye, Jiexu; Yu, Jianming; Chen, Dongzhi; Chen, Jianmeng

    2016-10-01

    Proper preservation of microbial activity over long periods poses a considerable challenge for pollutant biopurification. A composite microbial agent, mainly composed of bacteria and fungi isolated by the current research team, was constructed in this study and its performance in the removal of mixed waste gases (containing α-pinene, n-butyl acetate and o-xylene) was investigated. According to the removal efficiency in the first 24h and the response to starvation, the optimal ratio of selected carriers (activated carbon, wheat bran and sawdust) was found to be 1:2:1. In some cases of storages, the removal capability of the microbial agent was more than twice that of the suspension. Microbial analysis showed that the inoculated bacterial and fungal strains dominated the agent preparation and utilization. These results indicated that the agent has potential for use in biopurification of mixed waste gas, favoring the reduction of environmental passives and longer retention of microbial activity. PMID:27423036

  16. Microbial Siderophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzikiewicz, Herbert

    Iron is of great importance for many metabolic processes since the redox potential between its two valence states Fe2+ and Fe3+ lies within the range of physiological processes. Actually, iron is not a rare element, it is fourth in abundance in the earth crust, but it is not readily available for microorganisms. In the soil ferric oxide hydrates are formed at pH values around seven and the concentration of free Fe3+ is at best 10-17 mol/dm3 while about 10-6 mol/dm3 would be needed. In living organisms iron is usually strongly bound to peptidic substances such as transferrins. To increase the supply of soluble iron microorganisms other than those living in an acidic habitat may circumvent the problem by reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ (182), which seems to be of major importance for marine phytoplankton (151); see also amphiphilic marine bacteria (Sect.2.8) and Fe2+ binding ligands (Sect. 7) below. An important alternative is the production of Fe3+ chelating compounds, so-called siderophores. Siderophores are secondary metabolites with masses below 2,000 Da and a high affinity to Fe3+. Small iron-siderophore complexes can enter the cell via unspecific porins, larger ones need a transport system that recognizes the ferri-siderophore at the cell surface. In the cell, iron is released mostly by reduction to the less strongly bound Fe2+ state (137), and the free siderophore is re-exported ("shuttle mechanism"); for a modified shuttle system see pyoverdins (Sect. 2.1) and amonabactins (Sect. 2.7). Rarely the siderophore is degraded in the periplasmatic space as, e.g. enterobactin (Sect. 2.7). Alternatively Fe3+ is transferred at the cell surface from the ferri-siderophore to a trans-membrane transport system ("taxi mechanism"). A probably archaic and unspecific variety of the taxi mechanism comprises the reduction of Fe3+ at the cell surface (see ferrichrome A, Sect. 2.6 (99, 105)). The terms "shuttle" and "taxi mechanism" were coined by Raymond and Carrano (296).

  17. Effect of stocking large channel catfish in a biofloc technology production system on production and incidence of common microbial off-flavor compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Density-dependent production and incidence of common microbial off-flavors caused by geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol were investigated in an outdoor biofloc technology production system stocked with stocker-size (217 g/fish) channel catfish at 1.4, 2.1, or 2.8 kg/m3. Individual weight at harvest rang...

  18. Microbial ultraviolet sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qunjie; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2011-11-01

    Exposure to the shortest wavelengths in sunlight, ultraviolet light, constitutes a deleterious ecological factor for many microorganisms. The use of secondary metabolites as sunscreens has emerged as an important photoprotective mechanism in certain groups of large-celled microorganisms, such as cyanobacteria, fungi and many protists. In this Review, we describe our current understanding of microbial 'sunscreen' compounds, including scytonemin, the mycosporines and the naphthalene-based melanins. Study of these sunscreens has led to the discovery of new classes of compounds, new metabolic pathways, a deeper understanding of microbial photobiology and the potential for dermatological or biomedical applications.

  19. Middle infrared (wavelength range: 8 μm-14 μm) 2-dimensional spectroscopy (total weight with electrical controller: 1.7 kg, total cost: less than 10,000 USD) so-called hyperspectral camera for unmanned air vehicles like drones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Saito, Tsubasa; Ogawa, Satoru; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    We developed the palm size (optical unit: 73[mm]×102[mm]×66[mm]) and light weight (total weight with electrical controller: 1.7[kg]) middle infrared (wavelength range: 8[μm]-14[μm]) 2-dimensional spectroscopy for UAV (Unmanned Air Vehicle) like drone. And we successfully demonstrated the flights with the developed hyperspectral camera mounted on the multi-copter so-called drone in 15/Sep./2015 at Kagawa prefecture in Japan. We had proposed 2 dimensional imaging type Fourier spectroscopy that was the near-common path temporal phase-shift interferometer. We install the variable phase shifter onto optical Fourier transform plane of infinity corrected imaging optical systems. The variable phase shifter was configured with a movable mirror and a fixed mirror. The movable mirror was actuated by the impact drive piezo-electric device (stroke: 4.5[mm], resolution: 0.01[μm], maker: Technohands Co.,Ltd., type:XDT50-45, price: around 1,000USD). We realized the wavefront division type and near common path interferometry that has strong robustness against mechanical vibrations. Without anti-mechanical vibration systems, the palm-size Fourier spectroscopy was realized. And we were able to utilize the small and low-cost middle infrared camera that was the micro borometer array (un-cooled VOxMicroborometer, pixel array: 336×256, pixel pitch: 17[μm], frame rate 60[Hz], maker: FLIR, type: Quark 336, price: around 5,000USD). And this apparatus was able to be operated by single board computer (Raspberry Pi.). Thus, total cost was less than 10,000 USD. We joined with KAMOME-PJ (Kanagawa Advanced MOdule for Material Evaluation Project) with DRONE FACTORY Corp., KUUSATSU Corp., Fuji Imvac Inc. And we successfully obtained the middle infrared spectroscopic imaging with multi-copter drone.

  20. Agricultural by-products with bioactive effects: A multivariate approach to evaluate microbial and physicochemical changes in a fresh pork sausage enriched with phenolic compounds from olive vegetation water.

    PubMed

    Fasolato, Luca; Carraro, Lisa; Facco, Pierantonio; Cardazzo, Barbara; Balzan, Stefania; Taticchi, Agnese; Andreani, Nadia Andrea; Montemurro, Filomena; Martino, Maria Elena; Di Lecce, Giuseppe; Toschi, Tullia Gallina; Novelli, Enrico

    2016-07-01

    The use of phenolic compounds derived from agricultural by-products could be considered as an eco-friendly strategy for food preservation. In this study a purified phenol extract from olive vegetation water (PEOVW) was explored as a potential bioactive ingredient for meat products using Italian fresh sausage as food model. The research was developed in two steps: first, an in vitro delineation of the extract antimicrobial activities was performed, then, the PEOVW was tested in the food model to investigate the possible application in food manufacturing. The in vitro tests showed that PEOVW clearly inhibits the growth of food-borne pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. The major part of Gram-positive strains was inhibited at the low concentrations (0.375-3mg/mL). In the production of raw sausages, two concentrates of PEOVW (L1: 0.075% and L2: 0.15%) were used taking into account both organoleptic traits and the bactericidal effects. A multivariate statistical approach allowed the definition of the microbial and physicochemical changes of sausages during the shelf life (14days). In general, the inclusion of the L2 concentration reduced the growth of several microbial targets, especially Staphylococcus spp. and LABs (2log10CFU/g reduction), while the increasing the growth of yeasts was observed. The reduction of microbial growth could be involved in the reduced lipolysis of raw sausages supplemented with PEOVW as highlighted by the lower amount of diacylglycerols. Moisture and aw had a significant effect on the variability of microbiological features, while food matrix (the sausages' environment) can mask the effects of PEOVW on other targets (e.g. Pseudomonas). Moreover, the molecular identification of the main representative taxa collected during the experimentation allowed the evaluation of the effects of phenols on the selection of bacteria. Genetic data suggested a possible strain selection based on storage time and the addition of

  1. Agricultural by-products with bioactive effects: A multivariate approach to evaluate microbial and physicochemical changes in a fresh pork sausage enriched with phenolic compounds from olive vegetation water.

    PubMed

    Fasolato, Luca; Carraro, Lisa; Facco, Pierantonio; Cardazzo, Barbara; Balzan, Stefania; Taticchi, Agnese; Andreani, Nadia Andrea; Montemurro, Filomena; Martino, Maria Elena; Di Lecce, Giuseppe; Toschi, Tullia Gallina; Novelli, Enrico

    2016-07-01

    The use of phenolic compounds derived from agricultural by-products could be considered as an eco-friendly strategy for food preservation. In this study a purified phenol extract from olive vegetation water (PEOVW) was explored as a potential bioactive ingredient for meat products using Italian fresh sausage as food model. The research was developed in two steps: first, an in vitro delineation of the extract antimicrobial activities was performed, then, the PEOVW was tested in the food model to investigate the possible application in food manufacturing. The in vitro tests showed that PEOVW clearly inhibits the growth of food-borne pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. The major part of Gram-positive strains was inhibited at the low concentrations (0.375-3mg/mL). In the production of raw sausages, two concentrates of PEOVW (L1: 0.075% and L2: 0.15%) were used taking into account both organoleptic traits and the bactericidal effects. A multivariate statistical approach allowed the definition of the microbial and physicochemical changes of sausages during the shelf life (14days). In general, the inclusion of the L2 concentration reduced the growth of several microbial targets, especially Staphylococcus spp. and LABs (2log10CFU/g reduction), while the increasing the growth of yeasts was observed. The reduction of microbial growth could be involved in the reduced lipolysis of raw sausages supplemented with PEOVW as highlighted by the lower amount of diacylglycerols. Moisture and aw had a significant effect on the variability of microbiological features, while food matrix (the sausages' environment) can mask the effects of PEOVW on other targets (e.g. Pseudomonas). Moreover, the molecular identification of the main representative taxa collected during the experimentation allowed the evaluation of the effects of phenols on the selection of bacteria. Genetic data suggested a possible strain selection based on storage time and the addition of

  2. [Influence of coordination compounds of germanium (IV) and stannum (IV) on activity of some microbial enzymes with glycolytic and proteolytic action].

    PubMed

    Varbanets', L D; Matseliukh, O V; Nidialkova, N A; Hudzenko, O V; Avdiiuk, K V; Shmatkova, N V; Seĭfullina, I Ĭ

    2014-01-01

    Influence of coordinative compounds of germanium (IV) and stanum (IV) (complexes of germanium (IV) with nicotinamide (Nad) [GeCl2(Nad)4]Cl2 (1) and complexes of stanum (IV) with 2-hydroxybenzoilhydrazone 4-dimetylaminobenzaldehide (2-OH-HBdb) [SnCl4(2-OH-Bdb-H)] (2), 3-hydroxy-2-naphtoilhydrazone 2-hydroxynaphtaldehide (3-OH-H2Lnf) [SnCl3(3-OH-HLnf)] (3) and izonicotinoilhydrazone 2-hydroxyibenzaldehide [SnCl3 (Is·H)] (4) on activity of peptidases 1 and 2 Bacillus thuringiensis, α-L-rhamnosidase Cryptococcus albidus, Eupenicillium erubescens and α-amylase Aspergillus flavus var. oryzae. Results testify that all studied compounds differ on their influence on activity of the enzymes tested: significantly don't change elastolytic activity of peptidases 1 and 2 B. thuringiensis, completely inhibit A. flavus var. oryzae amylase, activate or oppress of α-L-rhamnosidase C. albidus and E. erubescens. Considerable differences in compounds (3, 4) on activity observed in case of the last. It's possible that peculiarity of influence (1) in compare with (2-4) is connected with existence of different central atoms of complexants: germanium (IV) (1) and stanum (IV) (2-4). A certain analogy in oppression of C. albidus α-L-rhamnosidase by compounds (1) and (4) can explain with presence of a pyridinic ring at molecules of their ligands. The less activsty displayed compound (2) with coordinative knot {SnCl4ON}. Nature of compounds (3, 4) activity was absolutely different: essential increase of activity of C. albidus α-L-rhamnosidase and full oppression of E. erubescens α-L-rhamnosidase by compound (3), while the action of compound (4) was feed back. Taking into account identical coordination knot {SnCl3O2N} the major role in this case play change of a hydrazide fragment in molecules of their ligands.

  3. Microbial reduction of uranium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Gorby, Y.A.; Landa, E.R.

    1991-01-01

    REDUCTION of the soluble, oxidized form of uranium, U(VI), to insoluble U(IV) is an important mechanism for the immobilization of uranium in aquatic sediments and for the formation of some uranium ores1-10. U(VI) reduction has generally been regarded as an abiological reaction in which sulphide, molecular hydrogen or organic compounds function as the reductant1,2,5,11. Microbial involvement in U(VI) reduction has been considered to be limited to indirect effects, such as microbial metabolism providing the reduced compounds for abiological U(VI) reduction and microbial cell walls providing a surface to stimulate abiological U(VI) reduction1,12,13. We report here, however, that dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can obtain energy for growth by electron transport to U(VI). This novel form of microbial metabolism can be much faster than commonly cited abiological mechanisms for U(VI) reduction. Not only do these findings expand the known potential terminal electron acceptors for microbial energy transduction, they offer a likely explanation for the deposition of uranium in aquatic sediments and aquifers, and suggest a method for biological remediation of environments contaminated with uranium.

  4. Biotechnological Aspects of Microbial Extracellular Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Souichiro

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a type of microbial respiration that enables electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials, including naturally-occurring metal compounds and artificial electrodes. Microorganisms harboring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, in addition to their contribution to global energy and material cycles. In this review, current knowledge on microbial EET and its application to diverse biotechnologies, including the bioremediation of toxic metals, recovery of useful metals, biocorrosion, and microbial electrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis), were introduced. Two potential biotechnologies based on microbial EET, namely the electrochemical control of microbial metabolism and electrochemical stimulation of microbial symbiotic reactions (electric syntrophy), were also discussed. PMID:26004795

  5. The microbial desulfurization of coal.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The chemical structure of coal macerals is usually characterized by the presence of inorganic and organic sulfur. Inorganic sulfur consists mostly of iron sulfides, the so-called "pyritic sulfur," whereas organic sulfur is covalently bound to the carbon atoms of the coal macromolecule. Comminution of coal to sizes that liberate the iron sulfide grains makes their removal with mineral beneficiation processes theoretically possible, but practically profitless. Microbial removal of pyritic sulfur has been extensively investigated over the last 50 years and the very promising results obtained have encouraged the design and construction of a semi-commercial pilot plant in the framework of Project JOULE 0039 funded by the European Commission. The results of the 1-year operation of this plant are reported here, the most significant being the 90 % pyrite removal achieved in five stirred tank bioreactors operating with a 40 % solids suspension and the pyritic iron solubilization rate of 36 mg dm(-3) h(-1). Taking into account the very high price of the kWh in Italy, a rough estimate of the overall costs is in the range from 25 to 30 per tonne of dry coal. So far the development of a microbial process for organic sulfur removal has shown to be much more difficult and less successful, although significant progress in laboratory research is reported. PMID:23576051

  6. Compound-specific nitrogen isotope analysis of D-alanine, L-alanine, and valine: application of diastereomer separation to delta15N and microbial peptidoglycan studies.

    PubMed

    Takano, Yoshinori; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Ogawa, Nanako O; Kitazato, Hiroshi; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2009-01-01

    We have developed an analytical method to determine the compound-specific nitrogen isotope compositions of individual amino acid enantiomers using gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry. A novel derivatization of amino acid diastereomers by optically active (R)-(-)-2-butanol or (S)-(+)-2-butanol offers two advantages for nitrogen isotope analysis. First, chromatographic chiral separation can be achieved without the use of chiral stationary-phase columns. Second, the elution order of these compounds on the chromatogram can be switched by a designated esterification reaction. We applied the method to the compound-specific nitrogen isotope analysis of D- and L-alanine in a peptidoglycan derived from the cell walls of cultured bacteria (Firmicutes and Actinobacteria; Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus staphylolyticus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, and Streptomyces sp.), natural whole bacterial cells (Bacillus subtilis var. natto), (pseudo)-peptidoglycan from archaea (Methanobacterium sp.), and cell wall from eukaryota (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). We observed statistically significant differences in nitrogen isotopic compositions; e.g., delta15N ( per thousand vs air) in Staphylococcus staphylolyticus for d-alanine (19.2 +/- 0.5 per thousand, n = 4) and L-alanine (21.3 +/- 0.8 per thousand, n = 4) and in Bacillus subtilis for D-alanine (6.2 +/- 0.2 per thousand, n = 3) and L-alanine (8.2 +/- 0.4 per thousand, n = 3). These results suggest that enzymatic reaction pathways, including the alanine racemase reaction, produce a nitrogen isotopic difference in amino acid enantiomers, resulting in 15N-depleted D-alanine. This method is expected to facilitate compound-specific nitrogen isotope studies of amino acid stereoisomers.

  7. Microbial metabolism of the pyridine ring. Formation of pyridinediols (dihydroxypyridines) as intermediates in the degradation of pyridine compounds by micro-organisms

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, C.; Cain, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    1. Several species of micro-organisms that were capable of utilizing pyridine compounds as carbon and energy source were isolated from soil and sewage. Compounds degraded included pyridine and the three isomeric hydroxypyridines. 2. Suitable modifications of the cultural conditions led to the accumulation of pyridinediols (dihydroxypyridines), which were isolated and characterized. 3. Three species of Achromobacter produced pyridine-2,5-diol from 2- or 3-hydroxypyridine whereas an uncommon Agrobacterium sp. (N.C.I.B. 10413) produced pyridine-3,4-diol from 4-hydroxypyridine. 4. On the basis of chemical isolation, induction of the necessary enzymes in washed suspensions and the substrate specificity exhibited by the isolated bacteria, the initial transformations proposed are: 2-hydroxypyridine → pyridine-2,5-diol; 3-hydroxypyridine → pyridine-2,5-diol and 4-hydroxypyridine → pyridine-3,4-diol. 5. A selected pyridine-utilizer, Nocardia Z1, did not produce any detectable hydroxy derivative from pyridine, but carried out a slow oxidation of 3-hydroxypyridine to pyridine-2,3-diol and pyridine-3,4-diol. These diols were not further metabolized. 6. Addition of the isomeric hydroxypyridines to a model hydroxylating system resulted in the formation of those diols predicted by theory. PMID:4664939

  8. Microbial Consortia Development and Microcosm and Column Experiments for Enhanced Bioremediation of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds, West Branch Canal Creek Wetland Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Majcher, Emily H.; Jones, Elizabeth J.; Voytek, Mary A.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorinated solvents, including 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene, carbon tetrachloride, and chloroform, are reaching land surface in localized areas of focused ground-water discharge (seeps) in a wetland and tidal creek in the West Branch Canal Creek area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. In cooperation with the U.S. Army Garrison, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, the U.S. Geological Survey is developing enhanced bioremediation methods that simulate the natural anaerobic degradation that occurs without intervention in non-seep areas of the wetland. A combination of natural attenuation and enhanced bioremediation could provide a remedy for the discharging ground-water plumes that would minimize disturbance to the sensitive wetland ecosystem. Biostimulation (addition of organic substrate or nutrients) and bioaugmentation (addition of microbial consortium), applied either by direct injection at depth in the wetland sediments or by construction of a permeable reactive mat at the seep surface, were tested as possible methods to enhance anaerobic degradation in the seep areas. For the first phase of developing enhanced bioremediation methods for the contaminant mixtures in the seeps, laboratory studies were conducted to develop a microbial consortium to degrade 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and its chlorinated daughter products under anaerobic conditions, and to test biostimulation and bioaugmentation of wetland sediment and reactive mat matrices in microcosms. The individual components required for the direct injection and reactive mat methods were then combined in column experiments to test them under groundwater- flow rates and contaminant concentrations observed in the field. Results showed that both direct injection and the reactive mat are promising remediation methods, although the success of direct injection likely would depend on adequately distributing and maintaining organic substrate throughout the wetland sediment in the seep

  9. Assessing microbial degradation of o-xylene at field-scale from the reduction in mass flow rate combined with compound-specific isotope analyses.

    PubMed

    Peter, A; Steinbach, A; Liedl, R; Ptak, T; Michaelis, W; Teutsch, G

    2004-07-01

    In recent years, natural attenuation (NA) has evolved into a possible remediation alternative, especially in the case of BTEX spills. In order to be approved by the regulators, biodegradation needs to be demonstrated which requires efficient site investigation and monitoring tools. Three methods--the Integral Groundwater Investigation method, the compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) and a newly developed combination of both--were used in this work to quantify at field scale the biodegradation of o-xylene at a former gasworks site which is heavily contaminated with BTEX and PAHs. First, the Integral Groundwater Investigation method [Schwarz, R., Ptak, T., Holder, T., Teutsch, G., 1998. Groundwater risk assessment at contaminated sites: a new investigation approach. In: Herbert, M. and Kovar, K. (Editors), GQ'98 Groundwater Quality: Remediation and Protection. IAHS Publication 250, pp. 68-71; COH 4 (2000) 170] was applied, which allows the determination of mass flow rates of o-xylene by integral pumping tests. Concentration time series obtained during pumping at two wells were used to calculate inversely contaminant mass flow rates at the two control planes that are defined by the diameter of the maximum isochrone. A reactive transport model was used within a Monte Carlo approach to identify biodegradation as the dominant process for reduction in the contaminant mass flow rate between the two consecutive control planes. Secondly, compound-specific carbon isotope analyses of o-xylene were performed on the basis of point-scale samples from the same two wells. The Rayleigh equation was used to quantify the degree of biodegradation that occurred between the wells. Thirdly, a combination of the Integral Groundwater Investigation method and the compound-specific isotope analysis was developed and applied. It comprises isotope measurements during the integral pumping tests and the evaluation of delta13C time series by an inversion algorithm to obtain spatially

  10. Assessing microbial degradation of o-xylene at field-scale from the reduction in mass flow rate combined with compound-specific isotope analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, A.; Steinbach, A.; Liedl, R.; Ptak, T.; Michaelis, W.; Teutsch, G.

    2004-07-01

    In recent years, natural attenuation (NA) has evolved into a possible remediation alternative, especially in the case of BTEX spills. In order to be approved by the regulators, biodegradation needs to be demonstrated which requires efficient site investigation and monitoring tools. Three methods—the Integral Groundwater Investigation method, the compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) and a newly developed combination of both—were used in this work to quantify at field scale the biodegradation of o-xylene at a former gasworks site which is heavily contaminated with BTEX and PAHs. First, the Integral Groundwater Investigation method [Schwarz, R., Ptak, T., Holder, T., Teutsch, G., 1998. Groundwater risk assessment at contaminated sites: a new investigation approach. In: Herbert, M. and Kovar, K. (Editors), GQ'98 Groundwater Quality: Remediation and Protection. IAHS Publication 250, pp. 68-71; COH 4 (2000) 170] was applied, which allows the determination of mass flow rates of o-xylene by integral pumping tests. Concentration time series obtained during pumping at two wells were used to calculate inversely contaminant mass flow rates at the two control planes that are defined by the diameter of the maximum isochrone. A reactive transport model was used within a Monte Carlo approach to identify biodegradation as the dominant process for reduction in the contaminant mass flow rate between the two consecutive control planes. Secondly, compound-specific carbon isotope analyses of o-xylene were performed on the basis of point-scale samples from the same two wells. The Rayleigh equation was used to quantify the degree of biodegradation that occurred between the wells. Thirdly, a combination of the Integral Groundwater Investigation method and the compound-specific isotope analysis was developed and applied. It comprises isotope measurements during the integral pumping tests and the evaluation of δ13C time series by an inversion algorithm to obtain spatially

  11. Assessing microbial degradation of o-xylene at field-scale from the reduction in mass flow rate combined with compound-specific isotope analyses.

    PubMed

    Peter, A; Steinbach, A; Liedl, R; Ptak, T; Michaelis, W; Teutsch, G

    2004-07-01

    In recent years, natural attenuation (NA) has evolved into a possible remediation alternative, especially in the case of BTEX spills. In order to be approved by the regulators, biodegradation needs to be demonstrated which requires efficient site investigation and monitoring tools. Three methods--the Integral Groundwater Investigation method, the compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) and a newly developed combination of both--were used in this work to quantify at field scale the biodegradation of o-xylene at a former gasworks site which is heavily contaminated with BTEX and PAHs. First, the Integral Groundwater Investigation method [Schwarz, R., Ptak, T., Holder, T., Teutsch, G., 1998. Groundwater risk assessment at contaminated sites: a new investigation approach. In: Herbert, M. and Kovar, K. (Editors), GQ'98 Groundwater Quality: Remediation and Protection. IAHS Publication 250, pp. 68-71; COH 4 (2000) 170] was applied, which allows the determination of mass flow rates of o-xylene by integral pumping tests. Concentration time series obtained during pumping at two wells were used to calculate inversely contaminant mass flow rates at the two control planes that are defined by the diameter of the maximum isochrone. A reactive transport model was used within a Monte Carlo approach to identify biodegradation as the dominant process for reduction in the contaminant mass flow rate between the two consecutive control planes. Secondly, compound-specific carbon isotope analyses of o-xylene were performed on the basis of point-scale samples from the same two wells. The Rayleigh equation was used to quantify the degree of biodegradation that occurred between the wells. Thirdly, a combination of the Integral Groundwater Investigation method and the compound-specific isotope analysis was developed and applied. It comprises isotope measurements during the integral pumping tests and the evaluation of delta13C time series by an inversion algorithm to obtain spatially

  12. Differences in microbial metabolites in urine headspace of subjects with Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) detected by volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis and metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Batty, Claire A; Cauchi, Michael; Hunter, J O; Woolner, Jenny; Baglin, Trevor; Turner, Claire

    2016-10-01

    ITP is an organ-specific autoimmune disorder characterised by a low platelet count whose cause is uncertain. A possible factor is food intolerance, although much of the information linking this with ITP is anecdotal. The role of food intolerance in ITP was studied by replacing a normal diet with an elemental diet (E028), but this did not increase platelet counts. Clear differences, however, were apparent between the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the urine headspace of patients with ITP and those present in healthy volunteers, which leads to speculation that abnormal metabolic activity of the intestinal microbiome may be a factor causing ITP. However, further work is needed to confirm this. There were also differences between the VOCs of patients on a normal diet and those on the elemental diet, and in this case, the VOCs involved are very likely to be of bacterial origin, as their production is affected by dietary manipulation. Many of these VOCs are known to be toxic. PMID:27475979

  13. Microbial synthesis of Pd/Fe3O4, Au/Fe3O4 and PdAu/Fe3O4 nanocomposites for catalytic reduction of nitroaromatic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Tuo, Ya; Liu, Guangfei; Dong, Bin; Zhou, Jiti; Wang, Aijie; Wang, Jing; Jin, Ruofei; Lv, Hong; Dou, Zeou; Huang, Wenyu

    2015-01-01

    Magnetically recoverable noble metal nanoparticles are promising catalysts for chemical reactions. However, the chemical synthesis of these nanocatalysts generally causes environmental concern due to usage of toxic chemicals under extreme conditions. Here, Pd/Fe3O4, Au/Fe3O4 and PdAu/Fe3O4 nanocomposites are biosynthesized under ambient and physiological conditions by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Microbial cells firstly transform akaganeite into magnetite, which then serves as support for the further synthesis of Pd, Au and PdAu nanoparticles from respective precursor salts. Surface-bound cellular components and exopolysaccharides not only function as shape-directing agent to convert some Fe3O4 nanoparticles to nanorods, but also participate in the formation of PdAu alloy nanoparticles on magnetite. All these three kinds of magnetic nanocomposites can catalyze the reduction of 4-nitrophenol and some other nitroaromatic compounds by NaBH4. PdAu/Fe3O4 demonstrates higher catalytic activity than Pd/Fe3O4 and Au/Fe3O4. Moreover, the magnetic nanocomposites can be easily recovered through magnetic decantation after catalysis reaction. PdAu/Fe3O4 can be reused in at least eight successive cycles of 4-nitrophenol reduction. The biosynthesis approach presented here does not require harmful agents or rigorous conditions and thus provides facile and environmentally benign choice for the preparation of magnetic noble metal nanocatalysts. PMID:26310728

  14. The influence of soluble microbial products on microbial community composition: hypothesis of microbial community succession.

    PubMed

    Chipasa, Kangala B; Medrzycka, Krystyna

    2008-01-01

    Soluble microbial products (SMP) are organic compounds produced by activated sludge microorganisms as they degrade substrates. They include by-products of microbial activity, death and lysis. The available literature does not reveal how SMP influence microbial community composition. In this regard, we microscopically studied changes in composition of microbial communities, especially protozoa and metazoa, under the influence of increased as well as reduced levels of SMP. The presence of SMP at high level significantly caused changes in microbial community composition. Microbial species shifted from attached ciliates (12-175 microm) to free-swimming and crawling ciliates (35-330 microm) and then invertebrates, which included rotifers (0.2-1 mm) and nematodes (1-50 mm). The shift of small-size microorganisms to large ones was observed as one of the most significant influences of SMP. Attached ciliates reappeared when we removed the SMP that had accumulated in the bioreactors - we have called this as the resurrection phenomenon of microorganisms. Such rapid changes in microbial community composition were not observed in the experiment with low concentration of SMP. Overall, the results suggest that accumulation of SMP is one of the intrinsic regulatory mechanisms that control viability and dormancy of microbial communities in activated sludge. PMID:18610657

  15. Microbial volatile emissions as insect semiochemicals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We provide a synthesis of the literature describing biochemical interactions between microorganisms and arthropods by way of microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) production. We explored important metabolic pathways involved in MVOC production and evaluated the functionality, generality, and e...

  16. Microbial nanowires for bioenergy applications.

    PubMed

    Malvankar, Nikhil S; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-06-01

    Microbial nanowires are electrically conductive filaments that facilitate long-range extracellular electron transfer. The model for electron transport along Shewanella oneidensis nanowires is electron hopping/tunneling between cytochromes adorning the filaments. Geobacter sulfurreducens nanowires are comprised of pili that have metal-like conductivity attributed to overlapping pi-pi orbitals of aromatic amino acids. The nanowires of Geobacter species have been implicated in direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET), which may be an important mode of syntrophy in the conversion of organic wastes to methane. Nanowire networks confer conductivity to Geobacter biofilms converting organic compounds to electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and increasing nanowire production is the only genetic manipulation shown to yield strains with improved current-producing capabilities. Introducing nanowires, or nanowire mimetics, might improve other bioenergy strategies that rely on extracellular electron exchange, such as microbial electrosynthesis. Similarities between microbial nanowires and synthetic conducting polymers suggest additional energy-related applications.

  17. Microbial methods of reducing technetium

    DOEpatents

    Wildung, Raymond E [Richland, WA; Garland, Thomas R [Greybull, WY; Gorby, Yuri A [Richland, WA; Hess, Nancy J [Benton City, WA; Li, Shu-Mei W [Richland, WA; Plymale, Andrew E [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward a method for microbial reduction of a technetium compound to form other compounds of value in medical imaging. The technetium compound is combined in a mixture with non-growing microbial cells which contain a technetium-reducing enzyme system, a stabilizing agent and an electron donor in a saline solution under anaerobic conditions. The mixture is substantially free of an inorganic technetium reducing agent and its reduction products. The resulting product is Tc of lower oxidation states, the form of which can be partially controlled by the stabilizing agent. It has been discovered that the microorganisms Shewanella alga, strain Bry and Shewanelia putrifacians, strain CN-32 contain the necessary enzyme systems for technetium reduction and can form both mono nuclear and polynuclear reduced Tc species depending on the stabilizing agent.

  18. Ecology, Microbial

    SciTech Connect

    Konopka, Allan

    2009-05-15

    Microbial ecology is a relatively young discipline within the field of microbiology. Its modern history spans just the past 60 years, and the field is defined by its emphasis on understanding the interactions of microbes with their environment, rather than their behavior under artificial laboratory conditions. Because microbes are ubiquitous, microbial ecologists study a broad diversity of habitats that range from aquatic to terrestrial to plant- or animal-associated. This has made it a challenge to identify unifying principles within the field. One approach is to recognize that although the activity of microbes in nature have effects at the macroscale, they interact with their physical, chemical and biological milieu at a scale of micrometers. At this scale, several different microbial ecosystems can be defined, based upon association with particles, the presence of environmental gradients and the continuous availability of water. Principles applicable to microbial ecology reflect not only their population ecology and physiological ecology, but also their broad versatility and quantitative importance in the biosphere as biogeochemical catalysts and capacity for rapid physiological and evolutionary responses.

  19. Ecology, Microbial

    SciTech Connect

    Konopka, Allan

    2009-03-19

    Microbial ecology is a relatively young discipline within the field of microbiology. Its modern history spans just the past 60 years, and the field is defined by its emphasis on understanding the interactions of microbes with their environment, rather than their behavior under artificial laboratory conditions. Because microbes are ubiquitous, microbial ecologists study a broad diversity of habitats that range from aquatic to terrestrial to plant- or animal-associated. This has made it a challenge to identify unifying principles within the field. One approach is to recognize that although the activity of microbes in nature have effects at the macroscale, they interact with their physical, chemical and biological milieu at a scale of micrometers. At this scale, several different microbial ecosystems can be defined, based upon association with particles, the presence of environmental gradients and the continuous availability of water. Principles applicable to microbial ecology reflect not only their population ecology and physiological ecology, but also their broad versatility and quantitative importance in the biosphere as biogeochemical catalysts and capacity for rapid physiological and evolutionary responses.

  20. Microbial Biotransformation to Obtain New Antifungals

    PubMed Central

    Bianchini, Luiz F.; Arruda, Maria F. C.; Vieira, Sergio R.; Campelo, Patrícia M. S.; Grégio, Ana M. T.; Rosa, Edvaldo A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Antifungal drugs belong to few chemical groups and such low diversity limits the therapeutic choices. The urgent need of innovative options has pushed researchers to search new bioactive molecules. Literature regarding the last 15 years reveals that different research groups have used different approaches to achieve such goal. However, the discovery of molecules with different mechanisms of action still demands considerable time and efforts. This review was conceived to present how Pharmaceutical Biotechnology might contribute to the discovery of molecules with antifungal properties by microbial biotransformation procedures. Authors present some aspects of (1) microbial biotransformation of herbal medicines and food; (2) possibility of major and minor molecular amendments in existing molecules by biocatalysis; (3) methodological improvements in processes involving whole cells and immobilized enzymes; (4) potential of endophytic fungi to produce antimicrobials by bioconversions; and (5) in silico research driving to the improvement of molecules. All these issues belong to a new conception of transformation procedures, so-called “green chemistry,” which aims the highest possible efficiency with reduced production of waste and the smallest environmental impact. PMID:26733974

  1. Microbial Biotransformation to Obtain New Antifungals.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, Luiz F; Arruda, Maria F C; Vieira, Sergio R; Campelo, Patrícia M S; Grégio, Ana M T; Rosa, Edvaldo A R

    2015-01-01

    Antifungal drugs belong to few chemical groups and such low diversity limits the therapeutic choices. The urgent need of innovative options has pushed researchers to search new bioactive molecules. Literature regarding the last 15 years reveals that different research groups have used different approaches to achieve such goal. However, the discovery of molecules with different mechanisms of action still demands considerable time and efforts. This review was conceived to present how Pharmaceutical Biotechnology might contribute to the discovery of molecules with antifungal properties by microbial biotransformation procedures. Authors present some aspects of (1) microbial biotransformation of herbal medicines and food; (2) possibility of major and minor molecular amendments in existing molecules by biocatalysis; (3) methodological improvements in processes involving whole cells and immobilized enzymes; (4) potential of endophytic fungi to produce antimicrobials by bioconversions; and (5) in silico research driving to the improvement of molecules. All these issues belong to a new conception of transformation procedures, so-called "green chemistry," which aims the highest possible efficiency with reduced production of waste and the smallest environmental impact. PMID:26733974

  2. Microbial xanthophylls.

    PubMed

    Bhosale, Prakash; Bernstein, Paul S

    2005-09-01

    Xanthophylls are oxygenated carotenoids abundant in the human food supply. Lutein, zeaxanthin, and cryptoxanthin are major xanthophyll carotenoids in human plasma. The consumption of these xanthophylls is directly associated with reduction in the risk of cancers, cardiovascular disease, age-related macular degeneration, and cataract formation. Canthaxanthin and astaxanthin also have considerable importance in aquaculture for salmonid and crustacean pigmentation, and are of commercial interest for the pharmaceutical and food industries. Chemical synthesis is a major source for the heavy demand of xanthophylls in the consumer market; however, microbial producers also have potential as commercial sources. In this review, we discuss the biosynthesis, commercial utility, and major microbial sources of xanthophylls. We also present a critical review of current research and technologies involved in promoting microbes as potential commercial sources for mass production.

  3. The revival of a so-called rotten fish: the ontogeny of the Devonian acanthodian Triazeugacanthus

    PubMed Central

    Chevrinais, Marion; Cloutier, Richard; Sire, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Since its original description as a chordate, the Late Devonian Scaumenella mesacanthi has been interpreted alternately as a prochordate, a larval ostracoderm and an immature acanthodian. For the past 30 years, these minute specimens were generally considered as decayed acanthodians, most of them belonging to Triazeugacanthus affinis. Among the abundant material of ‘Scaumenella’, we identified a size series of 188 specimens of Triazeugacanthus based on otolith characteristics. Despite taphonomic alteration, we describe proportional growth and progressive appearance of skeletal elements through size increase. Three ontogenetic stages are identified based on squamation extent, ossification completion and allometric growth. We demonstrate that what has been interpreted previously as various degrees of decomposition corresponds to ontogenetic changes. PMID:25694507

  4. [Pathomorphological changes in the organs of cattle dying in so-called sudden death].

    PubMed

    Zhelev, V; de Pino, A M

    1984-01-01

    Studied were morphologically the organs of 10 cattle originating from two provinces of Cuba that suddenly succumbed ( muerte subita ). There were hemorrahagic diathesis, and histologically--general activation of the reticulo-endothelial system, nonsuppurative encephalomyocarditis, interstitial nonsuppurative hepatitis, nephritis, and pneumonia as well as catarrhal hemorrhagic gastroenteritis. In all cases there were among the lymphoid proliferations diffusely disseminated eosinophile leukocytes ( hyperergia ). This finding showed that the disease had run a subacute or chronic course which was made acute by the action of some stress factors (continuous running, intoxications oligoelement disturbances, etc.). The finding was also characteristic of reactive processes taking place under the action of some specific virus that probably took part in the etiology of the disease and required an intermediary host that remained unknown at the time.

  5. The Sudbury-Serenitatis analogy and 'so-called' pristine nonmare rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Paul H.

    1992-01-01

    The Serenitatis Basin is the one lunar basin from which we confidently identify a suite of samples as pieces of the impact melt sheet: the distinctive Apollo 17 noritic breccias. Recent studies of the Sudbury Complex indicate that its 'irruptive' is almost entirely of impact-melt origin, making it the closest terrestrial analog to the Serenitatis melt sheet. Any attempt to model the evolution of the Moon's crust should be compatible with the relatively well-understood Sudbury Complex. However, the Sudbury-Moon analogy might be a misleading oversimplification, if applied too rigidly. The cause of evolutionary differences between the Serenitatis impact melt and the Sudbury impact melt is discussed.

  6. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: so-called psychiatric comorbidity and underlying defense mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Beghi, Massimiliano; Negrini, Paola Beffa; Perin, Cecilia; Peroni, Federica; Magaudda, Adriana; Cerri, Cesare; Cornaggia, Cesare Maria

    2015-01-01

    In Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) do not have a unique classification as they can be found within different categories: conversion, dissociative, and somatization disorders. The ICD-10, instead, considers PNES within dissociative disorders, merging the dissociative disorders and conversion disorders, although the underlying defense mechanisms are different. The literature data show that PNES are associated with cluster B (mainly borderline) personality disorders and/or to people with depressive or anxiety disorders. Defense mechanisms in patients with PNES with a prevalence of anxious/depressive symptoms are of “neurotic” type; their goal is to lead to a “split”, either vertical (dissociation) or horizontal (repression). The majority of patients with this type of PNES have alexithymia traits, meaning that they had difficulties in feeling or perceiving emotions. In subjects where PNES are associated with a borderline personality, in which the symbolic function is lost, the defense mechanisms are of a more archaic nature (denial). PNES with different underlying defense mechanisms have different prognoses (despite similar severity of PNES) and need usually a different treatment (pharmacological or psychological). Thus, it appears superfluous to talk about psychiatric comorbidity, since PNES are a different symptomatic expression of specific psychiatric disorders. PMID:26491330

  7. Toxicity of so-called edible hijiki seaweed (Sargassum fusiforme) containing inorganic arsenic.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Katsuhiko; Konomi, Aki

    2012-07-01

    The UK Food Standards Agency and its counterparts in other countries have warned consumers not to eat hijiki (Sargassum fusiforme; synonym Hizikia fusiformis), a Sargasso seaweed, because it contains large amounts of inorganic arsenic. We investigated dietary exposure of hijiki in weaning male F344/N rats fed an AIN-93G diet supplemented with 3% (w/w) hijiki powder for 7 weeks, compared with those fed only an AIN-93G diet. Body weight, body temperature, blood and tissue arsenic concentrations, plasma biochemistry and hematological parameters were measured. We found that feeding rats a 3% hijiki diet led to a marked accumulation of arsenic in blood and tissues, and evoked a high body temperature and abnormal blood biochemistry including elevated plasma alkaline phosphatase activity and inorganic phosphorus, consistent with arsenic poisoning. These findings should prompt further investigations to identify the health hazards related to consumption of hijiki and related Sargassum species in humans.

  8. An Exegetic Study of the So-Called Proposition of Confucian Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yi; Fu, Xiaowei

    2008-01-01

    Since Wang Guowei and Cai Yuanpei introduced the concepts of aesthetics and aesthetic education, respectively, to China in the early twentieth century, there has been a strong tendency in many of the aesthetic discussions to examine ancient texts and materials using modern concepts of aesthetics. In particular, sentences with the character-word…

  9. ACTIVE IMMUNITY PRODUCED BY SO CALLED BALANCED OR NEUTRAL MIXTURES OF DIPHTHERIA TOXIN AND ANTITOXIN.

    PubMed

    Smith, T

    1909-03-01

    The foregoing and earlier data taken together demonstrate that an active immunity lasting several years can be produced in guinea-pigs, by the injection of toxin-antitoxin mixtures which have no recognizable harmful effect either immediate or remote. They also show, what might have been anticipated, that under the same conditions mixtures which produce local lesions and which, therefore, contain an excess of toxin produce a much higher degree of immunity than the neutral mixtures, and that an excess of antitoxin reduces the possibility of producing an active immunity, and may extinguish it altogether. There is, therefore, a certain definite relation between the components of the mixture and the degree of immunity producible. Furthermore, toxin-antitoxin mixtures do not change materially within five days at room temperature. They are apparently more efficacious at the end of forty-eight hours than immediately after preparation. The experiments finally prove that a relatively high degree of active immunity can be induced by a harmless procedure, whereas the use of toxin alone leading to very severe local lesions is incapable of producing more than an insignificant protection. The method, therefore, invites further tests in regard to its ultimate applicability to the human being. Unless the subcutis of the guinea-pig reacts to toxin-antitoxin mixtures in a manner peculiar to itself, a practical, easily controlled method for active immunization can be worked out which should afford a larger protection than the serum alone and avoid the complications associated with horse serum. That proportion of toxin and antitoxin which would produce the highest desirable immunity consistent with the least discomfort would have to be carefully worked out for the human subject. From the nature of the immunity induced it is obvious, however, that such a method of immunization cannot take the place of a large dose of antitoxin in exposed individuals who must be protected at once. It would be applicable only as a general protective measure without reference to any immediate danger, since it would take several weeks, perhaps longer, to perfect the attainable immunity. Passing to the theoretical aspects of the facts observed, we find no publications bearing directly upon the subject before us. Madsen has, however, approached it very closely in his experiments on the immunization of animals with mixtures not fully balanced, or, in other words, in which the "toxones" were still free. He found that the injection of such mixtures in rabbits, goats and horses produces an active immunity. He makes the significant remark that perhaps in the immunizing capacity we may possess the keenest reagent for a poison which is not able to exert any toxic action in the body. This is fully borne out by the experiments described, for in these we pass beyond the visible spectrum, so to speak, of the toxin-antitoxin effects, and we are able to recognize toxic action only by the lasting immunizing effects. Another publication which touches upon some phases of the same problem is that of Morgenroth on the union between toxin and antitoxin. Morgenroth brought out the fact that a given toxin-antitoxin mixture is more toxic when injected directly into the circulation than when injected under the skin. Thus, an L(+) dose of 0.78 c.c. toxin + one unit antitoxin applied subcutaneously was of the same toxicity as 0.68 c.c. toxin + one unit antitoxin injected into the circulation. When the mixture had stood twenty-four hours this (L(+)) dose was still 0.78 c.c. subcutaneously, but it had risen to 0.74 c.c. when introduced by the intracardiac route. The author makes two deductions from these results. He assumes that the velocity of reaction between toxin and antitoxin is slow, and that the union is not completed until the mixture has stood twenty-four hours. Hence, the L(+) dose of toxin injected into the blood is higher after twenty-four hours than immediately after mixing the toxin and antitoxin. He furthermore explains the fact that the subcutaneous L(+) dose remains the same whether the mixture is injected at once or after twenty-four hours, by assuming that in the subcutis of the guinea-pig there is a catalytic acceleration of the union of toxin and antitoxin. In view of the writer's results it seems that not only immediately, but four to five days after the preparation of the mixture of toxin and antitoxin, there are still toxic substances available for the production of immunity in the body of the guinea-pig, when the dose of toxin in the mixture is far below the L(0) or neutral level. These toxins may be free, either because uncombined in vitro, or else because the mixture is partially dissociated in vivo, or there may be a third possibility. It is obvious that Morgenroth's investigations, however extensive and thorough, have not exhausted the subject, for both these inferences are incompatible with his. Perhaps his recent important studies on the recovery of toxin from its combination with antitoxin with weak acids may throw more light on this subject. The only conclusion which we may safely draw at this time is that the toxin-antitoxin mixture produces two sets of effects, essentially identical, however. One is visible, as injury (oedema, loss of hair, superficial and deep necrosis of skin, paralysis and death), and corresponds to the toxin spectrum of Ehrlich. The other is invisible and manifests itself only in degrees of active immunity. At what ratio of toxin to antitoxin in the mixture active immunity is no longer produced will vary somewhat with the guinea-pig used, but it is evident that traces of immunity are still transmitted to the young when the amount of toxin approaches half the L(0) dose.

  10. [Hormonal diagnosis in so-called androgenetic alopecia in the female].

    PubMed

    Moltz, L

    1988-04-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (a.A.) occurs quite frequently. Up to 79% of women suffer at least temporarily from varying degrees of intermittent diffuse hair loss in the centro-parietal and/or fronto-temporal regions. A.A. is caused by an androgen excess acting on the hair follicle for prolonged periods of time in the presence of a genetic predisposition. However, often hyperandrogenemia cannot be demonstrated in such patients. 125 women with clinically typical a.A. were investigated prospectively under standardized conditions. Patient age ranged from 18 to 68 years (mean +/- SD: 34 +/- 11.6). Atypical uterine bleeding such as menorrhagia, hypermenorrhea and polymenorrhea were found in 69 women. The hair loss varied between 50 and 400 hairs per day (124 +/- 125). Additional signs of hyperandrogenism, i.e. seborrhea (n = 83), acne (n = 52) and hirsutism (n = 28), were often observed. Basal levels of total and free testosterone (T and FT), dihydro-T (DHT) DHEA-sulfate (DS), delta 4-androstendione (A), 17 alpha-hydroxy-progesterone (17P), cortisol (F), progesterone (P), 17 beta-estradiol (E2), sex hormone binding globuline (SHBG), prolactin (PRL), thyreoidea-stimulating hormone (TSH), ferritin (Fe), vitamin B12 (B12) and folat (Fo) were determined by RIA. FT was also measured by equilibrium dialyses. Different methods of determining bound and unbound T were used; their diagnostic value is discussed in detail. In addition, a combined ACTH/TRH-stimulation test was performed in all patients. Pathologic changes of one parameter were detectable in 26.4% of patients, while 67.2% revealed deviations of two or more indices. Excluding clinically relevant borderline values, only 6.4% of patients were without any abnormalities. The incidence rate of pathologic parameters was as follows: FT in % = 52%, Fe = 42%, PRL = 34%, E2 = 34%, FT in pg = 29%, DHT = 28%, SHBG = 26%, TSH = 20.8%, DS = 19%, T = 14%, 17P = 11%, Fo = 7%, A = 6%, F = 6%, B12 = 5%. Group and individual case analyses revealed significant correlations between (1) the levels of the various androgens, PRL and TSH and (2) the E2, SHBG and FT values; these, in turn, were correlated to (3) the occurrence of certain bleeding anomalies (amount, duration, interval) and corresponding ferritin deficiency. Therapy was directed at normalizing the disturbed estrogen-androgen-balance. Using low-dose antiandrogens, estrogens, prolactin suppressants, corticoids, iron-II-preparations as well as estrogen-containing hair lotions hair loss was arrested in 74 of 104 treated women, while regrowth of hair was accomplished in 16 patients. 14 women did not respond to therapy. PMID:3378687

  11. The so-called dry laser cleaning governed by humidity at the nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grojo, D.; Delaporte, Ph.; Sentis, M.; Pakarinen, O. H.; Foster, A. S.

    2008-01-01

    Illumination with single nanosecond pulses leads to the detachment of silica particles with 250nm radii from silicon surfaces. We identify two laser-energy dependent cleaning regimes by time-of-flight particle-scattering diagnostics. For the higher energies, the ejection of particles is produced by nanoscale ablation due to the laser field enhancement at the particle-surface interface. The damage-free regime at lower energy is shown to be governed by the residual water molecules, which are inevitably trapped on the materials. We discuss the great importance that the humidity plays on the cleaning force and on the adhesion in the experiments.

  12. [Regarding respiration and the so-called "animal heat." An historical sketch].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, A

    2001-01-01

    According to Aristotle and Galen, the essential function of the respiration phenomenon was to cool the blood. Towards the middle of the XVI Century, Miguel Servet suggested, in his treatise Christianismi restitutio..., that the inspired air could have other functions besides cooling the blood. Later, Joseph Black thought that respiration was a combustion. In the light of the advances in chemistry achieved in the XVII Century, the English scientist Adair Crawford and the French chemist Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier conceived, in the second half of that century, the first general and quantitative theories on the origin of animal heat. Both these authors had the conviction that the "inflammable element", which will be called oxygen, was not formed in the pulmonary territory, but could be absorbed by the blood. Oxygen, foreseen by Mayow at the end of XVII Century, was discovered by Joseph Priestley in 1774. Lavoisier gave the name of oxygen to this gas and firmly established that the respiration phenomenon consists essentially in a process of combustion. The mathematician Joseph-Louis Lagrange, native of Turin, suggested that animal heat originates in all breathing tissues. This phenomenon was verified and described in detail by the biologist Lazzaro Spallanzani, professor at the University of Pavia. Dissemination, in the scientific world, of the new chemical nomenclature and of the respiratory theory, closely related to it, was based fundamentally on the works "Méthode de nomenclature chimique..." (1787) and "Traité élémentaire de chimie..." (1789). During the XIX Century, studies on the phenomenon of animal respiration continued and fundamental discoveries in this subject were attained, such as conversion of hemoglobin to oxyhemoglobin once oxygen had been fixed. Now it is possible to study the regulating mechanisms of the energetic metabolism of the myocardium in vivo, which allows decisive interventions in certain cardiopathies, such as in acute ischemic cardiopathy.

  13. Rhizophores in Rhizophora mangle L: an alternative interpretation of so-called ''aerial roots''.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Nanuza L de

    2006-06-01

    Rhizophora mangle L., one of the most common mangrove species, has an aerial structure system that gives it stability in permanently swampy soils. In fact, these structures, known as "aerial roots" or "stilt roots", have proven to be peculiar branches with positive geotropism, which form a large number of roots when in contact with swampy soils. These organs have a sympodial branching system, wide pith, slightly thickened cortex, collateral vascular bundles, polyarch stele and endarch protoxylem, as in the stem, and a periderm produced by a phellogen at the apex similar to a root cap. They also have the same type of trichosclereid that occurs in the stem, with negative geotropism, unlike true Rhizophora roots, which do not form trichosclereids at all. On the other hand, these branches do not form leaves and in this respect they are similar to roots. These peculiar branches are rhizophores or special root-bearing branches, analogous to those found in Lepidodendrales and other Carboniferous tree ferns that grew in swampy soils. PMID:16710561

  14. Importance of the so-called 'other' sexually-transmitted diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Willcox, R R

    1975-01-01

    (1) Some data are presented concerning the frequency and potential morbidity of sexually-transmitted organisms other than T. pallidum or N. gonorrhoeae. (2) Most of the diseases with which these organisms are associated are more prevalent than syphilis and some, at least in one sex, are as common as gonorrhoea. A number appear to carry considerable morbidity, which in the case of Type II herpes virus--if it is responsible for cervical cancer--may ultimately cause more fatalities than syphilis. (3) It is concluded: (a) that, if syphilis and gonorrhoea were reduced to the point of representing no public health concern, many other sexually-transmitted conditions would still remain to pose significant problems: and (b) that health education and other methods of prevention should, where possible, be designed to take into consideration the epidemiological implications of the other organisms listed. PMID:168937

  15. [Regarding respiration and the so-called "animal heat." An historical sketch].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, A

    2001-01-01

    According to Aristotle and Galen, the essential function of the respiration phenomenon was to cool the blood. Towards the middle of the XVI Century, Miguel Servet suggested, in his treatise Christianismi restitutio..., that the inspired air could have other functions besides cooling the blood. Later, Joseph Black thought that respiration was a combustion. In the light of the advances in chemistry achieved in the XVII Century, the English scientist Adair Crawford and the French chemist Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier conceived, in the second half of that century, the first general and quantitative theories on the origin of animal heat. Both these authors had the conviction that the "inflammable element", which will be called oxygen, was not formed in the pulmonary territory, but could be absorbed by the blood. Oxygen, foreseen by Mayow at the end of XVII Century, was discovered by Joseph Priestley in 1774. Lavoisier gave the name of oxygen to this gas and firmly established that the respiration phenomenon consists essentially in a process of combustion. The mathematician Joseph-Louis Lagrange, native of Turin, suggested that animal heat originates in all breathing tissues. This phenomenon was verified and described in detail by the biologist Lazzaro Spallanzani, professor at the University of Pavia. Dissemination, in the scientific world, of the new chemical nomenclature and of the respiratory theory, closely related to it, was based fundamentally on the works "Méthode de nomenclature chimique..." (1787) and "Traité élémentaire de chimie..." (1789). During the XIX Century, studies on the phenomenon of animal respiration continued and fundamental discoveries in this subject were attained, such as conversion of hemoglobin to oxyhemoglobin once oxygen had been fixed. Now it is possible to study the regulating mechanisms of the energetic metabolism of the myocardium in vivo, which allows decisive interventions in certain cardiopathies, such as in acute ischemic cardiopathy. PMID:11795113

  16. Les langues, dites, nationals, hors de leur territoire (So-Called National Languages outside Their Territory).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschoumy, Jacques-Andre

    A discussion of the role of national languages in an international context focuses on the situation of Europe, currently and in the foreseeable future, and particularly on the situation of multilingual Switzerland. The first section gives an overview of the status of national languages outside their own boundaries, especially in relation to…

  17. So-Called Giftedness and Teacher Education: Issues of Equity and Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzoli Smith, Laura; Campbell, Robert James

    2016-01-01

    The education of students identified as "gifted" has had a highly problematic history, having been judged as conceptually confused, socially and ethnically discriminatory, and educationally exclusive. Despite this, it is argued that contemporary research and scholarship critiquing the concepts of giftedness and gifted education…

  18. [Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour (so-called pseudotumour) of the hepatobiliary system].

    PubMed

    Stuckmann, G; Flury, R; Heinz, W; Strunk, H

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the ultrasonographic features of hepatic inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour (IMT). This tumour presented as an area of periportal soft-tissue infiltration. Because periportal infiltration is a common feature in both IMT and other malignant tumours of the hepatic portal, histological examination should be considered before final diagnosis and treatment. PMID:15368142

  19. Cause of death--so-called designed event acclimaxing timed happenings.

    PubMed

    Kothari, M L; Mehta, L A; Kothari, V M

    2000-01-01

    Cause-of-death as an established global medical institution faces its greatest challenge in the commonplace observation that the healthy do not necessarily survive and the diseased do not necessarily die. A logical analysis of the assumed relationships between disease and death provides some insights that allow questioning the taken-for-granted relationship between defined disease/s and the final common parameter of death. Causalism as a paradigm has taken leave of all advanced sciences. In medicine, it is lingering on for anthropocentric reasons. Natural death does not come to pass because of some (replaceable) missing element, but because the evolution of the individual from womb to tomb has arrived at its final destination. To accept death as a physiologic event is to advance thanatology and to disburden medical colleges and hospitals of a lot of avoidable thinking and doing.

  20. Cleaning-up atrazine-polluted soil by using Microbial Electroremediating Cells.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Garay, Ainara; Boltes, Karina; Esteve-Núñez, Abraham

    2016-10-01

    Biodegradation of pollutants in soil is greatly limited by the availability of terminal electron acceptors required for supporting microbial respiration. Such limitation can be overcome if soil-buried electrodes accept the electrons released in the microbial metabolism. We propose the term bioelectroventing for such a environmental treatment. The process would be performed in a device so-called Microbial Electroremediating Cell. Indeed, our studies demonstrate that the presence of electrodes as electron acceptors effectively stimulated by 5-fold the biodegradation rate of the herbicide atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropyl amino-1,3,5-triazine) in comparison with soil natural attenuation. Furthermore, a different set of toxicological test using Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata green alga e, Salmonella typhimorium bacteria and Sorghum saccharatum plant seeds respectively, confirm that atrazine-polluted soil can be effectively cleaned-up in short time by the use of MERCs. PMID:27448317

  1. Cleaning-up atrazine-polluted soil by using Microbial Electroremediating Cells.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Garay, Ainara; Boltes, Karina; Esteve-Núñez, Abraham

    2016-10-01

    Biodegradation of pollutants in soil is greatly limited by the availability of terminal electron acceptors required for supporting microbial respiration. Such limitation can be overcome if soil-buried electrodes accept the electrons released in the microbial metabolism. We propose the term bioelectroventing for such a environmental treatment. The process would be performed in a device so-called Microbial Electroremediating Cell. Indeed, our studies demonstrate that the presence of electrodes as electron acceptors effectively stimulated by 5-fold the biodegradation rate of the herbicide atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropyl amino-1,3,5-triazine) in comparison with soil natural attenuation. Furthermore, a different set of toxicological test using Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata green alga e, Salmonella typhimorium bacteria and Sorghum saccharatum plant seeds respectively, confirm that atrazine-polluted soil can be effectively cleaned-up in short time by the use of MERCs.

  2. A new strategy of glucose supply in a microbial fermentation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasbawati, Gunawan, A. Y.; Sidarto, K. A.; Hertadi, R.

    2015-09-01

    Strategy of glucose supply to achieve an optimal productivity of ethanol production of a yeast cell is one of the main features in a microbial fermentation process. Beside a known continuous glucose supply, in this study we consider a new supply strategy so called the on-off supply. An optimal control theory is applied to the fermentation system to find the optimal rate of glucose supply and time of supply. The optimization problem is solved numerically using Differential Evolutionary algorithm. We find two alternative solutions that we can choose to get the similar result: either long period process with low supply or short period process with high glucose supply.

  3. Microbial Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Microbial metabolomics constitutes an integrated component of systems biology. By studying the complete set of metabolites within a microorganism and monitoring the global outcome of interactions between its development processes and the environment, metabolomics can potentially provide a more accurate snap shot of the actual physiological state of the cell. Recent advancement of technologies and post-genomic developments enable the study and analysis of metabolome. This unique contribution resulted in many scientific disciplines incorporating metabolomics as one of their “omics” platforms. This review focuses on metabolomics in microorganisms and utilizes selected topics to illustrate its impact on the understanding of systems microbiology. PMID:22379393

  4. Microbial metropolis.

    PubMed

    Wimpenny, Julian

    2009-01-01

    Microorganisms can form tightly knit communities such as biofilms. Many others include marine snow, anaerobic digester granules, the ginger beer plant and bacterial colonies. This chapter is devoted to a survey of the main properties of these communities, with an emphasis on biofilms. We start with attachment to surfaces and the nature of adhesion. The growing community then forms within a matrix, generally of organic macromolecules. Inevitably the environment within such a matrix is different from that outside. Organisms respond by forming crowd-detection and response units; these quorum sensing systems act as switches between planktonic life and the dramatically altered conditions found inside microbial aggregates. The community then matures and changes and may even fail and disappear. Antimicrobial resistance is discussed as an example of multicellular behavior. The multicellular lifestyle has been modeled mathematically and responded to powerful molecular biological techniques. Latterly, microbial systems have been used as models for fundamental evolutionary processes, mostly because of their high rates of reproduction and the ease of genetic manipulation. The life of most microbes is a duality between the yin of the community and the yang of planktonic existence. Sadly far less research has been devoted to adaptation to free-living forms than in the opposite direction. PMID:20943124

  5. Microbial response to triepthylphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.; Santo Domingo, J.W.; Berry, C.J.

    1997-05-01

    The effect of triethylphosphate (TEP) on the activity of a landfill aquifer microbial community was evaluated using standard techniques and in situ hybridizations with phylogenetic probes. Benzene was used as an external carbon source to monitor degradation of an aromatic compound in TEP amended microcosms. Microscopical and viable counts were higher in TEP containing microcosms when compared to unamended controls. A significant increase in metabolic activity was also observed for TEP amended samples as determined by the number of cells hybridizing to an eubacterial probe. In addition, the number of beta and gamma Proteobacteria increased from undetectable levels prior to the study to 15-29% of the total bacteria in microcosms containing TEP and benzene. In these microcosms, nearly 40% of the benzene was degraded during the incubation period compared to less than 5% in unamended microcosms. While TEP has previously been used as an alternate phosphate source in the bioremediation of chlorinated aliphatics, this study shows that it can also stimulate the microbial degradation of aromatics in phosphate limited aquifers.

  6. The microbial nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Jetten, Mike S M

    2008-11-01

    This special issue highlights several recent discoveries in the microbial nitrogen cycle including the diversity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria in special habitats, distribution and contribution of aerobic ammonium oxidation by bacteria and crenarchaea in various aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, regulation of metabolism in nitrifying bacteria, the molecular diversity of denitrifying microorganisms and their enzymes, the functional diversity of freshwater and marine anammox bacteria, the physiology of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation and the degradation of recalcitrant organic nitrogen compounds. Simultaneously the articles in this issue show that many questions still need to be addressed, and that the microbes involved in catalyzing the nitrogen conversions still harbour many secrets that need to be disclosed to fully understand the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, and make future predictions and global modelling possible.

  7. Genome-Based Microbial Taxonomy Coming of Age.

    PubMed

    Hugenholtz, Philip; Skarshewski, Adam; Parks, Donovan H

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing the complete evolutionary history of extant life on our planet will be one of the most fundamental accomplishments of scientific endeavor, akin to the completion of the periodic table, which revolutionized chemistry. The road to this goal is via comparative genomics because genomes are our most comprehensive and objective evolutionary documents. The genomes of plant and animal species have been systematically targeted over the past decade to provide coverage of the tree of life. However, multicellular organisms only emerged in the last 550 million years of more than three billion years of biological evolution and thus comprise a small fraction of total biological diversity. The bulk of biodiversity, both past and present, is microbial. We have only scratched the surface in our understanding of the microbial world, as most microorganisms cannot be readily grown in the laboratory and remain unknown to science. Ground-breaking, culture-independent molecular techniques developed over the past 30 years have opened the door to this so-called microbial dark matter with an accelerating momentum driven by exponential increases in sequencing capacity. We are on the verge of obtaining representative genomes across all life for the first time. However, historical use of morphology, biochemical properties, behavioral traits, and single-marker genes to infer organismal relationships mean that the existing highly incomplete tree is riddled with taxonomic errors. Concerted efforts are now needed to synthesize and integrate the burgeoning genomic data resources into a coherent universal tree of life and genome-based taxonomy. PMID:26988968

  8. Hypersaline Microbial Mat Lipid Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Embaye, Tsegereda; Turk, Kendra A.; Summons, Roger E.

    2002-01-01

    Lipid biomarkers and compound specific isotopic abundances are powerful tools for studies of contemporary microbial ecosystems. Knowledge of the relationship of biomarkers to microbial physiology and community structure creates important links for understanding the nature of early organisms and paleoenvironments. Our recent work has focused on the hypersaline microbial mats in evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Specific biomarkers for diatoms, cyanobacteria, archaea, green nonsulfur (GNS), sulfate reducing, sulfur oxidizing and methanotrophic bacteria have been identified. Analyses of the ester-bound fatty acids indicate a highly diverse microbial community, dominated by photosynthetic organisms at the surface. The delta C-13 of cyanobacterial biomarkers such as the monomethylalkanes and hopanoids are consistent with the delta C-13 measured for bulk mat (-10%o), while a GNS biomarker, wax esters (WXE), suggests a more depleted delta C-13 for GNS biomass (-16%o). This isotopic relationship is different than that observed in mats at Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park (YSNP) where GNS appear to grow photoheterotrophic ally. WXE abundance, while relatively low, is most pronounced in an anaerobic zone just below the cyanobacterial layer. The WXE isotope composition at GN suggests that these bacteria utilize photoautotrophy incorporating dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) via the 3-hydroxypropionate pathway using H2S or H2.

  9. Microbial Regulation in Gorgonian Corals

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Laura R.; Smith, Stephanie M.; Downum, Kelsey R.; Mydlarz, Laura D.

    2012-01-01

    Gorgonian corals possess many novel natural products that could potentially mediate coral-bacterial interactions. Since many bacteria use quorum sensing (QS) signals to facilitate colonization of host organisms, regulation of prokaryotic cell-to-cell communication may represent an important bacterial control mechanism. In the present study, we examined extracts of twelve species of Caribbean gorgonian corals, for mechanisms that regulate microbial colonization, such as antibacterial activity and QS regulatory activity. Ethanol extracts of gorgonians collected from Puerto Rico and the Florida Keys showed a range of both antibacterial and QS activities using a specific Pseudomonas aeruginosa QS reporter, sensitive to long chain AHLs and a short chain N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHL) biosensor, Chromobacterium violaceium. Overall, the gorgonian corals had higher antimicrobial activity against non-marine strains when compared to marine strains. Pseudopterogorgia americana, Pseusopterogorgia acerosa, and Pseudoplexuara flexuosa had the highest QS inhibitory effect. Interestingly, Pseudoplexuara porosa extracts stimulated QS activity with a striking 17-fold increase in signal. The stimulation of QS by P. porosa or other elements of the holobiont may encourage colonization or recruitment of specific microbial species. Overall, these results suggest the presence of novel stimulatory QS, inhibitory QS and bactericidal compounds in gorgonian corals. A better understanding of these compounds may reveal insight into coral-microbial ecology and whether a therapeutic potential exists. PMID:22822369

  10. Statistical Modelling of Compound Floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevacqua, Emanuele; Maraun, Douglas; Vrac, Mathieu; Widmann, Martin; Manning, Colin

    2016-04-01

    In the recent special report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on extreme events it has been highlighted that an important class of extreme events has received little attention so far: so-called compound events (CEs) (Seneviratne et al., 2012). Compound events (CEs) are multivariate extreme events in which the individual contributing events might not be extreme themselves, but their joint occurrence causes an extreme impact. Following Leonard et al., 2013, we define events as CEs only when the contributing events are statistically dependent. For many events analysed so far, the contributing events have not been statistically dependent (e.g. the floods in Rotterdam, Van den Brink et al., 2005). Two typical examples of CEs are severe drought in conjunction with a heatwave, and storm surges coinciding with heavy rain that cause the so-called Compound Floods in the lower section of a river. We develop a multivariate statistical model to represent and analyse the physical mechanisms driving CEs, and to quantify the risk associated with these events. The model is based on pair-copula construction theory, which has the advantage of building joint probability distributions modeling the marginal distributions separately from the dependence structure among variables. This allows to analyse the individual contributing variables underlying the CE separately to their dependence structure. Here is presented an application of the statistical model for Compound Floods, based on a conceptual case study. For these particular events it is not trivial to find satisfying data. Usually, water level stations are not present in the area of the river where both the influence of the sea and river are seen. The main reason being that this critical area is small and stakeholders have little interest in measuring both effect from the sea and from the river. For these reasons we have developed a conceptual case study which allows us to vary the system's physical parameters

  11. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON THE C ISOTOPIC VALUE OF MICROBIAL LIPIDS APPLIED TO DETERMINE C USAGE IN MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The combination of compound specific stable isotopic analysis with phospholipid fatty acid (PLFAS) analysis is useful in determining the source of organic carbon used by groups of a microbial community. Determination of the effect of certain environmental parameters is important ...

  12. [Microbial denitrogenation of fuel oil].

    PubMed

    Li, Shan-shan; Ma, Ting; Li, Guo-qiang; Liang, Feng-lai; Liu, Ru-lin

    2006-12-01

    The amount of organic nitrides contained in fuel oil is smaller than the one of organic sulfur compounds, but the existence of them is enough to affect the invariability of oil product greatly , and has a big effect on the color of oil. They also contribute to catalyst poisoning during the refining of crude oil, thus reducing the catalyzing rate of the catalyst and increasing process costs. Further more, some nitrogen organic compounds possess mutagenic and toxic activities. The combustion of these contaminants form nitrogen oxides (NOx), releasing of which to the air will cause the formation of acid rain and hence to air pollution. The classical hydroprocessing methods of nitrogen removal are costly and complicated, so the scientists are more and more interested in microbial denitrogenation. The aspects as follows are introduced, including the aromatic nitrogen compounds of fuel oil, the varieties of denitrogenation techincs, the classes of microbial denitrogenation and its biochemical pathways, molecular genetics developments of carbazole-degradative genes, and our opinion of the research direction in the future.

  13. Potential risks of pharmacy compounding.

    PubMed

    Gudeman, Jennifer; Jozwiakowski, Michael; Chollet, John; Randell, Michael

    2013-03-01

    of microbial contamination to patients. In the last 11 years, three separate meningitis outbreaks have been traced to purportedly 'sterile' steroid injections contaminated with fungus or bacteria, which were made by compounding pharmacies. The most recent 2012 outbreak has resulted in intense scrutiny of pharmacy compounding practices and increased recognition of the need to ensure that compounding is limited to appropriate circumstances. Patients and healthcare practitioners need to be aware that compounded drugs are not the same as generic drugs, which are approved by the FDA. The risk-benefit ratio of using traditionally compounded medicines is favorable for patients who require specialized medications that are not commercially available, as they would otherwise not have access to suitable treatment. However, if an FDA-approved drug is commercially available, the use of an unapproved compounded drug confers additional risk with no commensurate benefit. PMID:23526368

  14. 16S rRNA targeted DGGE fingerprinting of microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Tzeneva, Vesela A; Heilig, Hans G H J; van Vliet, Wilma Akkermans; Akkermans, Antoon D L; de Vos, Willem M; Smidt, Hauke

    2008-01-01

    The past decades have seen the staggering development of molecular microbial ecology as a discipline that uses the detection of so-called biomarkers to monitor microbial communities in environment samples. A variety of molecules can be used as biomarkers, including cell-wall components, proteins, lipids, DNA or RNA. Especially, the application of small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and the corresponding genes have proven invaluable for advances in microbial ecology. Several types of fingerprinting methods have been developed for the description of microbial communities in environmental samples. Among the most commonly used approaches is denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified fragments. DGGE allows separation of DNA fragment mixtures of equal length depending on their sequence. The separation is based on their sequence-specific melting point in a polyacrylamide gel with a gradient of a denaturant chemical (generally a combination of urea and formamide). DGGE allows for a rapid analysis and comparison of microbial communities. Compositional diversity can be visualized using DGGE where each band in principle represents a bacterial phylotype. After staining bands are visualized at each position in the gel where DNA molecules stopped migration. In principle, DGGE fingerprinting can resolve single base pair differences.

  15. Microbial biosensors for organophosphate pesticides.

    PubMed

    Mulchandani, Ashok; Rajesh

    2011-09-01

    Organophosphates, amongst the most toxic substance known, are used widely in agriculture around the world. Their extensive use, however, has resulted in their occurrence in the water and food supply threatening humans and animals. Therefore, there is a need for determination of these neurotoxic compounds sensitively, selectively, and rapidly in the field. The present work is a brief review on the recent advancements in amperometric, potentiometric, and optical biosensors using genetically engineered microorganisms expressing organophosphate hydrolyzing enzyme intracellularly or anchored on the cell surface for the detection of organophosphate pesticides. The benefits and limitations associated with such microbial biosensors are delineated.

  16. Raman Spectroscopy of Microbial Pigments

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Howell G. M.; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapid nondestructive technique providing spectroscopic and structural information on both organic and inorganic molecular compounds. Extensive applications for the method in the characterization of pigments have been found. Due to the high sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy for the detection of chlorophylls, carotenoids, scytonemin, and a range of other pigments found in the microbial world, it is an excellent technique to monitor the presence of such pigments, both in pure cultures and in environmental samples. Miniaturized portable handheld instruments are available; these instruments can be used to detect pigments in microbiological samples of different types and origins under field conditions. PMID:24682303

  17. Microfluidics and microbial engineering.

    PubMed

    Kou, Songzi; Cheng, Danhui; Sun, Fei; Hsing, I-Ming

    2016-02-01

    The combination of microbial engineering and microfluidics is synergistic in nature. For example, microfluidics is benefiting from the outcome of microbial engineering and many reported point-of-care microfluidic devices employ engineered microbes as functional parts for the microsystems. In addition, microbial engineering is facilitated by various microfluidic techniques, due to their inherent strength in high-throughput screening and miniaturization. In this review article, we firstly examine the applications of engineered microbes for toxicity detection, biosensing, and motion generation in microfluidic platforms. Secondly, we look into how microfluidic technologies facilitate the upstream and downstream processes of microbial engineering, including DNA recombination, transformation, target microbe selection, mutant characterization, and microbial function analysis. Thirdly, we highlight an emerging concept in microbial engineering, namely, microbial consortium engineering, where the behavior of a multicultural microbial community rather than that of a single cell/species is delineated. Integrating the disciplines of microfluidics and microbial engineering opens up many new opportunities, for example in diagnostics, engineering of microbial motors, development of portable devices for genetics, high throughput characterization of genetic mutants, isolation and identification of rare/unculturable microbial species, single-cell analysis with high spatio-temporal resolution, and exploration of natural microbial communities.

  18. Newest developments in compounding of wooden fibre composites WFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunkau, M.

    2014-05-01

    Compounding trials in 2010 at HENSCHEL Compounding Technology Centre showed significant improvements of mechanical properties by using a co-rotating twin screw extruder combined with a newly developed machine the so-called AGGLOMAT. Together with TechWood International, UK a common patent was applied by the end of 2010 under DE 10 2010 060 911.0. Hereby the extruder stands for compounding and drying in a single process. The polymers are mixed and homogenized with the natural fibers in a continuous process. All materials are dosed via loss-in-weight feeders in a gravimetric mode. To suck out the moisture of up to 10% from the natural fibers so-called degassing side feeders are used. These side feeders are fitted out with counter-rotating twin screws which move into the process unit to avoid material deposits. The bigger volume creates an effective drying with moisture content below 0.5%. The homogenous compound will be discharged almost without pressure into an AGGLOMAT which purpose is to cool down the melt and transform it into agglomerates. The particle size of 1 to 10 mm is determined by choppers controlled by a frequency drive. This bears the advantage that the length of fibers is not shorten to much and increase mechanical properties of compound. In a further step the agglomerates are fed into a counter rotating twin screw extruder for production of WFC-profiles. Compared to previous systems the physical properties of profiles have been improved and allow new applications such as the construction of simply housings. In addition to that the throughput could be increased by 30% which delivers higher economical performance and faster return of investment.

  19. The microbial fate of carbon in high-latitude seas: Impact of the microbial loop on oceanic uptake of CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Yager, P.L.

    1996-12-31

    This dissertation examines pelagic microbial processes in high-latitude seas, how they affect regional and global carbon cycling, and how they might respond to hypothesized changes in climate. Critical to these interests is the effect of cold temperature on bacterial activity. Also important is the extent to which marine biological processes in general impact the inorganic carbon cycle. The study area is the Northeast Water (NEW) Polynya, a seasonally-recurrent opening in the permanent ice situated over the northeastern Greenland continental shelf. This work was part of an international, multi-disciplinary research project studying carbon cycling in the coastal Arctic. The first chapter describes a simple model which links a complex marine food web to a simplified ocean and atmosphere. The second chapter investigates the inorganic carbon inventory of the summertime NEW Polynya surface waters to establish the effect of biological processes on the air-sea pCO{sub 2} gradient. The third and fourth chapters use a kinetic approach to examine microbial activities in the NEW Polynya as a function of temperature and dissolved organic substrate concentration, testing the so-called Pomeroy hypothesis that microbial activity is disproportionately reduced at low environmental temperatures owing to increased organic substrate requirements. Together, the suite of data collected on microbial activities, cell size, and grazing pressure suggest how unique survival strategies adopted by an active population of high-latitude bacteria may contribute to, rather than detract from, an efficient biological carbon pump.

  20. The microbial world and the case for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horneck, Gerda

    2000-09-01

    Microbial prokaryotes have flourished on Earth for more than 3.5 Ga. They dominated the Earth's biosphere during the first 2 Ga of its history before the first unicellular mitotic eukaryotes appeared. Therefore, in a search for extant life beyond the Earth, microorganisms are the most likely candidates for a putative biota of an extraterrestrial habitat. On Earth, life has developed strategies to cope with the so-called extreme conditions, such as hot vents, permafrost, permanent ice, subsurface regions, high atmosphere, rocks or salt crystals. By analogy with terrestrial extremophile communities, potential protected niches have been postulated for Mars, such as sulfur-rich sub-surface areas for chemoautotrophic communities, rocks for endolithic communities, permafrost regions, hydrothermal vents, soil, or evaporite crystals. Several methods exist to trace and identify microbial communities on Earth. Some of these biogenic signatures and biomarkers may also be applicable in attempts to search for life on Mars. However, the search for signatures indicative for putative extant life on Mars can only be the final steps in a research strategy in the quest for extraterrestrial life. In particular, prior to any "search for extant life" experiment, more data are required on the geology (paleolakes, volcanism, hydrothermal vents, carbonates), climate (hydrosphere, duration of phases which allow liquid water) and radiation environment, present state and past evolution as well as organic molecules in sediments. The search for possible biological oases will be connected with the detection of areas where liquid water still exists under the current conditions on that planet.

  1. Familiarity and relational preference in the understanding of noun--noun compounds.

    PubMed

    Tagalakis, Georgios; Keane, Mark T

    2006-09-01

    When people are presented with noun-noun compounds, they tend to produce two main types of interpretation: relational and property interpretations. One theory of compounding maintains that relational interpretations are preferred over property ones. However, many of the studies supporting this relational preference hypothesis appear to be vitiated by a failure to control for the familiarity of compounds. A rating study on so-called "novel" compounds used in previous studies is reported, which shows that many can be considered to be familiar. Then two experiments in which familiarity is controlled are presented, to test the relational preference hypothesis, using a sensibility judgment task (Experiment 1) and a comprehension judgment task (Experiment 2). The results show that familiarity has a clear effect on the ease of understanding of noun-noun compounds but that there is no hard evidence for relational preference. The implications of these results for the empirical literature and for current theories are discussed. PMID:17225509

  2. Biogeochemistry of Microbial Mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenizi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The hierarchical organization of microbial ecosystems determines the rates of processes that shape Earth's environment, define the stage upon which major evolutionary events occurred, and create biosignatures in sediments and atmospheres. In cyanobacterial mats, oxygenic photosynthesis provides energy, organic substrates and oxygen to the ecosystem. Incident light changes with depth in the mat, both in intensity and spectral composition, and counteracting gradients of oxygen and sulfide shape the chemical microenvironment. A combination of benefits and hazards of light, oxygen and sulfide promotes the allocation of the various essential mat processes between light and dark periods and to various depths in the mat. Microliters produce hydrogen, small organic acids, nitrogen and sulfur species. Such compounds fuel a flow of energy and electrons in these ecosystems and thus shape interactions between groups of microorganisms. Coordinated observations of population distribution, abundance, and activity for an entire community are making fundamental questions in ecology accessible. These questions address those factors that sustain the remarkable diversity of microorganisms that are now being revealed by molecular techniques. These questions also target the processes that shape the various kinds of biosignatures that we will seek, both in ancient rocks from Earth and Mars, and in atmospheres of distant planets beyond our Solar System.

  3. Anodic and cathodic microbial communities in single chamber microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Daghio, Matteo; Gandolfi, Isabella; Bestetti, Giuseppina; Franzetti, Andrea; Guerrini, Edoardo; Cristiani, Pierangela

    2015-01-25

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a rapidly growing technology for energy production from wastewater and biomasses. In a MFC, a microbial biofilm oxidizes organic matter and transfers electrons from reduced compounds to an anode as the electron acceptor by extracellular electron transfer (EET). The aim of this work was to characterize the microbial communities operating in a Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell (SCMFC) fed with acetate and inoculated with a biogas digestate in order to gain more insight into anodic and cathodic EET. Taxonomic characterization of the communities was carried out by Illumina sequencing of a fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. Microorganisms belonging to Geovibrio genus and purple non-sulfur (PNS) bacteria were found to be dominant in the anodic biofilm. The alkaliphilic genus Nitrincola and anaerobic microorganisms belonging to Porphyromonadaceae family were the most abundant bacteria in the cathodic biofilm.

  4. Contribution of microbial carbon to soil fractions: significance of diverse microbial group biochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throckmorton, H.; Bird, J. A.; Dane, L.; Firestone, M. K.; Horwath, W. R.

    2011-12-01

    The importance of diverse microbial groups to soil C maintenance is still a matter of debate. This study follows the turnover of 13C labeled nonliving residues from diverse microbial groups into soil physical fractions in situ in a temperate forest in California (CA) and a tropical forest in Puerto Rico (PR), during 5 sampling points per site- over a 3 and 2 year period, respectively. Microbial groups include fungi, actinomycetes, Gm(+) bacteria, and Gm(-) bacteria, isolated from CA and PR soils to obtain temperate and tropical isolates composited of 3-4 species per group. The selected density fractionation approach isolated: a "light fraction" (LF), non-mineral aggregate "occluded fraction" (OF), and a "mineral bound fraction" (MF). Pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) was employed to characterize microbial group isolates, whole soils, and fractions. Microbial isolates contained unique biochemical fingerprints: temperate and tropical fungi and tropical Gm(-) were characterized by a low abundance of phenol, benzene, and N-compounds compared with other microbial group isolates. Py-GC-MS revealed compositional differences among soil fractions at both sites, likely attributed to differences in the decomposition stage and C source material (ie. plant vs. microbial). For both sites, benzene and N-compounds were greatest in the MF; lignin and phenol compounds were greatest in the LF; and lipids were greatest in the OF. The trend for polysaccharides differed between sites, with the greatest concentration in the CA OF; and for PR with the lowest concentration in the OF, and similar concentrations in the LF and MF. SOM chemistry was most similar between sites in the LF, compared with the OF and MF, suggesting that differences in SOM chemistry between sites may be more attributed to differential decomposition processes than unique litter quality inputs. A substantial portion of microbial C moved from the LF into the OF, and the MF by the first sampling

  5. Microbial Production of Isoprenoids Enabled by Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Immethun, Cheryl M.; Hoynes-O’Connor, Allison G.; Balassy, Andrea; Moon, Tae Seok

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms transform inexpensive carbon sources into highly functionalized compounds without toxic by-product generation or significant energy consumption. By redesigning the natural biosynthetic pathways in an industrially suited host, microbial cell factories can produce complex compounds for a variety of industries. Isoprenoids include many medically important compounds such as antioxidants and anticancer and antimalarial drugs, all of which have been produced microbially. While a biosynthetic pathway could be simply transferred to the production host, the titers would become economically feasible when it is rationally designed, built, and optimized through synthetic biology tools. These tools have been implemented by a number of research groups, with new tools pledging further improvements in yields and expansion to new medically relevant compounds. This review focuses on the microbial production of isoprenoids for the health industry and the advancements though synthetic biology. PMID:23577007

  6. Microbial Metabolism in Serpentinite Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Medina, M.; Brazelton, W. J.; Twing, K. I.; Kubo, M.; Hoehler, T. M.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    Serpentinization is the process in which ultramafic rocks, characteristic of the upper mantle, react with water liberating mantle carbon and reducing power to potenially support chemosynthetic microbial communities. These communities may be important mediators of carbon and energy exchange between the deep Earth and the surface biosphere. Our work focuses on the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory (CROMO) in Northern California where subsurface fluids are accessible through a series of wells. Preliminary analyses indicate that the highly basic fluids (pH 9-12) have low microbial diversity, but there is limited knowledge about the metabolic capabilities of these communties. Metagenomic data from similar serpentine environments [1] have identified Betaproteobacteria belonging to the order Burkholderiales and Gram-positive bacteria from the order Clostridiales as key components of the serpentine microbiome. In an effort to better characterize the microbial community, metabolism, and geochemistry at CROMO, fluids from two representative wells (N08B and CSWold) were sampled during recent field campaigns. Geochemical characterization of the fluids includes measurements of dissolved gases (H2, CO, CH4), dissolved inorganic and organic carbon, volatile fatty acids, and nutrients. The wells selected can be differentiated in that N08B had higher pH (10-11), lower dissolved oxygen, and cell counts ranging from 105-106 cells mL-1 of fluid, with an abundance of the betaproteobacterium Hydrogenophaga. In contrast, fluids from CSWold have slightly lower pH (9-9.5), DO, and conductivity, as well as higher TDN and TDP. CSWold fluid is also characterized for having lower cell counts (~103 cells mL-1) and an abundance of Dethiobacter, a taxon within the phylum Clostridiales. Microcosm experiments were conducted with the purpose of monitoring carbon fixation, methanotrophy and metabolism of small organic compounds, such as acetate and formate, while tracing changes in fluid

  7. Exploring Subglacial Microbial Ecology (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikucki, J.; Mitchell, A. C.; Johnson, S. S.; Grzymski, J.

    2009-12-01

    sulfur compounds and 3) What specific metabolic processes regulate the chemical transformations of subglacial efflux and at what rate. Our ability to link genomics and geochemistry allows us to address these questions and provide a framework for understanding the biogeochemistry of subglacial processes as well as the impact of microbial metabolism on rate and chemical nature of subglacial efflux.

  8. Polybenzimidazole compounds

    DOEpatents

    Klaehn, John R.; Peterson, Eric S.; Wertsching, Alan K.; Orme, Christopher J.; Luther, Thomas A.; Jones, Michael G.

    2010-08-10

    A PBI compound that includes imidazole nitrogens, at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2--, where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least five equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about fifteen equivalents.

  9. Polybenzimidazole compounds

    DOEpatents

    Klaehn, John R.; Peterson, Eric S.; Orme, Christopher J.; Jones, Michael G.; Wertsching, Alan K.; Luther, Thomas A.; Trowbridge, Tammy L.

    2011-11-22

    A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with a moiety containing a carbonyl group, the substituted imidazole nitrogens being bonded to carbon of the carbonyl group. At least 85% of the nitrogens may be substituted. The carbonyl-containing moiety may include RCO--, where R is alkoxy or haloalkyl. The PBI compound may exhibit a first temperature marking an onset of weight loss corresponding to reversion of the substituted PBI that is less than a second temperature marking an onset of decomposition of an otherwise identical PBI compound without the substituted moiety. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may use more than 5 equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted.

  10. Microbial hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, P.F.; Maness, P.C.; Martin, S.

    1995-09-01

    Photosynthetic bacteria inhabit an anaerobic or microaerophilic world where H{sub 2} is produced and consumed as a shared intermediary metabolite. Within a given bacterial isolate there are as many as 4 to 6 distinct enzymes that function to evolve or consume H{sub 2}. Three of the H{sub 2}-evolving physiologies involving three different enzymes from photosynthetic bacteria have been examined in detail for commercial viability. Nitrogenase-mediated H{sub 2} production completely dissimilates many soluble organic compounds to H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} at rates up to 131 {mu}mol H{sub 2}{sm_bullet}min{sup -1}{sm_bullet}g cdw{sup -1} and can remain active for up to 20 days. This metabolism is very energy intensive, however, which limits solar conversion efficiencies. Fermentative hydrogenase can produce H{sub 2} at rates of 440 {mu}mol{sm_bullet}min{sup -1}{sm_bullet}g cdw{sup -1} at low levels of irradiation over indefinite periods. The equilibrium for this activity is low (<0.15 atmospheres), thereby requiring gas sparging, vacuuming, or microbial scavenging to retain prolonged activity. Microbial H{sub 2} production from the CO component of synthesis or producer gases maximally reaches activities of 1.5 mmol{sm_bullet}min{sup -1}{sm_bullet}g cdw{sup -1}. Mass transport of gaseous CO into an aqueous bacterial suspension is the rate-limiting step. Increased gas pressure strongly accelerates these rates. Immobilized bacteria on solid supports at ambient pressures also show enhanced shift activity when the bulk water is drained away. Scaled-up bioreactors with 100-200 cc bed volume have been constructed and tested. The near-term goal of this portion of the project is to engineer and economically evaluate a prototype system for the biological production of H{sub 2} from biomass. The CO shift enables a positive selection technique for O{sub 2}-resistant, H{sub 2}-evolving bacterial enzymes from nature.

  11. Microbial Properties Database Editor Tutorial

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Microbial Properties Database Editor (MPDBE) has been developed to help consolidate microbial-relevant data to populate a microbial database and support a database editor by which an authorized user can modify physico-microbial properties related to microbial indicators and pat...

  12. Why Microbial Communities?

    ScienceCinema

    Fredrickson, Jim (PNNL)

    2016-07-12

    The Microbial Communities Initiative is a 5-year investment by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory that integrates biological/ecological experimentation, analytical chemistry, and simulation modeling. The objective is to create transforming technologies, elucidate mechanistic forces, and develop theoretical frameworks for the analysis and predictive understanding of microbial communities. Dr. Fredrickson introduces the symposium by defining microbial communities and describing their scientific relevance as they relate to solving problems in energy, climate, and sustainability.

  13. Our unique microbial identity.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jack A

    2015-05-14

    A recent article examines the extent of individual variation in microbial identities and how this might determine disease susceptibility, therapeutic responses and recovery from clinical interventions.

  14. Research advances on microbial genetics in China in 2015.

    PubMed

    Jianping, Xie; Yubo, Han; Gang, Liu; Linquan, Bai

    2016-09-01

    In 2015, there are significant progresses in many aspects of the microbial genetics in China. To showcase the contribution of Chinese scientists in microbial genetics, this review surveys several notable progresses in microbial genetics made largely by Chinese scientists, and some key findings are highlighted. For the basic microbial genetics, the components, structures and functions of many macromolecule complexes involved in gene expression regulation have been elucidated. Moreover, the molecular basis underlying the recognition of foreign nucleic acids by microbial immune systems was unveiled. We also illustrated the biosynthetic pathways and regulators of multiple microbial compounds, novel enzyme reactions, and new mechanisms regulating microbial gene expression. And new findings were obtained in the microbial development, evolution and population genetics. For the industrial microbiology, more understanding on the molecular basis of the microbial factory has been gained. For the pathogenic microbiology, the genetic circuits of several pathogens were depicted, and significant progresses were achieved for understanding the pathogen-host interaction and revealing the genetic mechanisms underlying antimicrobial resistance, emerging pathogens and environmental microorganisms at the genomic level. In future, the genetic diversity of microbes can be used to obtain specific products, while gut microbiome is gathering momentum. PMID:27644739

  15. Multipurpose Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Specially formulated derivatives of an unusual basic compound known as Alcide may be the answer to effective treatment and prevention of the disease bovine mastitis, a bacterial inflammation of a cow's mammary gland that results in loss of milk production and in extreme cases, death. Manufactured by Alcide Corporation the Alcide compound has killed all tested bacteria, virus and fungi, shortly after contact, with minimal toxic effects on humans or animals. Alcide Corporation credits the existence of the mastitis treatment/prevention products to assistance provided the company by NERAC, Inc.

  16. Characteristics of volatile organic compounds emission profiles from hot road bitumens.

    PubMed

    Boczkaj, Grzegorz; Przyjazny, Andrzej; Kamiński, Marian

    2014-07-01

    A procedure for the investigation and comparison of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emission profiles to the atmosphere from road bitumens with various degrees of oxidation is proposed. The procedure makes use of headspace analysis and gas chromatography with universal as well as selective detection, including gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The studies revealed that so-called vacuum residue, which is the main component of the charge, contains variable VOC concentrations, from trace to relatively high ones, depending on the extent of thermal cracking in the boiler of the vacuum distillation column. The VOC content in the oxidation product, so-called oxidized paving bitumen, is similarly varied. There are major differences in VOC emission profiles between vacuum residue and oxidized bitumens undergoing thermal cracking. The VOC content in oxidized bitumens, which did not undergo thermal cracking, increases with the degree of oxidation of bitumens. The studies revealed that the total VOC content increases from about 120 ppm for the raw vacuum residue to about 1900 ppm for so-called bitumen 35/50. The amount of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the volatile fraction of fumes of oxidized bitumens increases with the degree of oxidation of bitumen and constitutes from 0.34% to 3.66% (w/w). The contribution of volatile nitrogen compounds (VNCs) to total VOC content remains constant for the investigated types of bitumens (from 0.16 to 0.28% (w/w) of total VOCs). The results of these studies can also find use during the selection of appropriate bitumen additives to minimize their malodorousness. The obtained data append the existing knowledge on VOC emission from oxidized bitumens. They should be included in reports on the environmental impact of facilities in which hot bitumen binders are used. PMID:24875867

  17. Microbial Life in a Liquid Asphalt Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Haque, Shirin; de Sousa Antonio, Marina Resendes; Ali, Denzil; Hosein, Riad; Song, Young C.; Yang, Jinshu; Zaikova, Elena; Beckles, Denise M.; Guinan, Edward; Lehto, Harry J.; Hallam, Steven J.

    2011-04-01

    Pitch Lake in Trinidad and Tobago is a natural asphalt reservoir nourished by pitch seepage, a form of petroleum that consists of mostly asphaltines, from the surrounding oil-rich region. During upward seepage, pitch mixes with mud and gases under high pressure, and the lighter portion evaporates or is volatilized, which produces a liquid asphalt residue characterized by low water activity, recalcitrant carbon substrates, and noxious chemical compounds. An active microbial community of archaea and bacteria, many of them novel strains (particularly from the new Tar ARC groups), totaling a biomass of up to 107 cells per gram, was found to inhabit the liquid hydrocarbon matrix of Pitch Lake. Geochemical and molecular taxonomic approaches revealed diverse, novel, and deeply branching microbial lineages with the potential to mediate anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation processes in different parts of the asphalt column. In addition, we found markers for archaeal methane metabolism and specific gene sequences affiliated with facultative and obligate anaerobic sulfur- and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. The microbial diversity at Pitch Lake was found to be unique when compared to microbial communities analyzed at other hydrocarbon-rich environments, which included Rancho Le Brea, a natural asphalt environment in California, USA, and an oil well and a mud volcano in Trinidad and Tobago, among other sites. These results open a window into the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of recalcitrant hydrocarbon matrices and establish the site as a terrestrial analogue for modeling the biotic potential of hydrocarbon lakes such as those found on Saturn's largest moon Titan.

  18. Microbial activity in soils following steam treatment.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Ruth E; James, C Andrew; Bhupathiraju, Vishvesh K; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Steam enhanced extraction (SEE) is an aquifer remediation technique that can be effective at removing the bulk of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination from the subsurface, particularly highly volatile contaminants. However, low volatility compounds such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are less efficiently removed by this process. This research evaluated the effects of steam injection on soil microbial activity, community structure, and the potential for biodegradation of contaminants following steam treatment. Three different soils were evaluated: a laboratory-prepared microbially-enriched soil, soil from a creosote contaminated field site, and soil from a chlorinated solvent and waste oil contaminated field site. Results from field-scale steaming are also presented. Microbial activity before and after steam treatment was evaluated using direct epifluorescent microscopy (DEM) using the respiratory activity dye 5-cyano-2,3, ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) in conjunction with the fluorochrome 5-(4,6-dichlorotriazinyl) aminofluorescein (DTAF) to yield a quantitative assessment of active and total microbial numbers. DEM results indicate that steamed soils that were analyzed while still hot exhibited microbial activity levels that were below detection. However, soil samples that were slowly cooled, more closely reflecting the conditions of applied SEE, exhibited microbial activity levels that were comparable to presteamed soils. Samples from a field-site where steam was applied continuously for 6 weeks also showed high levels of microbial activity following cooling. The metabolic capabilities of the steamed communities were investigated by measuring cell growth in enrichment cultures on various substrates. These studies provided evidence that organisms capable of biodegradation were among the mesophilic populations that survived steam treatment. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of the soils with domain-level rRNA probes suggest

  19. Microbial enhanced oil recovery research. [Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, M.M.; Georgiou, G. )

    1992-01-01

    The surface active lipopeptide produced by Bacillus licheniformis JF-2 was isolated to near apparent homogeneity. NMR experiments revealed that this compound consists of a heptapeptide with an amino acid sequence similar to surfactin and a heterogeneous fatty acid consisting of the normal-, anteiso-, and iso- branched isomers. The surface activity of the B. licheniformis JF-2 surfactant was shown to depend on the presence of fermentation products and is strongly affected by the pH. Under conditions of optimal salinity and pH the interfacial tension against decane was 6 [times] 10[sup 3] mN/m which is one of the lowest values ever obtained with a microbial surfactant. Microbial compounds which exhibit particularly high surface activity are classified as biosurfactants. Microbial biosurfactants include a wide variety of surface and interfacially active compounds, such as glycolipids, lipopeptides polysaccharideprotein complexes, phospholipids, fatty acids and neutral lipids. Biosurfactants are easily biodegradable and thus are particularly suited for environmental applications such as bioremediation and the dispersion of oil spills. Bacillus licheniformis strain JF-2 has been shown to be able to grow and produce a very effective biosurfactant under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and in the presence of high salt concentrations. The production of biosurfactants in anaerobic, high salt environments is potentially important for a variety of in situ applications such as microbial enhanced oil recovery. As a first step towards evaluating the commercial utility of the B. licheniformis JF-2 surfactant, we isolated t-he active. compound from the culture supernatant, characterized its chemical structure and investigated its phase behavior. We found that the surface activity of the surfactant is strongly dependent on the pH of the aqueous. phase. This may be important for the biological function of the surfactant and is of interest for several applications in surfactancy.

  20. Perfluorinated Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated compounds such as the perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) and their derivatives are important man-made chemicals that have wide consumer and industrial applications. They are relatively contemporary chemicals, being in use only since the 1950s, and until recently, have be...

  1. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 63% of US magnesium compounds production during 2000. Premier Services in Florida, Dow Chemical in Michigan, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties, and Rohm & Haas recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from seawater. And Premier Services' recoveries, in Nevada, were from magnasite.

  2. Inflight microbial analysis technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Brown, Harlan D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper provides an assessment of functional characteristics needed in the microbial water analysis system being developed for Space Station. Available technology is reviewed with respect to performing microbial monitoring, isolation, or identification functions. An integrated system composed of three different technologies is presented.

  3. Engineering microbial factories for synthesis of value-added products

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing; Shao, Zengyi; Zhao, Huimin

    2011-01-01

    Microorganisms have become an increasingly important platform for the production of drugs, chemicals, and biofuels from renewable resources. Advances in protein engineering, metabolic engineering, and synthetic biology enable redesigning microbial cellular networks and fine-tuning physiological capabilities, thus generating industrially viable strains for the production of natural and unnatural value-added compounds. In this review, we describe the recent progress on engineering microbial factories for synthesis of valued-added products including alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids, polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, biofuels, and chemicals. Related topics on lignocellulose degradation, sugar utilization, and microbial tolerance improvement will also be discussed. PMID:21526386

  4. Microbial-Catalyzed Biotransformation of Multifunctional Triterpenoids Derived from Phytonutrients

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Syed Adnan Ali; Tan, Huey Ling; Sultan, Sadia; Mohd Faridz, Muhammad Afifi Bin; Mohd Shah, Mohamad Azlan Bin; Nurfazilah, Sharifah; Hussain, Munawar

    2014-01-01

    Microbial-catalyzed biotransformations have considerable potential for the generation of an enormous variety of structurally diversified organic compounds, especially natural products with complex structures like triterpenoids. They offer efficient and economical ways to produce semi-synthetic analogues and novel lead molecules. Microorganisms such as bacteria and fungi could catalyze chemo-, regio- and stereospecific hydroxylations of diverse triterpenoid substrates that are extremely difficult to produce by chemical routes. During recent years, considerable research has been performed on the microbial transformation of bioactive triterpenoids, in order to obtain biologically active molecules with diverse structures features. This article reviews the microbial modifications of tetranortriterpenoids, tetracyclic triterpenoids and pentacyclic triterpenoids. PMID:25003642

  5. Valproic Acid Induces Antimicrobial Compound Production in Doratomyces microspores.

    PubMed

    Zutz, Christoph; Bacher, Markus; Parich, Alexandra; Kluger, Bernhard; Gacek-Matthews, Agnieszka; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Wagner, Martin; Rychli, Kathrin; Strauss, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in public health is the rising number of antibiotic resistant pathogens and the lack of novel antibiotics. In recent years there is a rising focus on fungi as sources of antimicrobial compounds due to their ability to produce a large variety of bioactive compounds and the observation that virtually every fungus may still contain yet unknown so called "cryptic," often silenced, compounds. These putative metabolites could include novel bioactive compounds. Considerable effort is spent on methods to induce production of these "cryptic" metabolites. One approach is the use of small molecule effectors, potentially influencing chromatin landscape in fungi. We observed that the supernatant of the fungus Doratomyces (D.) microsporus treated with valproic acid (VPA) displayed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and two methicillin resistant clinical S. aureus isolates. VPA treatment resulted in enhanced production of seven antimicrobial compounds: cyclo-(L-proline-L-methionine) (cPM), p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, cyclo-(phenylalanine-proline) (cFP), indole-3-carboxylic acid, phenylacetic acid (PAA) and indole-3-acetic acid. The production of the antimicrobial compound phenyllactic acid was exclusively detectable after VPA treatment. Furthermore three compounds, cPM, cFP, and PAA, were able to boost the antimicrobial activity of other antimicrobial compounds. cPM, for the first time isolated from fungi, and to a lesser extent PAA, are even able to decrease the minimal inhibitory concentration of ampicillin in MRSA strains. In conclusion we could show in this study that VPA treatment is a potent tool for induction of "cryptic" antimicrobial compound production in fungi, and that the induced compounds are not exclusively linked to the secondary metabolism. Furthermore this is the first discovery of the rare diketopiperazine cPM in fungi. Additionally we could demonstrate that cPM and PAA boost antibiotic activity against antibiotic

  6. Valproic Acid Induces Antimicrobial Compound Production in Doratomyces microspores

    PubMed Central

    Zutz, Christoph; Bacher, Markus; Parich, Alexandra; Kluger, Bernhard; Gacek-Matthews, Agnieszka; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Wagner, Martin; Rychli, Kathrin; Strauss, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in public health is the rising number of antibiotic resistant pathogens and the lack of novel antibiotics. In recent years there is a rising focus on fungi as sources of antimicrobial compounds due to their ability to produce a large variety of bioactive compounds and the observation that virtually every fungus may still contain yet unknown so called “cryptic,” often silenced, compounds. These putative metabolites could include novel bioactive compounds. Considerable effort is spent on methods to induce production of these “cryptic” metabolites. One approach is the use of small molecule effectors, potentially influencing chromatin landscape in fungi. We observed that the supernatant of the fungus Doratomyces (D.) microsporus treated with valproic acid (VPA) displayed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and two methicillin resistant clinical S. aureus isolates. VPA treatment resulted in enhanced production of seven antimicrobial compounds: cyclo-(L-proline-L-methionine) (cPM), p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, cyclo-(phenylalanine-proline) (cFP), indole-3-carboxylic acid, phenylacetic acid (PAA) and indole-3-acetic acid. The production of the antimicrobial compound phenyllactic acid was exclusively detectable after VPA treatment. Furthermore three compounds, cPM, cFP, and PAA, were able to boost the antimicrobial activity of other antimicrobial compounds. cPM, for the first time isolated from fungi, and to a lesser extent PAA, are even able to decrease the minimal inhibitory concentration of ampicillin in MRSA strains. In conclusion we could show in this study that VPA treatment is a potent tool for induction of “cryptic” antimicrobial compound production in fungi, and that the induced compounds are not exclusively linked to the secondary metabolism. Furthermore this is the first discovery of the rare diketopiperazine cPM in fungi. Additionally we could demonstrate that cPM and PAA boost antibiotic activity

  7. Distribution and diversity of microbial communities in meromictic soda Lake Doroninskoe (Transbaikalia, Russia) during winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyugina, Evgeniya; Belkova, Natalia

    2015-11-01

    Meromictic soda and saline lakes are unique ecosystems characterized by the stability of physical, chemical and biological parameters, and they are distributed all over the world. Lakes located in regions with average annual negative air temperature are of particular interest because of the presence of two periods with intensive and dynamic processes: the so-called biological summer and the long ice season with the biological spring. Soda Lake Doroninskoe is located in Eastern Transbaikalia (51°14'N, 112°14'E) in the permafrost zone in an extreme continental climate, and is covered by ice for seven months per year. The structure and diversity of the microbial communities throughout the water column of the lake was studied by 16S rRNA gene amplicon metasequencing. Different species with specific functions were found to dominate at different depths. Metabolically flexible bacteria with a capacity to switch between anoxygenic photosynthesis and aerobic chemotrophic metabolism dominate in soda Lake Doroninskoe.

  8. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, seawater and natural brines accounted for 51% of US magnesium compounds production. World magnesia production was estimated to be 14.5 Mt. Most of the production came from China, North Korea, Russia and Turkey. Although no specific production figures are available, Japan and the United States are estimated to account for almost one-half of the world's capacity from seawater and brines.

  9. Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankland, Kenneth

    For many years, powder X-ray diffraction was used primarily as a fingerprinting method for phase identification in the context of molecular organic materials. In the early 1990s, with only a few notable exceptions, structures of even moderate complexity were not solvable from PXRD data alone. Global optimisation methods and highly-modified direct methods have transformed this situation by specifically exploiting some well-known properties of molecular compounds. This chapter will consider some of these properties.

  10. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production during 2002. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida. They were also recovered from well brines in Michigan by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And they were recovered from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals.

  11. Conditioning biomass for microbial growth

    DOEpatents

    Bodie, Elizabeth A; England, George

    2015-03-31

    The present invention relates to methods for improving the yield of microbial processes that use lignocellulose biomass as a nutrient source. The methods comprise conditioning a composition comprising lignocellulose biomass with an enzyme composition that comprises a phenol oxidizing enzyme. The conditioned composition can support a higher rate of growth of microorganisms in a process. In one embodiment, a laccase composition is used to condition lignocellulose biomass derived from non-woody plants, such as corn and sugar cane. The invention also encompasses methods for culturing microorganisms that are sensitive to inhibitory compounds in lignocellulose biomass. The invention further provides methods of making a product by culturing the production microorganisms in conditioned lignocellulose biomass.

  12. Spectroscopic analysis of phenolic compounds for food and feed formulations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic compounds exhibit several bioactive properties including anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, and anti-fungal characteristics with potential applications as additives in functional food and feed formulations. Phenolic compounds occur in plants as secondary metabolites and may be recovered as a co-...

  13. Microbial fuel cell treatment of fuel process wastewater

    DOEpatents

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Tsouris, Constantino

    2013-12-03

    The present invention is directed to a method for cleansing fuel processing effluent containing carbonaceous compounds and inorganic salts, the method comprising contacting the fuel processing effluent with an anode of a microbial fuel ell, the anode containing microbes thereon which oxidatively degrade one or more of the carbonaceous compounds while producing electrical energy from the oxidative degradation, and directing the produced electrical energy to drive an electrosorption mechanism that operates to reduce the concentration of one or more inorganic salts in the fuel processing effluent, wherein the anode is in electrical communication with a cathode of the microbial fuel cell. The invention is also directed to an apparatus for practicing the method.

  14. [Paradigm shift in the so-called "certification of medical fitness" for the recruitment of new civil servants].

    PubMed

    Lange, R

    2014-04-01

    In actual jurisdiction the Federal Administrative Court has substantially reduced the standard of "health ability" for civil servants who shall be newly employed. That means for the regulated official pre-employment medical examination that in critical cases a recommendation for non-employment will be more rarely considered in the lack of valid, i. e., selective scientific principles. Thereby the formerly pursued selection effect based on civil service law mainly will not apply in the future. Even though the widely opened approach to the civil servant status might be a favour for interested handicapped persons, the following impacts on official-organisational as well as fiscal aspects (governmental aid, pension- burden) can be difficultly foreseen. Hence, in the future the official pre-employment medical -examination will develop an increasing focus on advices about restrictions of assignment possibly having to be considered for admitted candidates.

  15. Malignant fat-forming solitary fibrous tumor (so-called "lipomatous hemangiopericytoma"): clinicopathologic analysis of 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jen-Chieh; Fletcher, Christopher D M

    2011-08-01

    Fat-forming solitary fibrous tumor is a rare variant of solitary fibrous tumor (SFT). Generally regarded as benign, very few fat-forming SFTs with malignant histologic features have been reported. Here, we report 14 histologically malignant fat-forming SFTs to better characterize this subset. Seven patients were female and 7 were male, with ages ranging 20 to 93 years (median, 57 y). Five tumors were located in the lower limb, 3 in the trunk, 3 in abdominopelvic locations, 2 in the head and neck region, and 1 in the upper limb. The tumor size ranged from 3.4 to 20 cm (median, 8.6 cm). Histologically, all exhibited at least focal hypercellularity; 12 tumors had mitoses >4/10 high-power fields (range, 2 to 37; median, 8), 12 showed at least moderate atypia, and 8 showed necrosis. It should be noted that 7 tumors contained only mature adipose tissue, whereas 5 contained multivacuolated lipoblasts and 2 had areas resembling atypical lipomatous tumor (ALT). Immunohistochemically, CD34 and CD99 were positive in most cases (11 of 14 and 8 of 10, respectively); MDM2 and CDK4 were both negative in all 4 cases tested (including both tumors with ALT-like areas). Follow-up data from 10 cases (median duration, 47.5 mo; range, 5 to 76) showed 2 patients with multiple metastases (both to lung and bones, and 1 each to breast and to soft tissue), both of whom died of disease. In conclusion, fat-forming SFTs exhibiting malignant histologic features have potential for aggressive behavior. The presence of lipoblasts and/or ALT-like areas, although described in some "benign" examples of fat-forming SFT, seems much more common in the malignant subset and may prompt a careful search for morphologic evidence of malignancy in any case of fat-forming SFT.

  16. Efficacy of a multifunctional plant complex in the treatment of the so-called 'cellulite': clinical and instrumental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Distante, F; Bacci, P A; Carrera, M

    2006-06-01

    'Cellulite' or more correctly oedemateous fibrosclerotic panniculopathy, or local lipodystrophy, is a common aesthetic problem for many women, visually characterized by the orange peel or dimpled look of the skin, mainly on the buttocks and thighs. The cause of cellulite is still a matter of debate. It is currently considered an endocrine-metabolic microcirculatory disorder that causes interstitial matrix alterations and structural changes in subcutaneous adipose tissue. The first step in cellulite treatment is stimulation of microcirculation and the removal of accumulated fluids and toxic elements. This can improve the interstitial matrix basal regulation, fibroblast activity and decrease interstitial oedema, with subsequent increase in lipolysis and a better oxygen and nutrition of the adipose tissue. In this paper are reported two trials aimed at evaluating clinically and instrumentally the effects of different orally administered multifunctional plant extracts-based formulations in the treatment of cellulite compared with a placebo.

  17. The so-called Listeria innocua ferritin is a Dps protein. Iron incorporation, detoxification, and DNA protection properties.

    PubMed

    Su, Meihong; Cavallo, Stefano; Stefanini, Simonetta; Chiancone, Emilia; Chasteen, N Dennis

    2005-04-19

    Listeria innocua Dps (DNA binding protein from starved cells) affords protection to DNA against oxidative damage and can accumulate about 500 iron atoms within its central cavity through a process facilitated by a ferroxidase center. The chemistry of iron binding and oxidation in Listeria Dps (LiDps, formerly described as a ferritin) using H(2)O(2) as oxidant was studied to further define the mechanism of iron deposition inside the protein and the role of LiDps in protecting DNA from oxidative damage. The relatively strong binding of 12 Fe(2+) to the apoprotein (K(D) approximately 0.023 microM) was demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimetry, fluorescence quenching, and pH stat experiments. Hydrogen peroxide was found to be a more efficient oxidant for the protein-bound Fe(2+) than O(2). Iron(II) oxidation by H(2)O(2) occurs with a stoichiometry of 2 Fe(2+)/H(2)O(2) in both the protein-based ferroxidation and subsequent mineralization reactions, indicating complete reduction of H(2)O(2) to H(2)O. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping experiments demonstrated that LiDps attenuates the production of hydroxyl radical by Fenton chemistry. DNA cleavage assays showed that the protein, while not binding to DNA itself, protects it against the deleterious combination of Fe(2+) and H(2)O(2). The overall process of iron deposition and detoxification by LiDps is described by the following equations. For ferroxidation, Fe(2+) + Dps(Z)--> [(Fe(2+))-Dps](Z+1) + H(+) (Fe(2+) binding) and [(Fe(2+))-Dps](Z+1) + Fe(2+) + H(2)O(2) --> [(Fe(3+))(2)(O)(2)-Dps](Z+1) + 2H(+) (Fe(2+) oxidation/hydrolysis). For mineralization, 2Fe(2+) + H(2)O(2) + 2H(2)O --> 2Fe(O)OH((core)) + 4H(+) (Fe(2+) oxidation/hydrolysis). These reactions occur in place of undesirable odd-electron redox processes that produce hydroxyl radical. PMID:15823015

  18. [Clinical signs, diagnostic approach and therapy for the so-called ovarian remnant syndrome in the bitch].

    PubMed

    Günzel-Apel, A-R; Buschhaus, J; Urhausen, C; Masal, C; Wolf, K; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Piechotta, M; Beyerbach, M; Schoon, H-A

    2012-01-01

    The ovarian remnant syndrome arises as a consequence of incomplete ovariectomy or ovariohysterectomy. Remnant ovarian tissue which has been left mostly unintentionally in the bitch may show endocrine activity a few weeks to several years after surgery, provoking a variety of clinical signs. The majority of affected bitches return to heat, in other cases signs of pseudopregnancy and endometritis may be observed. Occasionally, bitches with unclear clinical signs are presented with the suspicion of an inactive ovarian remnant. The following article intends to place the origin of the ovarian remnant syndrome into a factual context regarding the responsibility of the veterinarian and to demonstrate a reasonable diagnostic procedure according to the respective clinical signs. In this regard, the clinical-gynaecological examination, including vaginal cytology, must receive high priority, with the addition of progesterone analysis in peripheral blood plasma or serum if required. Using these combined diagnostic tools, ovarian remnants in stages of endocrine activity (follicular and luteal phases as well as cystic or tumourous ovarian tissue) can be easily unequivocally diagnosed. The application of a GnRH-stimulation test is only reasonable in bitches in which clinical signs are missing. In this context, the usefulness of semi-quantitative LH-assays is also discussed.

  19. Specific amplification of bacterial DNA by optimized so-called universal bacterial primers in samples rich of plant DNA.

    PubMed

    Dorn-In, Samart; Bassitta, Rupert; Schwaiger, Karin; Bauer, Johann; Hölzel, Christina S

    2015-06-01

    Universal primers targeting the bacterial 16S-rRNA-gene allow quantification of the total bacterial load in variable sample types by qPCR. However, many universal primer pairs also amplify DNA of plants or even of archaea and other eukaryotic cells. By using these primers, the total bacterial load might be misevaluated, whenever samples contain high amounts of non-target DNA. Thus, this study aimed to provide primer pairs which are suitable for quantification and identification of bacterial DNA in samples such as feed, spices and sample material from digesters. For 42 primers, mismatches to the sequence of chloroplasts and mitochondria of plants were evaluated. Six primer pairs were further analyzed with regard to the question whether they anneal to DNA of archaea, animal tissue and fungi. Subsequently they were tested with sample matrix such as plants, feed, feces, soil and environmental samples. To this purpose, the target DNA in the samples was quantified by qPCR. The PCR products of plant and feed samples were further processed for the Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism method followed by sequence analysis. The sequencing results revealed that primer pair 335F/769R amplified only bacterial DNA in samples such as plants and animal feed, in which the DNA of plants prevailed.

  20. [Intervertebral disk-induced diseases (BK Nr. 2108, 2109, 2110). The so-called exacerbation and assessment of work disability].

    PubMed

    Ludolph, E; Spohr, H; Echtermeyer, V

    1994-05-01

    Two problems are discussed from a multitude of problems arising with the assessment of the "new" occupational diseases classified under the heading "Vertebral Column" which are of essential importance in determining the amount of compensation payment under German statutory health insurance legislation. One problem concerns differentiation of damage from already existing damage or dividing the total disease into preliminary i.e. already existing damage on the one hand and worsening or exacerbation on the other. Pathogenesis of disk-related disease does not usually allow splitting the disease into an already existing damage that is not job-conditioned and an exacerbation caused by the insured exposure to job-conditioned risk: compensation must be based on the "all-or-nothing" principle. The second problem is to assess the reduction in ability to cope with gainful employment stress. Preventive considerations will decisively influence the number of working places that can be offered as alternatives if a person has been suffering from intravertebral disk disease. Not only those jobs that require heavy physical work are barred, but also those where the worker has to remain in the same position for a prolonged time. Such disease-specific preventive considerations result in a rejection of the usual assessment criteria for intervertebral disk diseases.

  1. [Rupture of the ulnar, collateral ligament of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb, so-called 'wobbly thumb'].

    PubMed

    Vanclooster, P; Reinders, J; Lens, J; Van Houtte, H; Munting, J

    1988-01-01

    A stable metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb is indispensable for a normal grip function of the hand. The joint is stabilized by collateral ligaments. A rupture of the ulnar, collateral ligament is often caused by a sports trauma, as indicated by the denominations "skiërs duim", "goalkeeper's thumb" and "baseball thumb". Many surgeons are not familiar with the phenomenon of an insufficient collateral ligament, also called "wackeldaum". In the period 1981-1985 a consecutive series of 35 patients with a ruptured ulnar collateral ligament was operated in the De Wever hospital Heerlen (Netherlands). On the basis of our own patients, attention is given to the diagnosis, therapy and results of the operative treatment of these lesions.

  2. A CHEMO-BIOLOGICAL STUDY OF THE RELATIONS OF PEPSIN TO SO-CALLED ANTI-PEPSIN

    PubMed Central

    Hamburger, Walter W.

    1911-01-01

    1. Fresh and inactivated animal serum under proper conditions will bind pepsin quantitatively in weak acid solution and will prevent it from digesting proteid even after the addition of free hydrochloric acid in excess. 2. This binding and inactivation of pepsin cannot be considered as due to a specific anti-pepsin. 3. The phenomenon has been named pepsin deviation in analogy with the deviation described for other ferments, notably trypsin. 4. The ability of animal serum to deviate pepsin has been responsible for most, if not all, of the published accounts of anti-pepsin. 5. By the use of a technique elaborated to control pepsin deviation, it has been found impossible to demonstrate normal anti-pepsin in the blood serum of the dog, cat, guinea pig, beef, horse, rabbit, and of man. PMID:19867495

  3. Jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) and the Agaricus mushroom lectin fit also to the so-called peanut receptor.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, B P; Ahmed, H; Uhlenbruck, G; Janssen, E; Kolar, C; Seiler, F R

    1985-12-01

    The lectin from jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) reacts with the peanut-specific lectin receptor represented by the T-disaccharide, which is also part of the Thomsen (= T)-Friedenreich antigen, namely O-beta-D-galactosyl-(1----3)-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. The difference between the jackfruit lectin and peanut lectin has been shown to be mainly due to the further linkage of the T-disaccharide: Whereas the peanut lectin reacts with both anomeric forms, jackfruit lectin and the closely - with respect to its specificity - related Agaricus bisporus mushroom lectin react predominantly with the alpha-linked T-disaccharide, so that they cannot detect the lipid-linked T-disaccharide, as the peanut lectin does.

  4. [Methods of the multivariate statistical analysis of so-called polyetiological diseases using the example of coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Lifshits, A M

    1979-01-01

    General characteristics of the multivariate statistical analysis (MSA) is given. Methodical premises and criteria for the selection of an adequate MSA method applicable to pathoanatomic investigations of the epidemiology of multicausal diseases are presented. The experience of using MSA with computors and standard computing programs in studies of coronary arteries aterosclerosis on the materials of 2060 autopsies is described. The combined use of 4 MSA methods: sequential, correlational, regressional, and discriminant permitted to quantitate the contribution of each of the 8 examined risk factors in the development of aterosclerosis. The most important factors were found to be the age, arterial hypertension, and heredity. Occupational hypodynamia and increased fatness were more important in men, whereas diabetes melitus--in women. The registration of this combination of risk factors by MSA methods provides for more reliable prognosis of the likelihood of coronary heart disease with a fatal outcome than prognosis of the degree of coronary aterosclerosis.

  5. [Laurel allergy. Cause, effect and sequelae of the external application of a so-called nature remedy].

    PubMed

    Hausen, B M

    1985-04-19

    Self-medication of rheumatic complaints in the upper arm, by one woman, and of a lipoma on the thigh, by another, with pure laurel oil caused within two weeks severe contact dermatitis and swellings far from the point of application. Sesquiterpene lactone, contained within laurel oil, proved to be the cause of the induced contact allergy. Since the acquired specific hypersensitivity of the eczema type is directed primarily against the alpha-methylene group of the lactone, cross-reactions were observed against a large number of other plans which are botanically unrelated but contain substances of a similar class. Those allergic to laurel oil should therefore avoid many cosmetics, articles of hygiene, foods, drinks and medicinal preparations which contain herbs, as well as gardening, certain cut flowers and perfumes, especially those of the family Compositae. The present trend "back to nature" makes further sensitizations against laurel oil likely. This would seem to justify the inclusion of these substances among the group of potentially harmful environmental and occupational products.

  6. Pyrogenic organic matter can alter microbial communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiello, Caroline; Gao, Xiaodong; Cheng, Hsiao-Ying; Silberg, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Soil microbes communicate with each other to manage a large range of processes that occur more efficiently when microbes are able to act simultaneously. This coordination occurs through the continuous production of signaling compounds that are easily diffused into and out of cells. As the number of microbes in a localized environment increases, the internal cellular concentration of these signaling compounds increases, and when a threshold concentration is reached, gene expression shifts, leading to altered (and coordinated) microbial behaviors. Many of these coordinated behaviors have biogeochemically important outcomes. For example, methanogenesis, denitrification, biofilm formation, and the development of plant-rhizobial symbioses are all regulated by a simple class of cell-cell signaling molecules known as acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). Pyrogenic organic matter in soils can act to disrupt microbial communication through multiple pathways. In the case of AHLs, charcoal's very high surface area can sorb these signaling compounds, preventing microbes from detecting each others' presence (Masiello et al., 2014). In addition, the lactone ring in AHLs is vulnerable to pH increases accompanying PyOM inputs, with soil pH values higher than 7-8 leading to ring opening and compound destabilization. Different microbes use different classes of signaling compounds, and not all microbial signaling compounds are pH-vulnerable. This implies that PyOM-driven pH increases may trigger differential outcomes for Gram negative bacteria vs fungi, for example. A charcoal-driven reduction in microbes' ability to detect cell-cell communication compounds may lead to a shift in the ability of microbes to participate in key steps of C and N cycling. For example, an increase in an archaeon-specific AHL has been shown to lead to a cascade of metabolic processes that eventually results in the upregulation of CH4 production (Zhang et al., 2012). Alterations in similar AHL compounds leads to

  7. Expansion of Microbial Forensics.

    PubMed

    Schmedes, Sarah E; Sajantila, Antti; Budowle, Bruce

    2016-08-01

    Microbial forensics has been defined as the discipline of applying scientific methods to the analysis of evidence related to bioterrorism, biocrimes, hoaxes, or the accidental release of a biological agent or toxin for attribution purposes. Over the past 15 years, technology, particularly massively parallel sequencing, and bioinformatics advances now allow the characterization of microorganisms for a variety of human forensic applications, such as human identification, body fluid characterization, postmortem interval estimation, and biocrimes involving tracking of infectious agents. Thus, microbial forensics should be more broadly described as the discipline of applying scientific methods to the analysis of microbial evidence in criminal and civil cases for investigative purposes.

  8. Nitrogen cycle in microbial mats: completely unknown?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coban, O.; Bebout, B.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial mats are thought to have originated around 3.7 billion years ago, most likely in the areas around submarine hydrothermal vents, which supplied a source of energy in the form of reduced chemical species from the Earth's interior. Active hydrothermal vents are also believed to exist on Jupiter's moon Europa, Saturn's moon Enceladus, and on Mars, earlier in that planet's history. Microbial mats have been an important force in the maintenance of Earth's ecosystems and the first photosynthesis was also originated there. Microbial mats are believed to exhibit most, if not all, biogeochemical processes that exist in aquatic ecosystems, due to the presence of different physiological groups of microorganisms therein. While most microbially mediated biogeochemical transformations have been shown to occur within microbial mats, the nitrogen cycle in the microbial mats has received very little study in spite of the fact that nitrogen usually limits growth in marine environments. We will present the first results in the determination of a complete nitrogen budget for a photosynthetic microbial mat. Both in situ sources and sinks of nitrogen in photosynthetic microbial mats are being measured using stable isotope techniques. Our work has a particular focus on recently described, but poorly understood, processes, e.g., anammox and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, and an emphasis on understanding the role that nitrogen cycling may play in generating biogenic nitrogen isotopic signatures and biomarker molecules. Measurements of environmental controls on nitrogen cycling should offer insight into the nature of co-evolution of these microbial communities and their planets of origin. Identifying the spatial (microscale) as well as temporal (diel and seasonal) distribution of nitrogen transformations, e.g., rates of nitrification and denitrification, within mats, particularly with respect to the distribution of photosynthetically-produced oxygen, is anticipated. The results

  9. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60% of US magnesium compounds production in 2001. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater in Florida by Premier Chemicals. They were also recovered from Michigan well brines by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And Premier Chemicals recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from magnesite in Nevada. Reilly Industries and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

  10. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 40 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2009. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover, and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  11. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 54 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2010. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  12. Understanding patterns of use and scientific opportunities in the emerging global microbial commons.

    PubMed

    Dijkshoorn, Lenie; De Vos, Paul; Dedeurwaerdere, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Rapidly growing global networking has induced and supported an increased interest in the life sciences in such general issues as health, climate change, food security and biodiversity. Therefore, the need to address and share research data and materials in a systematic way emerged almost simultaneously. This movement has been described as the so-called global research commons. Also in microbiology, where the sharing of microbiological materials is a key issue, microbial commons is attracting attention. Microbiology is currently facing great challenges with the advances of high throughput screening and next-generation whole genome sequencing. Furthermore, the exploration and use of microorganisms in agriculture and food production are increasing so as to safeguard global food and feed production. Further to several meetings on the subject, a special issue of Research in Microbiology is dedicated to Microbial Research Commons with a series of reviews elaborating its major pay-offs and needs in basic and applied microbiology. This paper gives an introduction to these articles covering a range of topics. These include the role of public culture collections and biological resource centers and legal aspects in the exchange of materials, microbial classification, an internet-based platform for data-sharing, applications in agriculture and food production, and challenges in metagenomics and extremophile research.

  13. The changing landscape of microbial biodiversity exploration and its implications for systematics.

    PubMed

    Hedlund, Brian P; Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Staley, James T

    2015-06-01

    A vast diversity of Bacteria and Archaea exists in nature that has evaded axenic culture. Advancements in single-cell genomics, metagenomics, and molecular microbial ecology approaches provide ever-improving insight into the biology of this so-called "microbial dark matter"; however, due to the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes, yet-uncultivated microorganisms are not accommodated in formal taxonomy regardless of the quantity or quality of data. Meanwhile, efforts to calibrate the existing taxonomy with phylogenetic anchors and genomic data are increasingly robust. The current climate provides an exciting opportunity to leverage rapidly expanding single-cell genomics and metagenomics datasets to improve the taxonomy of Bacteria and Archaea. However, this opportunity must be weighted carefully in light of the strengths and limitations of these approaches. We propose to expand the definition of the Candidatus taxonomy to include taxa, from the phylum level to the species level, that are described genomically, particularly when genomic work is coupled with advanced molecular ecology approaches to probe metabolic functions in situ. This system would preserve the rigor and value of traditional microbial systematics while enabling growth of a provisional taxonomic structure to facilitate communication about "dark" lineages on the tree of life. PMID:25921438

  14. Microbial surfactants: fundamentals and applicability in the formulation of nano-sized drug delivery vectors.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ligia R

    2015-07-01

    Microbial surfactants, so-called biosurfactants, comprise a wide variety of structurally distinct amphipathic molecules produced by several microorganisms. Besides exhibiting surface activity at the interfaces, these molecules present powerful characteristics including high biodegradability, low toxicity and special biological activities (e.g. antimicrobial, antiviral, anticancer, among others), that make them an alternative to their chemical counterparts. Several medical-related applications have been suggested for these molecules, including some reports on their potential use in the formulation of nano-sized drug delivery vectors. However, despite their promises, due to the generalized lack of knowledge on microbial surfactants phase behavior and stability under diverse physicochemical conditions, these applications remain largely unexplored, thus representing an exciting field of research. These nano-sized vectors are a powerful approach towards the current medical challenges regarding the development of efficient and targeted treatments for several diseases. In this review, a special emphasis will be given to nanoparticles and microemulsions. Nanoparticles are very auspicious as their size, shape and stability can be manipulated by changing the environmental conditions. On the other hand, the easiness of formulation, as well as the broad possibilities of administration justifies the recent popularity of the microemulsions. Notwithstanding, both vector types still require further developments to overcome some critical limitations related with toxicity and costs, among others. Such developments may include the search for other system components, as the microbial surfactants, that can display improved features. PMID:25655712

  15. Microbial Source Tracking

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial indicators of fecal contamination provide the basis for assessing the microbial quality of environmental waters. While the indicator concept has overall helped reduce waterborne outbreaks in recreational waters, the public health value of currently used indicator bacter...

  16. Microbial safety in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krooneman, Janneke; Harmsen, Hermie; Landini, Paolo; Zinn, Manfred; Munaut, Françoise; van der Meer, Walter; Beimfohr, Claudia; Reichert, Bas; Preuß, Andrea

    2005-10-01

    Microbial hygiene is important in our daily lives; preventing and combating microbial infections is increasingly important in society. In hospitals, strict monitoring and control is exercised for people and infrastructure alike. In modern buildings, air-conditioning system are screened for harmful bacteria such as Legionella. More recently, concerns about SARS (virus) and anthrax (bacteria) have added pressure on the scientific community to come up with adequate monitoring and control techniques to assure microbial hygiene. Additionally, the use of biotechnological recycling and cleaning processes for sustainability brings the need for reliable monitoring tools and preventive or riks-reducing strategies. In the manned space environment, similar problems need to be solved and efforts have already been made to study the behaviour of micro-organisms and microbial hygiene onboard space stations.

  17. Increased electrical output when a bacterial ABTS oxidizer is used in a microbial fuel cell

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a technology that provides electrical energy from the microbial oxidation of organic compounds. Most MFCs use oxygen as the oxidant in the cathode chamber. The present study examined the formation in culture of an unidentified bacterial oxidant and investigated the ...

  18. Filtering promiscuous compounds in early drug discovery: is it a good idea?

    PubMed

    Senger, Mario R; Fraga, Carlos A M; Dantas, Rafael F; Silva, Floriano P

    2016-06-01

    The use of computational filters for excluding supposedly nonspecific and promiscuous compounds from chemical libraries is a controversial issue, because many drugs used in clinics today would never reach the market if these filters were applied. In part, this conflict could be caused by the paradigm: one-drug-one-target, even though it is widely agreed that drug action is a result of a complex network of biomolecular interactions. Therefore, the so-called pan assay interference compounds (PAINS) or promiscuous compounds could be in fact assay artifacts, false positives or, simply, bright chemical matter (BCM) composed of privileged scaffolds, as we propose here. Despite apparent promiscuity, BCM can be tailored into new and safe drugs after overcoming selectivity criteria.

  19. Synthesis of Glycine and Other Prebiotic Compounds in the Interstellar Medium - An Example of Radiation Chemistry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, N. J.; Sivaraman, B.; Jeetha, S.; Dawes, A.; Hunniford, A.; McCullough, R. W.

    2007-08-01

    To understand how life can begin on a habitable planet such as the Earth, it is essential to know what organic compounds were likely to have been available, and how they interacted with the planetary environment. Therefore an understanding of the mechanisms by which organic chemical compounds are formed (so called /prebiotic chemistry/) is essential. Recent data from space based telescopes are revealing the interstellar medium as a rich 'chemical factory' in which many hydrocarbon speices are present (e.g. formic and acetic acid, alcohols and esters). Whether larger more complex species such as amino acids can form remains unknown since they can not, at present, be detected. However laboratory experiments that recreate the conditions of the ISM and the conditions under which stars and planets evolve have recently shown that such 'prebiotic compounds' may be formed through radiation induced chemistry. Details of these experiments will be discussed with the example of glycine formation used as an exemplar for such molecular synthesis.

  20. Simultaneous complexation of organic compounds and heavy metals by a modified cyclodextrin

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Brusseau, M.L.

    1995-10-01

    The cleanup of contaminated soil and groundwater at hazardous waste sites has become a major focus of research and policy debate. A major factor complicating the cleanup of many sites is the cooccurrence of organic compounds and heavy metals, the so-called mixed wastes. We investigated the ability of a modified cyclodextrin to simultaneously complex low-polarity organic compounds and heavy metals. The results of the experiments showed that carboxymethyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin could simultaneously increase the apparent aqueous solubilities of the selected organic compounds (anthracene, trichlorobenzene; biphenyl, and ODT) and complex with Cd{sup 2+}. This complexation was not significantly affected by changes in pH or by the presence of relatively high concentrations of Ca{sup 2+}. It is possible that this reagent can be used successfully to remediate hazardous waste sites contaminated by mixed wastes. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Ocean microbial metagenomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkhof, Lee J.; Goodman, Robert M.

    2009-09-01

    Technology for accessing the genomic DNA of microorganisms, directly from environmental samples without prior cultivation, has opened new vistas to understanding microbial diversity and functions. Especially as applied to soils and the oceans, environments on Earth where microbial diversity is vast, metagenomics and its emergent approaches have the power to transform rapidly our understanding of environmental microbiology. Here we explore select recent applications of the metagenomic suite to ocean microbiology.

  2. Engineering microbial chemical factories to produce renewable "biomonomers".

    PubMed

    Adkins, Jake; Pugh, Shawn; McKenna, Rebekah; Nielsen, David R

    2012-01-01

    By applying metabolic engineering tools and strategies to engineer synthetic enzyme pathways, the number and diversity of commodity and specialty chemicals that can be derived directly from renewable feedstocks is rapidly and continually expanding. This of course includes a number of monomer building-block chemicals that can be used to produce replacements to many conventional plastic materials. This review aims to highlight numerous recent and important advancements in the microbial production of these so-called "biomonomers." Relative to naturally-occurring renewable bioplastics, biomonomers offer several important advantages, including improved control over the final polymer structure and purity, the ability to synthesize non-natural copolymers, and allowing products to be excreted from cells which ultimately streamlines downstream recovery and purification. To highlight these features, a handful of biomonomers have been selected as illustrative examples of recent works, including polyamide monomers, styrenic vinyls, hydroxyacids, and diols. Where appropriate, examples of their industrial penetration to date and end-product uses are also highlighted. Novel biomonomers such as these are ultimately paving the way toward new classes of renewable bioplastics that possess a broader diversity of properties than ever before possible.

  3. Engineering microbial chemical factories to produce renewable “biomonomers”

    PubMed Central

    Adkins, Jake; Pugh, Shawn; McKenna, Rebekah; Nielsen, David R.

    2012-01-01

    By applying metabolic engineering tools and strategies to engineer synthetic enzyme pathways, the number and diversity of commodity and specialty chemicals that can be derived directly from renewable feedstocks is rapidly and continually expanding. This of course includes a number of monomer building-block chemicals that can be used to produce replacements to many conventional plastic materials. This review aims to highlight numerous recent and important advancements in the microbial production of these so-called “biomonomers.” Relative to naturally-occurring renewable bioplastics, biomonomers offer several important advantages, including improved control over the final polymer structure and purity, the ability to synthesize non-natural copolymers, and allowing products to be excreted from cells which ultimately streamlines downstream recovery and purification. To highlight these features, a handful of biomonomers have been selected as illustrative examples of recent works, including polyamide monomers, styrenic vinyls, hydroxyacids, and diols. Where appropriate, examples of their industrial penetration to date and end-product uses are also highlighted. Novel biomonomers such as these are ultimately paving the way toward new classes of renewable bioplastics that possess a broader diversity of properties than ever before possible. PMID:22969753

  4. Impacts of quorum sensing on microbial metabolism and human health.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yang-Chun; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria were considered to be lonely 'mutes' for hundreds of years. However, recently it was found that bacteria usually coordinate their behaviors at the population level by producing (speaking), sensing (listening), and responding to small signal molecules. This so-called quorum sensing (QS) regulation enables bacteria to live in a 'society' with cell-cell communication and controls many important bacterial behaviors. In this chapter, QS systems and their signal molecules for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria are introduced. Most interestingly, QS regulates the important bacterial behaviors such as metabolism and pathogenesis. QS-regulated microbial metabolism includes antibiotic synthesis, pollutant biodegradation, and bioenergy production, which are very relevant to human health. QS is also well-known for its involvement in bacterial pathogenesis, such as iin nfections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Novel disease diagnosis strategies and antimicrobial agents have also been developed based on QS regulation on bacterial infections. In addition, to meet the requirements for the detection/quantification of QS signaling molecules for research and application, different biosensors have been constructed, which will also be reviewed here. QS regulation is essential to bacterial survival and important to human health. A better understanding of QS could lead better control/manipulation of bacteria, thus making them more helpful to people.

  5. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 52 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2006. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from sea-water by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from brucite by Applied Chemical Magnesias in Texas, from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas from their operations mentioned above. About 59 percent of the magnesium compounds consumed in the United States was used for refractories that are used mainly to line steelmaking furnaces. The remaining 41 percent was consumed in agricultural, chemical, construction, environmental and industrial applications.

  6. Microbial Fuel Cells and Microbial Electrolyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Borole, Abhijeet P

    2015-01-01

    Microbial Fuel Cells and microbial electrolyzers represent an upcoming technology for production of electricity and hydrogen using a hybrid electrocatalytic-biocatalytic approach. The combined catalytic efficiency of these processes has potential to make this technology highly efficient among the various renewable energy production alternatives. This field has attracted electrochemists, biologists and many other disciplines due to its potential to contribute to the energy, water and environment sectors. A brief introduction to the technology is provided followed by current research needs from a bioelectrochemical perspective. Insights into the operation and limitations of these systems achieved via cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy are discussed along with the power management needs to develop the application aspects. Besides energy production, other potential applications in bioenergy, bioelectronics, chemical production and remediation are also highlighted.

  7. Comparing the effects of weathering and microbial degradation on gasoline using principal components analysis.

    PubMed

    Turner, Dee A; Goodpaster, John V

    2012-01-01

    Ignitable liquid residues recovered from a fire scene will often show signs of weathering as a result of exposure to the heat of the fire. In addition, when the substrate is rich in organic matter, both weathering and microbial degradation may be observed. In this study, 20 μL aliquots of fresh gasoline samples were intentionally weathered and also subjected to microbial degradation in potting soil. These samples were then analyzed using a passive adsorption-elution recovery method and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Peak areas from compounds of interest were normalized and autoscaled and then subjected to principal components analysis. This analysis showed that while lower boiling compounds are subject to weathering, a different set of compounds are subject to microbial degradation. Of the compounds studied, heptane, octane, toluene, and ethylbenzene were the most vulnerable to both weathering and microbial degradation. In contrast, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and 2-ethyltoluene were the most resistant to both phenomena.

  8. 13C-DEPLETED MICROBIAL LIPIDS INDICATE SEASONAL METHANOTROPHIC ACTIVITY IN SHALLOW ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Compound specific isotope analysis was combined with phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis to identify methanotrophic activity in members of the sedimentary microbial community in the Altamaha and Savannah River estuaries in Georgia. 13C-depleted PLFAs indicate methane utilizat...

  9. Biodiversity in production of antibiotics and other bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Girish; Balachandran, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Microbes continue to play a highly considerable role in the drug discovery and development process. Nevertheless, the number of new chemical entities (NCEs) of microbial origin that has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has been reduced in the past decade. This scarcity can be partly attributed to the redundancy in the discovered molecules from microbial isolates, which are isolated from common terrestrial ecological units. However, this situation can be partly overcome by exploring rarely exploited ecological niches as the source of microbes, which reduces the chances of isolating compounds similar to existing ones. The use of modern and advanced isolation techniques, modification of the existing fermentation methods, genetic modifications to induce expression of silent genes, analytical tools for the detection and identification of new chemical entities, use of polymers in fermentation to enhance yield of fermented compounds, and so on, have all aided in enhancing the frequency of acquiring novel compounds. These compounds are representative of numerous classes of diverse compounds. Thus, compounds of microbial origin and their analogues undergoing clinical trials continue to demonstrate the importance of compounds from microbial sources in modern drug discovery. PMID:24840777

  10. Biodiversity in production of antibiotics and other bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Girish; Balachandran, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Microbes continue to play a highly considerable role in the drug discovery and development process. Nevertheless, the number of new chemical entities (NCEs) of microbial origin that has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has been reduced in the past decade. This scarcity can be partly attributed to the redundancy in the discovered molecules from microbial isolates, which are isolated from common terrestrial ecological units. However, this situation can be partly overcome by exploring rarely exploited ecological niches as the source of microbes, which reduces the chances of isolating compounds similar to existing ones. The use of modern and advanced isolation techniques, modification of the existing fermentation methods, genetic modifications to induce expression of silent genes, analytical tools for the detection and identification of new chemical entities, use of polymers in fermentation to enhance yield of fermented compounds, and so on, have all aided in enhancing the frequency of acquiring novel compounds. These compounds are representative of numerous classes of diverse compounds. Thus, compounds of microbial origin and their analogues undergoing clinical trials continue to demonstrate the importance of compounds from microbial sources in modern drug discovery.

  11. Ecogenomics of microbial communities in bioremediation of chlorinated contaminated sites

    PubMed Central

    Maphosa, Farai; Lieten, Shakti H.; Dinkla, Inez; Stams, Alfons J.; Smidt, Hauke; Fennell, Donna E.

    2012-01-01

    Organohalide compounds such as chloroethenes, chloroethanes, and polychlorinated benzenes are among the most significant pollutants in the world. These compounds are often found in contamination plumes with other pollutants such as solvents, pesticides, and petroleum derivatives. Microbial bioremediation of contaminated sites, has become commonplace whereby key processes involved in bioremediation include anaerobic degradation and transformation of these organohalides by organohalide respiring bacteria and also via hydrolytic, oxygenic, and reductive mechanisms by aerobic bacteria. Microbial ecogenomics has enabled us to not only study the microbiology involved in these complex processes but also develop tools to better monitor and assess these sites during bioremediation. Microbial ecogenomics have capitalized on recent advances in high-throughput and -output genomics technologies in combination with microbial physiology studies to address these complex bioremediation problems at a system level. Advances in environmental metagenomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics have provided insights into key genes and their regulation in the environment. They have also given us clues into microbial community structures, dynamics, and functions at contaminated sites. These techniques have not only aided us in understanding the lifestyles of common organohalide respirers, for example Dehalococcoides, Dehalobacter, and Desulfitobacterium, but also provided insights into novel and yet uncultured microorganisms found in organohalide respiring consortia. In this paper, we look at how ecogenomic studies have aided us to understand the microbial structures and functions in response to environmental stimuli such as the presence of chlorinated pollutants. PMID:23060869

  12. Microbial diversity and their roles in the vinegar fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Li, Pan; Feng, Feng; Luo, Li-Xin

    2015-06-01

    Vinegar is one of the oldest acetic acid-diluted solution products in the world. It is produced from any fermentable sugary substrate by various fermentation methods. The final vinegar products possess unique functions, which are endowed with many kinds of compounds formed in the fermentation process. The quality of vinegar is determined by many factors, especially by the raw materials and microbial diversity involved in vinegar fermentation. Given that metabolic products from the fermenting strains are directly related to the quality of the final products of vinegar, the microbial diversity and features of the dominant strains involved in different fermentation stages should be analyzed to improve the strains and stabilize fermentation. Moreover, although numerous microbiological studies have been conducted to examine the process of vinegar fermentation, knowledge about microbial diversity and their roles involved in fermentation is still fragmentary and not systematic enough. Therefore, in this review, the dominant microorganism species involved in the stages of alcoholic fermentation and acetic acid fermentation of dissimilar vinegars were summarized. We also summarized various physicochemical properties and crucial compounds in disparate types of vinegar. Furthermore, the merits and drawbacks of vital fermentation methods were generalized. Finally, we described in detail the relationships among microbial diversity, raw materials, fermentation methods, physicochemical properties, compounds, functionality, and final quality of vinegar. The integration of this information can provide us a detailed map about the microbial diversity and function involved in vinegar fermentation.

  13. Bismaleimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Adams, J.E.; Jamieson, D.R.

    1986-01-14

    Bismaleimides of the formula shown in the diagram wherein R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] each independently is H, C[sub 1-4]-alkyl, C[sub 1-4]-alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1--3; and the alkylene bridging group, optionally, is substituted by 1--3 methyl groups or by fluorine, form polybismaleimide resins which have valuable physical properties. Uniquely, these compounds permit extended cure times, i.e., they remain fluid for a time sufficient to permit the formation of a homogeneous melt prior to curing.

  14. Bismaleimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Johnnie E.; Jamieson, Donald R.

    1986-01-14

    Bismaleimides of the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, C1 or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the alkylene bridging group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine, form polybismaleimide resins which have valuable physical properties. Uniquely, these compounds permit extended cure times, i.e., they remain fluid for a time sufficient to permit the formation of a homogeneous melt prior to curing.

  15. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 57 percent of magnesium compounds produced in the United States in 2011. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties LLC from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia LLC in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash Wendover LLC and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma Inc. in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its brine operation in Michigan.

  16. Revisiting the Dilution Procedure Used To Manipulate Microbial Biodiversity in Terrestrial Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Kuramae, Eiko E.; Klinkhamer, Peter G. L.

    2015-01-01

    It is hard to assess experimentally the importance of microbial diversity in soil for the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. An approach that is often used to make such assessment is the so-called dilution method. This method is based on the assumption that the biodiversity of the microbial community is reduced after dilution of a soil suspension and that the reduced diversity persists after incubation of more or less diluted inocula in soil. However, little is known about how the communities develop in soil after inoculation. In this study, serial dilutions of a soil suspension were made and reinoculated into the original soil previously sterilized by gamma irradiation. We determined the structure of the microbial communities in the suspensions and in the inoculated soils using 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Upon dilution, several diversity indices showed that, indeed, the diversity of the bacterial communities in the suspensions decreased dramatically, with Proteobacteria as the dominant phylum of bacteria detected in all dilutions. The structure of the microbial community was changed considerably in soil, with Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Verrucomicrobia as the dominant groups in most diluted samples, indicating the importance of soil-related mechanisms operating in the assembly of the communities. We found unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) even in the highest dilution in both the suspensions and the incubated soil samples. We conclude that the dilution approach reduces the diversity of microbial communities in soil samples but that it does not allow accurate predictions of the community assemblage during incubation of (diluted) suspensions in soil. PMID:25888175

  17. Revisiting the dilution procedure used to manipulate microbial biodiversity in terrestrial systems.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Kuramae, Eiko E; Klinkhamer, Peter G L; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-07-01

    It is hard to assess experimentally the importance of microbial diversity in soil for the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. An approach that is often used to make such assessment is the so-called dilution method. This method is based on the assumption that the biodiversity of the microbial community is reduced after dilution of a soil suspension and that the reduced diversity persists after incubation of more or less diluted inocula in soil. However, little is known about how the communities develop in soil after inoculation. In this study, serial dilutions of a soil suspension were made and reinoculated into the original soil previously sterilized by gamma irradiation. We determined the structure of the microbial communities in the suspensions and in the inoculated soils using 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Upon dilution, several diversity indices showed that, indeed, the diversity of the bacterial communities in the suspensions decreased dramatically, with Proteobacteria as the dominant phylum of bacteria detected in all dilutions. The structure of the microbial community was changed considerably in soil, with Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Verrucomicrobia as the dominant groups in most diluted samples, indicating the importance of soil-related mechanisms operating in the assembly of the communities. We found unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) even in the highest dilution in both the suspensions and the incubated soil samples. We conclude that the dilution approach reduces the diversity of microbial communities in soil samples but that it does not allow accurate predictions of the community assemblage during incubation of (diluted) suspensions in soil.

  18. Impact of a microbial-mineral biopreparation on microbial community and deodorization of manures.

    PubMed

    Matusiak, Katarzyna; Borowski, Sebastian; Opaliński, Sebastian; Bakuła, Tadeusz; Kołacz, Roman; Gutarowska, Beata

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the number of bacteria in poultry, cattle and swine manure in order to perform hygienization and deodorization using a microbial-mineral biopreparation. The highest number of bacteria was recorded in laying hens manure (5.1×10(10) cfu/g). It was noted that bacteria: coliforms, E. coli, Clostridium, Enterococcus number was reduced (1-2 log) after the biopreparation application. The investigated odorous compound concentrations were reduced with 34-78% efficiency, depending on the type of manure and odorant. All odorous compounds were efficiently reduced only in the case of laying hen manure. PMID:26645325

  19. Hydrolytic microbial communities in terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manucharova, Natalia; Chernov, Timofey; Kolcova, Ekaterina; Zelezova, Alena; Lukacheva, Euhenia; Zenova, Galina

    2014-05-01

    Hydrolytic microbial communities in terrestrial ecosystems Manucharova N.A., Chernov T.I., Kolcova E.M., Zelezova A.D., Lukacheva E.G. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia Vertical differentiation of terrestrial biogeocenoses is conditioned by the formation of vertical tiers that differ considerably in the composition and structure of microbial communities. All the three tiers, phylloplane, litter and soil, are united by a single flow of organic matter, and are spatially separated successional stages of decomposition of organic substances. Decomposition of organic matter is mainly due to the activity of microorganisms producing enzymes - hydrolase and lyase - which destroy complex organic compounds. Application of molecular biological techniques (FISH) in environmental studies provides a more complete information concerning the taxonomic diversity and potential hydrolytic activity of microbial complexes of terrestrial ecosystems that exist in a wide range of environmental factors (moisture, temperature, redox potential, organic matter). The combination of two molecular biological techniques (FISH and DGGE-analysis of fragments of gene 16S rRNA total amplificate) enables an informative assessment of the differences in the structure of dominant and minor components of hydrolytic complexes formed in different tiers of terrestrial ecosystems. The functional activity of hydrolytic microbial complexes of terrestrial ecosystems is determined by the activity of dominant and minor components, which also have a high gross enzymatic activity. Degradation of biopolymers in the phylloplane is mainly due to the representatives of the Proteobacteria phylogenetic group (classes alpha and beta). In mineral soil horizons, the role of hydrolytic representatives of Firmicutes and Actinobacteria increases. Among the key environmental parameters that determine the functional activity of the hydrolytic (chitinolytic) complex of soil layer (moisture, nutrient supply, successional

  20. Deep subsurface microbial processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1995-01-01

    Information on the microbiology of the deep subsurface is necessary in order to understand the factors controlling the rate and extent of the microbially catalyzed redox reactions that influence the geophysical properties of these environments. Furthermore, there is an increasing threat that deep aquifers, an important drinking water resource, may be contaminated by man's activities, and there is a need to predict the extent to which microbial activity may remediate such contamination. Metabolically active microorganisms can be recovered from a diversity of deep subsurface environments. The available evidence suggests that these microorganisms are responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of organic matter coupled to a variety of electron acceptors just as microorganisms do in surface sediments, but at much slower rates. The technical difficulties in aseptically sampling deep subsurface sediments and the fact that microbial processes in laboratory incubations of deep subsurface material often do not mimic in situ processes frequently necessitate that microbial activity in the deep subsurface be inferred through nonmicrobiological analyses of ground water. These approaches include measurements of dissolved H2, which can predict the predominant microbially catalyzed redox reactions in aquifers, as well as geochemical and groundwater flow modeling, which can be used to estimate the rates of microbial processes. Microorganisms recovered from the deep subsurface have the potential to affect the fate of toxic organics and inorganic contaminants in groundwater. Microbial activity also greatly influences 1 the chemistry of many pristine groundwaters and contributes to such phenomena as porosity development in carbonate aquifers, accumulation of undesirably high concentrations of dissolved iron, and production of methane and hydrogen sulfide. Although the last decade has seen a dramatic increase in interest in deep subsurface microbiology, in comparison with the study of

  1. Microbial production strategies and applications of lycopene and other terpenoids.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tian; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Tiangang

    2016-01-01

    Terpenoids are a large class of compounds that have far-reaching applications and economic value, particularly those most commonly found in plants; however, the extraction and synthesis of these compounds is often expensive and technically challenging. Recent advances in microbial metabolic engineering comprise a breakthrough that may enable the efficient, cost-effective production of these limited natural resources. Via the engineering of safe, industrial microorganisms that encode product-specific enzymes, and even entire metabolic pathways of interest, microbial-derived semisynthetic terpenoids may soon replace plant-derived terpenoids as the primary source of these valuable compounds. Indeed, the recent metabolic engineering of an Escherichia coli strain that produces the precursor to lycopene, a commercially and medically important compound, with higher yields than those in tomato plants serves as a successful example. Here, we review the recent developments in the metabolic engineering of microbes for the production of certain terpenoid compounds, particularly lycopene, which has been increasingly used in pharmaceuticals, nutritional supplements, and cosmetics. Furthermore, we summarize the metabolic engineering strategies used to achieve successful microbial production of some similar compounds. Based on this overview, there is a reason to believe that metabolic engineering comprises an optimal approach for increasing the production of lycopene and other terpenoids. PMID:26715120

  2. Lipid Biomarkers for a Hypersaline Microbial Mat Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Embaye, Tsege; Turk, Kendra A.

    2003-01-01

    The use of lipid biomarkers and their carbon isotopic compositions are valuable tools for establishing links to ancient microbial ecosystems. As witnessed by the stromatolite record, benthic microbial mats grew in shallow water lagoonal environments where microorganisms had virtually no competition apart from the harsh conditions of hypersalinity, desiccation and intense light. Today, the modern counterparts of these microbial ecosystems find appropriate niches in only a few places where extremes eliminate eukaryotic grazers. Answers to many outstanding questions about the evolution of microorganisms and their environments on early Earth are best answered through study of these extant analogs. Lipids associated with various groups of bacteria can be valuable biomarkers for identification of specific groups of microorganisms both in ancient organic-rich sedimentary rocks (geolipids) and contemporary microbial communities (membrane lipids). Use of compound specific isotope analysis adds additional refinement to the identification of biomarker source, so that it is possible to take advantage of the 3C-depletions associated with various functional groups of organisms (i.e. autotrophs, heterotrophs, methanotrophs, methanogens) responsible for the cycling of carbon within a microbial community. Our recent work has focused on a set of hypersaline evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico which support the abundant growth of Microcoleus-dominated microbial mats. Specific biomarkers for diatoms, cyanobacteria, archaea, green nonsulfur (GNS), sulfate reducing, and methanotrophic bacteria have been identified. Analyses of the ester-bound fatty acids indicate a highly diverse microbial community, dominated by photosynthetic organisms at the surface.

  3. Perspective for Aquaponic Systems: "Omic" Technologies for Microbial Community Analysis.

    PubMed

    Munguia-Fragozo, Perla; Alatorre-Jacome, Oscar; Rico-Garcia, Enrique; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo; Cruz-Hernandez, Andres; Ocampo-Velazquez, Rosalia V; Garcia-Trejo, Juan F; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon G

    2015-01-01

    Aquaponics is the combined production of aquaculture and hydroponics, connected by a water recirculation system. In this productive system, the microbial community is responsible for carrying out the nutrient dynamics between the components. The nutrimental transformations mainly consist in the transformation of chemical species from toxic compounds into available nutrients. In this particular field, the microbial research, the "Omic" technologies will allow a broader scope of studies about a current microbial profile inside aquaponics community, even in those species that currently are unculturable. This approach can also be useful to understand complex interactions of living components in the system. Until now, the analog studies were made to set up the microbial characterization on recirculation aquaculture systems (RAS). However, microbial community composition of aquaponics is still unknown. "Omic" technologies like metagenomic can help to reveal taxonomic diversity. The perspectives are also to begin the first attempts to sketch the functional diversity inside aquaponic systems and its ecological relationships. The knowledge of the emergent properties inside the microbial community, as well as the understanding of the biosynthesis pathways, can derive in future biotechnological applications. Thus, the aim of this review is to show potential applications of current "Omic" tools to characterize the microbial community in aquaponic systems.

  4. Perspective for Aquaponic Systems: "Omic" Technologies for Microbial Community Analysis.

    PubMed

    Munguia-Fragozo, Perla; Alatorre-Jacome, Oscar; Rico-Garcia, Enrique; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo; Cruz-Hernandez, Andres; Ocampo-Velazquez, Rosalia V; Garcia-Trejo, Juan F; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon G

    2015-01-01

    Aquaponics is the combined production of aquaculture and hydroponics, connected by a water recirculation system. In this productive system, the microbial community is responsible for carrying out the nutrient dynamics between the components. The nutrimental transformations mainly consist in the transformation of chemical species from toxic compounds into available nutrients. In this particular field, the microbial research, the "Omic" technologies will allow a broader scope of studies about a current microbial profile inside aquaponics community, even in those species that currently are unculturable. This approach can also be useful to understand complex interactions of living components in the system. Until now, the analog studies were made to set up the microbial characterization on recirculation aquaculture systems (RAS). However, microbial community composition of aquaponics is still unknown. "Omic" technologies like metagenomic can help to reveal taxonomic diversity. The perspectives are also to begin the first attempts to sketch the functional diversity inside aquaponic systems and its ecological relationships. The knowledge of the emergent properties inside the microbial community, as well as the understanding of the biosynthesis pathways, can derive in future biotechnological applications. Thus, the aim of this review is to show potential applications of current "Omic" tools to characterize the microbial community in aquaponic systems. PMID:26509157

  5. Microbial fuel cell with improved anode

    DOEpatents

    Borole, Abhijeet P.

    2010-04-13

    The present invention relates to a method for preparing a microbial fuel cell, wherein the method includes: (i) inoculating an anodic liquid medium in contact with an anode of the microbial fuel cell with one or more types of microorganisms capable of functioning by an exoelectrogenic mechanism; (ii) establishing a biofilm of the microorganisms on and/or within the anode along with a substantial absence of planktonic forms of the microorganisms by substantial removal of the planktonic microorganisms during forced flow and recirculation conditions of the anodic liquid medium; and (iii) subjecting the microorganisms of the biofilm to a growth stage by incorporating one or more carbon-containing nutritive compounds in the anodic liquid medium during biofilm formation or after biofilm formation on the anode has been established.

  6. Microbial bioinformatics 2020.

    PubMed

    Pallen, Mark J

    2016-09-01

    Microbial bioinformatics in 2020 will remain a vibrant, creative discipline, adding value to the ever-growing flood of new sequence data, while embracing novel technologies and fresh approaches. Databases and search strategies will struggle to cope and manual curation will not be sustainable during the scale-up to the million-microbial-genome era. Microbial taxonomy will have to adapt to a situation in which most microorganisms are discovered and characterised through the analysis of sequences. Genome sequencing will become a routine approach in clinical and research laboratories, with fresh demands for interpretable user-friendly outputs. The "internet of things" will penetrate healthcare systems, so that even a piece of hospital plumbing might have its own IP address that can be integrated with pathogen genome sequences. Microbiome mania will continue, but the tide will turn from molecular barcoding towards metagenomics. Crowd-sourced analyses will collide with cloud computing, but eternal vigilance will be the price of preventing the misinterpretation and overselling of microbial sequence data. Output from hand-held sequencers will be analysed on mobile devices. Open-source training materials will address the need for the development of a skilled labour force. As we boldly go into the third decade of the twenty-first century, microbial sequence space will remain the final frontier! PMID:27471065

  7. The Microbial Olympics.

    PubMed

    Youle, Merry; Rohwer, Forest; Stacy, Apollo; Whiteley, Marvin; Steel, Bradley C; Delalez, Nicolas J; Nord, Ashley L; Berry, Richard M; Armitage, Judith P; Kamoun, Sophien; Hogenhout, Saskia; Diggle, Stephen P; Gurney, James; Pollitt, Eric J G; Boetius, Antje; Cary, S Craig

    2012-08-01

    Every four years, the Olympic Games plays host to competitors who have built on their natural talent by training for many years to become the best in their chosen discipline. Similar spirit and endeavour can be found throughout the microbial world, in which every day is a competition to survive and thrive. Microorganisms are trained through evolution to become the fittest and the best adapted to a particular environmental niche or lifestyle, and to innovate when the 'rules of the game' are changed by alterations to their natural habitats. In this Essay, we honour the best competitors in the microbial world by inviting them to take part in the inaugural Microbial Olympics. PMID:22796885

  8. Microbial life in a liquid asphalt desert.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Haque, Shirin; de Sousa Antonio, Marina Resendes; Ali, Denzil; Hosein, Riad; Song, Young C; Yang, Jinshu; Zaikova, Elena; Beckles, Denise M; Guinan, Edward; Lehto, Harry J; Hallam, Steven J

    2011-04-01

    Pitch Lake in Trinidad and Tobago is a natural asphalt reservoir nourished by pitch seepage, a form of petroleum that consists of mostly asphaltines, from the surrounding oil-rich region. During upward seepage, pitch mixes with mud and gases under high pressure, and the lighter portion evaporates or is volatilized, which produces a liquid asphalt residue characterized by low water activity, recalcitrant carbon substrates, and noxious chemical compounds. An active microbial community of archaea and bacteria, many of them novel strains (particularly from the new Tar ARC groups), totaling a biomass of up to 10(7) cells per gram, was found to inhabit the liquid hydrocarbon matrix of Pitch Lake. Geochemical and molecular taxonomic approaches revealed diverse, novel, and deeply branching microbial lineages with the potential to mediate anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation processes in different parts of the asphalt column. In addition, we found markers for archaeal methane metabolism and specific gene sequences affiliated with facultative and obligate anaerobic sulfur- and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. The microbial diversity at Pitch Lake was found to be unique when compared to microbial communities analyzed at other hydrocarbon-rich environments, which included Rancho Le Brea, a natural asphalt environment in California, USA, and an oil well and a mud volcano in Trinidad and Tobago, among other sites. These results open a window into the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of recalcitrant hydrocarbon matrices and establish the site as a terrestrial analogue for modeling the biotic potential of hydrocarbon lakes such as those found on Saturn's largest moon Titan. PMID:21480792

  9. Biodegradation of halogenated organic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, G R; Chapalamadugu, S

    1991-01-01

    In this review we discuss the degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons by microorganisms, emphasizing the physiological, biochemical, and genetic basis of the biodegradation of aliphatic, aromatic, and polycyclic compounds. Many environmentally important xenobiotics are halogenated, especially chlorinated. These compounds are manufactured and used as pesticides, plasticizers, paint and printing-ink components, adhesives, flame retardants, hydraulic and heat transfer fluids, refrigerants, solvents, additives for cutting oils, and textile auxiliaries. The hazardous chemicals enter the environment through production, commercial application, and waste. As a result of bioaccumulation in the food chain and groundwater contamination, they pose public health problems because many of them are toxic, mutagenic, or carcinogenic. Although synthetic chemicals are usually recalcitrant to biodegradation, microorganisms have evolved an extensive range of enzymes, pathways, and control mechanisms that are responsible for catabolism of a wide variety of such compounds. Thus, such biological degradation can be exploited to alleviate environmental pollution problems. The pathways by which a given compound is degraded are determined by the physical, chemical, and microbiological aspects of a particular environment. By understanding the genetic basis of catabolism of xenobiotics, it is possible to improve the efficacy of naturally occurring microorganisms or construct new microorganisms capable of degrading pollutants in soil and aquatic environments more efficiently. Recently a number of genes whose enzyme products have a broader substrate specificity for the degradation of aromatic compounds have been cloned and attempts have been made to construct gene cassettes or synthetic operons comprising these degradative genes. Such gene cassettes or operons can be transferred into suitable microbial hosts for extending and custom designing the pathways for rapid degradation of recalcitrant

  10. Biodegradation of halogenated organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, G R; Chapalamadugu, S

    1991-03-01

    In this review we discuss the degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons by microorganisms, emphasizing the physiological, biochemical, and genetic basis of the biodegradation of aliphatic, aromatic, and polycyclic compounds. Many environmentally important xenobiotics are halogenated, especially chlorinated. These compounds are manufactured and used as pesticides, plasticizers, paint and printing-ink components, adhesives, flame retardants, hydraulic and heat transfer fluids, refrigerants, solvents, additives for cutting oils, and textile auxiliaries. The hazardous chemicals enter the environment through production, commercial application, and waste. As a result of bioaccumulation in the food chain and groundwater contamination, they pose public health problems because many of them are toxic, mutagenic, or carcinogenic. Although synthetic chemicals are usually recalcitrant to biodegradation, microorganisms have evolved an extensive range of enzymes, pathways, and control mechanisms that are responsible for catabolism of a wide variety of such compounds. Thus, such biological degradation can be exploited to alleviate environmental pollution problems. The pathways by which a given compound is degraded are determined by the physical, chemical, and microbiological aspects of a particular environment. By understanding the genetic basis of catabolism of xenobiotics, it is possible to improve the efficacy of naturally occurring microorganisms or construct new microorganisms capable of degrading pollutants in soil and aquatic environments more efficiently. Recently a number of genes whose enzyme products have a broader substrate specificity for the degradation of aromatic compounds have been cloned and attempts have been made to construct gene cassettes or synthetic operons comprising these degradative genes. Such gene cassettes or operons can be transferred into suitable microbial hosts for extending and custom designing the pathways for rapid degradation of recalcitrant

  11. Microbial Load Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, S. F.; Royer, E. R.

    1979-01-01

    The Microbial Load Monitor (MLM) is an automated and computerized system for detection and identification of microorganisms. Additionally, the system is designed to enumerate and provide antimicrobic susceptibility profiles for medically significant bacteria. The system is designed to accomplish these tasks in a time of 13 hours or less versus the traditional time of 24 hours for negatives and 72 hours or more for positives usually required for standard microbiological analysis. The MLM concept differs from other methods of microbial detection in that the system is designed to accept raw untreated clinical samples and to selectively identify each group or species that may be present in a polymicrobic sample.

  12. Microbial Control News - November 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is the first of a column in the Society for Invertebrate Pathology Newsletter. Entitled "Microbial Control News" this article summarizes regulatory actions in the U.S. and Canada regarding microbial insect pest control agents....

  13. Segregation of the Anodic Microbial Communities in a Microbial Fuel Cell Cascade.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Douglas M; Smith, Ann; Dahale, Sonal; Stratford, James P; Li, Jia V; Grüning, André; Bushell, Michael E; Marchesi, Julian R; Avignone Rossa, C

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic interactions within microbial communities are essential for the efficient degradation of complex organic compounds, and underpin natural phenomena driven by microorganisms, such as the recycling of carbon-, nitrogen-, and sulfur-containing molecules. These metabolic interactions ultimately determine the function, activity and stability of the community, and therefore their understanding would be essential to steer processes where microbial communities are involved. This is exploited in the design of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), bioelectrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy present in substrates into electrical energy through the metabolic activity of microorganisms, either single species or communities. In this work, we analyzed the evolution of the microbial community structure in a cascade of MFCs inoculated with an anaerobic microbial community and continuously fed with a complex medium. The analysis of the composition of the anodic communities revealed the establishment of different communities in the anodes of the hydraulically connected MFCs, with a decrease in the abundance of fermentative taxa and a concurrent increase in respiratory taxa along the cascade. The analysis of the metabolites in the anodic suspension showed a metabolic shift between the first and last MFC, confirming the segregation of the anodic communities. Those results suggest a metabolic interaction mechanism between the predominant fermentative bacteria at the first stages of the cascade and the anaerobic respiratory electrogenic population in the latter stages, which is reflected in the observed increase in power output. We show that our experimental system represents an ideal platform for optimization of processes where the degradation of complex substrates is involved, as well as a potential tool for the study of metabolic interactions in complex microbial communities.

  14. Segregation of the Anodic Microbial Communities in a Microbial Fuel Cell Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Douglas M.; Smith, Ann; Dahale, Sonal; Stratford, James P.; Li, Jia V.; Grüning, André; Bushell, Michael E.; Marchesi, Julian R.; Avignone Rossa, C.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic interactions within microbial communities are essential for the efficient degradation of complex organic compounds, and underpin natural phenomena driven by microorganisms, such as the recycling of carbon-, nitrogen-, and sulfur-containing molecules. These metabolic interactions ultimately determine the function, activity and stability of the community, and therefore their understanding would be essential to steer processes where microbial communities are involved. This is exploited in the design of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), bioelectrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy present in substrates into electrical energy through the metabolic activity of microorganisms, either single species or communities. In this work, we analyzed the evolution of the microbial community structure in a cascade of MFCs inoculated with an anaerobic microbial community and continuously fed with a complex medium. The analysis of the composition of the anodic communities revealed the establishment of different communities in the anodes of the hydraulically connected MFCs, with a decrease in the abundance of fermentative taxa and a concurrent increase in respiratory taxa along the cascade. The analysis of the metabolites in the anodic suspension showed a metabolic shift between the first and last MFC, confirming the segregation of the anodic communities. Those results suggest a metabolic interaction mechanism between the predominant fermentative bacteria at the first stages of the cascade and the anaerobic respiratory electrogenic population in the latter stages, which is reflected in the observed increase in power output. We show that our experimental system represents an ideal platform for optimization of processes where the degradation of complex substrates is involved, as well as a potential tool for the study of metabolic interactions in complex microbial communities. PMID:27242723

  15. Extremely Randomized Machine Learning Methods for Compound Activity Prediction.

    PubMed

    Czarnecki, Wojciech M; Podlewska, Sabina; Bojarski, Andrzej J

    2015-11-09

    Speed, a relatively low requirement for computational resources and high effectiveness of the evaluation of the bioactivity of compounds have caused a rapid growth of interest in the application of machine learning methods to virtual screening tasks. However, due to the growth of the amount of data also in cheminformatics and related fields, the aim of research has shifted not only towards the development of algorithms of high predictive power but also towards the simplification of previously existing methods to obtain results more quickly. In the study, we tested two approaches belonging to the group of so-called 'extremely randomized methods'-Extreme Entropy Machine and Extremely Randomized Trees-for their ability to properly identify compounds that have activity towards particular protein targets. These methods were compared with their 'non-extreme' competitors, i.e., Support Vector Machine and Random Forest. The extreme approaches were not only found out to improve the efficiency of the classification of bioactive compounds, but they were also proved to be less computationally complex, requiring fewer steps to perform an optimization procedure.

  16. Microbial Weathering of Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, D. S.; Longazo, T. G.; Wentworth, S. J.; Southam, G.

    2002-01-01

    Controlled microbial weathering of olivine experiments displays a unique style of nanoetching caused by biofilm attachment to mineral surfaces. We are investigating whether the morphology of biotic nanoetching can be used as a biosignature. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Microbial load monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caplin, R. S.; Royer, E. R.

    1977-01-01

    Design analysis of a microbial load monitor system flight engineering model was presented. Checkout of the card taper and media pump system was fabricated as well as the final two incubating reading heads, the sample receiving and card loading device assembly, related sterility testing, and software. Progress in these areas was summarized.

  18. A Microbial Murder Mystery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Melissa A.; Mitchell, James K.

    2002-01-01

    Proposes a microbial mystery activity to test students' knowledge of human anatomy and their ability to identify microbes. Provides an opportunity for students to develop logical deductive reasoning. Includes national science education standards related to this activity, activity sheets with whole procedures, and Internet resources. (KHR)

  19. Mapping Microbial Biodiversity

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, Daphne Lisabet; Micah C. Geary; White, Luke James; Lee, Randy Dean; Brizzee, Julie Ann; Rodman, A. C.; Rope, Ronald C

    2001-09-01

    We report the development of a prototype database that "maps" microbial diversity in the context of the geochemical and geological environment and geographic location. When it is fully implemented, scientists will be able to conduct database searches, construct maps containing the information of interest, download files, and enter data over the Internet.

  20. Indirect microbial detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    The growth of microorganisms in a sample is detected and monitored by culturing microorganisms in a growth medium and detecting a change in potential between two electrodes, separated from the microbial growth by a barrier which is permeable to charged paticles but microorganism impermeable.

  1. Pretreatment of microbial sludges

    DOEpatents

    Rivard, Christopher J.; Nagle, Nicholas J.

    1995-01-01

    Methods are described for pretreating microbial sludges to break cells and disrupt organic matter. One method involves the use of sonication, and another method involves the use of shear forces. The pretreatment of sludge enhances bioconversion of the organic fraction. This allows for efficient dewatering of the sludge and reduces the cost for final disposal of the waste.

  2. Pretreatment of microbial sludges

    DOEpatents

    Rivard, C.J.; Nagle, N.J.

    1995-01-10

    Methods are described for pretreating microbial sludges to break cells and disrupt organic matter. One method involves the use of sonication, and another method involves the use of shear forces. The pretreatment of sludge enhances bioconversion of the organic fraction. This allows for efficient dewatering of the sludge and reduces the cost for final disposal of the waste.

  3. Microbial solubilization of coal

    DOEpatents

    Strandberg, G.W.; Lewis, S.N.

    1988-01-21

    The present invention relates to a cell-free preparation and process for the microbial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products. More specifically, the present invention relates to bacterial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products and a cell-free bacterial byproduct useful for solubilizing coal. 5 tabs.

  4. Indirect microbial detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Indirect method for detection of microbial growth utilizes flow of charged particles across barrier that physically separated growing cells from electrodes and measures resulting difference in potential between two platinum electrodes. Technique allows simplified noncontact monitoring of all growth in highly infectious cultures or in critical biochemical studies.

  5. Microbial Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, Merry; Wall, Judy D.

    2006-10-01

    The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium March 10-12, 2006, in San Francisco, California, to discuss the production of energy fuels by microbial conversions. The status of research into various microbial energy technologies, the advantages and disadvantages of each of these approaches, research needs in the field, and education and training issues were examined, with the goal of identifying routes for producing biofuels that would both decrease the need for fossil fuels and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Currently, the choices for providing energy are limited. Policy makers and the research community must begin to pursue a broader array of potential energy technologies. A diverse energy portfolio that includes an assortment of microbial energy choices will allow communities and consumers to select the best energy solution for their own particular needs. Funding agencies and governments alike need to prepare for future energy needs by investing both in the microbial energy technologies that work today and in the untested technologies that will serve the world’s needs tomorrow. More mature bioprocesses, such as ethanol production from starchy materials and methane from waste digestors, will find applications in the short term. However, innovative techniques for liquid fuel or biohydrogen production are among the longer term possibilities that should also be vigorously explored, starting now. Microorganisms can help meet human energy needs in any of a number of ways. In their most obvious role in energy conversion, microorganisms can generate fuels, including ethanol, hydrogen, methane, lipids, and butanol, which can be burned to produce energy. Alternatively, bacteria can be put to use in microbial fuel cells, where they carry out the direct conversion of biomass into electricity. Microorganisms may also be used some day to make oil and natural gas technologies more efficient by sequestering carbon or by assisting in the recovery of oil and

  6. SEAGRASS RHIZOSPHERE MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Devereux, Richard. 2005. Seagrass Rhizosphere Microbial Communities. In: Interactions Between Macro- and Microorganisms in Marine Sediments. E. Kristense, J.E. Kostka and R.H. Haese, Editors. American Geophysical Union, Washington, DC. p199-216. (ERL,GB 1213).

    Seagrasses ...

  7. Spectroscopic investigation of volatile compounds produced during thermal and radiofrequency bipolar cautery on porcine liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, J. M.; Schramm, D.; Hahnloser, D.; Marinov, D.; Sigrist, M. W.

    2008-07-01

    The potential risks associated with the emission of by-products emitted by surgical cautery are of concern. Various investigations—mostly based on gas chromatography—have been performed to analyse the so-called surgical smoke but controversies remain in terms of composition and concentrations of compounds present in the smoke and hence the associated risk to human health. This quantitative model study uses for the first time CO2-laser-based photoacoustic spectroscopy and focuses on the analysis of volatile organic compounds produced during thermal- and radiofrequency bipolar cautery on porcine liver. The latter instrument is employed in actual human surgery. Concentrations in the ppm to sub-ppm range and molar fractions could be determined for carbon dioxide, water vapour, ammonia, ethanol and methanol. Distinct differences particularly in the methanol and ethanol contents were found between the two cautery devices employed.

  8. Chemistry of green encapsulating molding compounds at interfaces with other materials in electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandurra, A.; Zafarana, R.; Tenya, Y.; Pignataro, S.

    2004-07-01

    The interface chemistry between encapsulating epoxy phenolic molding compound (EMC) containing phosphorous based organic flame retardant (the so called "green materials") and copper oxide-hydroxide and aluminum oxide-hydroxide surfaces have been studied in comparison with "conventional" EMC containing bromine and antimony as flame retardant. These green materials are designed to reduce the presence of toxic elements in the electronic packages and, consequently, in the environment. For the study were used a Scanning Acoustic Microscopy for delamination measurements, a dynamometer for the pull strength measurements and an ESCA spectrometer for chemical analysis of the interface. The general behavior of the green compound in terms of delamination, adhesion, and corrosion is found better or at least comparable than that of the conventional EMC.

  9. Cerium compounds as scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, A.J.; Berman, E.; Koepke, C.; Lempicki, A.

    1991-01-01

    Stoichiometric Ce-materials with negligible Ce-Ce interactions should have superior scintillator properties. We present two materials: CeF{sub 3} and Ce{sub x}La{sub 1-x}P{sub 5}O{sub 14}. While cerium trifluoride is a known scintillator, pentaphosphate is of a limited usefulness, except as a remarkable model material. We show that quenching in fluoride is responsible for loss of 50% of the light output and is the cause of the, so-called, ultra fast component (2 ns). Light output of fluoride (about 50% of BGO) could be significantly improved. Deeper understanding of Ce-systems is needed to fully exploit their potentials. 10 figs., 6 refs.

  10. Cerium compounds as scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, A.J.; Berman, E.; Koepke, C.; Lempicki, A.

    1991-12-31

    Stoichiometric Ce-materials with negligible Ce-Ce interactions should have superior scintillator properties. We present two materials: CeF{sub 3} and Ce{sub x}La{sub 1-x}P{sub 5}O{sub 14}. While cerium trifluoride is a known scintillator, pentaphosphate is of a limited usefulness, except as a remarkable model material. We show that quenching in fluoride is responsible for loss of 50% of the light output and is the cause of the, so-called, ultra fast component (2 ns). Light output of fluoride (about 50% of BGO) could be significantly improved. Deeper understanding of Ce-systems is needed to fully exploit their potentials. 10 figs., 6 refs.

  11. CHARACTERIZING THE ABIOTIC REDUCTANTS FOR NITROAROMATIC COMPOUNDS AS A FUNCTION OF REDOX ZONATION IN ANOXIC SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reductive transformation is the dominant reaction pathway for the degradation of nitroaromatic compounds in anaerobic environments (Larson and Weber, 1994). Proposed reductants cover a spectrum ranging from reduced rninerals and organic matter to microbial enzyme systems. Transfo...

  12. A fungal metallo-beta-lactamase necessary for biotransformation of maize phytoprotectant compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xenobiotic compounds such as phytochemicals, microbial metabolites, and agrochemicals can impact the diversity and frequency of fungal species occurring in agricultural environments. Resistance to xenobiotics may allow plant pathogenic fungi to dominate the overall fungal community, with potential ...

  13. Microbial community structure of two freshwater sponges using Illumina MiSeq sequencing revealed high microbial diversity.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Swapnil; Shouche, Yogesh S; Gade, Wasudev N

    2016-12-01

    Sponges are primitive metazoans that are known to harbour diverse and abundant microbes. All over the world attempts are being made to exploit these microbes for their biotechnological potential to produce, bioactive compounds and antimicrobial peptides. However, the majority of the studies are focussed on the marine sponges and studies on the freshwater sponges have been neglected so far. To increase our understanding of the microbial community structure of freshwater sponges, microbiota of two fresh water sponges namely, Eunapius carteri and Corvospongilla lapidosa is explored for the first time using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology. Overall the microbial composition of these sponges comprises of 14 phyla and on an average, more than 2900 OTUs were obtained from C. lapidosa while E. carteri showed 980 OTUs which is higher than OTUs obtained in the marine sponges. Thus, our study showed that, fresh water sponges also posses highly diverse microbial community than previously thought and it is distinct from the marine sponge microbiota. The present study also revealed that microbial community structure of both the sponges is significantly different from each other and their respective water samples. In the present study, we have detected many bacterial lineages belonging to Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, etc. that are known to produce compounds of biotechnological importance. Overall, this study gives insight into the microbial composition of the freshwater sponges which is highly diverse and needs to be studied further to exploit their biotechnological capabilities.

  14. Responses of mixtures of polyhalogenated aromatic compounds or single compounds in the CALUX-assay a novel species-specific bioassay for Ah-receptor active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Murk, A.J.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Jonas, A.; Brouwer, A.; Denison, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    Polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs) elicit a number of common toxic responses, including reproductive toxicity, teratogenicity, impairment of immune responses, alterations in vitamin A and thyroid hormone metabolism and carcinogenesis. The toxic effects however are highly dependent on the animal species used, The most toxic PHAHs are approximate isostereomeres of 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and share a common mechanism of action mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Based on the common receptor mediated mechanism, the toxic equivalency factor concept was developed, in which the potency of each individual congener is expressed relative to TCDD, thus allowing hazard and risk assessment for mixtures of PHAHs. A number of recombinant cell lines were developed, including hepalclc7 mouse and H4IIE rat hepatoma cell lines, with AhR-mediated firefly (Photinus pyralis) luciferase gene expression. The response in this so-called CALUX (chemical activated luciferase expression) assay is additive for polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and PCDDS, but for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) both synergistic and antagonistic interactions have been demonstrated, which are partially species-dependent. Also some structurally related compounds, like polybrominated diphenyl ether, pentachlorinated phenol, benzo(a)pyrene, pyrene, tetrachlorobenzyltoluene (Ugilec 141) and mixtures of polychlorinated terphenyls have been tested in the CALUX assay. The responses of these compounds were sometimes agonistic, but also antagonistic and synergistic effects on the TCDO response were observed.

  15. Possibilities for extremophilic microorganisms in microbial electrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Dopson, Mark; Ni, Gaofeng; Sleutels, Tom H J A

    2016-03-01

    Microbial electrochemical systems exploit the metabolism of microorganisms to generate electrical energy or a useful product. In the past couple of decades, the application of microbial electrochemical systems has increased from the use of wastewaters to produce electricity to a versatile technology that can use numerous sources for the extraction of electrons on the one hand, while on the other hand these electrons can be used to serve an ever increasing number of functions. Extremophilic microorganisms grow in environments that are hostile to most forms of life and their utilization in microbial electrochemical systems has opened new possibilities to oxidize substrates in the anode and produce novel products in the cathode. For example, extremophiles can be used to oxidize sulfur compounds in acidic pH to remediate wastewaters, generate electrical energy from marine sediment microbial fuel cells at low temperatures, desalinate wastewaters and act as biosensors of low amounts of organic carbon. In this review, we will discuss the recent advances that have been made in using microbial catalysts under extreme conditions and show possible new routes that extremophilic microorganisms open for microbial electrochemical systems. PMID:26474966

  16. Possibilities for extremophilic microorganisms in microbial electrochemical systems

    PubMed Central

    Dopson, Mark; Ni, Gaofeng; Sleutels, Tom HJA

    2015-01-01

    Microbial electrochemical systems exploit the metabolism of microorganisms to generate electrical energy or a useful product. In the past couple of decades, the application of microbial electrochemical systems has increased from the use of wastewaters to produce electricity to a versatile technology that can use numerous sources for the extraction of electrons on the one hand, while on the other hand these electrons can be used to serve an ever increasing number of functions. Extremophilic microorganisms grow in environments that are hostile to most forms of life and their utilization in microbial electrochemical systems has opened new possibilities to oxidize substrates in the anode and produce novel products in the cathode. For example, extremophiles can be used to oxidize sulfur compounds in acidic pH to remediate wastewaters, generate electrical energy from marine sediment microbial fuel cells at low temperatures, desalinate wastewaters and act as biosensors of low amounts of organic carbon. In this review, we will discuss the recent advances that have been made in using microbial catalysts under extreme conditions and show possible new routes that extremophilic microorganisms open for microbial electrochemical systems. PMID:26474966

  17. Microbial Community Composition Affects Soil Fungistasis†

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Wietse; Verheggen, Patrick; Klein Gunnewiek, Paulien J. A.; Kowalchuk, George A.; van Veen, Johannes A.

    2003-01-01

    Most soils inhibit fungal germination and growth to a certain extent, a phenomenon known as soil fungistasis. Previous observations have implicated microorganisms as the causal agents of fungistasis, with their action mediated either by available carbon limitation (nutrient deprivation hypothesis) or production of antifungal compounds (antibiosis hypothesis). To obtain evidence for either of these hypotheses, we measured soil respiration and microbial numbers (as indicators of nutrient stress) and bacterial community composition (as an indicator of potential differences in the composition of antifungal components) during the development of fungistasis. This was done for two fungistatic dune soils in which fungistasis was initially fully or partly relieved by partial sterilization treatment or nutrient addition. Fungistasis development was measured as restriction of the ability of the fungi Chaetomium globosum, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium oxysporum, and Trichoderma harzianum to colonize soils. Fungistasis did not always reappear after soil treatments despite intense competition for carbon, suggesting that microbial community composition is important in the development of fungistasis. Both microbial community analysis and in vitro antagonism tests indicated that the presence of pseudomonads might be essential for the development of fungistasis. Overall, the results lend support to the antibiosis hypothesis. PMID:12571002

  18. Microbial degradation of chloroethenes in groundwater systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.

    2000-01-01

    The chloroethenes, tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) are among the most common contaminants detected in groundwater systems. As recently as 1980, the consensus was that chloroethene compounds were not significantly biodegradable in groundwater. Consequently, efforts to remediate chloroethene-contaminated groundwater were limited to largely unsuccessful pump-and-treat attempts. Subsequent investigation revealed that under reducing conditions, aquifer microorganisms can reductively dechlorinate PCE and TCE to the less chlorinated daughter products dichloroethene (DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC). Although recent laboratory studies conducted with halorespiring microorganisms suggest that complete reduction to ethene is possible, in the majority of groundwater systems reductive dechlorination apparently stops at DCE or VC. However, recent investigations conducted with aquifer and stream-bed sediments have demonstrated that microbial oxidation of these reduced daughter products can be significant under anaerobic redox conditions. The combination of reductive dechlorination of PCE and TCE under anaerobic conditions followed by anaerobic microbial oxidation of DCE and VC provides a possible microbial pathway for complete degradation of chloroethene contaminants in groundwater systems.

  19. Microbial provinces in the subseafloor.

    PubMed

    Schrenk, Matthew O; Huber, Julie A; Edwards, Katrina J

    2010-01-01

    The rocks and sediments of the oceanic subsurface represent a diverse mosaic of environments potentially inhabited by microorganisms. Understanding microbial ecosystems in subseafloor environments confounds standard ecological descriptions in part because we have difficulty elucidating and describing the scale of relevant processes. Habitat characteristics impact microbial activities and growth, which in turn affect microbial diversity, net production, and global biogeochemical cycles. Herein we provide descriptions of subseafloor microbial provinces, broadly defined as geologically and geographically coherent regions of the subseafloor that may serve as potential microbial habitats. The purpose of this review is to summarize and refine criteria for the definition and delineation of distinct subseafloor microbial habitats to aid in their exploration. This review and the criteria we outline aim to develop a unified framework to improve our understanding of subseafloor microbial ecology, enable quantification of geomicrobial processes, and facilitate their accurate assimilation into biogeochemical models. PMID:21141666

  20. Applications of Microbial Cell Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura-Shimizu, Mifumi; Karube, Isao

    Since the first microbial cell sensor was studied by Karube et al. in 1977, many types of microbial cell sensors have been developed as analytical tools. The microbial cell sensor utilizes microbes as a sensing element and a transducer. The characteristics of microbial cell sensors as sensing devices are a complete contrast to those of enzyme sensors or immunosensors, which are highly specific for the substrates of interest, although the specificity of the microbial cell sensor has been improved by genetic modification of the microbe used as the sensing element. Microbial cell sensors have the advantages of tolerance to measuring conditions, a long lifetime, and good cost performance, and have the disadvantage of a long response time. In this review, applications of microbial cell sensors are summarized.

  1. Insights into the phylogeny and coding potential of microbial dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinke, Christian; Schwientek, Patrick; Sczyrba, Alexander; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Anderson, Iain J.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Darling, Aaron; Malfatti, Stephanie; Swan, Brandon K.; Gies, Esther A.; Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Hedlund, Brian P.; Tsiamis, George; Sievert, Stefan M.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Hallam, Steven J.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Rubin, Edward M.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Woyke, Tanja

    2013-07-01

    Genome sequencing enhances our understanding of the biological world by providing blueprints for the evolutionary and functional diversity that shapes the biosphere. However, microbial genomes that are currently available are of limited phylogenetic breadth, owing to our historical inability to cultivate most microorganisms in the laboratory. We apply single-cell genomics to target and sequence 201 uncultivated archaeal and bacterial cells from nine diverse habitats belonging to 29 major mostly uncharted branches of the tree of life, so-called `microbial dark matter'. With this additional genomic information, we are able to resolve many intra- and inter-phylum-level relationships and to propose two new superphyla. We uncover unexpected metabolic features that extend our understanding of biology and challenge established boundaries between the three domains of life. These include a novel amino acid use for the opal stop codon, an archaeal-type purine synthesis in Bacteria and complete sigma factors in Archaea similar to those in Bacteria. The single-cell genomes also served to phylogenetically anchor up to 20% of metagenomic reads in some habitats, facilitating organism-level interpretation of ecosystem function. This study greatly expands the genomic representation of the tree of life and provides a systematic step towards a better understanding of biological evolution on our planet.

  2. Research supporting potential modification of the NASA specification for dry heat microbial reduction of spacecraft hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spry, James A.; Beaudet, Robert; Schubert, Wayne

    Dry heat microbial reduction (DHMR) is the primary method currently used to reduce the microbial load of spacecraft and component parts to comply with planetary protection re-quirements. However, manufacturing processes often involve heating flight hardware to high temperatures for purposes other than planetary protection DHMR. At present, the specifica-tion in NASA document NPR8020.12, describing the process lethality on B. atrophaeus (ATCC 9372) bacterial spores, does not allow for additional planetary protection bioburden reduction credit for processing outside a narrow temperature, time and humidity window. Our results from a comprehensive multi-year laboratory research effort have generated en-hanced data sets on four aspects of the current specification: time and temperature effects in combination, the effect that humidity has on spore lethality, and the lethality for spores with exceptionally high thermal resistance (so called "hardies"). This paper describes potential modifications to the specification, based on the data set gener-ated in the referenced studies. The proposed modifications are intended to broaden the scope of the current specification while still maintaining confidence in a conservative interpretation of the lethality of the DHMR process on microorganisms.

  3. Insights into the phylogeny and coding potential of microbial dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Rinke, Christian; Schwientek, Patrick; Sczyrba, Alexander; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Anderson, Iain J.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Darling, Aaron; Malfatti, Stephanie; Swan, Brandon K.; Gies, Esther A.; Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Hedlund, Brian P.; Tsiamis, George; Sievert, Stefan M.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Hallam, Steven J.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Rubin, Edward M.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Woyke, Tanja

    2013-07-01

    Genome sequencing enhances our understanding of the biological world by providing blueprints for the evolutionary and functional diversity that shapes the biosphere. However, microbial genomes that are currently available are of limited phylogenetic breadth, owing to our historical inability to cultivate most microorganisms in the laboratory. We apply single-cell genomics to target and sequence 201 uncultivated archaeal and bacterial cells fromnine diverse habitats belonging to 29 major mostly uncharted branches of the tree of life, so-called microbial dark matter. With this additional genomic information, we are able to resolve many intra- and inter-phylum-level relationships and to propose two new superphyla. We uncover unexpected metabolic features that extend our understanding of biology and challenge established boundaries between the three domains of life. These include a novel amino acid use for the opal stop codon, an archaeal-type purine synthesis in Bacteria and complete sigma factors in Archaea similar to those in Bacteria. The single-cell genomes also served to phylogenetically anchor up to 20percent of metagenomic reads in some habitats, facilitating organism-level interpretation of ecosystem function. This study greatly expands the genomic representation of the tree of life and provides a systematic step towards a better understanding of biological evolution on our planet.

  4. High CO2 subsurface environment enriches for novel microbial lineages capable of autotrophic carbon fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probst, A. J.; Jerett, J.; Castelle, C. J.; Thomas, B. C.; Sharon, I.; Brown, C. T.; Anantharaman, K.; Emerson, J. B.; Hernsdorf, A. W.; Amano, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tringe, S. G.; Woyke, T.; Banfield, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface environments span the planet but remain little understood from the perspective of the capacity of the resident organisms to fix CO2. Here we investigated the autotrophic capacity of microbial communities in range of a high-CO2 subsurface environments via analysis of 250 near-complete microbial genomes (151 of them from distinct species) that represent the most abundant organisms over a subsurface depth transect. More than one third of the genomes belonged to the so-called candidate phyla radiation (CPR), which have limited metabolic capabilities. Approximately 30% of the community members are autotrophs that comprise 70% of the microbiome with metabolism likely supported by sulfur and nitrogen respiration. Of the carbon fixation pathways, the Calvin Benson Basham Cycle was most common, but the Wood-Ljungdhal pathway was present in the greatest phylogenetic diversity of organisms. Unexpectedly, one organism from a novel phylum sibling to the CPR is predicted to fix carbon by the reverse TCA cycle. The genome of the most abundant organism, an archaeon designated "Candidatus Altiarchaeum hamiconexum", was also found in subsurface samples from other continents including Europe and Asia. The archaeon was proven to be a carbon fixer using a novel reductive acetyl-CoA pathway. These results provide evidence that carbon dioxide is the major carbon source in these environments and suggest that autotrophy in the subsurface represents a substantial carbon dioxide sink affecting the global carbon cycle.

  5. Microbial remediation of explosive waste.

    PubMed

    Singh, Baljinder; Kaur, Jagdeep; Singh, Kashmir

    2012-05-01

    Explosives are synthesized globally mainly for military munitions. Nitrate esters, such as GTN and PETN, nitroaromatics like TNP and TNT and nitramines with RDX, HMX and CL20, are the main class of explosives used. Their use has resulted in severe contamination of environment and strategies are now being developed to clean these substances in an economical and eco-friendly manner. The incredible versatility inherited in microbes has rendered these explosives as a part of the biogeochemical cycle. Several microbes catalyze mineralization and/or nonspecific transformation of explosive waste either by aerobic or anaerobic processes. It is likely that ongoing genetic adaptation, with the recruitment of silent sequences into functional catabolic routes and evolution of substrate range by mutations in structural genes, will further enhance the catabolic potential of bacteria toward explosives and ultimately contribute to cleansing the environment of these toxic and recalcitrant chemicals. This review summarizes information on the biodegradation and biotransformation pathways of several important explosives. Isolation, characterization, utilization and manipulation of the major detoxifying enzymes and the molecular basis of degradation are also discussed. This may be useful in developing safer and economic microbiological methods for clean up of soil and water contaminated with such compounds. The necessity of further investigations concerning the microbial metabolism of these substances is also discussed.

  6. Anaerobic biodegradation of explosives and related compounds by sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria : a review.

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathy, R.; Kulpa, C. F.; Manning, J.; Environmental Research; Univ. of Notre Dame

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, research on microbial degradation of explosives and nitroaromatic compounds has increased. Most studies of the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used aerobic microorganisms. Ecological observations suggest that sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria might metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment, but this ability had not been demonstrated until recently. Few review papers exist, and those deal mainly with aerobic bacterial degradation of explosives; none deals with anaerobic bacteria. In this paper, we review the anaerobic metabolic processes in the degradation of explosives and nitroaromatic compounds under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions.

  7. Microbial Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. M.; Mena, K. D.; Nickerson, C.A.; Pierson, D. L.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, microbiological spaceflight requirements have been established in a subjective manner based upon expert opinion of both environmental and clinical monitoring results and the incidence of disease. The limited amount of data, especially from long-duration missions, has created very conservative requirements based primarily on the concentration of microorganisms. Periodic reevaluations of new data from later missions have allowed some relaxation of these stringent requirements. However, the requirements remain very conservative and subjective in nature, and the risk of crew illness due to infectious microorganisms is not well defined. The use of modeling techniques for microbial risk has been applied in the food and potable water industries and has exceptional potential for spaceflight applications. From a productivity standpoint, this type of modeling can (1) decrease unnecessary costs and resource usage and (2) prevent inadequate or inappropriate data for health assessment. In addition, a quantitative model has several advantages for risk management and communication. By identifying the variable components of the model and the knowledge associated with each component, this type of modeling can: (1) Systematically identify and close knowledge gaps, (2) Systematically identify acceptable and unacceptable risks, (3) Improve communication with stakeholders as to the reasons for resource use, and (4) Facilitate external scientific approval of the NASA requirements. The modeling of microbial risk involves the evaluation of several key factors including hazard identification, crew exposure assessment, dose-response assessment, and risk characterization. Many of these factors are similar to conditions found on Earth; however, the spaceflight environment is very specialized as the inhabitants live in a small, semi-closed environment that is often dependent on regenerative life support systems. To further complicate modeling efforts, microbial dose

  8. Microbial Genomes Multiply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    2002-01-01

    The publication of the first complete sequence of a bacterial genome in 1995 was a signal event, underscored by the fact that the article has been cited more than 2,100 times during the intervening seven years. It was a marvelous technical achievement, made possible by automatic DNA-sequencing machines. The feat is the more impressive in that complete genome sequencing has now been adopted in many different laboratories around the world. Four years ago in these columns I examined the situation after a dozen microbial genomes had been completed. Now, with upwards of 60 microbial genome sequences determined and twice that many in progress, it seems reasonable to assess just what is being learned. Are new concepts emerging about how cells work? Have there been practical benefits in the fields of medicine and agriculture? Is it feasible to determine the genomic sequence of every bacterial species on Earth? The answers to these questions maybe Yes, Perhaps, and No, respectively.

  9. Evolution of microbial markets

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Gijsbert D. A.; Strassmann, Joan E.; Ivens, Aniek B. F.; Engelmoer, Daniel J. P.; Verbruggen, Erik; Queller, David C.; Noë, Ronald; Johnson, Nancy Collins; Hammerstein, Peter; Kiers, E. Toby

    2014-01-01

    Biological market theory has been used successfully to explain cooperative behavior in many animal species. Microbes also engage in cooperative behaviors, both with hosts and other microbes, that can be described in economic terms. However, a market approach is not traditionally used to analyze these interactions. Here, we extend the biological market framework to ask whether this theory is of use to evolutionary biologists studying microbes. We consider six economic strategies used by microbes to optimize their success in markets. We argue that an economic market framework is a useful tool to generate specific and interesting predictions about microbial interactions, including the evolution of partner discrimination, hoarding strategies, specialized versus diversified mutualistic services, and the role of spatial structures, such as flocks and consortia. There is untapped potential for studying the evolutionary dynamics of microbial systems. Market theory can help structure this potential by characterizing strategic investment of microbes across a diversity of conditions. PMID:24474743

  10. Evolutionary limits to cooperation in microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Nuno M.; Niehus, Rene; Foster, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Microbes produce many compounds that are costly to a focal cell but promote the survival and reproduction of neighboring cells. This observation has led to the suggestion that microbial strains and species will commonly cooperate by exchanging compounds. Here, we examine this idea with an ecoevolutionary model where microbes make multiple secretions, which can be exchanged among genotypes. We show that cooperation between genotypes only evolves under specific demographic regimes characterized by intermediate genetic mixing. The key constraint on cooperative exchanges is a loss of autonomy: strains become reliant on complementary genotypes that may not be reliably encountered. Moreover, the form of cooperation that we observe arises through mutual exploitation that is related to cheating and “Black Queen” evolution for a single secretion. A major corollary is that the evolution of cooperative exchanges reduces community productivity relative to an autonomous strain that makes everything it needs. This prediction finds support in recent work from synthetic communities. Overall, our work suggests that natural selection will often limit cooperative exchanges in microbial communities and that, when exchanges do occur, they can be an inefficient solution to group living. PMID:25453102

  11. Microbial transformation of citral by Penicillium sp..

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Akbar; Tavassoli, Afsaneh

    2010-01-01

    Thymol is present in the essential oils from herbs and spices, such as thyme. It is produced by these plant species as a chemical defense against phytopathogenic microorganisms. Therefore, this compound has attracted great attention in food industry, i.e., it has been used as a natural preservative in foods such as cheese to prevent fungal growth. Previous studies concerning the biotransformation of nerol by Penicillium sp. and microbial transformation of citral by sporulated surface cultures method (SSCM) of Penicillium digitatum have been reported. The objective of this research was to study the pathway involved during biotransformation of citral by Penicillium sp. using two methods. The culture preparation was done using different microbial methods and incubation periods to obtain Penicillium for citral biotransformation. The biotransformation products were identified by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). A comparison of the two methods showed that SSCM was more effective, its major products were thymol (21.5 %), geranial (18.6 %) and nerol (13.7 %). LM produced only one compound — thymol — with a low efficiency. PMID:20842292

  12. Microbial production of epoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Thomas R.; Roberto, Francisco F.

    2003-06-10

    A method for microbial production of epoxides and other oxygenated products is disclosed. The method uses a biocatalyst of methanotrophic bacteria cultured in a biphasic medium containing a major amount of a non-aqueous polar solvent. Regeneration of reducing equivalents is carried out by using endogenous hydrogenase activity together with supplied hydrogen gas. This method is especially effective with gaseous substrates and cofactors that result in liquid products.

  13. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  14. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  15. Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Development of the automated microbial metabolism laboratory (AMML) concept is reported. The focus of effort of AMML was on the advanced labeled release experiment. Labeled substrates, inhibitors, and temperatures were investigated to establish a comparative biochemical profile. Profiles at three time intervals on soil and pure cultures of bacteria isolated from soil were prepared to establish a complete library. The development of a strategy for the return of a soil sample from Mars is also reported.

  16. Advances in microbial amylases.

    PubMed

    Pandey, A; Nigam, P; Soccol, C R; Soccol, V T; Singh, D; Mohan, R

    2000-04-01

    This review makes a comprehensive survey of microbial amylases, i.e. alpha-amylase, beta-amylase and glucoamylase. Amylases are among the most important enzymes and are of great significance in present-day biotechnology. Although they can be derived from several sources, such as plants, animals and micro-organisms, the enzymes from microbial sources generally meet industrial demands. Microbial amylases could be potentially useful in the pharmaceutical and fine-chemical industries if enzymes with suitable properties could be prepared. With the advent of new frontiers in biotechnology, the spectrum of amylase application has widened in many other fields, such as clinical, medicinal and analytical chemistries, as well as their widespread application in starch saccharification and in the textile, food, brewing and distilling industries. In this review, after a brief description of the sources of amylases, we discuss the molecular biology of amylases, describing structures, cloning, sequences, and protoplast fusion and mutagenesis. This is followed by sections on their production and finally the properties of various amylases.

  17. Microbial reduction of iodate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Councell, T.B.; Landa, E.R.; Lovley, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    The different oxidation species of iodine have markedly different sorption properties. Hence, changes in iodine redox states can greatly affect the mobility of iodine in the environment. Although a major microbial role has been suggested in the past to account for these redox changes, little has been done to elucidate the responsible microorganisms or the mechanisms involved. In the work presented here, direct microbial reduction of iodate was demonstrated with anaerobic cell suspensions of the sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans which reduced 96% of an initial 100 ??M iodate to iodide at pH 7 in 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer, whereas anaerobic cell suspensions of the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens were unable to reduce iodate in 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer (pH 7). Both D. desulfuricans and S. putrefaciens were able to reduce iodate at pH 7 in 10 mM HEPES buffer. Both soluble ferrous iron and sulfide, as well as iron monosulfide (FeS) were shown to abiologically reduce iodate to iodide. These results indicate that ferric iron and/or sulfate reducing bacteria are capable of mediating both direct, enzymatic, as well as abiotic reduction of iodate in natural anaerobic environments. These microbially mediated reactions may be important factors in the fate and transport of 129I in natural systems.

  18. Contribution of microbial activity to carbon chemistry in clouds.

    PubMed

    Vaïtilingom, Mickaël; Amato, Pierre; Sancelme, Martine; Laj, Paolo; Leriche, Maud; Delort, Anne-Marie

    2010-01-01

    The biodegradation of the most abundant atmospheric organic C1 to C4 compounds (formate, acetate, lactate, succinate) by five selected representative microbial strains (three Pseudomonas strains, one Sphingomonas strain, and one yeast strain) isolated from cloud water at the puy de Dôme has been studied. Experiments were first conducted under model conditions and consisted of a pure strain incubated in the presence of a single organic compound. Kinetics showed the ability of the isolates to degrade atmospheric compounds at temperatures representative of low-altitude clouds (5 degrees C and 17 degrees C). Then, to provide data that can be extrapolated to real situations, microcosm experiments were developed. A solution that chemically mimicked the composition of cloud water was used as an incubation medium for microbial strains. Under these conditions, we determined that microbial activity would significantly contribute to the degradation of formate, acetate, and succinate in cloud water at 5 degrees C and 17 degrees C, with lifetimes of 0.4 to 69.1 days. Compared with the reactivity involving free radicals, our results suggest that biological activity drives the oxidation of carbonaceous compounds during the night (90 to 99%), while its contribution accounts for 2 to 37% of the reactivity during the day, competing with photochemistry.

  19. Microbial nitrogen metabolism: response to warming and resource supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckeridge, K. M.; Min, K.; Lehmeier, C.; Ballantyne, F.; Billings, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Ecosystem nitrogen (N) dynamics are dependent on microbial metabolic responses to a changing climate. Most studies that investigate soil microbial N dynamics in response to temperature employ measurements reflective of many interacting and confounding phenomena, as altering soil temperature can simultaneously alter moisture regime, substrate availability, and competitive dynamics between microbial populations. As a result, it is difficult to discern how temperature alone can alter patterns of microbial N metabolism using whole soils. Without that knowledge, it is impossible to parse temperature effects on soil N fluxes from other drivers. We address this issue by exploring the sensitivity of microbial partitioning of N between assimilation (growing biomass) and dissimilation (releasing N to the environment) in response to changes in temperature and quality (C:N ratio) of substrate, using a chemostat approach in which a microbial population is maintained at steady state. We perform our experiments using a Gram-negative bacterium (Pseudomonas fluorescens), ubiquitous in soils and dependent on organic compounds to satisfy its resource demand. Individual chemostat runs, all conducted at similar microbial growth rates, generate data describing microbial biomass N, solution N pools and microbial biomass and solution d15N. With these data we can calculate d15N enrichment (d15N microbial biomass - d15N nutrient solution) a proxy for microbial N partitioning. From a recently published model of microbial biomass d15N drivers, fractionation of N occurs with both uptake and excretion of NH3+ so that microbes with a net dissimilation become 15N enriched relative to their source. Because a related study has demonstrated increased microbial C demand with temperature, we predict that in a warming environment microorganisms will become relatively C limited. Accordingly, we hypothesize that warming will enhance microbial dissimilation, and that this N release will be exacerbated as

  20. Diversity of microbial communities of Loki's Castle black smoker field at the ultra-slow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeschke, A.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Thorseth, I. H.; Pedersen, R.; Früh-Green, G.

    2010-12-01

    Here we present an organic geochemical study of Loki’s Castle, a black smoker field recently discovered at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea at around 73.2°N. Located at the Mohn-Knipovich Ridge, which is one of the slowest spreading ridge segments on Earth, Loki’s Castle is the most northerly major hydrothermal vent field known to date. The vent field is composed of five actively venting (320°C) black-smoker chimneys that tower on top of a large mound of hydrothermal sulfide deposits. Loki’s Castle is a basalt-hosted hydrothermal system, but high methane and ammonium contents in the vent fluids strongly indicate a sedimentary component below the volcanic ridge. In 2009, another site of low-temperature hydrothermal venting hosting numerous barite chimneys was discovered in the vicinity of the black smokers, which probably results from subsurface mixing of diffuse hydrothermal fluid with seawater. In our study, variations in microbial communities associated with the formation of actively venting, sulfide and sulfate chimneys in this essentially unexplored ultraslow spreading ridge system are assessed based on biomarker lipid and compound-specific carbon isotope analyses. Lipid extracts from an active, high-temperature sulfide chimney yielded abundant archaeal di- and tetraether lipids as well as irregular isoprenoidal hydrocarbons (PMIs) that are associated with archaeal methanogens and methanotrophs. Predominant archaeal biomarker lipids include archaeol, sn-2-hydroxyarchaeol as well as glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) containing 0-4 cyclopentyl moieties. In addition, GDGTs with an additional covalent bond between the isoprenoid hydrocarbon chains, so-called H-shaped GDGTs, containing 0-4 cyclopentyl rings were also found to be abundant components and are indicative of hyperthermophilic methanogens. Biomarkers characteristic of eukaryotes (sterols) and bacteria (fatty acids and hopanoids) were less prevalent in

  1. Transformation of saturated nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds by microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Parshikov, Igor A; Silva, Eliane O; Furtado, Niege A J C

    2014-02-01

    The saturated nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds include many drugs and compounds that may be used as synthons for the synthesis of other pharmacologically active substances. The need for new derivatives of saturated nitrogen-containing heterocycles for organic synthesis, biotechnology and the pharmaceutical industry, including optically active derivatives, has increased interest in microbial synthesis. This review provides an overview of microbial technologies that can be valuable to produce new derivatives of saturated nitrogen-containing heterocycles, including hydroxylated derivatives. The chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivity of microbial processes can be indispensable for the synthesis of new compounds. Microbial processes carried out with fungi, including Beauveria bassiana, Cunninghamella verticillata, Penicillium simplicissimum, Aspergillus niger and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and bacteria, including Pseudomonas sp., Sphingomonas sp. and Rhodococcus erythropolis, biotransform many substrates efficiently. Among the biological activities of saturated nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds are antimicrobial, antitumor, antihypertensive and anti-HIV activities; some derivatives are effective for the treatment and prevention of malaria and trypanosomiasis, and others are potent glycosidase inhibitors.

  2. Microbial Formaldehyde Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy J. Donohue

    2004-12-09

    This project analyzed how cells sense and generate energy from formaldehyde oxidation. Formaldehyde is a toxin that is produced naturally, chemically or by metabolism of a wide variety of methyl-containing compounds. Our goals are to identify how cells sense the presence of this toxic compound and determine how they generate energy and nutrients from the oxidation of formaldehyde. This research capitalizes on the role of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides glutathione dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase (GSH FDH) in a formaldehyde oxidation pathway that is apparently found in a wide variety of microbes, plants and animals. Thus, our findings illustrate what is required for a large variety of cells to metabolize this toxic compound. A second major focus of our research is to determine how cells sense the presence of this toxic compound and control the expression of gene products required for its detoxification.

  3. Genomic perspectives in microbial oceanography.

    PubMed

    DeLong, Edward F; Karl, David M

    2005-09-15

    The global ocean is an integrated living system where energy and matter transformations are governed by interdependent physical, chemical and biotic processes. Although the fundamentals of ocean physics and chemistry are well established, comprehensive approaches to describing and interpreting oceanic microbial diversity and processes are only now emerging. In particular, the application of genomics to problems in microbial oceanography is significantly expanding our understanding of marine microbial evolution, metabolism and ecology. Integration of these new genome-enabled insights into the broader framework of ocean science represents one of the great contemporary challenges for microbial oceanographers.

  4. Microbial reductive dehalogenation.

    PubMed Central

    Mohn, W W; Tiedje, J M

    1992-01-01

    A wide variety of compounds can be biodegraded via reductive removal of halogen substituents. This process can degrade toxic pollutants, some of which are not known to be biodegraded by any other means. Reductive dehalogenation of aromatic compounds has been found primarily in undefined, syntrophic anaerobic communities. We discuss ecological and physiological principles which appear to be important in these communities and evaluate how widely applicable these principles are. Anaerobic communities that catalyze reductive dehalogenation appear to differ in many respects. A large number of pure cultures which catalyze reductive dehalogenation of aliphatic compounds are known, in contrast to only a few organisms which catalyze reductive dehalogenation of aromatic compounds. Desulfomonile tiedjei DCB-1 is an anaerobe which dehalogenates aromatic compounds and is physiologically and morphologically unusual in a number of respects, including the ability to exploit reductive dehalogenation for energy metabolism. When possible, we use D. tiedjei as a model to understand dehalogenating organisms in the above-mentioned undefined systems. Aerobes use reductive dehalogenation for substrates which are resistant to known mechanisms of oxidative attack. Reductive dehalogenation, especially of aliphatic compounds, has recently been found in cell-free systems. These systems give us an insight into how and why microorganisms catalyze this activity. In some cases transition metal complexes serve as catalysts, whereas in other cases, particularly with aromatic substrates, the catalysts appear to be enzymes. Images PMID:1406492

  5. Microbial carbon turnover in the plant-rhizosphere-soil continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Ashish; Dannert, Helena; Griffiths, Robert; Thomson, Bruce; Gleixner, Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Soil microbial biomass contributes significantly to maintenance of soil organic matter (SOM). It is well known that biochemical fractions of soil microorganisms have varying turnover and therefore contribute differentially to soil C storage. Here we compare the turnover rates of different microbial biochemical fractions using a pulse chase 13CO2 plant labelling experiment. The isotope signal was temporally traced into rhizosphere soil microorganisms using the following biomarkers: DNA, RNA, fatty acids and chloroform fumigation extraction derived microbial biomass size classes. C flow into soil microbial functional groups was assessed through phospholipid and neutral lipid fatty acid (PLFA/NLFA) analyses. Highest 13C enrichment was seen in the low molecular weight (LMW) size class of microbial biomass (Δδ13C =151) and in nucleic acids (DNA: 38o RNA: 66) immediately after the pulse followed by a sharp drop. The amount of 13C in the high molecular weight (HMW) microbial biomass (17-81) and total fatty acids (32-54) was lower initially and stayed relatively steady over the 4 weeks experimental period. We found significant differences in turnover rates of different microbial biochemical and size fractions. We infer that LMW cytosolic soluble compounds are rapidly metabolized and linked to respiratory C fluxes, whereas mid-sized products of microbial degradation and HMW polymeric compounds have lower renewal rate in that order. The turnover of cell wall fatty acids was also very slow. DNA and RNA showed faster turnover rate; and as expected RNA renewal was the fastest due to its rapid production by active microorganisms independent of cell replication. 13C incorporation into different functional groups confirmed that mutualistic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi rely on root C and are important in the initial plant C flux. We substantiated through measurements of isotope incorporation into bacterial RNA that rhizosphere bacteria are also important in the initial C conduit

  6. The use of Yucca schidigera and microbial preparation for poultry manure deodorization and hygienization.

    PubMed

    Matusiak, Katarzyna; Oleksy, Magdalena; Borowski, Sebastian; Nowak, Adriana; Korczyński, Mariusz; Dobrzański, Zbigniew; Gutarowska, Beata

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of microbial preparation and Yucca schidigera in the removal of odorous volatile compounds from poultry manure as well as to evaluate antimicrobial properties of these amendments. It was demonstrated that the combined treatment of poultry manure (PM) with the microbial preparation and Y. schidigera extract can reduce the concentration of odorants by 58%-73%, depending on the tested compound. When Y. schidigera extract and the microbial preparation were applied at a time interval of 48 h, the deodorization efficiency was improved by 6-24%. Furthermore, Y. schidigera extract has antimicrobial properties, which affect poultry manure hygienization. It was found that when the microbial preparation was enriched with Lactobacillus plantarum, it became insensitive to the antimicrobial properties of Y. schidigera.

  7. [Strategies on the construction of high-quality microbial natural product library--a review].

    PubMed

    Bian, Jiang; Song, Fuhang; Zhang, Lixin

    2008-08-01

    The microbial secondary metabolites are always the main source of the natural drugs. The historical paradigm of the deep ocean as a biological 'desert' has shifted to one of a 'rainforest' owing to the isolation of many novel microbes and their associated bioactive compounds. A high quality microbial and its natural product library are crucial for successful drug and other screenings. However, how to build up the library efficiently is still faced with many bottlenecks. To overcome the difficulties and limitations, we reviewed the following strategies: (1) diversifying microbial sources and dereplication; (2) diversifying gene sources and dereplication; (3) diversifying microbial metabolite sources and dereplication; (4) novel methods and technologies for bioactive secondary metabolites, especially the high-throughput synergy screening for multi-target drugs. Bioactive compounds isolated using the above chemical microbiology strategies have not only shown importance in biotechnological and pharmaceutical applications but also increased our understanding of the diversity of microbe, ecosystem functions and the exploitable biology.

  8. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  9. Compounding in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Zdoryk, Oleksandr A; Georgiyants, Victoriya A; Gryzodub, Oleksandr I; Schnatz, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical compounding in modern Ukraine has a rich history and goes back to ancient times. Today in the Ukraine, there is a revival of compounding practice, the opening of private compounding pharmacies, updating of legislative framework and requirements of the State Pharmacopeia of Ukraine for compounding preparations, and the introduction of Good Pharmaceutical Practice. PMID:23696172

  10. Soil microbial communities respond differently to three chemically defined polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Michael A; Kreinberg, Allison J; Gonzalez, Javier M; Halvorson, Jonathan J; French, Elizabeth; Bollmann, Annette; Hagerman, Ann E

    2013-11-01

    High molecular weight polyphenols (e.g. tannins) that enter the soil may affect microbial populations, by serving as substrates for microbial respiration or by selecting for certain microbes. In this study we examined how three phenolic compounds that represent some environmentally widespread tannins or their constituent functional groups were respired by soil microorganisms and how the compounds affected the abundance and diversity of soil bacteria and archaea, including ammonia oxidizers. An acidic, silt loam soil from a pine forest was incubated for two weeks with the monomeric phenol methyl gallate, the small polyphenol epigallocatechin gallate, or the large polyphenol oenothein B. Respiration of the polyphenols during the incubation was measured using the Microresp™ system. After incubation, metabolic diversity was determined by community level physiological profiling (CLPP), and genetic diversity was determined using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis on DNA extracted from the soil samples. Total microbial populations and ammonia-oxidizing populations were measured using real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Methyl gallate was respired more efficiently than the higher molecular weight tannins but not as efficiently as glucose. Methyl gallate and epigallocatechin gallate selected for genetically or physiologically unique populations compared to glucose. None of the polyphenols supported microbial growth, and none of the polyphenols affected ammonia-oxidizing bacterial populations or ammonia-oxidizing archaea. Additional studies using both a wider range of polyphenols and a wider range of soils and environments are needed to elucidate the role of polyphenols in determining soil microbiological diversity.

  11. Uranium Biomineralization By Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Taillefert, Martial

    2015-04-01

    This project investigated the geochemical and microbial processes associated with the biomineralization of radionuclides in subsurface soils. During this study, it was determined that microbial communities from the Oak Ridge Field Research subsurface are able to express phosphatase activities that hydrolyze exogenous organophosphate compounds and result in the non-reductive bioimmobilization of U(VI) phosphate minerals in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The changes of the microbial community structure associated with the biomineralization of U(VI) was determined to identify the main organisms involved in the biomineralization process, and the complete genome of two isolates was sequenced. In addition, it was determined that both phytate, the main source of natural organophosphate compounds in natural environments, and polyphosphate accumulated in cells could also be hydrolyzed by native microbial population to liberate enough orthophosphate and precipitate uranium phosphate minerals. Finally, the minerals produced during this process are stable in low pH conditions or environments where the production of dissolved inorganic carbon is moderate. These findings suggest that the biomineralization of U(VI) phosphate minerals is an attractive bioremediation strategy to uranium bioreduction in low pH uranium-contaminated environments. These efforts support the goals of the SBR long-term performance measure by providing key information on "biological processes influencing the form and mobility of DOE contaminants in the subsurface".

  12. Possibilities for the detection of microbial life on extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Knacke, Roger F

    2003-01-01

    We consider possibilities for the remote detection of microbial life on extrasolar planets. The Darwin/Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) telescope concepts for observations of terrestrial planets focus on indirect searches for life through the detection of atmospheric gases related to life processes. Direct detection of extraterrestrial life may also be possible through well-designed searches for microbial life forms. Satellites in Earth orbit routinely monitor colonies of terrestrial algae in oceans and lakes by analysis of reflected ocean light in the visible region of the spectrum. These remote sensing techniques suggest strategies for extrasolar searches for signatures of chlorophylls and related photosynthetic compounds associated with life. However, identification of such life-related compounds on extrasolar planets would require observations through strong, interfering absorptions and scattering radiances from the remote atmospheres and landmasses. Techniques for removal of interfering radiances have been extensively developed for remote sensing from Earth orbit. Comparable techniques would have to be developed for extrasolar planet observations also, but doing so would be challenging for a remote planet. Darwin/TPF coronagraph concepts operating in the visible seem to be best suited for searches for extrasolar microbial life forms with instruments that can be projected for the 2010-2020 decades, although resolution and signal-to-noise ratio constraints severely limit detection possibilities on terrestrial-type planets. The generation of telescopes with large apertures and extremely high spatial resolutions that will follow Darwin/TPF could offer striking possibilities for the direct detection of extrasolar microbial life.

  13. Possibilities for the detection of microbial life on extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Knacke, Roger F

    2003-01-01

    We consider possibilities for the remote detection of microbial life on extrasolar planets. The Darwin/Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) telescope concepts for observations of terrestrial planets focus on indirect searches for life through the detection of atmospheric gases related to life processes. Direct detection of extraterrestrial life may also be possible through well-designed searches for microbial life forms. Satellites in Earth orbit routinely monitor colonies of terrestrial algae in oceans and lakes by analysis of reflected ocean light in the visible region of the spectrum. These remote sensing techniques suggest strategies for extrasolar searches for signatures of chlorophylls and related photosynthetic compounds associated with life. However, identification of such life-related compounds on extrasolar planets would require observations through strong, interfering absorptions and scattering radiances from the remote atmospheres and landmasses. Techniques for removal of interfering radiances have been extensively developed for remote sensing from Earth orbit. Comparable techniques would have to be developed for extrasolar planet observations also, but doing so would be challenging for a remote planet. Darwin/TPF coronagraph concepts operating in the visible seem to be best suited for searches for extrasolar microbial life forms with instruments that can be projected for the 2010-2020 decades, although resolution and signal-to-noise ratio constraints severely limit detection possibilities on terrestrial-type planets. The generation of telescopes with large apertures and extremely high spatial resolutions that will follow Darwin/TPF could offer striking possibilities for the direct detection of extrasolar microbial life. PMID:14678662

  14. Microbial solubilization of phosphate

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, R.D.; Wolfram, J.H.

    1993-10-26

    A process is provided for solubilizing phosphate from phosphate containing ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of phosphate ore, microorganisms operable for solubilizing phosphate from the phosphate ore and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the microbial solubilization process. An aqueous solution containing soluble phosphorus can be separated from the reacted mixture by precipitation, solvent extraction, selective membrane, exchange resin or gravity methods to recover phosphate from the aqueous solution. 6 figures.

  15. Microbial solubilization of phosphate

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Robert D.; Wolfram, James H.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for solubilizing phosphate from phosphate containing ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of phosphate ore, microorganisms operable for solubilizing phosphate from the phosphate ore and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the microbial solubilization process. An aqueous solution containing soluble phosphorous can be separated from the reacted mixture by precipitation, solvent extraction, selective membrane, exchange resin or gravity methods to recover phosphate from the aqueous solution.

  16. Microbial metabolism of Tholin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, C. R.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Boston, P. J.; Segal, W.; Khare, B. N.

    1990-01-01

    Tholin, a class of complex organic heteropolymers hypothesized to possess wide solar system distribution, is shown to furnish the carbon and energy requirements of a wide variety of common soil bacteria which encompasses aerobic, anaerobic, and facultatively anaerobic bacteria. Some of these bacteria are able to derive not merely their carbon but also their nitrogen requirements from tholin. The palatability of tholins to modern microbes is speculated to have implications for the early evolution of microbial life on earth; tholins may have formed the base of the food chain for an early heterotrophic biosphere, prior to the evolution of autotrophy on the early earth.

  17. Archean Microbial Mat Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tice, Michael M.; Thornton, Daniel C. O.; Pope, Michael C.; Olszewski, Thomas D.; Gong, Jian

    2011-05-01

    Much of the Archean record of microbial communities consists of fossil mats and stromatolites. Critical physical emergent properties governing the evolution of large-scale (centimeters to meters) topographic relief on the mat landscape are (a) mat surface roughness relative to the laminar sublayer and (b) cohesion. These properties can be estimated for fossil samples under many circumstances. A preliminary analysis of Archean mat cohesion suggests that mats growing in shallow marine environments from throughout this time had cohesions similar to those of modern shallow marine mats. There may have been a significant increase in mat strength at the end of the Archean.

  18. Bayesian Integrated Microbial Forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Jarman, Kristin H.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Wunschel, David S.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Cliff, John B.; Petersen, Catherine E.; Colburn, Heather A.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2008-06-01

    In the aftermath of the 2001 anthrax letters, researchers have been exploring ways to predict the production environment of unknown source microorganisms. Different mass spectral techniques are being developed to characterize components of a microbe’s culture medium including water, carbon and nitrogen sources, metal ions added, and the presence of agar. Individually, each technique has the potential to identify one or two ingredients in a culture medium recipe. However, by integrating data from multiple mass spectral techniques, a more complete characterization is possible. We present a Bayesian statistical approach to integrated microbial forensics and illustrate its application on spores grown in different culture media.

  19. A review of microbial injury and recovery methods in food.

    PubMed

    Wu, V C H

    2008-09-01

    The existence of injured microorganisms in food and their recovery during culturing procedures is critical. Microbial injury is characterized by the capability of a microorganism to return to normalcy during a resuscitation process in which the damaged essential components are repaired. Injury of microorganisms can be induced by sublethal heat, freezing, freeze-drying, drying, irradiation, high hydrostatic pressure, aerosolization, dyes, sodium azide, salts, heavy metals, antibiotics, essential oils, sanitizing compounds, and other chemicals or natural antimicrobial compounds. Injured microorganisms present a potential threat in food safety since they may repair themselves under suitable conditions. Detection of injured microorganisms can be important to practical interpretations of data in food microbiology. This review provides an overview of microbial injury in food and discusses the development of recovery methods for detecting injured foodborne microorganisms.

  20. Pharmacy compounding urban legends.

    PubMed

    Kastango, Eric S

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews and clarifies a small sampling of the myths, or urban legends, about compounding. Included are comments on United sTates Pharmacopeia Chapter 797, environmental issues related to sterile compounding, and suggested resources for clarification of some of these myths. This article recommends a knowledge-based partnership between compounding pharmacists and pharmaceutical manufacturers to improve compounding activities and quality assurance methods to ensure that compounded medications are safe.

  1. Phytodegradation of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Newman, Lee A; Reynolds, Charles M

    2004-06-01

    The phytodegradation of organic compounds can take place inside the plant or within the rhizosphere of the plant. Many different compounds and classes of compounds can be removed from the environment by this method, including solvents in groundwater, petroleum and aromatic compounds in soils, and volatile compounds in the air. Although still a relatively new area of research, there are many laboratories studying the underlying science necessary for a wide range of applications for plant-based remediation of organic contaminants.

  2. Deposition of Biogenic Iron Minerals in a Methane Oxidizing Microbial Mat

    PubMed Central

    Wrede, Christoph; Dreier, Anne; Heller, Christina; Reitner, Joachim; Hoppert, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The syntrophic community between anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria forms thick, black layers within multi-layered microbial mats in chimney-like carbonate concretions of methane seeps located in the Black Sea Crimean shelf. The microbial consortium conducts anaerobic oxidation of methane, which leads to the formation of mainly two biomineral by-products, calcium carbonates and iron sulfides, building up these chimneys. Iron sulfides are generated by the microbial reduction of oxidized sulfur compounds in the microbial mats. Here we show that sulfate reducing bacteria deposit biogenic iron sulfides extra- and intracellularly, the latter in magnetosome-like chains. These chains appear to be stable after cell lysis and tend to attach to cell debris within the microbial mat. The particles may be important nuclei for larger iron sulfide mineral aggregates. PMID:23843725

  3. Construction of a microbial natural product library for chemical biology studies.

    PubMed

    Kato, Naoki; Takahashi, Shunji; Nogawa, Toshihiko; Saito, Tamio; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2012-04-01

    The RIKEN Natural Products Depository (NPDepo) is a public depository of small molecules. Currently, the NPDepo chemical library contains 39,200 pure compounds, half of which are natural products and their derivatives. In order to reinforce the uniqueness of our chemical library, we have improved our strategies for the collection of microbial natural products. Firstly, a microbial metabolite fraction library coupled with an MP (microbial products) plot database provides a powerful resource for the efficient isolation of microbial metabolites. Secondly, biosynthetic studies of microbial metabolites have enabled us to not only access ingenious biosynthetic machineries, but also obtain a variety of biosynthetic intermediates. Our chemical library contributes to the discovery of molecular probes for increasing our understanding of complex biological processes and for eventually developing new drug leads.

  4. An efficient magnetically modified microbial cell biocomposite for carbazole biodegradation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic modification of microbial cells enables to prepare smart biocomposites in bioremediation. In this study, we constructed an efficient biocomposite by assembling Fe3O4 nanoparticles onto the surface of Sphingomonas sp. XLDN2-5 cells. The average particle size of Fe3O4 nanoparticles was about 20 nm with 45.5 emu g-1 saturation magnetization. The morphology of Sphingomonas sp. XLDN2-5 cells before and after Fe3O4 nanoparticle loading was verified by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electronic microscopy. Compared with free cells, the microbial cell/Fe3O4 biocomposite had the same biodegradation activity but exhibited remarkable reusability. The degradation activity of the microbial cell/Fe3O4 biocomposite increased gradually during recycling processes. Additionally, the microbial cell/Fe3O4 biocomposite could be easily separated and recycled by an external magnetic field due to the super-paramagnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticle coating. These results indicated that magnetically modified microbial cells provide a promising technique for improving biocatalysts used in the biodegradation of hazardous compounds. PMID:24330511

  5. Potential for bioremediating using constructed mixed microbial mats

    SciTech Connect

    Goodroad, L.; Bender, J.; Phillips, P.; Gould, J.; Saha, G.; Rodriguez-Eaton, S.; Vatcharapijarn, Y.; Lee, R.; Word, J.

    1994-12-31

    Microbial mats are natural heterotrophic and autotrophic communities dominated by cyanobacteria (blue-green algae). They are self-organized laminated structures annealed tightly together by slimy secretions from various Microbial components. The surface slime of the mats effectively immobilizes the ecosystem to a variety of substrates, thereby stabilizing the most efficient internal microbial structure. Constructed microbial mats can be generated rapidly by enriching a water surface with ensiled grass clippings. These constructed mats are durable, tolerant to a variety of toxins and resilient under changing environmental conditions. The mats can he designed for specific tasks by inoculating the cyanobacteria/silage with selected microorganisms. Mats constructed with specific microbial components have been developed for various bioremediation applications: removal of metals, organic degradation, treatment of mixed contaminants, biological treatment ponds, and soil remediation. Constructed mats offer a broad range of mechanisms related to the sequestration of heavy metals, the biodegradation of recalcitrant organic compounds, and the remediation of mixed organic/inorganic contaminants such as TCE and carbofuran with heavy metals.

  6. Microbial biotransformation: a tool for drug designing (Review).

    PubMed

    Pervaiz, I; Ahmad, S; Madni, M A; Ahmad, H; Khaliq, F H

    2013-01-01

    For centuries microbial biotransformation has proved to be an imperative tool in alleviating the production of various chemicals used in food, pharmaceutical, agrochemical and other industries. In the field of phar- maceutical research and development, biotransformation studies have been extensively applied to investigate the metabolism of compounds (leads, lead candidates, etc.) using animal models. The microbial biotransfor- mation phenomenon is then commonly employed in comparing metabolic pathways of drugs and scaling up the metabolites of interest discovered in these animal models for further pharmacological and toxicological evaluation. Microorganisms can conveniently afford drugs difficult obtained via synthesis. The plethora of reported microbial biotransformations along with its added benefits has already invoked further research in bioconversion of novel and structurally complex drugs. This review alternatively discusses the prospect of microbial biotransformation studies as a significant element ameliorating drug discovery and design in terms of cost-effectiveness, environment protection and greater structural diversity as compared to animal models used to study metabolism. To explicate the microbial biotransformation paradigm in drug designing 3 main areas in this aspect have been analyzed: 1--lead expansion: obtaining pharmacologically improved metabo- lites from bioactive molecules; 2--biosynthesis of precursors/intermediates involved in the production of bioactive molecules; 3--resolution of racemic mixture to obtain enantiomers possessing different pharma- cological profiles.

  7. Microbial biotransformation: a tool for drug designing (Review).

    PubMed

    Pervaiz, I; Ahmad, S; Madni, M A; Ahmad, H; Khaliq, F H

    2013-01-01

    For centuries microbial biotransformation has proved to be an imperative tool in alleviating the production of various chemicals used in food, pharmaceutical, agrochemical and other industries. In the field of phar- maceutical research and development, biotransformation studies have been extensively applied to investigate the metabolism of compounds (leads, lead candidates, etc.) using animal models. The microbial biotransfor- mation phenomenon is then commonly employed in comparing metabolic pathways of drugs and scaling up the metabolites of interest discovered in these animal models for further pharmacological and toxicological evaluation. Microorganisms can conveniently afford drugs difficult obtained via synthesis. The plethora of reported microbial biotransformations along with its added benefits has already invoked further research in bioconversion of novel and structurally complex drugs. This review alternatively discusses the prospect of microbial biotransformation studies as a significant element ameliorating drug discovery and design in terms of cost-effectiveness, environment protection and greater structural diversity as compared to animal models used to study metabolism. To explicate the microbial biotransformation paradigm in drug designing 3 main areas in this aspect have been analyzed: 1--lead expansion: obtaining pharmacologically improved metabo- lites from bioactive molecules; 2--biosynthesis of precursors/intermediates involved in the production of bioactive molecules; 3--resolution of racemic mixture to obtain enantiomers possessing different pharma- cological profiles. PMID:25508645

  8. Microbial biotransformation: a tool for drug designing (Review).

    PubMed

    Pervaiz, I; Ahmad, S; Madni, M A; Ahmad, H; Khaliq, F H

    2013-01-01

    For centuries microbial biotransformation has proved to be an imperative tool in alleviating the production of various chemicals used in food, pharmaceutical, agrochemical and other industries. In the field of phar- maceutical research and development, biotransformation studies have been extensively applied to investigate the metabolism of compounds (leads, lead candidates, etc.) using animal models. The microbial biotransfor- mation phenomenon is then commonly employed in comparing metabolic pathways of drugs and scaling up the metabolites of interest discovered in these animal models for further pharmacological and toxicological evaluation. Microorganisms can conveniently afford drugs difficult obtained via synthesis. The plethora of reported microbial biotransformations along with its added benefits has already invoked further research in bioconversion of novel and structurally complex drugs. This review alternatively discusses the prospect of microbial biotransformation studies as a significant element ameliorating drug discovery and design in terms of cost-effectiveness, environment protection and greater structural diversity as compared to animal models used to study metabolism. To explicate the microbial biotransformation paradigm in drug designing 3 main areas in this aspect have been analyzed: 1--lead expansion: obtaining pharmacologically improved metabo- lites from bioactive molecules; 2--biosynthesis of precursors/intermediates involved in the production of bioactive molecules; 3--resolution of racemic mixture to obtain enantiomers possessing different pharma- cological profiles. PMID:25474866

  9. Molecular biology of microbial ureases.

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, H L; Island, M D; Hausinger, R P

    1995-01-01

    Urease (urea amidohydrolase; EC 3.5.1.5) catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to yield ammonia and carbamate. The latter compound spontaneously decomposes to yield another molecule of ammonia and carbonic acid. The urease phenotype is widely distributed across the bacterial kingdom, and the gene clusters encoding this enzyme have been cloned from numerous bacterial species. The complete nucleotide sequence, ranging from 5.15 to 6.45 kb, has been determined for five species including Bacillus sp. strain TB-90, Klebsiella aerogenes, Proteus mirabilis, Helicobacter pylori, and Yersinia enterocolitica. Sequences for selected genes have been determined for at least 10 other bacterial species and the jack bean enzyme. Urease synthesis can be nitrogen regulated, urea inducible, or constitutive. The crystal structure of the K. aerogenes enzyme has been determined. When combined with chemical modification studies, biophysical and spectroscopic analyses, site-directed mutagenesis results, and kinetic inhibition experiments, the structure provides important insight into the mechanism of catalysis. Synthesis of active enzyme requires incorporation of both carbon dioxide and nickel ions into the protein. Accessory genes have been shown to be required for activation of urease apoprotein, and roles for the accessory proteins in metallocenter assembly have been proposed. Urease is central to the virulence of P. mirabilis and H. pylori. Urea hydrolysis by P. mirabilis in the urinary tract leads directly to urolithiasis (stone formation) and contributes to the development of acute pyelonephritis. The urease of H. pylori is necessary for colonization of the gastric mucosa in experimental animal models of gastritis and serves as the major antigen and diagnostic marker for gastritis and peptic ulcer disease in humans. In addition, the urease of Y. enterocolitica has been implicated as an arthritogenic factor in the development of infection-induced reactive arthritis. The significant

  10. The Promise of Microbial Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Nawawy, Amin S.

    1982-01-01

    Prospects for microbial technology are discussed including: (1) possible transfer of nitrogen-fixing ability directly from bacteria to plant; (2) increasing food needs met through single-cell proteins and fermentation; (3) microbial production of antibiotics; and (4) increased biogas production. (Author/JN)

  11. Compositions of constructed microbial mats

    DOEpatents

    Bender, Judith A.; Phillips, Peter C.

    1999-01-01

    Compositions and methods of use of constructed microbial mats, comprising cyanobacteria and purple autotrophic bacteria and an organic nutrient source, in a laminated structure, are described. The constructed microbial mat is used for bioremediation of different individual contaminants and for mixed or multiple contaminants, and for production of beneficial compositions and molecules.

  12. Microbial safety of fresh produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The book entitled “Microbial Safety of Fresh Produce” with 23 chapters is divided into following six sections: Microbial contamination of fresh produce, Pre-harvest strategies, post-harvest interventions, Produce safety during processing and handling, Public, legal, and economic Perspectives, and Re...

  13. Microbial interactions during carrion decomposition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This addresses the microbial ecology of carrion decomposition in the age of metagenomics. It describes what is known about the microbial communities on carrion, including a brief synopsis about the communities on other organic matter sources. It provides a description of studies using state-of-the...

  14. Oxidation of aromatic contaminants coupled to microbial iron reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Baedecker, M.J.; Lonergan, D.J.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Siegel, D.I.

    1989-01-01

    THE contamination of sub-surface water supplies with aromatic compounds is a significant environmental concern1,2. As these contaminated sub-surface environments are generally anaerobic, the microbial oxidation of aromatic compounds coupled to nitrate reduction, sulphate reduction and methane production has been studied intensively1-7. In addition, geochemical evidence suggests that Fe(III) can be an important electron acceptor for the oxidation of aromatic compounds in anaerobic groundwater. Until now, only abiological mechanisms for the oxidation of aromatic compounds with Fe(III) have been reported8-12. Here we show that in aquatic sediments, microbial activity is necessary for the oxidation of model aromatic compounds coupled to Fe(III) reduction. Furthermore, a pure culture of the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium GS-15 can obtain energy for growth by oxidizing benzoate, toluene, phenol or p-cresol with Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor. These results extend the known physiological capabilities of Fe(III)-reducing organisms and provide the first example of an organism of any type which can oxidize an aromatic hydrocarbon anaerobically. ?? 1989 Nature Publishing Group.

  15. Microbial chemical factories: recent advances in pathway engineering for synthesis of value added chemicals.

    PubMed

    Dhamankar, Himanshu; Prather, Kristala L J

    2011-08-01

    The dwindling nature of petroleum and other fossil reserves has provided impetus towards microbial synthesis of fuels and value added chemicals from biomass-derived sugars as a renewable resource. Microbes have naturally evolved enzymes and pathways that can convert biomass into hundreds of unique chemical structures, a property that can be effectively exploited for their engineering into Microbial Chemical Factories (MCFs). De novo pathway engineering facilitates expansion of the repertoire of microbially synthesized compounds beyond natural products. In this review, we visit some recent successes in such novel pathway engineering and optimization, with particular emphasis on the selection and engineering of pathway enzymes and balancing of their accessory cofactors.

  16. Host-microbial interactions in the metabolism of therapeutic and diet-derived xenobiotics

    PubMed Central

    Carmody, Rachel N.; Turnbaugh, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Our associated microbial communities play a critical role in human health and predisposition to disease, but the degree to which they also shape therapeutic interventions is not well understood. Here, we integrate results from classic and current studies of the direct and indirect impacts of the gut microbiome on the metabolism of therapeutic drugs and diet-derived bioactive compounds. We pay particular attention to microbial influences on host responses to xenobiotics, adding to the growing consensus that treatment outcomes reflect our intimate partnership with the microbial world, and providing an initial framework from which to consider a more comprehensive view of pharmacology and nutrition. PMID:25105361

  17. Microbial Communities as Experimental Units.

    PubMed

    Day, Mitch D; Beck, Daniel; Foster, James A

    2011-05-01

    Artificial ecosystem selection is an experimental technique that treats microbial communities as though they were discrete units by applying selection on community-level properties. Highly diverse microbial communities associated with humans and other organisms can have significant impacts on the health of the host. It is difficult to find correlations between microbial community composition and community-associated diseases, in part because it may be impossible to define a universal and robust species concept for microbes. Microbial communities are composed of potentially thousands of unique populations that evolved in intimate contact, so it is appropriate in many situations to view the community as the unit of analysis. This perspective is supported by recent discoveries using metagenomics and pangenomics. Artificial ecosystem selection experiments can be costly, but they bring the logical rigor of biological model systems to the emerging field of microbial community analysis.

  18. Encapsulation of a model compound in pectin delays its release from a biobased polymeric material

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A model compound was encapsulated in pectin and then extruded with thermoplastic starch to form a composite. The intended product was a food-contact tray made of biobased polymers infused with an anti-microbial agent; however, caffeine was used as the model compound in the preliminary work. The mode...

  19. Microbial production of natural raspberry ketone.

    PubMed

    Beekwilder, Jules; van der Meer, Ingrid M; Sibbesen, Ole; Broekgaarden, Mans; Qvist, Ingmar; Mikkelsen, Joern D; Hall, Robert D

    2007-10-01

    Raspberry ketone is an important compound for the flavour industry. It is frequently used in products such as soft drinks, sweets, puddings and ice creams. The compound can be produced by organic synthesis. Demand for "natural" raspberry ketone is growing considerably. However, this product is extremely expensive. Consequently, there is a remaining desire to better understand how raspberry ketone is synthesized in vivo, and which genes and enzymes are involved. With this information we will then be in a better position to design alternative production strategies such as microbial fermentation. This article focuses on the identification and application of genes potentially linked to raspberry ketone synthesis. We have isolated candidate genes from both raspberry and other plants, and these have been introduced into bacterial and yeast expression systems. Conditions have been determined that result in significant levels of raspberry ketone, up to 5 mg/L. These results therefore lay a strong foundation for a potentially renewable source of "natural" flavour compounds making use of plant genes.

  20. Micro-analytical study of interactions between oil and lead compounds in paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotte, M.; Checroun, E.; Susini, J.; Walter, P.

    2007-12-01

    Oil paintings are complex hybrid materials, made of organic binders associated with inorganic minerals, susceptible to evolving over centuries. In particular, interactions of oil with lead compounds may give rise to the formation of lead soap aggregates, so-called protrusions. This phenomenon is studied here via X-ray and FTIR micro-analysis of an ancient painting dated from 1610. In complement, the synthesis of modern preparations, reconstructed from ancient recipes was assessed. Molecular and atomic images are obtained by combining synchrotron-based FTIR and X-ray fluorescence microscopies. Protrusions are identified in both ancient and modern samples, more particularly, in the ground layer of the paintings, below the colored layer. These observations imply that lead oxide, introduced as a siccative and not as a pigment, may be the element mainly responsible for the protrusions formation, and that this degradation may appear very rapidly on paintings.

  1. High-throughput screening to identify selective inhibitors of microbial sulfate reduction (and beyond)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.; Deutschbauer, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The selective perturbation of complex microbial ecosystems to predictably influence outcomes in engineered and industrial environments remains a grand challenge for geomicrobiology. In some industrial ecosystems, such as oil reservoirs, sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) produce hydrogen sulfide which is toxic, explosive and corrosive. Current strategies to selectively inhibit sulfidogenesis are based on non-specific biocide treatments, bio-competitive exclusion by alternative electron acceptors or sulfate-analogs which are competitive inhibitors or futile/alternative substrates of the sulfate reduction pathway. Despite the economic cost of sulfidogenesis, there has been minimal exploration of the chemical space of possible inhibitory compounds, and very little work has quantitatively assessed the selectivity of putative souring treatments. We have developed a high-throughput screening strategy to target SRM, quantitatively ranked the selectivity and potency of hundreds of compounds and identified previously unrecognized SRM selective inhibitors and synergistic interactions between inhibitors. Once inhibitor selectivity is defined, high-throughput characterization of microbial community structure across compound gradients and identification of fitness determinants using isolate bar-coded transposon mutant libraries can give insights into the genetic mechanisms whereby compounds structure microbial communities. The high-throughput (HT) approach we present can be readily applied to target SRM in diverse environments and more broadly, could be used to identify and quantify the potency and selectivity of inhibitors of a variety of microbial metabolisms. Our findings and approach are relevant for engineering environmental ecosystems and also to understand the role of natural gradients in shaping microbial niche space.

  2. Microbial load monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caplin, R. S.; Royer, E. R.

    1978-01-01

    Attempts are made to provide a total design of a Microbial Load Monitor (MLM) system flight engineering model. Activities include assembly and testing of Sample Receiving and Card Loading Devices (SRCLDs), operator related software, and testing of biological samples in the MLM. Progress was made in assembling SRCLDs with minimal leaks and which operate reliably in the Sample Loading System. Seven operator commands are used to control various aspects of the MLM such as calibrating and reading the incubating reading head, setting the clock and reading time, and status of Card. Testing of the instrument, both in hardware and biologically, was performed. Hardware testing concentrated on SRCLDs. Biological testing covered 66 clinical and seeded samples. Tentative thresholds were set and media performance listed.

  3. New microbial growth factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bok, S. H.; Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A screening procedure was used to isolate from soil a Penicillium sp., two bacterial isolates, and a Streptomyces sp. that produced a previously unknown microbial growth factor. This factor was an absolute growth requirement for three soil bacteria. The Penicillium sp. and one of the bacteria requiring the factor, an Arthrobacter sp., were selected for more extensive study concerning the production and characteristics of the growth factor. It did not seem to be related to the siderochromes. It was not present in soil extract, rumen fluid, or any other medium component tested. It appears to be a glycoprotein of high molecular weight and has high specific activity. When added to the diets for a meadow-vole mammalian test system, it caused an increased consumption of diet without a concurrent increase in rate of weight gain.

  4. Microbial transformation of sesquiterpenoids.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Haq N; Zubair, Muhammad; Rasool, Nasir; Hassan, Zahid; Ahmad, Viqar U

    2009-08-01

    Biotransformations are useful methods for producing medicinal and agricultural chemicals from both active and inactive natural products with the introduction of chemical functions into remote sites of the molecules. Research on microbial biotransformations of commonly available sesquiterpenoids into more valuable derivatives has always been of interest because of their economical potential to the perfume, food, chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Fungal transformations of sesquiterpenoids have been less frequently studied compared with many other natural products. In recent years, however, much attention has been given to the exploitation of new products with enhanced biological activity using microorganisms. This review, covering the period from 1990 to 2006, summarizes our knowledge of the biotransformations of sesquiterpenoids by various fungi. Such transformations could lead to the discovery of new reaction pathways that might be useful in the design of new value-added products.

  5. Chaos and microbial systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kot, M.

    1991-01-01

    Much of the recent work in nonlinear dynamics has centered on new techniques for identifying order in seemingly chaotic systems. To determine the robustness of these techniques, chaos must, to some extent, be brought into the laboratory. Preliminary investigations of the forded double-Monod equations, a model for a predator and a prey in a chemostat with periodic variation of inflowing substrate, suggested that simple microbial systems might provide the perfect framework for determining the efficacy and relevance of the new nonlinear dynamics in dealing with complex population dynamics. Progress in two areas of research, mathematical analysis and computer simulation of the periodically forced double-Monod equations and of related models; and experimental (chemostat) population studies that evaluate the accuracy and generality of the models, (and also judge the usefulness of various new techniques of nonlinear dynamics to the study of populations) is reported.

  6. Drinking water microbial myths.

    PubMed

    Allen, Martin J; Edberg, Stephen C; Clancy, Jennifer L; Hrudey, Steve E

    2015-01-01

    Accounts of drinking water-borne disease outbreaks have always captured the interest of the public, elected and health officials, and the media. During the twentieth century, the drinking water community and public health organizations have endeavored to craft regulations and guidelines on treatment and management practices that reduce risks from drinking water, specifically human pathogens. During this period there also evolved misunderstandings as to potential health risk associated with microorganisms that may be present in drinking waters. These misunderstanding or "myths" have led to confusion among the many stakeholders. The purpose of this article is to provide a scientific- and clinically-based discussion of these "myths" and recommendations for better ensuring the microbial safety of drinking water and valid public health decisions.

  7. Microbial fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nealson, Kenneth H; Pirbazari, Massoud; Hsu, Lewis

    2013-04-09

    A microbial fuel cell includes an anode compartment with an anode and an anode biocatalyst and a cathode compartment with a cathode and a cathode biocatalyst, with a membrane positioned between the anode compartment and the cathode compartment, and an electrical pathway between the anode and the cathode. The anode biocatalyst is capable of catalyzing oxidation of an organic substance, and the cathode biocatalyst is capable of catalyzing reduction of an inorganic substance. The reduced organic substance can form a precipitate, thereby removing the inorganic substance from solution. In some cases, the anode biocatalyst is capable of catalyzing oxidation of an inorganic substance, and the cathode biocatalyst is capable of catalyzing reduction of an organic or inorganic substance.

  8. Impact-induced microbial endolithic habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockell, C. S.; Lee, P.; Osinski, G.; Horneck, G.; Broady, P.

    2002-10-01

    Asteroid and comet impacts on Earth are commonly viewed as agents of ecosystem destruction, be it on local or global scales. However, for some microbial communities, impacts may represent an opportunity for habitat formation as some substrates are rendered more suitable for colonization when processed by impacts. We describe how heavily shocked gneissic crystalline basement rocks exposed at the Haughton impact structure, Devon Island, Nunavut, Arctic Canada, are hosts to endolithic photosynthetic microorganisms in significantly greater abundance than lesser-shocked or unshocked gneisses. Two factors contribute to this enhancement: (a) increased porosity due to impact fracturing and differential mineral vaporization, and (b) increased translucence due to the selective vaporization of opaque mineral phases. Using biological ultraviolet radiation dosimetry, and by measuring the concentrations of photoprotective compounds, we demonstrate that a covering of 0.8 mm of shocked gneiss can provide substantial protection from ultraviolet radiation, reducing the inactivation of Bacillus subtilis spores by 2 orders of magnitude. The colonisation of the shocked habitat represents a potential mechanism for pioneer microorganisms to invade an impact structure in the earliest stages of post-impact primary succession. The communities are analogous to the endolithic communities associated with sedimentary rocks in Antarctica, but because they occur in shocked crystalline rocks, they illustrate a mechanism for the creation of microbial habitats on planetary surfaces that do not have exposed sedimentary units. This might have been the case on early Earth. The data have implications for the microhabitats in which biological signatures might be sought on Mars.

  9. Microbial Field Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

  10. Microbial biosurfactants as additives for food industries.

    PubMed

    Campos, Jenyffer Medeiros; Stamford, Tânia Lúcia Montenegro; Sarubbo, Leonie Asfora; de Luna, Juliana Moura; Rufino, Raquel Diniz; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2013-01-01

    Microbial biosurfactants with high ability to reduce surface and interfacial surface tension and conferring important properties such as emulsification, detergency, solubilization, lubrication and phase dispersion have a wide range of potential applications in many industries. Significant interest in these compounds has been demonstrated by environmental, bioremediation, oil, petroleum, food, beverage, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries attracted by their low toxicity, biodegradability and sustainable production technologies. Despite having significant potentials associated with emulsion formation, stabilization, antiadhesive and antimicrobial activities, significantly less output and applications have been reported in food industry. This has been exacerbated by uneconomical or uncompetitive costing issues for their production when compared to plant or chemical counterparts. In this review, biosurfactants properties, present uses and potential future applications as food additives acting as thickening, emulsifying, dispersing or stabilising agents in addition to the use of sustainable economic processes utilising agro-industrial wastes as alternative substrates for their production are discussed.

  11. Dinitroso and polynitroso compounds

    PubMed Central

    Gowenlock, Brian G.; Richter-Addo, George B.

    2005-01-01

    The growing interest in the chemistry of C-nitroso compounds (RN=O; R = alkyl or aryl group) is due in part to the recognition of their participation in various metabolic processes of nitrogen-containing compounds. C-Nitroso compounds have a rich organic chemistry in their own right, displaying interesting intra- and intermolecular dimerization processes and addition reactions with unsaturated compounds. In addition, they have a fascinating coordination chemistry. While most of the attention has been directed towards C-nitroso compounds containing a single –NO moiety, there is an emerging area of research dealing with dinitroso and polynitroso compounds. In this critical review, we present and discuss the synthetic routes and properties of these relatively unexplored dinitroso and polynitroso compounds, and suggest areas of further development involving these compounds. (126 references.) PMID:16100619

  12. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  13. Global microbialization of coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Haas, Andreas F; Fairoz, Mohamed F M; Kelly, Linda W; Nelson, Craig E; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Edwards, Robert A; Giles, Steve; Hatay, Mark; Hisakawa, Nao; Knowles, Ben; Lim, Yan Wei; Maughan, Heather; Pantos, Olga; Roach, Ty N F; Sanchez, Savannah E; Silveira, Cynthia B; Sandin, Stuart; Smith, Jennifer E; Rohwer, Forest

    2016-01-01

    Microbialization refers to the observed shift in ecosystem trophic structure towards higher microbial biomass and energy use. On coral reefs, the proximal causes of microbialization are overfishing and eutrophication, both of which facilitate enhanced growth of fleshy algae, conferring a competitive advantage over calcifying corals and coralline algae. The proposed mechanism for this competitive advantage is the DDAM positive feedback loop (dissolved organic carbon (DOC), disease, algae, microorganism), where DOC released by ungrazed fleshy algae supports copiotrophic, potentially pathogenic bacterial communities, ultimately harming corals and maintaining algal competitive dominance. Using an unprecedented data set of >400 samples from 60 coral reef sites, we show that the central DDAM predictions are consistent across three ocean basins. Reef algal cover is positively correlated with lower concentrations of DOC and higher microbial abundances. On turf and fleshy macroalgal-rich reefs, higher relative abundances of copiotrophic microbial taxa were identified. These microbial communities shift their metabolic potential for carbohydrate degradation from the more energy efficient Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway on coral-dominated reefs to the less efficient Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways on algal-dominated reefs. This 'yield-to-power' switch by microorganism directly threatens reefs via increased hypoxia and greater CO2 release from the microbial respiration of DOC. PMID:27572833

  14. Global microbialization of coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Haas, Andreas F; Fairoz, Mohamed F M; Kelly, Linda W; Nelson, Craig E; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Edwards, Robert A; Giles, Steve; Hatay, Mark; Hisakawa, Nao; Knowles, Ben; Lim, Yan Wei; Maughan, Heather; Pantos, Olga; Roach, Ty N F; Sanchez, Savannah E; Silveira, Cynthia B; Sandin, Stuart; Smith, Jennifer E; Rohwer, Forest

    2016-04-25

    Microbialization refers to the observed shift in ecosystem trophic structure towards higher microbial biomass and energy use. On coral reefs, the proximal causes of microbialization are overfishing and eutrophication, both of which facilitate enhanced growth of fleshy algae, conferring a competitive advantage over calcifying corals and coralline algae. The proposed mechanism for this competitive advantage is the DDAM positive feedback loop (dissolved organic carbon (DOC), disease, algae, microorganism), where DOC released by ungrazed fleshy algae supports copiotrophic, potentially pathogenic bacterial communities, ultimately harming corals and maintaining algal competitive dominance. Using an unprecedented data set of >400 samples from 60 coral reef sites, we show that the central DDAM predictions are consistent across three ocean basins. Reef algal cover is positively correlated with lower concentrations of DOC and higher microbial abundances. On turf and fleshy macroalgal-rich reefs, higher relative abundances of copiotrophic microbial taxa were identified. These microbial communities shift their metabolic potential for carbohydrate degradation from the more energy efficient Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway on coral-dominated reefs to the less efficient Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways on algal-dominated reefs. This 'yield-to-power' switch by microorganism directly threatens reefs via increased hypoxia and greater CO2 release from the microbial respiration of DOC.

  15. Microbial populations in contaminant plumes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haack, S.K.; Bekins, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    Efficient biodegradation of subsurface contaminants requires two elements: (1) microbial populations with the necessary degradative capabilities, and (2) favorable subsurface geochemical and hydrological conditions. Practical constraints on experimental design and interpretation in both the hydrogeological and microbiological sciences have resulted in limited knowledge of the interaction between hydrogeological and microbiological features of subsurface environments. These practical constraints include: (1) inconsistencies between the scales of investigation in the hydrogeological and microbiological sciences, and (2) practical limitations on the ability to accurately define microbial populations in environmental samples. However, advances in application of small-scale sampling methods and interdisciplinary approaches to site investigations are beginning to significantly improve understanding of hydrogeological and microbiological interactions. Likewise, culture-based and molecular analyses of microbial populations in subsurface contaminant plumes have revealed significant adaptation of microbial populations to plume environmental conditions. Results of recent studies suggest that variability in subsurface geochemical and hydrological conditions significantly influences subsurface microbial-community structure. Combined investigations of site conditions and microbial-community structure provide the knowledge needed to understand interactions between subsurface microbial populations, plume geochemistry, and contaminant biodegradation.

  16. The Negative Effects of Volatile Sulphur Compounds.

    PubMed

    Milella, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Oral malodor has been studied extensively in humans but not necessarily to the same degree in our veterinary patients where malodor constitutes a significant problem. Breath malodor may originate from the mouth, or from an extra oral source, originating from other organ systems such as gastrointestinal, respiratory, or even systemic disease. Oral malodor is a result of microbial metabolism of exogenous and endogenous proteinaceous substrates leading to the production of compounds such as indole, skatole, tyramine, cadaverine, puterescine, mercaptans, and sulphides. Volatile sulphur compounds have been shown to be the main cause of oral malodor. Although most clients perceive oral malodor to be primarily a cosmetic problem, there is an increasing volume of evidence in human dental literature demonstrating that volatile sulphur compounds produced by bacteria, even at low concentrations, are toxic to tissues and play a role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. This article reviews the current available literature in human dentistry looking at these negative effects. No veterinary studies have been conducted looking at the negative effects of volatile sulphur compounds specifically, but as this article highlights, we should be aware of the potential negative effects of volatile sulphur compounds and consider this an area of future research. PMID:26415386

  17. Limited recovery of soil microbial activity after transient exposure to gasoline vapors.

    PubMed

    Modrzyński, Jakub J; Christensen, Jan H; Mayer, Philipp; Brandt, Kristian K

    2016-09-01

    During gasoline spills complex mixtures of toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released to terrestrial environments. Gasoline VOCs exert baseline toxicity (narcosis) and may thus broadly affect soil biota. We assessed the functional resilience (i.e. resistance and recovery of microbial functions) in soil microbial communities transiently exposed to gasoline vapors by passive dosing via headspace for 40 days followed by a recovery phase of 84 days. Chemical exposure was characterized with GC-MS, whereas microbial activity was monitored as soil respiration (CO2 release) and soil bacterial growth ([(3)H]leucine incorporation). Microbial activity was strongly stimulated and inhibited at low and high exposure levels, respectively. Microbial growth efficiency decreased with increasing exposure, but rebounded during the recovery phase for low-dose treatments. Although benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) concentrations decreased by 83-97% during the recovery phase, microbial activity in high-dose treatments did not recover and numbers of viable bacteria were 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than in control soil. Re-inoculation with active soil microorganisms failed to restore microbial activity indicating residual soil toxicity, which could not be attributed to BTEX, but rather to mixture toxicity of more persistent gasoline constituents or degradation products. Our results indicate a limited potential for functional recovery of soil microbial communities after transient exposure to high, but environmentally relevant, levels of gasoline VOCs which therefore may compromise ecosystem services provided by microorganisms even after extensive soil VOC dissipation. PMID:27376993

  18. Changes in Microbial Community Structure and Carbon Utilization Patterns in Response to Woody Encroachment into Grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creamer, C. A.; Filley, T. R.; Boutton, T. W.

    2012-12-01

    Land cover changes occurring in dryland ecosystems, such as woody encroachment, can moderate microbial activity and alter the flow of C and N between litter and soil, ultimately impacting soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics. We analyzed the quantity and isotopic composition of microbial phospholipids along a grassland-to-woodland successional chronosequence in southern Texas to determine how microbial community structure and SOC utilization patterns responded to the extent of woody encroachment across two sampling seasons (Spring and Fall). Woody encroachment resulted in significant increases in total microbial biomass and fungal:bacterial ratios along with significant decreases in the ratio of gram-positive:gram-negative bacteria. Compound-specific 13C analysis of microbial phospholipids revealed that gram-negative bacteria and fungi were preferentially utilizing newer, C3-derived inputs, while other microbial groups generally showed no preferential incorporation of newer or older C. This preferential use of newer C in gram-negative bacteria and fungi, combined with their increasing relative abundance, reveals that these microbial groups are most responsive to biogeochemical changes elicited by woody encroachment, potentially to enhanced rhizosphere development or changes in the chemical stability of C inputs. This research provides important information regarding the links between changing plant cover, SOC accrual, and microbial activity in response to a globally relevant environmental perturbation.

  19. Microbial atrazine breakdown in a karst groundwater system and its effect on ecosystem energetics.

    PubMed

    Iker, Brandon C; Kambesis, Pat; Oehrle, Stuart A; Groves, Chris; Barton, Hazel A

    2010-01-01

    In the absence of sunlight energy, microbial community survival in subterranean aquifers depends on integrated mechanisms of energy and nutrient scavenging. Because karst aquifers are particularly sensitive to agricultural land use impacts due to rapid and direct hydrologic connections for pollutants to enter the groundwater, we examined the fate of an exogenous pesticide (atrazine) into such an aquifer and its impact on microbial ecosystem function. Atrazine and its degradation product deethylatrazine (DEA) were detected in a fast-flowing karst aquifer underlying atrazine-impacted agricultural land. By establishing microbial cultures with sediments from a cave conduit within this aquifer, we observed two distinct pathways of microbial atrazine degradation: (i) in cave sediments previously affected by atrazine, apparent surface-derived catabolic genes allowed the microbial communities to rapidly degrade atrazine via hydroxyatrazine, to cyanuric acid, and (ii) in low-impact sediments not previously exposed to this pesticide, atrazine was also degraded by microbial activity at a much slower rate, with DEA as the primary degradation product. In sediments from both locations, atrazine affected nitrogen cycling by altering the abundance of nitrogen dissimulatory species able to use nitrogenous compounds for energy. The sum of these effects was that the presence of atrazine altered the natural microbial processes in these cave sediments, leading to an accumulation of nitrate. Such changes in microbial ecosystem dynamics can alter the ability of DEA to serve as a proxy for atrazine contamination and can negatively affect ecosystem health and water quality in karst aquifers.

  20. Environmental parameters controlling microbial activities in terrestrial subsurface environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    This project was begun in July 1988 as part of Phase I of the Deep Microbiology Subprogram. At this time, the Subprogram was preparing for sampling near the Savannah River Site (SRS) from what was being termed the Investigator's Hole.'' This was the fourth hole drilled for sampling in the coastal plain sediments at a site near the SRS. Since there was a possibility of sampling from the saline Triassic basin in the deeper regions in this fourth hole, there was particular interest in quantifying halotolerant microorganisms from these samples and in determining the responses of subsurface microbes to a range of soft concentrations. Further interest in the soft tolerances of microbes from these coastal sediments arose from the fact that all of these sediments were deposited under marine conditions. It was also anticipated that samples would be available from the shallow unsaturated (vadose) zone at this site, so there was interest in quantifying microbial responses to matric water potential as well as solute water potential. The initial objectives of this research project were to: characterize microbial communities in a saline aquifer; determine the potential for microbial metabolism of selected organic compounds in a saline aquifers; characterize microbial communities in unsaturated subsurface materials (vadose zones); and determine the potential for microbial metabolism of selected organic compounds in unsaturated subsurface materials (vadose zones). Samples were collected from the borehole during a period extending from August to October 1988. A total of nine samples were express shipped to New Mexico Tech for analyses. These were all saturated zone samples from six different geological formations. Water contents and water potentials were measured at the time of sample arrival.

  1. Regulating compounding pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Noble, Ashley

    2015-06-01

    (1) The Pew Charitable Trusts identified 27 compounding incidents that resulted in 89 deaths since 2001. (2) Unlike drug manufacturers, compounding pharmacies are generally not required to report adverse events associated with their products to the FDA. (3) Federal law on drug compounding was updated in 2013 to create a new group of compounders called "outsourcing facilities." Over 50 facilities in 23 states are now registered with the FDA.

  2. Effects of Ga substitution on the structural and magnetic properties of half metallic Fe{sub 2}MnSi Heusler compound

    SciTech Connect

    Pedro, S. S. Caraballo Vivas, R. J.; Andrade, V. M.; Cruz, C.; Paixão, L. S.; Contreras, C.; Costa-Soares, T.; Rocco, D. L.; Reis, M. S.; Caldeira, L.; Coelho, A. A.; Carvalho, A. Magnus G.

    2015-01-07

    The so-called half-metallic magnets have been proposed as good candidates for spintronic applications due to the feature of exhibiting a hundred percent spin polarization at the Fermi level. Such materials follow the Slater-Pauling rule, which relates the magnetic moment with the valence electrons in the system. In this paper, we study the bulk polycrystalline half-metallic Fe{sub 2}MnSi Heusler compound replacing Si by Ga to determine how the Ga addition changes the magnetic, the structural, and the half-metal properties of this compound. The material does not follow the Slater-Pauling rule, probably due to a minor structural disorder degree in the system, but a linear dependence on the magnetic transition temperature with the valence electron number points to the half-metallic behavior of this compound.

  3. Microbial proteomics: the quiet revolution

    SciTech Connect

    Seraphin, Bertrand; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2012-01-01

    Technological developments in DNA sequencing and their application to study thousands of microbial genomes or even microbial ecosystems still today often make the headlines of general newspapers and scientific journals. These revolutionary changes are hiding another revolution that is unfolding more quietly in the background: the development of microbial proteomics to study genome expression products. It is important to recognize that while DNA sequencing reveals extensive details about the genomic potential of an organism or community, proteomic measurements reveal the functional gene products that are present and operational under specific environmental conditions, and thus perhaps better characterize the critical biomolecules that execute the life processes (enzymes, signaling, structural factors, etc.).

  4. The estimation of microbial biomass.

    PubMed

    Harris, C M; Kell, D B

    1985-01-01

    Methods that have been used to estimate the content, and in some cases the nature, of the microbial biomass in a sample are reviewed. The methods may be categorised in terms of their principle (physical, chemical, biological or mathematical/computational), their speed (real-time or otherwise) and the amount of automation/expense involved. For sparse populations, where the output signal is to be enhanced by growth of the organisms, physical, chemical and biological approaches may be of equal merit, whilst in systems, such as laboratory and industrial fermentations, in which the microbial biomass content is high, physical methods (alone) can permit the real-time estimation of microbial biomass.

  5. Proposed modification to the specification for dry heat microbial reduction of spacecraft hardware for future US missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James; Spry, A.; Beaudet, Robert; Schubert, Wayne

    Dry heat microbial reduction (DHMR) is the primary technique used to reduce the microbial load of spacecraft and component parts to comply with planetary protection requirements. Often, manufacturing processes involve heating flight hardware to high temperatures for purposes other than planetary protection DHMR. At present, the existing specification in NASA document NPR8020.12C, describing the process lethality on B. atrophaeus (ATCC 9372) bacterial spores, does not allow for additional planetary protection bioburden reduction credit for processing outside a narrow temperature, time and humidity window. However, recent studies (Schubert et al., COSPAR 2008) from a comprehensive multi-year laboratory research effort have generated enhanced data sets on four aspects of the current specification: time and temperature combination effects, the effect that humidity has on spore lethality, the lethality for spores with exceptionally high thermal resistance (so called "hardies"), and the extended exposure requirement for encapsulated microorganisms. This paper describes proposed modifications to the specification, based on the data set generated in the referenced study. The proposed modifications are intended to broaden the scope of the current specification while still maintaining a confident conservative interpretation of the lethality of the DHMR process on microorganisms. Potential cost and schedule benefits to future missions utilizing the revised specification will be highlighted.

  6. The Diversity of Anti-Microbial Secondary Metabolites Produced by Fungal Endophytes: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Walaa Kamel; Raizada, Manish N.

    2013-01-01

    Endophytes are microbes that inhabit host plants without causing disease and are reported to be reservoirs of metabolites that combat microbes and other pathogens. Here we review diverse classes of secondary metabolites, focusing on anti-microbial compounds, synthesized by fungal endophytes including terpenoids, alkaloids, phenylpropanoids, aliphatic compounds, polyketides, and peptides from the interdisciplinary perspectives of biochemistry, genetics, fungal biology, host plant biology, human and plant pathology. Several trends were apparent. First, host plants are often investigated for endophytes when there is prior indigenous knowledge concerning human medicinal uses (e.g., Chinese herbs). However, within their native ecosystems, and where investigated, endophytes were shown to produce compounds that target pathogens of the host plant. In a few examples, both fungal endophytes and their hosts were reported to produce the same compounds. Terpenoids and polyketides are the most purified anti-microbial secondary metabolites from endophytes, while flavonoids and lignans are rare. Examples are provided where fungal genes encoding anti-microbial compounds are clustered on chromosomes. As different genera of fungi can produce the same metabolite, genetic clustering may facilitate sharing of anti-microbial secondary metabolites between fungi. We discuss gaps in the literature and how more interdisciplinary research may lead to new opportunities to develop bio-based commercial products to combat global crop and human pathogens. PMID:23543048

  7. Squalamine analogues as potential anti-trypanosomal and anti-leishmanial compounds.

    PubMed

    Khabnadideh, S; Tan, C L; Croft, S L; Kendrick, H; Yardley, V; Gilbert, I H

    2000-06-01

    This paper concerns the synthesis of various simplified analogues of the novel anti-microbial agent, squalamine. The compounds were then investigated for activity against Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African trypanosomiasis, Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease and Leishmania donovani, the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis. Several compounds showed in vitro activity, especially against T. brucei and L. donovani. However, one compound showed poor in vivo activity. PMID:10866389

  8. The biogeochemistry of microbial mats, stromatolites and the ancient biosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmarais, D. J.; Canfield, D. E.

    1991-01-01

    Stromatolites offer an unparalleled geologic record of early life, because they constitute the oldest and most abundant recognizable remains of microbial ecosystems. Microbial mats are living homologs of stromatolites; thus, the physiology of the microbiota as well as the processes which create those features of mats (e.g., biomarker organic compounds, elemental and stable isotopic compositions) which are preserved in the ancient record. Observations of the carbon isotopic composition (delta C-13) of stromatolites and microbial mats were made and are consistent with the hypothesis that atmospheric CO2 concentrations have declined by at least one to two orders of magnitude during the past 2.5 Ga. Whereas delta C-13 values of carbonate carbon average about 0 permil during both the early and mid-Proterozoic, the delta C-13 values of stromatolitic organic matter increase from an average of -35 between 2.0 and 2.6 Ga ago to an average of about -28 about 1.0 Ga ago. Modern microbial mats in hypersaline environments have delta C-13 values typically in the range of -5 to -9, relative to an inorganic bicarbonate source at 0 permil. Both microbial mats and pur cultures of cyanobacteria grown in waters in near equilibrium with current atmospheric CO2 levels exhibit minimal discrimination against C-13. In contrast, hot spring cyanobacterial mats or cyanobacterial cultures grown under higher CO2 levels exhibit substantially greater discrimination. If care is taken to compare modern mats with stromatolites from comparable environments, it might be possible to estimate ancient levels of atmospheric CO2. In modern microbial mats, a tight coupling exists between photosynthetic organic carbon production and subsequent carbon oxidation, mostly by sulfate reduction. The rate of one process fuels a high rate of the other, with much of the sulfate reduction occurring within the same depth interval as oxygenic photosynthesis. Other aspects of this study are presented.

  9. Soil microbial diversity and activity as terroir elements of Sangiovese vineyards in the Chianti Classico region (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiani, Arturo; Mocali, Stefano; Priori, Simone; Valboa, Giuseppe; Vignozzi, Nadia; Pellegrini, Sergio; Storchi, Paolo; Perria, Rita; Costantini, Edoardo

    2016-04-01

    Linking the uniqueness and quality of grapes and wine to the environment they are produced, based on the terroir concept, have recently become popular in many parts of world. The natural components of terroir are actually a set of processes, which together create a delicate equilibrium and regulation of its effect on products in both space and time. Climate, geology, geomorphology and soil are therefore the main environmental factors which make up the terroir effect on different scales. However, information on the impact of soil microbial communities on soil functions, grapevine plants and wine quality is still lacking. Thus, four of the most suitable areas (so called "cru") for the production of Sangiovese wine were chosen within the Barone Ricasoli farm of Brolio, the largest winery in the Chianti Classico area in central Italy: Fattoio, Miniera, Ceni and Colli-Agresto. Based on previous pedological and sensing technologies surveys, each area was further divided into two distinct homogeneous areas of about 1.5 ha called Basic Terroir Unit (UTB), which were monitored over 3 years (2012-2014) for the soil the chemical-physical variability (moisture, organic matter, nitrogen, potassium), the vineyard physiological status (water stress, grape production, characteristics of the grapes and wine) and the structure and activity of soil microbial communities (determined through DGGE, soil respiration and microbial biomass, respectively). The aim of the work was to assess the relationships among soil parameters and vine quality at intra- and inter- UTB level and, in particular, the potential impact of microbial composition and/or function on the terroir concept. The overall results highlighted a microbial community structure specific for each cru area and, in particular, associated to each UTB. Furthermore, microbial activity in Miniera and Ceni appeared to be positively related to Sangiovese quality, as determined through the Sangiovese Performance Index. However, except

  10. Energy and power limits for microbial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaRowe, D.; Amend, J.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this presentation is to describe a quantitative framework for determining how energy limits microbial activity, biomass and, ultimately, biogeochemical processes. Although this model can be applied to any environment, its utility is demonstrated in marine sediments, which are an attractive test habitat because they encompass a broad spectrum of energy levels, varying amounts of biomass and are ubiquitous. The potential number of active microbial cells in Arkonas Basin (Baltic Sea) sediments are estimated as a function of depth by quantifying the amount of energy that is available to them and the rate at which it is supplied: power. The amount of power supplied per cubic centimeter of sediment is determined by calculating the Gibbs energy of fermentation and sulfate reduction in combination with the rate of particulate organic carbon, POC, degradation. The Reactive Continuum Model (Boudreau and Ruddick, 1991), RCM, is used to determine the rate at which POC is made available for microbial consumption. The RCM represents POC as containing a range of different types of organic compounds whose ability to be consumed by microorganisms varies as a function of the age of the sediment and on the distribution of compound types that were initially deposited. The sediment age model and RCM parameters determined by (Mogollon et al., 2012) are used. The power available for fermentation and sulfate reduction coupled to H2 and acetate oxidation varies from 10-8 W cm-3 at the sediment water interface to between 10-11 - 10-12 W cm-3 at 3.5 meters below the seafloor, mbsf. Using values of maintenance powers for each of these catabolic activities taken from the literature, the total number of active cells in these sediments similarly decreases from just less than 108 cell cm-3 at the SWI to 4.6 x 104 cells cm-3 at 3.5 mbsf. The number of moles of POC decreases from 2.6 x 10-5 to 9.5 x 10-6, also becoming more recalcitrant with depth. Boudreau, B. P. and Ruddick, B. R

  11. Microbial Cell Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel John; Sullivan, Claretta; Mortensen, Ninell P; Allison, David P

    2011-01-01

    the maximum scan size (roughly 100 x 100 {mu}m) and the restricted movement of the cantilever in the Z (or height) direction. In most commercial AFMs, the Z range is restricted to roughly 10 {mu}m such that the height of cells to be imaged must be seriously considered. Nevertheless, AFM can provide structural-functional information at nanometer resolution and do so in physiologically relevant environments. Further, instrumentation for scanning probe microscopy continues to advance. Systems for high-speed imaging are becoming available, and techniques for looking inside the cells are being demonstrated. The ability to combine AFM with other imaging modalities is likely to have an even greater impact on microbiological studies. AFM studies of intact microbial cells started to appear in the literature in the 1990s. For example, AFM studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae examined buddings cars after cell division and detailed changes related to cell growth processes. Also, the first AFM studies of bacterial biofilms appeared. In the late 1990s, AFM studies of intact fungal spores described clear changes in spore surfaces upon germination, and studies of individual bacterial cells were also described. These early bacterial imaging studies examined changes in bacterial morphology due to antimicrobial peptides exposure and bacterial adhesion properties. The majority of these early studies were carried out on dried samples and took advantage of the resolving power of AFM. The lack of cell mounting procedures presented an impediment for cell imaging studies. Subsequently, several approaches to mounting microbial cells have been developed, and these techniques are described later. Also highlighted are general considerations for microbial imaging and a description of some of the various applications of AFM to microbiology.

  12. The eyes of a tiny 'Orsten' crustacean - a compound eye at receptor level?

    PubMed

    Schoenemann, Brigitte

    2013-01-14

    Among the oldest fossil crustaceans are those of the Late Cambrian (Furongian 499 ± 0.3-488.3 ± 1.7 Ma) of Västergötland, central Sweden and the lower Ordovician (Tremadocian 488.3 and 478.6 Ma) of the island of Őland. These are three-dimensionally preserved in nodules from the so called 'stinkstone' ('Orsten') limestone. 'Orsten'-like fossils represent tiny, often meiobenthic organsisms (Haug, Maas, & Waloszek, 2009) smaller than 2mm, which mainly were arthropods, especially crustaceans close to the stemline. As a result of phosphatisation, hairs, bristles and even cellular structures up to 0.3 μm are preserved (Walossek, 1993), especially compound eyes, as typical for all visually orientated crustaceans (Schoenemann et al., 2011). We show a miniscule prototype of a compound eye (∼40 μm) in a small crustacean, which lived almost half a billion years ago. The eye is close to but comfortably established above being limited in its resolving power by diffraction, but it is too small to be an apposition eye, normally regarded as the basal form of all compound eyes, as is found in bees, dragonflies, crustaceans and many other arthropods still living today. The facets of this compound eye are ∼8 μm in size, the surface structure indicates the relicts of a tiny lens covering each facet. In order to work functionally and to ensure that that diffraction and waveguide problems were avoided, it seems reasonable to suppose that the compound eye consisted of visual units, each with a single photoreceptor cell directly below a weak lens for capturing and slightly focusing the light. The entire unit has a diameter similar to that of a normal sensory cell as found in compound eyes. Thus, the early compound eye analysed here may be interpreted as a prototype representing the earliest stages of the evolution of crustacean compound eyes.

  13. Teaching Microbial Growth by Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, A. Fernandez; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presented is a simulation program for Apple II computer which assays the effects of a series of variables on bacterial growth and interactions between microbial populations. Results of evaluation of the program with students are summarized. (CW)

  14. When microbial conversations get physical

    PubMed Central

    Reguera, Gemma

    2011-01-01

    It is widely accepted that microorganisms are social beings. Whereas communication via chemical signals (e.g. quorum sensing) has been the focus of most investigations, the use of physical signals for microbial cell-cell communication has received only limited attention. Here, I argue that physical modes of microbial communication could be widespread in nature. This is based on experimental evidence on the microbial emission and response to three physical signals: sound waves, electromagnetic radiation, and electric currents. These signals propagate rapidly and, even at very low intensities, they provide useful mechanisms when a rapid response is required. I also make some suggestions for promising future research avenues that could bring novel and unsuspected insights into the physical nature of microbial signaling networks. PMID:21239171

  15. Microbial Infection and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song; Yu, Yangsheng; Yue, Yinshi; Zhang, Zhixin; Su, Kaihong

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex autoimmune disease affecting 1–2% of general worldwide population. The etiopathogenesis of RA involves the interplay of multiple genetic risk factors and environmental triggers. Microbial infections are believed to play an important role in the initiation and perpetuation of RA. Recent clinical studies have shown the association of microbial infections with RA. Accumulated studies using animal models have also found that microbial infections can induce and/or exaggerate the symptoms of experimental arthritis. In this review, we have identified the most common microbial infections associated with RA in the literature and summarized the current evidence supporting their pathogenic role in RA. We also discussed the potential mechanisms whereby infection may promote the development of RA, such as generation of neo-autoantigens, induction of loss of tolerance by molecular mimicry, and bystander activation of the immune system. PMID:25133066

  16. Allopatric origins of microbial species

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Rachel J

    2006-01-01

    Although allopatric divergence is a well-accepted mechanism of speciation for eukaryotic macro-organisms, the importance of geographical barriers to divergence in microbial populations is a subject of great debate. Do geographically separated populations of micro-organisms diverge independently, or does their structure fit the often quoted Bass-Becking description ‘everything is everywhere; the environment selects’? Aided by high-resolution genetic and genomic tools, the search for ‘microbial marsupials’ has revealed that in fact both are true; some species of micro-organisms demonstrate allopatric divergence, while others do not. This discovery opens the door for comparative analyses, where questions about the differences in evolutionary and ecological mechanisms that drive divergence and speciation in different microbial species can begin to be explored. Investigating these differences in evolutionary mechanisms will greatly enhance interest in, and understanding of, the dynamic processes that create and maintain the vast diversity of the microbial world. PMID:17062415

  17. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  18. Biogeochemical Processes in Microbial Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.

    2001-01-01

    The hierarchical organization of microbial ecosystems determines process rates that shape Earth's environment, create the biomarker sedimentary and atmospheric signatures of life, and define the stage upon which major evolutionary events occurred. In order to understand how microorganisms have shaped the global environment of Earth and, potentially, other worlds, we must develop an experimental paradigm that links biogeochemical processes with ever-changing temporal and spatial distributions of microbial populations and their metabolic properties. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Life Support Systems Microbial Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Monserrate C.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the current microbial challenges of environmental control and life support systems. The contents include: 1) Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) What is it?; 2) A Look Inside the International Space Station (ISS); 3) The Complexity of a Water Recycling System; 4) ISS Microbiology Acceptability Limits; 5) Overview of Current Microbial Challenges; 6) In a Perfect World What we Would like to Have; and 7) The Future.

  20. Microbial origin of desert varnish.

    PubMed

    Dorn, R I; Oberlander, T M

    1981-09-11

    Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analyses of desert varnish reveal that microorganisms concentrate ambient manganese that becomes greatly enhanced in brown to black varnish. Specific characteristics of desert varnish and of varnish bacteria support a microbial origin for manganese-rich films. Varnish microbes can be cultured and produce laboratory manganese films. Accordingly, natural desert varnish and also manganese-rich rock varnishes in nondesert environments appear to be a product of microbial activity. PMID:17744757

  1. Microbial genomes: Blueprints for life

    SciTech Connect

    Relman, David A.; Strauss, Evelyn

    2000-12-31

    Complete microbial genome sequences hold the promise of profound new insights into microbial pathogenesis, evolution, diagnostics, and therapeutics. From these insights will come a new foundation for understanding the evolution of single-celled life, as well as the evolution of more complex life forms. This report is an in-depth analysis of scientific issues that provides recommendations and will be widely disseminated to the scientific community, federal agencies, industry and the public.

  2. Microbial origin of desert varnish.

    PubMed

    Dorn, R I; Oberlander, T M

    1981-09-11

    Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analyses of desert varnish reveal that microorganisms concentrate ambient manganese that becomes greatly enhanced in brown to black varnish. Specific characteristics of desert varnish and of varnish bacteria support a microbial origin for manganese-rich films. Varnish microbes can be cultured and produce laboratory manganese films. Accordingly, natural desert varnish and also manganese-rich rock varnishes in nondesert environments appear to be a product of microbial activity.

  3. Exploring microbial dark matter to resolve the deep archaeal ancestry of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Saw, Jimmy H; Spang, Anja; Zaremba-Niedzwiedzka, Katarzyna; Juzokaite, Lina; Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Murugapiran, Senthil K; Colman, Dan R; Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina; Hedlund, Brian P; Guy, Lionel; Ettema, Thijs J G

    2015-09-26

    The origin of eukaryotes represents an enigmatic puzzle, which is still lacking a number of essential pieces. Whereas it is currently accepted that the process of eukaryogenesis involved an interplay between a host cell and an alphaproteobacterial endosymbiont, we currently lack detailed information regarding the identity and nature of these players. A number of studies have provided increasing support for the emergence of the eukaryotic host cell from within the archaeal domain of life, displaying a specific affiliation with the archaeal TACK superphylum. Recent studies have shown that genomic exploration of yet-uncultivated archaea, the so-called archaeal 'dark matter', is able to provide unprecedented insights into the process of eukaryogenesis. Here, we provide an overview of state-of-the-art cultivation-independent approaches, and demonstrate how these methods were used to obtain draft genome sequences of several novel members of the TACK superphylum, including Lokiarchaeum, two representatives of the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group (Bathyarchaeota), and a Korarchaeum-related lineage. The maturation of cultivation-independent genomics approaches, as well as future developments in next-generation sequencing technologies, will revolutionize our current view of microbial evolution and diversity, and provide profound new insights into the early evolution of life, including the enigmatic origin of the eukaryotic cell. PMID:26323759

  4. Short AntiMicrobial Peptides (SAMPs) as a class of extraordinary promising therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Suhas; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G; de la Torre, Beatriz G; Albericio, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    The emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria has a direct impact on global public health because of the reduced potency of existing antibiotics against pathogens. Hence, there is a pressing need for new drugs with different modes of action that can kill microorganisms. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) can be regarded as an alternative tool for this purpose because they are proven to have therapeutic effects with broad-spectrum activities. There are some hurdles in using AMPs as clinical candidates such as toxicity, lack of stability and high budgets required for manufacturing. This can be overcome by developing shorter and more easily accessible AMPs, the so-called Short AntiMicrobial Peptides (SAMPs) that contain between two and ten amino acid residues. These are emerging as an attractive class of therapeutic agents with high potential for clinical use and possessing multifunctional activities. In this review we attempted to compile those SAMPs that have exhibited biological properties which are believed to hold promise for the future. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27352996

  5. Exploring microbial dark matter to resolve the deep archaeal ancestry of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Saw, Jimmy H; Spang, Anja; Zaremba-Niedzwiedzka, Katarzyna; Juzokaite, Lina; Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Murugapiran, Senthil K; Colman, Dan R; Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina; Hedlund, Brian P; Guy, Lionel; Ettema, Thijs J G

    2015-09-26

    The origin of eukaryotes represents an enigmatic puzzle, which is still lacking a number of essential pieces. Whereas it is currently accepted that the process of eukaryogenesis involved an interplay between a host cell and an alphaproteobacterial endosymbiont, we currently lack detailed information regarding the identity and nature of these players. A number of studies have provided increasing support for the emergence of the eukaryotic host cell from within the archaeal domain of life, displaying a specific affiliation with the archaeal TACK superphylum. Recent studies have shown that genomic exploration of yet-uncultivated archaea, the so-called archaeal 'dark matter', is able to provide unprecedented insights into the process of eukaryogenesis. Here, we provide an overview of state-of-the-art cultivation-independent approaches, and demonstrate how these methods were used to obtain draft genome sequences of several novel members of the TACK superphylum, including Lokiarchaeum, two representatives of the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group (Bathyarchaeota), and a Korarchaeum-related lineage. The maturation of cultivation-independent genomics approaches, as well as future developments in next-generation sequencing technologies, will revolutionize our current view of microbial evolution and diversity, and provide profound new insights into the early evolution of life, including the enigmatic origin of the eukaryotic cell.

  6. Exploring microbial dark matter to resolve the deep archaeal ancestry of eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Saw, Jimmy H.; Spang, Anja; Zaremba-Niedzwiedzka, Katarzyna; Juzokaite, Lina; Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Murugapiran, Senthil K.; Colman, Dan R.; Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina; Hedlund, Brian P.; Guy, Lionel; Ettema, Thijs J. G.

    2015-01-01

    The origin of eukaryotes represents an enigmatic puzzle, which is still lacking a number of essential pieces. Whereas it is currently accepted that the process of eukaryogenesis involved an interplay between a host cell and an alphaproteobacterial endosymbiont, we currently lack detailed information regarding the identity and nature of these players. A number of studies have provided increasing support for the emergence of the eukaryotic host cell from within the archaeal domain of life, displaying a specific affiliation with the archaeal TACK superphylum. Recent studies have shown that genomic exploration of yet-uncultivated archaea, the so-called archaeal ‘dark matter’, is able to provide unprecedented insights into the process of eukaryogenesis. Here, we provide an overview of state-of-the-art cultivation-independent approaches, and demonstrate how these methods were used to obtain draft genome sequences of several novel members of the TACK superphylum, including Lokiarchaeum, two representatives of the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group (Bathyarchaeota), and a Korarchaeum-related lineage. The maturation of cultivation-independent genomics approaches, as well as future developments in next-generation sequencing technologies, will revolutionize our current view of microbial evolution and diversity, and provide profound new insights into the early evolution of life, including the enigmatic origin of the eukaryotic cell. PMID:26323759

  7. Organic Compounds in Produced Waters From Coalbed Methane Wells in the Powder River Basin, WY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orem, W.; Lerch, H.; Rice, C.; Tatu, C.

    2003-12-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) is a significant energy resource, accounting for about 7.5% of natural gas production in the USA. The Powder River Basin (PRB), WY is currently one of the most active CBM drilling sites in the USA. One aspect of concern in the exploitation of CBM resources is the large volumes of water recovered from wells along with the natural gas (so-called produced waters). CBM produced waters may contain coal-derived dissolved substances (inorganic and organic) of environmental concern, and a potential disposal problem for CBM producers. Studies of CBM produced water have mostly focused on inorganics. Dissolved organic compounds in CBM produced water may also present an environmental issue, but little information is available. As part of a larger study of the health and environmental effects of organic compounds derived from coal, we analyzed a number of produced water samples from CBM wells in the PRB, WY for dissolved organic substances. Our goals were results on coal-derived organic compounds in the environment to evaluate potential health and environmental impacts. In 2001, we sampled produced water from 13 CBM wells covering a broad area of the PRB in order to identify and quantify the organic compounds present. In 2002, produced water from 4 of the 2001 CBM wells and 8 new CBM wells were sampled for dissolved organic components. Produced water was collected directly from each well and filtered on site. Organic compounds were isolated from produced water samples by liquid/liquid extraction with methylene chloride and identified and quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Organic compounds identified by GC/MS in extracts of the produced water samples, included: phenols, biphenyls, N-, O-, and S-containing heterocyclic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalates, aliphatic hydrocarbons, and fatty acids. However, most compounds had structures unidentified by GC/MS databases. Many of the identified organic compounds

  8. Molecular ecology of microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Henk; Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; Stal, Lucas J

    2014-11-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are ideal model systems for ecological and evolutionary analysis of highly diverse microbial communities. Microbial mats are small-scale, nearly closed, and self-sustaining benthic ecosystems that comprise the major element cycles, trophic levels, and food webs. The steep and fluctuating physicochemical microgradients, that are the result of the ever changing environmental conditions and of the microorganisms' own activities, give rise to a plethora of potential niches resulting in the formation of one of the most diverse microbial ecosystems known to date. For several decades, microbial mats have been studied extensively and more recently molecular biological techniques have been introduced that allowed assessing and investigating the diversity and functioning of these systems. These investigations also involved metagenomics analyses using high-throughput DNA and RNA sequencing. Here, we summarize some of the latest developments in metagenomic analysis of three representative phototrophic microbial mat types (coastal, hot spring, and hypersaline). We also present a comparison of the available metagenomic data sets from mats emphasizing the major differences between them as well as elucidating the overlap in overall community composition. PMID:25109247

  9. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect

    D. Jolley

    2000-11-09

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses.

  10. Molecular ecology of microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Henk; Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; Stal, Lucas J

    2014-11-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are ideal model systems for ecological and evolutionary analysis of highly diverse microbial communities. Microbial mats are small-scale, nearly closed, and self-sustaining benthic ecosystems that comprise the major element cycles, trophic levels, and food webs. The steep and fluctuating physicochemical microgradients, that are the result of the ever changing environmental conditions and of the microorganisms' own activities, give rise to a plethora of potential niches resulting in the formation of one of the most diverse microbial ecosystems known to date. For several decades, microbial mats have been studied extensively and more recently molecular biological techniques have been introduced that allowed assessing and investigating the diversity and functioning of these systems. These investigations also involved metagenomics analyses using high-throughput DNA and RNA sequencing. Here, we summarize some of the latest developments in metagenomic analysis of three representative phototrophic microbial mat types (coastal, hot spring, and hypersaline). We also present a comparison of the available metagenomic data sets from mats emphasizing the major differences between them as well as elucidating the overlap in overall community composition.

  11. Chaos and microbial systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kot, M.

    1990-07-01

    A recurrent theme of much recent research is that seemingly random fluctuations often occur as the result of simple deterministic mechanisms. Hence, much of the recent work in nonlinear dynamics has centered on new techniques for identifying order in seemingly chaotic systems. To determine the robustness of these techniques, chaos must, to some extent, be brought into the laboratory. Preliminary investigations of the forced double-Monod equations, a model for a predator and a prey in a chemostat with periodic variation in inflowing substrate concentration, suggest that simple microbial systems may provide the perfect framework for determining the efficacy and relevance of the new nonlinear dynamics in dealing with complex population dynamics. This research has two main goals, that is the mathematical analysis and computer simulation of the periodically forced double-Monod equations and of related models; and experimental (chemostat) population studies that evaluate the accuracy and generality of the models, and that judge the usefulness of various new techniques of nonlinear dynamics to the study of populations.

  12. Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory (AMML) 1971-1972 program involved the investigation of three separate life detection schemes. The first was a continued further development of the labeled release experiment. The possibility of chamber reuse without inbetween sterilization, to provide comparative biochemical information was tested. Findings show that individual substrates or concentrations of antimetabolites may be sequentially added to a single test chamber. The second detection system which was investigated for possible inclusion in the AMML package of assays, was nitrogen fixation as detected by acetylene reduction. Thirdly, a series of preliminary steps were taken to investigate the feasibility of detecting biopolymers in soil. A strategy for the safe return to Earth of a Mars sample prior to manned landings on Mars is outlined. The program assumes that the probability of indigenous life on Mars is unity and then broadly presents the procedures for acquisition and analysis of the Mars sample in a manner to satisfy the scientific community and the public that adequate safeguards are being taken.

  13. Microbial Production of Biovanillin

    PubMed Central

    Converti, A.; Aliakbarian, B.; Domínguez, J.M.; Bustos Vázquez, G.; Perego, P.

    2010-01-01

    This review aims at providing an overview on the microbial production of vanillin, a new alternative method for the production of this important flavor of the food industry, which has the potential to become economically competitive in the next future. After a brief description of the applications of vanillin in different industrial sectors and of its physicochemical properties, we described the traditional ways of providing vanillin, specifically extraction and chemical synthesis (mainly oxidation) and compared them with the new biotechnological options, i.e., biotransformations of caffeic acid, veratraldehyde and mainly ferulic acid. In the second part of the review, emphasis has been addressed to the factors most influencing the bioproduction of vanillin, specifically the age of inoculum, pH, temperature, type of co-substrate, as well as the inhibitory effects exerted either by excess substrate or product. The final part of the work summarized the downstream processes and the related unit operations involved in the recovery of vanillin from the bioconversion medium. PMID:24031526

  14. The microbial carbon pump: from genes to ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Nianzhi; Zheng, Qiang

    2011-11-01

    The majority of marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is resistant to biological degradation and thus can remain in the water column for thousands of years, constituting carbon sequestration in the ocean. To date the origin of such recalcitrant DOC (RDOC) is unclear. A recently proposed conceptual framework, the microbial carbon pump (MCP), emphasizes the microbial transformation of organic carbon from labile to recalcitrant states. The MCP is concerned with both microbial uptakes and outputs of DOC compounds, covering a wide range from gene to ecosystem levels. In this minireview, the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter is used as an example for the microbial processing of DOC at the genetic level. The compositions of the ABC transporter genes of the two major marine bacterial clades Roseobacter and SAR11 demonstrate that they have distinct patterns in DOC utilization: Roseobacter strains have the advantage of taking up carbohydrate DOC, while SAR11 bacteria prefer nitrogen-containing DOC. At the ecosystem level, bacterially derived RDOC based on d-amino acid biomarkers is reported to be responsible for about a quarter of the total marine RDOC pool. Under future global warming scenarios, partitioning of primary production into DOC could be enhanced, and thus the MCP could play an even more important role in carbon sequestration by the ocean. Joint efforts to study the MCP from multiple disciplines are required to obtain a better understanding of ocean carbon cycle and its coupling with global change.

  15. Simulated Carbon Cycling in a Model Microbial Mat.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, K. L.; Potter, C. S.

    2006-12-01

    We present here the novel addition of detailed organic carbon cycling to our model of a hypersaline microbial mat ecosystem. This ecosystem model, MBGC (Microbial BioGeoChemistry), simulates carbon fixation through oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis, and the release of C and electrons for microbial heterotrophs via cyanobacterial exudates and also via a pool of dead cells. Previously in MBGC, the organic portion of the carbon cycle was simplified into a black-box rate of accumulation of simple and complex organic compounds based on photosynthesis and mortality rates. We will discuss the novel inclusion of fermentation as a source of carbon and electrons for use in methanogenesis and sulfate reduction, and the influence of photorespiration on labile carbon exudation rates in cyanobacteria. We will also discuss the modeling of decomposition of dead cells and the ultimate release of inorganic carbon. The detailed modeling of organic carbon cycling is important to the accurate representation of inorganic carbon flux through the mat, as well as to accurate representation of growth models of the heterotrophs under different environmental conditions. Because the model ecosystem is an analog of ancient microbial mats that had huge impacts on the atmosphere of early earth, this MBGC can be useful as a biological component to either early earth models or models of other planets that potentially harbor life.

  16. Functional Potential of Soil Microbial Communities in the Maize Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jingbo; Li, Jiabao; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Yannarell, Anthony C.; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial communities in the rhizosphere make significant contributions to crop health and nutrient cycling. However, their ability to perform important biogeochemical processes remains uncharacterized. Here, we identified important functional genes that characterize the rhizosphere microbial community to understand metabolic capabilities in the maize rhizosphere using the GeoChip-based functional gene array method. Significant differences in functional gene structure were apparent between rhizosphere and bulk soil microbial communities. Approximately half of the detected gene families were significantly (p<0.05) increased in the rhizosphere. Based on the detected gyrB genes, Gammaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Cyanobacteria were most enriched in the rhizosphere compared to those in the bulk soil. The rhizosphere niche also supported greater functional diversity in catabolic pathways. The maize rhizosphere had significantly enriched genes involved in carbon fixation and degradation (especially for hemicelluloses, aromatics and lignin), nitrogen fixation, ammonification, denitrification, polyphosphate biosynthesis and degradation, sulfur reduction and oxidation. This research demonstrates that the maize rhizosphere is a hotspot of genes, mostly originating from dominant soil microbial groups such as Proteobacteria, providing functional capacity for the transformation of labile and recalcitrant organic C, N, P and S compounds. PMID:25383887

  17. Microbial Source Tracking: Current and Future Molecular Tools in Microbial Water Quality Forensics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current regulations in the United States stipulate that the microbial quality of waters used for consumption and recreational activities should be determined regularly by measuring microbial indicators of fecal pollution. Hence, the microbial risk associated with these waters is...

  18. Microbial processing of carbon in hydrothermal systems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaRowe, D.; Amend, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Microorganisms are known to be active in hydrothermal systems. They catalyze reactions that consume and produce carbon compounds as a result of their efforts to gain energy, grow and replace biomass. However, the rates of these processes, as well as the size of the active component of microbial populations, are poorly constrained in hydrothermal environments. In order to better characterize biogeochemical processes in these settings, a quantitative relationship between rates of microbial catalysis, energy supply and demand and population size is presented. Within this formulation, rates of biomass change are determined as a function of the proportion of catabolic power that is converted into biomass - either new microorganisms or the replacement of existing cell components - and the amount of energy that is required to synthesize biomass. The constraints that hydrothermal conditions place on power supply and demand are explicitly taken into account. The chemical composition, including the concentrations of organic compounds, of diffuse and focused flow hydrothermal fluids, hydrothermally influenced sediment pore water and fluids from the oceanic lithosphere are used in conjunction with cell count data and the model described above to constrain the rates of microbial processes that influence the carbon cycle in the Juan de Fuca hydrothermal system.

  19. Microbial communities in the deep subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, Lee R.

    The diversity of microbial populations and microbial communities within the earth's subsurface is summarized in this review. Scientists are currently exploring the subsurface and addressing questions of microbial diversity, the interactions among microorganisms, and mechanisms for maintenance of subsurface microbial communities. Heterotrophic anaerobic microbial communities exist in relatively permeable sandstone or sandy sediments, located adjacent to organic-rich deposits. These microorganisms appear to be maintained by the consumption of organic compounds derived from adjacent deposits. Sources of organic material serving as electron donors include lignite-rich Eocene sediments beneath the Texas coastal plain, organic-rich Cretaceous shales from the southwestern US, as well as Cretaceous clays containing organic materials and fermentative bacteria from the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Additionally, highly diverse microbial communities occur in regions where a source of organic matter is not apparent but where igneous rock is present. Examples include the basalt-rich subsurface of the Columbia River valley and the granitic subsurface regions of Sweden and Canada. These subsurface microbial communities appear to be maintained by the action of lithotrophic bacteria growing on H2 that is chemically generated within the subsurface. Other deep-dwelling microbial communities exist within the deep sediments of oceans. These systems often rely on anaerobic metabolism and sulfate reduction. Microbial colonization extends to the depths below which high temperatures limit the ability of microbes to survive. Energy sources for the organisms living in the oceanic subsurface may originate as oceanic sedimentary deposits. In this review, each of these microbial communities is discussed in detail with specific reference to their energy sources, their observed growth patterns, and their diverse composition. This information is critical to develop further understanding of subsurface

  20. Growth-inhibitory activity of natural and synthetic isothiocyanates against representative human microbial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Kurepina, Natalia; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Mustaev, Arkady

    2013-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to test the growth inhibition activity of isothiocyanates (ITC), defense compounds of plants, against common human microbial pathogens. Methods and Results In this study we have tested the growth inhibitory activity of a diverse collection of new and previously known representative ITC of various structural classes against pathogenic bacteria, fungi and molds by a serial dilution method. Generally, the compounds were more active against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi exhibiting species-specific bacteriostatic or bactericidal effect. The most active compounds inhibited the growth of both drug-susceptible and multi drug resistant (MDR) pathogens at micromolar concentrations. In the case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis some compounds were more active against MDR, rather than against susceptible strains. The average anti-microbial activity for some of new derivatives was significantly higher than previously reported for the most active ITC compounds. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) established for various classes of ITC with Bacillus cereus (model organism for B. anthracis) followed a distinct pattern, thereby enabling prediction of new more efficient inhibitors. Remarkably, tested bacteria failed to develop resistance to ITC. While effectively inhibiting microbial growth, ITCs displayed moderate toxicity towards eukaryotic cells. Conclusions High antimicrobial activity coupled with moderate toxicity grants further thorough studies of the ITC compounds aimed at elucidation of their cellular targets and inhibitory mechanism. Significance and impact of the study This systematic study identified new ITC compounds highly active against common human microbial pathogens at the concentrations comparable with those for currently used antimicrobial drugs (e.g. rifampicin, fluconazole). Tested representative pathogens do not develop resistance to the inhibitors. These properties justify further evaluation of ITC compounds as potential

  1. High-Up: A Remote Reservoir of Microbial Extremophiles in Central Andean Wetlands.

    PubMed

    Albarracín, Virginia H; Kurth, Daniel; Ordoñez, Omar F; Belfiore, Carolina; Luccini, Eduardo; Salum, Graciela M; Piacentini, Ruben D; Farías, María E

    2015-01-01

    The Central Andes region displays unexplored ecosystems of shallow lakes and salt flats at mean altitudes of 3700 m. Being isolated and hostile, these so-called "High-Altitude Andean Lakes" (HAAL) are pristine and have been exposed to little human influence. HAAL proved to be a rich source of microbes showing interesting adaptations to life in extreme settings (poly-extremophiles) such as alkalinity, high concentrations of arsenic and dissolved salts, intense dryness, large daily ambient thermal amplitude, and extreme solar radiation levels. This work reviews HAAL microbiodiversity, taking into account different microbial niches, such as plankton, benthos, microbial mats and microbialites. The modern stromatolites and other microbialites discovered recently at HAAL are highlighted, as they provide unique modern-though quite imperfect-analogs of environments proxy for an earlier time in Earth's history (volcanic setting and profuse hydrothermal activity, low atmospheric O2 pressure, thin ozone layer and high UV exposure). Likewise, we stress the importance of HAAL microbes as model poly-extremophiles in the study of the molecular mechanisms underlying their resistance ability against UV and toxic or deleterious chemicals using genome mining and functional genomics. In future research directions, it will be necessary to exploit the full potential of HAAL poly-extremophiles in terms of their biotechnological applications. Current projects heading this way have yielded detailed molecular information and functional proof on novel extremoenzymes: i.e., DNA repair enzymes and arsenic efflux pumps for which medical and bioremediation applications, respectively, are envisaged. But still, much effort is required to unravel novel functions for this and other molecules that dwell in a unique biological treasure despite its being hidden high up, in the remote Andes. PMID:26733008

  2. High-Up: A Remote Reservoir of Microbial Extremophiles in Central Andean Wetlands.

    PubMed

    Albarracín, Virginia H; Kurth, Daniel; Ordoñez, Omar F; Belfiore, Carolina; Luccini, Eduardo; Salum, Graciela M; Piacentini, Ruben D; Farías, María E

    2015-01-01

    The Central Andes region displays unexplored ecosystems of shallow lakes and salt flats at mean altitudes of 3700 m. Being isolated and hostile, these so-called "High-Altitude Andean Lakes" (HAAL) are pristine and have been exposed to little human influence. HAAL proved to be a rich source of microbes showing interesting adaptations to life in extreme settings (poly-extremophiles) such as alkalinity, high concentrations of arsenic and dissolved salts, intense dryness, large daily ambient thermal amplitude, and extreme solar radiation levels. This work reviews HAAL microbiodiversity, taking into account different microbial niches, such as plankton, benthos, microbial mats and microbialites. The modern stromatolites and other microbialites discovered recently at HAAL are highlighted, as they provide unique modern-though quite imperfect-analogs of environments proxy for an earlier time in Earth's history (volcanic setting and profuse hydrothermal activity, low atmospheric O2 pressure, thin ozone layer and high UV exposure). Likewise, we stress the importance of HAAL microbes as model poly-extremophiles in the study of the molecular mechanisms underlying their resistance ability against UV and toxic or deleterious chemicals using genome mining and functional genomics. In future research directions, it will be necessary to exploit the full potential of HAAL poly-extremophiles in terms of their biotechnological applications. Current projects heading this way have yielded detailed molecular information and functional proof on novel extremoenzymes: i.e., DNA repair enzymes and arsenic efflux pumps for which medical and bioremediation applications, respectively, are envisaged. But still, much effort is required to unravel novel functions for this and other molecules that dwell in a unique biological treasure despite its being hidden high up, in the remote Andes.

  3. High-Up: A Remote Reservoir of Microbial Extremophiles in Central Andean Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Albarracín, Virginia H.; Kurth, Daniel; Ordoñez, Omar F.; Belfiore, Carolina; Luccini, Eduardo; Salum, Graciela M.; Piacentini, Ruben D.; Farías, María E.

    2015-01-01

    The Central Andes region displays unexplored ecosystems of shallow lakes and salt flats at mean altitudes of 3700 m. Being isolated and hostile, these so-called “High-Altitude Andean Lakes” (HAAL) are pristine and have been exposed to little human influence. HAAL proved to be a rich source of microbes showing interesting adaptations to life in extreme settings (poly-extremophiles) such as alkalinity, high concentrations of arsenic and dissolved salts, intense dryness, large daily ambient thermal amplitude, and extreme solar radiation levels. This work reviews HAAL microbiodiversity, taking into account different microbial niches, such as plankton, benthos, microbial mats and microbialites. The modern stromatolites and other microbialites discovered recently at HAAL are highlighted, as they provide unique modern—though quite imperfect—analogs of environments proxy for an earlier time in Earth's history (volcanic setting and profuse hydrothermal activity, low atmospheric O2 pressure, thin ozone layer and high UV exposure). Likewise, we stress the importance of HAAL microbes as model poly-extremophiles in the study of the molecular mechanisms underlying their resistance ability against UV and toxic or deleterious chemicals using genome mining and functional genomics. In future research directions, it will be necessary to exploit the full potential of HAAL poly-extremophiles in terms of their biotechnological applications. Current projects heading this way have yielded detailed molecular information and functional proof on novel extremoenzymes: i.e., DNA repair enzymes and arsenic efflux pumps for which medical and bioremediation applications, respectively, are envisaged. But still, much effort is required to unravel novel functions for this and other molecules that dwell in a unique biological treasure despite its being hidden high up, in the remote Andes. PMID:26733008

  4. Ecotoxicology of organofluorous compounds.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Margaret B; Loi, Eva I H; Kwok, Karen Y; Lam, Paul K S

    2012-01-01

    Organofluorous compounds have been developed for myriad purposes in a variety of fields, including manufacturing, industry, agriculture, and medicine. The widespread use and application of these compounds has led to increasing concern about their potential ecological toxicity, particularly because of the stability of the C-F bond, which can result in chemical persistence in the environment. This chapter reviews the chemical properties and ecotoxicology of four groups of organofluorous compounds: fluorinated refrigerants and propellants, per- and polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs), fluorinated pesticides, and fluoroquinolone antibiotics. These groups vary in their environmental fate and partitioning, but each raises concern in terms of ecological risk on both the regional and global scale, particularly those compounds with long environmental half-lives. Further research on the occurrence and toxicities of many of these compounds is needed for a more comprehensive understanding of their ecological effects.

  5. XAFS Model Compound Library

    DOE Data Explorer

    Newville, Matthew

    The XAFS Model Compound Library contains XAFS data on model compounds. The term "model" compounds refers to compounds of homogeneous and well-known crystallographic or molecular structure. Each data file in this library has an associated atoms.inp file that can be converted to a feff.inp file using the program ATOMS. (See the related Searchable Atoms.inp Archive at http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/adb/) This Library exists because XAFS data on model compounds is useful for several reasons, including comparing to unknown data for "fingerprinting" and testing calculations and analysis methods. The collection here is currently limited, but is growing. The focus to date has been on inorganic compounds and minerals of interest to the geochemical community. [Copied, with editing, from http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/ModelLib/

  6. Recalcitrant Carbonaceous Material: A Source of Electron Donors for Anaerobic Microbial Metabolisms in the Subsurface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, S. L.; Montgomery, W.; Sephton, M. A.; Cockell, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    More than 90% of organic material on Earth resides in sedimentary rocks in the form of kerogens; fossilized organic matter formed through selective preservation of high molecular weight biopolymers under anoxic conditions. Despite its prevalence in the subsurface, the extent to which this material supports microbial metabolisms is unknown. Whilst aerobic microorganisms are known to derive energy from kerogens within shales, utilization in anaerobic microbial metabolisms that proliferate in the terrestrial subsurface, such as microbial iron reduction, has yet to be demonstrated. Data are presented from microbial growth experiments in which kerogens and shales were supplied as the sole electron donor source for microbial iron reduction by an enrichment culture. Four well-characterized kerogens samples (representative of Types I-IV, classified by starting material), and two shale samples, were assessed. Organic analysis was carried out to investigate major compound classes present in each starting material. Parallel experiments were conducted to test inhibition of microbial iron reduction in the presence of each material when the culture was supplied with a full redox couple. The results demonstrate that iron-reducing microorganisms in this culture were unable to use kerogens and shales as a source of electron donors for energy acquisition, despite the presence of compound classes known to support this metabolism. Furthermore, the presence of these materials was found to inhibit microbial iron reduction to varying degrees, with some samples leading to complete inhibition. These results suggest that recalcitrant carbonaceous material in the terrestrial subsurface is not available for microbial iron reduction and similar metabolisms, such as sulphate-reduction. Further research is needed to investigate the inhibition exerted by these materials, and to assess whether these findings apply to other microbial consortia. These results may have significant implications for

  7. Degradation potential and microbial community structure of heavy oil-enriched microbial consortia from mangrove sediments in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Bacosa, Hernando P; Suto, Koichi; Inoue, Chihiro

    2013-01-01

    Mangroves constitute valuable coastal resources that are vulnerable to oil pollution. One of the major processes to remove oil from contaminated mangrove sediment is microbial degradation. A study on heavy oil- and hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial consortia from mangrove sediments in Okinawa, Japan was performed to evaluate their capacity to biodegrade and their microbial community composition. Surface sediment samples were obtained from mangrove sites in Okinawa (Teima, Oura, and Okukubi) and enriched with heavy oil as the sole carbon and energy source. The results revealed that all enriched microbial consortia degraded more than 20% of heavy oil in 21 days. The K1 consortium from Okukubi site showed the most extensive degradative capacity after 7 and 21 days. All consortia degraded more than 50% of hexadecane but had little ability to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The consortia were dominated by Pseudomonas or Burkholderia. When incubated in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds, the active bacterial community shifted to favor the dominance of Pseudomonas. The K1 consortium was a superior degrader, demonstrating the highest ability to degrade aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon compounds; it was even able to degrade heavy oil at a concentration of 15%(w/v). The dominance and turn-over of Pseudomonas and Burkholderia in the consortia suggest an important ecological role for and relationship between these two genera in the mangrove sediments of Okinawa.

  8. Preparation of uranium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

    2013-02-19

    UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

  9. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions or the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Injection of nutrient stimulates the growth and metabolism of reservoir bacteria, which produces beneficial products to enhance oil recovery. Sometimes, chemical treatments are used to clean or condition injection water. Such a chemical treatment has been initiated by Sullivan and Company at the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit. The unit injection water was treated with a mixture of water, methanol, isopropyl alcohol, and three proprietary chemicals. To determine if the chemicals would have an impact on the pilot, it was important to determine the effects of the chemical additives on the growth and metabolism of the bacteria from wells in this field. Two types of media were used: a mineral salts medium with molasses and nitrate, and this medium with 25 ppm of the treatment chemicals added. Samples were collected anaerobically from each of two wells, 1A-9 and 7-2. A sample from each well was inoculated and cultured in the broth tubes of molasses-nitrate medium with and without the chemicals. Culturing temperature was 35{degrees}C. Absorbance, pressure and cell number were checked to determine if the chemicals affected the growth and metabolism of bacteria in the brine samples. 12 figs.

  10. [Microbial geochemical calcium cycle].

    PubMed

    Zavarzin, G A

    2002-01-01

    The participation of microorganisms in the geochemical calcium cycle is the most important factor maintaining neutral conditions on the Earth. This cycle has profound influence on the fate of inorganic carbon, and, thereby, on the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. The major part of calcium deposits was formed in the Precambrian, when prokaryotic biosphere predominated. After that, calcium recycling based on biogenic deposition by skeletal organisms became the main process. Among prokaryotes, only a few representatives, e.g., cyanobacteria, exhibit a special calcium function. The geochemical calcium cycle is made possible by the universal features of bacteria involved in biologically mediated reactions and is determined by the activities of microbial communities. In the prokaryotic system, the calcium cycle begins with the leaching of igneous rock predominantly through the action of the community of organotrophic organisms. The release of carbon dioxide to the soil air by organotrophic aerobes leads to leaching with carbonic acid and soda salinization. Under anoxic conditions, of major importance is the organic acid production by primary anaerobes (fermentative microorganisms). Calcium carbonate is precipitated by secondary anaerobes (sulfate reducers) and to a smaller degree by methanogens. The role of the cyanobacterial community in carbonate deposition is exposed by stromatolites, which are the most common organo-sedimentary Precambrian structures. Deposition of carbonates in cyanobacterial mats as a consequence of photoassimilation of CO2 does not appear to be a significant process. It is argued that carbonates were deposited at the boundary between the "soda continent", which emerged as a result of subaerial leaching with carbonic acid, and the ocean containing Ca2+. Such ecotones provided favorable conditions for the development of the benthic cyanobacterial community, which was a precursor of stromatolites.

  11. Nitrodifluoraminoterphenyl compounds and processes

    DOEpatents

    Lerom, M.W.; Peters, H.M.

    1975-07-08

    This patent relates to the nitrodifluoraminoterphenyl compounds: 3,3''-bis (difluoramino)-2,2'' 4,4', 4'',6,6',6''-octanitro-m-terphenyl (DDONT) and 3,3''-bis(difluoramino)-2,2',2''4,4',4'',6,6',6''-nonanitro-m-terphenyl (DDNONA). Procedures are described wherein diamino precursors of the indicated compounds are prepared and the final compounds are obtained by a fluorination operation. The compounds are highly energetic and suitable for use as explosives and particularly in exploding bridge wire (EBW) detonators. (auth)

  12. Metabolic fingerprint of dimethyl sulfone (DMSO2) in microbial-mammalian co-metabolism.

    PubMed

    He, Xuan; Slupsky, Carolyn M

    2014-12-01

    There is growing awareness that intestinal microbiota alters the energy harvesting capacity of the host and regulates metabolism. It has been postulated that intestinal microbiota are able to degrade unabsorbed dietary components and transform xenobiotic compounds. The resulting microbial metabolites derived from the gastrointestinal tract can potentially enter the circulation system, which, in turn, affects host metabolism. Yet, the metabolic capacity of intestinal microbiota and its interaction with mammalian metabolism remains largely unexplored. Here, we review a metabolic pathway that integrates the microbial catabolism of methionine with mammalian metabolism of methanethiol (MT), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), which together provide evidence that supports the microbial origin of dimethyl sulfone (DMSO2) in the human metabolome. Understanding the pathway of DMSO2 co-metabolism expends our knowledge of microbial-derived metabolites and motivates future metabolomics-based studies on ascertaining the metabolic consequences of intestinal microbiota on human health, including detoxification processes and sulfur xenobiotic metabolism.

  13. The contribution of microbial mats to the arsenic geochemistry of an ancient gold mine.

    PubMed

    Drewniak, Lukasz; Maryan, Natalia; Lewandowski, Wiktor; Kaczanowski, Szymon; Sklodowska, Aleksandra

    2012-03-01

    The ancient Zloty Stok (SW Poland) gold mine is such an environment, where different microbial communities, able to utilize inorganic arsenic species As(III) and As(V), are found. The purpose of the present study was to (i) estimate prokaryotic diversity in the microbial mats in bottom sediments of this gold mine, (ii) identify microorganisms that can metabolize arsenic, and (iii) estimate their potential role in the arsenic geochemistry of the mine and in the environment. The oxidation/reduction experiments showed that the microbial mat community may significantly contribute to arsenic contamination in groundwater. The presence of both arsenite oxidizing and dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria in the mat was confirmed by the detection of arsenite oxidase and dissimilatory arsenate reductase genes, respectively. This work also demonstrated that microorganisms utilizing other compounds that naturally co-occur with arsenic are present within the microbial mat community and may contribute to the arsenic geochemistry in the environment.

  14. Performance assessment of a submerged membrane bioreactor using a novel microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    Chon, Kangmin; Lee, Kyungpyo; Kim, In-Soo; Jang, Am

    2016-06-01

    The performance of a submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) with and without a novel microbial consortium (NMBR vs. CMBR) was compared to provide deeper insights into the effects of changes in water quality and dissolved organic matter (DOM) characteristics by a novel microbial consortium on the fouling characteristics of MBR processes. Despite similar operating conditions and identical DOM properties in the feed waters, NMBR exhibited a lower propensity to release polysaccharide-like compounds with low molecular weight by bacterial activities compared to CMBR. These compounds have a great fouling potential for MBR processes. Therefore, an increase in the transmembrane pressure (TMP) of NMBR (normalized TMP (TMP/TMP0): 1.14) was much slower and less significant than that observed in CMBR (TMP/TMP0: 2.61). These observations imply that the novel microbial consortium can efficiently mitigate membrane fouling by hydrophilic DOM in MBR processes.

  15. Bioremediation of PAHs and VOCs: Advances in clay mineral-microbial interaction.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Bhabananda; Sarkar, Binoy; Rusmin, Ruhaida; Naidu, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    Bioremediation is an effective strategy for cleaning up organic contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Advanced bioremediation implies that biotic agents are more efficient in degrading the contaminants completely. Bioremediation by microbial degradation is often employed and to make this process efficient, natural and cost-effective materials can serve as supportive matrices. Clay/modified clay minerals are effective adsorbents of PAHs/VOCs, and readily available substrate and habitat for microorganisms in the natural soil and sediment. However, the mechanism underpinning clay-mediated biodegradation of organic compounds is often unclear, and this requires critical investigation. This review describes the role of clay/modified clay minerals in hydrocarbon bioremediation through interaction with microbial agents in specific scenarios. The vision is on a faster, more efficient and cost-effective bioremediation technique using clay-based products. This review also proposes future research directions in the field of clay modulated microbial degradation of hydrocarbons.

  16. Perspective for Aquaponic Systems: “Omic” Technologies for Microbial Community Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Munguia-Fragozo, Perla; Alatorre-Jacome, Oscar; Rico-Garcia, Enrique; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo; Cruz-Hernandez, Andres; Ocampo-Velazquez, Rosalia V.; Garcia-Trejo, Juan F.; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon G.

    2015-01-01

    Aquaponics is the combined production of aquaculture and hydroponics, connected by a water recirculation system. In this productive system, the microbial community is responsible for carrying out the nutrient dynamics between the components. The nutrimental transformations mainly consist in the transformation of chemical species from toxic compounds into available nutrients. In this particular field, the microbial research, the “Omic” technologies will allow a broader scope of studies about a current microbial profile inside aquaponics community, even in those species that currently are unculturable. This approach can also be useful to understand complex interactions of living components in the system. Until now, the analog studies were made to set up the microbial characterization on recirculation aquaculture systems (RAS). However, microbial community composition of aquaponics is still unknown. “Omic” technologies like metagenomic can help to reveal taxonomic diversity. The perspectives are also to begin the first attempts to sketch the functional diversity inside aquaponic systems and its ecological relationships. The knowledge of the emergent properties inside the microbial community, as well as the understanding of the biosynthesis pathways, can derive in future biotechnological applications. Thus, the aim of this review is to show potential applications of current “Omic” tools to characterize the microbial community in aquaponic systems. PMID:26509157

  17. Carbon input increases microbial nitrogen demand, but not microbial nitrogen mining in boreal forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Birgit; Alaei, Saeed; Bengtson, Per; Bodé, Samuel; Boeckx, Pascal; Schnecker, Jörg; Mayerhofer, Werner; Rütting, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    Plant primary production at mid and high latitudes is often limited by low soil N availability. It has been hypothesized that plants can indirectly increase soil N availability via root exudation, i.e., via the release of easily degradable organic compounds such as sugars into the soil. These compounds can stimulate microbial activity and extracellular enzyme synthesis, and thus promote soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition ("priming effect"). Even more, increased C availability in the rhizosphere might specifically stimulate the synthesis of enzymes targeting N-rich polymers such as proteins that store most of the soil N, but are too large for immediate uptake ("N mining"). This effect might be particularly important in boreal forests, where plants often maintain high primary production in spite of low soil N availability. We here tested the hypothesis that increased C availability promotes protein depolymerization, and thus soil N availability. In a laboratory incubation experiment, we added 13C-labeled glucose to a range of soil samples derived from boreal forests across Sweden, and monitored the release of CO2 by C mineralization, distinguishing between CO2 from the added glucose and from the native, unlabeled soil organic C (SOC). Using a set of 15N pool dilution assays, we further measured gross rates of protein depolymerization (the breakdown of proteins into amino acids) and N mineralization (the microbial release of excess N as ammonium). Comparing unamended control samples, we found a high variability in C and N mineralization rates, even when normalized by SOC content. Both C and N mineralization were significantly correlated to SOM C/N ratios, with high C mineralization at high C/N and high N mineralization at low C/N, suggesting that microorganisms adjusted C and N mineralization rates to the C/N ratio of their substrate and released C or N that was in excess. The addition of glucose significantly stimulated the mineralization of native SOC in soils

  18. Microbial ecology summer research program, June 20-August 26, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    The personnel, lecture topics, and summaries of research reports generated are presented. Research topics include: mutants of Escherichia coli affected in inducer exclusion; anaerobic chitin degradation; feeding relationships of harpacticoid copepods and microbial flora; degradation of ortho phenyl phenol by streptomycetes; biodegradation of dieldrin and aromatic compounds; the effect of neurotoxins on chemotaxis is Spirochaeta aurantia; chemotaxis and algal attachment of caulobacter; pigment formation in Lyngbya aestuari; diel movements of bacteria in a salt marsh; chemotaxis in S. Aurantia; isolation of marine toluate-oxidizing bacteria; growth inhibition of enteric bacteria by methyl-..cap alpha..-D-glucoside; studies of magnetic bacteria in brackish waters; and mechanisms of interaction between two microbial populations in activated sludge. (ACR)

  19. Metabolic engineering of microbial competitive advantage for industrial fermentation processes.

    PubMed

    Shaw, A Joe; Lam, Felix H; Hamilton, Maureen; Consiglio, Andrew; MacEwen, Kyle; Brevnova, Elena E; Greenhagen, Emily; LaTouf, W Greg; South, Colin R; van Dijken, Hans; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-08-01

    Microbial contamination is an obstacle to widespread production of advanced biofuels and chemicals. Current practices such as process sterilization or antibiotic dosage carry excess costs or encourage the development of antibiotic resistance. We engineered Escherichia coli to assimilate melamine, a xenobiotic compound containing nitrogen. After adaptive laboratory evolution to improve pathway efficiency, the engineered strain rapidly outcompeted a control strain when melamine was supplied as the nitrogen source. We additionally engineered the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica to assimilate nitrogen from cyanamide and phosphorus from potassium phosphite, and they outcompeted contaminating strains in several low-cost feedstocks. Supplying essential growth nutrients through xenobiotic or ecologically rare chemicals provides microbial competitive advantage with minimal external risks, given that engineered biocatalysts only have improved fitness within the customized fermentation environment.

  20. Ultrasonic intensification as a tool for enhanced microbial biofuel yields.

    PubMed

    Naveena, Balakrishnan; Armshaw, Patricia; Tony Pembroke, J

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonication has recently received attention as a novel bioprocessing tool for process intensification in many areas of downstream processing. Ultrasonic intensification (periodic ultrasonic treatment during the fermentation process) can result in a more effective homogenization of biomass and faster energy and mass transfer to biomass over short time periods which can result in enhanced microbial growth. Ultrasonic intensification can allow the rapid selective extraction of specific biomass components and can enhance product yields which can be of economic benefit. This review focuses on the role of ultrasonication in the extraction and yield enhancement of compounds from various microbial sources, specifically algal and cyanobacterial biomass with a focus on the production of biofuels. The operating principles associated with the process of ultrasonication and the influence of various operating conditions including ultrasonic frequency, power intensity, ultrasonic duration, reactor designs and kinetics applied for ultrasonic intensification are also described.