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Sample records for compounds voc emitted

  1. [Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from furniture and electrical appliances].

    PubMed

    Tanaka-Kagawa, Toshiko; Jinno, Hideto; Furukawa, Yoko; Nishimura, Tetsuji

    2010-01-01

    Organic chemicals are widely used as ingredients in household products. Therefore, furniture and other household products as well as building products may influence the indoor air quality. This study was performed to estimate quantitatively influence of household products on indoor air quality. Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions were investigated for 10 products including furniture (chest, desk, dining table, sofa, cupboard) and electrical appliances (refrigerator, electric heater, desktop personal computer, liquid crystal display television and audio) by the large chamber test method (JIS A 1912) under the standard conditions of 28 degrees C, 50% relative humidity and 0.5 times/h ventilation. Emission rate of total VOC (TVOC) from the sofa showed the highest; over 7900 microg toluene-equivalent/unit/h. Relatively high TVOC emissions were observed also from desk and chest. Based on the emission rates, the impacts on the indoor TVOC were estimated by the simple model with a volume of 17.4 m3 and ventilation frequency of 0.5 times/h. The estimated TVOC increment for the sofa was 911 microg/m3, accounting for almost 230% of the provisional target value, 400 microg/m3. The values of estimated increment of toluene emitted from cupboard and styrene emitted from refrigerator were 10% and 16% of guideline values, respectively. These results revealed that VOC emissions from household products may influence significantly indoor air quality.

  2. Characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from a petroleum refinery in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Li, Guohao; Wang, Gang; Wang, Haiyan

    2014-06-01

    This study made a field VOCs (volatile organic compounds) measurement for a petroleum refinery in Beijing by determining 56 PAMS VOCs, which are demanded for photochemical assessment in US, and obtained the characteristics of VOCs emitted from the whole refinery and from its inner main devices. During the monitoring period, this refinery brought about an average increase of 61 ppbv in the ambient TVOCs (sum of the PAMS VOCs) at the refinery surrounding area, while the background of TVOCs there was only 10-30 ppbv. In chemical profile, the VOCs emitted from the whole refinery was characteristic by isobutane (8.7%), n-butane (7.9%), isopentane (6.3%), n-pentane (4.9%%), n-hexane (7.6%), C6 branched alkanes (6.0%), propene (12.7%), 1-butene (4.1%), benzene (7.8%), and toluene (5.9%). On the other hand, the measurement for the inner 5 devices, catalytic cracking units (CCU2 and CCU3), catalytic reforming unit (CRU), tank farm (TF), and wastewater treatment(WT), revealed the higher level of VOCs pollutions (about several hundred ppbv of TVOCs), and the individual differences in VOCs chemical profiles. Based on the measured speciated VOCs data at the surrounding downwind area, PMF receptor model was applied to identify the VOCs sources in the refinery. Then, coupling with the VOCs chemical profiles measured at the device areas, we concluded that CCU1/3 contributes to 25.9% of the TVOCs at the surrounding downwind area by volume, followed by CCU2 (24.7%), CRU (18.9%), TF (18.3%) and WT (12.0%), which was accordant with the research of US EPA (2008). Finally, ozone formation potentials of the 5 devices were also calculated by MIR technique, which showed that catalytic cracking units, accounting for about 55.6% to photochemical ozone formation, should be given the consideration of VOCs control firstly.

  3. [Evaluation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from household products by small chamber test method].

    PubMed

    Tanaka-Kagawa, Toshiko; Jinno, Hideto; Obama, Tomoko; Miyagawa, Makoto; Yoshikawa, Jun; Komatsu, Kazuhiro; Tokunaga, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Identification and removal/replacement of sources of indoor air pollutants, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and aldehydes, are most effective measures to reduce indoor chemical exposures. For instance, formaldehyde emissions from building materials have been successfully decreased by the restrictions on interior finishing materials under the amended Building Standard Low in Japan. This study was performed to estimate quantitatively influence of household products on indoor air quality. VOC emissions were investigated for 51 products including interior materials, bedclothes, stationeries, toys and printed matters by the small chamber test method (JIS A 1901) under the standard conditions of 28 degrees C, 50% relative humidity and 0.5 times/h ventilation. Total VOC (TVOC) emissions from the tablecloth and gloves, both of which were made of polyvinyl chloride, showed the highest emission rates; over 2000 microg/(m2 x h) after 1 day, and then rapidly decreased to less than 500 microg/(m2 x h) in a week. Among stationeries/toys for schoolchildren and infants, jigsaw puzzle and play mat exhibited higher TVOC emission rates (38 and 24 microg/(m2 x h) after 1 day, respectively). As for VOCs emitted from printed matters, high boiling-point compounds (higher than that of n-tridecane) were typically identified along with toluene, xylenes and ethylbenzene. These results revealed that VOC emissions from household products may influence significantly indoor air quality.

  4. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from materials collected from buildings affected by microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Claeson, A-S; Sandström, M; Sunesson, A-L

    2007-03-01

    In this study mould damaged materials, including carpet, concrete, gypsum board, insulation, plastic, sand and wood, from 20 different buildings with moisture problems were collected. To study emissions from these materials both conventional methods for sampling, such as collection on Tenax TA, were used as well as complementary methods for sampling a wider spectrum of compounds, such as more volatile VOCs, amines and aldehydes. Analysis was carried out using gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. Mass spectrometry was used for identification of compounds. Alcohols and ketones were almost exclusively emitted from the materials after they had been wet for a week. Acids were also emitted in large quantities from wet gypsum board and plastic. No primary or secondary amines could be identified, but two tertiary amines, trimethylamine and triethylamine, were emitted from sand contaminated by Bacillus. The most common moulds found were Penicillium and Aspergillus. A multivariate method (partial least squares, PLS) was used to investigate the emission patterns from the materials. Materials with bacterial growth had a different VOC profile to those with only mould growth.

  5. [Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from wood furniture--estimation of emission rate by passive flux sampler].

    PubMed

    Jinno, Hideto; Tanaka-Kagawa, Toshiko; Furuta, Mitsuko; Shibatsuji, Masayoshi; Nishimura, Tetsuji

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate aldehydes and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emission from furniture, which may cause hazardous influence on human being such as sick building/sick house syndrome. In this study, VOCs emitted from six kinds of wood furniture, including three set of dining tables and three beds, were analyzed by large chamber test method (JIS A 1911). Based on the emission rates of total VOCs (TVOC), the impacts on the indoor TVOC was estimated by the simulation model with volume of 20 m3 and ventilation frequency of 0.5 times/h. The estimated increment of formaldehyde were exceeded the guideline value (100 microg/m3) in one set of dining table and one bed. The estimated TVOC increment values were exceeded the provisional target value for indoor air (400 microg/m3) in two sets of dining tables and two beds. These results revealed that VOC emissions from wood furniture may influence significantly indoor air quality. Also, in this study, to establish the alternative method for large chamber test methods, emission rates from representative five areas of furniture unit were evaluated by passive sampling method using flux sampler and emission rate from full-sized furniture was predicted. Emission rates predicted by flux passive sampler were 10-106% (formaldehyde) and 8-141% (TVOC) of the data measured using large chamber test, respectively.

  6. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Volatile Organic Compounds' Impact on Indoor Air Quality On this page: Introduction Sources Health Effects Levels ...

  7. Are Some Fungal Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Mycotoxins?

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Joan W.; Inamdar, Arati A.

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are carbon-compounds that easily evaporate at room temperature. Toxins are biologically produced poisons; mycotoxins are those toxins produced by microscopic fungi. All fungi emit blends of VOCs; the qualitative and quantitative composition of these volatile blends varies with the species of fungus and the environmental situation in which the fungus is grown. These fungal VOCs, produced as mixtures of alcohols, aldehydes, acids, ethers, esters, ketones, terpenes, thiols and their derivatives, are responsible for the characteristic moldy odors associated with damp indoor spaces. There is increasing experimental evidence that some of these VOCs have toxic properties. Laboratory tests in mammalian tissue culture and Drosophila melanogaster have shown that many single VOCs, as well as mixtures of VOCs emitted by growing fungi, have toxic effects. This paper describes the pros and cons of categorizing toxigenic fungal VOCs as mycotoxins, uses genomic data to expand on the definition of mycotoxin, and summarizes some of the linguistic and other conventions that can create barriers to communication between the scientists who study VOCs and those who study toxins. We propose that “volatoxin” might be a useful term to describe biogenic volatile compounds with toxigenic properties. PMID:26402705

  8. Are Some Fungal Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Mycotoxins?

    PubMed

    Bennett, Joan W; Inamdar, Arati A

    2015-09-22

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are carbon-compounds that easily evaporate at room temperature. Toxins are biologically produced poisons; mycotoxins are those toxins produced by microscopic fungi. All fungi emit blends of VOCs; the qualitative and quantitative composition of these volatile blends varies with the species of fungus and the environmental situation in which the fungus is grown. These fungal VOCs, produced as mixtures of alcohols, aldehydes, acids, ethers, esters, ketones, terpenes, thiols and their derivatives, are responsible for the characteristic moldy odors associated with damp indoor spaces. There is increasing experimental evidence that some of these VOCs have toxic properties. Laboratory tests in mammalian tissue culture and Drosophila melanogaster have shown that many single VOCs, as well as mixtures of VOCs emitted by growing fungi, have toxic effects. This paper describes the pros and cons of categorizing toxigenic fungal VOCs as mycotoxins, uses genomic data to expand on the definition of mycotoxin, and summarizes some of the linguistic and other conventions that can create barriers to communication between the scientists who study VOCs and those who study toxins. We propose that "volatoxin" might be a useful term to describe biogenic volatile compounds with toxigenic properties.

  9. Emission characteristics of VOCs emitted from consumer and commercial products and their ozone formation potential.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Trieu-Vuong; Kim, Su-Yeon; Son, Youn-Suk; Choi, In-Young; Park, Seong-Ryong; Sunwoo, Young; Kim, Jo-Chun

    2015-06-01

    The characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from several consumer and commercial products (body wash, dishwashing detergent, air freshener, windshield washer fluid, lubricant, hair spray, and insecticide) were studied and compared. The spray products were found to emit the highest amount of VOCs (~96 wt%). In contrast, the body wash products showed the lowest VOC contents (~1.6 wt%). In the spray products, 21.6-96.4 % of the VOCs were propane, iso-butane, and n-butane, which are the components of liquefied petroleum gas. Monoterpene (C10H16) was the dominant component of the VOCs in the non-spray products (e.g., body wash, 53-88 %). In particular, methanol was present with the highest amount of VOCs in windshield washer fluid products. In terms of the number of carbon, the windshield washer fluids, lubricants, insecticides, and hair sprays comprised >95 % of the VOCs in the range C2-C5. The VOCs in the range C6-C10 were predominantly found in the body wash products. The dishwashing detergents and air fresheners contained diverse VOCs from C2 to C11. Besides comprising hazardous VOCs, VOCs from consumer products were also ozone precursors. The ozone formation potential of the consumer and commercial spray products was estimated to be higher than those of liquid and gel materials. In particular, the hair sprays showed the highest ozone formation potential.

  10. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOCS) CHAPTER 31.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The term "volatile organic compounds' (VOCs) was originally coined to refer, as a class, to carbon-containing chemicals that participate in photochemical reactions in the ambient (outdoor) are. The regulatory definition of VOCs used by the U.S. EPA is: Any compound of carbon, ex...

  11. [Study on the chemical compositions of VOCs emitted by cooking oils based on GC-MS].

    PubMed

    He, Wan-Qing; Nie, Lei; Tian, Gang; Li, Jing; Shao, Xia; Wang, Min-Yan

    2013-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are key precursors of ozone and secondary organic aerosols in air, and the differences in the compositions of VOCs lead to their different contribution to atmospheric reaction. Cooking oil fume is one of the important sources of atmospheric VOCs, and its chemical compositions are distinct under different conditions of oil types, food types, cooking methods and heating temperatures etc. In this study, the production of cooking oil fume was simulated by heating typical pure vegetable oils (peanut oil, sunflower oil, soybean oil, olive oil and blend oil) at different temperatures in beakers to investigate the chemical compositions of VOCs. The emitted VOCs were sampled with a Tenax adsorption tube and analyzed using GC-MS after thermal desorption. According to spectral library search and map analysis, using area normalized semi-quantitative method, preliminary qualitative and quantitative tests were conducted for the specific components of VOCs under different conditions.

  12. Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions during malting and beer manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Nigel B.; Costigan, Gavin T.; Swannell, Richard P. J.; Woodfield, Michael J.

    Estimates have been made of the amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released during different stages of beer manufacture. The estimates are based on recent measurements and plant specification data supplied by manufacturers. Data were obtained for three main manufacturing processes (malting, wort processing and fermentation) for three commercial beer types. Some data on the speciation of emitted compounds have been obtained. Based on these measurements, an estimate of the total unabated VOC emission. from the U.K. brewing industry was calculated as 3.5 kta -1, over 95% of which was generated during barley malting. This value does not include any correction for air pollution control.

  13. Study of the dispersion of VOCs emitted by a municipal solid waste landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiriac, Rodica; Carré, Jean; Perrodin, Yves; Vaillant, Hervé; Gasso, Santiago; Miele, Philippe

    The dispersion of VOCs emitted by a municipal solid waste landfill was studied for a period of over one year. Sixteen VOCs were monitored: linear alkanes from C 7 to C 11, BTEX, trimethylbenzene, trichlorethylene, tetrachlorethylene, α and β-pinenes, limonene. The analytical procedure was first comprised of static long-term sampling of about 2 months using radial diffusion Radiello tubes containing activated carbon, followed by extraction by solvent ( i.e. CS 2) and GC/MS analysis. The results were initially analysed on the basis of the total concentration of the quantified VOCs, then by examining the concentrations of certain selected compounds. The influence of different parameters such as operating conditions, meteorological conditions and site morphology was highlighted on the basis of total VOC concentrations. In order to study the VOC's dispersion more closely, 5 compounds were chosen: toluene, benzene, limonene, and the sum trichlorethylene + tetrachlorethylene, as a "marker", to verify the origin of the VOCs emitted. The results showed that the main source of VOCs is the open cell and lead to different hypotheses on interferences from neighbouring sources and to the proposal of solutions to limit the emission of VOCs and their dispersion. To our knowledge, this type of study has not been accomplished until this day.

  14. Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from PVC floor coverings.

    PubMed

    Wiglusz, R; Igielska, B; Sitko, E; Nikel, G; Jarnuszkiewicz, I

    1998-01-01

    In this study 29 PVC floor coverings were tested for emission of vinyl chloride (VC) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs). A study on the effect of higher temperature on emission of VOCs from newly manufactured PVC flooring was also carried out. The study was conducted in climatic chamber, according to Polish Standard PN-89/Z-04021. GC method was used for analyzing of the compounds emitted. VC was not emitted from any of the floorings tested. Other VOCs were emitted in different concentrations. The influence of temperature on emission was conducted at temperatures of 23 degrees C and 35 degrees C from 2 hrs up to 180 days after introduction of materials in the chamber. The increase of temperature caused increase of total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) emission during 24 hrs of experiment. Then the emission was comparable for both temperatures. After 9 days emission of identified and unidentified compounds (TVOC) showed a rapid decay and stayed on very low level during a few months. The study conducted showed that PVC floorings after 10 days of installation in the room should not be source of indoor air contamination.

  15. [Study on control and management for industrial volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Lin; Zhang, Guo-Ning; Nei, Lei; Wang, Yu-Fei; Hao, Zheng-Ping

    2011-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from industrial sources account for a large percent of total anthropogenic VOCs. In this paper, VOCs emission characterization, control technologies and management were discussed. VOCs from industrial emissions were characterized by high intensity, wide range and uneven distribution, which focused on Bejing-Tianjin Joint Belt, Shangdong Peninsula, Yangtze River Delta and the Pearl River Delta. The current technologies for VOCs treatment include adsorption, catalytic combustion, bio-degradation and others, which were applied in petrochemical, oil vapor recovery, shipbuilding, printing, pharmaceutical, feather manufacturing and so on. The scarcity of related regulations/standards plus ineffective supervision make the VOCs management difficult. Therefore, it is suggested that VOCs treatment be firstly performed from key areas and industries, and then carried out step by step. By establishing of actual reducing amount control system and more detailed VOCs emission standards and regulations, applying practical technologies together with demonstration projects, and setting up VOCs emission registration and classification-related-charge system, VOCs could be reduced effectively.

  16. Pollution profiles and health risk assessment of VOCs emitted during e-waste dismantling processes associated with different dismantling methods.

    PubMed

    An, Taicheng; Huang, Yong; Li, Guiying; He, Zhigui; Chen, Jiangyao; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2014-12-01

    Pollution profiles of typical volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted during dismantling of various printed circuit board assemblies (PCBAs) of e-wastes using different methods were comparatively investigated in the real e-waste dismantling workshops in South China in April 2013. Similar pollution profiles and concentrations of VOCs were observed between dismantling mobile phone and hard disk PCBAs by using electric blowers and between dismantling television and power supplier PCBAs using electric heating furnaces. Aromatic hydrocarbons (accounting for >60% of the sum of VOCs) were the dominant group during using electric blowers, while aromatic (accounting for >44% of the sum of VOCs) and halogenated hydrocarbons (accounting for >48% of the sum of VOCs) were the two dominant groups which contributed equally using electric heating furnaces. However, the distribution profiles of VOCs emitted during dismantling of televisions, hard disks and micro motors using rotary incinerators varied greatly, though aromatic hydrocarbons were still the dominant group. The combustion of e-wastes led to the most severe contamination of VOCs, with total VOCs (3.3×10(4) μg m(-3)) using rotary incinerators about 190, 180, 139, and 40 times higher than those using mechanical cutting, electric soldering iron, electric blower, and electric heating furnace, respectively. Both cancer and non-cancer risks existed for workers due to exposure to on-site emitted VOCs in all workshops especially in those using rotary incinerators according to the USEPA methodology, whereas only cancer risks existed in rotary incinerator workshops according to the American Conference of Industrial Hygienists methodology.

  17. Characterization of low-VOC latex paints: Volatile organic compound content, VOC and aldehyde emissions, and paint performance. Final report, January 1997--January 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Fortmann, R.; Lao, H.C.; Ng, A.; Roache, N.

    1999-04-01

    The report gives results of laboratory tests to evaluate commercially available latex paints advertised as `low-odor,` `low-VOC (volatile organic compound),` or `no-VOC.` Measurements were performed to quantify the total content of VOCs in the paints and to identify the predominant VOCs and aldehydes in the emissions following application to test substrates. The performance of the paints was evaluated and compared to that of commonly used conventional latex paints by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard methods that measured parameters such as scrubbability, cleanability, and hiding power. The report describes the paints that were tested, the test methods, and the experimental data. Results are presented that can be used to evaluate the low-odor/low-VOC paints as alternatives to conventional latex wall paints that contain and emit higher concentrations of VOCs.

  18. Gastrophysa polygoni herbivory on Rumex confertus: Single leaf VOC induction and dose dependent herbivore attraction/repellence to individual compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report large induction (> 65fold increases) of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from a single leaf of the invasive weed mossy sorrel, Rumex confertus Willd. (Polygonaceae), by herbivory of the dock leaf beetle, Gastrophysa polygoni L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). The R. confertus VOC ble...

  19. Biomass Burning Contributions to Ambient Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in the Harvest Season in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, R.; Xie, S.

    2015-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play a fundamental role in the tropospheric chemistry as key precursors of ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA), and many VOC species have an adverse impact on human health. Therefore, VOCs are of great concern. Biomass burning, which is recognized as an important source of VOCs in China, has a significant effect on air pollution and climate change. Recent studies have reported some source profiles of VOCs emitted from biomass burning in China, and emission inventories have also been developed to estimate the biomass burning emissions. Nevertheless, very little is known about the emission characteristics of biomass burning, nor its contributions to ambient VOCs. This work presents the results from a continuous measurement of 108 VOC compounds by an online GC-MS/FID system at a receptor site in Beijing from October 1-14, 2014. Several biomass burning plumes were identified by extremely high level of acetonitrile, which is an excellent signature of biomass burning. The emission ratios of six VOCs species relative to acetonitrile were determined by enhancement ratio method. The contributions of biomass burning to ambient VOCs were also explored. Results show that the mixing ratios of ambient VOCs in biomass burning days were over twice as that in non-burning days. And biomass burning accounted for 25.1% (benzene), 24.6% (toluene), 18.8% (acetone), 24.9% (MEK), 29.4% (MVK), and 18.2% (n-hexanal) of the ambient mixing ratios, respectively. PMF analysis indicated that the contributions of biomass burning to VOCs increased from 5.5% to 12.7% on average in biomass burning days, which revealed that the high level of ambient VOCs in Beijing during this period can be partly attributed to extensive biomass burning. Our study will be helpful to better understand biomass burning emissions in China, as well as to explore the contributions of biomass burning to haze formation in the harvest season.

  20. Catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad; Razzak, Shaikh A.; Hossain, Mohammad M.

    2016-09-01

    Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is one of the major contributors to air pollution. The main sources of VOCs are petroleum refineries, fuel combustions, chemical industries, decomposition in the biosphere and biomass, pharmaceutical plants, automobile industries, textile manufacturers, solvents processes, cleaning products, printing presses, insulating materials, office supplies, printers etc. The most common VOCs are halogenated compounds, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, aromatic compounds, and ethers. High concentrations of these VOCs can cause irritations, nausea, dizziness, and headaches. Some VOCs are also carcinogenic for both humans and animals. Therefore, it is crucial to minimize the emission of VOCs. Among the available technologies, the catalytic oxidation of VOCs is the most popular because of its versatility of handling a range of organic emissions under mild operating conditions. Due to that fact, there are numerous research initiatives focused on developing advanced technologies for the catalytic destruction of VOCs. This review discusses recent developments in catalytic systems for the destruction of VOCs. Review also describes various VOCs and their sources of emission, mechanisms of catalytic destruction, the causes of catalyst deactivation, and catalyst regeneration methods.

  1. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOC) RECOVERY SEMINAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the seminar was to bring researchers, technology developers, and industry representatives together to discuss recovery technologies and techniques for VOCs. The seminar focused on the specific VOC recovery needs of industry and on case studies that summarize effec...

  2. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Dairy Cows and Their Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, S.; Holzinger, R.; Mitloehner, F.; Goldstein, A.

    2005-12-01

    Biogenic VOCs are typically defined as those directly emitted from plants, but approximately 6% of global net primary production is consumed by cattle that carry out enteric fermentation and then emit VOCs that could also be considered biogenic. Current regulatory estimates suggest that dairy cattle in central California emit VOCs at rates comparable to those from passenger vehicles in the region, and thus contribute significantly to the extreme non-attainment of ozone standards there. We report PTR-MS measurements of ammonia and VOCs, and cavity-enhanced-absorption gas analyzer (Los Gatos Research, Inc.) measurements of CH4, emitted from dairy cattle in various stages of pregnancy/lactation and their waste. Experiments were conducted in chambers at UC Davis that simulate freestall cow housing conditions. CH4 fluxes ranged from 125-374 lb/cow/year. The compounds with the highest fluxes from '3 cows+waste' treatments were: ammonia (1-18), methanol (0-2.3), acetone+propanal (0.2-0.7), dimethylsulfide (0-0.4), and mass 109 (likely ID = p-cresol; 0-0.3) in lb/cow/year. Mass 60 (likely ID = trimethylamine) and acetic acid were also abundant. There were 10s of additional compounds with detectable, but small, emissions. A few compounds that were likely emitted (i.e. ethanol, formaldehyde, and dimethylamine) were not quantified by the PTR-MS. The total flux for all measured organic gases (TOG = CH4 + PTR-MS VOCs(including acetone+propanal)) averaged 246±45 lb/cow/year for '3 cows+waste' treatments, and was dominated by methane (>98%). TOG flux for 'waste only' treatments averaged 1.1±0.1 lb/cow/year, and was instead dominated by VOC (>84%). The PTR-MS VOCs as a percent of TOG (0.6±0.2%) emitted from '3 cows+waste' treatments in chamber conditions was a factor of 10 smaller than that currently estimated by the California Air Resources Board. In addition, the ozone forming potentials of the most abundant VOCs are only about 10% those of typical combustion or plant

  3. Leaf level emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from some Amazonian and Mediterranean plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracho-Nunez, A.; Knothe, N. M.; Welter, S.; Staudt, M.; Costa, W. R.; Liberato, M. A. R.; Piedade, M. T. F.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2012-11-01

    As volatile organic compounds (VOCs) significantly affect atmospheric chemistry (oxidative capacity) and physics (secondary organic aerosol formation and effects), emission inventories defining regional and global biogenic VOC emission strengths are important. The aim of this work was to achieve a description of VOC emissions from poorly described tropical vegetation to be compared with the quite well investigated and highly heterogeneous emissions from Mediterranean vegetation. For this task, common plant species of both ecosystems were investigated. Sixteen plant species from the Mediterranean area, which is known for its special diversity in VOC emitting plant species, were chosen. In contrast, little information is currently available regarding emissions of VOCs from tropical tree species at the leaf level. Twelve plant species from different environments of the Amazon basin, i.e. Terra firme, Várzea and Igapó, were screened for emission of VOCs at leaf level with a branch enclosure system. Analysis of the volatile organics was performed online by a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and offline by collection on adsorbent tubes and subsequent gas chromatographic analysis. Isoprene was quantitatively the most dominant compound emitted followed by monoterpenes, methanol and acetone. Most of the Mediterranean species emitted a variety of monoterpenes, whereas only five tropical species were monoterpene emitters exhibiting a quite conservative emission pattern (α-pinene > limonene > sabinene > β-pinene). Mediterranean plants showed additional emissions of sesquiterpenes, whereas in the case of plants from the Amazon region no sesquiterpenes were detected probably due to a lack of sensitivity in the measuring systems. On the other hand methanol emissions, an indicator of growth, were common in most of the tropical and Mediterranean species. A few species from both ecosystems showed acetone emissions. The observed heterogeneous emissions

  4. Real-time and online screening method for materials emitting volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Changhyuk; Sul, Yong Tae; Pui, David Y. H.

    2016-09-01

    In the semiconductor industry, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the cleanroom air work as airborne molecular contamination, which reduce the production yield of semiconductor chips by forming nanoparticles and haze on silicon wafers and photomasks under ultraviolet irradiation during photolithography processes. Even though VOCs in outdoor air are removed by gas filters, VOCs can be emitted from many kinds of materials used in cleanrooms, such as organic solvents and construction materials (e.g., adhesives, flame retardants and sealants), threatening the production of semiconductors. Therefore, finding new replacements that emit lower VOCs is now essential in the semiconductor industry. In this study, we developed a real-time and online method to screen materials for developing the replacements by converting VOCs into nanoparticles under soft X-ray irradiation. This screening method was applied to measure VOCs emitted from different kinds of organic solvents and adhesives. Our results showed good repeatability and high sensitivity for VOCs, which come from aromatic compounds, some alcohols and all tested adhesives (Super glue and cleanroom-use adhesives). In addition, the overall trend of measured VOCs from cleanroom-use adhesives was well matched with those measured by a commercial thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, which is a widely used off-line method for analyzing VOCs. Based on the results, this screening method can help accelerate the developing process for reducing VOCs in cleanrooms.

  5. Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from tropical plant species in India.

    PubMed

    Padhy, P K; Varshney, C K

    2005-06-01

    Foliar emission of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from common Indian plant species was measured. Dynamic flow enclosure technique was used and the gas samples were collected onto Tenax-GC/Carboseive cartridges. The Tenax-GC/Carboseive cartridges were attached to the thermal disorber sample injection system and the gas sample was analysed using gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionisation detection (FID). Fifty-one local plant species were screened, out of which 36 species were found to emit VOC (4 high emitter; 28 moderate emitter; and 4 low-emitter), while in the remaining 15 species no VOC emission was detected or the levels of emission were below detection limit (BDL). VOC emission was found to vary from one species to another. There was a marked seasonal and diurnal variation in VOC emission. The minimum and maximum VOC emission values were < 0.1 and 87 microgg(-1) dry leaf h(-1) in Ficus infectoria and Lantana camara respectively. Out of the 51 plant species studied, 13 species are reported here for the first time. Among the nine tree species (which were selected for detailed study), the highest average hourly emission (9.69+/-8.39 microgg(-1) dry leaf) was observed in Eucalyptus species and the minimum in Syzygium jambolanum (1.89+/-2.48 microgg(-1) dry leaf). An attempt has been made to compare VOC emission from different plant species between present study and the literature (tropical and other regions).

  6. Assessment of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in indooor parking facilities at Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristanto, Gabriel Andari

    This dissertation identified the types, magnitudes, sources, and assessed risk exposure of VOCs in different types of indoor parking facilities. VOCs are ones of major pollutants emitted from automobiles. The indoor parking facilities included were attached garages, grounds, and underground parking. Modification of method TO15 by EPA had been applied for identifying types and magnitudes of VOCs. Results of these identifications are presented. Eight most abundant VOCs could be identified in every sampling location with toluene as the most abundant compound followed by m,p-xylene, ethylbenzene and benzene. Compare to ground and underground parking, attached garages have the highest concentration of TVOCs. For sources identification, BTEX, m,p-xylene and benzene, and toluene and benzene ratios are calculated. BTEX ratios for ground and underground parking are similar compare to attached garage due to the similar pattern of driving speed and the content of gasoline fuel. On the other hand the ratios of m,p-xylene and benzene and toluene and benzene in attached garage are higher compare to the same ratios for ground and underground parking due to other significant contributor of VOCs such as solvent, household cleanings stored. Cancer and noncancer risk assessment were also calculated. Results showed that cancer and noncancer risk due human exposures to VOC in indoor parking facilities were relatively low. However the risk of the human exposure to VOCs from indoor parking facilities has to be considered as a part of total risks of VOC exposures on human during their daily activities. When people in Houston have already exposed to high VOC concentrations from outdoor environment activities such as traffic and refineries and petrochemical facilities, additional activities causing VOC exposures will add the risk significantly.

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF LOW-VOC LATEX PAINTS: VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND CONTENT, VOC AND ALDEHYDE EMISSIONS, AND PAINT PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of laboratory tests to evaluate commercially available latex paints advertised as "low-odor," "low-VOC (volatile organic compound)," or "no-VOC." Measurements were performed to quantify the total content of VOCs in the paints...

  8. [Estimation and forecast of volatile organic compounds emitted from paint uses in China].

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Shu-xiao; Hao, Ji-ming

    2009-10-15

    Based on the current consumptions and forecast consumptions of paints in China, using the volatile organic compounds (VOC) contents of paints calculated as emission factors, an emission inventory model was established to calculate provincial, sector-specific, and species-specific VOC emissions during 2005-2020. The results indicated that the VOC amount emitted from paint use was 1883 kt in 2005, of which aromatics, alcohol compounds, ester compounds, ether compounds and ketone compounds were the main species. The maximum incremental reactivity (MIR,O3/VOC) of VOC emitted in 2005 was about 3.6 g/kg, and the toxic VOC accounted for 31% of the total in weight. The VOC emissions would increase to 5673 kt in 2020 if there were no further control policies and actions taken. Therefore, it is essential to implement the VOC emission control from paint uses as soon as possible. Two control scenarios were developed to evaluate the potential of VOC emission reductions. In 2020, VOC emissions from paint uses might be controlled at 3 519 kt through the improvement of paints quality to the level of that in developed countries in 1990s and installation of waste gas treatment equipments in newly-built factories. VOC emissions could be further reduced to 2243 kt if the quality of decorative paint and wood paint would be improved to the current level of that in developed countries and all factories install waste gas treatment equipments. All these control measures also helpe to reduce the toxicity and atmospheric oxidation reactivity of VOC emissions.

  9. Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, K. F.; Lee, S. C.; Ho, W. K.; Blake, D. R.; Cheng, Y.; Li, Y. S.; Fung, K.; Louie, P. K. K.; Park, D.

    2009-06-01

    Vehicle emissions of VOCs were determined in summer and winter of 2003 at the Shing Mun Tunnel, Hong Kong. One hundred and ten VOCs were quantified in this study. The average concentration of the total measured VOCs at the inlet and outlet of the tunnel were 81 250 pptv and 117 850 pptv, respectively. Among the 110 compounds analyzed, ethene, ethyne and toluene were the most abundant species in the tunnel. The total measured VOC emission factors ranged from 67 mg veh-1 km-1 to 148 mg veh-1 km-1, with an average of 115 mg veh-1 km-1. The five most abundant VOCs observed in the tunnel were, in decreasing order, ethene, toluene, n-butane, propane and i-pentane. These five most abundant species contributed over 38% of the total measured VOCs emitted. The high propane and n-butane emissions were found to be associated with LPG-fueled taxi. And fair correlations were observed between marker species (ethene, i-pentane, n-nonane, BTEX) with fractions of gasoline-fueled or diesel-fueled vehicles. Moreover, ethene, ethyne, and propene are the key species that were abundant in the tunnel but not in gasoline vapors or LPG. In order to evaluate the ozone formation potential emissions in Hong Kong, the maximum increment reactivity is calculated. It was found that about 568 mg of O3 is induced by per vehicle per kilometer traveled. Among them, ethene, propene and toluene contribute most to the ozone-formation reactivity.

  10. Real time analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in centenarians.

    PubMed

    Mazzatenta, Andrea; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw; Di Giulio, Camillo

    2015-04-01

    Centenarians are a model to study human longevity and the physiological process of aging. A plethora of studies on this model show the complexity of the system. Laboratory studies fail to find a biomarker of senescence. The real time exhaled breath volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been suggested as a new biomarker to detect and monitor physiological processes in the respiratory system. VOCs exhaled by centenarians have not been studied in the general population and across-age-groups. In the present study we investigated, in real time, the breath properties and VOC exhaled content in healthy centenarians as compared with non-centenarian seniors and young healthy subjects. We found distinctly different breath pattern and distribution profiles of VOCs in the centenarians. Thus, the VOCs measurement allowed to discriminate the differences between the age-groups. We propose a VOCs fingerprint as a biomarker underlying the physiological mechanisms of aging and longevity. Longevity should be considered physiologically as a new phase of life, characteristic of the well adapted subject.

  11. Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, K. F.; Lee, S. C.; Ho, W. K.; Blake, D. R.; Cheng, Y.; Li, Y. S.; Ho, S. S. H.; Fung, K.; Louie, P. K. K.; Park, D.

    2009-10-01

    Vehicle emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were determined at the Shing Mun Tunnel, Hong Kong in summer and winter of 2003. One hundred and ten VOCs were quantified in this study. The average concentration of the total measured VOCs at the inlet and outlet of the tunnel were 81 250 pptv and 117 850 pptv, respectively. Among the 110 compounds, ethene, ethyne and toluene were the most abundant species in the tunnel. The total measured VOC emission factors ranged from 67 mg veh-1 km-1 to 148 mg veh-1 km-1, with an average of 115 mg veh-1 km-1. The five most abundant VOCs observed in the tunnel were, in decreasing order, ethene, toluene, n-butane, propane and i-pentane. These five most abundant species contributed over 38% of the total measured VOCs emitted. The high propane and n-butane emissions were found to be associated with liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)-fueled taxis. Fair correlations were observed between marker species (ethene, i-pentane, n-nonane, and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes - BTEX) with fractions of gasoline-fueled or diesel-fueled vehicles. Moreover, ethene, ethyne, and propene are the key species that were abundant in the tunnel but not in gasoline vapors or LPG. The ozone formation potential from the VOCs in Hong Kong was evaluated by the maximum increment reactivity (MIR). It was found to be 568 mg of ozone per vehicle per kilometer traveled. Among them, ethene, propene and toluene contribute most to the ozone-formation reactivity.

  12. Leaf level emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from some Amazonian and Mediterranean plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracho-Nunez, A.; Knothe, , N. M.; Welter, S.; Staudt, M.; Costa, W. R.; Liberato, M. A. R.; Piedade, M. T. F.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2013-09-01

    Emission inventories defining regional and global biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission strengths are needed to determine the impact of VOC on atmospheric chemistry (oxidative capacity) and physics (secondary organic aerosol formation and effects). The aim of this work was to contribute with measurements of tree species from the poorly described tropical vegetation in direct comparison with the quite well-investigated, highly heterogeneous emissions from Mediterranean vegetation. VOC emission from sixteen plant species from the Mediterranean area were compared with twelve plant species from different environments of the Amazon basin by an emission screening at leaf level using branch enclosures. Analysis of the volatile organics was performed online by a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and offline by collection on adsorbent tubes and subsequent gas chromatographic analysis. Isoprene was the most dominant compound emitted followed by monoterpenes, methanol and acetone. The average loss rates of VOC carbon in relation to the net CO2 assimilation were found below 4% and indicating normal unstressed plant behavior. Most of the Mediterranean species emitted a large variety of monoterpenes, whereas only five tropical species were identified as monoterpene emitters exhibiting a quite conservative emission pattern (α-pinene < limonene < sabinene < ß-pinene). Mediterranean plants showed additional emissions of sesquiterpenes. In the case of Amazonian plants no sesquiterpenes were detected. However, missing of sesquiterpenes may also be due to a lack of sensitivity of the measuring systems. Furthermore, our screening activities cover only 1% of tree species of such tropical areas as estimated based on recent biodiversity reports. Methanol emissions, an indicator of growth, were found to be common in most of the tropical and Mediterranean species. A few species from both ecosystems showed acetone emissions. The observed heterogeneous

  13. Measurements of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from wood stains using an electronic balance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.S.; Nong, G.; Shaw, C.Y.; Wang, J.

    1999-07-01

    An emissions test method using an electronic balance is introduced for measuring the TVOC emission rates of oil-based wood stains, with a detailed procedure for preparing test specimens. The emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from an artificial wood stain and an oil-based commercial wood stain were determined. Results showed that VOC emissions from both stains included a surface evaporation and an internal diffusion sub-process. With regard to time, the entire emission period could be divided into three periods: (1) an initial evaporation-controlled period that was characterized by a high and fast decaying emission rate, (2) a transition period (following the initial period) in which the emissions transited from an evaporation-controlled to an internal diffusion-controlled process, and (3) an internal diffusion-controlled period that was characterized by a low and slowly decaying emission rate. For the commercial wood stain tested, the length of the initial period was approximately three hours, and about 46% of the emittable VOC mass was emitted during this short period. The transition period was between 3 and 6.5 hours from the start of testing and only accounted for about 4% of VOC mass emitted. The rest (about 50%) of the VOC mass was emitted in the diffusion-controlled period over a long period of time. Comparison between the commercial wood stain and an artificial wood stain suggested that the pigments/solids in the wood stain had significant effect on the time scales and amount of mass emitted during each emission period. The presence of additional VOCs in the commercial wood stain might have also affected the emission profiles. These results are useful for developing better models for predicting the emission rates. The electronic balance method was also compared with those determined from the TVOC concentrations measured at the chamber exhaust (referred to as chamber method). Results show that the two methods agreed well with each

  14. [Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC): definition, classification and properties].

    PubMed

    Cicolella, A

    2008-02-01

    The term volatile organic compounds includes a wide variety of chemical substances with the common feature of being carbon compounds that are volatile at ambient temperature. They can be classified into different families defined by their chemical formulae, each of which possesses common properties, although there may be major differences in terms of toxicity. For that reason the effects of VOC on health have to be considered both in an individual way and also from a global viewpoint on account of their common toxic properties and the role they play in the formation of environmental photo-oxidative pollutants, both outdoors and indoors.

  15. Rapid leaf development drives the seasonal pattern of volatile organic compound (VOC) fluxes in a 'coppiced' bioenergy poplar plantation.

    PubMed

    Brilli, Federico; Gioli, Beniamino; Fares, Silvano; Terenzio, Zenone; Zona, Donatella; Gielen, Bert; Loreto, Francesco; Janssens, Ivan A; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2016-03-01

    Leaves of fast-growing, woody bioenergy crops often emit volatile organic compounds (VOC). Some reactive VOC (especially isoprene) play a key role in climate forcing and may negatively affect local air quality. We monitored the seasonal exchange of VOC using the eddy covariance technique in a 'coppiced' poplar plantation. The complex interactions of VOC fluxes with climatic and physiological variables were also explored by using an artificial neural network (Self Organizing Map). Isoprene and methanol were the most abundant VOC emitted by the plantation. Rapid development of the canopy (and thus of the leaf area index, LAI) was associated with high methanol emissions and high rates of gross primary production (GPP) since the beginning of the growing season, while the onset of isoprene emission was delayed. The highest emissions of isoprene, and of isoprene photo-oxidation products (Methyl Vinyl Ketone and Methacrolein, iox ), occurred on the hottest and sunniest days, when GPP and evapotranspiration were highest, and formaldehyde was significantly deposited. Canopy senescence enhanced the exchange of oxygenated VOC. The accuracy of methanol and isoprene emission simulations with the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature increased by applying a function to modify their basal emission factors, accounting for seasonality of GPP or LAI.

  16. Effect of a fungal infection on the profile of volatile organic compounds emitted by plant roots.

    PubMed

    Fiers, M; Lognay, G; Wathelet, J P; Fauconnier, M L; Jijakli, M H

    2012-01-01

    It is known since few years that the aerial and underground parts of the plants emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that can interact with other organisms of the environment. They are involved in the attraction of seed dispersers and pollinators, the repellence of enemies via direct or indirect mechanisms and the induction of defence systems in other parts of the same plant or in other plants in the vicinity (Dudareva et al., 2006). It has been shown previously that the VOCs spectrum emitted by plants hardly depends on their physiological state (Kant et al., 2009). However those phenomenons were poorly studied at the edaphic level. Thus, the Rhizovol project, a multidisciplinary project in Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech was set up to study the emissions of VOCs by plant roots and their interactions with other organisms of the rhizosphere. As a partner of this project, the Plant Pathology Unit of Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech chose to study the effect of a fungal infection on the profile of VOCs emitted by plant roots, based on three model organisms, barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), since it is a major crop in Belgium that can suffer a large range of aggressions, and two pathogenic fungi, Cochliobolus sativus and Fusarium culmorum, responsible for root and foot rots and seedling blight on cereals (Wiese, 1977). Later in the development, C. sativus produces elongate brown-black lesions (spot blotch) and F. culmorum induces head blight and produces mycotoxins that make the grain unsuitable for consumption (Nielsen et al., 2011). The objective of this work was to identify the VOCs emitted during the dual interactions between barley roots and a pathogenic fungus. The study was performed in two steps; first, the independent analyses of the VOCs emitted by each of the partners (C. sativus, F. culmorum and healthy barley roots), then the analyses of the VOCs spectrum emitted during dual interactions.

  17. Emission and Photochemical Evolution of Low Vapor Pressure-Volatile Organic Compounds (LVP-VOCs): from Consumer Products to Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Kacarab, M.; Chen, C. L.; Price, D.; Carter, W. P. L.; Cocker, D. R., III

    2015-12-01

    Missing emission sources contribute to potential problems in air quality modeling and human health. Low Vapor Pressure-Volatile Organic Compounds (LVP-VOCs) are widely used in consumer products and currently receive VOC exemptions based on their vapor pressure. However, 58.5 TPD LVP-VOC is estimated to emit in 2020 from consumer products in California based on government and industry inventory data. This work investigates the emission and photochemical evolution of major LVP-VOCs in consumer products to demonstrate LVP-VOC impacts on criteria air pollutants. LVP-VOC emission potential is investigated by offline gravimetric and online headspace tracking pure compounds and consumer product mixtures under ambient relevant conditions. Only 3 of the 14 pure LVP-VOCs were found to be atmospherically unavailable. All target LVP-VOCs are observed to evaporate from tested consumer product mixtures. We found improved thermodynamic parameters to predict LVP-VOC evaporation rate. LVP-VOCs photochemical evolution and their impact on ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation are evaluated by integrating SAPRC-11 modeling with laboratory studies in a 90 m3 dual environmental chamber at UC Riverside/CE-CERT. Simultaneous photooxidation experiments, with and without the LVP-VOC, are conducted in the presence of reactive organic gas (ROG) surrogate representing urban chemical smog. Further, LVP-VOC photochemical evolution pathway is investigated under various atmospheric activity (LVP + H2O2, LVP+NO or LVP+H2O2+NO) in the environmental chamber. Gas phase and particle phase mass spectrometers (SIFT-MS, Selected Ion Flow Tube-Mass Spectrum and HR-ToF-MS, High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol mass Spectrometer) are applied to monitor the evolution of LVP-VOCs in the controlled atmosphere. The potential of LVP-VOC oxidation into ELVOC is also illustrated. We finally interpret the health risk and environmental concern related to LVP-VOC emission and photoxidation.

  18. Attraction of the gypsy moth to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of damaged Dahurian larch.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Valimaki, Sanna; Shi, Juan; Zong, Shixiang; Luo, Youqing; Heliovaara, Kari

    2012-01-01

    Olfactory responses of the gypsy moth Lymantria dispar (L.) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae), a major defoliator of deciduous trees, were examined in Inner Mongolia, China. We studied whether the gypsy moth adults are attracted by the major volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of damaged Larix gmelinii (Dahurian larch) foliage and compared the attractiveness of the plant volatiles with that of the synthetic sex pheromone. Our results indicated that the VOCs of the Dahurian larch were effective in attracting gypsy moth males especially during the peak flight period. The VOCs also attracted moths significantly better than the sex pheromone of the moth. Our study is the first trial to show the responses of adult gypsy moths to volatile compounds emitted from a host plant. Electroantennogram responses of L. gmelinii volatiles on gypsy moths supported our field observations. A synergistic effect between host plant volatiles and sex pheromone was also obvious, and both can be jointly applied as a new attractant method or population management strategy of the gypsy moth.

  19. Compositions of volatile organic compounds emitted from melted virgin and waste plastic pellets.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Mizukoshi, Atsushi; Noguchi, Miyuki; Ni, Yueyong; Yanagisawa, Yukio

    2009-03-01

    To characterize potential air pollution issues related to recycling facilities of waste plastics, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from melted virgin and waste plastics pellets were analyzed. In this study, laboratory experiments were performed to melt virgin and waste plastic pellets under various temperatures (150, 200, and 250 degrees C) and atmospheres (air and nitrogen [N2]). In the study presented here, low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS) and the recycled waste plastic pellets were used. The VOCs generated from each plastic pellets were collected by Tenax/Carboxen adsorbent tubes and analyzed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS). The result showed the higher temperatures generated larger amounts of total VOCs (TVOCs). The VOCs emitted from the virgin plastic pellets likely originated from polymer degradation. Smaller TVOC emissions were observed in N2 atmosphere than in air atmosphere. In particular, larger amounts of the oxygenated compounds, which are generally hazardous and malodorous, were detected in air than in N2. In addition to the compounds originating from polymer degradation, the compounds originating from the plastic additives were also detected from LDPE and PS. Furthermore, various species of VOCs likely originating from contaminant inseparate polyvinyl chloride (PVC), food residues, cleaning agents, degreasers, and so on were detected from the waste plastic. Thus, melting waste plastics, as is conducted in recycling facilities, might generate larger amounts of potentially toxic compounds than producing virgin plastics.

  20. Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) on Board of the Zeppelin NT during the PEGASOS Campaign in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Julia; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Beck, Harry; Rohrer, Franz; Broch, Sebastian; Fuchs, Hendrik; Gomm, Sebastian; Holland, Frank; Lu, Keding; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Mentel, Thomas; Rose, Bernhard; Wegener, Robert; Wahner, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are mostly emitted at the ground and are degraded by the reactions with OH, NO3 or O3 as they rise upwards in the atmosphere. VOCs play an important role as sources and sinks for radicals in the troposphere. Up to date, most of the VOC measurements were performed from ground based platforms; the profile measurements across the whole planetary boundary layer (PBL) are still quite limited which restrained the exploring of the VOCs chemistry of the entire PBL. This although these measurements are particularly interesting, as most of the chemistry of the VOC degradation in the troposphere takes place in the PBL. Moreover, fast VOCs measurements utilizing Gas Chromatography coupled with Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) are a challenge due to the great chemical variability of VOC species. Therefore accurate in-situ measurements of VOCs together with other species as CO, NOx, O3 and the OH reactivity, encompassing different levels of altitude and fast time resolution, would essentially improve the understanding of the VOC distribution in the lower troposphere. Here we present the setup and the modifications of the fast GC-MS system and the results of the PEGASOS Zeppelin campaigns in summer 2012. First, we present our developments and modifications of an in-flight GC-MS system to detect volatile non methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) with a time resolution of 3 minutes and a detection limit in the order of 2 pptv. The modified setup enabled us to analyze 70 different VOC species, ranging from alkanes (C4 to C11), aromatics and terpenes to oxygenated hydrocarbons (OVOC) such as alcohols and aldehydes. Second, in contrast to previous airplane studies also utilizing a GC-MS system, the Zeppelin NT as a measuring platform during the PEGASOS campaign enabled us to measure vertical profiles up to 1500m at low travelling speeds which means a high spatial resolution. We will present results for selected VOC that offer new insights on height profiles

  1. Measurements of chlorinated volatile organic compounds emitted from office printers and photocopiers.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Joanna; Szewczyńska, Małgorzata; Pośniak, Małgorzata

    2015-04-01

    Office devices can release volatile organic compounds (VOCs) partly generated by toners and inks, as well as particles of paper. The aim of the presented study is to identify indoor emissions of volatile halogenated organic compounds into the office workspace environment. Mixtures of organic pollutants emitted by seven office devices, i.e. printers and copiers, were analyzed by taking samples in laboratory conditions during the operation of these appliances. Tests of volatile organic compound emissions from selected office devices were conducted in a simulated environment (test chamber). Samples of VOCs were collected using three-layered thermal desorption tubes. Separation and identification of organic pollutant emissions were made using thermal desorption combined with gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Test chamber studies indicated that operation of the office printer and copier would contribute to the significant concentration level of VOCs in typical office indoor air. Among the determined volatile halogenated compounds, only chlorinated organic compounds were identified, inter alia: trichloroethylene - carcinogenic - and tetrachloroethylene - possibly carcinogenic to human. The results show that daily exposure of an office worker to chemical factors released by the tested printing and copying units can be variable in terms of concentrations of VOCs. The highest emissions in the test chamber during printing were measured for ethylbenzene up to 41.3 μg m(-3), xylenes up to 40.5 μg m(-3) and in case of halogenated compounds the highest concentration for chlorobenzene was 6.48 μg m(-3). The study included the comparison of chamber concentrations and unit-specific emission rates of selected VOCs and the identified halogenated compounds. The highest amount of total VOCs was emitted while copying with device D and was rated above 1235 μg m(-3) and 8400 μg unit(-1) h(-1) on average.

  2. Removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using biofilters

    SciTech Connect

    Carriere, P.E.; Mohaghegh, S.D.; Madabhushi, B.S.

    1995-12-31

    One of the most significant air pollution control challenges being faced by the Federal and State agencies and the chemical process industries is the control of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are discharged from process industries as major components of mixed organic wastes which contaminate the environment. Among these wastes, benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene are classified as major pollutants with high frequencies of occurrence on the EPA list of priority pollutants. Biofiltration, a recent air pollution control technology, is the removal and decomposition of contaminants present in emissions of non hazardous substances using a biologically activated medium. Biofiltration involves contacting the contaminated emission gas stream with microorganisms in a filter media. Biofiltration utilizes microorganisms immobilized in the form of a biofilm layer on an adsorptive filter media. Compared to other technologies, biofiltration is inexpensive, reliable and requires no post treatment. The main objective of this study was to compare the performance of both Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) and Biologically Activated Carbon (BAC) for the removal of benzene and toluene.

  3. Key volatile organic compounds emitted from swine nursery house

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H. Q.; Choi, H. L.; Zhu, K.; Lee, J. H.

    2011-05-01

    This study was carried out to quantify the concentration and emission levels of key volatile organic compounds (VOCs) - sulfides, indolics, phenolics and volatile fatty acids (VFA) - emitted from swine nursery house, and assess the effect of microclimate (including temperature, relative humidity and air speed) on the key odorous compounds. Samples were collected from the Experimental Farm of Seoul National University in Suwon, South Korea. And the collection took place for four seasons and the sampling time was fixed at 10:30 in the morning. The application of one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni t analyses revealed that, most of the odorous compound concentrations, such as dimethyl sulfide (DMS), dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), indole, p-cresol and all the volatile fatty acids were lowest during the summer ( P < 0.01). Meanwhile, negative correlations were observed between temperature and odorants, as well as air speed and odorants. A possible reason was that high ventilation transferred most of the odors out of the house during the summer. From the whole year data, non-linear multiple regressions were conducted and the equations were proposed depending upon the relationships between microclimate parameters and odorous compounds. The equations were applied in hope of easily calculating the concentrations of the odorous compounds in the commercial farms. The results obtained in this study should be used for reducing the volatile organic compounds by controlling microclimate parameters and also could be helpful in setting a guideline for good management practices in nursery house.

  4. LakeVOC; A Deterministic Model to Estimate Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in Reservoirs and Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bender, David A.; Asher, William E.; Zogorski, John S.

    2003-01-01

    This report documents LakeVOC, a model to estimate volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in lakes and reservoirs. LakeVOC represents the lake or reservoir as a two-layer system and estimates VOC concentrations in both the epilimnion and hypolimnion. The air-water flux of a VOC is characterized in LakeVOC in terms of the two-film model of air-water exchange. LakeVOC solves the system of coupled differential equations for the VOC concentration in the epilimnion, the VOC concentration in the hypolimnion, the total mass of the VOC in the lake, the volume of the epilimnion, and the volume of the hypolimnion. A series of nine simulations were conducted to verify LakeVOC representation of mixing, dilution, and gas exchange characteristics in a hypothetical lake, and two additional estimates of lake volume and MTBE concentrations were done in an actual reservoir under environmental conditions. These 11 simulations showed that LakeVOC correctly handled mixing, dilution, and gas exchange. The model also adequately estimated VOC concentrations within the epilimnion in an actual reservoir with daily input parameters. As the parameter-input time scale increased (from daily to weekly to monthly, for example), the differences between the measured-averaged concentrations and the model-estimated concentrations generally increased, especially for the hypolimnion. This may be because as the time scale is increased from daily to weekly to monthly, the averaging of model inputs may cause a loss of detail in the model estimates.

  5. Pollution characteristics and health risk assessment of volatile organic compounds emitted from different plastic solid waste recycling workshops.

    PubMed

    He, Zhigui; Li, Guiying; Chen, Jiangyao; Huang, Yong; An, Taicheng; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2015-04-01

    The pollution profiles of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from different recycling workshops processing different types of plastic solid waste (PSW) and their health risks were investigated. A total of 64 VOCs including alkanes, alkenes, monoaromatics, oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs), chlorinated VOCs (ClVOCs) and acrylonitrile during the melting extrusion procedure were identified and quantified. The highest concentration of total VOCs (TVOC) occurred in the poly(acrylonitrile-butadiene styrene) (ABS) recycling workshop, followed by the polystyrene (PS), polypropylene (PP), polyamide (PA), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene (PE) and polycarbonate (PC) workshops. Monoaromatics were found as the major component emitted from the ABS and PS recycling workshops, while alkanes were mainly emitted from the PE and PP recycling processes, and OVOCs from the PVC and PA recycling workshops. According to the occupational exposure limits' (OEL) assessment, the workers suffered acute and chronic health risks in the ABS and PS recycling workshops. Meanwhile, it was found that most VOCs in the indoor microenvironments were originated from the melting extrusion process, while the highest TVOC concentration was observed in the PS rather than in the ABS recycling workshop. Non-cancer hazard indices (HIs) of all individual VOCs were <1.0, whereas the total HI in the PS recycling workshop was 1.9, posing an adverse chronic health threat. Lifetime cancer risk assessment suggested that the residents also suffered from definite cancer risk in the PS, PA, ABS and PVC recycling workshops.

  6. Characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the evaporative emissions of modern passenger cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Tingting; Yue, Xin; Chai, Fahe; Hu, Jingnan; Lai, Yitu; He, Liqang; Zhu, Rencheng

    2017-02-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from vehicle evaporative emissions contribute substantially to photochemical air pollution. Yet, few studies of the characteristics of VOCs emitted from vehicle evaporative emissions have been published. We investigate the characteristics of 57 VOCs in hot soak, 24 h diurnal and 48 h diurnal emissions by applying the Sealed Housing Evaporative Determination unit (SHED) test to three modern passenger cars (one US Tier 2 and two China IV vehicles) using two different types of gasoline. The characteristics of the VOCs from the hot soak, 24 h diurnal and 48 h diurnal emissions were different due to their different emission mechanisms. In the hot soak emissions, toluene, isopentane/n-pentane, and 2,2,4-trimethylpentane were dominant species. In the 24 h and 48 h diurnal emissions, isopentane and n-pentane were dominant species. Toluene was the third most dominant component in the 24 h diurnal emissions but decreased by a mass of 42%-80% in the 48 h diurnal emissions. In the hot soak, 24 h diurnal and 48 h diurnal emissions, alkanes were generally the dominant hydrocarbons, followed by aromatics and olefins. However, owing to different evaporative emission mechanisms, the weight percentages of the aromatic hydrocarbons decreased and the weight percentages of the alkanes increased from the hot soak test to the 24 h diurnal and 48 h diurnal tests for each vehicle. The dominant contributors to the ozone formation potentials (OFPs) were also different in the hot soak, 24 h diurnal and 48 h diurnal emissions. The OFPs (g O3/g VOC) of the hot soak emissions were higher than those of the 24 h and 48 h diurnal emissions. In addition, the combined effect of decreasing the olefin and aromatic contents of gasoline on vehicle evaporative emissions was investigated. The aromatics all decreased substantially in the hot soak, 24 h and 48 h diurnal emissions, and the total masses of the VOCs and OFPs decreased, with the greatest reduction occurring in

  7. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in surface coating materials: Their compositions and potential as an alternative fuel.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Trieu-Vuong; Choi, In-Young; Son, Youn-Suk; Song, Kyu-Yong; Sunwoo, Young; Kim, Jo-Chun

    2016-03-01

    A sampling system was designed to determine the composition ratios of VOCs emitted from 31 surface coating materials (SCMs). Representative architectural, automotive, and marine SCMs in Korea were investigated. Toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene were the predominant VOCs. The VOC levels (wt%) from automotive SCMs were significantly higher than those from architectural and marine paints. It was found that target SCMs comprised mainly VOCs with 6-10 carbon atoms in molecules, which could be adsorbed by activated carbon. The saturated activated carbon which had already adsorbed toluene, ethylbenzene, and m-xylene was combusted. The saturated activated carbon was more combustible than new activated carbon because it comprised inflammable VOCs. Therefore, it could be an alternative fuel when using in a "fuelization system". To use the activated carbon as a fuel, a control technology of VOCs from a coating process was also designed and introduced.

  8. 40 CFR 60.312 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.312 Section 60.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Surface Coating of Metal Furniture § 60.312 Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). (a) On...

  9. 40 CFR 60.312 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.312 Section 60.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Surface Coating of Metal Furniture § 60.312 Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). (a) On...

  10. 40 CFR 60.312 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.312 Section 60.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Surface Coating of Metal Furniture § 60.312 Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). (a) On...

  11. 40 CFR 60.312 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.312 Section 60.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Surface Coating of Metal Furniture § 60.312 Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). (a) On...

  12. 40 CFR 60.312 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.312 Section 60.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Surface Coating of Metal Furniture § 60.312 Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). (a) On...

  13. The Amazonian Floodplains, an ecotype with challenging questions on volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesselmeier, J.

    2012-12-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are affected by a variety of biotic and abiotic factors such as light intensity, temperature, CO2 and drought. Another factor usually overlooked but very important for the tropical rainforest in Amazonia is regular flooding. According to recent estimates, the total Amazonian floodplain area easily ranges up to 700,000 km^2, including whitewater river floodplains (várzea) blackwater regions (igapó) and further clearwater regions. Regarding the total Amazonian wetlands the area sums up to more than 2.000.000 km^2, i.e. 30% of Amazonia. To survive the flooding periods causing anoxic conditions for the root system of up to several months, vegetation has developed several morphological, anatomical and physiological strategies. One is to switch over the root metabolism to fermentation, thus producing ethanol as one of the main products. Ethanol is a toxic metabolite which is transported into the leaves by the transpiration stream. From there it can either be directly emitted into the atmosphere, or can be re-metabolized to acetaldehyde and/or acetate. All of these compounds are volatile enough to be partly released into the atmosphere. We observed emissions of ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid under root anoxia. Furthermore, plant stress induced by flooding also affected leaf primary physiological processes as well as other VOC emissions such as the release of isoprenoids and other volatiles. For example, Hevea spruceana could be identified as a monoterpene emitting tree species behaving differently upon anoxia depending on the origin, with increasing emissions of the species from igapó and decreasing with the corresponding species from várzea. Contrasting such short term inundations, studies of VOC emissions under long term conditions (2-3 months) did not confirm the ethanol/acetaldehyde emissions, whereas emissions of other VOC species decreased considerably. These results demonstrate that the transfer of our knowledge

  14. Detection of new VOC compounds with iCRDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Leen, J. B.; Gardner, A.; Gupta, M.; Baer, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    The instrument at Los Gatos Research (a member of ABB Inc.) which is based on incoherent cavity ringdown spectroscopy (iCRDS) that operates in the mid-infrared (bands from 860-1060 cm-1 or 970-1280 cm-1) is capable of detecting a broad range of VOCs, in situ, continuously and autonomously, for example, BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene), including differentiation of xylene isomers. Previously, we have demonstrated the measurement of trichloroethylene (TCE) in zero air with a precision of 0.17 ppb (1σ in 4 minutes), and the measurement of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with a precision of 0.15 ppb (1σ in 4 minutes). Both of these measured precisions exceed the EPA's commercial building action limit, which for TCE is 0.92 ppb (5 µg/m3) and for PCE is 0.29 ppb (2 µg/m3). This ability has been fully demonstrated by the deployment of the instrument to the Superfund site at Moffett Naval Air Station in Mountain View, California where contaminated ground water results in vapor intrusion of TCE and PCE. For two weeks, the instrument operated continuously and autonomously, successfully measuring TCE and PCE concentrations in both the breathing zone and steam tunnel air, in excellent agreement with previous TO-15 data. In this poster, we present laboratory performance data targeting new toxic molecules with the same instrument. We have demonstrated the measurement of trichlorofluolomethane (Freon 11) in zero air with a precision of 1 ppb (3σ at 1075cm-1), and hexafluoropropene in zero air with a precision of about 0.3 ppb (3σ per spectrum). The iCRDS instrument has shown the ability to continuously and autonomously measure sub-ppb levels of toxic VOCs in the lab/field, offering an unprecedented picture of the short term dynamics associated with vapor intrusion and ground water pollution.

  15. Remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with membrane separation techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Weng, Huan-xin; Chen, Huan-lin; Gao, Cong-jie

    2002-04-01

    Membrane separation, a new technology for removing VOCs including pervaporation, vapor permeation, membrane contactor, and membrane bioreactor was presented. Comparing with traditional techniques, these special techniques are an efficient and energy-saving technology. Vapor permeation can be applied to recovery of organic solvents from exhaust streams. Membrane contactor could be used for removing or recovering VOCs from air or wastewater. Pervaporation and vapor permeation are viable methods for removing VOCs from wastewater to yield a VOC concentrate which could either be destroyed by conventional means, or be recycled for reuse.

  16. Gastrophysa polygoni herbivory on Rumex confertus: single leaf VOC induction and dose dependent herbivore attraction/repellence to individual compounds.

    PubMed

    Piesik, Dariusz; Wenda-Piesik, Anna; Kotwica, Karol; Łyszczarz, Alicja; Delaney, Kevin J

    2011-11-15

    We report large induction (>65(fold) increases) of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from a single leaf of the invasive weed mossy sorrel, Rumex confertus Willd. (Polygonaceae), by herbivory of the dock leaf beetle, Gastrophysa polygoni L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). The R. confertus VOC blend induced by G. polygoni herbivory included two green leaf volatiles ((Z)-3-hexenal, (Z)-3-hexen-1-yl acetate) and three terpenes (linalool, ß-caryophyllene, (E)-ß-farnesene). Uninjured leaves produced small constitutive amounts of the GLVs and barely detectable amounts of the terpenes. A Y-tube olfactometer bioassay revealed that both sexes of adult G. polygoni were attracted to (Z)-3-hexenal and (Z)-3-hexen-1-yl acetate at a concentration of 300 ng h(-1). No significant G. polygoni attraction or repellence was detected for any VOC at other concentrations (60 and 1500 ng h(-1)). Yet, G. polygoni males and females were significantly repelled by (or avoided) at the highest test concentration (7500 ng h(-1)) of both GLVs and (E)-ß-farnesene. Mated male and female G. polygoni might be attracted to injured R. confertus leaves, but might avoid R. confertus when VOC concentrations (especially the terpene (E)-ß-farnesene) suggest high overall plant injury from conspecifics, G. viridula, or high infestations of other herbivores that release (E)-ß-farnesene (e.g., aphids). Tests in the future will need to examine G. polygoni responses to VOCs emitted directly from uninjured (constitutive) and injured (induced) R. confertus, and examine whether R. confertus VOC induction concentrations increase with greater tissue removal on a single leaf and/or the number of leaves with feeding injury.

  17. Identification and quantitation of volatile organic compounds emitted from dairy silages and other feedstuffs.

    PubMed

    Malkina, Irina L; Kumar, Anuj; Green, Peter G; Mitloehner, Frank M

    2011-01-01

    High ground-level ozone continues to be an important human, animal, and plant health impediment in the United States and especially in California's San Joaquin Valley (SJV). According to California state and regional air quality agencies, dairies are one of the major sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the SJV. A number of recently conducted studies reported emissions data from different dairy sources. However, limited data are currently available for silage and otherfeed storages on dairies, which could potentially contribute to ozone formation. Because the impact of different VOCs on ozone formation varies significantly from one molecular species to another, detailed characterization of VOC emissions is essential to include all the important contributors to atmospheric chemistry and especially atmospheric reactivity. The present research study identifies and quantifies the VOCs emitted from various silages and other feedstuffs. Experiments were conducted in an environmental chamber under controlled conditions. Almost 80 VOCs were identified and quantified from corn (Zea mays L.), alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.),and cereal (wheat [Triticum aestivum L.] and oat [Avena sativava L.] grains) silages, total mixed ration (TMR), almond (Amygdalus communis L.) shells and hulls using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography. The results revealed high concentrations of emitted alcohols and other oxygenated species. Lower concentrations of highly reactive alkenes and aldehydes were also detected. Additional quantitation and monitoring of these emissions are essential for assessment of and response to the specific needs of the regional air quality in the SJV.

  18. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. 60.502 Section 60.502 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals § 60.502 Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and after the date on which § 60.8(a) requires...

  19. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. 60.502 Section 60.502 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals § 60.502 Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and after the date on which § 60.8(a) requires...

  20. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. 60.502 Section 60.502 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals § 60.502 Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and after the date on which § 60.8(a) requires...

  1. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. 60.502 Section 60.502 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals § 60.502 Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and after the date on which § 60.8(a) requires...

  2. ACTION CONCENTRATION FOR MIXTURES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOC) & METHANE & HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    MARUSICH, R.M.

    2006-07-10

    Waste containers may contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs), methane, hydrogen and possibly propane. These constituents may occur individually or in mixtures. Determining if a waste container contains a flammable concentration of flammable gases and vapors (from VOCs) is important to the safety of the handling, repackaging and shipping activities. This report provides the basis for determining the flammability of mixtures of flammable gases and vapors. The concentration of a mixture that is at the lowest flammability limit for that mixture is called the action concentration. The action concentration can be determined using total VOC concentrations or actual concentration of each individual VOC. The concentrations of hydrogen and methane are included with the total VOC or individual VOC concentration to determine the action concentration. Concentrations below this point are not flammable. Waste containers with gas/vapor concentrations at or above the action concentration are considered flammable.

  3. Cross-kingdom effects of plant-plant signaling via volatile organic compounds emitted by tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants infested by the greenhouse whitefly (Trialeurodes vaporariorum).

    PubMed

    Ángeles López, Yesenia Ithaí; Martínez-Gallardo, Norma Angélica; Ramírez-Romero, Ricardo; López, Mercedes G; Sánchez-Hernández, Carla; Délano-Frier, John Paul

    2012-11-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from plants in response to insect infestation can function as signals for the attraction of predatory/parasitic insects and/or repulsion of herbivores. VOCs also may play a role in intra- and inter-plant communication. In this work, the kinetics and composition of VOC emissions produced by tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants infested with the greenhouse whitefly Trialeurodes vaporariorum was determined within a 14 days period. The VOC emission profiles varied concomitantly with the duration of whitefly infestation. A total of 36 different VOCs were detected during the experiment, 26 of which could be identified: 23 terpenoids, plus decanal, decane, and methyl salicylate (MeSA). Many VOCs were emitted exclusively by infested plants, including MeSA and 10 terpenoids. In general, individual VOC emissions increased as the infestation progressed, particularly at 7 days post-infestation (dpi). Additional tunnel experiments showed that a 3 days exposure to VOC emissions from whitefly-infested plants significantly reduced infection by a biotrophic bacterial pathogen. Infection of VOC-exposed plants induced the expression of a likely tomato homolog of a methyl salicylate esterase gene, which preceded the expression of pathogenesis-related protein genes. This expression pattern correlated with reduced susceptibility in VOC-exposed plants. The observed cross-kingdom effect of plant-plant signaling via VOCs probably represents a generalized defensive response that contributes to increased plant fitness, considering that resistance responses to whiteflies and biotrophic bacterial pathogens in tomato share many common elements.

  4. Plant leaves as indoor air passive samplers for volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Todd A; Doucette, William J

    2015-03-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) enter indoor environments through internal and external sources. Indoor air concentrations of VOCs vary greatly but are generally higher than outdoors. Plants have been promoted as indoor air purifiers for decades, but reports of their effectiveness differ. However, while air-purifying applications may be questionable, the waxy cuticle coating on leaves may provide a simple, cost-effective approach to sampling indoor air for VOCs. To investigate the potential use of plants as indoor air VOC samplers, a static headspace approach was used to examine the relationship between leaf and air concentrations, leaf lipid contents and octanol-air partition coefficients (Koa) for six VOCs and four plant species. The relationship between leaf and air concentrations was further examined in an actual residence after the introduction of several chlorinated VOC emission sources. Leaf-air concentration factors (LACFs), calculated from linear regressions of the laboratory headspace data, were found to increase as the solvent extractable leaf lipid content and Koa value of the VOC increased. In the studies conducted in the residence, leaf concentrations paralleled the changing air concentrations, indicating a relatively rapid air to leaf VOC exchange. Overall, the data from the laboratory and residential studies illustrate the potential for plant leaves to be used as cost effective, real-time indoor air VOC samplers.

  5. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Conventional and High Performance School Buildings in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Lexuan; Su, Feng-Chiao; Batterman, Stuart

    2017-01-21

    Exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been an indoor environmental quality (IEQ) concern in schools and other buildings for many years. Newer designs, construction practices and building materials for "green" buildings and the use of "environmentally friendly" products have the promise of lowering chemical exposure. This study examines VOCs and IEQ parameters in 144 classrooms in 37 conventional and high performance elementary schools in the U.S. with the objectives of providing a comprehensive analysis and updating the literature. Tested schools were built or renovated in the past 15 years, and included comparable numbers of conventional, Energy Star, and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)-certified buildings. Indoor and outdoor VOC samples were collected and analyzed by thermal desorption, gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy for 94 compounds. Aromatics, alkanes and terpenes were the major compound groups detected. Most VOCs had mean concentrations below 5 µg/m³, and most indoor/outdoor concentration ratios ranged from one to 10. For 16 VOCs, the within-school variance of concentrations exceeded that between schools and, overall, no major differences in VOC concentrations were found between conventional and high performance buildings. While VOC concentrations have declined from levels measured in earlier decades, opportunities remain to improve indoor air quality (IAQ) by limiting emissions from building-related sources and by increasing ventilation rates.

  6. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Conventional and High Performance School Buildings in the U.S.

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Lexuan; Su, Feng-Chiao; Batterman, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been an indoor environmental quality (IEQ) concern in schools and other buildings for many years. Newer designs, construction practices and building materials for “green” buildings and the use of “environmentally friendly” products have the promise of lowering chemical exposure. This study examines VOCs and IEQ parameters in 144 classrooms in 37 conventional and high performance elementary schools in the U.S. with the objectives of providing a comprehensive analysis and updating the literature. Tested schools were built or renovated in the past 15 years, and included comparable numbers of conventional, Energy Star, and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)-certified buildings. Indoor and outdoor VOC samples were collected and analyzed by thermal desorption, gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy for 94 compounds. Aromatics, alkanes and terpenes were the major compound groups detected. Most VOCs had mean concentrations below 5 µg/m3, and most indoor/outdoor concentration ratios ranged from one to 10. For 16 VOCs, the within-school variance of concentrations exceeded that between schools and, overall, no major differences in VOC concentrations were found between conventional and high performance buildings. While VOC concentrations have declined from levels measured in earlier decades, opportunities remain to improve indoor air quality (IAQ) by limiting emissions from building-related sources and by increasing ventilation rates. PMID:28117727

  7. Characterization of volatile organic compounds emitted by barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) roots and their attractiveness to wireworms.

    PubMed

    Gfeller, Aurélie; Laloux, Morgan; Barsics, Fanny; Kati, Djamel Edine; Haubruge, Eric; du Jardin, Patrick; Verheggen, François J; Lognay, Georges; Wathelet, Jean-Paul; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure

    2013-08-01

    Root volatile organic compounds (VOCs), their chemistry and ecological functions have garnered less attention than aboveground emitted plant VOCs. We report here on the identification of VOCs emitted by barley roots (Hordeum vulgare L.). Twenty nine VOCs were identified from isolated 21-d-old roots. The detection was dependent on the medium used for root cultivation. We identified 24 VOCs from 7-d-old roots when plants were cultivated on sterile Hoagland gelified medium, 33 when grown on sterile vermiculite, and 34 on non-sterile vermiculite. The major VOCs were fatty acid derived compounds, including hexanal, methyl hexanoate, (E)-hex-2-enal, 2-pentylfuran, pentan-1-ol, (Z)-2-(pentenyl)-furan, (Z)-pent-2-en-1-ol, hexan-1-ol, (Z)-hex-3-en-1-ol, (E)-hex-2-en-1-ol, oct-1-en-3-ol, 2-ethylhexan-1-ol (likely a contaminant), (E)-non-2-enal, octan-1-ol, (2E,6Z)-nona-2,6-dienal, methyl (E)-non-2-enoate, nonan-1-ol, (Z)-non-3-en-1-ol, (E)-non-2-en-1-ol, nona-3,6-dien-1-ol, and nona-2,6-dien-1-ol. In an olfactometer assay, wireworms (larvae of Agriotes sordidus Illiger, Coleoptera: Elateridae) were attracted to cues emanating from barley seedlings. We discuss the role of individual root volatiles or a blend of the root volatiles detected here and their interaction with CO2 for wireworm attraction.

  8. Mixing ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere of Karachi, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, Barbara; Meinardi, Simone; Simpson, Isobel J.; Khwaja, Haider A.; Blake, Donald R.; Rowland, F. Sherwood

    Mixing ratios of carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH 4), non-methane hydrocarbons, halocarbons and alkyl nitrates (a total of 72 species) were determined for 78 whole air samples collected during the winter of 1998-1999 in Karachi, Pakistan. This is the first time that volatile organic compound (VOC) levels in Karachi have been extensively characterized. The overall air quality of the urban environment was determined using air samples collected at six locations throughout Karachi. Methane (6.3 ppmv) and ethane (93 ppbv) levels in Karachi were found to be much higher than in other cities that have been studied. The very high CH 4 levels highlight the importance of natural gas leakage in Karachi. The leakage of liquefied petroleum gas contributes to elevated propane and butane levels in Karachi, although the propane and butane burdens were lower than in other cities (e.g., Mexico City, Santiago). High levels of benzene (0.3-19 ppbv) also appear to be of concern in the Karachi urban area. Vehicular emissions were characterized using air samples collected along the busiest thoroughfare of the city (M.A. Jinnah Road). Emissions from vehicular exhaust were found to be the main source of many of the hydrocarbons reported here. Significant levels of isoprene (1.2 ppbv) were detected at the roadside, and vehicular exhaust is estimated to account for about 20% of the isoprene observed in Karachi. 1,2-Dichloroethane, a lead scavenger added to leaded fuel, was also emitted by cars. The photochemical production of ozone (O 3) was calculated for CO and the various VOCs using the Maximum Incremental Reactivity (MIR) scale. Based on the MIR scale, the leading contributors to O 3 production in Karachi are ethene, CO, propene, m-xylene and toluene.

  9. A parsimonious model for the release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) encapsulated in products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Jolliet, Olivier

    2016-02-01

    Studies have demonstrated that near-field chemical intakes may exceed environmentally mediated exposures and are therefore essential to be considered when assessing chemical emissions across a product's life cycle. VOCs encapsulated in materials/products can be a major emission source in the use phase. Previous models describing such emissions require complex analytical or numerical solutions, which poses a great computational burden and lack transparency for use in high-throughput screening of chemicals. In the present study, we adapted a model which describes VOC emissions from building materials and subsequent removal by ventilation, and decoupled the material and air governing equations by assuming a pseudo-steady-state between emission and loss. Results of this decoupled model show good agreement with the original more complex model and the experimental data. The solution of this decoupled model for mass fraction emitted, which still consists of an infinite sum of exponential terms, is further reduced to a sum of only two exponentials with parameters which can be predicted from physiochemical properties using explicit equations. Results of this simple two-exponential model agree well with the original full model over a 15-year time period with R-square greater than 0.99 for a wide range of compounds and material thicknesses. Moreover, the chemical concentration at the material surface can be simply calculated from the derivative of this two-exponential model, which also agrees well with the surface concentration calculated using the original full model. The present parsimonious approach greatly reduces the computational burden, and can be easily implemented for high-throughput screening.

  10. Extended Research on Detection of Deception Using Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2006-06-01

    A system that captures and analyzes volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from skin surfaces may offer a viable alternative method to the polygraph instrument currently in use for detecting deception in U.S. government settings. Like the involuntary autonomic central nervous system response data gathered during polygraph testing, VOC emissions from the skin may provide data that can be used to detect stress caused by deception. Detecting VOCs, then, may present a noninvasive, non-intrusive method for observing, recording, and quantifying evidence of stress or emotional change.

  11. Process-specific emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from petrochemical facilities in the Yangtze River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Mo, Ziwei; Shao, Min; Lu, Sihua; Qu, Hang; Zhou, Mengyi; Sun, Jin; Gou, Bin

    2015-11-15

    Process-specific emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from petrochemical facilities were investigated in the Yangtze River Delta, China. Source samples were collected from various process units in the petrochemical, basic chemical, and chlorinated chemical plants, and were measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection. The results showed that propane (19.9%), propene (11.7%), ethane (9.5%) and i-butane (9.2%) were the most abundant species in the petrochemical plant, with propene at much higher levels than in petrochemical profiles measured in other regions. Styrene (15.3%), toluene (10.3%) and 1,3-butadiene (7.5%) were the major species in the basic chemical industry, while halocarbons, especially dichloromethane (15.2%) and chloromethane (7.5%), were substantial in the chlorinated chemical plant. Composite profiles were calculated using a weight-average approach based on the VOC emission strength of various process units. Emission profiles for an entire petrochemical-related industry were found to be process-oriented and should be established considering the differences in VOC emissions from various manufacturing facilities. The VOC source reactivity and carcinogenic risk potential of each process unit were also calculated in this study, suggesting that process operations mainly producing alkenes should be targeted for possible controls with respect to reducing the ozone formation potential, while process units emitting 1,3-butadiene should be under priority control in terms of toxicity. This provides a basis for further measurements of process-specific VOC emissions from the entire petrochemical industry. Meanwhile, more representative samples should be collected to reduce the large uncertainties.

  12. 40 CFR 60.112 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112 Section 60.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... After June 11, 1973, and Prior to May 19, 1978 § 60.112 Standard for volatile organic compounds...

  13. 40 CFR 60.112 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112 Section 60.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... After June 11, 1973, and Prior to May 19, 1978 § 60.112 Standard for volatile organic compounds...

  14. 40 CFR 60.112b - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds... for Volatile Organic Liquid Storage Vessels (Including Petroleum Liquid Storage Vessels) for Which... organic compounds (VOC). (a) The owner or operator of each storage vessel either with a design...

  15. 40 CFR 60.112 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112 Section 60.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... After June 11, 1973, and Prior to May 19, 1978 § 60.112 Standard for volatile organic compounds...

  16. 40 CFR 60.112 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112 Section 60.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... After June 11, 1973, and Prior to May 19, 1978 § 60.112 Standard for volatile organic compounds...

  17. 40 CFR 60.112b - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds... for Volatile Organic Liquid Storage Vessels (Including Petroleum Liquid Storage Vessels) for Which... organic compounds (VOC). (a) The owner or operator of each storage vessel either with a design...

  18. 40 CFR 60.112b - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds... for Volatile Organic Liquid Storage Vessels (Including Petroleum Liquid Storage Vessels) for Which... organic compounds (VOC). (a) The owner or operator of each storage vessel either with a design...

  19. 40 CFR 60.112b - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds... for Volatile Organic Liquid Storage Vessels (Including Petroleum Liquid Storage Vessels) for Which... organic compounds (VOC). (a) The owner or operator of each storage vessel either with a design...

  20. 40 CFR 60.112 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112 Section 60.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... After June 11, 1973, and Prior to May 19, 1978 § 60.112 Standard for volatile organic compounds...

  1. Measurement of volatile organic compounds emitted in libraries and archives: an inferential indicator of paper decay?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A sampling campaign of indoor air was conducted to assess the typical concentration of indoor air pollutants in 8 National Libraries and Archives across the U.K. and Ireland. At each site, two locations were chosen that contained various objects in the collection (paper, parchment, microfilm, photographic material etc.) and one location was chosen to act as a sampling reference location (placed in a corridor or entrance hallway). Results Of the locations surveyed, no measurable levels of sulfur dioxide were detected and low formaldehyde vapour (< 18 μg m-3) was measured throughout. Acetic and formic acids were measured in all locations with, for the most part, higher acetic acid levels in areas with objects compared to reference locations. A large variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was measured in all locations, in variable concentrations, however furfural was the only VOC to be identified consistently at higher concentration in locations with paper-based collections, compared to those locations without objects. To cross-reference the sampling data with VOCs emitted directly from books, further studies were conducted to assess emissions from paper using solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibres and a newly developed method of analysis; collection of VOCs onto a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer strip. Conclusions In this study acetic acid and furfural levels were consistently higher in concentration when measured in locations which contained paper-based items. It is therefore suggested that both acetic acid and furfural (possibly also trimethylbenzenes, ethyltoluene, decane and camphor) may be present in the indoor atmosphere as a result of cellulose degradation and together may act as an inferential non-invasive marker for the deterioration of paper. Direct VOC sampling was successfully achieved using SPME fibres and analytes found in the indoor air were also identified as emissive by-products from paper. Finally a new non

  2. Development of a Combined Real Time Monitoring and Integration Analysis System for Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Kentaro; Iizuka, Atsushi; Inoue, Yasuo; Mizukoshi, Atsushi; Noguchi, Miyuki; Yamasaki, Akihiro; Yanagisawa, Yukio

    2010-01-01

    A combined integration analysis and real time monitoring (Peak Capture System) system was developed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Individual integration analysis and real time monitoring can be used to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze VOCs in the atmosphere and in indoor environments and determine the variation in total VOC (TVOC) concentration with time, respectively. In the Peak Capture System, real time monitoring was used to predict future elevations in the TVOC concentration (peak), and this was used an indicator of when to collect (capture) ambient air samples for integration analysis. This enabled qualitative and quantitative analysis of VOCs when the TVOC concentration was high. We developed an algorithm to predict variation in the TVOC concentration, and constructed an automatic system to initiate air sampling for integration analysis. With the system, auto-sampling and analysis of VOCs in a conventional house were conducted. In comparison with background concentrations, the results of peak analysis enabled identification of compounds whose concentration rose. This also enabled an evaluation of possible VOC emission sources. PMID:21317996

  3. [Variation characteristics of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Nanjing northern suburb, China].

    PubMed

    An, Jun-Lin; Zhu, Bin; Li, Yong-Yu

    2013-12-01

    Based on the data of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) collected continuously from Mar 1, 2011 to Feb 29, 2012 in the northern suburb of Nanjing, characteristics of their temporal variation, photochemical reactivity of their compositions and source characteristics of VOCs were analyzed. The results showed that the mean value of VOCs mixing ratios was 43.52 x 10(-9) (volume fraction). There was an obvious seasonal cycle of VOCs, with the maximum in summer and minimum in winter. Diurnal variation of VOCs mixing ratios showed a very clear cycle, with higher average VOCs mixing ratios at nighttime than at daytime. The seasonal trend of VOCs mixing ratios at night was in the order of summer > autumn > spring > winter, whereas the order during daytime was winter > summer > spring > winter. Mixing ratio of VOCs had greater diurnal amplitude in autumn and lesser in winter. Alkanes and alkenes had greater diurnal amplitude in autumn. Aromatics and alkenes had greater diurnal amplitude in spring. Using the propylene-equal mixing ratios method, alkenes was found to be the largest part of VOCs, followed by aromatics, and alkanes was the least. The ratios of T/B, E/B and X/B were 1.23, 0.95 and 0.81, respectively, possibly due to the aging of the air mass at this site. The robust vehicular indicator, 3-methylpentane, which is an intrinsic component gasoline, was used to estimate the contributions of traffic versus non-traffic sources. The non-traffic source contribution was significant for ethene (85%), toluene (71%) and m, p-xylene (82%).

  4. Contribution of low vapor pressure-volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOCs) from consumer products to ozone formation in urban atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; McKone, Thomas E.; Bennett, Deborah H.

    2015-05-01

    Because recent laboratory testing indicates that some low vapor pressure-volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOC) solvents readily evaporate at ambient conditions, LVP-VOCs used in some consumer product formulations may contribute to ozone formation. The goal of this study is to determine the fraction of LVP-VOCs available for ozone formation from the use of consumer products for two hypothetical emissions. This study calculates and compares the fraction of consumed product available for ozone formation as a result of (a) volatilization to air during use and (b) down-the-drain disposal. The study also investigates the impact of different modes of releases on the overall fraction available in ambient air for ozone formation. For the portion of the LVP-VOCs volatilized to air during use, we applied a multi-compartment mass-balance model to track the fate of emitted LVP-VOCs in a multimedia urban environment. For the portion of the LVP-VOCs disposed down the drain, we used a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) fate model to predict the emission rates of LVP-VOCs to ambient air at WWTPs or at the discharge zone of the facilities and then used these results as emissions in the multimedia urban environment model. In a WWTP, the LVP-VOCs selected in this study are primarily either biodegraded or removed via sorption to sludge depending on the magnitude of the biodegradation half-life and the octanol-water partition coefficient. Less than 0.2% of the LVP-VOCs disposed down the drain are available for ozone formation. In contrast, when the LVP-VOC in a consumer product is volatilized from the surface to which it has been applied, greater than 90% is available for photochemical reactions either at the source location or in the downwind areas. Comparing results from these two modes of releases allows us to understand the importance of determining the fraction of LVP-VOCs volatilized versus disposed down the drain when the product is used by consumers. The results from this study

  5. Age matters: the effects of volatile organic compounds emitted by Trichoderma atroviride on plant growth.

    PubMed

    Lee, Samantha; Hung, Richard; Yap, Melanie; Bennett, Joan W

    2015-06-01

    Studying the effects of microbial volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on plant growth is challenging because the production of volatiles depends on many environmental factors. Adding to this complexity, the method of volatile exposure itself can lead to different responses in plants and may account for some of the contrasting results. In this work, we present an improved experimental design, a plate-within-a-plate method, to study the effects of VOCs produced by filamentous fungi. We demonstrate that the plant growth response to VOCs is dependent on the age of the plant and fungal cultures. Plants exposed to volatiles emitted by 5-day-old Trichoderma atroviride for 14 days exhibited inhibition, while plants exposed to other exposure conditions had growth promotion or no significant change. Using GC-MS, we compared fungal volatile emission of 5-day-old and 14-day-old T. atroviride. As the fungi aged, a few compounds were no longer detected, but 24 new compounds were discovered.

  6. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in photochemically aged air from the Eastern and Western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derstroff, Bettina; Stoenner, Christof; Klüpfel, Thomas; Sauvage, Carina; Crowley, John; Phillips, Gavin; Parchatka, Uwe; Lelieveld, Jos; Williams, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    In summer 2014 a comprehensively instrumented measurement campaign (CYPHEX) was conducted in northwest Cyprus in order to investigate atmospheric oxidation chemistry in the Mediterranean region. The site was periodically influenced by the northerly Etesian winds advecting air from Eastern Europe (Turkey and Greece) and from westerly winds bringing more photochemically processed emissions from Western Europe (Spain and France). In this study the data from a Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) are analyzed. Generally, oxidized volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) such as methanol and acetone were measured in high mixing ratios (max. 9.5 ppb, min. 1.3 ppb, average 3.2 ppb for methanol, max. 7.9 ppb, min. 1.3 ppb, average 2.4 ppb for acetone ) while precursors like propane showed low values (max. 500 ppt). This demonstrates that the air measured was oxidized to a high degree over the Mediterranean Sea. Low values of acetonitrile throughout the campaign indicated no significant influence of biomass burning on the data. Temporal variations in VOC mixing ratios and precursor/product ratios over the campaign can be explained by using the HYSPLIT backward trajectory model which delineated air masses originating from Eastern and Western Europe. Diel variations of reactive VOCs such as isoprene and terpenes were also observed at the site. A sharp increase in isoprene and monoterpenes at circa 9:00 local time indicated that the 600 m hilltop site was influenced by ascending boundary layer air at this time. In this study, particular emphasis is placed on acetic (ethanoic) acid measured by PTR- TOF-MS and calibrated by a permeation source. Acetic acid is an atmospheric oxidation product of multiple volatile organic compounds, emitted directly from vegetation, and found in abundance in the Mediterranean region (max. 2.7 ppb, min. 0.2 ppb, average 0.8 ppb). Acetic acid contributes to the acidity of precipitation in remote areas, can be incorporated

  7. Growth promotion of Lactuca sativa in response to volatile organic compounds emitted from diverse bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Fincheira, Paola; Venthur, Herbert; Mutis, Ana; Parada, Maribel; Quiroz, Andrés

    2016-12-01

    Agrochemicals are currently used in horticulture to increase crop production. Nevertheless, their indiscriminate use is a relevant issue for environmental and legal aspects. Alternative tools for reducing fertilizers and synthetic phytohormones are being investigated, such as the use of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as growth inducers. Some soil bacteria, such as Pseudomonas and Bacillus, stimulate Arabidopsis and tobacco growth by releasing VOCs, but their effects on vegetables have not been investigated. Lactuca sativa was used as model vegetable to investigate bacterial VOCs as growth inducers. We selected 10 bacteria strains, belonging to Bacillus, Staphylococcus and Serratia genera that are able to produce 3-hydroxy-2-butanone (acetoin), a compound with proven growth promoting activity. Two-day old-seedlings of L. sativa were exposed to VOCs emitted by the selected bacteria grown in different media cultures for 7 days. The results showed that the VOCs released from the bacteria elicited an increase in the number of lateral roots, dry weight, root growth and shoot length, depending on the media used. Three Bacillus strains, BCT53, BCT9 and BCT4, were selected according to its their growth inducing capacity. The BCT9 strain elicited the greatest increases in dry weight and primary root length when L. sativa seedlings were subjected to a 10-day experiment. Finally, because acetoin only stimulated root growth, we suggest that other volatiles could be responsible for the growth promotion of L. sativa. In conclusion, our results strongly suggest that bacteria volatiles can be used as growth-inducers as alternative or complementary strategies for application in horticulture species.

  8. [Characteristics and source apportionment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the northern suburb of Nanjing].

    PubMed

    An, Jun-lin; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Hong-lei; Yang, Hui

    2014-12-01

    Based on the data of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) collected continuously from 1st Mar, 2011 to 29th Feb, 2012 in the northern suburb of Nanjing, characteristics of their variability, differences of ratios of tracers and source apportionment by principal component analysis/absolute principal component scores (PCA/APCS) were analyzed. The results showed that the total VOCs mixing ratios were 43.52 x 10(-9), which accounted for 45.1% of alkanes, alkenes for 25.3%, alkyne for 7.3%, and aromatics for 22.3%. There was an obviously seasonal variation of VOCs, with the maximum in summer and the minimum in winter. There was an obvious seasonal variation of VOCs component, with highest alkanes in winter, highest alkenes in summer, highest aromatic in spring, and highest alkyne in winter. By using the specific pollutant ratios ( hydrocarbons/acetylene and toluene/benzene) method, it indicated that the observation site was greatly affected by the surrounding industrial areas. Source analysis of VOCs by PCA/APCS mode showed that the sources consisted of industrial production sources, automobile emission sources, combustion sources, industrial production volatilization sources, solvent use sources and biogenic emission sources. In addition, there were seasonal variations. Overall, the sources related to industrial production activities represented 45% - 63% of VOCs, and they were followed by automobile emission sources, which represented 34% - 50%.

  9. 40 CFR 60.112a - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112a Section 60.112a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Commenced After May 18, 1978, and Prior to July 23, 1984 § 60.112a Standard for volatile organic...

  10. 40 CFR 60.112a - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112a Section 60.112a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Commenced After May 18, 1978, and Prior to July 23, 1984 § 60.112a Standard for volatile organic...

  11. 40 CFR 60.112a - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112a Section 60.112a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Commenced After May 18, 1978, and Prior to July 23, 1984 § 60.112a Standard for volatile organic...

  12. 40 CFR 60.112a - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112a Section 60.112a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Commenced After May 18, 1978, and Prior to July 23, 1984 § 60.112a Standard for volatile organic...

  13. 40 CFR 60.112a - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112a Section 60.112a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Commenced After May 18, 1978, and Prior to July 23, 1984 § 60.112a Standard for volatile organic...

  14. AMBIENT LEVEL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) MONITORING USING SOLID ADSORBANTS - RECENT U.S. EPA STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient air spiked with 1-10 ppbv concentrations of 41 toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) listed in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Compendium Method TO-14A was monitored using solid sorbents for sample collection and a Varian Saturn 2000 ion trap mass spectrome...

  15. Volatile organic compounds emitted by filamentous fungi isolated from flooded homes after Hurricane Sandy show toxicity in a Drosophila bioassay.

    PubMed

    Zhao, G; Yin, G; Inamdar, A A; Luo, J; Zhang, N; Yang, I; Buckley, B; Bennett, J W

    2016-10-17

    Superstorm Sandy provided an opportunity to study filamentous fungi (molds) associated with winter storm damage. We collected 36 morphologically distinct fungal isolates from flooded buildings. By combining traditional morphological and cultural characters with an analysis of ITS sequences (the fungal DNA barcode), we identified 24 fungal species that belong to eight genera: Penicillium (11 species), Fusarium (four species), Aspergillus (three species), Trichoderma (two species), and one species each of Metarhizium, Mucor, Pestalotiopsis, and Umbelopsis. Then, we used a Drosophila larval assay to assess possible toxicity of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by these molds. When cultured in a shared atmosphere with growing cultures of molds isolated after Hurricane Sandy, larval toxicity ranged from 15 to 80%. VOCs from Aspergillus niger 129B were the most toxic yielding 80% mortality to Drosophila after 12 days. The VOCs from Trichoderma longibrachiatum 117, Mucor racemosus 138a, and Metarhizium anisopliae 124 were relatively non-toxigenic. A preliminary analysis of VOCs was conducted using solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry from two of the most toxic, two of the least toxic, and two species of intermediate toxicity. The more toxic molds produced higher concentrations of 1-octen-3-ol, 3-octanone, 3-octanol, 2-octen-1-ol, and 2-nonanone; while the less toxic molds produced more 3-methyl-1-butanol and 2-methyl-1-propanol, or an overall lower amount of volatiles. Our data support the hypothesis that at certain concentrations, some VOCs emitted by indoor molds are toxigenic.

  16. Method for lowering the VOCS emitted during drying of wood products

    DOEpatents

    Banerjee, Sujit; Boerner, James Robert; Su, Wei

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for removal of VOCs from wood products prior to drying the wood products. The method of the invention includes the steps of providing a chamber having an opening for receiving wood and loading the chamber with green wood. The wood is loaded to an extent sufficient to provide a limited headspace in the chamber. The chamber is then closed and the wood is heated in the chamber for a time and at a temperature sufficient to saturate the headspace with moisture and to substantially transfer VOCs from the wood product to the moisture in the headspace.

  17. Pollution characteristics of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the southeast coastal cities of China.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lei; Liao, Xu; Chen, Jinsheng; Xiao, Hang; Xu, Lingling; Zhang, Fuwang; Niu, Zhenchuan; Yu, Jianshuan

    2013-04-01

    With the rapid urbanization, the southeast coastal cities of China are facing increasing air pollution in the past decades. Large emissions of VOCs from vehicles and petrochemical factories have contributed greatly to the local air quality deterioration. Investigating the pollution characteristics of VOCs is of great significance to the environmental risk assessment and air quality improvement. Ambient VOC samples were collected simultaneously from nine coastal cities of southeast China using the Tedlar bags, and were subsequently preprocessed and analyzed using a cryogenic preconcentrator and a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry system, respectively. VOC compositions, spatial distributions, seasonal variations and ozone formation potentials (OPFs) were discussed. Results showed that methylene chloride, toluene, isopropyl alcohol and n-hexane were most abundant species, and oxygenated compounds, aromatics and halogenated hydrocarbons were most abundant chemical classes (62.5-95.6% of TVOCs). Both industrial and vehicular exhausts might contribute greatly to the VOC emissions. The VOC levels in the southeast coastal cities of China were sufficiently high (e.g., 6.5 μg m(-3) for benzene) to pose a health risk to local people. A more serious pollution state was found in the southern cities of the study region, while higher VOC levels were usually observed in winter. The B/T ratio (0.26 ± 0.09) was lower than the typical ratio (ca. 0.6) for roadside samples, while the B/E (1.6-7.6) and T/E (7.2-26.8) ratios were higher than other cities around the world, which indicated a unique emission profile in the study region. Besides, analysis on ozone formation potentials (OFPs) indicated that toluene was the most important species in ozone production with the accountabilities for total OFPs of 22.6 to 59.6%.

  18. Cellular reactions to long-term volatile organic compound (VOC) exposures

    PubMed Central

    Gostner, Johanna M.; Zeisler, Johannes; Alam, Mohammad Tauqeer; Gruber, Peter; Fuchs, Dietmar; Becker, Kathrin; Neubert, Kerstin; Kleinhappl, Markus; Martini, Stefan; Überall, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of cellular processes initiated by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are limited when modelling realistic long-term exposure scenarios at low concentrations. Exposure to indoor VOCs is associated with a range of adverse effects, but data on molecular changes at regulatory threshold limits are lacking. Activity analysis of VOC in vitro can be a valuable complement to inhalation toxicological evaluations. We developed an exposure platform that generates a stable VOC atmosphere and allows the exposure of cells for longer periods. Using formaldehyde as a model analyte, air-liquid interface cultured A549 lung epithelial cells were exposed to critical concentrations of 0.1 and 0.5 ppm for 3 days. Owing to the lack of known exposure biomarkers, we applied a genome-wide transcriptional analysis to investigate cellular responses at these sublethal concentrations. We demonstrate a minor overlap of differentially expressed transcripts for both treatment concentrations, which can be further analyzed for their use as exposure biomarkers. Moreover, distinct expression patterns emerge for 0.1 and 0.5 ppm formaldehyde exposure, which is reflected in significant enrichment of distinct biological processes. More specifically, metabolism of specific compound classes, lipid biosynthesis and lung-associated functions are affected by lower exposure levels and processes affecting proliferation and apoptosis dominate the higher exposure levels. PMID:27905399

  19. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart B of... - Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content Limits for Automobile Refinish Coatings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Limits for Automobile Refinish Coatings 1 Table 1 to Subpart B of Part 59 Protection of Environment... Automobile Refinish Coatings Pt. 59, Subpt. B, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart B of Part 59—Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content Limits for Automobile Refinish Coatings Coating category Grams VOC per liter...

  20. Characterization of Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions at Sites of Oil Sands Extraction and Upgrading in northern Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, J.; Simpson, I. J.; Meinardi, S.; Blake, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    The crude oil reserves in Canada's oil sands are second only to Saudi Arabia, holding roughly 173 billion barrels of oil in the form of bitumen, an unconventional crude oil which does not flow and cannot be pumped without heating or dilution. Oil sands deposits are ultimately used to make the same petroleum products as conventional forms of crude oil, though more processing is required. Hydrocarbons are the basis of oil, coal and natural gas and are an important class of gases emitted into the atmosphere during oil production, particularly because of their effects on air quality and human health. However, they have only recently begun to be independently assessed in the oil sands regions. As part of the 2008 ARCTAS airborne mission, whole air samples were collected in the boundary layer above the surface mining operations of northern Alberta. Gas chromatography analysis revealed enhanced concentrations of 53 VOCs (C2 to C10) over the mining region. When compared to local background levels, the measured concentrations were enhanced up to 1.1-400 times for these compounds. To more fully characterize emissions, ground-based studies were conducted in summer 2010 and winter 2011 in the oil sands mining and upgrading areas. The data from the 200 ground-based samples revealed enhancements in the concentration of 65 VOCs. These compounds were elevated up to 1.1-3000 times above background concentrations and include C2-C8 alkanes, C1-C5 alkyl nitrates, C2-C4 alkenes and potentially toxic aromatic compounds such as benzene, toluene, and xylenes.

  1. Diagnosis of air quality through observation and modeling of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as pollution tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Tzu; Hsieh, Hsin-Cheng; Chen, Sheng-Po; Chang, Julius S.; Lin, Neng-Huei; Chang, Chih-Chung; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2012-08-01

    This study used selected ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as pollution tracers to study the effects of meteorology on air quality. A remote coastal site was chosen as a receptor to monitor pollutants transported upwind from urban traffic and industrial sources. Large concentration variability in VOC concentrations was observed at the coastal site due to rapid changes in meteorology, which caused periodic land-sea exchange of air masses. To assure the quality of the on-line measurements, uniform concentrations of chlorofluorocarbon-113 (CFC-113) were exploited as an internal check of the instrument's stability and the resulting data quality. A VOC speciated air quality model was employed to simulate both temporal and spatial distributions of VOC plumes. The model successfully captured the general features of the variations of toluene as a pollution tracer, which suggests that emissions and meteorology were reasonably well simulated in the model. Through validation by observation, the model can display both the temporal and spatial distribution of air pollutants in a dynamic manner. Thus, a more insightful understanding of how local air quality is affected by meteorology can be obtained.

  2. Investigation of transpiration and/or accumulation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by plants

    SciTech Connect

    Goodrich, R.L.; Carlsen, T.M.

    1994-12-31

    The authors are in the planning stages of an investigation to explore plant transpiration and/or accumulation of VOCs (primarily Trichloroethylene [TCE]) by native vegetation. Such processes may naturally remediate these compounds in shallow ground water. To adequately quantify the amount of TCE in ground water prior to vegetation uptake, the authors will first install shallow piezometers adjacent to existing vegetation. Vegetation sampling will be synchronized with the ground water sampling to establish baseline conditions. They will conduct a literature search to identify potential structures with high lipid content in the plant species of interest (Populus fremontii, Typha latifolia and Salix). To investigate VOC distribution in the plant, individual morphological segments of the plant will be analyzed. The vegetation will be dissected into distinct segments, such as the vegetative (stem and leaves) and reproductive structures, to determine the possible accumulation of TCE at various points within the plant. They have completed preliminary development of analytical methods that they will use to analyze the samples. In the field, plastic (Tedlar) bags will be tightly secured onto the vegetation and a direct head-space analysis will be conducted on the bags, thus providing information on the rate of transpiration compared to the actual accumulation of VOCs within the plant. At a minimum, they expect to document VOC losses from the ground water via plant transpiration.

  3. Personal volatile organic compound (VOC) exposure of children attending elementary schools adjacent to industrial complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kun-Ho; Jo, Wan-Kuen

    The major deficiency in linking the effects of environmental exposure to children's health is the lack of data on the exposure of children to hazardous environmental pollutants. Accordingly, the present study compared the personal volatile organic compound (VOC) exposure of children from four elementary schools at different proximities to the Daegu Dyeing Industrial Complex (DDIC) and adjacent to different traffic densities. The personal air concentrations of four VOCs (toluene, m, p-xylenes, and o-xylene) were significantly higher for the children attending the school (S1) closest to the boundary of the DDIC compared to the children attending the school (S2) further away. The DDIC was the likely primary cause for the elevated personal air concentrations of the four VOCs in the children attending the school nearest the DDIC. The personal exposure to toluene and methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) for the children attending the school near a major roadway with a high traffic density was significantly higher than that for the children attending the school near a roadway with a low traffic density. The difference in the breath concentrations was generally similar to the difference in the personal air concentrations among the children from the four schools. In contrast to the children attending schools in low-income areas, the children attending schools in high-income areas exhibited no significant difference in the concentrations of any of the target VOCs in the personal air and breath samples between the children living with and without a smoker in the home.

  4. Belowground communication: impacts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from soil fungi on other soil-inhabiting organisms.

    PubMed

    Werner, Stephanie; Polle, Andrea; Brinkmann, Nicole

    2016-10-01

    We reviewed the impact of fungal volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on soil-inhabiting organisms and their physiological and molecular consequences for their targets. Because fungi can only move by growth to distinct directions, a main mechanism to protect themselves from enemies or to manipulate their surroundings is the secretion of exudates or VOCs. The importance of VOCs in this regard has been significantly underestimated. VOCs not only can be means of communication, but also signals that are able to specifically manipulate the recipient. VOCs can reprogram root architecture of symbiotic partner plants or increase plant growth leading to enlarged colonization surfaces. VOCs are also able to enhance plant resistance against pathogens by activating phytohormone-dependent signaling pathways. In some cases, they were phytotoxic. Because the response was specific to distinct species, fungal VOCs may contribute to regulate the competition of plant communities. Additionally, VOCs are used by the producing fungus to attack rivaling fungi or bacteria, thereby protecting the emitter or its nutrient sources. In addition, animals, like springtails, nematodes, and earthworms, which are important components of the soil food web, respond to fungal VOCs. Some VOCs are effective repellents for nematodes and, therefore, have applications as biocontrol agents. In conclusion, this review shows that fungal VOCs have a huge impact on soil fauna and flora, but the underlying mechanisms, how VOCs are perceived by the recipients, how they manipulate their targets and the resulting ecological consequences of VOCs in inter-kingdom signaling is only partly understood. These knowledge gaps are left to be filled by future studies.

  5. Identification of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) From Photochemical Activity in Snow Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, G.; Ariya, P. A.

    2004-05-01

    The occurrence of VOCs in snow has been observed and can be related to anthropogenic emissions and biological activity. Photochemistry and microorganisms play a major role in the transformation of compounds in different compartments of the global ecosystem. Studies so far focused on the determination of single analytes or a class of compounds - mainly of anthropogenic origin (e.g. halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons) - that were considered important with regard to health and environmental concerns. Broader studies that describe a range of different compounds with different functionalities are relatively rare, especially for those of biological origin. The presented study investigated the formation of VOCs in snow samples and their connection with microbiological activity. The main aim was to pre-concentrate, identify and quantify volatile organic compounds. Snow samples were collected in an urban environment (Montreal, Canada) with sterilized containers. Samples were transferred into a heated reaction flask, where the sample was melted. A two-trap system was employed for pre-concentration: The first trap was used for water removal. The second trap was used for the collection of expected analytes by removing volatiles from the circulating air. Circulation was maintained with a pump at atmospheric pressure. Adsorption to glass walls of the reaction flask was prevented with halocarbon wax coating. Different sterilization methods were employed to suppress microbiological activity in order to collect background data and identify compounds of biological origin. VOC concentration and compound identification was performed with gas chromatography and mass spectrometric detection (GC-MS) by taking a sample with a gas-tight syringe through a septum-port. The sample was directly injected into the GC system. Compounds were identified by their respective mass spectra and included aldehydes and alcohols.

  6. New device for time-averaged measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

    PubMed

    Santiago Sánchez, Noemí; Tejada Alarcón, Sergio; Tortajada Santonja, Rafael; Llorca-Pórcel, Julio

    2014-07-01

    Contamination by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the environment is an increasing concern since these compounds are harmful to ecosystems and even to human health. Actually, many of them are considered toxic and/or carcinogenic. The main sources of pollution come from very diffuse focal points such as industrial discharges, urban water and accidental spills as these compounds may be present in many products and processes (i.e., paints, fuels, petroleum products, raw materials, solvents, etc.) making their control difficult. The presence of these compounds in groundwater, influenced by discharges, leachate or effluents of WWTPs is especially problematic. In recent years, law has been increasingly restrictive with the emissions of these compounds. From an environmental point of view, the European Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC) sets out some VOCs as priority substances. This binding directive sets guidelines to control compounds such as benzene, chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride to be at a very low level of concentration and with a very high frequency of analysis. The presence of VOCs in the various effluents is often highly variable and discontinuous since it depends on the variability of the sources of contamination. Therefore, in order to have complete information of the presence of these contaminants and to effectively take preventive measures, it is important to continuously control, requiring the development of new devices which obtain average concentrations over time. As of today, due to technical limitations, there are no devices on the market that allow continuous sampling of these compounds in an efficient way and to facilitate sufficient detection limits to meet the legal requirements which are capable of detecting very sporadic and of short duration discharges. LABAQUA has developed a device which consists of a small peristaltic pump controlled by an electronic board that governs its operation by pre-programming. A constant flow passes

  7. Exposure of Jeepney Drivers in Manila, Philippines, to Selected Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

    PubMed Central

    LUNGU, Claudiu T.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the occupational exposure of jeepney drivers to selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Manila, Philippines. Personal sampling was conducted on 15 jeepney drivers. Area sampling was conducted to determine the background VOC concentration in Manila as compared to that in a rural area. Both personal and area samples were collected for 5 working days. Samples were obtained using diffusive samplers and were analyzed for 6 VOCs (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m,p-xylene and o-xylene) using gas chromatography. Results showed that the average personal exposure concentration of jeepney drivers was 55.6 (± 9.3), 196.6 (± 75.0), 17.9 (± 9.0), 72.5 (± 21.1) and 88.5 (± 26.5) μg/m3 for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m,p-xylene and o-xylene, respectively. The urban ambient concentration was 11.8 (± 2.2), 83.7 (± 40.5) and 38.0 (± 12.1) μg/m3 for benzene, toluene and o-xylene, respectively. The rural ambient concentration was 14.0 (± 6.0) and 24.7 (± 11.9) μg/m3 for toluene and o-xylene, respectively. The personal samples had significantly higher (p<0.05) concentrations for all selected VOCs than the urban area samples. Among the area samples, the urban concentrations of benzene and toluene were significantly higher (p<0.05) than the rural concentrations. The personal exposures for all the target VOCs were not significantly different among the jeepney drivers. PMID:19218755

  8. [Pollution characteristics and health risk assessment of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in pesticide factory].

    PubMed

    Tan, Bing; Wang, Tie-Yu; Pang, Bo; Zhu, Zhao-Yun; Wang, Dao-Han; Lü, Yong-Long

    2013-12-01

    A method for determining volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air by summa canister collecting and gas chromatography/ mass spectroscopy detecting was adopted. Pollution condition and characteristics of VOCs were discussed in three representative pesticide factories in Zhangjiakou City, Hebei Province. Meanwhile, an internationally recognized four-step evaluation model of health risk assessment was applied to preliminarily assess the health risk caused by atmospheric VOCs in different exposure ways, inhalation and dermal exposure. Results showed that serious total VOCs pollution existed in all factories. Concentrations of n-hexane (6161.90-6910.00 microg x m(-3)), benzene (126.00-179.30 microg x m(-3)) and 1,3-butadiene (115.00-177.30 microg x m(-3)) exceeded the Chronic Inhalation Reference Concentrations recommended by USEPA, corresponding to 700, 30 and 2 microg x m(-3), respectively. Concentration of dichloromethane (724.00 microg x m(-3)) in factory B was also higher than the reference concentration (600 microg x m(-3)). Results of health risk assessment indicated that non-carcinogenic risk indexes of VOCs ranged from 1.00E-04 to 1.00E + 00 by inhalation exposure, and 1.00E-09 to 1.00E-05 by dermal exposure. Risk indexes of n-hexane and dichloromethane by inhalation exposure in all factories exceeded 1, and risk index of benzene by inhalation in factory B was also higher than 1. Carcinogenic risk indexes exposed to VOCs ranged from 1.00E-08 to 1.00E-03 by inhalation exposure and 1. oo00E -13 to 1.00E-08 by dermal exposure. Cancer risk of 1,3-butadiene by inhalation exceeded 1.0E-04, which lead to definite risk, and those of benzene by inhalation also exceeded the maximum allowable level recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (5.0E-05). The risks of dermal exposure presented the same trend as inhalation exposure, but the level was much lower than that of inhalation exposure. Thus, inhalation exposure of atmospheric VOCs was the

  9. On the use of plant emitted volatile organic compounds for atmospheric chemistry simulation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Hohaus, T.; Yu, Z.; Tillmann, R.; Kuhn, U.; Andres, S.; Kaminski, M.; Wegener, R.; Novelli, A.; Fuchs, H.; Wahner, A.

    2015-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) contribute to about 90% of the emitted VOC globally with isoprene being one of the most abundant BVOC (Guenther 2002). Intensive efforts in studying and understanding the impact of BVOC on atmospheric chemistry were undertaken in the recent years. However many uncertainties remain, e.g. field studies have shown that in wooded areas measured OH reactivity can often not be explained by measured BVOC and their oxidation products (e.g. Noelscher et al. 2012). This discrepancy may be explained by either a lack of understanding of BVOC sources or insufficient understanding of BVOC oxidation mechanisms. Plants emit a complex VOC mixture containing likely many compounds which have not yet been measured or identified (Goldstein and Galbally 2007). A lack of understanding BVOC sources limits bottom-up estimates of secondary products of BVOC oxidation such as SOA. Similarly, the widespread oversimplification of atmospheric chemistry in simulation experiments, using single compound or simple BVOC mixtures to study atmospheric chemistry processes limit our ability to assess air quality and climate impacts of BVOC. We will present applications of the new extension PLUS (PLant chamber Unit for Simulation) to our atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR. PLUS is used to produce representative BVOC mixtures from direct plant emissions. We will report on the performance and characterization of the newly developed chamber. As an exemplary application, trees typical of a Boreal forest environment were used to compare OH reactivity as directly measured by LIF to the OH reactivity calculated from BVOC measured by GC-MS and PTRMS. The comparison was performed for both, primary emissions of trees without any influence of oxidizing agents and using different oxidation schemes. For the monoterpene emitters investigated here, we show that discrepancies between measured and calculated total OH reactivity increase with increasing degree of oxidation

  10. Behavior of VOCs and carbonyl compounds emission from different types of wallpapers in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jungyun; Kim, Suejin; Kim, Arong; Lee, Wooseok; Han, Jinseok; Cha, Jun-Seok

    2014-04-17

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbonyls from three types of commercially available wallpapers (i.e., PVC-coated, paper-backed, natural material-coated) in Korea were evaluated using a 20 L small chamber. A total of 332 products were tested for emission factors, frequencies of occurrence and composition ratios. Toluene and formaldehyde concentrations were below Korean standard values for all products; however, the total VOC (TVOC) concentrations exceeded current standards (4.0 mg/m²·h) for 30 products. The TVOC emission factor for PVC-coated wallpapers, for which polymer materials are used in the manufacturing process, was seven and 16 times higher than those of paper-backed and natural material-coated wallpapers, respectively. The detection frequencies for toluene and formaldehyde were the highest (82.5%) and fourth highest (79.5%), respectively among the 50 target chemical species. The composition ratios for BTEX ranged from 0.3% to 5.1% and unidentified VOCs, which were not qualitatively analyzed using standard gas methods, ranged from 90.2% to 94.8%. Among six carbonyl compounds (acrolein was not detected in any type of wallpaper), acetone had the highest concentrations in PVC-coated (44.6%) and paper-backed (66.6%) wallpapers. Formaldehyde emissions were highest (64.6%) for natural material-coated wallpapers, a result of the formaldehyde-based resin used in the manufacturing process for these products.

  11. Behavior of VOCs and Carbonyl Compounds Emission from Different Types of Wallpapers in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jungyun; Kim, Suejin; Kim, ARong; Lee, Wooseok; Han, Jinseok; Cha, Jun-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbonyls from three types of commercially available wallpapers (i.e., PVC-coated, paper-backed, natural material-coated) in Korea were evaluated using a 20 L small chamber. A total of 332 products were tested for emission factors, frequencies of occurrence and composition ratios. Toluene and formaldehyde concentrations were below Korean standard values for all products; however, the total VOC (TVOC) concentrations exceeded current standards (4.0 mg/m2·h) for 30 products. The TVOC emission factor for PVC-coated wallpapers, for which polymer materials are used in the manufacturing process, was seven and 16 times higher than those of paper-backed and natural material-coated wallpapers, respectively. The detection frequencies for toluene and formaldehyde were the highest (82.5%) and fourth highest (79.5%), respectively among the 50 target chemical species. The composition ratios for BTEX ranged from 0.3% to 5.1% and unidentified VOCs, which were not qualitatively analyzed using standard gas methods, ranged from 90.2% to 94.8%. Among six carbonyl compounds (acrolein was not detected in any type of wallpaper), acetone had the highest concentrations in PVC-coated (44.6%) and paper-backed (66.6%) wallpapers. Formaldehyde emissions were highest (64.6%) for natural material-coated wallpapers, a result of the formaldehyde-based resin used in the manufacturing process for these products. PMID:24747540

  12. Biomass burning contribution to ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the Chengdu-Chongqing Region (CCR), China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lingyu; Chen, Yuan; Zeng, Limin; Shao, Min; Xie, Shaodong; Chen, Wentai; Lu, Sihua; Wu, Yusheng; Cao, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured intensively using an online gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/flame ionization detector (GC-MS/FID) at Ziyang in the Chengdu-Chongqing Region (CCR) from 6 December 2012 to 4 January 2013. Alkanes contributed the most (59%) to mixing ratios of measured non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), while aromatics contributed the least (7%). Methanol was the most abundant oxygenated VOC (OVOC), contributing 42% to the total amount of OVOCs. Significantly elevated VOC levels occurred during three pollution events, but the chemical composition of VOCs did not differ between polluted and clean days. The OH loss rates of VOCs were calculated to estimate their chemical reactivity. Alkenes played a predominant role in VOC reactivity, among which ethylene and propene were the largest contributors; the contributions of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were also considerable. Biomass burning had a significant influence on ambient VOCs during our study. We chose acetonitrile as a tracer and used enhancement ratio to estimate the contribution of biomass burning to ambient VOCs. Biomass burning contributed 9.4%-36.8% to the mixing ratios of selected VOC species, and contributed most (>30% each) to aromatics, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde.

  13. Development of a portable instrument for the continuous analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and its application to environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Etsu; Matsushita, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Mitsuaki; Fuse, Yasuro; Miki, Sadao; Fujimoto, Kiyoomi; Morita, Hiroyoshi; Shimada, Osamu

    2006-01-01

    A small, time efficient and sensitive instrument for the continuous analysis of very volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with a boiling point lower than 100 degrees C in addition to the analysis of VOCs with a boiling point in the range of 100-150 degrees C was developed and applied to the measurement of VOCs in the course of university research and environmental monitoring. VOCs, such as n-hexane, acetone, ethyl acetate, alcohols, benzene, toluene and xylene, were continuously measured once every 30 min. The detection limits of hexane, ethyl acetate, benzene and toluene at a preconcentration time of 10 min were 0.41 microg/m(3) (0.12 ppb), 0.67 microg/m(3) (0.19 ppb), 0.22 microg/m(3) (0.07 ppb) and 0.22 microg/m(3) (0.06 ppb), respectively. The relative standard deviations of VOCs were less than 5%. The sensitivities of the present method VOCs were higher than those of the conventional method. The temporal changes in VOC concentrations in several laboratories and at a plant for the disposal of organic liquid wastes were measured, and the behavior of VOCs was analyzed. All the VOC concentrations, except that of ethyl acetate, determined using the portable instrument were slightly lower than those determined using a passive sampler. The portable instrument developed in the course of this study can be used for the risk assessment and management of chemicals.

  14. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in urban air: How chemistry affects the interpretation of positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Bin; Shao, Min; de Gouw, Joost; Parrish, David D.; Lu, Sihua; Wang, Ming; Zeng, Limin; Zhang, Qian; Song, Yu; Zhang, Jianbo; Hu, Min

    2012-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured online at an urban site in Beijing in August-September 2010. Diurnal variations of various VOC species indicate that VOCs concentrations were influenced by photochemical removal with OH radicals for reactive species and secondary formation for oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs). A photochemical age-based parameterization method was applied to characterize VOCs chemistry. A large part of the variability in concentrations of both hydrocarbons and OVOCs was explained by this method. The determined emission ratios of hydrocarbons to acetylene agreed within a factor of two between 2005 and 2010 measurements. However, large differences were found for emission ratios of some alkanes and C8 aromatics between Beijing and northeastern United States secondary formation from anthropogenic VOCs generally contributed higher percentages to concentrations of reactive aldehydes than those of inert ketones and alcohols. Anthropogenic primary emissions accounted for the majority of ketones and alcohols concentrations. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was also used to identify emission sources from this VOCs data set. The four resolved factors were three anthropogenic factors and a biogenic factor. However, the anthropogenic factors are attributed here to a common source at different stages of photochemical processing rather than three independent sources. Anthropogenic and biogenic sources of VOCs concentrations were not separated completely in PMF. This study indicates that photochemistry of VOCs in the atmosphere complicates the information about separated sources that can be extracted from PMF and the influence of photochemical processing must be carefully considered in the interpretation of source apportionment studies based upon PMF.

  15. Distribution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in surface water, soil, and groundwater within a chemical industry park in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Benhua; Chen, Liang; Huang, Linxian; Wang, Yongseng; Li, Yuehua

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the distribution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the surface water, soil, and groundwater within a chemical industry park in Eastern China. At least one VOC was detected in each of the 20 sampling sites, and the maximum number of VOCs detected in the surface water, groundwater, and soil were 13, 16, and 14, respectively. Two of the 10 VOCs with elevated concentrations detected in surface water, groundwater, and soil were chloroform and 1,2-dichloroethane. The characteristics of VOCs, which include volatility, boiling point, and solubility, could significantly affect their distribution in surface water, soil, and groundwater. However, due to the direct discharging of chemical industry wastewater into surface water, higher concentrations of VOCs (except chloroform) were detected in surface water than in soil and groundwater. Fortunately, the higher volatility of VOCs prevents the VOCs from impacting groundwater, which helps to maintain a lower concentration of VOCs in the groundwater than in both surface water and soil. This is because pollutants with relatively higher boiling points and lower solubilities have higher detection frequencies in soil, and contaminants with relatively lower boiling points and higher solubilities have higher detection frequencies in water, notably in surface water.

  16. Technology projects for characterization--monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    SciTech Connect

    Junk, G.A.; Haas, W.J. Jr.

    1992-07-01

    One hundred thirty technology project titles related to the characterization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at an arid site are listed alphabetically by first contact person in a master compilation that includes phone numbers, addresses, keywords, and short descriptions. Separate tables are presented for 62 field-demonstrated, 36 laboratory-demonstrated, and 35 developing technology projects. The technology projects in each of these three categories are also prioritized in separate summary tables. Additional tables are presented for a number of other categorizations of the technology projects: In Situ; Fiberoptic; Mass Spectrometer; Optical Spectroscopy; Raman or SERS; Ion Mobility or Acoustic; Associated; and Commercial. Four lists of contact person names are provided so details concerning the projects that deal with sampling, and VOCs in gases, waters, and soils (sediments) can be obtained. Finally, seven wide-ranging conclusions based on observations and experiences during this work are presented.

  17. A Novel Wireless Wearable Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Monitoring Device with Disposable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yue; Chen, Cheng; Xian, Xiaojun; Tsow, Francis; Verma, Gaurav; McConnell, Rob; Fruin, Scott; Tao, Nongjian; Forzani, Erica S.

    2016-01-01

    A novel portable wireless volatile organic compound (VOC) monitoring device with disposable sensors is presented. The device is miniaturized, light, easy-to-use, and cost-effective. Different field tests have been carried out to identify the operational, analytical, and functional performance of the device and its sensors. The device was compared to a commercial photo-ionization detector, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and carbon monoxide detector. In addition, environmental operational conditions, such as barometric change, temperature change and wind conditions were also tested to evaluate the device performance. The multiple comparisons and tests indicate that the proposed VOC device is adequate to characterize personal exposure in many real-world scenarios and is applicable for personal daily use. PMID:27918484

  18. Application of horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger for volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission control.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, P M; Dawande, S D

    2013-04-01

    The petroleum products have wide range of volatility and are required to be stored in bulk. The evaporation losses are significant and it is a economic as well as environmental concern, since evaporative losses of petroleum products cause increased VOC in ambient air. Control of these losses poses a major problem for the storage tank designers. Ever rising cost of petroleum products further adds to the gravity of the problem. Condensation is one of the technologies for reducing volatile organic compounds emissions. Condensation is effected by condenser, which is basically a heat exchanger and the heat exchanger configuration plays an important role. The horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger is a promising configuration that finds an application in VOC control. This paper attempts to understand underlying causes of emissions and analyse the option of horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger as vent condenser.

  19. Predicted concentrations in new relocatable classrooms of volatile organic compounds emitted from standard and alternate interior finish materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, Alfred T.; Fisk, William J.; Shendell, Derek G.; Apte, Michael G.

    2001-07-01

    Relocatable classrooms (RCs) are widely employed by California school districts to satisfy rapidly expanding space requirements due to population growth and class size reduction policies. There is public concern regarding indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in schools, particularly in RCs, but very little data to support or dispel these concerns. Several studies are investigating various aspects of IEQ in California schools. This laboratory-based study focused on evaluating the emissions of toxic and/or odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, from materials used to finish the interiors of new RCs. Furthermore, the study implemented a procedure for VOC source reduction by testing and selecting lower-emitting materials as substitutes for standard materials. In total, 17 standard and alternate floor coverings, wall panels and ceiling panels were quantitatively tested for emissions of VOCs using smallscale environmental chambers. Working with the largest northern California manufacturer of conventional RCs and two school districts, specifications were developed for four new RCs to be produced in early summer 2001. Two of these will be predominantly finished with standard materials. Alternate carpet systems, an alternate wall panel covering and an alternate ceiling panel were selected for the two other RCs based on the results of the laboratory study and considerations of cost and anticipated performance and maintenance. Particular emphasis was placed on reducing the concentrations of VOCs on California agency lists of toxic compounds. Indoor concentrations of toxic and odorous VOCs were estimated for the four classrooms by mass balance using the measured VOC emission factors, exposed surface areas of the materials in the RCs, and three ventilation rate scenarios. Results indicate that reductions in the concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde phenol, di(ethylene glycol) butyl ether, vinyl acetate, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene

  20. Quantitative determination of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in milk by multiple dynamic headspace extraction and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Ciccioli, Paolo; Brancaleoni, Enzo; Frattoni, Massimiliano; Fedele, Vincenzo; Claps, Salvatore; Signorelli, Federica

    2004-01-01

    A method for the accurate determination of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in milk samples has been developed and tested. It combines multiple dynamic headspace extraction with GC-MS. Absolute amounts of VOC in the liquid phase are obtained by determining the first order kinetic dependence of the stepwise extraction of the analytes and internal standards from the liquid matrix. Compounds released from milk were collected on a train of traps filled with different solid sorbents to cover all components having a number of carbon atoms ranging from 4 to 15. They were analysed by GC-MS after thermal desorption of VOC from the collecting traps. Quantification of VOC in milk was performed using deuterated compounds as internal standards. The method was used to follow seasonal variations of monoterpenes in goat milk and to detect the impact of air pollution on the quality of milk.

  1. Seasonal variability and source apportionment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the Paris megacity (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudic, Alexia; Gros, Valérie; Sauvage, Stéphane; Locoge, Nadine; Sanchez, Olivier; Sarda-Estève, Roland; Kalogridis, Cerise; Petit, Jean-Eudes; Bonnaire, Nicolas; Baisnée, Dominique; Favez, Olivier; Albinet, Alexandre; Sciare, Jean; Bonsang, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    Within the framework of air quality studies at the megacity scale, highly time-resolved volatile organic compound (C2-C8) measurements were performed in downtown Paris (urban background sites) from January to November 2010. This unique dataset included non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and aromatic/oxygenated species (OVOCs) measured by a GC-FID (gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector) and a PTR-MS (proton transfer reaction - mass spectrometer), respectively. This study presents the seasonal variability of atmospheric VOCs being monitored in the French megacity and their various associated emission sources. Clear seasonal and diurnal patterns differed from one VOC to another as the result of their different origins and the influence of environmental parameters (solar radiation, temperature). Source apportionment (SA) was comprehensively conducted using a multivariate mathematical receptor modeling. The United States Environmental Protection Agency's positive matrix factorization tool (US EPA, PMF) was used to apportion and quantify ambient VOC concentrations into six different sources. The modeled source profiles were identified from near-field observations (measurements from three distinct emission sources: inside a highway tunnel, at a fireplace and from a domestic gas flue, hence with a specific focus on road traffic, wood-burning activities and natural gas emissions) and hydrocarbon profiles reported in the literature. The reconstructed VOC sources were cross validated using independent tracers such as inorganic gases (NO, NO2, CO), black carbon (BC) and meteorological data (temperature). The largest contributors to the predicted VOC concentrations were traffic-related activities (including motor vehicle exhaust, 15 % of the total mass on the annual average, and evaporative sources, 10 %), with the remaining emissions from natural gas and background (23 %), solvent use (20 %), wood-burning (18 %) and a biogenic source (15 %). An important finding of

  2. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart B of... - Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content Limits for Automobile Refinish Coatings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards...

  3. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart B of... - Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content Limits for Automobile Refinish Coatings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards...

  4. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart B of... - Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content Limits for Automobile Refinish Coatings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards...

  5. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart D of... - Volatile Organic Compound (VOC), Content Limits for Architectural Coatings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Volatile Organic Compound (VOC... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards...

  6. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart B of... - Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content Limits for Automobile Refinish Coatings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards...

  7. Safety Evaluation of Osun River Water Containing Heavy Metals and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Rats.

    PubMed

    Azeez, L; Salau, A K; Adewuyi, S O; Osineye, S O; Tijani, K O; Balogun, R O

    2015-12-20

    This study evaluated the pH, heavy metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Osun river water. It also evaluated its safety in rats. Heavy metals were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) while VOCs were determined by gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Male and female rats were exposed to Osun river water for three weeks and then sacrificed. The abundance of heavy metals in Osun river followed the trend Pb > Cd > Zn > Fe > Cr > Cu while VOCs followed the trend benzene < ethylbenzene < toluene < xylene. The concentrations of Pb, Cd and benzene were higher than the permissible limits of Standards Organization of Nigeria (SON) and World Health Organization (WHO) respectively. Rats exposed to Osun river water for three weeks had increased WBC, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), serum proteins and serum aminotransferases. There were also significant decreases in HCT, PLT, liver aminotransferases and liver glutathione compared to the control. These results show that the pollutants in Osun river water are capable of inducing hematological imbalance and liver cell injury. The toxicity induced in blood was sex-dependent affecting female rats more than male rats.

  8. Chlorinated volatile organic compounds (Cl-VOCs) in environment - sources, potential human health impacts, and current remediation technologies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Binbin; Lei, Chao; Wei, Chaohai; Zeng, Guangming

    2014-10-01

    Chlorinated volatile organic compounds (Cl-VOCs), including polychloromethanes, polychloroethanes and polychloroethylenes, are widely used as solvents, degreasing agents and a variety of commercial products. These compounds belong to a group of ubiquitous contaminants that can be found in contaminated soil, air and any kind of fluvial mediums such as groundwater, rivers and lakes. This review presents a summary of the research concerning the production levels and sources of Cl-VOCs, their potential impacts on human health as well as state-of-the-art remediation technologies. Important sources of Cl-VOCs principally include the emissions from industrial processes, the consumption of Cl-VOC-containing products, the disinfection process, as well as improper storage and disposal methods. Human exposure to Cl-VOCs can occur through different routes, including ingestion, inhalation and dermal contact. The toxicological impacts of these compounds have been carefully assessed, and the results demonstrate the potential associations of cancer incidence with exposure to Cl-VOCs. Most Cl-VOCs thus have been listed as priority pollutants by the Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) of China, Environmental Protection Agency of the U.S. (U.S. EPA) and European Commission (EC), and are under close monitor and strict control. Yet, more efforts will be put into the epidemiological studies for the risk of human exposure to Cl-VOCs and the exposure level measurements in contaminated sites in the future. State-of-the-art remediation technologies for Cl-VOCs employ non-destructive methods and destructive methods (e.g. thermal incineration, phytoremediation, biodegradation, advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) and reductive dechlorination), whose advantages, drawbacks and future developments are thoroughly discussed in the later sections.

  9. FORMULATING ULTRA-LOW-VOC WOOD FURNITURE COATINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses the formulation of ultra-low volatile organic compound (VOC) wood furniture coatings. The annual U.S. market for wood coatings is about 240, 000 cu m (63 million gal). In this basis, between 57 and 91 million kg (125 and 200 million lb) of VOCs are emitted i...

  10. SUBSTRATE EFFECTS ON VOC EMISSIONS FROM A LATEX PAINT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of two substrates -- a stainless steel plate and a gypsum board -- on the volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from a latex paint were evaluated by environmental chamber tests. It was found that the amount of VOCs emitted from the painted stainless steel was 2 to...

  11. Influence of volatile organic compounds emitted by Pseudomonas and Serratia strains on Agrobacterium tumefaciens biofilms.

    PubMed

    Plyuta, Vladimir; Lipasova, Valentina; Popova, Alexandra; Koksharova, Olga; Kuznetsov, Alexander; Szegedi, Erno; Chernin, Leonid; Khmel, Inessa

    2016-07-01

    The ability to form biofilms plays an important role in bacteria-host interactions, including plant pathogenicity. In this work, we investigated the action of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by rhizospheric strains of Pseudomonas chlororaphis 449, Pseudomonas fluorescens B-4117, Serratia plymuthica IC1270, as well as Serratia proteamaculans strain 94, isolated from spoiled meat, on biofilms formation by three strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens which are causative agents of crown-gall disease in a wide range of plants. In dual culture assays, the pool of volatiles emitted by the tested Pseudomonas and Serratia strains suppressed the formation of biofilms of A. tumefaciens strains grown on polycarbonate membrane filters and killed Agrobacterium cells in mature biofilms. The individual VOCs produced by the tested Pseudomonas strains, that is, ketones (2-nonanone, 2-heptanone, 2-undecanone), and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) produced by Serratia strains, were shown to kill A. tumefaciens cells in mature biofilms and suppress their formation. The data obtained in this study suggest an additional potential of some ketones and DMDS as protectors of plants against A. tumefaciens strains, whose virulence is associated with the formation of biofilms on the infected plants.

  12. Measurements of volatile organic compounds emitted from plants in the metropolitan area of São Paulo City , Brazil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, L.; Pisani, S.; Pool, C.; Vasconcellos, P.

    2003-04-01

    The presence of the biogenic hydrocarbons in an NO_x-containing atmosphere can enhance ozone generation and the impact of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from vegetation on atmospheric chemistry has been investigated. No study of VOC emission rates from plant species has been carried out in São Paulo City, Brazil, prior to this work. This study is part of a three-years project on biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions from species of plants found in the vegetation of the São Paulo metropolitan area. Typical plants (Alchornea sidifolia, Cupania oblongifolia, Cecropia pachystachia, Casearia sylvestris, Machaerium villosum, Croton floribundus, Myrcia rostrata, Solanum erianthum and Ficus insípida) were selected and identical species were studied in urban, sub-urban and forest regions. Biogenic hydrocarbons were determined placing branches of plants in enclosures and measuring the accumulation of emitted compounds in an all-Teflon chamber, the cuvette system. Measuring ambient VOC concentration adsorptive preconcentration, followed by GC-MS after thermal desorption of the sample, was employed to determine components heavier than C_5. Collection of carbonyl compounds on 2, 4-dinitrophenylhydrazine coated particles followed by HPLC-UV was used to analyze low molecular weight carbonyl compounds. Emissions rates of isoprene, a-pinene, camphene and limonene ranged from 0.01 to 2.16 μg C/h.g and emissions rates of aldehydes (C_1 - C_6), acrolein, methacrolein, 2-butanone and acetone ranged from 0.04 to 4.20 μg C/h.g. Ambient and chamber temperatures, relative humidity, light intensity, O_3 and NO_x were monitored during experiments.

  13. StreamVOC--A Deterministic Source-Apportionment Model to Estimate Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in Rivers and Streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asher, William E.; Bender, David A.; Zogorski, John S.; Bartholomay, Roy C.

    2006-01-01

    This report documents the construction and verification of the model, StreamVOC, that estimates (1) the time- and position-dependent concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in rivers and streams as well as (2) the source apportionment (SA) of those concentrations. The model considers how different types of sources and loss processes can act together to yield a given observed VOC concentration. Reasons for interest in the relative and absolute contributions of different sources to contaminant concentrations include the need to apportion: (1) the origins for an observed contamination, and (2) the associated human and ecosystem risks. For VOCs, sources of interest include the atmosphere (by absorption), as well as point and nonpoint inflows of VOC-containing water. Loss processes of interest include volatilization to the atmosphere, degradation, and outflows of VOC-containing water from the stream to local ground water. This report presents the details of StreamVOC and compares model output with measured concentrations for eight VOCs found in the Aberjona River at Winchester, Massachusetts. Input data for the model were obtained during a synoptic study of the stream system conducted July 11-13, 2001, as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. The input data included a variety of basic stream characteristics (for example, flows, temperature, and VOC concentrations). The StreamVOC concentration results agreed moderately well with the measured concentration data for several VOCs and provided compound-dependent SA estimates as a function of longitudinal distance down the river. For many VOCs, the quality of the agreement between the model-simulated and measured concentrations could be improved by simple adjustments of the model input parameters. In general, this study illustrated: (1) the considerable difficulty of quantifying correctly the locations and magnitudes of ground-water-related sources of

  14. TECHNICAL JUSTIFICATION FOR CHOOSING PROPANE AS A CALIBRATION AGENT FOR TOTAL FLAMMABLE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) DETERMINATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    DOUGLAS, J.G.

    2006-07-06

    This document presents the technical justification for choosing and using propane as a calibration standard for estimating total flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in an air matrix. A propane-in-nitrogen standard was selected based on a number of criteria: (1) has an analytical response similar to the VOCs of interest, (2) can be made with known accuracy and traceability, (3) is available with good purity, (4) has a matrix similar to the sample matrix, (5) is stable during storage and use, (6) is relatively non-hazardous, and (7) is a recognized standard for similar analytical applications. The Waste Retrieval Project (WRP) desires a fast, reliable, and inexpensive method for screening the flammable VOC content in the vapor-phase headspace of waste containers. Table 1 lists the flammable VOCs of interest to the WRP. The current method used to determine the VOC content of a container is to sample the container's headspace and submit the sample for gas chromatography--mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The driver for the VOC measurement requirement is safety: potentially flammable atmospheres in the waste containers must be allowed to diffuse prior to processing the container. The proposed flammable VOC screening method is to inject an aliquot of the headspace sample into an argon-doped pulsed-discharge helium ionization detector (Ar-PDHID) contained within a gas chromatograph. No actual chromatography is performed; the sample is transferred directly from a sample loop to the detector through a short, inert transfer line. The peak area resulting from the injected sample is proportional to the flammable VOC content of the sample. However, because the Ar-PDHID has different response factors for different flammable VOCs, a fundamental assumption must be made that the agent used to calibrate the detector is representative of the flammable VOCs of interest that may be in the headspace samples. At worst, we desire that calibration with the selected calibrating

  15. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human lung epithelial A549 cells caused by airborne volatile organic compounds emitted from pine wood and oriented strand boards.

    PubMed

    Gminski, Richard; Tang, Tao; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2010-06-16

    Due to the massive reduction of air-change rates in modern, energy-saving houses and dwellings, the contribution of volatile organic compound (VOCs) emissions from wood-based materials to indoor air quality has become increasingly important. To evaluate toxicity of VOC mixtures typically emitted from pine wood and oriented strand boards (OSB) and their main constituents (selected terpenes and aldehydes), cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were investigated in human A549 lung cells. To facilitate exposure directly via gas phase, a 250 L emission chamber was combined with a Vitrocell exposure system. VOC exposure concentrations were measured by GC/MSD. Biological effects were determined after an exposure time of 1h by measuring cytotoxicity (erythrosine B staining) and genotoxicity (comet assay). Neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic effects were observed for VOC mixtures emitted from pine wood or OSB at loading factors of approximately 13 m(2)/m(3) (worst case conditions) of the panels (with maximum VOC levels of about 80 mg/m(3)) in comparison to clean air. While alpha-pinene and Delta(3)-carene did not induce toxic effects even at exposure concentrations of up to 1800 mg/m(3) and 600 mg/m(3), respectively, hexanal showed a cytotoxic effect at 2000 mg/m(3). The alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes 2-heptenal and 2-octenal caused genotoxic effects in concentrations exceeding 100mg/m(3) and 40 mg/m(3), respectively. In conclusion, high concentrations of VOCs and VOC mixtures emitted from pine wood and OSB did not lead to adverse effects in A549 human lung cells even at concentrations 10(2) to 10(5)-fold higher than those found in normal indoor air. Attention must be paid to mutagenic and possibly carcinogenic alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes.

  16. Organic liquids storage tanks volatile organic compounds (VOCS) emissions dispersion and risk assessment in developing countries: the case of Dar-es-Salaam City, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Msafiri M

    2006-05-01

    The emission estimation of nine volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from eight organic liquids storage tanks companies in Dar-es-Salaam City Tanzania has been done by using US EPA standard regulatory storage tanks emission model (TANKS 4.9b). Total VOCs atmospheric emission has been established to be 853.20 metric tones/yr. It has been established further that petrol storage tanks contribute about 87% of total VOCs emitted, while tanks for other refined products and crude oil were emitting 10% and 3% of VOCs respectively. Of the eight sources (companies), the highest emission value from a single source was 233,222.94 kg/yr and the lowest single source emission value was 6881.87 kg/yr. The total VOCs emissions estimated for each of the eight sources were found to be higher than the standard level of 40,000 kg/yr per source for minor source according to US EPA except for two sources, which were emitting VOCs below the standard level. The annual emissions per single source for each of the VOCs were found to be below the US EPA emissions standard which is 2,000 kg/yr in all companies except the emission of hexane from company F1 which was slightly higher than the standard. The type of tanks used seems to significantly influence the emission rate. Vertical fixed roof tanks (VFRT) emit a lot more than externally floating roof tanks (EFRT) and internally floating roof tanks (IFRT). The use of IFRT and EFRT should be encouraged especially for storage of petrol which had highest atmospheric emission contribution. Model predicted atmospheric emissions are less than annual losses measured by companies in all the eight sources. It is possible that there are other routes for losses beside atmospheric emissions. It is therefore important that waste reduction efforts in these companies are directed not only to reducing atmospheric emissions, but also prevention of the spillage and leakage of stored liquid and curbing of the frequently reported illegal siphoning of stored products

  17. Spatial and temporal trends of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in a rural area of northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Parra, M A; González, L; Elustondo, D; Garrigó, J; Bermejo, R; Santamaría, J M

    2006-10-15

    Ambient concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured at 40 rural sampling points in Navarre (northern Spain). Air samples were collected by means of sorbent passive sampling and analyzed by thermal desorption (TD) and gas chromatography/mass-selective detector (GC/MSD). A total of 140 VOCs were identified during the study, which was carried out between May to October 2004 for a total of a 10 biweekly sampling campaigns. Concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m/p-xylenes, o-xylene (BTEX) and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene were determined in order to investigate their temporal and spatial distributions. Geostatistical analysis pointed to traffic as the main emission source of these compounds. Supporting this idea, BTEX and nitrogen oxides concentrations were found to be highly significantly correlated (r = 0.495, P = 0.001), whereas a strong negative correlation between BTEX and ozone was also observed (r = -0.355, P = 0.025). The concentrations for the BTEX group were similar to the values that have been previously reported for other rural areas.

  18. Emission and Chemistry of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) as Observed at T3: Contrast of the Dry and Wet Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; McKinney, K. A.; Watson, T. B.; Springston, S. R.; Seco, R.; Park, J. H.; Kim, S.; Shilling, J. E.; Guenther, A. B.; Yee, L.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Wernis, R. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Brito, J.; Artaxo, P.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Manzi, A. O.; Martin, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical rainforests are vigorous emitters of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) year round. Despite the small seasonal variation expected for tropical rainforests, converging evidence has shown that, among other factors, there can be considerable differences between the wet and dry seasons in leaf coverage, species composition, leaf-level photosynthetic photo flux, and ozone and NOx levels, which are important controlling factors of VOC emission and chemistry. There have been, however, a limited number of studies on the seasonality of VOC concentrations over tropical rainforests. As part of the GoAmazon 2014/5 Experiment, two-month continuous measurements of VOC compounds were carried out using a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) at the T3 site in both the wet and dry seasons of 2014. During the dry season most biogenic VOC species and their oxidation products exhibited increased concentration. For some species, the diel pattern was also different between the two seasons. Implications of the seasonality of the emission and chemistry of biogenic VOCs, in particular isoprene and terpenes, are discussed.

  19. A Compendium of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Released By Human Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Filipiak, Wojciech; Mochalski, Pawel; Filipiak, Anna; Ager, Clemens; Cumeras, Raquel; Davis, Cristina E.; Agapiou, Agapios; Unterkofler, Karl; Troppmair, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) offer unique insights into ongoing biochemical processes in healthy and diseased humans. Yet, their diagnostic use is hampered by the limited understanding of their biochemical or cellular origin and their frequently unclear link to the underlying diseases. Major advancements are expected from the analyses of human primary cells, cell lines and cultures of microorganisms. In this review, a database of 125 reliably identified VOCs previously reported for human healthy and diseased cells was assembled and their potential origin is discussed. The majority of them have also been observed in studies with other human matrices (breath, urine, saliva, feces, blood, skin emanations). Moreover, continuing improvements of qualitative and quantitative analyses, based on the recommendations of the ISO-11843 guidelines, are suggested for the necessary standardization of analytical procedures and better comparability of results. The data provided contribute to arriving at a more complete human volatilome and suggest potential volatile biomarkers for future validation. Dedication: This review is dedicated to the memory of Prof. Dr. Anton Amann, who sadly passed away on January 6, 2015. He was motivator and motor for the field of breath research. PMID:27160536

  20. Modeling emissions of volatile organic compounds from silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), necessary reactants for photochemical smog formation, are emitted from numerous sources. Limited available data suggest that dairy farms emit VOCs with cattle feed, primarily silage, being the primary source. Process-based models of VOC transfer within and from si...

  1. First results on headspace-solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of volatile organic compounds emitted by wax objects in museums.

    PubMed

    Lattuati-Derieux, A; Thao, S; Langlois, J; Regert, M

    2008-04-11

    Sampling volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by a large variety of materials is nowadays a very useful technique for analytical purpose. In the field of cultural heritage, it can be applied to identify some constituents of museum artefacts off-gassing VOCs without sampling on the object itself. In this study, we focused on objects made of wax. First volatiles emitted by a reference beeswax were trapped and identified by headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME)-gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC/MS). This allowed to identify numerous volatile biomarkers, namely saturated n-alkanes from C(10) to C(21), saturated n-carboxylic acids containing 6-12 carbon atoms, benzene and cinnamic derivatives that may be considered as volatile biomarkers of beeswax. The SPME strategy was then performed at the Orsay museum (Paris) in a showcase containing a wax sculpture "Le Mineur de la Loire" by J.-J. Carriès. The use of beeswax in this sculpture was unequivocally confirmed by the VOCs concentrated in the showcase, together with a set of characteristic molecular compounds identified by HT-GC/MS. HS-SPME-GC/MS thus appears to be a powerful in situ and non-invasive analytical technique that allows to identify natural substances in the field of cultural heritage without any sampling of solid matter from the object. The results obtained are promising for orientating the strategy of preventive conservation related to works of art characterised by important emission of VOCs.

  2. Systemic resistance induced by volatile organic compounds emitted by plant growth-promoting fungi in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Naznin, Hushna Ara; Kiyohara, Daigo; Kimura, Minako; Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Shimizu, Masafumi; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) were extracted and identified from plant growth-promoting fungi (PGPF), Phoma sp., Cladosporium sp. and Ampelomyces sp., using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Among the three VOC extracted, two VOC blends (emitted from Ampelomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp.) significantly reduced disease severity in Arabidopsis plants against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst). Subsequently, m-cresol and methyl benzoate (MeBA) were identified as major active volatile compounds from Ampelomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp., respectively, and found to elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR) against the pathogen. Molecular signaling for disease suppression by the VOC were investigated by treating different mutants and transgenic Arabidopsis plants impaired in salicylic acid (SA) or Jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) signaling pathways with m-cresol and MeBA followed by challenge inoculation with Pst. Results show that the level of protection was significantly lower when JA/ET-impaired mutants were treated with MeBA, and in SA-, and JA/ET-disrupted mutants after m-cresol treatment, indicating the involvement of these signal transduction pathways in the ISR primed by the volatiles. Analysis of defense-related genes by real-time qRT-PCR showed that both the SA-and JA-signaling pathways combine in the m-cresol signaling of ISR, whereas MeBA is mainly involved in the JA-signaling pathway with partial recruitment of SA-signals. The ET-signaling pathway was not employed in ISR by the volatiles. Therefore, this study identified two novel volatile components capable of eliciting ISR that may be promising candidates in biological control strategy to protect plants from diseases.

  3. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from feedlot pen surface materials as affected by within pen location, moisture, and temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the effects of pen location, moisture, and temperature on emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from surface materials obtained from feedlot pens where beef cattle were fed a diet containing 30% wet distillers grain plus solubles. Surface material...

  4. CRITICAL EVALUATION OF THE DIFFUSION HYPOTHESIS IN THE THEORY OF POROUS MEDIA VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) SOURCES AND SINKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper proposes three alternative, diffusion-limited mathematical models to account for volatile organic compound (VOC) interactions with indoor sinks, using the linear isotherm model as a reference point. (NOTE: Recent reports by both the U.S. EPA and a study committee of the...

  5. Measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in libraries and archives in Florence (Italy).

    PubMed

    Cincinelli, A; Martellini, T; Amore, A; Dei, L; Marrazza, G; Carretti, E; Belosi, F; Ravegnani, F; Leva, P

    2016-12-01

    Indoor air samples from libraries and archives in Florence, Italy, were collected and analysed for a variety of volatile organic compounds. The aim was to perform a characterisation of the indoor air quality, and try to elucidate if there are VOCs that may cause or result from the determination of the cultural heritage institutions. All compounds of interest were regularly detected, with BTEXs (Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, Xylenes) being the most abundant and followed by cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes, aldehydes, terpenes and organic acids. The prevalence and qualitative characteristics, such as concentrations, profiles and indoor/outdoor ratios of BTEXs underline the important influence of the outdoor air infiltrations on the indoor air concentrations. Acetic acid that is a substance that can oxidise books and other exposed objects was detected at concentrations ranging between 1.04 and 18.9μgm(-3), while furfural, that is a known marker of paper degradation, was constantly present at concentrations that ranged between 5.26 and 32.6μgm(-3). This work shows the importance that indoor air quality monitoring campaigns can have in order to give early warning to cultural heritage institution managers about the impact that indoor air quality can have on exposed and/or preserved objects.

  6. Solid-phase microcolumn extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry identification of volatile organic compounds emitted by paper.

    PubMed

    Hrivnák, Ján; Tölgyessy, Peter; Figedyová, Sona; Katuscák, Svetozár

    2009-11-15

    A rapid non-destructive sampling technique for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by paper sheets is described. A capillary, which is connected to a microcolumn packed with Tenax TA, is inserted between two sheets at the centre of a paper stack encapsulated inside a PET/Al/PE composite foil. The other end of the microcolumn is connected to a gas-tight syringe and an appropriate volume of gaseous phase is aspirated. The microcolumn is then thermally desorbed in a modified GC inlet (modification is presented) and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In the chromatogram from the analysis of artificially aged paper sample 21 compounds were identified. Advantages of the method including the short sampling time (1 min), simplicity and economic aspect are discussed.

  7. High-VOC biochar-effectiveness of post-treatment measures and potential health risks related to handling and storage.

    PubMed

    Buss, Wolfram; Mašek, Ondřej

    2016-10-01

    Biochar can contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs), formed and introduced during the pyrolysis process. In some pyrolysis units or under specific conditions during production, pyrolysis vapours can deposit on biochar in significant amounts resulting in high-VOC biochar. In this study, it was tested to which extent VOCs are released from such high-VOC biochars when openly stored, which post-treatment measures are most effective in reducing phytotoxic potential and whether the VOC emissions could exceed human health-related threshold values. It was shown that the initial VOC release of high-VOC biochars can exceed occupational exposure limit values and even after 2 months, the biochars still emitted VOCs exceeding air quality guideline values. Consequently, these specific high-VOC biochars pose health risks when handled or stored openly. Simple open-air storage turned out to be insufficient for VOC removal. Low temperature treatment, on the other hand, removed VOCs from the high-VOC biochars effectively and alleviated any human health risks and phytotoxic effects. In addition to the high-VOC biochars, a low-VOC biochar was tested which did not emit any VOCs and was even able to sorb VOCs from the VOC-rich biochar to a certain extent. Thermal treatment and blending with low-VOC biochar are methods which could be used in practise to treat high-VOC biochar, reducing VOC emissions. This study revealed significant new findings on the topic of VOCs in biochar which highlights the need to include VOCs in the list of priority contaminants in biochar.

  8. Characterization of Odorous Compounds (VOC and Carbonyl Compounds) in the Ambient Air of Yeosu and Gwangyang, Large Industrial Areas of South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Young-Kyo; Suvarapu, Lakshmi Narayana; Baek, Sung-Ok

    2014-01-01

    Odorous compounds play an important role in air pollution in industrial areas and the residential areas surrounding them. This study measured the odorous volatile organic compounds (VOC) and carbonyl compounds at Yeosu and Gwangyang, two large industrial areas of South Korea, during four seasons of 2008-2009. Along with these two cities, the same odorous compounds were measured at Suncheon, which was selected as a control site. The concentrations of VOC and carbonyl compounds that were listed as odorous air pollutants by the Ministry of Environment of South Korea are discussed. Benzene and formaldehyde were included in the target analytes because of their carcinogenic nature. Most researchers only examined the concentration of odorous compounds in ambient air but the present study evaluated the odor intensity, which is a new parameter that will help better understand the precise odor perceived by people. This paper describes the seasonal variations and spatial distribution of the above-mentioned odorous compounds at the specified sites. Pearson correlation coefficients between the odorous compounds and other air pollutants, such as ozone, CO, SO2, NO2, and PM10, and meteorological conditions, such as temperature and wind speed, provide the source information of odorous VOC and carbonyl compounds. PMID:25309959

  9. The pollution characteristics of odor, volatile organochlorinated compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emitted from plastic waste recycling plants.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Chen, Mei-Lien; Chang, Keng-Fu; Chang, Fu-Kuei; Mao, I-Fang

    2009-02-01

    Plastic waste treatment trends toward recycling in many countries; however, the melting process in the facilities which adopt material recycling method for treating plastic waste may emit toxicants and cause sensory annoyance. The objectives of this study were to analyze the pollution characteristics of the emissions from the plastic waste recycling plants, particularly in harmful volatile organochlorinated compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), odor levels and critical odorants. Ten large recycling plants were selected for analysis of odor concentration (OC), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and PAHs inside and outside the plants using olfactometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detector, respectively. The olfactometric results showed that the melting processes used for treating polyethylene/polypropylene (PE/PP) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic waste significantly produced malodor, and the odor levels at downwind boundaries were 100-229 OC, which all exceeded Taiwan's EPA standard of 50 OC. Toluene, ethylbenzene, 4-methyl-2-pentanone, methyl methacrylate and acrolein accounted for most odors compared to numerous VOCs. Sixteen organochlorinated compounds were measured in the ambient air emitted from the PVC plastic waste recycling plant and total concentrations were 245-553 microg m(-3); most were vinyl chloride, chloroform and trichloroethylene. Concentrations of PAHs inside the PE/PP plant were 8.97-252.16 ng m(-3), in which the maximum level were 20-fold higher than the levels detected from boundaries. Most of these recycling plants simply used filter to treat the melting fumes, and this could not efficiently eliminate the gaseous compounds and malodor. Improved exhaust air pollution control were strongly recommended in these industries.

  10. The indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) characteristics and source identification in a new university campus in Tianjin, China.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jian; Liu, Junjie; Pei, Jingjing

    2017-02-02

    This study investigates the VOCs constituents and concentration levels on a new university campus, where all of the buildings including classrooms and student dormitories were newly built and decorated within one year. Investigated indoor environments, include dormitories, classrooms and the library. About 30 dormitory buildings with different furniture loading ratio were measured. The characteristics of the indoor VOCs species are analysed and possible sources are identified. The VOCs are analysed with GC-MS method. It was found that the average TVOC concentration can reach up to 2.44 mg/m3. Alkenes were the most abundant VOCs in dormitory rooms, contribute to 86.5% of the total VOCs concentration. Concentration of the ?-Pinene is the highest among the alkenes. Unlike the dormitory rooms, there is almost no room with TVOC concentration above 0.6 mg/m3 in classroom and library buildings. Formaldehyde concentration in the dormitory rooms increased about 23.7% after the installation of furniture, and the highest level reached 0.068 mg/m3. Ammonia released from the building anti-freeze material results to an average indoor concentration of 0.28 mg/m3, which is 100% over- the threshold, and should be seriously considered. Further experiments were conducted to analyse the source of the ?-Pinene and some alkanes in dormitory rooms. The results showed that the ?-Pinene mainly comes from the bed boards while the wardrobes are the main sources of alkanes. The contribution of the pinewood bed boards to the ?-Pinene and TVOC concentration can reach up to above 90%. The same type rooms are sampled 1 year later and the decay rate of ?-Pinene is quite high close to 100% which almost cannot be detected in the sampled rooms. Implication Statement Analysis of indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in newly built campus buildings in China identified the specific constituents of indoor VOCs contaminants exposed to Chinese college students. The main detected substance includes

  11. Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from Biomass Combustion - Emission Ratios, OH Reactivities and SOA Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, W. C.; Gilman, J. B.; Goldan, P. D.; Warneke, C.; Degouw, J.; Veres, P. R.; Burling, I. R.; Yokelson, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    Multiple instruments including a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS), a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), a proton ion trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS), a negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometer (NI-PT-CIMS) and a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) acquired data from 77 burns of various biomass fuels conducted at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Sciences Laboratory (FSL) in Missoula, MT in February 2009. We compare VOC measurements of oxygenates, aromatics and biogenics from the various instruments as well as from the various fuel types collected in southeastern and southwestern regions of the United States. The relative contribution of the combustion species to the total reactivity with the OH radical is calculated and compared to ambient air reactivity in various locations. Total reactivity for measured species in these fires occasionally exceeded 1000 sec-1 with the majority of this reactivity due to alkenes. In addition, we investigate the relative contribution of the combustion species to the potential for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Measurements of several compounds not previously reported in various urban ambient air measurement campaigns such as pyrazole (C3H4N2), pyrrole (C4H5N), benzofuran (C8H6O) and 2-furanaldehyde (C5H4O2), which are highly reactive with OH, will be presented.

  12. Emission and profile characteristic of volatile organic compounds emitted from coke production, iron smelt, heating station and power plant in Liaoning Province, China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianwu; Deng, Hao; Bai, Zhipeng; Kong, Shaofei; Wang, Xiuyan; Hao, Jiming; Han, Xinyu; Ning, Ping

    2015-05-15

    107 kinds of C₂-C₁₂ volatile organic compound (VOC) mass concentrations and profiles for four types of coal-fired stationary sources in Liaoning Province were studied by a dilution sampling system and GC-MS analysis method, which are of significant importance with regard to VOC emissions in northeast of China. The results showed that there were some differences among these VOC source profiles. The total mass concentrations of analyzed 107 VOC species varied from 10,917 to 19,652 μg m(-3). Halogenated hydrocarbons exhibited higher mass percentages for the VOC source profiles of iron smelt (48.8%) and coke production plant (37.7%). Aromatic hydrocarbons were the most abundant in heating station plant (69.1%). Ketones, alcohols and acetates held 45.0% of total VOCs in thermal power plant. For non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), which are demanded for photochemical assessment in the USA, toluene and n-hexane were the most abundant species in the iron smelt, coke production and thermal power plant, with the mass percentages of 64.8%, 52.7% and 38.6%, respectively. Trimethylbenzene, n-propylbenzene and o,m-ethyltoluene approximately accounted for 70.0% in heating station plant. NMHCs emitted from coke production, iron smelt, heating station and power plant listed above presented different chemical reactivities. The average OH loss rate of NMHCs from heating station, was 4 to 5.6 times higher than that of NMHCs from iron smelt, coke production and power plant, which implies that VOCs emitted from heating station in northeast of China should be controlled firstly to avoid photochemical ozone pollution and protect human health. There are significant variations in the ratios of benzene/toluene and m, p-xylene/ethylbenzene of these coal-fired source profiles. The representativeness of the coal-fired sources studied and the VOC samples collected should be more closely examined. The accuracy of VOC source profiles related to coal-fired processes is highly dependent on

  13. Ground water: volatile organic compounds (VOC's). January 1970-December 1988 (Citations from the NTIS data base). Report for January 1970-December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning volatile organic compounds (VOC's) in ground water. Articles cover the detection, identification, and quantification of VOC's in ground water. Detection methods are covered as well as means for following the spread of the compounds. Citations also cover the removal of volatile organic compounds from groundwater. Superfund decisions, environmental impact statements, and reports of the Installation Restoration Program undertaken by the military are included. (Contains 161 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  14. Trends in selected ambient volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations and a comparison to mobile source emission trends in California's South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yanbo; Fuentes, Mark; Rieger, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Trends in ambient concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) in the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) are compared to trends in VOC emissions from Light-Duty Gasoline Vehicles (LDGV) tested on chassis dynamometers and to trends observed in tunnel studies during the same period to understand the impacts of gasoline vehicle emissions on ambient VOC concentrations from 1999 to 2009. Annual median concentrations for most ambient VOCs decreased 40% from 1999 to 2009 in the SoCAB, based on data from the Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS). Annual concentration decreases of most compounds, except 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, are highly correlated with the decrease of acetylene, a marker for tailpipe emissions from LDGV. This indicates that ambient VOC concentration decreases were likely due to tailpipe emission reductions from gasoline vehicles. Air Toxics Monitoring Network data also support this conclusion. Benzene concentration-normalized ratios for most compounds except ethane, propane, isoprene, and 2,2,4-trimethylpentane were stable even as these compound concentrations decreased significantly from 1999 to 2009. Such stability suggests that the main sources of ambient VOC were still the same from 1999 to 2009. The comparison of trends in dynamometer testing and tunnel studies also shows that tailpipe emissions remained the dominant source of tunnel LDGV emissions. The pronounced changes in 2,2,4-trimethylpentane ratios due to the introduction of Phase 3 gasoline also confirm the substantial impact of LDGV emissions on ambient VOCs. Diurnal ambient VOC data also suggest that LDGV tailpipe emissions remained the dominant source of ambient VOCs in the SoCAB in 2009. Our conclusion, which is that current inventory models underestimate VOC emissions from mobile sources, is consistent with that of several recent studies of ambient trends in the SoCAB. Our study showed that tailpipe emissions remained a bigger contributor to ambient VOCs than evaporative

  15. Degradation Pathways for Geogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Soil Gases from the Solfatara Crater (Campi Flegrei, Southern Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassi, F.; Venturi, S.; Cabassi, J.; Capecchiacci, F.; Nisi, B., Sr.; Vaselli, O.

    2014-12-01

    The chemical composition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil gases from the Solfatara crater (Campi Flegrei, Southern Italy) was analyzed to investigate the effects of biogeochemical processes occurring within the crater soil on gases discharged from the hydrothermal reservoir and released into the atmosphere through diffuse degassing. In this system, two fumarolic vents (namely Bocca Grande and Bocca Nuova) are the preferential pathways for hydrothermal fluid uprising. For our goal, the chemistry of VOCs discharged from these sites were compared to that of soil gases. Our results highlighted that C4-C9 alkanes, alkenes, S-bearing compounds and alkylated aromatics produced at depth were the most prone to degradation processes, such as oxidation-reduction and hydration-dehydration reactions, as well as to microbial activity. Secondary products, which were enriched in sites characterized by low soil gas fluxes, mostly consisted of aldheydes, ketons, esters, ethers, organic acids and, subordinately, alcohols. Benzene, phenol and hydrofluorocarbons (HCFCs) produced at depth were able to transit through the soil almost undisturbed, independently on the emission rate of diffuse degassing. The presence of cyclics was possibly related to an independent low-temperature VOC source, likely within sedimentary formations overlying the hydrothermal reservoir. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) were possibly due to air contamination. This study demonstrated the strict control of biogeochemical processes on the behaviour of hydrothermal VOCs that, at least at a local scale, may have a significant impact on air quality. Laboratory experiments conducted at specific chemical-physical conditions and in presence of different microbial populations may provide useful information for the reconstruction of the degradation pathways controlling fate and behaviour of VOCs in the soil.

  16. Industrial sector-based volatile organic compound (VOC) source profiles measured in manufacturing facilities in the Pearl River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Junyu; Yu, Yufan; Mo, Ziwei; Zhang, Zhou; Wang, Xinming; Yin, Shasha; Peng, Kang; Yang, Yang; Feng, Xiaoqiong; Cai, Huihua

    2013-07-01

    Industrial sector-based VOC source profiles are reported for the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, China, based source samples (stack emissions and fugitive emissions) analyzed from sources operating under normal conditions. The industrial sectors considered are printing (letterpress, offset and gravure printing processes), wood furniture coating, shoemaking, paint manufacturing and metal surface coating. More than 250 VOC species were detected following US EPA methods TO-14 and TO-15. The results indicated that benzene and toluene were the major species associated with letterpress printing, while ethyl acetate and isopropyl alcohol were the most abundant compounds of other two printing processes. Acetone and 2-butanone were the major species observed in the shoemaking sector. The source profile patterns were found to be similar for the paint manufacturing, wood furniture coating, and metal surface coating sectors, with aromatics being the most abundant group and oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) as the second largest contributor in the profiles. While OVOCs were one of the most significant VOC groups detected in these five industrial sectors in the PRD region, they have not been reported in most other source profile studies. Such comparisons with other studies show that there are differences in source profiles for different regions or countries, indicating the importance of developing local source profiles.

  17. In vivo analysis of palm wine (Elaeis guineensis) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasekan, Ola; Otto, Sabine

    2009-04-01

    The in vivo volatile organic compounds (VOCs) release patterns in palm wine was carried out using the PTR-MS. In order to analyze the complex mixtures of VOCs in palm wine, the fragmentation patterns of 14 known aroma compounds of palm wine were also investigated. Results revealed masses m/z (43, 47, 61, 65, 75, 89 and 93) as the predominant ones measured in-breathe exhaled from the nose, during consumption of palm wine. Further studies of aroma's fragmentation patterns, showed that the m/z 43 is characteristic of fragment of various compounds, while m/z 47 is ethanol, m/z 61(acetic acid), m/z 65 (protonated ethanol cluster ions), m/z 75 (methyl acetate), m/z 89 (acetoin) and m/z 93 (2-phenylethanol) respectively. The dynamic release parameters (Imax and tmax) of the 7 masses revealed significant (P = 0.05) differences, between maximum intensity (Imax) and no significant (P = 0.05) differences between tmax among VOCs respectively.

  18. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the food and drink industries of the European community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passant, Neil R.; Richardson, Stephen J.; Swannell, Richard P. J.; Gibson, N.; Woodfield, M. J.; van der Lugt, Jan Pieter; Wolsink, Johan H.; Hesselink, Paul G. M.

    Estimates were made of the amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released into the atmosphere as a result of the industrial manufacture and processing of food and drink in the European Community. The estimates were based on a review of literature sources, industrial and government contacts and recent measurements. Data were found on seven food manufacturing sectors (baking, vegetable oil extraction, solid fat processing, animal rendering, fish meal processing, coffee production and sugar beet processing) and three drink manufacturing sectors (brewing, spirit production and wine making). The principle of a data quality label is advocated to illustrate the authors' confidence in the data, and to highlight areas for further research. Emissions of ethanol from bread baking and spirit maturation were found to be the principle sources. However, significant losses of hexane and large quantities of an ill-defined mixture of partially oxidized hydrocarbons were noted principally from seed oil extraction and the drying of plant material, respectively. This latter mixture included low molecular weight aldehydes, carboxylic acids, ketones, amines and esters. However, the precise composition of many emissions were found to be poorly understood. The total emission from the food and drink industry in the EC was calculated as 260 kt yr -1. However, many processes within the target industry were found to be completely uncharacterized and therefore not included in the overall estimate (e.g. soft drink manufacture, production of animal food, flavourings, vinegar, tea, crisps and other fried snacks). Moreover, the use of data quality labels illustrated the fact that many of our estimates were based on limited data. Hence, further emissions monitoring is recommended from identified sources (e.g. processing of sugar beet, solid fat and fish meal) and from uncharacterized sources.

  19. Optimizing the emission inventory of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) based on network observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng-Po; Liu, Wen-Tzu; Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Chang, Julius S.; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2014-02-01

    Hourly observations of 56 non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) performed by a network of photochemical assessment monitoring stations (PAMS) at 11 locations across Taiwan were used to evaluate 56 speciated emissions and the resulting simulations of an air quality model. Based on the PAMS observations at two urban sites, emission modification was made for the 56 PAMS species in the model. To further test the applicability of this emission correction approach, the same modified emissions were subject to seven different meteorological conditions and comparison with observations of all the 11 PAMS sites. Originally there was a minimum of only 8 of 56 species showed agreement with observations for the worst of the 11 PAMS sites and 28 of 56 species for the best site. With modified emissions, the number increased to 13-52 species across the 11 PAMS sites, demonstrating that the simple urban based correction procedure has broad applicability. When applying this modification of PAMS emissions to the simulations of other air quality gases, SO2 and NOx showed small changes compared with observations (-0.27% and -2.51%, respectively), while total VOC concentrations showed significant changes (+15.28%) as a result of the adjustment in VOC emissions (+26.7%). Although VOCs are the precursor of ozone, the relatively large changes in VOC did not seem to affect ozone formation to the similar extent, only resulting in the changes of average O3 by 2.9 ppb (+9.41%). It shows that although the emission modification improves individual VOC simulations, the performance in oxidant simulation is still largely unaltered. Although the original U.S. VOC emission profiles can capture the general features of ambient VOCs, further optimization of emissions may still be needed by referencing extensive observations, so that emissions can better fit domestic conditions and accuracy in model simulations can be improved.

  20. Assessment of regional influence from a petrochemical complex by modeling and fingerprint analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuan-Chang; Chen, Sheng-Po; Tong, Yu-Huei; Fan, Chen-Lun; Chen, Wei-Hao; Wang, Jia-Lin; Chang, Julius S.

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate a strategy to investigate the influence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on its neighboring districts from a gigantic petrochemical complex. Monitoring of the VOCs in the region was achieved by a nine-station network, dubbed photochemical assessment measurement stations (PAMS), which produced speciated mixing ratios of 54 non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) to represent VOCs with an hourly resolution within a 20 km radius. One-year (2013/10/1-2014/9/30) worth of PAMS data from the network were used in forms of total NMHCs (called PAMS-TNMHC) and speciated mixing ratios. Three dimensional modeling coupled with PAMS measurements successfully elucidated how the study domain was affected by the petrochemical complex and distant sources under three typical seasonal wind patterns: northeast monsoonal, southwest monsoonal, and local-circulation. More exquisite analysis of influence on the neighboring districts was permitted with the use of speciated mixing ratios of VOCs provided by the PAMS network. The ratios of ethylene/acetylene (E/A) > 3 and propylene/acetylene (P/A) > 1.5 were used as indicators to reveal the PAMS sites affected by the petrochemical emissions. Consequently, the hourly speciated data from the nine PAMS sites enabled a finer assessment of the districts affected by the complex to calculate the percent time of influence (dubbed TI%) for all the sites (districts). It was found that the region was more affected by the complex under both the northeast monsoonal and the local-circulation wind types with some of the PAMS sites greater than 5% for the TI%. By contrast, influence on the region was found minimal under the southwest monsoonal flow with the TI% small than 1.5% across all sites. This study successfully devised a method of assessment with the use of speciated measurements of selected VOCs and modeling to assess the influence of a prominent source on the neighboring districts by filtering out irrelevant sources under

  1. An Analysis of Air Pollution Control Technologies for Shipyard Emitted Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    reducing the overall amount of coating used in the Shipbuilding Industry are High Volume Low Pressure ( HVLP ) systems and airless spray equipment. Other...systems, such as plural component systems that mix two-part paints at the spray gun , reduce the volume of coating used by reducing the amount of pre-mixed...carbon dioxide expands into a gas as it is released horn pressure when the solution is sprayed . As the coating sprays from the gun , atomization

  2. Source Signature of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) associated with oil and natural gas operations in Utah and Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Warneke, C.; Holloway, J. S.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Young, C. J.; Edwards, P.; Brown, S. S.; Wolfe, D. E.; Williams, E. J.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Energy Information Administration has reported a sharp increase in domestic oil and natural gas production from "unconventional" reserves (e.g., shale and tight sands) between 2005 and 2012. The recent growth in drilling and fossil fuel production has led to environmental concerns regarding local air quality. Severe wintertime ozone events (greater than 100 ppb ozone) have been observed in Utah's Uintah Basin and Wyoming's Upper Green River Basin, both of which contain large natural gas fields. Raw natural gas is a mixture of approximately 60-95 mole percent methane while the remaining fraction is composed of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other non-hydrocarbon gases. We measured an extensive set of VOCs and other trace gases near two highly active areas of oil and natural gas production in Utah's Uintah Basin and Colorado's Denver-Julesburg Basin in order to characterize primary emissions of VOCs associated with these industrial operations and identify the key VOCs that are precursors for potential ozone formation. UBWOS (Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study) was conducted in Uintah County located in northeastern Utah in January-February 2012. Two Colorado studies were conducted at NOAA's Boulder Atmospheric Observatory in Weld County in northeastern Colorado in February-March 2011 and July-August 2012 as part of the NACHTT (Nitrogen, Aerosol Composition, and Halogens on a Tall Tower) and SONNE (Summer Ozone Near Natural gas Emissions) field experiments, respectively. The C2-C6 hydrocarbons were greatly enhanced for all of these studies. For example, the average propane mixing ratio observed during the Utah study was 58 ppb (median = 35 ppb, minimum = 0.8, maximum = 520 ppb propane) compared to urban averages which range between 0.3 and 6.0 ppb propane. We compare the ambient air composition from these studies to urban measurements in order to show that the VOC source signature from oil and natural gas operations is distinct and can be clearly

  3. Physiological variability in volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath and released from faeces due to nutrition and somatic growth in a standardized caprine animal model.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sina; Trefz, Phillip; Bergmann, Andreas; Steffens, Markus; Ziller, Mario; Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen S; Köhler, Heike; Reinhold, Petra

    2015-05-14

    Physiological effects may change volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations and may therefore act as confounding factors in the definition of VOCs as disease biomarkers. To evaluate the extent of physiological background variability, this study assessed the effects of feed composition and somatic growth on VOC patterns in a standardized large animal model. Fifteen clinically healthy goats were followed during their first year of life. VOCs present in the headspace over faeces, exhaled breath and ambient air inside the stable were repeatedly assessed in parallel with the concentrations of glucose, protein, and albumin in venous blood. VOCs were collected and analysed using solid-phase or needle-trap microextraction and gas chromatograpy together with mass spectroscopy. The concentrations of VOCs in exhaled breath and above faeces varied significantly with increasing age of the animals. The largest variations in volatiles detected in the headspace over faeces occurred with the change from milk feeding to plant-based diet. VOCs above faeces and in exhaled breath correlated significantly with blood components. Among VOCs exhaled, the strongest correlations were found between exhaled nonanal concentrations and blood concentrations of glucose and albumin. Results stress the importance of a profound knowledge of the physiological backgrounds of VOC composition before defining reliable and accurate marker sets for diagnostic purposes.

  4. Detection and quantification of methane and VOC emissions from oil and gas production operations using remote measurements, Interim report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improved understanding of air pollutant emissions from oil and gas production operations is needed. With a steadily increasing number of production sources, the impact of emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on regional ozone is potentially significant. As the separation dis...

  5. Occupational hygiene in terms of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and bioaerosols at two solid waste management plants in Finland

    SciTech Connect

    Lehtinen, Jenni; Tolvanen, Outi; Nivukoski, Ulla; Veijanen, Anja; Hänninen, Kari

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Odorous VOCs: acetic acid, 2,3-butanedione, ethyl acetate, alpha-pinene and limonene. ► VOC concentrations did not exceed occupational exposure limit concentrations. ► 2,3-Butanedione as the health effecting compound is discussed. ► Endotoxin concentrations may cause health problems in waste treatment. - Abstract: Factors affecting occupational hygiene were measured at the solid waste transferring plant at Hyvinkää and at the optic separation plant in Hämeenlinna. Measurements consisted of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and bioaerosols including microbes, dust and endotoxins. The most abundant compounds in both of the plants were aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, esters of carboxylic acids, ketones and terpenes. In terms of odour generation, the most important emissions were acetic acid, 2,3-butanedione, ethyl acetate, alpha-pinene and limonene due to their low threshold odour concentrations. At the optic waste separation plant, limonene occurred at the highest concentration of all single compounds of identified VOCs. The concentration of any single volatile organic compound did not exceed the occupational exposure limit (OEL) concentration. However, 2,3-butanedione as a health risk compound is discussed based on recent scientific findings linking it to lung disease. Microbe and dust concentrations were low at the waste transferring plant. Only endotoxin concentrations may cause health problems; the average concentration inside the plant was 425 EU/m{sup 3} which clearly exceeded the threshold value of 90 EU/m{sup 3}. In the wheel loader cabin the endotoxin concentrations were below 1 EU/m{sup 3}. High microbial and endotoxin concentrations were measured in the processing hall at the optic waste separation plant. The average concentration of endotoxins was found to be 10,980 EU/m{sup 3}, a concentration which may cause health risks. Concentrations of viable fungi were quite high in few measurements in the control room. The most

  6. Investigation of key parameters influencing the efficient photocatalytic oxidation of indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    SciTech Connect

    Quici, Natalia; Kibanova, Daria; Vera, Maria Laura; Choi, Hyeok; Dionysiou, Dionysios D.; Litter, Marta I.; Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Destaillats, Hugo; Destaillats, Hugo

    2008-06-01

    Photocatalytic oxidation of indoor VOCs has the potential to eliminate pollutants from indoor environments, thus effectively improving and/or maintaining indoor air quality while reducing ventilation energy costs. Design and operation of UV photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners requires optimization of various parameters to achieve highest pollutant removal efficiencies while avoiding the formation of harmful secondary byproducts and maximizing catalyst lifetime.

  7. Health evaluation of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from wood and wood-based materials.

    PubMed

    Jensen, L K; Larsen, A; Mølhave, L; Hansen, M K; Knudsen, B

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the authors describe a method for evaluation of material emissions. The study was based on chemical analysis of emissions from 23 materials representing solid wood and wood-based materials commonly used in furniture, interior furnishings, and building products in Denmark in the 1990s. The authors used the emission chamber testing method to examine the selected materials with a qualitative screening and quantitative determination of volatile organic compounds. The authors evaluated the toxicological effects of all substances identified with chamber testing. Lowest concentration of interest and standard room concentrations were assessed, and the authors calculated an S-value for each wood and wood-based material. The authors identified 144 different chemical substances with the screening analyses, and a total of 84 individual substances were quantified with chamber measurements. The irritative effects dominated at low exposure levels; therefore, the lowest concentration of interest and the S-value were based predominantly on these effects. The S-values were very low for solid ash, oak, and beech. For solid spruce and pine, the determining substances for size of the S-value were delta3-carene, alpha-pinene, and limonene. For the surface-treated wood materials, the S-value reflected the emitted substances from the surface treatment.

  8. Screening the Emission Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in China Based on Multi-effect Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, H., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere have adverse impacts via three main pathways: photochemical ozone formation, secondary organic aerosol production, and direct toxicity to humans. Few studies have integrated these effects to prioritize control measures for VOCs sources. In this study, we developed a multi-effect evaluation methodology based on updated emission inventories and source profiles, which was combined with ozone formation potential (OFP), secondary organic aerosol potential (SOAP), and VOC toxicity data to identify important emission sources and key species. We derived species-specific emission inventories for 152 sources. The OFPs, SOAPs, and toxicity of each source were determined, and the contribution and share of each source to each of these adverse effects was calculated. Weightings were given to the three adverse effects by expert scoring, and the integrated impact was determined. Using 2012 as the base year, solvent usage and industrial process were found to be the most important anthropogenic sources, accounting for 24.2 and 23.1% of the integrated environmental effect, respectively. This was followed by biomass burning, transportation, and fossil fuel combustion, all of which had a similar contribution ranging from 16.7 to 18.6%. The top five industrial sources, including plastic products, rubber products, chemical fiber products, the chemical industry, and oil refining, accounted for nearly 70.0% of industrial emissions. In China, emissions reductions are required for styrene, toluene, ethylene, benzene, and m/p-xylene. The 10 most abundant chemical species contributed 76.5% of the integrated impact. Beijing, Chongqing, Shanghai, Jiangsu, and Guangdong were the five leading provinces when considering the integrated effects. Besides, the chemical mass balance model (CMB) was used to verify the VOCs inventories of 47 cities in China, so as to optimize our evaluation results. We suggest that multi-effect evaluation is necessary to

  9. Exposures to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and associated health risks of socio-economically disadvantaged population in a "hot spot" in Camden, New Jersey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiangmei (May); Fan, Zhihua (Tina); Zhu, Xianlei; Jung, Kyung Hwa; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Weisel, Clifford P.; Lioy, Paul J.

    2012-09-01

    To address disparities in health risks associated with ambient air pollution for racial/ethnic minority groups, this study characterized personal and ambient concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a suspected hot spot of air pollution - the Village of Waterfront South (WFS), and an urban reference community - the Copewood/Davis Streets (CDS) neighborhood in Camden, New Jersey. Both are minority-dominant, impoverished communities. We collected 24-h integrated personal air samples from 54 WFS residents and 53 CDS residents, with one sample on a weekday and one on a weekend day during the summer and winter seasons of 2004-2006. Ambient air samples from the center of each community were also collected simultaneously during personal air sampling. Toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (TEX) presented higher (p < 0.05) ambient levels in WFS than in CDS, particularly during weekdays. A stronger association between personal and ambient concentrations of MTBE and TEX was found in WFS than in CDS. Fourteen to forty-two percent of the variation in personal MTBE, hexane, benzene, and TEX was explained by local outdoor air pollution. These observations indicated that local sources impacted the community air pollution and personal exposure in WFS. The estimated cancer risks resulting from two locally emitted VOCs, benzene and ethylbenzene, and non-cancer neurological and respiratory effects resulting from hexane, benzene, toluene, and xylenes exceeded the US EPA risk benchmarks in both communities. These findings emphasized the need to address disparity in health risks associated with ambient air pollution for the socio-economically disadvantaged groups. This study also demonstrated that air pollution hot spots similar to WFS can provide robust setting to investigate health effects of ambient air pollution.

  10. Application of inverse dispersion model for estimating volatile organic compounds emitted from the offshore industrial park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, M.; Lee, C.; Yu, H.

    2013-12-01

    In the last 20 years, the Yunlin offshore industrial park has significantly contributed to the economic development of Taiwan. Its annual production value has reached almost 12 % of Taiwan's GDP in 2012. The offshore industrial park also balanced development of urban and rural in areas. However, the offshore industrial park is considered the major source of air pollution to nearby counties, especially, the emission of Volatile Organic Compounds(VOCs). Studies have found that exposures to high level of some VOCs have caused adverse health effects on both human and ecosystem. Since both health and ecological effects of air pollution have been the subject of numerous studies in recent years, it is a critical issue in estimating VOCs emissions. Nowadays emission estimation techniques are usually used emissions factors in calculation. Because the methodology considered totality of equipment activities based on statistical assumptions, it would encounter great uncertainty between these coefficients. This study attempts to estimate VOCs emission of the Yunlin Offshore Industrial Park using an inverse atmospheric dispersion model. The inverse modeling approach will be applied to the combination of dispersion modeling result which input a given one-unit concentration and observations at air quality stations in Yunlin. The American Meteorological Society-Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD) is chosen as the tool for dispersion modeling in the study. Observed concentrations of VOCs are collected by the Taiwanese Environmental Protection Administration (TW EPA). In addition, the study also analyzes meteorological data including wind speed, wind direction, pressure and temperature etc. VOCs emission estimations from the inverse atmospheric dispersion model will be compared to the official statistics released by Yunlin Offshore Industrial Park. Comparison of estimated concentration from inverse dispersion modeling and official statistical concentrations will

  11. Influence of relative humidity on VOC concentrations in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Markowicz, Pawel; Larsson, Lennart

    2015-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) may be emitted from surfaces indoors leading to compromised air quality. This study scrutinized the influence of relative humidity (RH) on VOC concentrations in a building that had been subjected to water damage. While air samplings in a damp room at low RH (21-22%) only revealed minor amounts of 2-ethylhexanol (3 μg/m(3)) and 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate (TXIB, 8 μg/m(3)), measurements performed after a rapid increase of RH (to 58-75%) revealed an increase in VOC concentrations which was 3-fold for 2-ethylhexanol and 2-fold for TXIB. Similar VOC emission patterns were found in laboratory analyses of moisture-affected and laboratory-contaminated building materials. This study demonstrates the importance of monitoring RH when sampling indoor air for VOCs in order to avoid misleading conclusions from the analytical results.

  12. Characterizing the chemical evolution of air masses via multi-platform measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during CalNEX: Composition, OH reactivity, and potential SOA formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Bon, D.; Warneke, C.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Holloway, J. S.; Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Atlas, E. L.; Blake, D. R.; Herndon, S. C.; Zahniser, M. S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Li, S.; Alvarez, S. L.; Rappenglueck, B.; Flynn, J. H.; Grossberg, N.; Lefer, B. L.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are critical components in the photochemical production of ozone (O3) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). During the CalNex 2010 field campaign, an extensive set of VOCs were measured at the Pasadena ground site, and aboard the NOAA WP-3D aircraft and the WHOI Research Vessel Atlantis. The measurements from each platform provide a unique perspective into the emissions, transport, and atmospheric processing of VOCs within the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). The observed enhancement ratios of the hydrocarbons measured on all three platforms are in good agreement and are generally well correlated with carbon monoxide (CO), indicating the prevalence of on-road VOC emission sources throughout the SoCAB. Offshore measurements aboard the ship and aircraft are used to characterize the air mass composition as a function of the land/sea-breeze effect. VOC ratios and other trace gases are used to identify air masses containing relatively fresh emissions that were often associated with offshore flow and re-circulated continental air associated with onshore flow conditions. With the prevailing southwesterly airflow pattern in the LAB throughout the daytime, the Pasadena ground site effectively functions as a receptor site and is used to characterize primary VOC emissions from downtown Los Angeles and to identify the corresponding secondary oxidation products. The chemical evolution of air masses as a function of the time of day is investigated in order to determine the relative impacts of primary emissions vs. secondary VOC products on OH reactivity and potential SOA formation. The reactivity of VOCs with the hydroxyl radical (OH) at the Pasadena site was dominated by the light hydrocarbons, isoprene, and oxygenated VOCs including aldehydes (secondary products) and alcohols (primary anthropogenic emissions). Toluene and benzaldehyde, both of which are associated with primary anthropogenic emissions, are the predominant VOC precursors to the

  13. Occupational hygiene in terms of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and bioaerosols at two solid waste management plants in Finland.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, Jenni; Tolvanen, Outi; Nivukoski, Ulla; Veijanen, Anja; Hänninen, Kari

    2013-04-01

    Factors affecting occupational hygiene were measured at the solid waste transferring plant at Hyvinkää and at the optic separation plant in Hämeenlinna. Measurements consisted of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and bioaerosols including microbes, dust and endotoxins. The most abundant compounds in both of the plants were aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, esters of carboxylic acids, ketones and terpenes. In terms of odour generation, the most important emissions were acetic acid, 2,3-butanedione, ethyl acetate, alpha-pinene and limonene due to their low threshold odour concentrations. At the optic waste separation plant, limonene occurred at the highest concentration of all single compounds of identified VOCs. The concentration of any single volatile organic compound did not exceed the occupational exposure limit (OEL) concentration. However, 2,3-butanedione as a health risk compound is discussed based on recent scientific findings linking it to lung disease. Microbe and dust concentrations were low at the waste transferring plant. Only endotoxin concentrations may cause health problems; the average concentration inside the plant was 425 EU/m(3) which clearly exceeded the threshold value of 90 EU/m(3). In the wheel loader cabin the endotoxin concentrations were below 1 EU/m(3). High microbial and endotoxin concentrations were measured in the processing hall at the optic waste separation plant. The average concentration of endotoxins was found to be 10,980 EU/m(3), a concentration which may cause health risks. Concentrations of viable fungi were quite high in few measurements in the control room. The most problematic factor was endotoxins whose average measured concentrations was 4853 EU/m(3).

  14. Do time-averaged, whole-building, effective volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions depend on the air exchange rate? A statistical analysis of trends for 46 VOCs in U.S. offices.

    PubMed

    Rackes, A; Waring, M S

    2016-08-01

    We used existing data to develop distributions of time-averaged air exchange rates (AER), whole-building 'effective' emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOC), and other variables for use in Monte Carlo analyses of U.S. offices. With these, we explored whether long-term VOC emission rates were related to the AER over the sector, as has been observed in the short term for some VOCs in single buildings. We fit and compared two statistical models to the data. In the independent emissions model (IEM), emissions were unaffected by other variables, while in the dependent emissions model (DEM), emissions responded to the AER via coupling through a conceptual boundary layer between the air and a lumped emission source. For 20 of 46 VOCs, the DEM was preferable to the IEM and emission rates, though variable, were higher in buildings with higher AERs. Most oxygenated VOCs and some alkanes were well fit by the DEM, while nearly all aromatics and halocarbons were independent. Trends by vapor pressure suggested multiple mechanisms could be involved. The factors of temperature, relative humidity, and building age were almost never associated with effective emission rates. Our findings suggest that effective emissions in real commercial buildings will be difficult to predict from deterministic experiments or models.

  15. Indoor air quality (IAQ) assessment in a multistorey shopping mall by high-spatial-resolution monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    PubMed

    Amodio, M; Dambruoso, P R; de Gennaro, Gianluigi; de Gennaro, L; Loiotile, A Demarinis; Marzocca, A; Stasi, F; Trizio, L; Tutino, M

    2014-12-01

    In order to assess indoor air quality (IAQ), two 1-week monitoring campaigns of volatile organic compounds (VOC) were performed in different areas of a multistorey shopping mall. High-spatial-resolution monitoring was conducted at 32 indoor sites located in two storehouses and in different departments of a supermarket. At the same time, VOC concentrations were monitored in the mall and parking lot area as well as outdoors. VOC were sampled at 48-h periods using diffusive samplers suitable for thermal desorption. The samples were then analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The data analysis and chromatic maps indicated that the two storehouses had the highest VOC concentrations consisting principally of terpenes. These higher TVOC concentrations could be a result of the low efficiency of the air exchange and intake systems, as well as the large quantity of articles stored in these small spaces. Instead, inside the supermarket, the food department was the most critical area for VOC concentrations. To identify potential emission sources in this department, a continuous VOC analyzer was used. The findings indicated that the highest total VOC concentrations were present during cleaning activities and that these activities were carried out frequently in the food department. The study highlights the importance of conducting both high-spatial-resolution monitoring and high-temporal-resolution monitoring. The former was able to identify critical issues in environments with a complex emission scenario while the latter was useful in interpreting the dynamics of each emission source.

  16. Effect of habitat and age on variations in volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from Quercus ilex and Pinus pinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Street, R. A.; Owen, S.; Duckham, S. C.; Boissard, C.; Hewitt, C. N.

    A dynamic branch enclosure was used to measure emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) under field conditions from two common native Mediterranean species, Quercus ilex and Pinus pinea. In addition to α-pinene, β-pinene, sabinene, limonene and cineole, a suite of lesser known compounds were tentatively identified including cis- and trans-ocimene, cis- and trans-linalool oxide and sabinaketone. Emissions of isoprene from Quercus ilex were insignificant in comparison to those of the monoterpenes and were not detected from Pinus pinea. Variability in emission rates between two habitats, the forest and the dunes, were assessed for Quercus ilex. Temperature sensitivities of emissions and total summed emission rates from Quercus ilex were clearly related to environmental conditions. Emission rates from Pinus pinea showed great variability, but differences between normalised mean emission rates from mature forest and young plantation trees may be significant. Existing emission rate models were found to inadequately describe the observed data.

  17. VOC emissions from wet toner photocopy machines

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, J.L.; Howard, C.L.; Leto, B.J.

    1997-12-31

    Indoor air pollution in office buildings affects millions of American workers every day. Potential sources of office indoor air pollution are photocopiers which emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during operation. A photocopier`s toner and dispersant contain heavy-treated naphtha, a mixture consisting primarily of decane, which is known to be toxic to humans. An experimental study was completed to characterize VOC emissions from a photocopier located on campus at the University of Texas at Austin. Experiments were completed to estimate the air turnover rate in the room, the VOC concentration in the room during photocopier operation, and a typical daily concentration profile. Based on these experiments, two emissions models were developed: (1) a mass balance on VOC concentration in the room, and (2) a mass balance on the amount of toner and dispersant used per copy. Room ventilation rate was determined to be approximately 1.5 air exchanges per hour. Photocopier emission rates were measured to be from 2 g/min to 9 g/min based on VOC concentration in the room, and were calculated to be 5.4 g/min based on toner and dispersant consumption. These high emission rates of potentially harmful VOCs indicate a need for implementation of measures to protect the health of those utilizing wet toner photocopy machines on a regular basis.

  18. Nanotechnology in environmental remediation: degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) over visible-light-active nanostructured materials.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Rengaraj; Al-Kindy, Salma M Z; Silanpaa, Mika; Kim, Younghun

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are major pollutants and are considered to be one of the most important contaminants generated by human beings living in urban and industrial areas. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a VOC that has been widely used as a gasoline additive to reduce VOC emissions from motor vehicles. However, new gasoline additives like MTBE are having negative environmental impacts. Recent survey reports clearly show that groundwater is often polluted owing to leakage of petroleum products from underground storage tanks. MTBE is highly soluble in water (e.g., 0.35-0.71 M) and has been detected at high concentrations in groundwater. The presence of MTBE in groundwater poses a potential health problem. The documented effects of MTBE exposure are headaches, vomiting, diarrhea, fever, cough, muscle aches, sleepiness, disorientation, dizziness, and skin and eye irritation. To address these problems, photocatalytic treatment is the preferred treatment for polluted water. In the present work, a simple and template-free solution phase synthesis method has been developed for the preparation of novel cadmium sulfide (CdS) hollow microspheres using cadmium nitrate and thioacetamide precursors. The synthesized products have been characterized by a variety of methods, including X-ray powder diffraction, high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and UV-visible diffused reflectance spectroscopy. The HR-SEM measurements revealed the spherical morphology of the CdS microspheres, which evolved by the oriented aggregation of the primary CdS nanocrystals. Furthermore, studies of photocatalytic activity revealed that the synthesized CdS hollow microspheres exhibit an excellent photocatalytic performance in rapidly degrading MTBE in aqueous solution under visible light illumination. These results suggest that CdS microspheres will be an interesting candidate for photocatalytic detoxification studies under visible light

  19. Biogenic VOC and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and ozone are short-lived contributors to radiative forcing that can drive relatively rapid changes in climate. They are not emitted into the atmosphere but are formed from precursors including biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) that are emitted from terrestrial ecosystems. BVOC can also impact longer-lived climate-relevant compounds by acting as a sink for the oxidants that remove moderately reactive gases such as methane and by being a source of carbon dioxide. Emissions of BVOC are highly temperature sensitive, and some also respond to light, and so there is a potential feedback coupling between climate and BVOC emissions. Another potential feedback is associated with the water cycle since SOA can influence precipitation by serving as cloud condensation nuclei and because VOC emissions are sensitive to water availability. Anthropogenic air pollutants add to the complexity of this coupled system by enhancing the production of ozone and SOA from BVOC. The role of BVOC in the land-atmosphere-climate system and potential feedback couplings is conceptually clear but developing an accurate quantitative representation is challenging. Our current understanding of the role of BVOC in the climate system and potential feedback couplings will be presented and the major uncertainties will be discussed. Advances in observations for constraining models, including long-term measurements and recent multi-scale studies, will be presented and priorities for continued advances will be discussed.

  20. Fragranced consumer products: Chemicals emitted, ingredients unlisted

    SciTech Connect

    Steinemann, Anne C.; MacGregor, Ian C.; Gordon, Sydney M.; Gallagher, Lisa G.; Davis, Amy L.; Ribeiro, Daniel S.; Wallace, Lance A.

    2011-04-15

    Fragranced consumer products are pervasive in society. Relatively little is known about the composition of these products, due to lack of prior study, complexity of formulations, and limitations and protections on ingredient disclosure in the U.S. We investigated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from 25 common fragranced consumer products-laundry products, personal care products, cleaning supplies, and air fresheners-using headspace analysis with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Our analysis found 133 different VOCs emitted from the 25 products, with an average of 17 VOCs per product. Of these 133 VOCs, 24 are classified as toxic or hazardous under U.S. federal laws, and each product emitted at least one of these compounds. For 'green' products, emissions of these compounds were not significantly different from the other products. Of all VOCs identified across the products, only 1 was listed on any product label, and only 2 were listed on any material safety data sheet (MSDS). While virtually none of the chemicals identified were listed, this nonetheless accords with U.S. regulations, which do not require disclosure of all ingredients in a consumer product, or of any ingredients in a mixture called 'fragrance.' Because the analysis focused on compounds emitted and listed, rather than exposures and effects, it makes no claims regarding possible risks from product use. Results of this study contribute to understanding emissions from common products, and their links with labeling and legislation.

  1. Reducing VOC Press Emission from OSB Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gary D. McGinnis; Laura S. WIlliams; Amy E. Monte; Jagdish Rughani: Brett A. Niemi; Thomas M. Flicker

    2001-12-31

    Current regulations require industry to meet air emission standards with regard to particulates, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and other gases. One of many industries that will be affected by the new regulations is the wood composites industry. This industry generates VOCs, HAPs, and particulates mainly during the drying and pressing of wood. Current air treatment technologies for the industry are expensive to install and operate. As regulations become more stringent, treatment technologies will need to become more efficient and cost effective. The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of process conditions and chemical additives to reduce VOC/HAPs in air emitted from presses and dryers during the production of oriented strand board.

  2. Matrix effect on the performance of headspace solid phase microextraction method for the analysis of target volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Higashikawa, Fábio S; Cayuela, Maria Luz; Roig, Asunción; Silva, Carlos A; Sánchez-Monedero, Miguel A

    2013-11-01

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) is a fast, cheap and solvent free methodology widely used for environmental analysis. A SPME methodology has been optimized for the analysis of VOCs in a range of matrices covering different soils of varying textures, organic matrices from manures and composts from different origins, and biochars. The performance of the technique was compared for the different matrices spiked with a multicomponent VOC mixture, selected to cover different VOC groups of environmental relevance (ketone, terpene, alcohol, aliphatic hydrocarbons and alkylbenzenes). VOC recovery was dependent on the nature itself of the VOC and the matrix characteristics. The SPME analysis of non-polar compounds, such as alkylbenzenes, terpenes and aliphatic hydrocarbons, was markedly affected by the type of matrix as a consequence of the competition for the adsorption sites in the SPME fiber. These non-polar compounds were strongly retained in the biochar surfaces limiting the use of SPME for this type of matrices. However, this adsorption capacity was not evident when biochar had undergone a weathering/aging process through composting. Polar compounds (alcohol and ketone) showed a similar behavior in all matrices, as a consequence of the hydrophilic characteristics, affected by water content in the matrix. SPME showed a good performance for soils and organic matrices especially for non-polar compounds, achieving a limit of detection (LD) and limit of quantification (LQ) of 0.02 and 0.03 ng g(-1) for non-polar compounds and poor extraction for more hydrophilic and polar compounds (LD and LQ higher 310 and 490 ng g(-1)). The characteristics of the matrix, especially pH and organic matter, had a marked impact on SPME, due to the competition of the analytes for active sites in the fiber, but VOC biodegradation should not be discarded in matrices with active microbial biomass.

  3. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Analysis For Disease Detection: Proof Of Principle For Field Studies Detecting Paratuberculosis And Brucellosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, Henri; Köhler, Heike; Nicola, Commander; Reinhold, Petra; Turner, Claire; Chambers, Mark

    2009-05-01

    A proof of concept investigation was performed to demonstrate that two independent infectious diseases of cattle result in different patterns of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the headspace of serum samples detectable using an electronic nose (e-nose). A total of 117 sera from cattle naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (paraTB, n = 43) or Brucella sp. (n = 26) and sera from corresponding control animals (n = 48) were randomly and analysed blind to infection status using a ST214 e-nose (Scensive Ltd, Leeds, UK). Samples were collected under non-standardised conditions on different farms from the UK (brucellosis) and Germany (paraTB). The e-nose could differentiate the sera from brucellosis infected, paraTB infected and healthy animals at the population level, but the technology used was not suitable for determination of the disease status of individual animals. Nevertheless, the data indicate that there are differences in the sensor responses depending on the disease status, and therefore, it shows the potential of VOC analysis from serum headspace samples for disease detection.

  4. Constraints on the sources and impacts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) over North America from tall tower measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lu

    This dissertation presents the first-ever in-situ tall tower measurements of volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations. The data span August 2009 through July 2012, and provide new constraints on seasonal and long-term controls on VOC sources and their atmospheric effects. The 200 m sampling height provides a large-scale footprint, while the tall tower location, near the intersection of the main North American ecosystems and at times downwind of the Twin Cities, affords information on natural emissions from some of the most important US landscapes as well as on anthropogenic sources. I interpret the dataset using an atmospheric chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem CTM), with a focus on several key atmospheric VOCs. This dissertation finds that current models underestimate methanol emission rates for younger versus older leaves. This biased seasonality means that the photochemical role for methanol early in the growing season is presently underestimated. A Bayesian inverse analysis of the tall tower observations reveals that the prior estimate of North American anthropogenic acetone sources (based on the US EPA's NEI05 inventory) is accurate to within 20%. However, biogenic acetone emissions from broadleaf trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants are presently underestimated (˜37%), while emissions from needleleaf trees plus secondary production from biogenic precursors are overestimated by a similar amount (˜40%). Model-measurement comparisons imply that isoprene emissions in the immediate vicinity of the tall tower are accurately captured by the MEGANv2.1 biogenic inventory, but that larger-scale regional emissions are underestimated, reflecting the heterogeneous land cover in this transitional landscape. Isoprene emissions play a key role in seasonal shifts between VOC-limited chemistry in the spring and fall and NOx-limited or transitional chemistry in the summer. A Bayesian inverse analysis based on the tall tower measurements suggests that: i) the RETRO

  5. Source apportionment of ambient VOCS in Mumbai city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Anjali

    Air pollution kills almost half a million Asians every year. Most of this pollution is emitted from buses, trucks, motorcycles and other forms of transport. As Asia's cities continue to expand, the rising number of vehicles has resulted in even greater pollution. Amongst the measures available to control, vehicular emission was engine modification, catalytic converters and fuel modifications. Some of these have led to emissions of some hazardous air pollutants (HAP) like volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOC emission is an area needing attention in air quality management. This paper discusses a study on VOC concentration at major sources like traffic junction, residential area, commercial areas, industrial areas and petrol pumps in Mumbai city. CMB8 Model has been used to apportion VOCs in Mumbai city. It was observed that evaporative emissions dominate in Mumbai. In order to control VOCs in air the management strategy should thus focus on cost effective vapor recovery systems at refueling stations and in vehicles. Effective inspection and maintenance programme can reduce evaporative and exhaust VOC emissions. Modifying certain fuel parameters, like reducing benzene content in petrol will as well reduce VOC content in air. The benzene content in petrol was 3% in the year 2001 in Mumbai. Adulteration also results in high levels of VOCs in air.

  6. Surface emission determination of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from a closed industrial waste landfill using a self-designed static flux chamber.

    PubMed

    Gallego, E; Perales, J F; Roca, F J; Guardino, X

    2014-02-01

    Closed landfills can be a source of VOC and odorous nuisances to their atmospheric surroundings. A self-designed cylindrical air flux chamber was used to measure VOC surface emissions in a closed industrial landfill located in Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia, Spain. The two main objectives of the study were the evaluation of the performance of the chamber setup in typical measurement conditions and the determination of the emission rates of 60 different VOC from that industrial landfill, generating a valuable database that can be useful in future studies related to industrial landfill management. Triplicate samples were taken in five selected sampling points. VOC were sampled dynamically using multi-sorbent bed tubes (Carbotrap, Carbopack X, Carboxen 569) connected to SKC AirCheck 2000 pumps. The analysis was performed by automatic thermal desorption coupled with a capillary gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry detector. The emission rates of sixty VOC were calculated for each sampling point in an effort to characterize surface emissions. To calculate average, minimum and maximum emission values for each VOC, the results were analyzed by three different methods: Global, Kriging and Tributary area. Global and Tributary area methodologies presented similar values, with total VOC emissions of 237 ± 48 and 222 ± 46 g day(-1), respectively; however, Kriging values were lower, 77 ± 17 gd ay(-1). The main contributors to the total emission rate were aldehydes (nonanal and decanal), acetic acid, ketones (acetone), aromatic hydrocarbons and alcohols. Most aromatic hydrocarbon (except benzene, naphthalene and methylnaphthalenes) and aldehyde emission rates exhibited strong correlations with the rest of VOC of their family, indicating a possible common source of these compounds. B:T ratio obtained from the emission rates of the studied landfill suggested that the factors that regulate aromatic hydrocarbon distributions in the landfill emissions are different from the ones

  7. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) onboard the HALO research aircraft during OMO-ASIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safadi, Layal; Neumaier, Marco; Fischbeck, Garlich; Zahn, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    We report on first results of VOC measurements during the OMO-Asia campaign that took place in summer 2015 on Cyprus and on the island of Gan (Maldives) to study the free-radical chemistry at higher altitudes during the Asian summer monsoon. The deployed instrument (KMS = Karlsruhe Mass Spectrometer) is based on a commercial PTRMS from Ionicon and was strongly modified for the use onboard the research aircraft HALO (a modified Gulfstream GV-550 having a ceiling altitude of ~15.5 km). By the construction of an aluminum vacuum system, the development of largely custom-made electronics and the use of light-weight pumps, the weight was reduced to ~55 kg compared to 120-130 kg of the commercial instrument. The KMS is in addition very robust and field-compliant. Before OMO-Asia the HALO payload was tested first during a technical field campaign OMO-EU which took place in Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany) in winter 2015. During OMO-Asia the instrument was calibrated before and after each flight by diluting an external gas standard (Apel-Riemer Environmental, Inc. Denver, Colorado) containing ~1 ppm of 10 VOCs. The determined sensitivity for acetone was ~380 cps/ppb showing a variation of ±5% over a period of 8 weeks. The detection limit amounted to ~35 ppt for acetone at an integration time of 6 s. The measurements during all together 17 flights took place over a wide range of Asia, including Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Oman and Sri Lanka. Referring to the meteorological forecasts of carbon monoxide (CO), remnant of the Asia monsoon outflow was measured during some flights (e.g. over Oman). Acetone mixing ratios of up to ~1500 ppt and up to ~100 ppt of benzene were measured in the outflow of the plume. The gathered data shows a good correlation with the measurements taken with other instruments (e.g. CO measurements by Max Planck Institute for Chemistry). The poster will describe the instrument and the main features derived.

  8. Operation of a two-stage treatment train for the remediation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a complex air stream

    SciTech Connect

    Manninen, M.R.; Kleinheinz, G.T.; Niemi, B.A.; Hose, J.T.

    1999-07-01

    The use of aqueous biological systems to remove contaminants from waste streams has been well documented. However, in complex waste streams containing compounds of varying chemical properties, the use of only one type of treatment system may not be the best alternative. When treating a complex waste stream, the use of treatment trains, or coupled systems, may be advantageous when compared with any single technology. The purpose of this project was to design and operate a treatment train for the effective removal and biodegradation of a complex mixture of VOCs with varying chemical properties. A bench-scale system was designed consisting of a liquid bioreactor coupled to a biofilter for removal of acetone, methanol, methyl ethyl ketone, naphthalene, alpha-pinene, and toluene. The liquid bioreactor contained an aqueous medium and an inert solid support (polystyrene bioballs) which immobilized a characterized microbial population. The biofiltration portion of the system utilized the same microbial inoculum, but employed Douglas fir bark as its solid support. As the air stream bubbled into the liquid bioreactor, the VOCs were made available to the bacteria for destruction in the aqueous medium or on the polystyrene solid support. The fugitive VOCs from the liquid bioreactor were then subsequently treated by the biofiltration unit. The six-compound VOC mixture was added to the air stream via in-line syringe pump injection. Concentrations of the VOC mixture in the main influent air stream, the effluent air stream from the liquid bioreactor, the aqueous medium in the liquid bioreactor, and the effluent air stream from the biofilter were monitored on a regular basis via an on-line gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Successful biodegradation of the complex VOC mixture was accomplished with this treatment train, the average total VOC removal efficiency being 96.2% ({+-}2.6).

  9. Determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from wrapping films and wrapped PDO Italian cheeses by using HS-SPME and GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Panseri, Sara; Chiesa, Luca Maria; Zecconi, Alfonso; Soncini, Gabriella; De Noni, Ivano

    2014-06-25

    Nowadays food wrapping assures attractive presentation and simplifies self-service shopping. Polyvinylchloride (PVC)- and polyethylene (PE)-based cling-films are widely used worldwide for wrapping cheeses. For this purpose, films used in retail possess suitable technical properties such as clinginess and unrolling capacity, that are achieved by using specific plasticizers during their manufacturing process. In the present study, the main VOCs of three cling-films (either PVC-based or PE-based) for retail use were characterized by means of Solid-Phase Micro-Extraction and GC/MS. In addition, the effects of cling film type and contact time on the migration of VOCs from the films to four different PDO Italian cheeses during cold storage under light or dark were also investigated. Among the VOCs isolated from cling-films, PVC released 2-ethylhexanol and triacetin. These compounds can likely be considered as a "non-intentionally added substance". These same compounds were also detected in cheeses wrapped in PVC films with the highest concentration found after 20 days storage. The PE cling-film was shown to possess a simpler VOC profile, lacking some molecules peculiar to PVC films. The same conclusions can be drawn for cheeses wrapped in the PE cling-film. Other VOCs found in wrapped cheeses were likely to have been released either by direct transfer from the materials used for the manufacture of cling-films or from contamination of the films. Overall, HS-SPME is shown to be a rapid and solvent free technique to screen the VOCs profile of cling-films, and to detect VOCs migration from cling-films to cheese under real retail storage conditions.

  10. Light dependency of VOC emissions from selected Mediterranean plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, S. M.; Harley, P.; Guenther, A.; Hewitt, C. N.

    The light, temperature and stomatal conductance dependencies of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from ten plant species commonly found in the Mediterranean region were studied using a fully controlled leaf cuvette in the laboratory. At standard conditions of temperature and light (30°C and 1000 μmol m -2 s -1 PAR), low emitting species ( Arbutus unedo, Pinus halepensis, Cistus incanus, Cistus salvifolius, Rosmarinus officinalis and Thymus vulgaris) emitted between 0.1 and 5.0 μg (C) (total VOCs) g -1 dw h -1, a medium emitter ( Pinus pinea) emitted between 5 and 10 μg (C) g -1 dw h -1 and high emitters ( Cistus monspeliensis, Lavendula stoechas and Quercus sp.) emitted more than 10 μg (C) g -1 dw h -1. VOC emissions from all of the plant species investigated showed some degree of light dependency, which was distinguishable from temperature dependency. Emissions of all compounds from Quercus sp. were light dependent. Ocimene was one of several monoterpene compounds emitted by P. pinea and was strongly correlated to light. Only a fraction of monoterpene emissions from C. incanus exhibited apparent weak light dependency but emissions from this plant species were strongly correlated to temperature. Data presented here are consistent with past studies, which show that emissions are independent of stomatal conductance. These results may allow more accurate predictions of monoterpene emission fluxes from the Mediterranean region to be made.

  11. Predicting the emission of volatile organic compounds from silage systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a precursor to smog, emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere is an environmental concern in some regions. The major VOC emission source from farms is silage, with emissions coming from the silo face, mixing wagon, and feed bunk. The major compounds emitted are alcohols wit...

  12. Automated detection and reporting of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in complex environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Preppernau, B.L.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1997-03-01

    This paper describes results from efforts to develop VOC sensing systems based on two complementary techniques. The first technique used a gated channeltron detector for resonant laser-induced multiphoton photoionization detection of trace organic vapors in a supersonic molecular beam. The channeltron was gated using a relatively simple circuit to generate a negative gate pulse with a width of 400 ns (FWHM), a 50 ns turn-on (rise) time, a 1.5 {mu}s turn-off (decay) time, a pulse amplitude of {minus}1000 Volts, and a DC offset adjustable from zero to {minus}1500 Volts. The gated channeltron allows rejection of spurious responses to UV laser light scattered directly into the channeltron and time-delayed ionization signals induced by photoionization of residual gas in the vacuum chamber. Detection limits in the part-per-trillion range have been demonstrated with the gated detector. The second technique used arrays of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices coated with various chemically selective materials (e.g., polymers, self assembled monolayers) to provide unique response patterns to various chemical analytes. This work focused on polymers, formed by spin casting from solution or by plasma polymerization, as well as on self assembled monolayers. Response from coated SAWs to various concentrations of water, volatile organics, and organophosphonates (chemical warfare agent simulants) were used to provide calibration data. A novel visual empirical region of influence (VIERI) pattern recognition technique was used to evaluate the ability to use these response patterns to correctly identify chemical species. This investigation shows how the VERI technique can be used to determine the best set of coatings for an array, to predict the performance of the array even if sensor responses change due to aging of the coating materials, and to identify unknown analytes based on previous calibration data.

  13. Summary of state VOC (volatile organic compound) regulations. Volume 2. Group 3 CTG (control technique guidelines) and greater than 100 ton per year non-CTG VOC regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C.R.; Meardon, K.R.

    1988-05-01

    In April of 1985, EPA published Summary of State VOC Regulations (EPA-450/2-85-003), which summarized regulations for Group I, II, and III CTG's and >100 tpy non-CTG categories as of August 1, 1984. This document updates and expands parts of that publication; specifically, it presents summaries of State and local regulations for Group III CTG's and >100 tpy non-CTG regulations. Information used to compile the document was collected from all 10 EPA regions in early 1987.

  14. Arabidopsis thaliana as Bioindicator of Fungal VOCs in Indoor Air

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Richard; Yin, Guohua; Klich, Maren A.; Grimm, Casey; Bennett, Joan W.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the ability of Arabidopsis thaliana to detect different mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by the common indoor fungus, Aspergillus versicolor, and demonstrate the potential usage of the plant as a bioindicator to monitor fungal VOCs in indoor air. We evaluated the volatile production of Aspergillus versicolor strains SRRC 108 (NRRL 3449) and SRRC 2559 (ATCC 32662) grown on nutrient rich fungal medium, and grown under conditions to mimic the substrate encountered in the built environment where fungi would typically grow indoors (moist wallboard and ceiling tiles). Using headspace solid phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we analyzed VOC profiles of the two strains. The most abundant compound produced by both strains on all three media was 1-octen-3-ol. Strain SRRC 2559 made several terpenes not detected from strain SRRC 108. Using a split-plate bioassay, we grew Arabidopsis thaliana in a shared atmosphere with VOCs from the two strains of Aspergillus versicolor grown on yeast extract sucrose medium. The VOCs emitted by SRRC 2559 had an adverse impact on seed germination and plant growth. Chemical standards of individual VOCs from the Aspergillus versicolor mixture (2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-octen-3-ol, limonene, and β-farnesene), and β-caryophyllene were tested one by one in seed germination and vegetative plant growth assays. The most inhibitory compound to both seed germination and plant growth was 1-octen-3-ol. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis is a useful model for monitoring indoor air quality as it is sensitive to naturally emitted fungal volatile mixtures as well as to chemical standards of individual compounds, and it exhibits relatively quick concentration- and duration-dependent responses. PMID:27790067

  15. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from oil and natural gas activities: compositional comparison of 13 major shale basins via NOAA airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Aikin, K. C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Koss, A.; Yuan, B.; Warneke, C.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Holloway, J. S.; Graus, M.; Tokarek, T. W.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Sueper, D.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    The recent and unprecedented increase in natural gas production from shale formations is associated with a rise in the production of non-methane volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including natural gas plant liquids (e.g., ethane, propane, and butanes) and liquid lease condensate (e.g., pentanes, hexanes, aromatics and cycloalkanes). Since 2010, the production of natural gas liquids and the amount of natural gas vented/flared has increased by factors of ~1.28 and 1.57, respectively (U.S. Energy and Information Administration), indicating an increasingly large potential source of hydrocarbons to the atmosphere. Emission of VOCs may affect local and regional air quality due to the potential to form tropospheric ozone and organic particles as well as from the release of toxic species such as benzene and toluene. The 2015 Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus (SONGNex) campaign studied emissions from oil and natural gas activities across the central United States in order to better understand their potential air quality and climate impacts. Here we present VOC measurements from 19 research flights aboard the NOAA WP-3D over 11 shale basins across 8 states. Non-methane hydrocarbons were measured using an improved whole air sampler (iWAS) with post-flight analysis via a custom-built gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The whole air samples are complimented by higher-time resolution measurements of methane (Picarro spectrometer), ethane (Aerodyne spectrometer), and VOCs (H3O+ chemical ionization mass spectrometer). Preliminary analysis show that the Permian Basin on the New Mexico/Texas border had the highest observed VOC mixing ratios for all basins studied. We will utilize VOC enhancement ratios to compare the composition of methane and VOC emissions for each basin and the associated reactivities of these gases with the hydroxyl radical, OH, as a proxy for potential ozone formation.

  16. The human volatilome: volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath, skin emanations, urine, feces and saliva.

    PubMed

    Amann, Anton; Costello, Ben de Lacy; Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen; Buszewski, Bogusław; Pleil, Joachim; Ratcliffe, Norman; Risby, Terence

    2014-09-01

    Breath analysis is a young field of research with its roots in antiquity. Antoine Lavoisier discovered carbon dioxide in exhaled breath during the period 1777-1783, Wilhelm (Vilém) Petters discovered acetone in breath in 1857 and Johannes Müller reported the first quantitative measurements of acetone in 1898. A recent review reported 1765 volatile compounds appearing in exhaled breath, skin emanations, urine, saliva, human breast milk, blood and feces. For a large number of compounds, real-time analysis of exhaled breath or skin emanations has been performed, e.g., during exertion of effort on a stationary bicycle or during sleep. Volatile compounds in exhaled breath, which record historical exposure, are called the 'exposome'. Changes in biogenic volatile organic compound concentrations can be used to mirror metabolic or (patho)physiological processes in the whole body or blood concentrations of drugs (e.g. propofol) in clinical settings-even during artificial ventilation or during surgery. Also compounds released by bacterial strains like Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Streptococcus pneumonia could be very interesting. Methyl methacrylate (CAS 80-62-6), for example, was observed in the headspace of Streptococcus pneumonia in concentrations up to 1420 ppb. Fecal volatiles have been implicated in differentiating certain infectious bowel diseases such as Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter, Salmonella and Cholera. They have also been used to differentiate other non-infectious conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, alterations in urine volatiles have been used to detect urinary tract infections, bladder, prostate and other cancers. Peroxidation of lipids and other biomolecules by reactive oxygen species produce volatile compounds like ethane and 1-pentane. Noninvasive detection and therapeutic monitoring of oxidative stress would be highly desirable in autoimmunological, neurological, inflammatory diseases and cancer

  17. Multiple internal standard normalization for improving HS-SPME-GC-MS quantitation in virgin olive oil volatile organic compounds (VOO-VOCs) profile.

    PubMed

    Fortini, Martina; Migliorini, Marzia; Cherubini, Chiara; Cecchi, Lorenzo; Calamai, Luca

    2017-04-01

    The commercial value of virgin olive oils (VOOs) strongly depends on their classification, also based on the aroma of the oils, usually evaluated by a panel test. Nowadays, a reliable analytical method is still needed to evaluate the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and support the standard panel test method. To date, the use of HS-SPME sampling coupled to GC-MS is generally accepted for the analysis of VOCs in VOOs. However, VOO is a challenging matrix due to the simultaneous presence of: i) compounds at ppm and ppb concentrations; ii) molecules belonging to different chemical classes and iii) analytes with a wide range of molecular mass. Therefore, HS-SPME-GC-MS quantitation based upon the use of external standard method or of only a single internal standard (ISTD) for data normalization in an internal standard method, may be troublesome. In this work a multiple internal standard normalization is proposed to overcome these problems and improving quantitation of VOO-VOCs. As many as 11 ISTDs were used for quantitation of 71 VOCs. For each of them the most suitable ISTD was selected and a good linearity in a wide range of calibration was obtained. Except for E-2-hexenal, without ISTD or with an unsuitable ISTD, the linear range of calibration was narrower with respect to that obtained by a suitable ISTD, confirming the usefulness of multiple internal standard normalization for the correct quantitation of VOCs profile in VOOs. The method was validated for 71 VOCs, and then applied to a series of lampante virgin olive oils and extra virgin olive oils. In light of our results, we propose the application of this analytical approach for routine quantitative analyses and to support sensorial analysis for the evaluation of positive and negative VOOs attributes.

  18. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emission characteristics and control strategies for a petrochemical industrial area in middle Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chia-Hsien; Horng, Jao-Jia

    2009-11-01

    This study investigated VOC emissions from the largest petrochemical industrial district in Taiwan and recommended some control measures to reduce VOC emissions. In addition to the petrochemical industry, the district encompasses a chemical and fiber industry, a plastics industry and a harbor, which together produce more than 95% of the VOC emissions in the area. The sequence of VOC emission was as follows: components (e.g., valves, flanges, and pumps) (47%) > tanks (29%) > stacks (15%) > wastewater treatment facility (6%) > loading (2%) > flares (1%). Other plants producing high-density polyethylene (HDPE), styrene, ethylene glycol (EG), gas oil, and iso-nonyl-alchol (INA) were measured to determine the VOC leaching in the district. The VOC emissions of these 35 plants (90% of all plants) were less than 100 tons/year. About 74% of the tanks were fixed-roof tanks that leached more VOCs than the other types of tanks. To reduce leaching, the components should be checked periodically, and companies should be required to follow the Taiwan EPA regulations. A VOC emission management system was developed in state implementation plans (SIPs) to inspect and reduce emissions in the industrial district.

  19. The VOC-ozone connection: a grassland case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Hoertnagl, L.; Bamberger, I.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Dunkel, J.; Hammerle, A.; Graus, M.; Hansel, A.

    2008-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is formed in the presence of sunlight through the interaction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and NOX (NO, NO2). A photochemical equilibrium exists between NO, NO2 and O3; however in the presence of VOCs this equilibrium is broken and additional O3 is produced. O3 damages plants in several ways, most importantly by reducing net photosynthesis and growth. The extent of this damage depends on the time-integrated absorbed O3 flux (i.e. the dose), which is a function of leaf stomatal conductance and ambient O3 concentration, and further influenced by plant species specific defence mechanisms. VOCs are produced by plants through a variety of pathways and in response to large number of different driving forces. A large variety of VOCs are emitted by plants in response to stress conditions, including the foliar uptake of O3. Here we present preliminary data from an ongoing study where concurrent measurements of the fluxes of VOCs and O3 are made above a managed mountain grassland in Tyrol/Austria. Fluxes of several different VOCs are measured by means of the eddy covariance method and a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Fluxes of O3 are measured by both the eddy covariance method and a modified Bowen-ratio approach. The data analysis will try to identify whether VOC emissions change with the time-integrated uptake of O3 by plants.

  20. VOCs and OVOCs distribution and control policy implications in Pearl River Delta region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, Peter K. K.; Ho, Josephine W. K.; Tsang, Roy C. W.; Blake, Donald R.; Lau, Alexis K. H.; Yu, Jian Zhen; Yuan, Zibing; Wang, Xinming; Shao, Min; Zhong, Liuju

    2013-09-01

    Ambient air measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) were conducted and characterised during a two-year grid study in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of southern China. The present grid study pioneered the systematic investigation of the nature and characteristics of complex VOC and OVOC sources at a regional scale. The largest contributing VOCs, accounting over 80% of the total VOCs mixing ratio, were toluene, ethane, ethyne, propane, ethene, butane, benzene, pentane, ethylbenzene, and xylenes. Sub-regional VOC spatial characteristics were identified, namely: i) relatively fresh pollutants, consistent with elevated vehicular and industrial activities, around the PRD estuary; and ii) a concentration gradient with higher mixing ratios of VOCs in the west as compared with the eastern part of PRD. Based on alkyl nitrate aging determination, a high hydroxyl radical (OH) concentration favoured fast hydrocarbon reactions and formation of locally produced ozone. The photochemical reactivity analysis showed aromatic hydrocarbons and alkenes together consisted of around 80% of the ozone formation potential (OFP) among the key VOCs. We also found that the OFP from OVOCs should not be neglected since their OFP contribution was more than one-third of that from VOCs alone. These findings support the choice of current air pollution control policy which focuses on vehicular sources but warrants further controls. Industrial emissions and VOCs emitted by solvents should be the next targets for ground-level ozone abatement.

  1. Ambient levels and temporal trends of VOCs, including carbonyl compounds, and ozone at Cabañeros National Park border, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Florentina; Tapia, Araceli; Notario, Alberto; Albaladejo, José; Martínez, Ernesto

    2014-03-01

    Concentration levels of 15 carbonyls, 17 VOCs and ozone were studied at Cabañeros National Park border, Spain, in an area mainly constituted by holm oaks (Quercus ilex) and cork oaks (Quercus suber), along with scrubland formations such as rock-rose and heather. The compounds were collected by means of diffusive samplers from August-November 2010 and February-August 2011. Carbonyl compounds, VOCs and O3 were analysed by HPLC with diode array UV-Vis detector, GC-FID and by UV-visible spectrophotometry, respectively. The most abundant carbonyls were hexanal, acetone-acrolein, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Seasonal variation was apparent with maximum values observed in summer months. Total carbonyl concentrations ranged from 2.8 to 19.7 μg m-3. Most VOCs studied (using chemically desorbable cartridges) were either not detected or were below their detection limits, however, a parallel sampling using thermally desorbable cartridges, from May 22 to June 19, revealed the presence of much more VOCs, identified using GC-MS. O3 concentration ranged from 27.2 to 90.5 μg m-3, reaching the maximum monthly mean concentration in March (84.4 μg m-3). The analysis of back trajectories indicates the transport of polluted air masses from remote areas, mainly from the Mediterranean basin that should contribute to the high levels of ozone observed.

  2. Volatilization of low vapor pressure--volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOCs) during three cleaning products-associated activities: Potential contributions to ozone formation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; McKone, Thomas E; Bennett, Deborah H

    2016-06-01

    There have been many studies to reduce ozone formation mostly from volatile organic compound (VOC) sources. However, the role of low vapor pressure (LVP)-VOCs from consumer products remains mostly unexplored and unaddressed. This study explores the impact of high production volume LVP-VOCs on ozone formation from three cleaning products-associated activities (dishwashing, clothes washing, and surface cleaning). We develop a model framework to account for the portion available for ozone formation during the use phase and from the down-the-drain disposal. We apply experimental studies that measured emission rates or models that were developed for estimating emission rates of organic compounds during the use phase. Then, the fraction volatilized (fvolatilized) and the fraction disposed down the drain (fdown-the-drain) are multiplied by the portion available for ozone formation for releases to the outdoor air (fO3|volatilized) and down-the-drain (fO3|down-the-drain), respectively. Overall, for chemicals used in three specific cleaning-product uses, fvolatilized is less than 0.6% for all studied LVP-VOCs. Because greater than 99.4% of compounds are disposed of down the drain during the use phase, when combined with fO3|volatilized and fO3|down-the-drain, the portion available for ozone formation from the direct releases to outdoor air and the down-the-drain disposal is less than 0.4% and 0.2%, respectively. The results from this study indicate that the impact of the studied LVP-VOCs on ozone formation is very sensitive to what occurs during the use phase and suggest the need for future research on experimental work at the point of use.

  3. Emission of volatile organic compounds from silage: compounds, sources, and implications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Silage, fermented cattle feed, has recently been identified as a significant source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted to the atmosphere. A small number of studies have measured VOC emission from silage, but not enough is known about the processes involved to accurately quantify emission r...

  4. A shape tailored gold-conductive polymer nanocomposite as a transparent electrode with extraordinary insensitivity to volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Rania; Homaeigohar, Shahin; Häußler, Dietrich; Elbahri, Mady

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the transparent conducting polymer of poly (3,4-ethylenendioxythiophene): poly(styrene sulphonate) (PEDOT:PSS) was nanohybridized via inclusion of gold nanofillers including nanospheres (NSs) and nanorods (NRs). Such nanocomposite thin films offer not only more optimum conductivity than the pristine polymer but also excellent resistivity against volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Interestingly, such amazing properties are achieved in the diluted regimes of the nanofillers and depend on the characteristics of the interfacial region of the polymer and nanofillers, i.e. the aspect ratio of the latter component. Accordingly, a shape dependent response is made that is more desirable in case of using the Au nanorods with a much larger aspect ratio than their nanosphere counterparts. This transparent nanocomposite thin film with an optimized conductivity and very low sensitivity to organic gases is undoubtedly a promising candidate material for the touch screen panel production industry. Considering PEDOT as a known material for integrated electrodes in energy saving applications, we believe that our strategy might be an important progress in the field. PMID:27654345

  5. A shape tailored gold-conductive polymer nanocomposite as a transparent electrode with extraordinary insensitivity to volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Rania; Homaeigohar, Shahin; Häußler, Dietrich; Elbahri, Mady

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the transparent conducting polymer of poly (3,4-ethylenendioxythiophene): poly(styrene sulphonate) (PEDOT:PSS) was nanohybridized via inclusion of gold nanofillers including nanospheres (NSs) and nanorods (NRs). Such nanocomposite thin films offer not only more optimum conductivity than the pristine polymer but also excellent resistivity against volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Interestingly, such amazing properties are achieved in the diluted regimes of the nanofillers and depend on the characteristics of the interfacial region of the polymer and nanofillers, i.e. the aspect ratio of the latter component. Accordingly, a shape dependent response is made that is more desirable in case of using the Au nanorods with a much larger aspect ratio than their nanosphere counterparts. This transparent nanocomposite thin film with an optimized conductivity and very low sensitivity to organic gases is undoubtedly a promising candidate material for the touch screen panel production industry. Considering PEDOT as a known material for integrated electrodes in energy saving applications, we believe that our strategy might be an important progress in the field.

  6. Leaf ontogeny dominates the seasonal exchange of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in a SRC-poplar plantation during an entire growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilli, Federico; Gioli, Beniamino; Fares, Silvano; Zenone, Terenzio; Zona, Donatella; Gielen, Bert; Loreto, Francesco; Janssens, Ivan; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2015-04-01

    The declining cost of many renewable energy technologies and changes in the prices of fossil fuels have recently encouraged governments policies to subsidize the use of biomass as a sustainable source of energy. Deciduous poplars (Populus spp.) trees are often selected for biomass production in short rotation coppiced (SRC) for their high CO2 photosynthetic assimilation rates and their capacity to develop dense canopies with high values of leaf area index (LAI). So far, observations and projections of seasonal variations of many VOC fluxes has been limited to strong isoprenoids emitting evergreen ecosystems such tropical and Mediterranean forests as well as Citrus and oil palm plantation, all having constant values of LAI. We run a long-term field campaign where the exchange of VOC, together with CO2 and water vapor was monitored during an entire growing season (June - November, 2012) above a SRC-based poplar plantation. Our results confirmed that isoprene and methanol were the most abundant fluxes emitted, accounting for more than 90% of the total carbon released in form of VOC. However, Northern climates characterized by fresh summertime temperatures and recurring precipitations favored poplar growth while inhibiting the development of isoprene emission that resulted in only 0.7% of the net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE). Besides, measurements of a multitude of VOC fluxes by PTR-TOF-MS showed bi-directional exchange of oxygenated-VOC (OVOC) such as: formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, isoprene oxidation products (iox, namely MVK, MAC and MEK) as well as ethanol and formic acid. The application of Self Organizing Maps to visualize the relationship between the full time-series of many VOC fluxes and the observed seasonal variations of environmental, physiological and structural parameters proved the most abundant isoprene ad methanol fluxes to occur mainly on the hottest days under mid-high light intensities when also NEE and evapotraspiration reached the highest

  7. Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, I. J.; Blake, N. J.; Barletta, B.; Diskin, G. S.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Gorham, K.; Huey, L. G.; Meinardi, S.; Rowland, F. S.; Vay, S. A.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Yang, M.; Blake, D. R.

    2010-08-01

    Oil sands comprise 30% of the world's oil reserves and the crude oil reserves in Canada's oil sands deposits are second only to Saudi Arabia. The extraction and processing of oil sands is much more challenging than for light sweet crude oils because of the high viscosity of the bitumen contained within the oil sands and because the bitumen is mixed with sand and contains chemical impurities such as sulphur. Despite these challenges, the importance of oil sands is increasing in the energy market. To our best knowledge this is the first peer-reviewed study to characterize volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from Alberta's oil sands mining sites. We present high-precision gas chromatography measurements of 76 speciated C2-C10 VOCs (alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cycloalkanes, aromatics, monoterpenes, oxygenates, halocarbons, and sulphur compounds) in 17 boundary layer air samples collected over surface mining operations in northeast Alberta on 10 July 2008, using the NASA DC-8 airborne laboratory as a research platform. In addition to the VOCs, we present simultaneous measurements of CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2, which were measured in situ aboard the DC-8. Methane, CO, CO2, NO, NO2, NOy, SO2 and 53 VOCs (e.g., halocarbons, sulphur species, NMHCs) showed clear statistical enhancements (up to 1.1-397×) over the oil sands compared to local background values and, with the exception of CO, were higher over the oil sands than at any other time during the flight. Twenty halocarbons (e.g., CFCs, HFCs, halons, brominated species) either were not enhanced or were minimally enhanced (< 10%) over the oil sands. Ozone levels remained low because of titration by NO, and three VOCs (propyne, furan, MTBE) remained below their 3 pptv detection limit throughout the flight. Based on their mutual correlations, the compounds emitted by the oil sands industry fell into two groups: (1) evaporative emissions from the oil sands and its products and/or from the diluent used to

  8. Use of Compound-Specific Stable Isotope Analysis to Distinguish Between Vapor Intrusion and Indoor Sources of VOCs - CSIA Protocol for Vapor Intrusion Investigations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Vapor Intrusion Version 2 Investigations July 2014 13 4.0 DATA INTERPRETATION The measured isotope ratios for the subsurface samples and for...Results for Single Isotope If two isotope ratios are analyzed, the data interpretation is as follows (Figure 5): Indoor Source Range CSIA...GUIDANCE DOCUMENT Use of Compound-Specific Stable Isotope Analysis to Distinguish Between Vapor Intrusion and Indoor Sources of VOCs

  9. Control of industrial VOC (volatile organic compound) emissions by catalytic incineration. volume 5. catalytic incinerator performance at industrial site c-3. Final report, May 1982-August 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Blacksmith, J.R.; Randall, J.L.

    1984-07-01

    The report is part of a two-phase EPA effort to assess the performance, suitability, and costs of various technologies to control emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In Phase 1, information was assembled from the literature on the use and cost of using catalytic incineration for VOC control. Results included: (1) a review of current and developing catalytic incineration technology, (2) an assessment of the overall performance of catalytic incinerators, (3) a review of applications where catalytic incinerators are used, (4) a comparative analysis of catalytic incineration with other competing VOC controls, (5) an examination of available methods for emission testing catalytic incinerators, and (6) an assessment of the need for additional performance test data. Phase 2 was a test program designed to increase the catalytic incinerator performance data base. It resulted in reports documenting the performance of eight catalytic incinerators at six industrial sites. The incinerators were used to control VOC emissions from solvent evaporation processes at can coating, coil coating, magnet wire, and graphic arts printing plants. Performance was measured at several process conditions at each site. Incinerator performance was characterized in terms of destruction efficiency, outlet solvent concentration, and energy usage. Design and operating data were collected. This report preseents test resultls and data evaluation for the testing conducted at the third test site, which involved the testing of two catalytic incinerators at Plant C-3, a graphic arts printing establishment.

  10. Natural attenuation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the leachate plume of a municipal landfill: Using alkylbenzenes as process probes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eganhouse, R.P.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Scholl, M.A.; Matthews, L.L.

    2001-01-01

    More than 70 individual VOCs were identified in the leachate plume of a closed municipal landfill. Concentrations were low when compared with data published for other landfills, and total VOCs accounted for less than 0.1% of the total dissolved organic carbon. The VOC concentrations in the core of the anoxic leachate plume are variable, but in all cases they were found to be near or below detection limits within 200 m of the landfall. In contrast to the VOCs, the distributions of chloride ion, a conservative tracer, and nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon, indicate little dilution over the same distance. Thus, natural attentuation processes are effectively limiting migration of the VOC plume. The distribution of C2-3-benzenes, paired on the basis of their octanol-water partition coefficients and Henry's law constants, were systematically evaluated to assess the relative importance of volatilization, sorption, and biodegradation as attenuation mechanisms. Based on our data, biodegradation appears to be the process primarily responsible for the observed attenuation of VOCs at this site. We believe that the alkylbenzenes are powerful process probes that can and should be exploited in studies of natural attenuation in contaminated ground water systems.

  11. Emissions of volatile organic compounds during the decomposition of plant litter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Christopher M.; Monson, Russell K.; Fierer, Noah

    2010-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted during plant litter decomposition, and such VOCs can have wide-ranging impacts on atmospheric chemistry, terrestrial biogeochemistry, and soil ecology. However, we currently have a limited understanding of the relative importance of biotic versus abiotic sources of these VOCs and whether distinct types of litter emit different types and quantities of VOCs during decomposition. We analyzed VOCs emitted by microbes or by abiotic mechanisms during the decomposition of litter from 12 plant species in a laboratory experiment using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Net emissions from litter with active microbial populations (non-sterile litters) were between 0 and 11 times higher than emissions from sterile controls over a 20-d incubation period, suggesting that abiotic sources of VOCs are generally less important than biotic sources. In all cases, the sterile and non-sterile litter treatments emitted different types of VOCs, with methanol being the dominant VOC emitted from litters during microbial decomposition, accounting for 78 to 99% of the net emissions. We also found that the types of VOCs released during biotic decomposition differed in a predictable manner among litter types with VOC profiles also changing as decomposition progressed over time. These results show the importance of incorporating both the biotic decomposition of litter and the species-dependent differences in terrestrial vegetation into global VOC emission models.

  12. Comparisons of diffusive and advective fluxes of gas phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in unsaturated zones under natural conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Kehua; Zhan, Hongbin

    2013-02-01

    Diffusive flux is traditionally treated as the dominant mechanism of gas transport in unsaturated zones under natural conditions, and advective flux is usually neglected. However, some researchers have found that pressure-driven and density-driven advective flux may also be significant under certain conditions. This article compares the diffusive, pressure-driven and density-driven advective fluxes of gas phase volatile organic compound (VOCs) in unsaturated zones under various natural conditions. The presence of a less or more permeable layer at ground surface in a layered unsaturated zone is investigated for its impact on the net contribution of advective and diffusive fluxes. Results show although the transient advective flux can be greater than the diffusive flux, under most of the field conditions the net contribution of the advective flux is one to three orders of magnitude less than the diffusive flux, and the influence of the density-driven flux is undetectable. The advective flux contributes comparably with the diffusive flux only when the gas-filled porosity is less than 0.05. The presence of a less permeable layer at ground surface slightly increases the total flux in the underlying layer, while the presence of a more permeable layer at ground surface significantly increases the total flux in it. When the magnitude of water table fluctuation is less than 1 cm, and the period is greater than 0.5 day, the fluctuation of the water table can be simulated by fixing the water table position and setting a fluctuating moving velocity at the water table.

  13. Quantifying VOC emissions for the strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect

    Knowlton, Robert G.; Lord, David L.

    2013-06-01

    A very important aspect of the Department of Energys (DOEs) Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program is regulatory compliance. One of the regulatory compliance issues deals with limiting the amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted into the atmosphere from brine wastes when they are discharged to brine holding ponds. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has set limits on the amount of VOCs that can be discharged to the atmosphere. Several attempts have been made to quantify the VOC emissions associated with the brine ponds going back to the late 1970s. There are potential issues associated with each of these quantification efforts. Two efforts were made to quantify VOC emissions by analyzing VOC content of brine samples obtained from wells. Efforts to measure air concentrations were mentioned in historical reports but no data have been located to confirm these assertions. A modeling effort was also performed to quantify the VOC emissions. More recently in 2011- 2013, additional brine sampling has been performed to update the VOC emissions estimate. An analysis of the statistical confidence in these results is presented here. Arguably, there are uncertainties associated with each of these efforts. The analysis herein indicates that the upper confidence limit in VOC emissions based on recent brine sampling is very close to the 0.42 ton/MMB limit used historically on the project. Refining this estimate would require considerable investment in additional sampling, analysis, and monitoring. An analysis of the VOC emissions at each site suggests that additional discharges could be made and stay within current regulatory limits.

  14. Analysis and quantitation of volatile organic compounds emitted from plastics used in museum construction by evolved gas analysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Samide, Michael J; Smith, Gregory D

    2015-12-24

    Construction materials used in museums for the display, storage, and transportation of artwork must be assessed for their tendency to emit harmful pollution that could potentially damage cultural treasures. Traditionally, a subjective metals corrosion test known as the Oddy test has been widely utilized in museums for this purpose. To augment the Oddy test, an instrumental sampling approach based on evolved gas analysis (EGA) coupled to gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectral (MS) detection has been implemented for the first time to qualitatively identify off-gassed pollutants under specific conditions. This approach is compared to other instrumental methods reported in the literature. This novel application of the EGA sampling technique yields several benefits over traditional testing, including rapidity, high sensitivity, and broad detectability of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Furthermore, unlike other reported instrumental approaches, the EGA method was used to determine quantitatively the amount of VOCs emitted by acetate resins and polyurethane foams under specific conditions using both an external calibration method as well as surrogate response factors. EGA was successfully employed to rapidly characterize emissions from 12 types of common plastics. This analysis is advocated as a rapid pre-screening method to rule out poorly performing materials prior to investing time and energy in Oddy testing. The approach is also useful for rapid, routine testing of construction materials previously vetted by traditional testing, but which may experience detrimental formulation changes over time. As an example, a case study on batch re-orders of rigid expanded poly(vinyl chloride) board stock is presented.

  15. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) emitted and accumulated by herbaceous and woody California crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormeño, E.; Fares, S.; Park, J.; Gentner, D. R.; Karlik, J. F.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2009-12-01

    Emissions from vegetation may substantially influence regional air quality in California. However, the emission potentials of many important crop species have not been extensively studied, although they comprise extensive areas of landcover within this state. A better knowledge of the emission rate at the species-specific level is critical for reducing uncertainties in emission inventories and evaluating emission model performance. In the present study we identify and quantify BVOC produced (emitted and stored) by leaves of 22 dominant agricultural woody and herbaceous crops in California. Emissions were studied by means of a dynamic cuvette system where a whole plant (herbaceous species) or a branch (woody species) was enclosed. Emitted BVOC were collected by passing air from the cuvette enclosing the branch through a glass tube packed with carbon based adsorbents. The adsorbents were later liquid extracted and concentrated in the laboratory. BVOCs stored in the plant tissues were extracted with an organic solvent, after plant grinding. Both BVOC emitted and BVOC stored were identified and quantified using the same GC-MS equipment. Most identified leaf emissions and stored compounds were terpenoids, but BVOC from other biosynthetic classes (benzenoids and fatty acid derivates)were not negligible. The relationship between different BVOC classes and between emitted and stored terpenoids will be presented. Differences between herbaceous and woody crops, and a variety of foliar secretory structures (e.g. secretory cavities, secretory ducts, glandular trichomes, and glands), will be evaluated in terms of BVOC content and emissions to the atmosphere.

  16. Anthropogenic and biogenic influence on VOC fluxes at an urban background site in Helsinki, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rantala, Pekka; Järvi, Leena; Taipale, Risto; Laurila, Terhi K.; Patokoski, Johanna; Kajos, Maija K.; Kurppa, Mona; Haapanala, Sami; Siivola, Erkki; Petäjä, Tuukka; Ruuskanen, Taina M.; Rinne, Janne

    2016-07-01

    We measured volatile organic compounds (VOCs), carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon monoxide (CO) at an urban background site near the city centre of Helsinki, Finland, northern Europe. The VOC and CO2 measurements were obtained between January 2013 and September 2014 whereas for CO a shorter measurement campaign in April-May 2014 was conducted. Both anthropogenic and biogenic sources were identified for VOCs in the study. Strong correlations between VOC fluxes and CO fluxes and traffic rates indicated anthropogenic source of many VOCs. The VOC with the highest emission rate to the atmosphere was methanol, which originated mostly from traffic and other anthropogenic sources. The traffic was also a major source for aromatic compounds in all seasons whereas isoprene was mostly emitted from biogenic sources during summer. Some amount of traffic-related isoprene emissions were detected during other seasons but this might have also been an instrumental contamination from cycloalkane products. Generally, the observed VOC fluxes were found to be small in comparison with previous urban VOC flux studies. However, the differences were probably caused by lower anthropogenic activities as the CO2 fluxes were also relatively small at the site.

  17. Ambient air levels of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in a medium size city in Northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Parra, M A; Elustondo, D; Bermejo, R; Santamaría, J M

    2009-01-15

    Ambient concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were measured by means of passive sampling at 40 sampling points in a medium-size city in Northern Spain, from June 2006 to June 2007. VOC and NO2 samplers were analysed by thermal desorption followed by gas chromatography/mass-selective detector and by visible spectrophotometry, respectively. Mean concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, propylbenzene, trimethylbenzenes, and NO(2) were 2.84, 13.26, 2.15, 6.01, 0.59, 1.32 and 23.17 microg m(-3) respectively, and found to be highly correlated. Their spatial distribution showed high differences in small distances and pointed to traffic as the main emission source of these compounds. The lowest levels of VOC and NO2 occurred during summer, owing to the increase in solar radiation and to lower traffic densities. Mean concentrations of benzene and NO2 exceeded the European limits at some of the monitored points.

  18. New method to quantify volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in cloud droplets sampled at the puy de Dôme research station.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomb, A.; Fleuret, J.; Gaimoz, C.; Deguillaume, L.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years several studies have focused on the health and environmental effects of atmospheric pollution, and especially on the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In cloud droplets, chemical reactions in the liquid phase modify the amount of radicals which drive the oxidizing power of the atmosphere. The objective of this project was to identify and quantify VOCs in cloud water samples at the puy de Dôme research site using a combination of stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE)-thermal desorption (TD)-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Experimental studies were carried out at the puy de Dôme (PDD) Station (48°N, 2°E; 1465 m a.s.l.), in the Massif Central Region (France). It is a strategic point from which to observe warm and mixed clouds that are present 30% of the time on an annual basis. Clouds are frequently formed at the top of the site either during advection of frontal systems or by orographic rise of moist air. The station is in the free troposphere a large fraction of the time and air masses are usually exempt from the influence of local pollution. Non-precipitating cloud droplets are sampled using a single-stage cloud collector. Cloud droplets larger than 7 µm (cut-off diameter) are collected by impaction onto a rectangular plate at a flow rate of approximately 86 m3 h-1. This work has established a functional procedure to allow the quantitative extraction of 80 VOCs in cloud water. The method has been optimized to determine the best repeatability and detection limit for most of the compounds (hydrophobic and hydrophilic). According to SBSE theory, at equilibrium the distribution coefficients of the analytes between the aqueous matrix and coated film of the stir bar (PDMS) are correlated with the corresponding octanol-water partitioning coefficients (Kpdms/w vs Ko/w). Hydrophobic compounds, characterized by a high octanol-water distribution coefficient (Kow), are extracted from water by SBSE with a high recovery. However

  19. Apparatus and method for reading two-dimensional electrophoretograms containing. beta. -ray-emitting labeled compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, H.L.; Kinnison, W.W.; Lillberg, J.W.

    1987-08-11

    An apparatus for reading flat, substantially planar two-dimensional gel electrophoretograms containing ..beta..-ray-emitting labeled compounds, the apparatus comprising in combination: a. a single, substantially flat and rectangular proportional chamber radiation detection means substantially parallel to and approximately coextensive with the gel electrophoretogram for receiving ..beta..-rays emitted from the electrophoretogram and cosmic rays and generating electrical signals according to the two dimensional coordinates of each ..beta..-ray and cosmic ray received thereby; b. substantially flat and rectangular scintillator means located nearby to the substantially flat and rectangular proportional chamber radiation detection means for detecting the incidence of cosmic rays on the substantially flat and rectangular proportional chamber radiation detection means and having an electrical output in response thereto, yet having substantially no sensitivity to the ..beta..-rays emitted from the gel; c. magnetic field generating means for providing a substantially uniform magnetic field having dimensions substantially coextensive with the rectangular dimension of the substantially flat and rectangular proportional chamber radiation detection means and passing substantially perpendicularly therethrough and through the scintillator means.

  20. [Air quality in schools - classroom levels of carbon dioxide (CO2), volatile organic compounds (VOC), aldehydes, endotoxins and cat allergen].

    PubMed

    Fromme, H; Heitmann, D; Dietrich, S; Schierl, R; Körner, W; Kiranoglu, M; Zapf, A; Twardella, D

    2008-02-01

    Children are assumed to be more vulnerable to health hazards and spend a large part of their time in schools. To assess the exposure situation in this microenvironment, we evaluated the indoor air quality in winter 2004/5 in 92 classrooms, and in 75 classrooms in summer 2005 in south Bavaria, Germany. Indoor air climate parameters (temperature, relative humidity), carbon dioxide (CO2) and various volatile organic compounds, aldehydes and ketones were measured. Additionally, cat allergen (Fel d1) and endotoxin (LAL-test) were analysed in the settled dust of school rooms. Data on room and building characteristics were collected by use of a standardised form. Only data collected during teaching hours were considered in analysis. The median indoor CO2 concentration in the classrooms ranged in the winter and summer period from 598 to 4 172 ppm and 480 to 1 875 ppm, respectively. While during the winter period in 92% of the classrooms the CO2 daily medians went above 1 000 ppm, the percentage of classrooms with increased CO2 concentration fell to 28% in summer. In winter, in 60% of classes the daily median CO2 concentration exceeded 1 500 ppm, while in summer this threshold was reached by only 9%. A high concentration of CO2 was associated with a high number of pupils, a low room surface area and a low room volume. The levels of total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) in classrooms ranged between 110 and 1 000 microg/m3 (median in winter 345 microg/m3, in summer 260 microg/m3). Acetone, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were measured in concentrations from 14.0 to 911 microg/m3, from 3.1 to 46.1 microg/m3, and from 2.9 to 78 microg/m3, respectively. The other aldehydes were detected in minor amounts only. The median Fel d1 level in winter was 485 ng/g dust (20 to 45 160 ng/g) and in summer it was 417 ng/g (40-7 470 ng/g). We observed no marked differences between the two sampling periods and between smooth floors and rooms with carpeted floors. No differences were found

  1. Short-Term Intra-Subject Variation in Exhaled Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in COPD Patients and Healthy Controls and Its Effect on Disease Classification

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Christopher; Mac Parthaláin, Neil; Syed, Yasir; Deganello, Davide; Claypole, Timothy; Lewis, Keir

    2014-01-01

    Exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are of interest for their potential to diagnose disease non-invasively. However, most breath VOC studies have analyzed single breath samples from an individual and assumed them to be wholly consistent representative of the person. This provided the motivation for an investigation of the variability of breath profiles when three breath samples are taken over a short time period (two minute intervals between samples) for 118 stable patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and 63 healthy controls and analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). The extent of the variation in VOC levels differed between COPD and healthy subjects and the patterns of variation differed for isoprene versus the bulk of other VOCs. In addition, machine learning approaches were applied to the breath data to establish whether these samples differed in their ability to discriminate COPD from healthy states and whether aggregation of multiple samples, into single data sets, could offer improved discrimination. The three breath samples gave similar classification accuracy to one another when evaluated separately (66.5% to 68.3% subjects classified correctly depending on the breath repetition used). Combining multiple breath samples into single data sets gave better discrimination (73.4% subjects classified correctly). Although accuracy is not sufficient for COPD diagnosis in a clinical setting, enhanced sampling and analysis may improve accuracy further. Variability in samples, and short-term effects of practice or exertion, need to be considered in any breath testing program to improve reliability and optimize discrimination. PMID:24957028

  2. Root anoxia effects on physiology and emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) under short- and long-term inundation of trees from Amazonian floodplains.

    PubMed

    Bracho-Nunez, Araceli; Knothe, Nina Maria; Costa, Wallace R; Maria Astrid, Liberato R; Kleiss, Betina; Rottenberger, Stefanie; Piedade, Maria Teresa Fernandez; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are affected by a variety of biotic and abiotic factors such as light intensity, temperature, CO2 and drought. Another stress factor, usually overlooked but very important for the Amazon region, is flooding. We studied the exchange of VOCs in relation to CO2 exchange and transpiration of 8 common tree species from the Amazonian floodplain forest grown up from seeds using a dynamic enclosure system. Analysis of volatile organics was performed by PTR-MS fast online measurements. Our study confirmed emissions of ethanol and acetaldehyde at the beginning of root anoxia after inundation, especially in less anoxia adapted species such as Vatairea guianensis, but not for Hevea spruceana probably due to a better adapted metabolism. In contrast to short-term inundation, long-term flooding of the root system did not result in any emission of ethanol or/and acetaldehyde. Emission of other VOCs, such as isoprenoids, acetone, and methanol exhibited distinct behavior related to the origin (igapó or várzea type of floodplain) of the tree species. Also physiological activities exhibited different response patterns for trees from igapó or várzea. In general, isoprenoid emissions increased within the course of some days of short-term flooding. After a long period of waterlogging, VOC emissions decreased considerably, along with photosynthesis, transpiration and stomatal conductance. However, even under long-term testing conditions, two tree species did not show any significant decrease or increase in photosynthesis. In order to understand ecophysiological advantages of the different responses we need field investigations with adult tree species.

  3. Ambient air/near-field measurements of methane and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from a natural gas facility in Northern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudic, Alexia; Gros, Valérie; Bonsang, Bernard; Baisnee, Dominique; Vogel, Félix; Yver Kwok, Camille; Ars, Sébastien; Finlayson, Andrew; Innocenti, Fabrizio; Robinson, Rod

    2015-04-01

    Since the 1970's, the natural gas consumption saw a rapid growth in large urban centers, thus becoming an important energy resource to meet continuous needs of factories and inhabitants. Nevertheless, it can be a substantial source of methane (CH4) and pollutants in urban areas. For instance, we have determined that about 20% of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in downtown Paris are originating from this emission source (Baudic, Gros et al., in preparation). Within the framework of the "Fugitive Methane Emissions" (FuME) project (Climate-KIC, EIT); 2-weeks gas measurements were conducted at a gas compressor station in Northern Europe. Continuous ambient air measurements of methane and VOCs concentrations were performed using a cavity ring-down spectrometer (model G2201, Picarro Inc., Santa Clara, USA) and two portable GC-FID (Chromatotec, Saint-Antoine, France), respectively. On-site near-field samplings were also carried out at the source of two pipelines using stainless steel flasks (later analyzed with a laboratory GC-FID). The objective of this study aims to use VOCs as additional tracers in order to better characterize the fugitive methane emissions in a complex environment, which can be affected by several urban sources (road-traffic, others industries, etc.). Moreover, these measurements have allowed determining the chemical composition of this specific source. Our results revealed that the variability of methane and some VOCs was (rather) well correlated, especially for alkanes (ethane, propane, etc.). An analysis of selected events with strong concentrations enhancement was performed using ambient air measurements; thus allowing the preliminary identification of different emission sources. In addition, some flasks were also sampled in Paris to determine the local natural gas composition. A comparison between both was then performed. Preliminary results from these experiments will be presented here.

  4. Concentration, ozone formation potential and source analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a thermal power station centralized area: A study in Shuozhou, China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yulong; Peng, Lin; Li, Rumei; Li, Yinghui; Li, Lijuan; Bai, Huiling

    2017-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from two sampling sites (HB and XB) in a power station centralized area, in Shuozhou city, China, were sampled by stainless steel canisters and measured by gas chromatography-mass selective detection/flame ionization detection (GC-MSD/FID) in the spring and autumn of 2014. The concentration of VOCs was higher in the autumn (HB, 96.87 μg/m(3); XB, 58.94 μg/m(3)) than in the spring (HB, 41.49 μg/m(3); XB, 43.46 μg/m(3)), as lower wind speed in the autumn could lead to pollutant accumulation, especially at HB, which is a new urban area surrounded by residential areas and a transportation hub. Alkanes were the dominant group at both HB and XB in both sampling periods, but the contribution of aromatic pollutants at HB in the autumn was much higher than that of the other alkanes (11.16-19.55%). Compared to other cities, BTEX pollution in Shuozhou was among the lowest levels in the world. Because of the high levels of aromatic pollutants, the ozone formation potential increased significantly at HB in the autumn. Using the ratio analyses to identify the age of the air masses and analyze the sources, the results showed that the atmospheric VOCs at XB were strongly influenced by the remote sources of coal combustion, while at HB in the spring and autumn were affected by the remote sources of coal combustion and local sources of vehicle emission, respectively. Source analysis conducted using the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model at Shuozhou showed that coal combustion and vehicle emissions made the two largest contributions (29.98% and 21.25%, respectively) to atmospheric VOCs. With further economic restructuring, the influence of vehicle emissions on the air quality should become more significant, indicating that controlling vehicle emissions is key to reducing the air pollution.

  5. Characterizing Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from Oil and Natural Gas Operations in Haynesville, Fayetteville, and Marcellus Shale Regions via Aircraft Observations During SENEX 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Dumas, M.; Hughes, D.; Jaksich, A.; Hatch, C. D.; Graus, M.; Peischl, J.; Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Holloway, J.; Trainer, M.; Aikin, K.; Kaiser, J.; Keutsch, F. N.; Wolfe, G. M.; Hanisco, T. F.; Warneke, C.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The 2013 SENEX (Southeast Nexus) field campaign took place in June and July 2013 with to ascertain how the interaction of natural and anthropogenic emissions influence climate change and air quality throughout the southeastern United States. Five of the research flights utilizing the NOAA WP-3D aircraft focused on areas of intensive oil and natural gas production from various shale plays. These areas included the Haynesville shale in eastern Texas and western Louisiana, the Fayetteville shale in northern Arkansas, and the Marcellus shale in western Pennsylvania. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook 2013 report, (1) the Haynesville, Fayetteville, and Marcellus shale collectively account for approximately 75% of the dry shale gas produced in the U.S., and (2) shale gas is expected to provide the largest source of growth in the U.S. natural gas supply over the next few decades. Depending on the particular shale formation, raw natural gas can contain significant amounts of non-methane hydrocarbons in the form of natural gas liquids (e.g., ethane, propane, butanes) and natural gas condensate (e.g., pentanes, cycloalkanes, and aromatics). Trace gases including methane, aromatics, formaldehyde, other oxygenated VOCs, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides were measured by multiple instruments aboard the NOAA WP-3D research aircraft. Up to 72 whole air samples (WAS) were collected in flight and analyzed in the field post-flight for a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Whole air samples provide a detailed chemical snapshot that can be combined with higher time-resolved measurements in order to provide a more comprehensive chemical analysis. In this presentation, we will compare the emissions composition of the Haynesville, Fayetteville, and Marcellus shale plays to investigate the relative importance of primary VOC emissions on the formation of secondary pollutants such as ozone, oxygenated VOCs, and secondary

  6. Comparison of Adsorption/Desorption of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) on Electrospun Nanofibers with Tenax TA for Potential Application in Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Lanling; Deng, Siwei; Zhao, Renshan; Deng, Jianjun; Kang, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the adsorption/desorption of target compounds on homemade electrospun nanofibers, polystyrene (PS) nanofibers, acrylic resin (AR) nanofibers and PS-AR composite nanofibers with Tenax TA. Ten volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were analyzed by preconcentration onto different sorbents followed by desorption (thermal and solvent orderly) and analysis by capillary gas chromatography. In comparison to Tenax TA, the electrospun nanofibers displayed a significant advantage in desorption efficiency and adsorption selectivity. Stability studies were conducted as a comparative experiment between PS-AR nanofibers and Tenax TA using toluene as the model compound. No stability problems were observed upon storage of toluene on both PS-AR nanofibers and Tenax TA over 60 hours period when maintained in an ultra-freezer (−80°C). The nanofibers provided slightly better stability for the adsorbed analytes than Tenax TA under other storage conditions. In addition, the nanofibers also provided slightly better precision than Tenax TA. The quantitative adsorption of PS-AR nanofibers exhibited a good linearity, as evidenced by the 0.988–0.999 range of regression coefficients (R). These results suggest that for VOCs sampling the electrospun nanofibers can be a potential ideal adsorbent. PMID:27776140

  7. The reduction of HNO3 by volatile organic compounds emitted by motor vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutter, A. P.; Malloy, Q. G. J.; Leong, Y. J.; Gutierrez, C. V.; Calzada, M.; Scheuer, E.; Dibb, J. E.; Griffin, R. J.

    2014-04-01

    Nitric acid (HNO3) was reduced in a flow tube by volatile organic carbon compounds (VOCs) generated from engine oil vapor. The primary reaction product was believed to be HONO. The reaction was not enhanced when Teflon® Raschig rings were added to the flow tube to increase surface area, thereby showing the reaction to be homogeneous under the conditions studied. The HONO formation observed ranged between 0.1 and 0.6 ppb h-1, with a mean of 0.3 ± 0.1 ppb h-1, for typical HNO3 concentrations of 4-5 ppb and estimated concentrations of the reactive components in the engine oil vapor between 200 and 300 ppt. The observations in this study compare well to a recently published field study conducted in Houston that observed average formation rates of 0.6 ± 0.3 ppb h-1. Water vapor was found to decrease the HONO formation rate by ˜0.1 ppb h-1 for every 1% increase in the water mixing ratio.

  8. Use of thermal desorption gas chromatography-olfactometry/mass spectrometry for the comparison of identified and unidentified odor active compounds emitted from building products containing linseed oil.

    PubMed

    Clausen, P A; Knudsen, H N; Larsen, K; Kofoed-Sørensen, V; Wolkoff, P; Wilkins, C K

    2008-11-14

    The emission of odor active volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a floor oil based on linseed oil, the linseed oil itself and a low-odor linseed oil was investigated by thermal desorption gas chromatography combined with olfactometry and mass spectrometry (TD-GC-O/MS). The oils were applied to filters and conditioned in the micro emission cell, FLEC, for 1-3days at ambient temperature, an air exchange rate of 26.9h(-1) and a 30% relative humidity. These conditions resulted in dynamic headspace concentrations and composition of the odor active VOCs that may be similar to real indoor setting. Emission samples for TD-GC-O/MS analysis from the FLEC were on Tenax TA. Although many volatile VOCs were detected by MS, only the odor active VOCs are reported here. In total, 142 odor active VOCs were detected in the emissions from the oils. About 50 of the odor active VOCs were identified or tentatively identified by GC-MS. While 92 VOCs were detected from the oil used in the floor oil, only 13 were detected in the low-odor linseed oil. The major odor active VOCs were aldehydes and carboxylic acids. Spearmen rank correlation of the GC-O profiles showed that the odor profile of the linseed oil likely influenced the odor profile of the floor oil based on this linseed oil.

  9. Estimation of Secondary Compounds Concentrations Contributed by Biogenic VOC With Chemical Transport Model in the Central Area of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Kanemaru, A.; Okumura, M.; Tohno, S.

    2008-12-01

    Biogenic VOC (BVOC) has comparably large contribution to generation of secondary air pollutants, such as photochemical oxidant or urban aerosol. In this study a BVOC emission inventory in the Kansai area, which is located in the central part of Japan, based on the field observation was developed. Some validations of the inventory were conducted by estimating the concentration distribution of oxidants with this developed and an existing BVOC emission inventory in Kansai area by meteorological model MM5 and atmospheric chemical transport model CMAQ. In the development of BVOC emission, the vegetation map by the Biodiversity Center of Japan which had been arranged as basic information on natural environmental preservation in a regional standard mesh (the third mesh) in 1999 was used. In this study isoprene and the mono-terpene were taken up as BVOC. Quercus crispula and Quercus serrata were selected as the source of isoprene, and Cryptomeria japonica, Chamaecyparis obtuse, Quercus phillyraeoides, Pinus densiflora, and Pinus thunbergii were selected as sources of mono-terpene. The parameter of the basic emission rate included in the model was decided by arranging the result of the observation in Kansai Research Center of Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute in each season. This emission flux from each species were calculated by G93 model by Guenther et al. and meteorological fields for the model, such as temperatures and sunlight intensities, were renewed hour by hour, therefore, this emission inventory has a high time resolution according to the season and time. In calculating meteorological fields, meteorological model MM5 Ver.3.7 was conducted in Japanese standard mesh in the selected five days of April, July, and October in 2004, and January 2005 respectively, and taking out the result of wind velocities and temperatures for substituting to the G93 model. Then atmospheric chemical transport model CMAQ Ver.4.6 with the emission inventories and

  10. The urban atmosphere as a non-point source for the transport of MTBE and other volatile organic compounds (VOCS) to shallow groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pankow, J.F.; Thomson, N.R.; Johnson, R.L.; Baehr, A.L.; Zogorski, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    Infiltration and dispersion (including molecular diffusion) can transport volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from urban air into shallow groundwater. The gasoline additive methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is of special interest because of its (1) current levels in some urban air, (2) strong partitioning from air into water, (3) resistance to degradation, (4) use as an octane-booster since the 1970s, (5) rapidly increasing use in the 1990s to reduce CO and O3 in urban air, and (6) its frequent detection rat lOW microgram per liter levels in shallow urban groundwater in Denver, New England, and elsewhere. Numerical simulations were conducted using a l-D model domain set in medium sand (depth to water table = 5 m) to provide a test of whether MTBE and other atmospheric VOCs could move to shallow groundwater within the 10-15 y time frame over which MTBE has now been used in large amounts. Degradation and sorption were assumed negligible. In case 1 (no infiltration, steady atmospheric source), 10 y was not long enough to permit significant VOC movement by diffusion into shallow groundwater. Case 2 considered a steady atmospheric source plus 36 cm/y of net infiltration; groundwater at 2 m below the water table became nearly saturated with atmospheric levels of VOC within 5 y. Case 3 was similar to case 2, but considered the source to be seasonal being 'on' for only 5 of 12 months each year, as with the use of MTBE during the winter fuel-oxygenate season; groundwater at 2 m below the water table became equilibrated with 5/12 of the 'source-on' concentration within 5 y. Cases 4 and 5 added an evapotranspiration (ET) loss of 36 cm/y, resulting in no net recharge. Case 4 took the ET from the surface, and case 5 took the ET from the capillary fringe at a depth of 3.5 m. Net VOC mass transfer to shallow groundwater after 5 y was less for both cases 4 and 5 than for case 3. However, it was significantly greater for cases 4 and 5 than for case 1, even though cases 1, 4, add 5 were

  11. On-road emission characteristics of VOCs from diesel trucks in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhiliang; Shen, Xianbao; Ye, Yu; Cao, Xinyue; Jiang, Xi; Zhang, Yingzhi; He, Kebin

    2015-02-01

    This paper is the first in our series of papers aimed at understanding the volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions of vehicles in Beijing by conducting on-board emission measurements. This paper focuses on diesel vehicles. In this work, 18 China III diesel vehicles, including seven light-duty diesel trucks (LDDTs), four medium-duty diesel trucks (MDDTs) and seven heavy-duty diesel trucks (HDDTs), were examined when the vehicles were driven on predesigned fixed test routes in Beijing in China using a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS). Tedlar bag sampling and 2,4-dinitrophenyhydrazine (DNPH) cartridge sampling were used to collect VOC species, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were used to analyze these samples. We obtained the VOC emission factors and relative compositions for diesel trucks of different sizes under different driving patterns. In total, 64 VOC species were quantified in this study, including 25 alkanes, four alkenes, 13 aromatics, 13 carbonyls and nine other compounds. The emission factors of the total VOCs based on mileage traveled for HDDTs were higher than those of LDDTs and MDDTs. Carbonyls, aromatics and alkanes were the dominant VOC species. Carbonyls accounted for 42.7%-69.2% of the total VOCs in the three types of tested diesel trucks. The total VOC emission factors of the tested vehicles that were driven on non-highway routes were 1.5-2.0 times higher than those of the vehicles driven on the highway. As for the OFP calculation results, with increased vehicle size, the ozone formation potential presented an increasing trend. Among the VOC components, carbonyls were the primary contributor to OFP. In addition, the OFPs under non-highway driving cycles were 1.3-1.7 times those under highway driving cycles. The results of this study will be helpful in improving our understanding of VOCs emitted from on-road diesel trucks in China.

  12. VOC Contamination in Hospital, from Stationary Sampling of a Large Panel of Compounds, in View of Healthcare Workers and Patients Exposure Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bessonneau, Vincent; Mosqueron, Luc; Berrubé, Adèle; Mukensturm, Gaël; Buffet-Bataillon, Sylvie; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre; Thomas, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Background We aimed to assess, for the first time, the nature of the indoor air contamination of hospitals. Methods and Findings More than 40 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including aliphatic, aromatic and halogenated hydrocarbons, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, ethers and terpenes were measured in a teaching hospital in France, from sampling in six sampling sites – reception hall, patient room, nursing care, post-anesthesia care unit, parasitology-mycology laboratory and flexible endoscope disinfection unit – in the morning and in the afternoon, during three consecutive days. Our results showed that the main compounds found in indoor air were alcohols (arithmetic means ± SD: 928±958 µg/m3 and 47.9±52.2 µg/m3 for ethanol and isopropanol, respectively), ethers (75.6±157 µg/m3 for ether) and ketones (22.6±20.6 µg/m3 for acetone). Concentrations levels of aromatic and halogenated hydrocarbons, ketones, aldehydes and limonene were widely variable between sampling sites, due to building age and type of products used according to health activities conducted in each site. A high temporal variability was observed in concentrations of alcohols, probably due to the intensive use of alcohol-based hand rubs in all sites. Qualitative analysis of air samples led to the identification of other compounds, including siloxanes (hexamethyldisiloxane, octamethyltrisiloxane, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane), anesthetic gases (sevoflurane, desflurane), aliphatic hydrocarbons (butane), esters (ethylacetate), terpenes (camphor, α-bisabolol), aldehydes (benzaldehyde) and organic acids (benzoic acid) depending on sites. Conclusion For all compounds, concentrations measured were lower than concentrations known to be harmful in humans. However, results showed that indoor air of sampling locations contains a complex mixture of VOCs. Further multicenter studies are required to compare these results. A full understanding of the exposure of healthcare workers and patients to complex

  13. Sensitivity-Based VOC Reactivity Calculation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) reactivity scales are used to compare the ozone-forming potentials of various compounds. The comparison allows for substitution of compounds to lessen formation of ozone from paints, solvents, and other products. Current reactivity scales for VOC c...

  14. Dual-emitting nanocomposites derived from rare-earth compound nanotubes for ratiometric fluorescence sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tian-Ying; Zhang, Da-Quan; Yu, Xue-Feng; Xiang, Yang; Luo, Min; Wang, Jia-Hong; Tan, Guo-Long; Wang, Qu-Quan; Chu, Paul K.

    2013-01-01

    A new class of ratiometric fluorescence sensors composed of rare-earth (RE) compound nanotubes is described. Polyethylenimine-coated yttrium hydroxide fluoride nanotubes (YHF NTs) that were synthesized hydrothermally exhibit highly efficient fluorescence when doped with RE ions. The polyethylenimine on the NTs facilitates the incorporation of phosphors such as quantum dots or organic dyes onto the NT surface to produce dual-emitting nanocomposites which are excellent ratiometric fluorescence sensors. The phosphor layer and underlying tubes in the nanocomposites act as the indicator and reference probes, respectively. This ratiometric fluorescence method which can be applied to the detection of heavy metals in solutions, temperature sensing, and pH sensing boasts high sensitivity and selectivity as well as better accuracy than traditional intensity-based fluorescence methods.A new class of ratiometric fluorescence sensors composed of rare-earth (RE) compound nanotubes is described. Polyethylenimine-coated yttrium hydroxide fluoride nanotubes (YHF NTs) that were synthesized hydrothermally exhibit highly efficient fluorescence when doped with RE ions. The polyethylenimine on the NTs facilitates the incorporation of phosphors such as quantum dots or organic dyes onto the NT surface to produce dual-emitting nanocomposites which are excellent ratiometric fluorescence sensors. The phosphor layer and underlying tubes in the nanocomposites act as the indicator and reference probes, respectively. This ratiometric fluorescence method which can be applied to the detection of heavy metals in solutions, temperature sensing, and pH sensing boasts high sensitivity and selectivity as well as better accuracy than traditional intensity-based fluorescence methods. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: EA and TGA profiles, emission spectra of YHF:Eu NTs. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr33217e

  15. Anthropogenic sources of VOC in a football stadium: Assessing human emissions in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, Patrick R.; Faber, Peter; Drewnick, Frank; Lelieveld, Jos; Williams, Jonathan

    2013-10-01

    Measurements of gas-phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs), aerosol composition, carbon dioxide (CO2), and ozone (O3) were made inside Coface Arena in Mainz, Germany (49°59‧3″N, 8°13‧27″E) during a football match on April 20 2012. The VOC measurements were performed with a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS). Observed VOCs could be classified into several distinct source categories including (1) human respiration/breath, (2) ozonolysis of skin oils, and (3) cigarette smoke/combustion. In this work, we present a detailed discussion on the scale and potential impacts of VOCs emitted as a result of these sources and their contributions on local and larger scales. Human emissions of VOCs have a negligible contribution to the global atmospheric budget (˜1% or less) for all those quantified in this study. However, fluxes as high as 0.02 g m-2 h-1 and 2 × 10-4 g m-2 h-1, for ethanol and acetone respectively are observed, suggesting the potential for significant impact on local air chemistry and perhaps regional scales. This study suggests that even in outdoor environments, situations exist where VOCs emitted as a result of human presence and activity are an important component of local air chemistry.

  16. Impact of cigarette smoking on volatile organic compound (VOC) blood levels in the U.S. population: NHANES 2003-2004.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David M; Ocariz, Jessica M; McGuirk, Maureen F; Blount, Benjamin C

    2011-11-01

    The impact of cigarette smoking on volatile organic compound (VOC) blood levels is studied using 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data. Cigarette smoke exposure is shown to be a predominant source of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes and styrene (BTEXS) measured in blood as determined by (1) differences in central tendency and interquartile VOC blood levels between daily smokers [≥1 cigarette per day (CPD)] and less-than-daily smokers, (2) correlation among BTEXS and the 2,5-dimethylfuran (2,5-DMF) smoking biomarker in the blood of daily smokers, and (3) regression modeling of BTEXS blood levels versus categorized CPD. Smoking status was determined by 2,5-DMF blood level using a cutpoint of 0.014 ng/ml estimated by regression modeling of the weighted data and confirmed with receiver operator curve (ROC) analysis. The BTEXS blood levels among daily smokers were moderately-to-strongly correlated with 2,5-DMF blood levels (correlation coefficient, r, ranging from 0.46 to 0.92). Linear regression of the geometric mean BTEXS blood levels versus categorized CPD showed clear dose-response relationship (correlation of determination, R(2), ranging from 0.81 to 0.98). Furthermore, the pattern of VOCs in blood of smokers is similar to that reported in mainstream cigarette smoke. These results show that cigarette smoking is a primary source of benzene, toluene and styrene and an important source of ethylbenzene and xylene exposure for the U.S. population, as well as the necessity of determining smoking status and factors affecting dose (e.g., CPD, time since last cigarette) in assessments involving BTEXS exposure.

  17. Volatile organic compound emissions from silage systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a precursor to smog, emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere is an environmental concern in some regions. The major source from farms is silage, with emissions coming from the silo face, mixing wagon, and feed bunk. The major compounds emitted are alcohols with other impor...

  18. Indoor air VOC concentrations in suburban and rural New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Clifford P; Alimokhtari, Shahnaz; Sanders, Paul F

    2008-11-15

    Indoor VOC air concentrations of many compounds are higher than outdoor concentrations due to indoor sources. However, most studies have measured residential indoor air in urban centers so the typical indoor air levels in suburban and rural regions have not been well characterized. Indoor VOC air concentrations were measured in 100 homes in suburban and rural areas in NJ to provide background levels for investigations of the impact from subsurface contamination sources. Of the 57 target compounds, 23 were not detected in any of the homes, and 14 compounds were detected in at least 50% of the homes with detection limits of approximately 1 microg/m3. The common compounds identified included aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons from mobile sources, halogenated hydrocarbons commonly used in consumer products or from chlorinated drinking water, acetone and 2-butanone emitted from cosmetic products, and Freons. Typical concentrations were in the low microg/m3 range, though values of tens, hundreds or even thousands of microg/m3 were measured in individual homes in which activities related to specific sources of VOCs were reported. Compounds with known similar sources were highly correlated. The levels observed are consistent with concentrations found in the air of urban homes.

  19. Apparatus and method for reading two-dimensional electrophoretograms containing .beta.-ray-emitting labeled compounds

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Herbert L.; Kinnison, W. Wayne; Lillberg, John W.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus and method for electronically reading planar two dimensional .beta.-ray emitter-labeled gel electrophoretograms. A single, flat rectangular multiwire proportional chamber is placed in close proximity to the gel and the assembly placed in an intense uniform magnetic field disposed in a perpendicular manner to the rectangular face of the proportional chamber. Beta rays emitted in the direction of the proportional chamber are caused to execute helical motions which substantially preserve knowledge of the coordinates of their origin in the gel. Perpendicularly oriented, parallel wire, parallel plane cathodes electronically sense the location of the .beta.-rays from ionization generated thereby in a detection gas coupled with an electron avalanche effect resulting from the action of a parallel wire anode located therebetween. A scintillator permits the present apparatus to be rendered insensitive when signals are generated from cosmic rays incident on the proportional chamber. Resolution for concentrations of radioactive compounds in the gel exceeds 700 .mu.m. The apparatus and method of the present invention represent a significant improvement over conventional autoradiographic techniques in dynamic range, linearity and sensitivity of data collection. A concentration and position map for gel electrophoretograms having significant concentrations of labeled compounds and/or highly radioactive labeling nuclides can generally be obtained in less than one hour.

  20. Apparatus for reading two-dimensional electrophoretograms containing. beta. -ray-emitting labeled compounds

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, H.L.; Kinnison, W.W.; Lillberg, J.W.

    1985-04-30

    An apparatus and method for electronically reading planar two-dimensional ..beta..-ray emitter-labeled gel electrophoretograms. A single, flat rectangular multiwire proportional chamber is placed in close proximity to the gel and the assembly placed in an intense uniform magnetic field disposed in a perpendicular manner to the rectangular face of the proportional chamber. Beta rays emitted in the direction of the proportional chamber are caused to execute helical motions which substantially preserve knowledge the coordinates of their origin in the gel. Perpendicularly oriented, parallel wire, parallel plane cathodes electronically sense the location of the ..beta..-rays from ionization generated thereby in a detection gas coupled with an electron avalanche effect resulting from the action of a parallel wire anode located therebetween. A scintillator permits the present apparatus to be rendered insensitive when signals are generated from cosmic rays incident on the proportional chamber. Resolution for concentrations of radioactive compounds in the gel exceeds 700-..mu..m. The apparatus and method of the present invention represent a significant improvement over conventional autoradiographic techniques in dynamic range, linearity and sensitivity of data collection. A concentration and position map for gel electrophoretograms having significant concentrations of labeled compounds and/or highly radioactive labeling nuclides can generally be obtained in less than one hour.

  1. Detection and localization of particle-emitting sources with compound-eye inspired detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi

    2007-08-01

    We develop methods to detect and localize particle-emitting sources using detector arrays that are inspired by biological compound eyes. The sources of interest may be optical, nuclear, or cosmic; they emit particles such as visible photons, neutrons, protons, or charged particles. Our results may have wide applications to artificial vision, which can be important in robotics (robot vision) or medicine (e.g., artificial eyes for the blind); security, where the detection of nuclear materials is needed; or astronomy. This dissertation consists of three parts. First, we detect a far-field particle source using two directional detector arrays: cubic and spherical. We propose a mean-difference test (MDT) detector, analyze its statistical performance, and show that the MDT has a number of advantages over the generalized likelihood- ratio test (GLRT). Second, we localize the source by proposing a novel biologically inspired detector array, whose configuration generalizes the compound eye of insects. This array combines the advantages of compound eyes (e.g., large field-of-view) and human eyes (e.g., high angular resolution). Based on a statistical model of the array measurements, we analyze the array performance by computing the Cramérao bound (CRB) on the error in estimating the source direction. We also derive lower bounds on the mean-square angular error (MSAE) of the source localization and investigate the MSAE of two source- direction estimators. Numerical examples, including the optimal array design, are presented to further illustrate the array performance. Third, we derive a statistical angular resolution limit (ARL) on resolving two closely spaced point sources in a three-dimensional frame, which is applicable to various measurement models (e.g., radar, sonar, or astronomy). Using the asymptotic analysis of the GLRT, we derive the ARL with constraints on the probabilities of false alarm and detection. Our results give explicit analytical expression for the ARL

  2. Pollution characteristics of volatile organic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and phthalate esters emitted from plastic wastes recycling granulation plants in Xingtan Town, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, De-Yin; Zhou, Shun-Gui; Hong, Wei; Feng, Wei-Feng; Tao, Liang

    2013-06-01

    With the aim to investigate the main pollution characteristics of exhaust gases emitted from plastic waste recycling granulation plants, mainly volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and phthalate esters (PAEs) were analyzed in Xingtan Town, the largest distribution center of plastic waste recycling in China. Both inside and outside the plants, the total concentrations of volatile monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs), PAHs and PAEs ranged from 2000 to 3000 μg m-3, 450 to 1200 ng m-3, and 200 to 1200 ng m-3, respectively. Their concentration levels inside the plants were higher than those outside the plants, and PAHs and PAEs were mainly distributed in the gas-phase. Notably, highly toxic benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) could be detected inside the plants, and harmful PAEs could be detected not only inside but also outside the plants, although PAEs are non-volatile. The exhaust gas composition and concentration were related to the plastic feedstock and granulation temperature.

  3. Measurement of VOC permeability of polymer bags and VOC solubility in polyethylene drum liner

    SciTech Connect

    Liekhus, K.J.; Peterson, E.S.

    1995-03-01

    A test program conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) investigated the use of a transport model to estimate the volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration in the void volume of a waste drum. Unsteady-state VOC transport model equations account for VOC permeation of polymer bags, VOC diffusion across openings in layers of confinement, and VOC solubility in a polyethylene drum liner. In support of this program, the VOC permeability of polymer bags and VOC equilibrium concentration in a polyethylene drum liner were measured for nine VOCs. The VOCs used in experiments were dichloromethane, carbon tetrachloride, cyclohexane, toluene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, methanol, 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (Freon-113), trichloroethylene, and p-xylene. The experimental results of these measurements as well as a method of estimating both parameters in the absence of experimental data are described in this report.

  4. Cut-induced VOC emissions from agricultural grasslands.

    PubMed

    Davison, B; Brunner, A; Ammann, C; Spirig, C; Jocher, M; Neftel, A

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for fast response measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC) has enabled the use of eddy covariance methods to investigate VOC fluxes on the ecosystem scale. In this study PTR-MS flux measurements of VOC were performed over agricultural grassland during and after a cut event. Selected masses detected by the PTR-MS showed fluxes of methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone. They were highest directly after cutting and during the hay drying phase. Simultaneously, significant fluxes of protonated ion masses 73, 81, and 83 were observed. Due to the limited identification of compounds with the PTR-MS technique, GC-MS and GC-FID-PTR-MS techniques were additionally applied. In this way, ion mass 73 could be identified as 2-butanone, mass 81 mainly as (Z)-3-hexenal, and mass 83 mainly as the sum of (Z)-3-hexenol and hexenyl acetates. Hexenal, hexenols, and the hexenyl acetates are mostly related to plant wounding during cutting. It was found that legume plants and forbs emit a higher number of different VOC species than graminoids.

  5. Influence of ozone concentration and temperature on ultra-fine particle and gaseous volatile organic compound formations generated during the ozone-initiated reactions with emitted terpenes from a car air freshener.

    PubMed

    Lamorena, Rheo B; Lee, Woojin

    2008-10-30

    Experiments were conducted to identify the emissions from the car air freshener and to identify the formation of ultra-fine particles and secondary gaseous compounds during the ozone-initiated oxidations with emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The identified primary constituents emitted from the car air freshener in this study were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, p-cymene, and limonene. Formation of ultra-fine particles (4.4-160 nm) was observed when ozone was injected into the chamber containing emitted monoterpenes from the air freshener. Particle number concentrations, particle mass concentrations, and surface concentrations were measured in time dependent experiments to describe the particle formation and growth within the chamber. The irritating secondary gaseous products formed during the ozone-initiated reactions include formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, acetone, and propionaldehyde. Ozone concentration (50 and 100 ppb) and temperature (30 and 40 degrees C) significantly affect the formation of particles and gaseous products during the ozone-initiated reactions. The results obtained in this study provided an insight on the potential exposure of particles and irritating secondary products formed during the ozone-initiated reaction to passengers in confined spaces.

  6. Pilot and Full Scale Measurements of VOC Emissions from Lumber Drying of Inland Northwest Species

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Brad G.; Lamb, Brian K.; Westberg, Halvor; Folk, Richard; Knighton, B; Grimsrud, E

    2004-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are precursors to ground level ozone. Ground level ozone is the major component of photochemical smog, and has been linked to a variety of adverse health effects. These health effects include cancer, heart disease, pneumonia and death. In order to reduce ground level ozone, VOC emissions are being more stringently regulated. One VOC source that may come under regulation is lumber drying. Drying lumber is known to emit VOC into the atmosphere. This research evaluates the validity of VOC emission measurements from a small-scale kiln to approximate VOC emissions from kilns at commercial mills. We also report emission factors for three lumber species commonly harvested in the northwest United States (Douglas-fir, ponderosa pine, & grand fir). This work was done with a novel tracer ratio technique at a small laboratory kiln and a large commercial lumber drying facility. The measured emission factors were 0.51 g/kgOD for Douglas-fir, 0.7 g/kgOD for ponderosa pine, and 0.15 g/kgOD for grand fir. Aldehyde emission rates from lumber drying were also measured in some experiments. Results indicate that aldehyde emissions can constitute a significant percentage of the total VOC emissions.

  7. Effects of climate change on volatile organic compound emissions from soil and litter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, C. M.; Fierer, N.

    2012-12-01

    Our knowledge of the variability and magnitude of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from soil and litter is relatively limited compared to what we know about VOC emissions from terrestrial plants. With climate change expecting to alter plant community composition, nitrogen (N) deposition rates, mean annual temperatures, and precipitation patterns, it is unknown how production and consumption of VOCs from litter and soil will respond. We spent the last four years quantifying VOC emissions from soil and litter, comparing VOC emissions to CO2 emissions, and identifying the biotic and abiotic controls on emission rates with both lab and field experiments using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). In all studies, methanol was the dominant VOC flux. VOC emissions were not driven by abiotic processes, as microbial sources accounted for 78% to 99% of the total VOC emissions from decomposing litter. Litter chemistry was correlated with the types of VOCs emitted and the net emissions of carbon as VOCs was found to be up to 88% of that emitted as CO2 suggesting that VOCs likely represent an important component of the carbon cycle in many terrestrial systems. Nitrogen additions drastically reduced VOC emissions from litter to near zero, though it is still not understood whether this was due to an increase in consumption or a decrease in production. Finally, field and lab experiments show that temperature and moisture are both important controls of certain VOC emissions from soils, but that the effects of these factors on VOC emissions are not necessarily equivalent to their effects on CO2 emissions. Together, these series of studies are moving us toward a predictive understanding of VOC emissions from soil and litter with the ultimate goal of incorporating these VOC emissions into global models of terrestrial VOC dynamics.

  8. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart D of... - Volatile Organic Compound (VOC), Content Limits for Architectural Coatings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Concrete curing compounds 350 2.9 Concrete curing and sealing compounds 700 5.8 Concrete protective coatings 400 3.3 Concrete surface retarders 780 6.5 Conversion varnish 725 6.0 Dry fog coatings 400...

  9. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart D of... - Volatile Organic Compound (VOC), Content Limits for Architectural Coatings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Concrete curing compounds 350 2.9 Concrete curing and sealing compounds 700 5.8 Concrete protective coatings 400 3.3 Concrete surface retarders 780 6.5 Conversion varnish 725 6.0 Dry fog coatings 400...

  10. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart D of... - Volatile Organic Compound (VOC), Content Limits for Architectural Coatings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Concrete curing compounds 350 2.9 Concrete curing and sealing compounds 700 5.8 Concrete protective coatings 400 3.3 Concrete surface retarders 780 6.5 Conversion varnish 725 6.0 Dry fog coatings 400...

  11. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart D of... - Volatile Organic Compound (VOC), Content Limits for Architectural Coatings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Concrete curing compounds 350 2.9 Concrete curing and sealing compounds 700 5.8 Concrete protective coatings 400 3.3 Concrete surface retarders 780 6.5 Conversion varnish 725 6.0 Dry fog coatings 400...

  12. EFFECTS OF PARTICLE EVAPORATION ON THE ANGULAR MOMENTUM OF THE EMITTING NUCLEUS FOR DEEP INELASTIC AND COMPOUND NUCLEAR REACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, S.K.; Moretto, L.G.

    1980-09-01

    A model is developed which allows one to calculate analytically the angular momentum removed, and the angular momentum misalignment created by the evaporation of light particles from an excited nucleus. The mass, temperature, and angular momentum of the emitting nucleus are explicitly considered. The formalism applies equally well to heavy ion and compound nuclear reactions.

  13. Flameless thermal destruction of VOCs

    SciTech Connect

    Hohl, H.M.

    1997-04-01

    A new technology controls volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions with high destruction efficiencies. This article describes the technology developed by Thermatrix, Inc. of San Jose, CA. The field proven flameless thermal oxidation (FTO) is capable of destroying over 99.99 percent of a wide range of organic air pollution. Topics covered include FTO technology, high destruction efficiencies, VOCs in wastewater from chemical manufacturing; refinery fugitive emissions.

  14. Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, I. J.; Blake, N. J.; Barletta, B.; Diskin, G. S.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Gorham, K.; Huey, L. G.; Meinardi, S.; Rowland, F. S.; Vay, S. A.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Yang, M.; Blake, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Oil sands comprise 30% of the world's oil reserves and the crude oil reserves in Canada's oil sands deposits are second only to Saudi Arabia. The extraction and processing of oil sands is much more challenging than for light sweet crude oils because of the high viscosity of the bitumen contained within the oil sands and because the bitumen is mixed with sand and contains chemical impurities such as sulphur. Despite these challenges, the importance of oil sands is increasing in the energy market. To our best knowledge this is the first peer-reviewed study to characterize volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from Alberta's oil sands mining sites. We present high-precision gas chromatography measurements of 76 speciated C2-C10 VOCs (alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cycloalkanes, aromatics, monoterpenes, oxygenated hydrocarbons, halocarbons and sulphur compounds) in 17 boundary layer air samples collected over surface mining operations in northeast Alberta on 10 July 2008, using the NASA DC-8 airborne laboratory as a research platform. In addition to the VOCs, we present simultaneous measurements of CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2, which were measured in situ aboard the DC-8. Carbon dioxide, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, SO2 and 53 VOCs (e.g., non-methane hydrocarbons, halocarbons, sulphur species) showed clear statistical enhancements (1.1-397×) over the oil sands compared to local background values and, with the exception of CO, were greater over the oil sands than at any other time during the flight. Twenty halocarbons (e.g., CFCs, HFCs, halons, brominated species) either were not enhanced or were minimally enhanced (<10%) over the oil sands. Ozone levels remained low because of titration by NO, and three VOCs (propyne, furan, MTBE) remained below their 3 pptv detection limit throughout the flight. Based on their correlations with one another, the compounds emitted by the oil sands industry fell into two groups: (1) evaporative emissions from the oil sands and its

  15. Volatile organic compounds (VOC), formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in schools in Johor Bahru, Malaysia: Associations with rhinitis, ocular, throat and dermal symptoms, headache and fatigue.

    PubMed

    Norbäck, Dan; Hashim, Jamal Hisham; Hashim, Zailina; Ali, Faridah

    2017-03-15

    This paper studied associations between volatile organic compounds (VOC), formaldehyde, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) in schools in Malaysia and rhinitis, ocular, nasal and dermal symptoms, headache and fatigue among students. Pupils from eight randomly selected junior high schools in Johor Bahru, Malaysia (N=462), participated (96%). VOC, formaldehyde and NO2 were measured by diffusion sampling (one week) and VOC also by pumped air sampling during class. Associations were calculated by multi-level logistic regression adjusting for personal factors, the home environment and microbial compounds in the school dust. The prevalence of weekly rhinitis, ocular, throat and dermal symptoms were 18.8%, 11.6%, 15.6%, and 11.1%, respectively. Totally 20.6% had weekly headache and 22.1% fatigue. Indoor CO2 were low (range 380-690 ppm). Indoor median NO2 and formaldehyde concentrations over one week were 23μg/m(3) and 2.0μg/m(3), respectively. Median indoor concentration of toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, and limonene over one week were 12.3, 1.6, 78.4 and 3.4μg/m(3), respectively. For benzaldehyde, the mean indoor concentration was 2.0μg/m(3) (median<1μg/m(3)). Median indoor levels during class of benzene and cyclohexane were 4.6 and 3.7μg/m(3), respectively. NO2 was associated with ocular symptoms (p<0.001) and fatigue (p=0.01). Formaldehyde was associated with ocular (p=0.004), throat symptoms (p=0.006) and fatigue (p=0.001). Xylene was associated with fatigue (p<0.001) and benzaldehyde was associated with headache (p=0.03). In conclusion, xylene, benzaldehyde, formaldehyde and NO2 in schools can be risk factors for ocular and throat symptoms and fatigue among students in Malaysia. The indoor and outdoor levels of benzene were often higher than the EU standard of 5μg/m(3).

  16. Short-chain oxygenated VOCs: Emission and uptake by plants and atmospheric sources, sinks, and concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, Roger; Peñuelas, Josep; Filella, Iolanda

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have multiple atmospheric implications and play many roles in plant physiology and ecology. Among these VOCs, growing interest is being devoted to a group of short-chain oxygenated VOCs (oxVOCs). Technology improvements such as proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry are facilitating the study of these hydrocarbons and new data regarding these compounds is continuously appearing. Here we review current knowledge of the emissions of these oxVOCs by plants and the factors that control them, and also provide an overview of sources, sinks, and concentrations found in the atmosphere. The oxVOCs reviewed here are formic and acetic acids, acetone, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, methanol, and ethanol. In general, because of their water solubility (low gas-liquid partitioning coefficient), the plant-atmosphere exchange is stomatal-dependent, although it can also take place via the cuticle. This exchange is also determined by atmospheric mixing ratios. These compounds have relatively long atmospheric half-lives and reach considerable concentrations in the atmosphere in the range of ppbv. Likewise, under non-stressed conditions plants can emit all of these oxVOCs together at fluxes ranging from 0.2 up to 4.8 μg(C)g -1(leaf dry weight)h -1 and at rates that increase several-fold when under stress. Gaps in our knowledge regarding the processes involved in the synthesis, emission, uptake, and atmospheric reactivity of oxVOCs precludes the clarification of exactly what is conditioning plant-atmosphere exchange—and also when, how, and why this occurs—and these lacunae therefore warrant further research in this field.

  17. [Preliminary study concerning emissions of the volatile organic compounds from cooking oils].

    PubMed

    He, Wan-Qing; Tian, Gang; Nie, Lei; Qu, Song; Li, Jing; Wang, Min-Yan

    2012-09-01

    Cooking oil fume is one of the important sources of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are the key precursors of ozone and secondary organic aerosols in air. In this study, the production of cooking oil fume was simulated by heating typical pure vegetable oils (peanut oil, sunflower oil, soybean oil, olive oil and blend oil) at different temperatures in beakers to investigate the VOCs emission characteristics. The emitted VOCs were sampled with a Tenax adsorption tube and analyzed using GC-MS after thermal desorption. The results showed that the emission of VOCs increased with the increase of the heating temperature for all the investigated cooking oils, and at a given temperature, the blend oil emitted the lowest amount of VOCs. The VOCs emission intensity at different heating temperatures fitted well with binomial equations and ranged from 1.6-11.1 mg x (kg x min)(-1).

  18. Drosophila melanogaster as a model to characterize fungal volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, Arati A; Zaman, Taslim; Morath, Shannon U; Pu, David C; Bennett, Joan W

    2014-05-01

    Fungi are implicated in poor indoor air quality and may pose a potential risk factor for building/mold related illnesses. Fungi emit numerous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as alcohols, esters, ethers, ketones, aldehydes, terpenoids, thiols, and their derivatives. The toxicity profile of these VOCs has never been explored in a model organism, which could enable the performance of high throughput toxicological assays and lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of toxicity. We have established a reductionist Drosophila melanogaster model to evaluate the toxicity of fungal VOCs. In this report, we assessed the toxicity of fungal VOCs emitted from living cultures of species in the genera, Trichoderma, Aspergillus, and Penicillium and observed a detrimental effect on larval survival. We then used chemical standards of selected fungal VOCs to assess their toxicity on larval and adult Drosophila. We compared the survival of adult flies exposed to these fungal VOCs with known industrial toxic chemicals (formaldehyde [37%], xylene, benzene, and toluene). Among the tested fungal VOC standards, the compounds with eight carbons (C8) caused greater truncation of fly lifespan than tested non-C8 fungal VOCs and industrial toxins. Our data validate the use of Drosophila melanogaster as a model with the potential to elucidate the mechanistic attributes of different toxic VOCs emitted by fungi and also to explore the potential link between reported human illnesses/symptoms and exposure to water damaged and mold contaminated buildings.

  19. 40 CFR Table 34 to Subpart G of... - Fraction Measured (Fm) and Fraction Emitted (Fe) For HAP Compounds in Wastewater Streams

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Emitted (Fe) For HAP Compounds in Wastewater Streams 34 Table 34 to Subpart G of Part 63 Protection of... Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 34 Table 34 to Subpart G of Part 63—Fraction Measured (Fm) and Fraction Emitted (Fe) For HAP Compounds in Wastewater Streams Chemical name...

  20. 40 CFR Table 34 to Subpart G of... - Fraction Measured (Fm) and Fraction Emitted (Fe) For HAP Compounds in Wastewater Streams

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Emitted (Fe) For HAP Compounds in Wastewater Streams 34 Table 34 to Subpart G of Part 63 Protection of... Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 34 Table 34 to Subpart G of Part 63—Fraction Measured (Fm) and Fraction Emitted (Fe) For HAP Compounds in Wastewater Streams Chemical name...

  1. 40 CFR Table 34 to Subpart G of... - Fraction Measured (Fm) and Fraction Emitted (Fe) For HAP Compounds in Wastewater Streams

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Emitted (Fe) For HAP Compounds in Wastewater Streams 34 Table 34 to Subpart G of Part 63 Protection of... Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 34 Table 34 to Subpart G of Part 63—Fraction Measured (Fm) and Fraction Emitted (Fe) For HAP Compounds in Wastewater Streams Chemical name...

  2. 40 CFR Table 34 to Subpart G of... - Fraction Measured (Fm) and Fraction Emitted (Fe) For HAP Compounds in Wastewater Streams

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Emitted (Fe) For HAP Compounds in Wastewater Streams 34 Table 34 to Subpart G of Part 63 Protection of... Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 34 Table 34 to Subpart G of Part 63—Fraction Measured (Fm) and Fraction Emitted (Fe) For HAP Compounds in Wastewater Streams Chemical name...

  3. 40 CFR Table 34 to Subpart G of... - Fraction Measured (Fm) and Fraction Emitted (Fe) For HAP Compounds in Wastewater Streams

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Emitted (Fe) For HAP Compounds in Wastewater Streams 34 Table 34 to Subpart G of Part 63 Protection of... Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 34 Table 34 to Subpart G of Part 63—Fraction Measured (Fm) and Fraction Emitted (Fe) For HAP Compounds in Wastewater Streams Chemical name...

  4. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Measurements in Karachi, Pakistan (2006): a Comparison With Previous Urban Sampling Campaigns Worldwide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, B.; Meinardi, S.; Khwaja, H. A.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Baker, A. K.; Zou, S.; Rowland, F.; Blake, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    Mixing ratios of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and 47 nonmethane hydrocarbons - NMHCs - (19 alkanes, 13 alkenes, ethyne, and 14 aromatics) were determined for ground level whole air samples collected during the winter of 2006 in Karachi, Pakistan. Pakistan is among the fastest growing economies in Asia, and Karachi is one of the largest cities in the world with a rapidly expanding population of over 14 million in the whole metropolitan area, and a large industrial base. Samples were collected in January 2006 throughout the urban area to characterize the overall air composition of the city, and along the busiest road to determine the traffic signature of Karachi. This sampling campaign follows a previous study carried out in the winter of 1998-1999 in the same city, when elevated concentrations of many NMHCs were observed. Exceptionally high levels of methane were still observed in 2006 with an average mixing ratio of 5.0 ppmv (6.3 ppmv were observed in 1999). The overall air composition of the Karachi urban environment characterized during this 2006 sampling is compared to 1999 aiming to highlight any possible change in the main VOC sources present throughout the city. In particular, we want to evaluate the impact of the heavy usage of natural gas on the overall air quality of Karachi and the recently increased use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as alternative source of energy. We also compare the composition of the urban troposphere of Karachi to other major urban centers worldwide such as Guangzhou (China), Mexico City (Mexico), and Milan (Italy).

  5. NICS report links VOCs to respiratory problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, E.

    1992-04-22

    Children who live near the chemical plants of Kanawha Valley, WV, suffer more acute and chronic respiratory aliments than those farther away, says a Harvard University School of Public Health report. In the $1-million, five-year study commissioned by the National Institute for Chemical Studies (NICS:Charleston, WV) and funded by the Environmental Protection Agency, proximity to chemical plants that emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was linked to higher incidence of asthma, acute eye irritation, shortness of breath, and chronic cough. The researchers say they adjusted for most other factors, such as parental smoking and petroleum. {open_quotes}The research hypothesis was whether children in the valley had more symptoms,{close_quotes} says NICS president Paul Hill. {open_quotes}Yes, there is a difference.{close_quotes} The study showed that some ailments were up to 28% more prevalent in children in the valley than in other Kanawha County children.

  6. Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions characterization during the flow-back phase of a hydraulically refractured well in the Uintah Basin, Utah using mobile PTR-MS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, F.; Warneke, C.; Brown, S. S.; De Gouw, J. A.; Dube, W. P.; Edwards, P.; Gilman, J.; Graus, M.; Helleis, F.; Kofler, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Orphal, J.; Petron, G.; Roberts, J. M.; Zahn, A.

    2014-12-01

    Ongoing improvements in advanced technologies for crude oil and natural gas extraction from unconventional reserves, such as directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing, have greatly increased the production of fossil fuels within recent years. The latest forecasts even estimate an enhancement of 56% in total natural gas production due to increased development of shale gas, tight gas and offshore natural gas resources from 2012 to 2040 with the largest contribution from shale formations [US EIA: Annual Energy Outlook 2014]. During the field intensive 'Energy and Environment - Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS)', measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were made using proton-transfer-reactions mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) at the ground site Horse Pool and using a mobile laboratory in the Uintah Basin, Utah, which is a region well known for intense fossil fuel production. A reworked gas well in the Red Wash fields was sampled regularly within two weeks performing mobile laboratory measurements downwind of the well site. The well had been recently hydraulically refractured at that time and waste water was collected into an open flow-back pond. Very high mixing ratios of aromatic hydrocarbons (C6-C13) up to the ppm range were observed coming from condensate and flow-back reservoirs. The measurements are used to determine sources of specific VOC emissions originating from the different parts of the well site and mass spectra are used to classify the air composition in contrast to samples taken at the Horse Pool field site and crude oil samples from South Louisiana. Enhancement ratios and time series of measured peak values for aromatics showed no clear trend, which indicates changes in emissions with operations at the site.

  7. VOC emission into the atmosphere by trees and leaf litter in Polish forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isidorov, V.; Smolewska, M.; Tyszkiewicz, Z.

    2009-04-01

    It is generally recognized at present that the vegetation of continents is the principal source of reactive volatile organic compounds (VOC) of the atmosphere. The upper limit of the evaluation of global phytogenic VOC is 1100-1500 Tg/yr (Isidorov, 1990; Guenther et al., 1995). Although these global evaluations showing the place of phytogenic emission among of other VOC sources are important, evaluations for individual countries are also very important. This poster represents the results of the estimation of VOC emission from Polish forests. Calculations took into account the composition and age of forests. According to our estimation, the total VOC emission by the arboreal vegetation differs from 190 to 750 kt/yr, depending of weather conditions in different years. There are only few studies conducted on decaying plant material as a source of atmospheric VOCs, but still they are able to give evidence of the importance of this source. For Polish forests, the litter mass is estimated to be (16-19)106 t/yr. These organic materials undergo decomposition by mesofauna and microorganisms. In these processes volatile organic compounds (VOC) stored in the litter and secondary metabolites of litter-destroying fungi are emitted into the atmosphere. The scale of the phenomenon makes leaf litter an important VOC source in the atmosphere. The filling of numerous gaps in researches of VOC emissions from decomposing leaf litter demands carrying out of long term field experiments in various climatic conditions. In this communication we report also the results of 3.5-year experiment on qualitative and quantitative GC-MS investigations of VOC emitted into the gas phase from leaves litter of some species of deciduous and coniferous trees of Polish forests. Apart from terpenes and their oxygenated derivatives, which are usual in plant tissues, leaf litter intensively emits vast amounts of lower alcohols and carbonyl compounds. We suppose that these volatile substances are products

  8. VOC emissions from residential combustion of Southern and mid-European woods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtyugina, Margarita; Alves, Célia; Calvo, Ana; Nunes, Teresa; Tarelho, Luís; Duarte, Márcio; Prozil, Sónia O.; Evtuguin, Dmitry V.; Pio, Casimiro

    2014-02-01

    Emissions of trace gases (carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), total hydrocarbons (THC)), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from combustion of European beech, Pyrenean oak and black poplar in a domestic woodstove and fireplace were studied. These woods are widely used as biofuel in residential combustion in Southern and mid-European countries. VOCs in the flue gases were collected in Tedlar bags, concentrated in sorbent tubes and analysed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-flame ionisation detection (GC-FID). CO2 emissions ranged from 1415 ± 136 to 1879 ± 29 g kg-1 (dry basis). The highest emission factors for CO and THC, 115.8 ± 11.7 and 95.6 24.7 ± 6.3 g kg-1 (dry basis), respectively, were obtained during the combustion of black poplar in the fireplace. European beech presented the lowest CO and THC emission factors for both burning appliances. Significant differences in emissions of VOCs were observed among wood species burnt and combustion devices. In general the highest emission factors were obtained from the combustion of Pyrenean oak in the woodstove. Among the VOCs identified, benzene and related compounds were always the most abundant group, followed by oxygenated compounds and aliphatic hydrocarbons. The amount and the composition of emitted VOCs were strongly affected by the wood composition, the type of burning device and operating conditions. Emission data obtained in this work are useful for modelling the impact of residential wood combustion on air quality and tropospheric ozone formation.

  9. VOC concentration in Taiwan's household drinking water.

    PubMed

    Kuo, H W; Chiang, T F; Lo, I I; Lai, J S; Chan, C C; Wang, J D

    1997-12-03

    The objective of this study is to analyze volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in Taiwan's drinking water supply. Focusing on Taiwan's three major metropolitan areas--Taipei, Taichung and Kaohsiung (in the north, middle and south, respectively)--171 samples were taken from tap water and 68 from boiled water. Tests showed VOC concentrations were highest in Kaohsiung. This is due to different water sources and methods of treatment. Except for bromoform, trihalomethane (THM) concentrations were highest. Detection rates of toluene and 1,2-dichloroethane were slightly higher than other VOC compounds. VOC concentrations decreased significantly after water was boiled. THMs had a removal rate from 61% to 82%. The authors conclude that the three metropolitan areas contain significantly different levels of VOCs and that boiling can significantly reduce the presence of VOCs. Other sources of pollution that contaminate drinking water such as industrial plants and gas stations must be further investigated.

  10. Equilibration times, compound selectivity, and stability of diffusion samplers for collection of ground-water VOC concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Campbell, T.R.

    2001-01-01

    Vapor-filled polyethylene diffusion samplers (typically used to locate discharge zones of volatile organic compound contaminated ground water beneath streams and lakes) and water-filled polyethylene diffusion bag samplers (typically used to obtain volatile organic compound concentrations in ground-water at wells) were tested to determine compound selectivity, equilibration times, and sample stability. The aqueous concentrations of several volatile organic compounds obtained from within water-filled diffusion samplers closely matched concentrations in ambient water outside the samplers. An exception was methyl-tert-butyl ether, which was detectable, but not reliably quantifiable using the diffusion samplers. The samplers equilibrated to a variety of volatile organic compounds within 24 h for vapor-filled passive diffusion vial samplers and within 48 h for water-filled passive diffusion bag samplers. Under field conditions, however, a longer equilibration time may be required to account for environmental disturbances caused by sampler deployment. An equilibrium period for both vapor- and water-filled diffusion samplers of approximately 2 weeks probably is adequate for most investigations in sandy formations. Longer times may be required for diffusion-sampler equilibration in poorly permeable sediment. The vapor-filled samplers should be capped and water from the diffusion bag samplers should be transferred to sampling vials immediately upon recovery to avoid volatilization losses of the gasses. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  11. Probability of Elevated Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Concentrations in Groundwater in the Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, L. Niel

    2009-01-01

    This raster data set delineates the predicted probability of elevated volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in groundwater in the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007. This data set was developed by a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority. This project was designed to evaluate potential land-development effects on groundwater and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. This groundwater probability map and its associated probability maps was developed as follows: (1) A point data set of wells with groundwater quality and groundwater age data was overlaid with thematic layers of anthropogenic (related to human activities) and hydrogeologic data by using a geographic information system to assign each well values for depth to groundwater, distance to major streams and canals, distance to gypsum beds, precipitation, soils, and well depth. These data then were downloaded to a statistical software package for analysis by logistic regression. (2) Statistical models predicting the probability of elevated nitrate concentrations, the probability of unmixed young water (using chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations and tritium activities), and the probability of elevated volatile organic compound concentrations were developed using logistic regression techniques. (3) The statistical models were entered into a GIS and the probability map was constructed.

  12. Speciation of volatile organic compounds from poultry production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The air consent agreement between EPA and large animal feeding operations (AFO) is designed to determine at what level compounds are being emitted from these facilities. However, the methodology used for quantifying total non-methane hydrocarbons and speciation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) n...

  13. DEVELOPING A NO-VOC WOOD TOPCOAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports an evaluation of a new low-VOC (volatile organic compound) wood coating technology, its performance characteristics, and its application and emissions testing. The low-VOC wood coating selected for the project was a two-component, water-based epoxy coating. Poly...

  14. MEMBRANE BIOTREATMENT OF VOC-LADEN AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses membrane biotreatment of air laden with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Microporous flat-sheet and hollow-fiber membrane contactors were used to support air-liquid mass transfer interfaces. These modules were used in a two-step process to transfer VOCs fr...

  15. Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Humans Indoors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaochen; Misztal, Pawel K; Nazaroff, William W; Goldstein, Allen H

    2016-12-06

    Research on the sources of indoor airborne chemicals has traditionally focused on outdoor air, building materials, furnishings, and activities such as smoking, cooking, and cleaning. Relatively little research has examined the direct role of occupant emissions, even though this source clearly contributes to indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and influences indoor chemistry. In this work, we quantify occupant-related gaseous VOC emissions in a university classroom using a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Time-resolved concentrations of VOCs in room air and supply air were measured continuously during occupied and unoccupied periods. The emission factor for each human-emitted VOC was determined by dividing the occupant-associated source rate by the corresponding occupancy. Among the most abundant species detected were compounds associated with personal care products. Also prominent were human metabolic emissions, such as isoprene, methanol, acetone, and acetic acid. Additional sources included human skin oil oxidation by ozone, producing compounds such as 4-oxopentanal (4-OPA) and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (6-MHO). By mass, human-emitted VOCs were the dominant source (57%) during occupied periods in a well-ventilated classroom, with ventilation supply air the second most important (35%), and indoor nonoccupant emissions the least (8%). The total occupant-associated VOC emission factor was 6.3 mg h(-1) per person.

  16. Electronic and optical properties of novel carbazole-based donor-acceptor compounds for applications in blue-emitting organic light-emitting diodes

    DOE PAGES

    Legaspi, Christian M.; Stubbs, Regan E.; Yaron, David J.; ...

    2015-08-20

    We report that organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have received a significant attention over the past decade due to their energy-saving potential. We have recently synthesized two novel carbazole-based donor-acceptor compounds and analyzed their optical properties to determine their suitability for use as blue emitters in OLEDs. These compounds show remarkable photo-stability and high quantum yields in the blue region of the spectrum. In addition, they have highly solvatochromic emission. In non-polar solvents, bright, blue-shifted (λmax ≈ 398 nm), and highly structured emission is seen. With increasing solvent dielectric constant, the emission becomes weaker, red-shifted (λmax ≈ 507 nm), and broad.more » We aim to determine the underlying cause of these changes. Electronic structure calculations indicate the presence of multiple excited states with comparable oscillator strength. These states are of interest because there are several with charge-transfer (CT) character, and others centered on the donor moiety. We theorize that CT states play a role in the observed changes in emission lineshape and may promote charge mobility for electrofluorescence in OLEDs. In the future, we plan to use Stark spectroscopy to analyze the polarity of excited states and transient absorption spectroscopy to observe the dynamics in the excited state.« less

  17. Electronic and optical properties of novel carbazole-based donor-acceptor compounds for applications in blue-emitting organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Legaspi, Christian M.; Stubbs, Regan E.; Yaron, David J.; Peteanu, Linda A.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Kemboi, Abraham; Picker, Jesse; Fossum, Eric

    2015-08-20

    We report that organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have received a significant attention over the past decade due to their energy-saving potential. We have recently synthesized two novel carbazole-based donor-acceptor compounds and analyzed their optical properties to determine their suitability for use as blue emitters in OLEDs. These compounds show remarkable photo-stability and high quantum yields in the blue region of the spectrum. In addition, they have highly solvatochromic emission. In non-polar solvents, bright, blue-shifted (λmax ≈ 398 nm), and highly structured emission is seen. With increasing solvent dielectric constant, the emission becomes weaker, red-shifted (λmax ≈ 507 nm), and broad. We aim to determine the underlying cause of these changes. Electronic structure calculations indicate the presence of multiple excited states with comparable oscillator strength. These states are of interest because there are several with charge-transfer (CT) character, and others centered on the donor moiety. We theorize that CT states play a role in the observed changes in emission lineshape and may promote charge mobility for electrofluorescence in OLEDs. In the future, we plan to use Stark spectroscopy to analyze the polarity of excited states and transient absorption spectroscopy to observe the dynamics in the excited state.

  18. Temporal variation of VOC emission from solvent and water based wood stains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gennaro, Gianluigi; Loiotile, Annamaria Demarinis; Fracchiolla, Roberta; Palmisani, Jolanda; Saracino, Maria Rosaria; Tutino, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Solvent- and water-based wood stains were monitored using a small test emission chamber in order to characterize their emission profiles in terms of Total and individual VOCs. The study of concentration-time profiles of individual VOCs enabled to identify the compounds emitted at higher concentration for each type of stain, to examine their decay curve and finally to estimate the concentration in a reference room. The solvent-based wood stain was characterized by the highest Total VOCs emission level (5.7 mg/m3) that decreased over time more slowly than those related to water-based ones. The same finding was observed for the main detected compounds: Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, Xylenes, Styrene, alpha-Pinene and Camphene. On the other hand, the highest level of Limonene was emitted by a water-based wood stain. However, the concentration-time profile showed that water-based product was characterized by a remarkable reduction of the time of maximum and minimum emission: Limonene concentration reached the minimum concentration in about half the time compared to the solvent-based product. According to AgBB evaluation scheme, only one of the investigated water-based wood stains can be classified as a low-emitting product whose use may not determine any potential adverse effect on human health.

  19. Volatile organic compound emissions from dairy cows and their waste as measured by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Stephanie L; Mitloehner, Frank M; Jackson, Wendi; Depeters, Edward J; Fadel, James G; Robinson, Peter H; Holzinger, Rupert; Goldstein, Allen H

    2007-02-15

    California dairies house approximately 1.8 million lactating and 1.5 million dry cows and heifers. State air regulatory agencies view these dairies as a major air pollutant source, but emissions data are sparse, particularly for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The objective of this work was to determine VOC emissions from lactating and dry dairy cows and their waste using an environmental chamber. Carbon dioxide and methane were measured to provide context for the VOCs. VOCs were measured by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The compounds with highest fluxes when cows plus waste were present were methanol, acetone + propanal, dimethylsulfide, and m/z 109 (likely 4-methyl-phenol). The compounds with highest fluxes from fresh waste (urine and feces) were methanol, m/z 109, and m/z 60 (likely trimethylamine). Ethanol fluxes are reported qualitatively, and several VOCs that were likely emitted (formaldehyde, methylamine, dimethylamine) were not detectable by PTR-MS. The sum of reactive VOC fluxes measured when cows were present was a factor of 6-10 less than estimates historically used for regulatory purposes. In addition, ozone formation potentials of the dominant VOCs were -10% those of typical combustion or biogenic VOCs. Thus dairy cattle have a comparatively small impact on ozone formation per VOC mass emitted.

  20. Underestimated public health risks caused by overestimated VOC removal in wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junchen; Wang, Kun; Zhao, Qingliang; Huang, Likun; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Yang, Wen-Bin

    2014-02-01

    The uncontrolled release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and the adverse health effects on the public have been of increasing concern. In this study, a lab-scale bioreactor was prepared to analyze the mass distribution of three aromatic (benzene, toluene, and xylenes) and four chlorinated VOCs (chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene) among the air, water and sludge phases in wastewater treatment processes. The VOC distribution through a full-scale WWTP in northern China was further investigated with respect to the effects of seasonal temperature variations and treatment technologies, followed by the cancer risk assessment using a steady-state Gaussian plume model (Industrial Source Complex) to simulate the atmospheric behaviors of the VOCs emitted from the WWTP. It was found that three aromatic hydrocarbons, notably benzene, were more readily released from the wastewater into the atmosphere, whereas the chlorinated compounds except chloroform were mainly present in the water phase through the treatment processes. The primary clarifier was the technology releasing high levels of VOCs into the atmosphere from the wastewater. The extents of volatilization or biodegradation, two important mechanisms to remove VOCs from wastewater, appeared to be determined by the physicochemical characteristics of the compounds, as the influence of treatment technologies (e.g., aeration) and seasonal temperature variations was rather limited. More importantly, the people living in the areas even more than 4 km away from the WWTP were still potentially exposed to cancer risks exceeding the regulatory threshold limit. The findings described the complex nature of VOC emissions from WWTPs and quantitatively indicated that the associated health impacts on the public near the WWTPs could be severely underestimated, whereas their treatment efficiencies by wastewater treatment technologies were overestimated

  1. Exchange of volatile organic compounds in the boreal forest floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, Hermanni; Bäck, Jaana; Pumpanen, Jukka; Pihlatie, Mari; Hakola, Hannele; Hellén, Heidi; Aalto, Juho; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Kajos, Maija K.; Kolari, Pasi; Taipale, Risto; Vesala, Timo

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems, mainly plants, emit large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere. In addition to plants, VOCs also have less-known sources, such as soil. VOCs are a very diverse group of reactive compounds, including terpenoids, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. Due to their high reactivity, VOCs take part in formation and growth of secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere and thus affect also Earth's radiation balance (Kulmala et al. 2004). We have studied boreal soil and forest floor VOC fluxes with chamber and snow gradient techniques we were developed. Spatial and temporal variability in VOC fluxes was studied with year-round measurements in the field and the sources of boreal soil VOCs in the laboratory with fungal isolates. Determination of the compounds was performed mass spectrometrically. Our results reveal that VOCs from soil are mainly emitted by living roots, above- and belowground litter and microbes. The strongest source appears to be litter, in which both plant residuals and decomposers play a role in the emissions. Soil fungi showed high emissions of lighter VOCs, like acetone, acetaldehyde and methanol, from isolates. Temperature and moisture are the most critical physical factors driving VOC fluxes. Since the environment in boreal forests undergoes strong seasonal changes, the VOC flux strength of the forest floor varies markedly during the year, being highest in spring and autumn. The high spatial heterogeneity of the forest floor was also clearly visible in VOC fluxes. The fluxes of other trace gases (CO2, CH4 and N2O) from soil, which are also related to the soil biological activity and physical conditions, did not show correlations with the VOC fluxes. These results indicate that emissions of VOCs from the boreal forest floor account for as much as several tens of percent, depending on the season, of the total forest ecosystem VOC emissions. This emphasises that forest floor compartment should be taken into

  2. Case study: Vacuuming for VOCs

    SciTech Connect

    Das, A.; Mazowiecki, C.R.

    1996-06-01

    The soil-vapor extraction system, which draws VOC-laden vapors from the subsurface, has become a popular remediation tool. The soil-vapor extraction (SVE) system, also know as {open_quotes}venting,{close_quotes} has proven to be a popular and cost-effective choice to remediate sites contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose zone. The SVE system includes airflow in the subsurface by applying a vacuum through extraction wells. The system is described in this article, with a report on performance monitoring included.

  3. EVALUATION OF LOW-VOC LATEX PAINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an evaluation of four commercially available low-VOC (volatile organic compound) latex paints as substitutes for conventional latex paints by assessing both their emission characteristics and their performance as coatings. Bulk analysis indicated that ...

  4. Philips VOCs signature — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    A combination of 22 breath volatile organic compounds (VOCs), predominantly alkanes, alkane derivatives, and benzene derivatives, that can discriminate between patients with and without lung cancer, regardless of stage (all p<0.0003).

  5. Influence of dry deposition of semi-volatile organic compounds (VOC) on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the Mexico City plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, Alma; Madronich, Sasha; Aumont, Bernard; Lee-Taylor, Julia; Karl, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The dry deposition removal of organic compounds from the atmosphere and its impact on organic aerosol mass is currently unexplored and unaccounted for in chemistry-climate models. The main reason for this omission is that current models use simplified SOA mechanisms that lump precursors and their products into volatility bins, therefore losing information on other important properties of individual molecules (or groups) that are needed to calculate dry deposition. In this study, we apply the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) to simulate SOA formation and estimate the influence of dry deposition of VOCs on SOA concentrations downwind of Mexico City. SOA precursors considered here include short- and long-chain alkanes (C3-25), alkenes, and light aromatics. The results suggest that 90% of SOA produced in Mexico City originates from the oxidation and partitioning of long-chain (C>12) alkanes, while the regionally exported SOA is almost equally produced from long-chain alkanes and from shorter alkanes and light aromatics. We show that dry deposition of oxidized gases is not an efficient sink for SOA, as it removes <5% of SOA within the city's boundary layer and ~15% downwind. We discuss reasons for this limited influence, and investigate separately the impacts on short and long-chain species. We show that the dry deposition is competing with the uptake of gases to the aerosol phase, and because dry deposition of submicron aerosols is slow, condensation onto particles protects organic gases from deposition and therefore increases their atmospheric burden and lifetime. In the absence of this condensation, ~50% of the regionally produced mass would have been dry-deposited.

  6. World Calibration Center for VOC (WCC-VOC), a new Facility for the WMO-GAW-Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappenglueck, B.-

    2002-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are recognized to be important precursors of tropospheric ozone as well as other oxidants and organic aerosols. In order to design effective control measures for the reduction of photooxidants, photochemical processes have to be understood and the sources of the precursors known. Reliable and representative measurements of VOCs are necessary to describe the anthropogenic and biogenic sources, to follow the photochemical degradation of VOCs in the troposphere. Measurement of VOCs is of key importance for the understanding of tropospheric chemistry. Tropospheric VOCs have been one of the recommended measurements to be made within the GAW programme. The purpose will be to monitor their atmospheric abundance, to characterize the various compounds with regard to anthropogenic and biogenic sources and to evaluate their role in the tropospheric ozone formation process. An international WMO/GAW panel of experts for VOC measurements developed the rational and objectives for this GAW activity and recommended the configuration and required activities of the WCC-VOC. In reflection of the complexity of VOC measurements and the current status of measurement technology, a "staged" approach was adopted. Stage 1 measurements: C2-C9 hydrocarbons, including alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, dienes and monocyclics. (The WCC-VOC operates currently under this mode). Stage 2 measurements: C10-C14 hydrocarbons, including higher homologs of the Stage 1 set as well as biogenic hydrocarbon compounds. Stage 3 measurements: Oxygenated VOCs, including alcohols, carbonyls, carboxylic acids. The Quality Assurance/Science Activity Centre (QA/SAC) Germany currently has established the World Calibration Centre for VOC (WCC-VOC). The WCC-VOC has operated in the research mode und has become operational recently. From now on, the WCC-VOC conducts one round-robin calibration audit per year at all global stations that measure VOCs and assists other stations in setting up VOC

  7. Signals of speciation: volatile organic compounds resolve closely related sagebrush taxa, suggesting their importance in evolution.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Deidre M; Runyon, Justin B; Richardson, Bryce A

    2016-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play important roles in the environmental adaptation and fitness of plants. Comparison of the qualitative and quantitative differences in VOCs among closely related taxa and assessing the effects of environment on their emissions are important steps to deducing VOC function and evolutionary importance. Headspace VOCs from five taxa of sagebrush (Artemisia, subgenus Tridentatae) growing in two common gardens were collected and analyzed using GC-MS. Of the 74 total VOCs emitted, only 15 were needed to segregate sagebrush taxa using Random Forest analysis with a low error of 4%. All but one of these 15 VOCs showed qualitative differences among taxa. Ordination of results showed strong clustering that reflects taxonomic classification. Random Forest identified five VOCs that classify based on environment (2% error), which do not overlap with the 15 VOCs that segregated taxa. We show that VOCs can discriminate closely related species and subspecies of Artemisia, which are difficult to define using molecular markers or morphology. Thus, it appears that changes in VOCs either lead the way or follow closely behind speciation in this group. Future research should explore the functions of VOCs, which could provide further insights into the evolution of sagebrushes.

  8. Volatile Organic Compounds Emitted by Fungal Associates of Conifer Bark Beetles and their Potential in Bark Beetle Control.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Dineshkumar; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Hammerbacher, Almuth

    2016-09-01

    Conifer bark beetles attack and kill mature spruce and pine trees, especially during hot and dry conditions. These beetles are closely associated with ophiostomatoid fungi of the Ascomycetes, including the genera Ophiostoma, Grosmannia, and Endoconidiophora, which enhance beetle success by improving nutrition and modifying their substrate, but also have negative impacts on beetles by attracting predators and parasites. A survey of the literature and our own data revealed that ophiostomatoid fungi emit a variety of volatile organic compounds under laboratory conditions including fusel alcohols, terpenoids, aromatic compounds, and aliphatic alcohols. Many of these compounds already have been shown to elicit behavioral responses from bark beetles, functioning as attractants or repellents, often as synergists to compounds currently used in bark beetle control. Thus, these compounds could serve as valuable new agents for bark beetle management. However, bark beetle associations with fungi are very complex. Beetle behavior varies with the species of fungus, the stage of the beetle life cycle, the host tree quality, and probably with changes in the emission rate of fungal volatiles. Additional research on bark beetles and their symbiotic associates is necessary before the basic significance of ophiostomatoid fungal volatiles can be understood and their applied potential realized.

  9. Characterization of semi-volatile organic compounds emitted during heating of nitrogen-containing plastics at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Mafumi; Nakata, Chisto; Wu, Wei; Kawamoto, Katsuya; Noma, Yukio

    2007-08-01

    Because of recent volume increases, appropriate management of plastic recycling, which generates various organic compounds, is required to ensure the chemical safety of the processes. The processing temperature and resin type are the important factors determining both the efficiency of the processes and the emission of chemicals. Therefore, we studied the thermal degradation of various plastics at various temperatures from 70 to 300 degrees C under oxygen-present conditions to identify the semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) emitted and to understand their thermal behaviors. The plastics examined were nitrogen-containing resins, such as polyamide 6, polyurethane, melamine formaldehyde, urea formaldehyde and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene. Major commodity plastics were also investigated for comparison. In total, more than 500 SVOCs were detected as emissions from plastics. While various nitrogen-containing SVOCs were detected from nitrogen-containing resins, the major commodity plastics released only these, which possibly were included as additives. These results indicate that the nitrogen atoms in the SVOCs emitted originated from the resins and additives, and not from ambient air at low temperature. As a result of the detection of raw materials, degradation chemicals and by-products of the polymers in the emissions, we found that the variation in chemical species is dependent on the resins. Additives were also emitted from all the resins, meaning that these chemicals were also released to the environment at the temperature examined. In most cases, the numbers and concentrations of SVOCs increased with increasing heating temperature. The variation of thermal behaviors of SVOCs was related to the origins and chemical species of SVOCs.

  10. Both the adaxial and abaxial epidermal layers of the rose petal emit volatile scent compounds.

    PubMed

    Bergougnoux, Véronique; Caissard, Jean-Claude; Jullien, Frédéric; Magnard, Jean-Louis; Scalliet, Gabriel; Cock, J Mark; Hugueney, Philippe; Baudino, Sylvie

    2007-09-01

    The localization and timing of production and emission of scent was studied in different Rosa x hybrida cultivars, focusing on three particular topics. First, it was found that petals represent the major source of scent in R. x hybrida. In heavily scented cultivars, the spectrum and levels of volatiles emitted by the flower broadly correlated with the spectrum and levels of volatiles contained within the petal, throughout petal development. Secondly, analysis of rose cultivars that lacked a detectable scent indicated that the absence of fragrance was due to a reduction in both the biosynthesis and emission of scent volatiles. A cytological study, conducted on scented and non-scented rose cultivars showed that no major difference was visible in the anatomy of the petals either at small magnification in optical sections or in ultrathin sections observed by TEM. In particular, the cuticle of epidermal cells was not thicker in scentless cultivars. Thirdly, using two different techniques, solid/liquid phase extraction and headspace collection of volatiles, we showed that in roses, both epidermal layers are capable of producing and emitting scent volatiles, despite the different morphologies of the cells of these two tissues. Moreover, OOMT, an enzyme involved in scent molecule biosynthesis was localized in both epidermal layers.

  11. Air sparging: Effects of VOCs and soil properties on VOC volatilization

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, K.P.; Ong, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    The effect of the physical-chemical properties of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and soil on the volatilization of VOCs during air sparging was investigated using a laboratory-scale air sparging system. The variables studied included two types of soils, three different VOCs, and various air flowrates. VOCs used were chloroform, trichloroethylene (TCE), and carbon tetrachloride. As expected, the percent removal efficiencies of VOCs over a 24-h period were proportional to the injected air flowrate and Henry`s law constant. Experimental results also indicated that beyond a certain air flowrate, the mass of TCE removed was similar for the two porous media used in the experiments. The VOCs volatilized from the porous media appeared to be limited by the interfacial surface area of the water-air interface of the air channels. However, other physical processes, such as diffusion, may also be limiting.

  12. Chamber assessment of formaldehyde and VOC emissions from wood-based panels.

    PubMed

    Brown, S K

    1999-09-01

    Volatile organic emissions from particleboard, medium density fibreboard (MDF) and office furniture have been measured in dynamic environmental chambers, both small and room-sized. Characterisation of product emission properties in small chambers was possible when inter- and intra-sheet variations were considered. Formaldehyde emission factors for all products were approximately double European low-emission specifications and did not decay to the latter for several months. Long-term emission behaviour could not be predicted from short-term measurements. Volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions were low for the MDF product, higher for particleboard, and highest for laminated office furniture. The compounds emitted differed from those reported in other countries. VOC emissions from the sheet products decreased more quickly than formaldehyde, reaching low levels within two weeks, except for MDF which was found to become a low-level source of hexanal after several months.

  13. T2VOC user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Falta, R.W.; Pruess, K.; Finsterle, S.; Battistelli, A.

    1995-03-01

    T2VOC is a numerical simulator for three-phase, three-component, non-isothermal flow of water, air, and a volatile organic compound (VOC) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. Developed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, T2VOC is an extension of the TOUGH2 general-purpose simulation program. This report is a self-contained guide to application of T2VOC to subsurface contamination problems involving nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). It gives a technical description of the T2VOC code, including a discussion of the physical processes modeled, and the mathematical and numerical methods used. Detailed instructions for preparing input data are presented along with several illustrative sample problems.

  14. VOC transport in vented drums containing simulated waste sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Liekhus, K.J.; Gresham, G.L.; Rae, C.; Connolly, M.J.

    1994-02-01

    A model is developed to estimate the volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration in the headspace of the innermost layer of confinement in a lab-scale vented waste drum containing simulated waste sludge. The VOC transport model estimates the concentration using the measured VOC concentration beneath the drum lid and model parameters defined or estimated from process knowledge of drum contents and waste drum configuration. Model parameters include the VOC diffusion characteristic across the filter vent, VOC diffusivity in air, size of opening in the drum liner lid, the type and number of layers of polymer bags surrounding the waste, VOC permeability across the polymer, and the permeable surface area of the polymer bags. Comparison of model and experimental results indicates that the model can accurately estimate VOC concentration in the headspace of the innermost layer of confinement. The model may be useful in estimating the VOC concentration in actual waste drums.

  15. Plant specific volatile organic compound emission factors from young and mature leaves of Mediterranean vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracho-Nunez, Araceli; Welter, Saskia; Staudt, Michael; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    Terrestrial vegetation is the most important source of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOC) with significant influence on the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere. VOCs influence the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere and contribute to the formation and growth of secondary organic aerosols affecting cloud development and precipitation. The aim of our study was to investigate potential quantitative and qualitative differences in VOC emission patterns of young and mature leaves for nine typical Mediterranean plant species. The Mediterranean area was chosen due to its special diversity in VOC emitting plant species. Foliar isoprenoid emissions as well as emissions of oxygenated VOC like methanol and acetone were measured under standard light and temperature conditions during spring and summer 2008 at the CEFE-CNRS institute in Montpellier, France. A proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) was used for online measurement of VOCs. While PTR-MS is an excellent technique for fast chemical measurements it lacks specificity and compounds with the same mass cannot be distinguished. For this reason, cartridge samples were collected and afterwards analyzed with GC-FID. In parallel offline VOC analyses were performed with gas chromatography (GC) coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector, enabling assignment of the observed PTR-MS mass to charge ratios (m/z) to specific identification based on the GC-FID retention times. Thus, combining the PTR-MS and GC-FID analyses enabled accurate and online identification of the VOCs emitted. The results emphasise that VOC emission is a developmentally regulated process and quantitative and qualitative variability is plant species specific. Leaf ontogeny clearly influenced not only the standard emission rate but also the VOC composition, with methanol being the major compound that contributes to the total VOC emissions in young leaves and maintaining or decreasing its contribution with maturity.

  16. Characterization and control of organic compounds emitted from air pollution sources. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, J.J.; Kleeman, M.J.; Cass, G.R.; Simoneit, B.R.T.

    1998-04-01

    A dilution source sampling system is used to quantify the air pollutant emissions from major urban air pollution sources. The emissions from catalyst-equipped gasoline powered-motor vehicles, noncatalyst gasoline-powered motor vehicls, diesel trucks, meat charbroiling, the cooking of vegetables with seed oils, fireplace combustion of softwood and hardwood, cigarette combustion, and paint spray coating operations are characterized. Semi-volatile and particle-phase organic compounds in the diluted source emissions are collected simultaneously by both a traditional filter/PUF (polyurethane foam) sampling train and by an advanced organic compound-based denuder/filter/PUF sampling train to provide information on the gas/particle phase distribution of the semi-volatile organic compounds. Emission rates of hundreds of organic compounds, spanning carbon number from C1 to C29 are determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. Fine partile mass emission rates and fine particle elemental chemical composition are measured as well.

  17. Measurements of hydrocarbons and reduced sulfur compounds emitted from a wastewater treatment pond

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, G.; Geen, C.; Friel, D.

    1996-12-31

    A flux chamber was deployed on the water surface to monitor the emissions of hydrocarbons and reduced sulfur compounds from a wastewater treatment pond at a refinery site. Air samples were collected in Tedlar bags and analyzed on-site by means of a gas chromatograph/flame ionization detector (GC/FID) for hydrocarbons and a gas chromatograph/flame photometric detector (GC/FPD) for reduced sulfur compounds. The standard deviations of the duplicate samples for hydrocarbons and for reduced sulfur compounds were better than 4% and 11%, respectively. The pond was monitored during the daytime and nighttime, under two different weather conditions where the daytime temperatures were about 22{degrees}C and 14{degrees}C. The results showed that the difference between day and night emissions of hydrocarbons and reduced sulfur compounds were greater during the warm weather compared to those during cool weather. Air samples were also collected with charcoal adsorbent tubes and analyzed by means of a gas chromatograph/mass selective detector (GC/MSD) at the BOVAR Environmental (BE) laboratory to confirm the GC/FID hydrocarbon analyses. There was excellent agreement between hydrocarbons identified by GC/FID and GC/MSD. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Modeling emissions of volatile organic compounds from silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Photochemical smog is a major air pollution problem and a significant cause of premature death in the U.S. Smog forms in the presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are emitted primarily from industry and motor vehicles in the U.S. However, dairy farms may be an important source in so...

  19. Evaluation of volatile organic compound (VOC) blank data and application of study reporting levels to groundwater data collected for the California GAMA Priority Basin Project, May 2004 through September 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fram, Miranda S.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were analyzed in quality-control samples collected for the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program Priority Basin Project. From May 2004 through September 2010, a total of 2,026 groundwater samples, 211 field blanks, and 109 source-solution blanks were collected and analyzed for concentrations of 85 VOCs. Results from analyses of these field and source-solution blanks and of 2,411 laboratory instrument blanks during the same time period were used to assess the quality of data for the 2,026 groundwater samples. Eighteen VOCs were detected in field blanks or source-solution blanks: acetone, benzene, bromodichloromethane, 2-butanone, carbon disulfide, chloroform, 1,1-dichloroethene, dichloromethane, ethylbenzene, tetrachloroethene, styrene, tetrahydrofuran, toluene, trichloroethene, trichlorofluoromethane, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, m- and p-xylenes, and o-xylene. The objective of the evaluation of the VOC-blank data was to determine if study reporting levels (SRLs) were needed for any of the VOCs detected in blanks to ensure the quality of the data from groundwater samples. An SRL is equivalent to a raised reporting level that is used in place of the reporting level used by the analyzing laboratory [long‑term method detection level (LT-MDL) or laboratory reporting level (LRL)] to reduce the probability of reporting false-positive detections. Evaluation of VOC-blank data was done in three stages: (1) identification of a set of representative quality‑control field blanks (QCFBs) to be used for calculation of SRLs and identification of VOCs amenable to the SRL approach, (2) evaluation of potential sources of contamination to blanks and groundwater samples by VOCs detected in field blanks, and (3) selection of appropriate SRLs from among four potential SRLs for VOCs detected in field blanks and application of those SRLs to the groundwater data. An important conclusion from this study is that to ensure the

  20. Aromatic VOCs global influence in the ozone production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera-Perez, David; Pozzer, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are a subgroup of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) of special interest in the atmosphere of urban and semi-urban areas. Aromatics form a high fraction of VOCs, are highly reactive and upon oxidation they are an important source of ozone. These group of VOCs are released to the atmosphere by processes related to biomass burning and fossil fuel consumption, while they are removed from the atmosphere primarily by OH reaction and by dry deposition. In addition, a branch of aromatics (ortho-nitrophenols) produce HONO upon photolysis, which is responsible of certain amount of the OH recycling. Despite their importance in the atmosphere in anthropogenic polluted areas, the influence of aromatics in the ozone production remains largely unknown. This is of particular relevance, being ozone a pollutant with severe side effects on air quality, health and climate. In this work the atmospheric impacts at global scale of the most emitted aromatic VOCs in the gas phase (benzene, toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzene, styrene, phenol, benzaldehyde and trimethylbenzenes) are analysed and assessed. Specifically, the impact on ozone due to aromatic oxidation is estimated, as this is of great interest in large urban areas and can be helpful for developing air pollution control strategies. Further targets are the quantification of the NOx loss and the OH recycling due to aromatic oxidation. In order to investigate these processes, two simulations were performed with the numerical chemistry and climate simulation ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model. The simulations compare two cases, one with ozone concentrations when aromatics are present or the second one when they are missing. Finally, model simulated ozone is compared against a global set of observations in order to better constrain the model accuracy.

  1. The role of local environment on the electronic properties of a novel blue-emitting donor-acceptor compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legaspi, Christian M.; Stubbs, Regan E.; Yaron, David J.; Peteanu, Linda A.; Kemboi, Abraham; Picker, Jesse; Fossum, Eric

    2016-09-01

    With the rising popularity of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) in display applications, demand for more efficient blue emitters has increased. We have recently synthesized a novel blue-emitting, donor-acceptor system employing carbazole as the donor and a benzothiazole derivative as the acceptor, BTZ-CBZ. We find that the solution-phase emission of BTZ-CBZ is highly dependent on solvent polarity, both in lineshape and emission maximum, showing a Stokes shift of 50 nm in methylcyclohexane and 150 nm in acetonitrile. This is expected behavior for donor-acceptor compounds due to the presence of a charge-transfer excited state. However, the solid state properties are more important for OLED devices. Using time-dependent density functional theory calculations employing the linear-response (LR) and state-specific (SS) polarizable continuum model (PCM), we explore the effects of solvent reorganization on the emission properties of BTZ-CBZ. SS-PCM reproduces the solvatochromism behavior of BTZ-CBZ in solution, but LR-PCM shows effectively no shift with solvent polarity. We surmise that this is because solvent reorganization is necessary for the solvatochromic effect to occur. The effect of rigid matrices on the emission of BTZ-CBZ has direct implications on its viability as a blue emitter in solid-state OLEDs and which molecular environments will be ideal for devices.

  2. Rapid production of positron emitting labeled compounds for use in cardiology PET studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolomey, Leonard

    1985-05-01

    Large scale clinical application of positron emission tomography requires a variety of short-lived positron emitting radionuclides to be produced in Curie quantities up to 20 times per day. Rapid routine production of these radiopharmaceuticals requires the collaboration of engineers and chemists to achieve production targetry compatible with high beam current (up to 100 μA) and radionuclide production in a chemical form compatible with the rapid radiochemical synthesis. Chemical processing is further complicated by the need to repeat the procedures several times per day and maintain sterility within the shielded area. At our cyclotron facility primary production targets for 11C, 13N, 15O, and 18F (half lives from 2 min to 2 h) are mounted on a vertical gantr that indexes to position the required target on the beam line. Target changes are handled under microprocessor control remotely from the control room such that all valves, cooling, evacuation of target manifold, and testing of interlocks are handled automatically. This system enables us to change targets, energy and particles in less than five minutes. Since the installation of the cyclotron up to fifteen batches of routine radiopharmaceuticals have been produced per day with very low radiation doses to all personnel involved. These radiopharmaceuticals will be used to measure perfusion, metabolism and other biochemical functions in man non invasively with PET.

  3. Thorium and actinium polyphosphonate compounds as bone-seeking alpha particle-emitting agents.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Gjermund; Bruland, Oyvind S; Larsen, Roy H

    2004-01-01

    The present study explores the use of alpha-particle-emitting, bone-seeking agents as candidates for targeted radiotherapy. Actinium and thorium 1,4,7,10 tetraazacyclododecane N,N',N'',N''' 1,4,7,10-tetra(methylene) phosphonic acid (DOTMP) and thorium-diethylene triamine N,N',N'' penta(methylene) phosphonic acid (DTMP) were prepared and their biodistribution evaluated in conventional Balb/C mice at four hours after injection. All three bone-seeking agents showed a high uptake in bone and a low uptake in soft tissues. Among the soft tissue organs, only kidney had a relatively high uptake. The femur/kidney ratios for 227Th-DTMP, 228-Ac-DOTMP and 227Th-DOTMP were 14.2, 7.6 and 6.0, respectively. A higher liver uptake of 228Ac-DOTMP was seen than for 227Th-DTMP and 227Th-DOTMP. This suggests that some demetallation of the 228Ac-DOTMP complex had occurred. The results indicate that 225Ac-DOTMP, 227Th-DOTMP and 227Th-DTMP have promising properties as potential therapeutic bone-seeking agents.

  4. Characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols emitted from peatland fire in Riau, Sumatra, Indonesia (2): Identification of organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yusuke; Kawamoto, Haruo; Tohno, Susumu; Oda, Masafumi; Iriana, Windy; Lestari, Puji

    2015-06-01

    Smoke emitted from Indonesian peatland fires has caused dense haze and serious air pollution in Southeast Asia such as visibility impairment and adverse health impacts. To mitigate the Indonesian peatland fire aerosol impacts, an effective strategy and international framework based on the latest scientific knowledge needs to be established. Although several attempts have been made, limited data exist regarding the chemical characteristics of peatland fire smoke for the source apportionment. In order to identify the key organic compounds of peatland fire aerosols, we conducted intensive field studies based on ground-based and source-dominated sampling of PM2.5 in Riau Province, Sumatra, Indonesia, during the peatland fire seasons in 2012. Levoglucosan was the most abundant compound among the quantified organic compounds at 8.98 ± 2.28% of the PM2.5 mass, followed by palmitic acid at 0.782 ± 0.163% and mannosan at 0.607 ± 0.0861%. Potassium ion was not appropriate for an indicator of Indonesian peatland fires due to extremely low concentrations associated with smoldering fire at low temperatures. The vanillic/syringic acids ratio was 1.06 ± 0.155 in this study and this may be a useful signature profile for peatland fire emissions. Particulate n-alkanes also have potential for markers to identify impact of Indonesian peatland fire source at a receptor site.

  5. The VOC-Ozone connection: a grassland case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Hoertnagl, L.; Bamberger, I.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Dunkel, J.; Hammerle, A.; Graus, M.; Hansel, A.

    2009-04-01

    Trophospheric ozone (O3) is formed in the presence of sunlight through the interaction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and NOx (NO, NO2). O3 damages plants in several ways, most importantly by reducing net photosynthesis and growth. The extent of this damage depends on the time-integrated absorbed O3 flux (i.e. the dose), which is a function of leaf stomatal conductance and ambient O3 concentration, and further influenced by plant species specific defence mechanisms. VOCs are produced by plants through a variety of pathways and in response to a large number of different driving forces. A large variety of VOCs are emitted by plants in response to stress conditions, including the foliar uptake of O3. Here we present preliminary data from an ongoing study where concurrent measurements of the fluxes of VOCs and O3 are made above a managed mountain grassland in Tyrol/Austria. Fluxes of several different VOCs and O3 are measured by means of the eddy covariance method and a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and an ozone analyser, respectively. Our findings show that the Methanol (MeOH) flux is correlated with the daily time-integrated O3 uptake by vegetation (integrated daily from sunrise - a surrogate for the O3 dose absorbed and the oxidative stress experienced by plants) - MeOH deposition and emission prevailing at low and high time-integrated O3 uptake rates, respectively. Fluxes of other VOCs were not related to the time-integrated O3 uptake. Integrated over longer time scales (several weeks) no correlation between the O3 uptake and MeOH emissions were found. Our study thus confirms earlier leaf-level studies, who found that MeOH emission increase with O3 dose, at the ecosystems scale. As the reaction with the hydroxyl radical (OH), which is responsible for the destruction of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4), is the major sink of atmospheric MeOH, this process provides a potentially important indirect radiative forcing.

  6. Native Fluorescence Detection Methods, Devices, and Systems for Organic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Bhartia, Rohit (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor); Lane, Arthur L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Naphthalene, benzene, toluene, xylene, and other volatile organic compounds VOCs have been identified as serious health hazards. Embodiments of the invention are directed to methods and apparatus for near-real-time in-situ detection and accumulated dose measurement of exposure to naphthalene vapor and other hazardous gaseous VOCs. The methods and apparatus employ excitation of fluorophors native or endogenous to compounds of interest using light sources emitting in the ultraviolet below 300 nm and measurement of native fluorescence emissions in distinct wavebands above the excitation wavelength. The apparatus of some embodiments are cell-phone-sized sensor/dosimeter "badges" to be worn by personnel potentially exposed to hazardous VOCs. The badge sensor of some embodiments provides both real time detection and data logging of exposure to naphthalene or other VOCs of interest from which both instantaneous and accumulated dose can be determined.

  7. Duration of emission of volatile organic compounds from mechanically damaged plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lincoln; Beck, John J

    2015-09-01

    Classical biological control of invasive alien weeds depends on the use of arthropod herbivores that are sufficiently host specific to avoid risk of injuring nontarget plants. Host plant specificity is usually evaluated by using a combination of behavioral and developmental experiments under choice, no-choice and field conditions. Secondary plant compounds are likely to have an important influence on host plant specificity. However, relatively little is known about the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted by target and nontarget plants, and how environmental conditions may affect their emission. Previous studies have shown that mechanical damage of leaves increases the composition and content of VOCs emitted. In this study we measured the VOC emissions of five species of plants in the subtribe Centaureinae (Asteraceae)--Carthamus tinctorius, Centaurea cineraria, Centaurea melitensis, Centaurea rothrockii, and Centaurea solstitialis--that have previously been used in host specificity experiments for a prospective biological control agent of yellow starthistle (C. solstitialis). Leaves of each plant were punctured with a needle and the VOCs were collected by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) periodically over 48 h and analyzed by GC-MS. A total of 49 compounds were detected. Damage caused an immediate increase of 200-600% in the composition of VOCs emitted from each plant species, and the amounts generally remained high for at least 48 h. The results indicate that a very unspecific mechanical damage can cause a prolonged change in the VOC profile of plants.

  8. Effect of resin content and substrate on the emission of BTEX and carbonyls from low-VOC water-based wall paint.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ping; Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Chi-Chi; Cheng, Yu-Lin

    2016-02-01

    The primary aim of this work is to explore the effect of resin content and the effect of substrate on the emission of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) and carbonyls from low-VOC water-based wall paint. Four low-volatile organic compound (VOC) paints include paints A (20% acrylic), B (30% acrylic), C (20% polyvinyl acetate), and D (30% polyvinyl acetate) were painted on stainless steel specimen for the study of resin effect. Green calcium silicate, green cement, and stainless steel were painted with paints A and C for the study of substrate effect. Concentrations of the VOCs in the chamber decreased with the elapsed time. Both resin type and resin quantity in paint had effects on VOC emissions. Paints with acrylic resin emitted less BTEX and carbonyls than paints with polyvinyl acetate resin. However, the effects of resin quantity varied with VOCs. Porous substrates were observed to interact more strongly with paints than inert substrates. Both green calcium silicate and green cement substrates have strong power of adsorption of VOCs from wall paints, namely toluene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2-butanone, methacrolein, butyraldehyde, and benzaldehyde. Some compounds like toluene, formaldehyde, and butyaldehyde were desorbed very slowly from green calcium silicate and green cement substrates.

  9. Impact of multisource VOC emission on in-vehicle air quality: test chamber simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodzik, K.; Faber, J.; Goƚda-Kopek, A.; Łomankiewicz, D.

    2016-09-01

    Air quality inside vehicle may be strongly influenced by the presence of volatile organic compounds (VOC). The sources of these compounds may be different. In case of new vehicles VOC mainly originate from off-gassing of interior materials, while in used cars exterior pollution, like exhaust gases, starts to dominate. The aim of this work was to check the influence of multiple VOC sources on concentration of volatile organic compounds emitted from car interior parts. For this purpose material emission tests were performed in 1 m3 emission testing chamber (WKE 1000, Weiss, Germany) at 65 °C, 5% RH and with air exchange. Three different car parts were studied: sun visor, headlining, and handbrake lever cover. It was stated that volatile organic compounds concentration inside test chamber during the test performed with three different parts inside was significantly lower than those being result of addition of the results obtained for parts tested separately. Presented results indicate interactions between different materials and their emissions as well as prove that some of materials acts like sorbents.

  10. Effects of volatile compounds emitted by Protea species (Proteaceae) on antennal electrophysiological responses and attraction of cetoniine beetles.

    PubMed

    Steenhuisen, Sandy-Lynn; Jürgens, Andreas; Johnson, Steven D

    2013-03-01

    Evolutionary shifts in pollination systems within a plant genus are commonly associated with changes in floral scent, reflecting selection mediated through the sensory systems of various pollinators. The most common cetoniine beetle pollinator of grassland Protea species in South Africa, Atrichelaphinis tigrina, previously has been shown to have a strong preference for the fruity floral scent of these plants over the weak scent of their bird-pollinated congeners. However, it is not known which of the many compounds found in the scent of beetle pollinated Protea species play a role for pollinator attraction. Electroantennograms (EAG) from A. tigrina beetles were recorded in response to 15 compounds emitted by Protea flower heads. EAG responses to all 15 compounds were significantly greater than those to the paraffin solvent in which they were diluted. The greatest responses were observed for aromatics (anisole, methyl benzoate, methyl salicylate, benzaldehyde) followed by the monoterpene β-linalool, which can comprise up to 66 % of fruity Protea scents. Five compounds that elicited EAG responses (benzaldehyde, β-linalool, (E/Z)-linalool oxide (furanoid), methyl benzoate, and methyl salicylate) were tested in commercially available yellow bucket traps in the field to test their attractiveness to beetles. Traps baited with methyl benzoate, β-linalool, (E/Z)-linalool oxide (furanoid), and methyl salicylate caught significantly more insects than did those containing paraffin only. Methyl benzoate also was more specifically attractive to A. tigrina than was (E/Z)-linalool oxide (furanoid) and paraffin baited controls. A second field experiment using a combination of linalool vs. paraffin baited yellow or green traps showed that trap color had a significant effect on the number of trapped beetles. Yellow traps yielded a ten-fold higher number of insect catches than did green traps. However, the combination of yellow color and the scent compound linalool yielded the

  11. Emission of volatile organic compounds from silage: Compounds, sources, and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Howard, Cody; Muck, Richard E.; Franco, Roberta B.; Montes, Felipe; Green, Peter G.; Mitloehner, Frank; Trabue, Steven L.; Rotz, C. Alan

    2013-10-01

    Silage, fermented cattle feed, has recently been identified as a significant source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere. A small number of studies have measured VOC emission from silage, but not enough is known about the processes involved to accurately quantify emission rates and identify practices that could reduce emissions. Through a literature review, we have focused on identifying the most important compounds emitted from corn silage (the most common type of silage in the US) and the sources of these compounds by quantifying their production and emission potential in silage and describing production pathways. We reviewed measurements of VOC emission from silage and assessed the importance of individual silage VOCs through a quantitative analysis of VOC concentrations within silage. Measurements of VOC emission from silage and VOCs present within silage indicated that alcohols generally make the largest contribution to emission from corn silage, in terms of mass emitted and potential ozone formation. Ethanol is the dominant alcohol in corn silage; excluding acids, it makes up more than half of the mean mass of VOCs present. Acids, primarily acetic acid, may be important when emission is high and all VOCs are nearly depleted by emission. Aldehydes and esters, which are more volatile than acids and alcohols, are important when exposure is short, limiting emission of more abundant but less volatile compounds. Variability in silage VOC concentrations is very high; for most alcohols and acids, tolerance intervals indicate that 25% of silages have concentrations a factor of two away from median values, and possibly much further. This observation suggests that management practices can significantly influence VOC concentrations. Variability also makes prediction of emissions difficult. The most important acids, alcohols, and aldehydes present in silage are probably produced by bacteria (and, in the case of ethanol, yeasts) during fermentation and

  12. Particulate organic compounds emitted from experimental wildland fires in a Mediterranean ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, C. A.; Gonçalves, C.; Evtyugina, M.; Pio, C. A.; Mirante, F.; Puxbaum, H.

    2010-07-01

    Fine (PM 2.5) and coarse (PM 2.5-10) smoke particles from controlled biomass burnings of a shrub-dominated forest in Lousã Mountain, Portugal, enabled the quantification by chromatographic techniques of several molecular tracers for the combustion of Mediterranean forest ecosystems, which could be conducive to source apportionment studies. The major organic components in the smoke samples were pyrolysates of vegetation cuticles, mainly comprising steradienes and sterol derivatives, carbohydrates from the breakdown of cellulose, aliphatic lipids from vegetation waxes and methoxyphenols from the lignin thermal degradation. Most of these compounds are chiefly found in fine particles. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were also present as minor constituents. Anhydrosugar and PAH molecular diagnostic ratios were applied as source assignment tools. Some biomarkers are reported for the first time in biomass burning smoke.

  13. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) mitigation in the pyrolysis process of waste tires using CO₂ as a reaction medium.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eilhann E; Oh, Jeong-Ik; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Our work reported the CO2-assisted mitigation of PAHs and VOCs in the thermo-chemical process (i.e., pyrolysis). To investigate the pyrolysis of used tires to recover energy and chemical products, the experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale batch-type reactor. In particular, to examine the influence of the CO2 in pyrolysis of a tire, the pyrolytic products including C1-5-hydrocarbons (HCs), volatile organic carbons (VOCs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were evaluated qualitatively by gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectroscopy (MS) as well as with a thermal conductivity detector (TCD). The mass balance of the pyrolytic products under various pyrolytic conditions was established on the basis of their weight fractions of the pyrolytic products. Our experimental work experimentally validated that the amount of gaseous pyrolytic products increased when using CO2 as a pyrolysis medium, while substantially altering the production of pyrolytic oil in absolute content (7.3-17.2%) and in relative composition (including PAHs and VOCs). Thus, the co-feeding of CO2 in the pyrolysis process can be considered an environmentally benign and energy efficient process.

  14. Evaluation of low-VOC latex paints

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.C.S.; Fortmann, R.C.; Roache, N.F.; Lao, H.C.

    1999-01-01

    The paper gives results of an evaluation of four commercially available low-VOC (volatile organic compound) latex paints as substitutes for conventional latex paints by assessing both their emission characteristics and their performance as coatings. Bulk analysis indicated that the VOC contents of all four paints are considerably lower than those of conventional latex paints. Low-VOC emissions were confirmed by small chamber emission tests. However, sigificant emissions of several aldehydes, especially formaldehyde, were detected from two of the paints. ASTM methods were used to evaluate the hiding power, scrubbability, washability, dry to touch, and yellowing index. The results indicated that one of the low-VOC paints tested showed performance equivalent or superior to that of a widely used conventional latex paint used as a control. It was concluded that low-VOC latex paint can be a viable option to replace conventional latex paints for prevention of indoor air pollution. However, paints marketed as low-VOC may still have significant emissions of some individual VOCs, and some may not have performance characteristics matching those of conventional latex paints.

  15. Evaluation of low-VOC latex paints

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.C.S.; Fortmann, R.C.; Roache, N.F.; Lao, H.C.

    1999-11-01

    The paper gives results of an evaluation of four commercially available low-VOC (volatile organic compound) latex paints as substitutes for conventional latex paints by assessing both their emission characteristics and their performance as coatings. Bulk analysis indicated that the VOC contents of all four paints are considerably lower than those of conventional latex paints. Low-VOC emissions were confirmed by small chamber emission tests. However, sigificant emissions of several aldehydes, especially formaldehyde, were detected from two of the paints. ASTM methods were used to evaluate the hiding power, scrubbability, washability, dry to touch, and yellowing index. The results indicated that one of the low-VOC paints tested showed performance equivalent or superior to that of a widely used conventional latex paint used as a control. It was concluded that low-VOC latex paint can be a viable option to replace conventional latex paints for prevention of indoor air pollution. However, paints marketed as low-VOC may still have significant emissions of some individual VOCs, and some may not have performance characteristics matching those of conventional latex paints.

  16. VOC Control: Current practices and future trends

    SciTech Connect

    Moretti, E.C.; Mukhopadhyay, N. )

    1993-07-01

    One of the most formidable challenges posed by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) is the search for efficient and economical control strategies for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are precursors to ground-level ozone, a major component in the formation of smog. Under the CAAA, thousands of currently unregulated sources will be required to reduce or eliminate VOC emissions. In addition, sources that are currently regulated may seek to evaluate alternative VOC control strategies to meet stricter regulatory requirements such as the maximum achievable control technology (MACT) requirements in Title III of the CAAA. Because of the increasing attention being given to VOC control, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers' (AIChE) Center for Waste Reduction Technologies (CWRT) initiated a study of VOC control technologies and regulatory initiatives. A key objective of the project was to identify and describe existing VOC control technologies and air regulations, as well as emerging technologies and forthcoming regulations. That work is the basis for this article.

  17. VOCs monitoring system simulation and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldararu, Florin; Vasile, Alexandru; Vatra, Cosmin

    2010-11-01

    The designed and simulated system will be used in the tanning industry, for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) measurements. In this industry, about 90% of the solvent contained in the emulsions evaporates during its application, giving rise to VOC, which are at the same time hazardous atmospheric pollutants and one of the sources of ground level photochemical ozone formation. It results that a monitoring system is necessary in a leather finishing process, in order to detect hazardous VOC concentration and conducting process in order of VOC concentration diminishing. The paper presents the design of a VOC monitoring system, which includes sensors for VOCs and temperature, the conditioning circuitry for these sensors, the suction system of the gas in the hood, the data acquisition and the computing system and graphic interface. The used sensor in the detection system is a semiconductor sensor, produced by Figaro Engineering Inc., characterized by a short response time, high sensitivity at almost all VOC substances. The design of the conditioning circuitry and data acquisition is done in order to compensate the sensor response variation with temperature and to maintain the low response time of the sensor. The temperature compensation is obtained by using a thermistor circuitry, and the compensation is done within the software design. A Mitsubishi PLC is used to receive the output signals of the circuits including the sensor and of the thermistor, respectively. The acquisition and computing system is done using Mitsubishi ALPHA 2 controller and a graphical terminal, GOT 1000.

  18. Lower operating temperatures oxidize VOCs

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.

    1996-12-01

    Regenerative catalytic oxidation (RCO) is a new volatile organic compound (VOC) abatement technology that is gaining acceptance in plants where energy costs are high and hours of operation are long. By combining the features of thermal and catalytic oxidation, RCO technology provides an efficient and cost-effective solution to air pollution problems in a variety of industries where hours of operation reach 4,000 annually, and the challenge is growing to reduce energy and operating costs, yet comply with increasingly stringent VOC control regulations. These may include: printed circuit board fabrication (laminate manufacturing), printing (lithography and flexography), coating (cans, coils and fabrics), forest products (production of woods ranging from plywood to medium- and high-density fiberboard) and automotive OEM (spray-paint booths) and component manufacturing (parts spray-painting, resin components, adhesive components, miscellaneous metalworking applications).

  19. Photocatalytic solar tower reactor for the elimination of a low concentration of VOCs.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Nobuaki; Sano, Taizo

    2014-10-15

    We developed a photocatalytic solar tower reactor for the elimination of low concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) typically emitted from small industrial establishments. The photocatalytic system can be installed in a narrow space, as the reactor is cylindrical-shaped. The photocatalytic reactor was placed vertically in the center of a cylindrical scattering mirror, and this vertical reactor was irradiated with scattered sunlight generated by the scattering mirror. About 5 ppm toluene vapor, used as representative VOC, was continuously photodegraded and converted to CO2 almost stoichiometrically under sunny conditions. Toluene removal depended only on the intensity of sunlight. The performance of the solar tower reactor did not decrease with half a year of operation, and the average toluene removal was 36% within this period.

  20. Final disposal of VOCs from industrial wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Ying, W.; Bonk, R.R.; Hannam, S.C. ); Qi-dong Li )

    1994-08-01

    Vapor phase carbon adsorption followed by spent carbon regeneration and catalytic oxidation were evaluated as methods for disposal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from industrial wastewaters during treatment operations such as aeration, air-stripping and aerobic biodegradation. Adsorptive capacities and breakthrough characteristics for eight VOCs found in many hazardous landfill leachates and contaminated groundwater were compared for selection of the best adsorbent and optimum treatment conditions. Coconut shell-based activated carbons exhibited higher VOC loading capacities than coal-based carbons, fiber carbon, molecular sieve and zeolite. Steam and hot nitrogen were both effective for regeneration of the spent carbon. A small quantity of adsorbates left in the regenerated carbon did not result in immediate VOC breakthrough in the next cycle adsorption treatment. Catalytic oxidation was found to be an attractive alternative for VOC disposal. Using a new commercial catalyst developed for destruction of halogenated organic compounds, even stable VOCs such as trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene were completely destroyed at <350[degrees]C when oxidation was conducted at a space velocity of 17000/hr. 25 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Mechanisms of Increased Particle and VOC Emissions during DPF Active Regeneration and Practical Emissions Considering Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Inomata, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Hiroshi

    2017-03-07

    Mechanisms involved in increased particle and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions during active and parked active regenerations of a diesel particulate filter (DPF) were investigated using heavy-duty trucks equipped with both a urea selective catalytic reduction system and a DPF (SCR + DPF) and a DPF-only. Particle emissions increased in the later part of the regeneration period but the mechanisms were different above and below 23 nm. Particles above 23 nm were emitted due to the lower filtering efficiency of the DPF because of the decreasing amount of soot trapped during regeneration. Small particles below 23 nm were thought to be mainly sulfuric acid particles produced from SO2 trapped by the catalyst, being released and oxidized during regeneration. Contrary to the particle emissions, VOCs increased in the earlier part of the regeneration period. The mean molecular weights of the VOCs increased gradually as the regeneration proceeded. To evaluate "practical emissions" in which increased emissions during the regeneration were considered, a Regeneration Correction Factor (RCF), which is the average emission during one cycle of regeneration/emission in normal operation, was adopted. The RCFs of PM and VOCs were 1.1-1.5, and those of PNs were as high as 3-140, although they were estimated from a limited number of observations.

  2. Multi-pass gas cell designed for VOCs analysis by infrared spectroscopy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junbo; Wang, Xin; Wei, Haoyun

    2015-10-01

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) emitted from chemical, petrochemical, and other industries are the most common air pollutants leading to various environmental hazards. Regulations to control the VOCs emissions have been more and more important in China, which requires specific VOCs measurement systems to take measures. Multi-components analysis system, with an infrared spectrometer, a gas handling module and a multi-pass gas cell, is one of the most effective air pollution monitoring facilities. In the VOCs analysis system, the optical multi-pass cell is required to heat to higher than 150 degree Celsius to prevent the condensation of the component gas. Besides that, the gas cell needs to be designed to have an optical path length that matches the detection sensitivity requirement with a compact geometry. In this article, a multi-pass White cell was designed for the high temperature absorption measurements in a specified geometry requirement. The Aberration theory is used to establish the model to accurately calculate the astigmatism for the reflector system. In consideration of getting the optimum output energy, the dimensions of cell geometry, object mirrors and field mirror are optimized by the ray-tracing visible simulation. Then finite element analysis was used to calculate the thermal analysis for the structure of the external and internal elements for high stability. According to the simulation, the cell designed in this paper has an optical path length of 10 meters with an internal volume of 3 liters, and has good stability between room temperature to 227 degree Celsius.

  3. Locating industrial VOC sources with aircraft observations.

    PubMed

    Toscano, P; Gioli, B; Dugheri, S; Salvini, A; Matese, A; Bonacchi, A; Zaldei, A; Cupelli, V; Miglietta, F

    2011-05-01

    Observation and characterization of environmental pollution, focussing on Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), in a high-risk industrial area, are particularly important in order to provide indications on a safe level of exposure, indicate eventual priorities and advise on policy interventions. The aim of this study is to use the Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME) method to measure VOCs, directly coupled with atmospheric measurements taken on a small aircraft environmental platform, to evaluate and locate the presence of VOC emission sources in the Marghera industrial area. Lab analysis of collected SPME fibres and subsequent analysis of mass spectrum and chromatograms in Scan Mode allowed the detection of a wide range of VOCs. The combination of this information during the monitoring campaign allowed a model (Gaussian Plume) to be implemented that estimates the localization of emission sources on the ground.

  4. Deposition of terpenes to vegetation - a paradigm shift towards bidirectional VOC exchange?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamberger, I.; Hörtnagl, L.; Ruuskanen, T.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Müller, M.; Graus, M.; Karl, T.; Wohlfahrt, G.; Hansel, A.

    2012-04-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are important precursors for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation (Hallquist et al., 2009). In addition reactive BVOCs play a crucial role in local tropospheric ozone production (Atkinson, 2000). According to the present scientific understanding vegetation is recognized as a major VOC emission source rather than a deposition sink. Our recent observations however demonstrate that an uptake of terpene compounds to mountain grassland can be significant - at least under certain atmospheric conditions. After a severe hailstorm volume mixing ratios (VMR) of locally emitted terpene compounds originating from conifers located at the mountain slopes were strongly enhanced, even during daytime hours. Weeks after the hailstorm our PTR-MS and PTR-time-of-flight (PTR-TOF) instruments still measured deposition fluxes of monoterpenes (m/z 137.133), sesquiterpenes (m/z 205.195), and oxygenated terpenes (m/z 153.128) to the grassland. The total amount of terpenoids (on a carbon basis) deposited to the grassland during the weeks after the hailstorm is comparable to the total methanol emission of the entire growing season (Bamberger et al., 2011). These findings pose the question whether the terminology should be adjusted from VOC emission to VOC exchange.

  5. Evaluations of an Enhanced Total Hydrocarbon Analyzer With Complex Mixtures of Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, John H.; Limero, Thomas F.; James, John T.; Breach, James; Hinton, Mark

    1995-01-01

    From the earliest manned missions, the volatile organic compound (VOC) content of spacecraft air has been a concern because of a much greater potential for contamination than air in most terrestrial settings. First, the volume of air is small compared to the mass of man- made materials comprising the interior furnishings of the spacecraft. These man-made materials offgas VOCs trapped during manufacture. Second, the nitrogen fraction of the air is recycled. Any VOCs not scrubbed out with charcoal filters or aqueous condensate (mainly water expired by the crew) will accumulate in the air. Third, the crew emits metabolic VOCs. Fourth, experimental payloads can also offgas or accidentally release a VOC; in fact a major organic constituent of the atmosphere is the disinfectant isopropanol released from swabs used in medical experiments.

  6. On-line measurements of nitro organic compounds emitted from automobiles by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry: Laboratory experiments and a field measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, S.; Tanimoto, H.; Fujitani, Y.; Fushimi, A.; Sato, K.; Sekimoto, K.; Yamada, H.; Hori, S.; Shimono, A.; Hikida, T.

    2011-12-01

    On-line measurements of nitro organic compounds in automobile exhaust were carried out by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) with a chassis dynamometer. Diesel vehicles with oxidation catalyst system (diesel vehicle A) and with diesel PM-NOx reduction system ((diesel vehicle B) and a gasoline vehicle were used as a test vehicle. In the case of the diesel vehicle A, the emissions of nitromethane, nitrophenol (NPh), C7-, C8-, C9-, and C10-nitrophenols, and dihydroxynitrobenzenes (DHNB) were observed in the diesel exhaust from the experiment under the constant driving at 60 km hr-1. Temporal variations of mixing ratios for nitromethane, NPh, and DHNB along with related volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured during a transient driving cycle. The time-resolved measurement revealed that the nitromethane emission was strongly correlated with the emissions of CO, benzene, and acetone, which are relatively quickly produced in acceleration processes and appeared as sharp peaks. On the other hand, the NPh emission was moderately correlated with the emissions of acetic acid and phenol, which peaks were broad. The emission of nitromethane was observed from the exhaust of the diesel vehicle B but the emission of other nitro organic compounds was not observed. This suggests that the emission of nitro organic compounds besides nitromethane may depend on the diesel exhaust aftertreatment devices. The emission of nitromethane was also observed from the exhaust of the gasoline vehicle with cold start. An in-situ measurement of nitro organic compounds and their related VOCs was carried out at the crossing of an urban city, Kawasaki. Nitromethane was observed at the crossing and we found that the concentration of nitrometane varied rapidly. During the measurement, the maximum of the concentration of nitrometane reached 5 ppbv. Not only nitrophenols but also nitroaromatics were sometimes detected in the field measurement.

  7. Study of the VOC emissions from a municipal solid waste storage pilot-scale cell: comparison with biogases from municipal waste landfill site.

    PubMed

    Chiriac, R; De Araujos Morais, J; Carre, J; Bayard, R; Chovelon, J M; Gourdon, R

    2011-11-01

    The emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from municipal solid waste stored in a pilot-scale cell containing 6.4 tonnes of waste (storage facility which is left open during the first period (40 days) and then closed with recirculation of leachates during a second period (100 days)) was followed by dynamic sampling on activated carbon and analysed by GC-MS after solvent extraction. This was done in order to know the VOC emissions before the installation of a methanogenesis process for the entire waste mass. The results, expressed in reference to toluene, were exploited during the whole study on all the analyzable VOCs: alcohols, ketones and esters, alkanes, benzenic and cyclic compounds, chlorinated compounds, terpene, and organic sulphides. The results of this study on the pilot-scale cell are then compared with those concerning three biogases from a municipal waste landfill: biogas (1) coming from waste cells being filled or recently closed, biogas (2) from all the waste storage cells on site, and biogas (3) which is a residual gas from old storage cells without aspiration of the gas. The analysis of the results obtained revealed: (i) a high emission of VOCs, principally alcohols, ketones and esters during the acidogenesis; (ii) a decrease in the alkane content and an increase in the terpene content were observed in the VOCs emitted during the production of methane; (iii) the production of heavier alkanes and an increase in the average number of carbon atoms per molecule of alkane with the progression of the stabilisation/maturation process were also observed. Previous studies have concentrated almost on the analysis of biogases from landfills. Our research aimed at gaining a more complete understanding of the decomposition/degradation of municipal solid waste by measuring the VOCs emitted from the very start of the landfill process i.e. during the acidogenesis and acetogenesis phases.

  8. TREATMENT OF VOCS IN HIGH STRENGTH WASTES USING AN ANAEROBIC EXPANDED-BED GAS REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential of the expanded-bed granular activated carbon (GAC) anaerobic reactor in treating a high strength waste containing RCRA volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was studied. A total of six VOCs, methylene chloride, chlorobenzene, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, toluene ...

  9. Characteristics of microbial volatile organic compound flux rates from soil and plant litter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, C. M.; Fierer, N.

    2013-12-01

    Our knowledge of microbial production and consumption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from soil and litter, as well as which microorganisms are involved, is relatively limited compared to what we know about VOC emissions from terrestrial plants. With climate change expecting to alter plant community composition, nitrogen (N) deposition rates, mean annual temperatures, precipitation patterns, and atmospheric VOC concentrations, it is unknown how microbial production and consumption of VOCs from litter and soil will respond. We have spent the last 5 years quantifying VOC flux rates in decaying plant litter, mineral soils and from a subalpine field site using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Microbial production, relative to abiotic sources, accounted for 78% to 99% of the total VOC emissions from decomposing litter, highlighting the importance of microbial metabolisms in these systems. Litter chemistry correlated with the types of VOCs emitted, of which, methanol was emitted at the highest rates from all studies. The net emissions of carbon as VOCs was found to be up to 88% of that emitted as CO2 suggesting that VOCs likely represent an important component of the carbon cycle in many terrestrial systems. Nitrogen additions drastically reduced VOC emissions from litter to near zero, though it is still not understood whether this was due to an increase in consumption or a decrease in production. In the field, the root system contributed to 53% of the carbon that was emitted as VOCs from the soil with increasing air temperatures correlating to an increase in VOC flux rates from the soil system. Finally, we are currently utilizing next generation sequencing techniques (Illumina MiSeq) along with varying concentrations of isoprene, the third most abundant VOC in the atmosphere behind methane and methanol, above soils in a laboratory incubation to determine consumption rates and the microorganisms (bacteria, archaea and fungi) associated with the

  10. Volatile organic compounds released from Microcystis flos-aquae under nitrogen sources and their toxic effects on Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qinghuan; Yang, Lin; Yang, Wangting; Bai, Yan; Hou, Ping; Zhao, Jingxian; Zhou, Lv; Zuo, Zhaojiang

    2017-01-01

    Eutrophication promotes massive growth of cyanobacteria and algal blooms, which can poison other algae and reduce biodiversity. To investigate the differences in multiple nitrogen (N) sources in eutrophicated water on the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from cyanobacteria, and their toxic effects on other algal growth, we analyzed VOCs emitted from Microcystis flos-aquae with different types and concentrations of nitrogen, and determined the effects under Normal-N and Non-N conditions on Chlorella vulgaris. M. flos-aquae released 27, 22, 20, 27, 19, 25 and 17 compounds, respectively, with NaNO3, NaNO2, NH4Cl, urea, Ser, Lys and Arg as the sole N source. With the reduction in N amount, the emission of VOCs was increased markedly, and the most VOCs were found under Non-N condition. C. vulgaris cell propagation, photosynthetic pigment and Fv/Fm declined significantly following exposure to M. flos-aquae VOCs under Non-N condition, but not under Normal-N condition. When C. vulgaris cells were treated with two terpenoids, eucalyptol and limonene, the inhibitory effects were enhanced with increasing concentrations. Therefore, multiple N sources in eutrophicated water induce different VOC emissions from cyanobacteria, and reduction in N can cause nutrient competition, which can result in emissions of more VOCs. Those VOCs released from M. flos-aquae cells under Non-N for nutrient competition can inhibit other algal growth. Among those VOCs, eucalyptol and limonene are the major toxic agents.

  11. VOC and HAP recovery using ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Michael R. Milota : Kaichang Li

    2007-05-29

    During the manufacture of wood composites, paper, and to a lesser extent, lumber, large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as terpenes, formaldehyde, and methanol are emitted to air. Some of these compounds are hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). The air pollutants produced in the forest products industry are difficult to manage because the concentrations are very low. Presently, regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs and RCOs) are commonly used for the destruction of VOCs and HAPs. RTOs consume large amounts of natural gas to heat air and moisture. The combustion of natural gas generates increased CO2 and NOx, which have negative implications for global warming and air quality. The aforementioned problems are addressed by an absorption system containing a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) as an absorbent. RTILs are salts, but are in liquid states at room temperature. RTILs, an emerging technology, are receiving much attention as replacements for organic solvents in industrial processes with significant cost and environmental benefits. Some of these processes include organic synthesis, extraction, and metal deposition. RTILs would be excellent absorbents for exhausts from wood products facilities because of their unique properties: no measurable vapor pressure, high solubility of wide range of organic compounds, thermal stability to 200°C (almost 400°F), and immisciblity with water. Room temperature ionic liquids were tested as possible absorbents. Four were imidizolium-based and were eight phosphonium-based. The imidizolium-based ionic liquids proved to be unstable at the conditions tested and in the presence of water. The phosphonium-based ionic liquids were stable. Most were good absorbents; however, cleaning the contaminates from the ionic liquids was problematic. This was overcome with a higher temperature (120°C) than originally proposed and a very low pressure (1 kPa. Absorption trials were conducted with tetradecy

  12. Emissions of volatile organic compounds from new carpets measured in a large-scale environmental chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, A.T.; Wooley, J.D.; Daisey, J.M. )

    1993-03-01

    This study was undertaken to quantify the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by new carpets. Samples of four typical carpets, including two with styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) latex adhesive and two with different backings, were collected from the finish lines at manufacturers' mills. Individual VOCs released from these samples were identified, and their concentrations, emission rates and mass emissions were measured under simulated indoor conditions in a 20 m[sup 3] environmental chamber over one week periods. Concentrations and emission rates of VOCs emitted by a new SBR carpet were also measured in a house. The carpets emitted a variety of VOCs. The two SBR carpets primarily emitted 4-phenylcyclohexene (4-PCH), the source of [open quotes]new carpet[close quotes] odor, and styrene. The concentrations and emission rates of 4-PCH were similar for the two carpets, while the styrene values varied significantly. The carpet with a polyvinyl chloride backing emitted formaldehyde, vinyl acetate, isooctane, 1,2-propanediol, and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol. Of these, vinyl acetate and propanediol had the highest concentrations and emission rates. The carpet with a polyurethane backing primarily emitted butylated hydroxytoluene. With the exception of formaldehyde, little is known about the health effects of these VOCs at low concentrations. 23 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Emissions of volatile organic compounds from new carpets measured in a large-scale environmental chamber.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, A T; Wooley, J D; Daisey, J M

    1993-03-01

    This study was undertaken to quantify the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by new carpets. Samples of four typical carpets, including two with styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) latex adhesive and two with different backings, were collected from the finish lines at manufacturers' mills. Individual VOCs released from these samples were identified, and their concentrations, emission rates and mass emissions were measured under simulated indoor conditions in a 20 m3 environmental chamber over one week periods. Concentrations and emission rates of VOCs emitted by a new SBR carpet were also measured in a house. The carpets emitted a variety of VOCs. The two SBR carpets primarily emitted 4-phenylcyclohexene (4-PCH), the source of "new carpet" odor, and styrene. The concentrations and emission rates of 4-PCH were similar for the two carpets, while the styrene values varied significantly. The carpet with a polyvinyl chloride backing emitted formaldehyde, vinyl acetate, isooctane, 1,2-propanediol, and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol. Of these, vinyl acetate and propanediol had the highest concentrations and emission rates. The carpet with a polyurethane backing primarily emitted butylated hydroxytoluene. With the exception of formaldehyde, little is known about the health effects of these VOCs at low concentrations.

  14. VOC removal and deodorization of effluent gases from an industrial plant by photo-oxidation, chemical oxidation, and ozonization.

    PubMed

    Domeño, Celia; Rodríguez-Lafuente, Angel; Martos, J M; Bilbao, Rafael; Nerín, Cristina

    2010-04-01

    The efficiency of photo-oxidation, chemical oxidation by sodium hypochlorite, and ozonization for the industrial-scale removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and odors from gaseous emissions was studied by applying these treatments (in an experimental system) to substances passing through an emission stack of a factory producing maize derivatives. Absorption and ozonization were the most efficient treatment, removing 75% and 98% of VOCs, respectively, while photo-oxidation only removed about 59%. The emitted chemical compounds and odors were identified and quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (in full-scan mode). In addition to presenting the results, their implications for selecting optimal processes for treating volatile emissions are discussed.

  15. Patterns in volatile organic compound emissions along a savanna-rainforest gradient in central Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, L. F.; Greenburg, J.; Guenther, A.; Tyndall, G.; Zimmerman, P.; M'bangui, M.; Moutsamboté, J.-M.; Kenfack, D.

    1998-01-01

    In temperate regions the chemistry of the lower troposphere is known to be significantly affected by biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by plants. The chemistry of the lower troposphere over the tropics, however, is poorly understood, in part because of the considerable uncertainties in VOC emissions from tropical ecosystems. Present global VOC models predict that base emissions of isoprene from tropical rainforests are considerably higher than from savannas. These global models of VOC emissions which rely mainly on species inventories are useful, but significant improvement might be made with more ecologically based models of VOC emissions by plants. Ecosystems along a successional transect from woodland savanna to primary rainforest in central Africa were characterized for species composition and vegetation abundance using ground surveys and remotely sensed data. A total of 336 species (mostly trees) at 13 sites were recorded, and 208 of these were measured for VOC emissions at near-optimal light and temperature conditions using a leaf cuvette and hand-held photoionization detector (PID). A subset of 59 species was also sampled using conventional VOC emission techniques in order to validate the PID technique. Results of ecological and VOC emission surveys indicate both phylogenetic and successional patterns along the savanna-rainforest transect. Genera and families of trees which tend to emit isoprene include Lophira, Irvingia, Albizia, Artocarpus, Ficus, Pterocarpus, Caesalpiniaceae, Arecaceae, and Moraceae. Other taxa tend to contain stored VOCs (Annonaceae and Asteraceae). Successional patterns suggest that isoprene emissions are highest in the relatively early successional Isoberlinia forest communities and progressively decrease in the later successional secondary and primary rainforest communities. Stored VOCs appear to increase along the savanna-rainforest succession, but these data are more tentative. These findings are consistent with

  16. Effects of heat and drought stress on post‐illumination bursts of volatile organic compounds in isoprene‐emitting and non‐emitting poplar

    PubMed Central

    Jud, Werner; Vanzo, Elisa; Li, Ziru; Ghirardo, Andrea; Zimmer, Ina; Sharkey, Thomas D.; Schnitzler, Jörg‐Peter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Over the last decades, post‐illumination bursts (PIBs) of isoprene, acetaldehyde and green leaf volatiles (GLVs) following rapid light‐to‐dark transitions have been reported for a variety of different plant species. However, the mechanisms triggering their release still remain unclear. Here we measured PIBs of isoprene‐emitting (IE) and isoprene non‐emitting (NE) grey poplar plants grown under different climate scenarios (ambient control and three scenarios with elevated CO2 concentrations: elevated control, periodic heat and temperature stress, chronic heat and temperature stress, followed by recovery periods). PIBs of isoprene were unaffected by elevated CO2 and heat and drought stress in IE, while they were absent in NE plants. On the other hand, PIBs of acetaldehyde and also GLVs were strongly reduced in stress‐affected plants of all genotypes. After recovery from stress, distinct differences in PIB emissions in both genotypes confirmed different precursor pools for acetaldehyde and GLV emissions. Changes in PIBs of GLVs, almost absent in stressed plants and enhanced after recovery, could be mainly attributed to changes in lipoxygenase activity. Our results indicate that acetaldehyde PIBs, which recovered only partly, derive from a new mechanism in which acetaldehyde is produced from methylerythritol phosphate pathway intermediates, driven by deoxyxylulose phosphate synthase activity. PMID:26390316

  17. ESTIMATES OF REGIONAL NATURAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND FLUXES FROM ENCLOSURE AND AMBIENT MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses results of an investigation at two forested sites in the Southeastern United States. A variety of VOC compounds including methanol, 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol, 6-methyl-5-hepten-
    2-one, isoprene, and 15 monoterpenes were emitted from vegetation at these sites. D...

  18. VOCs elimination and health risk reduction in e-waste dismantling workshop using integrated techniques of electrostatic precipitation with advanced oxidation technologies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiangyao; Huang, Yong; Li, Guiying; An, Taicheng; Hu, Yunkun; Li, Yunlu

    2016-01-25

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted during the electronic waste dismantling process (EWDP) were treated at a pilot scale, using integrated electrostatic precipitation (EP)-advanced oxidation technologies (AOTs, subsequent photocatalysis (PC) and ozonation). Although no obvious alteration was seen in VOC concentration and composition, EP technology removed 47.2% of total suspended particles, greatly reducing the negative effect of particles on subsequent AOTs. After the AOT treatment, average removal efficiencies of 95.7%, 95.4%, 87.4%, and 97.5% were achieved for aromatic hydrocarbons, aliphatic hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons, as well as nitrogen- and oxygen-containing compounds, respectively, over 60-day treatment period. Furthermore, high elimination capacities were also seen using hybrid technique of PC with ozonation; this was due to the PC unit's high loading rates and excellent pre-treatment abilities, and the ozonation unit's high elimination capacity. In addition, the non-cancer and cancer risks, as well as the occupational exposure cancer risk, for workers exposed to emitted VOCs in workshop were reduced dramatically after the integrated technique treatment. Results demonstrated that the integrated technique led to highly efficient and stable VOC removal from EWDP emissions at a pilot scale. This study points to an efficient approach for atmospheric purification and improving human health in e-waste recycling regions.

  19. A farm-level model of VOC emission from silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent measurements suggest that dairy farms can be a significant emission source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). However, accurate estimates of farm-level emissions currently do not exist. A preliminary process-based model was developed to estimate VOC emissions from silage on farms and to as...

  20. Unsteady-state VOC transport in vented waste drums

    SciTech Connect

    Liekhus, K.J.; Gresham, G.L.; Peterson, E.S.; Rae, C.; Hotz, N.J.; Connolly, M.J.

    1993-08-01

    A model of unsteady-state volatile organic compound (VOC) transport in a vented waste drum has been developed. Model predictions of the VOC concentration in the innermost layer of confinement and the drum headspace are compared to measurements in lab-scale simulated waste drums.

  1. Characterization and measurement of VOC emissions from silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is growing concern in the U.S. regarding the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from farms and their contribution to smog formation near ozone non-attainment areas. The few studies that have measured VOC emissions have identified mixed feed and the exposed silage face as major farm ...

  2. VOC EMISSIONS FROM AN AIR FRESHENER IN THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes results of tests, conducted in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) large chamber facility, that investigated emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) from one electrical plug-in type air freshener with pine-scented refills. VOCs were measured ...

  3. Analysis of Relative Concentration of Ethanol and Other Odorous Compounds (OCs) Emitted from the Working Surface at a Landfill in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong; Lu, Wenjing; Liu, Yanjun; Guo, Hanwen; Xu, Sai; Ming, Zhongyuan; Wang, Hongtao

    2015-01-01

    Estimating odor emissions from landfill sites is a complicated task because of the various chemical and biological species that exist in landfill gases. In this study, the relative concentration of ethanol and other odorous compounds emitted from the working surface at a landfill in China was analyzed. Gas sampling was conducted at the landfill on a number of selected days from March 2012 to March 2014, which represented different periods throughout the two years. A total of 41, 59, 66, 54, 63, 54, 41, and 42 species of odorous compounds were identified and quantified in eight sampling activities, respectively; a number of 86 species of odorous compounds were identified and quantified all together in the study. The measured odorous compounds were classified into six different categories (Oxygenated compounds, Halogenated compounds, Terpenes, Sulfur compounds, Aromatics, and Hydrocarbons). The total average concentrations of the oxygenated compounds, sulfur compounds, aromatics, halogenated compounds, hydrocarbons, and terpenes were 2.450 mg/m3, 0.246 mg/m3, 0.203 mg/m3, 0.319 mg/m3, 0.530 mg/m3, and 0.217 mg/m3, respectively. The relative concentrations of 59 odorous compounds with respect to the concentration of ethyl alcohol (1000 ppm) were determined. The dominant contaminants that cause odor pollution around the landfill are ethyl sulfide, methyl mercaptan, acetaldehyde, and hydrogen sulfide; dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl sulfide also contribute to the pollution to a certain degree. PMID:25769100

  4. VOCs in Arid soils: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds In Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) focuses on technologies to clean up volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants in soil and groundwater at arid sites. The initial host site is the 200 West Area at DOE`s Hanford site in southeastern Washington state. The primary VOC contaminant is carbon tetrachloride, in association with heavy metals and radionuclides. An estimated 580--920 metric tons of carbon tetrachloride were disposed of between 1955 and 1973, resulting in extensive soil and groundwater contamination. The VOC-Arid ID schedule has been divided into three phases of implementation. The phased approach provides for: rapid transfer of technologies to the Environmental Restoration (EM-40) programs once demonstrated; logical progression in the complexity of demonstrations based on improved understanding of the VOC problem; and leveraging of the host site EM-40 activities to reduce the overall cost of the demonstrations. During FY92 and FY93, the primary technology demonstrations within the ID were leveraged with an ongoing expedited response action at the Hanford 200 West Area, which is directed at vapor extraction of VOCs from the vadose (unsaturated) zone. Demonstration efforts are underway in the areas of subsurface characterization including: drilling and access improvements, off-gas and borehole monitoring of vadose zone VOC concentrations to aid in soil vapor extraction performance evaluation, and treatment of VOC-contaminated off-gas. These current demonstration efforts constitute Phase 1 of the ID and, because of the ongoing vadose zone ERA, can result in immediate transfer of successful technologies to EM-40.

  5. Evaluation of the Effect of Two Volatile Organic Compounds on Barley Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kaddes, Amine; Parisi, Olivier; Berhal, Chadi; Ben Kaab, Sofiene; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure; Nasraoui, Bouzid; Jijakli, M Haissam; Massart, Sébastien; De Clerck, Caroline

    2016-08-26

    This study aimed to determine the effect of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) on some pathogens, these VOCs were emitted during interactions of barley with Fusarium culmorum Schltdl and/or Cochliobolus sativus Shoemaker, two common root rot pathogens. Our work shows that two organic esters: methyl propanoate (MP) and methyl prop-2-enoate (MA) significantly reduced the development of fungi in vitro. Additional tests showed that the esters significantly inhibited spore germination of these pathogens. The activity of these VOCs on a wide range of fungal and bacterial pathogens was also tested in vitro and showed inhibitory action. The effect of the VOCs on infected barley seeds also showed plantlets growing without disease symptoms. MA and MP seem to have potential value as alternative plant protection compounds against barley bioagressors.

  6. Quantification of volatile organic compounds in smoke from prescribed burning and comparison with occupational exposure limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romagnoli, E.; Barboni, T.; Santoni, P.-A.; Chiaramonti, N.

    2014-05-01

    Prescribed burning represents a serious threat to personnel fighting fires due to smoke inhalation. The aim of this study was to investigate exposure by foresters to smoke from prescribed burning, focusing on exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The methodology for smoke sampling was first evaluated. Potentially dangerous compounds were identified among the VOCs emitted by smoke fires at four prescribed burning plots located around Corsica. The measured mass concentrations for several toxic VOCs were generally higher than those measured in previous studies due to the experimental framework (short sampling distance between the foresters and the flame, low combustion, wet vegetation). In particular, benzene, phenol and furfural exceeded the legal short-term exposure limits published in Europe and/or the United States. Other VOCs such as toluene, ethybenzene or styrene remained below the exposure limits. In conclusion, clear and necessary recommendations were made for protection of personnel involved in fighting fires.

  7. GEIGER BRICKEL BENEFITS FROM LOW -VOC COATINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Midwest Research Institute, under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), conducted a study to identify wood furniture manufacturing facilities that had converted to low-volatile organic compound (VOC)/hazardous air pollutant (HAP) wood furnit...

  8. COMPOSITE SAMPLING FOR SOIL VOC ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data published by numerous researchers over the last decade demonstrate that there is a high degree of spatial variability in the measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil at contaminated waste sites. This phenomenon is confounded by the use of a small sample aliqu...

  9. Contrasting responses of silver birch VOC emissions to short- and long-term herbivory.

    PubMed

    Maja, Mengistu M; Kasurinen, Anne; Yli-Pirilä, Pasi; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Klemola, Tero; Holopainen, Toini; Holopainen, Jarmo K

    2014-03-01

    There is a need to incorporate the effects of herbivore damage into future models of plant volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions at leaf or canopy levels. Short-term (a few seconds to 48 h) changes in shoot VOC emissions of silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) in response to feeding by geometrid moths (Erannis defoliaria Hübner) were monitored online by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS). In addition, two separate field experiments were established to study the effects of long-term foliage herbivory (FH, 30-32 days of feeding by geometrids Agriopis aurantiaria (Clerck) and E. defoliaria in two consecutive years) and bark herbivory (BH, 21 days of feeding by the pine weevil (Hylobius abietis L.) in the first year) on shoot and rhizosphere VOC emissions of three silver birch genotypes (gt14, gt15 and Hausjärvi provenance). Online monitoring of VOCs emitted from foliage damaged by geometrid larvae showed rapid bursts of green leaf volatiles (GLVs) immediately after feeding activity, whereas terpenoid emissions had a tendency to gradually increase during the monitoring period. Long-term FH caused transient increases in total monoterpene (MT) emissions from gt14 and sesquiterpene (SQT) emissions from Hausjärvi provenance, mainly in the last experimental season. In the BH experiment, genotype effects were detected, with gt14 trees having significantly higher total MT emissions compared with other genotypes. Only MTs were detected in the rhizosphere samples of both field experiments, but their emission rates were unaffected by genotype or herbivory. The results suggest that silver birch shows a rapid VOC emission response to short-term foliage herbivory, whereas the response to long-term foliage herbivory and bark herbivory is less pronounced and variable at different time points.

  10. Promotion of plant growth by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain SS101 via novel volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Soon; Dutta, Swarnalee; Ann, Mina; Raaijmakers, Jos M; Park, Kyungseok

    2015-05-29

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) play key roles in modulating plant growth and induced systemic resistance (ISR) to pathogens. Despite their significance, the physiological functions of the specific VOCs produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens SS101 (Pf.SS101) have not been precisely elucidated. The effects of Pf.SS101 and its VOCs on augmentation of plant growth promotion were investigated in vitro and in planta. A significant growth promotion was observed in plants exposed Pf.SS101 under both conditions, suggesting that its VOCs play a key role in promoting plant growth. Solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) and a gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometer (GC-MS) system were used to characterize the VOCs emitted by Pf.SS101 and 11 different compounds were detected in samples inoculated this bacterium, including 13-Tetradecadien-1-ol, 2-butanone and 2-Methyl-n-1-tridecene. Application of these compounds resulted in enhanced plant growth. This study suggests that Pf.SS101 promotes the growth of plants via the release of VOCs including 13-Tetradecadien-1-ol, 2-butanone and 2-Methyl-n-1-tridecene, thus increasing understanding of the role of VOCs in plant-bacterial inter-communication.

  11. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and Elevated Concentrations of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Unsaturated-Zone Vapors Near a Chemical and Low-Level Radioactivity Waste-Disposal Facility, Amargosa Desert Research Site, Nye County, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, R. J.; Andraski, B. J.; Walvoord, M. A.; Stonestrom, D. A.; Prudic, D. E.; Luo, W.

    2003-12-01

    As part of its Toxic Substances Hydrology Program, the U.S. Geological Survey is studying contaminant-transport processes in an arid environment at the Amargosa Desert Research Site (http://nevada.usgs.gov/adrs/). The site is near waste-disposal facilities 20 kilometers east of Death Valley National Park. Low-level radioactive waste was buried in unlined trenches of varying depth during 1962-92. Hazardous chemical waste was buried in unlined trenches at an adjacent facility during 1970-88. Mean annual precipitation at the site from 1981 to 2000 was 108 millimeters. The unsaturated zone is aerobic down to the water table, which is about 110 m (meters) deep. Sampling infrastructure south and west of the facility includes a grid of vapor probes 1.5 m deep, a 23.8-m-deep background borehole (JFDB), and two approximately 100-m-deep boreholes (UZB-2 and UZB-3), which are 160 m and 100 m from the nearest trench, respectively, and are instrumented for multi-level sampling. Analytes detected in unsaturated-zone-vapor samples include elevated concentrations of tritium and carbon-14; three chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) compounds, eight chlorinated solvent compounds, and toluene, all at concentrations exceeding 1,000 parts per billion (ppb) in UZB-3, and at lower concentrations in UZB-2 and in the shallow-vapor-probe grid; and CO2 in concentrations up to 2% in UZB-3, whereas maximum CO2 concentrations in JFDB are less than 0.2%. With the notable exception of toluene, VOCs that are known to be highly biodegradable are generally absent or occur at low concentrations (<100 ppb). The trends in the CO2 concentration profiles approximately parallel those of CFCs and radionuclides. The following preliminary conclusions have been drawn from the radionuclide, VOC, and CO2 data: 1. Biodegradation of organic substances is a reasonable explanation for the presence of CO2 in UZB-3 at concentrations greater those in JFDB (background), which are attributed to near-surface natural biological

  12. Development and Mining of a Volatile Organic Compound Database

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Azian Azamimi; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md.; Ono, Naoaki; Sato, Tetsuo; Sugiura, Tadao; Morita, Aki Hirai; Katsuragi, Tetsuo; Muto, Ai; Nishioka, Takaaki; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are small molecules that exhibit high vapor pressure under ambient conditions and have low boiling points. Although VOCs contribute only a small proportion of the total metabolites produced by living organisms, they play an important role in chemical ecology specifically in the biological interactions between organisms and ecosystems. VOCs are also important in the health care field as they are presently used as a biomarker to detect various human diseases. Information on VOCs is scattered in the literature until now; however, there is still no available database describing VOCs and their biological activities. To attain this purpose, we have developed KNApSAcK Metabolite Ecology Database, which contains the information on the relationships between VOCs and their emitting organisms. The KNApSAcK Metabolite Ecology is also linked with the KNApSAcK Core and KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity Database to provide further information on the metabolites and their biological activities. The VOC database can be accessed online. PMID:26495281

  13. A Real-Time Fast-Flow Tube Study of VOC and Particulate Emissions from Electronic, Potentially Reduced-Harm, Conventional, and Reference Cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Blair, Sandra L; Epstein, Scott A; Nizkorodov, Sergey A; Staimer, Norbert

    Tobacco-free electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), which are currently not regulated by the FDA, have become widespread as a "safe" form of smoking. One approach to evaluate the potential toxicity of e-cigarettes and other types of potentially "reduced-harm" cigarettes is to compare their emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including reactive organic electrophillic compounds such as acrolein, and particulate matter to those of conventional and reference cigarettes. Our newly designed fast-flow tube system enabled us to analyze VOC composition and particle number concentration in real-time by promptly diluting puffs of mainstream smoke obtained from different brands of combustion cigarettes and e-cigarettes. A proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTRMS) was used to analyze real-time cigarette VOC emissions with a 1 s time resolution. Particles were detected with a condensation particle counter (CPC). This technique offers real-time analysis of VOCs and particles in each puff without sample aging and does not require any sample pretreatment or extra handling. Several important determining factors in VOC and particle concentration were investigated: (1) puff frequency; (2) puff number; (3) tar content; (4) filter type. Results indicate that electronic cigarettes are not free from acrolein and acetaldehyde emissions and produce comparable particle number concentrations to those of combustion cigarettes, more specifically to the 1R5F reference cigarette. Unlike conventional cigarettes, which emit different amounts of particles and VOCs each puff, there was no significant puff dependence in the e-cigarette emissions. Charcoal filter cigarettes did not fully prevent the emission of acrolein and other VOCs.

  14. Diagnosing gastrointestinal illnesses using fecal headspace volatile organic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Daniel K; Leggett, Cadman L; Wang, Kenneth K

    2016-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from stool are the components of the smell of stool representing the end products of microbial activity and metabolism that can be used to diagnose disease. Despite the abundance of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and methane that have already been identified in human flatus, the small portion of trace gases making up the VOCs emitted from stool include organic acids, alcohols, esters, heterocyclic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, and alkanes, among others. These are the gases that vary among individuals in sickness and in health, in dietary changes, and in gut microbial activity. Electronic nose devices are analytical and pattern recognition platforms that can utilize mass spectrometry or electrochemical sensors to detect these VOCs in gas samples. When paired with machine-learning and pattern recognition algorithms, this can identify patterns of VOCs, and thus patterns of smell, that can be used to identify disease states. In this review, we provide a clinical background of VOC identification, electronic nose development, and review gastroenterology applications toward diagnosing disease by the volatile headspace analysis of stool. PMID:26819529

  15. Diagnosing gastrointestinal illnesses using fecal headspace volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Chan, Daniel K; Leggett, Cadman L; Wang, Kenneth K

    2016-01-28

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from stool are the components of the smell of stool representing the end products of microbial activity and metabolism that can be used to diagnose disease. Despite the abundance of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and methane that have already been identified in human flatus, the small portion of trace gases making up the VOCs emitted from stool include organic acids, alcohols, esters, heterocyclic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, and alkanes, among others. These are the gases that vary among individuals in sickness and in health, in dietary changes, and in gut microbial activity. Electronic nose devices are analytical and pattern recognition platforms that can utilize mass spectrometry or electrochemical sensors to detect these VOCs in gas samples. When paired with machine-learning and pattern recognition algorithms, this can identify patterns of VOCs, and thus patterns of smell, that can be used to identify disease states. In this review, we provide a clinical background of VOC identification, electronic nose development, and review gastroenterology applications toward diagnosing disease by the volatile headspace analysis of stool.

  16. 40 CFR 60.562-2 - Standards: Equipment leaks of VOC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from the Polymer Manufacturing Industry § 60.562-2 Standards... determination of equivalency for any means of emission limitation that achieves a reduction in emissions of VOC at least equivalent to the reduction in emissions of VOC achieved by the controls required in...

  17. 40 CFR 60.562-2 - Standards: Equipment leaks of VOC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from the Polymer Manufacturing Industry § 60.562-2 Standards... determination of equivalency for any means of emission limitation that achieves a reduction in emissions of VOC at least equivalent to the reduction in emissions of VOC achieved by the controls required in...

  18. 40 CFR 60.562-2 - Standards: Equipment leaks of VOC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from the Polymer Manufacturing Industry § 60.562-2 Standards... determination of equivalency for any means of emission limitation that achieves a reduction in emissions of VOC at least equivalent to the reduction in emissions of VOC achieved by the controls required in...

  19. 40 CFR 60.562-2 - Standards: Equipment leaks of VOC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from the Polymer Manufacturing Industry § 60.562-2 Standards... determination of equivalency for any means of emission limitation that achieves a reduction in emissions of VOC at least equivalent to the reduction in emissions of VOC achieved by the controls required in...

  20. LOW-VOC COATINGS FOR AUTOMOBILE REFINISHING USING NOVEL POLYMER RESINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coating operations release a significant portion of the non-mobile source, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air. The U.S. EPA's Emissions Characterization and Prevention Branch has formulated novel low-VOC coatings for the automotive refinishing sector that reduce VOC l...

  1. Semivolatile organic compound emissions from heavy-duty trucks operating on diesel and bio-diesel fuel blends

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study measured semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in particle matter (PM) emitted from three heavy-duty trucks equipped with modern after-treatment technologies. Emissions testing was conducted as described by the George et al. VOC study also presented as part of this se...

  2. Next Generation Air Monitoring (NGAM) VOC Sensor Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of next generation air monitor (NGAM) volatile organic compound (VOC) evaluations performed using both laboratory as well as field scale settings. These evaluations focused on challenging lower cost (<$2500) NGAM technologies to either controlle...

  3. ASSESSMENT OF VOC EMISSIONS FROM FIBERGLASS BOAT MANUFACTURING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents an assessment of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from fiberglass boat manufacturing. Description of the industry structure is presented, including estimates of the number of facilities, their size, and geographic distribution. The fiberglass boat m...

  4. Carbonyl compounds emitted by a diesel engine fuelled with diesel and biodiesel-diesel blends: Sampling optimization and emissions profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarieiro, Lílian Lefol Nani; Pereira, Pedro Afonso de Paula; Torres, Ednildo Andrade; da Rocha, Gisele Olimpio; de Andrade, Jailson B.

    Biodiesel is emerging as a renewable fuel, hence becoming a promising alternative to fossil fuels. Biodiesel can form blends with diesel in any ratio, and thus could replace partially, or even totally, diesel fuel in diesel engines what would bring a number of environmental, economical and social advantages. Although a number of studies are available on regulated substances, there is a gap of studies on unregulated substances, such as carbonyl compounds, emitted during the combustion of biodiesel, biodiesel-diesel and/or ethanol-biodiesel-diesel blends. CC is a class of hazardous pollutants known to be participating in photochemical smog formation. In this work a comparison was carried out between the two most widely used CC collection methods: C18 cartridges coated with an acid solution of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH) and impinger bottles filled in 2,4-DNPH solution. Sampling optimization was performed using a 2 2 factorial design tool. Samples were collected from the exhaust emissions of a diesel engine with biodiesel and operated by a steady-state dynamometer. In the central body of factorial design, the average of the sum of CC concentrations collected using impingers was 33.2 ppmV but it was only 6.5 ppmV for C18 cartridges. In addition, the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 4% for impingers and 37% for C18 cartridges. Clearly, the impinger system is able to collect CC more efficiently, with lower error than the C18 cartridge system. Furthermore, propionaldehyde was nearly not sampled by C18 system at all. For these reasons, the impinger system was chosen in our study. The optimized sampling conditions applied throughout this study were: two serially connected impingers each containing 10 mL of 2,4-DNPH solution at a flow rate of 0.2 L min -1 during 5 min. A profile study of the C1-C4 vapor-phase carbonyl compound emissions was obtained from exhaust of pure diesel (B0), pure biodiesel (B100) and biodiesel-diesel mixtures (B2, B5, B10, B20, B50, B

  5. Concentrations and co-occurrence correlations of 88 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the ambient air of 13 semi-rural to urban locations in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pankow, J.F.; Luo, W.; Bender, D.A.; Isabelle, L.M.; Hollingsworth, J.S.; Chen, C.; Asher, W.E.; Zogorski, J.S.

    2003-01-01

    The ambient air concentrations of 88 volatile organic compounds were determined in samples taken at 13 semi-rural to urban locations in Maine, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois, Louisiana, and California. The sampling periods ranged from 7 to 29 months, yielding a large data set with a total of 23,191 individual air concentration values, some of which were designated "ND" (not detected). For each compound at each sampling site, the air concentrations (ca, ppbV) are reported in terms of means, medians, and means of the detected values. The analytical method utilized adsorption/thermal desorption with air-sampling cartridges. The analytes included numerous halogenated alkanes, halogenated alkenes, ethers, alcohols, nitriles, esters, ketones, aromatics, a disulfide, and a furan. At some sites, the air concentrations of the gasoline-related aromatic compounds and the gasoline additive methyl tert-butyl ether were seasonally dependent, with concentrations that maximized in the winter. For each site studied here, the concentrations of some compounds were highly correlated one with another (e.g., the BTEX group (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and the xylenes). Other aromatic compounds were also all generally correlated with one another, while the concentrations of other compound pairs were not correlated (e.g., benzene was not correlated with CFC-12). The concentrations found for the BTEX group were generally lower than the values that have been previously reported for urbanized and industrialized areas of other nations. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Volatile organic compounds at swine facilities: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ji-Qin; Robarge, Wayne P; Xiao, Changhe; Heber, Albert J

    2012-10-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are regulated aerial pollutants that have environmental and health concerns. Swine operations produce and emit a complex mixture of VOCs with a wide range of molecular weights and a variety of physicochemical properties. Significant progress has been made in this area since the first experiment on VOCs at a swine facility in the early 1960s. A total of 47 research institutions in 15 North American, European, and Asian countries contributed to an increasing number of scientific publications. Nearly half of the research papers were published by U.S. institutions. Investigated major VOC sources included air inside swine barns, in headspaces of manure storages and composts, in open atmosphere above swine wastewater, and surrounding swine farms. They also included liquid swine manure and wastewater, and dusts inside and outside swine barns. Most of the sample analyses have been focusing on identification of VOC compounds and their relationship with odors. More than 500 VOCs have been identified. About 60% and 10% of the studies contributed to the quantification of VOC concentrations and emissions, respectively. The largest numbers of VOC compounds with reported concentrations in a single experimental study were 82 in air, 36 in manure, and 34 in dust samples. The relatively abundant VOC compounds that were quantified in at least two independent studies included acetic acid, butanoic acid (butyric acid), dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl sulfide, iso-valeric, p-cresol, propionic acid, skatole, trimethyl amine, and valeric acid in air. They included acetic acid, p-cresol, iso-butyric acid, butyric acid, indole, phenol, propionic acid, iso-valeric acid, and skatole in manure. In dust samples, they were acetic acid, propionic acid, butyric acid, valeric acid, p-cresol, hexanal, and decanal. Swine facility VOCs were preferentially bound to smaller-size dusts. Identification and quantification of VOCs were restricted by using instruments based on

  7. Reactivity-adjusted VOC measurements by airtrack: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.Y.; Hurley, M.D.; Nance, B.; Japar, S.M.

    1996-12-31

    Measurements of concentrations of ozone precursors, volatile organic compounds (VOC) and NO{sub x} (NO + NO{sub 2}), are essential to better understand ozone-precursor relationships in urban and regional areas. In the last two decades, major advances on measuring VOC and NO{sub x} have been made. Reliable techniques for measuring NO{sub x} are available currently, although it is difficult to measure NO{sub 2} without interferences of other species at routine monitoring sites. For VOC, reliable techniques are available for lighter nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC), and current techniques for measuring heavier NMHC and partially oxidized NMHC including carbonyl compounds are somewhat uncertain and are under further development. Currently available measurement techniques for VOC are time-consuming and expensive. Consequently, a simple measurement technique for reactivity-adjusted, total VOC would be valuable for evaluating ozone-precursor relationships. Recently, an integrated air quality assessment instrument, AIRTRAK, has been introduced. The uniqueness of the AIRTRAK is the possible, continuous measurements of ambient VOC. Measurements of smog formation coefficients and derivation of VOC concentrations are based on the integrated empirical rate (IER) model. However, the IER model does not appear to hold rigorously. Consequently, the capability of VOC measurements by AIRTRAK has not been demonstrated adequately. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate the VOC measurement capability of AIRTRAK after substantial experiences in flow-mode experiments using AIRTRAK at our laboratory. First, model simulations are performed to derive relationships between measured smog concentrations (by AIRTRAK) and ambient VOC concentrations. Using these relationships, numerical simulations are performed to simulate ambient VOC measurements. Further, preliminary investigations of implementing the present methodology to AIRTRAK are performed.

  8. Sensory and chemical characterization of VOC emissions from building products: impact of concentration and air velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, H. N.; Kjaer, U. D.; Nielsen, P. A.; Wolkoff, P.

    The emissions from five commonly used building products were studied in small-scale test chambers over a period of 50 days. The odor intensity was assessed by a sensory panel and the concentrations of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of concern for the indoor air quality were measured. The building products were three floor coverings: PVC, floor varnish on beechwood parquet and nylon carpet on a latex foam backing; an acrylic sealant, and a waterborne wall paint on gypsum board. The impacts of the VOC concentration in the air and the air velocity over the building products on the odor intensity and on the emission rate of VOCs were studied. The emission from each building product was studied under two or three different area-specific ventilation rates, i.e. different ratios of ventilation rate of the test chamber and building product area in the test chamber. The air velocity over the building product samples was adjusted to different levels between 0.1 and 0.3 m s -1. The origin of the emitted VOCs was assessed in order to distinguish between primary and secondary emissions. The results show that it is reasonable after an initial period of up to 14 days to consider the emission rate of VOCs of primary origin from most building products as being independent of the concentration and of the air velocity. However, if the building product surface is sensitive to oxidative degradation, increased air velocity may result in increased secondary emissions. The odor intensity of the emissions from the building products only decayed modestly over time. Consequently, it is recommended to use building products which have a low impact on the perceived air quality from the moment they are applied. The odor indices (i.e. concentration divided by odor threshold) of primary VOCs decayed markedly faster than the corresponding odor intensities. This indicates that the secondary emissions rather than the primary emissions, are likely to affect the perceived air quality in the

  9. Red:far-red light conditions affect the emission of volatile organic compounds from barley (Hordeum vulgare), leading to altered biomass allocation in neighbouring plants

    PubMed Central

    Kegge, Wouter; Ninkovic, Velemir; Glinwood, Robert; Welschen, Rob A. M.; Voesenek, Laurentius A. C. J.; Pierik, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play various roles in plant–plant interactions, and constitutively produced VOCs might act as a cue to sense neighbouring plants. Previous studies have shown that VOCs emitted from the barley (Hordeum vulgare) cultivar ‘Alva’ cause changes in biomass allocation in plants of the cultivar ‘Kara’. Other studies have shown that shading and the low red:far-red (R:FR) conditions that prevail at high plant densities can reduce the quantity and alter the composition of the VOCs emitted by Arabidopsis thaliana, but whether this affects plant–plant signalling remains unknown. This study therefore examines the effects of far-red light enrichment on VOC emissions and plant–plant signalling between ‘Alva’ and ‘Kara’. Methods The proximity of neighbouring plants was mimicked by supplemental far-red light treatment of VOC emitter plants of barley grown in growth chambers. Volatiles emitted by ‘Alva’ under control and far-red light-enriched conditions were analysed using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS). ‘Kara’ plants were exposed to the VOC blend emitted by the ‘Alva’ plants that were subjected to either of the light treatments. Dry matter partitioning, leaf area, stem and total root length were determined for ‘Kara’ plants exposed to ‘Alva’ VOCs, and also for ‘Alva’ plants exposed to either control or far-red-enriched light treatments. Key Results Total VOC emissions by ‘Alva’ were reduced under low R:FR conditions compared with control light conditions, although individual volatile compounds were found to be either suppressed, induced or not affected by R:FR. The altered composition of the VOC blend emitted by ‘Alva’ plants exposed to low R:FR was found to affect carbon allocation in receiver plants of ‘Kara’. Conclusions The results indicate that changes in R:FR light conditions influence the emissions of VOCs in barley, and that these altered emissions

  10. Solutions for VOC and HAPS control on natural gas fired internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, J.Z.; Sleigh, S.; Cotherman, R.

    1996-12-31

    Natural gas fired stationary internal combustion engines (IC engines) emit volatile organic compounds (VOC) and hazardous air pollutants (HAP) as part of their normal operations. VOC and HAP emissions are coming under increased scrutiny with the advent of such Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 regulations as Title I`s Reasonably Available Control Technology (RACT), Title III`s Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) and Title V`s Operating Permit Program (Title V). In addition, many states are imposing more stringent emission limits on these sources. These emissions may also contribute to the reportable chemicals from the total facility under SARA Title III. Numerous facilities nationwide are interested in reducing these emissions in order to comply with current requirements, to opt out of requirements or to reduce reportable chemicals. This paper will examine the source of these emissions, and discuss combustion control technologies and system operating flexibility, end-of-pipe control technologies, and system tuning opportunities which have the potential to reduce VOC and HAP emissions from IC engines. Data will be presented on potential emission reduction efficiencies achievable using the various control options. 7 refs., 4 tabs.

  11. Characterization of non-methane volatile organic compounds at swine facilities in eastern North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blunden, Jessica; Aneja, Viney P.; Lonneman, William A.

    Samples were collected and analyzed in a field study to characterize C 2-C 12 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted at five swine facilities in Eastern North Carolina between April 2002 and February 2003. Two sites employed conventional lagoon and field spray technologies, while three sites utilized various alternative waste treatment technologies in an effort to substantially reduce gaseous compound emissions, odor, and pathogens from these swine facilities. More than 100 compounds, including various paraffins, olefins, aromatics, ethers, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, halogenated hydrocarbons, phenols, and sulfides were positively identified and quantified by Gas Chromatographic/Flame Ionization Detection (GC/FID) analysis and confirmed by Gas Chromatographic/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS). GC/MS analysis of one particularly complex sample collected assisted in providing identification and retention times for 17 sulfur-type VOCs including dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and dimethyl trisulfide as well as many other VOCs. Highest VOC concentration levels measured at each of the facilities were near the hog barn ventilation fans. Total measured VOCs at the hog barns were typically dominated by oxygenated hydrocarbons (HCs), i.e., ethanol, methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone. These compounds, in addition to other oxygenated VOCs measured at the various sites, generally represented ˜37-73% of net total measured VOCs that were emitted from the hog barns at the various sites. Dimethyl sulfide and dimethyl disulfide, both recognized as malodorous compounds, were determined to have higher concentration levels at the barns than the background at every farm sampled with the exception of one farm during the warm sampling season.

  12. MEMBRANE-MODERATED STRIPPING PROCESS FOR REMOVING VOCS FROM WATER IN A COMPOSITE HOLLOW FIBER MODULE. (R825511C027)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The "stripmeation" process for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from water has been introduced and studied. An aqueous solution of the VOC is passed through the bores of hydrophobic microporous polypropylene hollow fibers having a plasma polymerized silicone ...

  13. The atmospheric chemistry of trace gases and particulate matter emitted by different land uses in Borneo

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, A. R.; Langford, B.; Pugh, T. A. M.; Robinson, N.; Misztal, P. K.; Heard, D. E.; Lee, J. D.; Lewis, A. C.; Jones, C. E.; Hopkins, J. R.; Phillips, G.; Monks, P. S.; Karunaharan, A.; Hornsby, K. E.; Nicolas-Perea, V.; Coe, H.; Gabey, A. M.; Gallagher, M. W.; Whalley, L. K.; Edwards, P. M.; Evans, M. J.; Stone, D.; Ingham, T.; Commane, R.; Furneaux, K. L.; McQuaid, J. B.; Nemitz, E.; Seng, Yap Kok; Fowler, D.; Pyle, J. A.; Hewitt, C. N.

    2011-01-01

    We report measurements of atmospheric composition over a tropical rainforest and over a nearby oil palm plantation in Sabah, Borneo. The primary vegetation in each of the two landscapes emits very different amounts and kinds of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), resulting in distinctive VOC fingerprints in the atmospheric boundary layer for both landscapes. VOCs over the Borneo rainforest are dominated by isoprene and its oxidation products, with a significant additional contribution from monoterpenes. Rather than consuming the main atmospheric oxidant, OH, these high concentrations of VOCs appear to maintain OH, as has been observed previously over Amazonia. The boundary-layer characteristics and mixing ratios of VOCs observed over the Borneo rainforest are different to those measured previously over Amazonia. Compared with the Bornean rainforest, air over the oil palm plantation contains much more isoprene, monoterpenes are relatively less important, and the flower scent, estragole, is prominent. Concentrations of nitrogen oxides are greater above the agro-industrial oil palm landscape than over the rainforest, and this leads to changes in some secondary pollutant mixing ratios (but not, currently, differences in ozone). Secondary organic aerosol over both landscapes shows a significant contribution from isoprene. Primary biological aerosol dominates the super-micrometre aerosol over the rainforest and is likely to be sensitive to land-use change, since the fungal source of the bioaerosol is closely linked to above-ground biodiversity. PMID:22006961

  14. Identification and quantification of gaseous organic compounds emitted from biomass burning using two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, L. E.; Luo, W.; Pankow, J. F.; Yokelson, R. J.; Stockwell, C. E.; Barsanti, K. C.

    2014-09-01

    The current understanding of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation within biomass burning (BB) plumes is limited by the incomplete identification and quantification of the non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) emitted from such fires. Gaseous organic compounds were collected on sorbent cartridges during laboratory burns as part of the fourth Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment (FLAME-4), with analysis by two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC / TOFMS). The sensitivity and resolving power of GC × GC / TOFMS allowed the acquisition of the most extensive data set of BB NMOCs to date, with measurements for 722 positively or tentatively identified compounds. Estimated emission factors (EFs) are presented for these compounds for burns of six different vegetative fuels, including conifer branches, grasses, agricultural residue, and peat. The number of compounds detected from individual burns ranged from 129 to 474, and included extensive isomer groups. For example, 38 monoterpene isomers were observed in the emissions from coniferous fuels; the isomeric ratios were found to be consistent with those reported in relevant essential oils, suggesting that the composition of such oils may be very useful when predicting fuel-dependent terpene emissions. Further, eleven sesquiterpenes were detected and tentatively identified, providing the first reported speciation of sesquiterpenes in gas-phase BB emissions. The calculated EFs for all measured compounds are compared and discussed in the context of potential SOA formation.

  15. Identification and quantification of gaseous organic compounds emitted from biomass burning using two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, L. E.; Luo, W.; Pankow, J. F.; Yokelson, R. J.; Stockwell, C. E.; Barsanti, K. C.

    2015-02-01

    The current understanding of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation within biomass burning (BB) plumes is limited by the incomplete identification and quantification of the non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) emitted from such fires. Gaseous organic compounds were collected on sorbent cartridges during laboratory burns as part of the fourth Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment (FLAME-4) and analyzed by two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-ToFMS). The sensitivity and resolving power of GC × GC-ToFMS allowed the acquisition of the most extensive data set of BB NMOCs to date, with measurements for 708 positively or tentatively identified compounds. Estimated emission factors (EFs) are presented for these compounds for burns of six different vegetative fuels, including conifer branches, grasses, agricultural residue, and peat. The number of compounds meeting the peak selection criteria ranged from 129 to 474 among individual burns, and included extensive isomer groups. For example, 38 monoterpene isomers were observed in the emissions from coniferous fuels; the isomeric ratios were found to be consistent with those reported in relevant essential oils, suggesting that the composition of such oils may be very useful when predicting fuel-dependent terpene emissions. Further, 11 sesquiterpenes were detected and tentatively identified, providing the first reported speciation of sesquiterpenes in gas-phase BB emissions. The calculated EFs for all measured compounds are compared and discussed in the context of potential SOA formation.

  16. Characterization of total ecosystem-scale biogenic VOC exchange at a Mediterranean oak-hornbeam forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schallhart, Simon; Rantala, Pekka; Nemitz, Eiko; Taipale, Ditte; Tillmann, Ralf; Mentel, Thomas F.; Loubet, Benjamin; Gerosa, Giacomo; Finco, Angelo; Rinne, Janne; Ruuskanen, Taina M.

    2016-06-01

    Recently, the number and amount of biogenically emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been discussed in great detail. Depending on the ecosystem, the published number varies between a dozen and several hundred compounds. We present ecosystem exchange fluxes from a mixed oak-hornbeam forest in the Po Valley, Italy. The fluxes were measured by a proton transfer reaction-time-of-flight (PTR-ToF) mass spectrometer and calculated using the eddy covariance (EC) method. Detectable fluxes were observed for up to 29 compounds, dominated by isoprene, which comprised over 60 % of the total upward flux (on a molar basis). The daily average of the total VOC upward flux was 10.4 nmol m-2 s-1. Methanol had the highest concentration and accounted for the largest downward flux. Methanol seemed to be deposited to dew, as the downward flux happened in the early morning, right after the calculated surface temperature came closest to the calculated dew point temperature.We estimated that up to 30 % of the upward flux of methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) originated from atmospheric oxidation of isoprene. A comparison between two methods for the flux detection (manual and automated) was made. Their respective advantages and disadvantages were discussed and the differences in their results shown. Both provide comparable results.

  17. Effect of mechanical damage on emission of volatile organic compounds from plant leaves and implications for evaluation of host plant specificity of prospective biological control agents of weeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessment of host plant specificity is a critical step in the evaluation of classical biological control agents of weeds, which is necessary for avoiding possible damage to nontarget plants. Volatile organic compounds (VOC) emitted by plants likely play an important role in determining which plant...

  18. Fungal succession in relation to volatile organic compounds emissions from Scots pine and Norway spruce leaf litter-decomposing fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isidorov, Valery; Tyszkiewicz, Zofia; Pirożnikow, Ewa

    2016-04-01

    Leaf litter fungi are partly responsible for decomposition of dead material, nutrient mobilization and gas fluxes in forest ecosystems. It can be assumed that microbial destruction of dead plant materials is an important source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted into the atmosphere from terrestrial ecosystems. However, little information is available on both the composition of fungal VOCs and their producers whose community can be changed at different stages of litter decomposition. The fungal community succession was investigated in a litter bag experiment with Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) needle litter. The succession process can be divided into a several stages controlled mostly by changes in litter quality. At the very first stages of decomposition the needle litter was colonized by ascomycetes which can use readily available carbohydrates. At the later stages, the predominance of Trichoderma sp., the known producers of cellulolytic enzymes, was documented. To investigate the fungi-derived VOCs, eight fungi species were isolated. As a result of gas chromatographic analyses, as many as 75C2sbnd C15 fungal volatile compounds were identified. Most components detected in emissions were very reactive substances: the principal groups of VOCs were formed by monoterpenes, carbonyl compounds and aliphatic alcohols. It was found that production of VOCs by fungi is species specific: only 10 metabolites were emitted into the gas phase by all eight species. The reported data confirm that the leave litter decomposition is important source of reactive organic compounds under the forest canopy.

  19. Generation and detection of metal ions and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions from the pretreatment processes for recycling spent lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Wang, Guangxu; Xu, Zhenming

    2016-06-01

    The recycling of spent lithium-ion batteries brings benefits to both economic and environmental terms, but it can also lead to contaminants in a workshop environment. This study focused on metals, non-metals and volatile organic compounds generated by the discharging and dismantling pretreatment processes which are prerequisite for recycling spent lithium-ion batteries. After discharging in NaCl solution, metal contents in supernate and concentrated liquor were detected. Among results of condition #2, #3, #4 and #5, supernate and concentrated liquor contain high levels of Na, Al, Fe; middle levels of Co, Li, Cu, Ca, Zn; and low levels of Mn, Sn, Cr, Zn, Ba, K, Mg, V. The Hg, Ag, Cr and V are not detected in any of the analyzed supernate. 10wt% NaCl solution was a better discharging condition for high discharge efficiency, less possible harm to environment. To collect the gas released from dismantled LIB belts, a set of gas collecting system devices was designed independently. Two predominant organic vapour compounds were dimethyl carbonate (4.298mgh(-1)) and tert-amylbenzene (0.749mgh(-1)) from one dismantled battery cell. To make sure the concentrations of dimethyl carbonate under recommended industrial exposure limit (REL) of 100mgL(-1), for a workshop on dismantling capacity of 1000kg spent LIBs, the minimum flow rate of ventilating pump should be 235.16m(3)h(-1).

  20. Volatile organic compounds in the Pearl River Delta: Identification of source regions and recommendations for emission-oriented monitoring strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zibing; Zhong, Liuju; Lau, Alexis Kai Hon; Yu, Jian Zhen; Louie, Peter K. K.

    2013-09-01

    For the purpose of systematically characterizing the ambient volatile organic compound (VOC) levels and their emission sources in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) of China, a grid study with VOC samples simultaneously taken at 84 sites over the PRD was conducted in summer and winter of 2008 and 2009. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model was applied to identify the major VOC contributing sources and their temporal and spatial variations. Nine sources were identified, with gasoline exhaust, industrial emission and LPG leakage & propellant emission the top three significant sources. They accounted for 23%, 16% and 13% of the ambient VOC levels, respectively. Control measures should be therefore targeted on mitigating the VOC emissions from the traffic-related and industrial-related sources. The total VOC level did not show strong increase from 5 a.m. to 10 a.m. during all the four sampling campaigns, which may result from stronger wind and higher mixing height at 10 a.m. Three hotspot areas with significant VOC contributions were identified by source apportionment analysis: (1) the Pearl River Estuary; (2) an area from Central Dongguan to North Shenzhen; and (3) the Zhuhai-Zhongshan-Jiangmen area. For better characterizing the roles of VOC and NOx in producing the secondary pollutants and to identify specific sources emitting excessive concentrations of precursors, the emission-oriented Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Station (PAMS) network is recommended to be established in the PRD. Three PAMS networks are suggested in correspondence to the three identified hotspot areas.

  1. Native Fluorescence Detection Methods and Detectors for Naphthalene and/or Other Volatile Organic Compound Vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Bhartia, Rohit (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor); Lane, Arthur L. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Naphthalene, benzene, toluene, xylene, and other volatile organic compounds have been identified as serious health hazards. This is especially true for personnel working with JP8 jet fuel and other fuels containing naphthalene as well as other hazardous volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Embodiments of the invention are directed to methods and apparatus for near-real-time in-situ detection and accumulated dose measurement of exposure to naphthalene vapor and other hazardous gaseous VOCs. The methods and apparatus employ excitation of fluorophors native or endogenous to compounds of interest using light sources emitting in the ultraviolet below 300 nm and measurement of native fluorescence emissions in distinct wavebands above the excitation wavelength. The apparatus of some embodiments are cell-phone-sized sensor/dosimeter "badges" to be worn by personnel potentially exposed to naphthalene or other hazardous VOCs. The badge sensor of some embodiments provides both real time detection and data logging of exposure to naphthalene or other VOCs of interest from which both instantaneous and accumulated dose can be determined. The badges employ a new native fluorescence based detection method to identify and differentiate VOCs. The particular focus of some embodiments are the detection and identification of naphthalene while other embodiments are directed to detection and identification of other VOCs like aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene, toluene, and xylene.

  2. Source Apportionment of VOCs in Edmonton, Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, M. C.; Brown, S. G.; Aklilu, Y.; Lyder, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Regional emissions at Edmonton, Alberta, are complex, containing emissions from (1) transportation sources, such as cars, trucks, buses, and rail; (2) industrial sources, such as petroleum refining, light manufacturing, and fugitive emissions from holding tanks or petroleum terminals; and (3) miscellaneous sources, such as biogenic emissions and natural gas use and processing. From 2003 to 2009, whole air samples were collected at two sites in Edmonton and analyzed for over 77 volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs were sampled in the downtown area (Central) and the industrial area on the eastern side of the city (East). Concentrations of most VOCs were highest at the East site. The positive matrix factorization (PMF) receptor model was used to apportion ambient concentration measurements of VOCs into eleven factors, which were associated with emissions source categories. Factors of VOCs identified in the final eleven-factor solution include transportation sources (both gasoline and diesel vehicles), industrial sources, a biogenic source, and a natural-gas-related source. Transportation sources accounted for more mass at the Central site than at the East site; this was expected because Central is in a core urban area where transportation emissions are concentrated. Transportation sources accounted for nearly half of the VOC mass at the Central site, but only 6% of the mass at the East site. Encouragingly, mass from transportation sources has declined by about 4% a year in this area; this trend is similar to the decline found throughout the United States, and is likely due to fleet turnover as older, more highly polluting cars are replaced with newer, cleaner cars. In contrast, industrial sources accounted for ten times more VOC mass at the East site than at the Central site and were responsible for most of the total VOC mass observed at the East site. Of the six industrial factors identified at the East site, four were linked to petrochemical industry production

  3. Energy Efficient Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants (o-HAPs) from Industrial Waste Streams by Direct Electron Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Testoni, A. L.

    2011-10-19

    This research program investigated and quantified the capability of direct electron beam destruction of volatile organic compounds and organic hazardous air pollutants in model industrial waste streams and calculated the energy savings that would be realized by the widespread adoption of the technology over traditional pollution control methods. Specifically, this research determined the quantity of electron beam dose required to remove 19 of the most important non-halogenated air pollutants from waste streams and constructed a technical and economic model for the implementation of the technology in key industries including petroleum refining, organic & solvent chemical production, food & beverage production, and forest & paper products manufacturing. Energy savings of 75 - 90% and green house gas reductions of 66 - 95% were calculated for the target market segments.

  4. Alternative control technology document: Control of VOC emissions from the application of agricultural pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    In many States, some of the ozone nonattainment areas are comprised primarily of agricultural counties where a potentially significant contribution to the ozone may result from area sources of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) emissions. A potential source of VOC emissions in agricultural counties is the release of organic compounds from the application of agricultural pesticides. The report provides technical information that State and local agencies can consider while developing strategies for reducing VOC emissions.

  5. Characterization of volatile organic compounds from different cooking emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shuiyuan; Wang, Gang; Lang, Jianlei; Wen, Wei; Wang, Xiaoqi; Yao, Sen

    2016-11-01

    Cooking fume is regarded as one of the main sources of urban atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and its chemical characteristics would be different among various cooking styles. In this study, VOCs emitted from four different Chinese cooking styles were collected. VOCs concentrations and emission characteristics were analyzed. The results demonstrated that Barbecue gave the highest VOCs concentrations (3494 ± 1042 μg/m3), followed by Hunan cuisine (494.3 ± 288.8 μg/m3), Home cooking (487.2 ± 139.5 μg/m3), and Shandong cuisine (257.5 ± 98.0 μg/m3). The volume of air drawn through the collection hood over the stove would have a large impact on VOCs concentration in the exhaust. Therefore, VOCs emission rates (ER) and emission factors (EF) were also estimated. Home cooking had the highest ER levels (12.2 kg/a) and Barbecue had the highest EF levels (0.041 g/kg). The abundance of alkanes was higher in Home cooking, Shandong cuisine and Hunan cuisine with the value of 59.4%-63.8%, while Barbecue was mainly composed of alkanes (34.7%) and alkenes (39.9%). The sensitivity species of Home cooking and Hunan cuisine were alkanes, and that of Shandong cuisine and Barbecue were alkenes. The degree of stench pollution from cooking fume was lighter.

  6. Study of the VOC emissions from a municipal solid waste storage pilot-scale cell: Comparison with biogases from municipal waste landfill site

    SciTech Connect

    Chiriac, R.; De Araujos Morais, J.; Carre, J.; Bayard, R.; Chovelon, J.M.; Gourdon, R.

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > Follow-up of the emission of VOCs in a municipal waste pilot-scale cell during the acidogenesis and acetogenesis phases. > Study from the very start of waste storage leading to a better understanding of the decomposition/degradation of waste. > Comparison of the results obtained on the pilot-scale cell with those from 3 biogases coming from the same landfill site. > A methodology of characterization for the progression of the stabilization/maturation of waste is finally proposed. - Abstract: The emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from municipal solid waste stored in a pilot-scale cell containing 6.4 tonnes of waste (storage facility which is left open during the first period (40 days) and then closed with recirculation of leachates during a second period (100 days)) was followed by dynamic sampling on activated carbon and analysed by GC-MS after solvent extraction. This was done in order to know the VOC emissions before the installation of a methanogenesis process for the entire waste mass. The results, expressed in reference to toluene, were exploited during the whole study on all the analyzable VOCs: alcohols, ketones and esters, alkanes, benzenic and cyclic compounds, chlorinated compounds, terpene, and organic sulphides. The results of this study on the pilot-scale cell are then compared with those concerning three biogases from a municipal waste landfill: biogas (1) coming from waste cells being filled or recently closed, biogas (2) from all the waste storage cells on site, and biogas (3) which is a residual gas from old storage cells without aspiration of the gas. The analysis of the results obtained revealed: (i) a high emission of VOCs, principally alcohols, ketones and esters during the acidogenesis; (ii) a decrease in the alkane content and an increase in the terpene content were observed in the VOCs emitted during the production of methane; (iii) the production of heavier alkanes and an increase in the average number of carbon

  7. VOCs in representative canadian residences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otson, Rein; Fellin, Philip; Tran, Quang

    Stored extracts of passive samplers exposed in 757 randomly selected Canadian residences provided a unique opportunity for retrospective determination of the occurrence of airborne volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Aliquots of the individual extracts were pooled to form a composite exposure sample and a corresponding blank sample. To identify and quantitate potentially hazardous organics in the samples, GC-MS analyses were conducted by several approaches. The amounts of 52 target compounds in the the composite sample were estimated based on selected ion monitoring (SIM) results, extraction recoveries, average air volume sampled, and 3M OVM 3500 passive sampling rates. Forty of the organics were detected and were present in amounts equivalent to airborne concentrations ranging from <1 to 104 μg m -3. Several other compounds were also tentatively identified by full scan analysis. Many of the detected organics have been reported to be associated with activities such as tobacco smoking and the presence of consumer products and plastic materials indoors. The analytical results have been useful in risk assessments and establishment of a new Canadian priority substances list (PSL).

  8. Optimization of headspace solid phase microextraction for the analysis of microbial volatile organic compounds emitted by fungi: Application to historical objects.

    PubMed

    Sawoszczuk, Tomasz; Syguła-Cholewińska, Justyna; del Hoyo-Meléndez, Julio M

    2015-08-28

    The main goal of this work was to optimize the SPME sampling method for measuring microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) emitted by active molds that may deteriorate historical objects. A series of artificially aged model materials that resemble those found in historical objects was prepared and evaluated after exposure to four different types of fungi. The investigated pairs consisted of: Alternaria alternata on silk, Aspergillus niger on parchment, Chaetomium globosum on paper and wool, and Cladosporium herbarum on paper. First of all, a selection of the most efficient SPME fibers was carried out as there are six different types of fibers commercially available. It was important to find a fiber that absorbs the biggest number and the highest amount of MVOCs. The results allowed establishing and selecting the DVB/CAR/PDMS fiber as the most effective SPME fiber for this kind of an analysis. Another task was to optimize the time of MVOCs extraction on the fiber. It was recognized that a time between 12 and 24h is adequate for absorbing a high enough amount of MVOCs. In the last step the temperature of MVOCs desorption in the GC injection port was optimized. It was found that desorption at a temperature of 250°C allowed obtaining chromatograms with the highest abundances of compounds. To the best of our knowledge this work constitutes the first attempt of the SPME method optimization for sampling MVOCs emitted by molds growing on historical objects.

  9. Identification of Key Plant-Associated Volatiles Emitted by Heliothis virescens Larvae that Attract the Parasitoid, Microplitis croceipes: Implications for Parasitoid Perception of Odor Blends.

    PubMed

    Morawo, Tolulope; Fadamiro, Henry

    2016-11-01

    Herbivores emit plant-associated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) after feeding on plants. These plant-associated VOCs can be used by parasitoids to locate their hosts. It is hypothesized that certain compounds play key roles in the attractiveness of host-associated odor blends. The larval parasitoid, Microplitis croceipes (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) and its herbivore host, Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), a major pest of cotton plant were used as model species to identify key compounds mediating attraction of parasitoids to hosts. Comparative GC/MS analyses of cotton-fed vs. artificial diet-fed hosts indicated that 12 of 17 compounds in the headspace of H. virescens larvae were exclusive to plant-fed hosts, and thus considered to be plant-associated. In order to identify key attractive compounds, a full blend of 15 commercially available synthetic compounds was modified by removing each of the 10 plant-associated compounds emitted by host larvae. In Y-tube olfactometer bioassays testing parasitoid responses to modified blends, 1-octen-3-ol, decanal, (E)-β-caryophyllene, α-humulene, α-farnesene, and β-pinene were identified as key compounds contributing to attractiveness of the natural blend of VOCs emitted by cotton-fed hosts. The results showed that while various host-associated compounds act in concert to serve as useful host location cues, only a fraction of the natural blend mediates attraction in parasitoids. Furthermore, the role of a compound is better assessed in the context of other compounds, and odor blends are better perceived as a whole rather than as individual components.

  10. Estimation of VOC emissions from produced-water treatment ponds in Uintah Basin oil and gas field using modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, H.; Mansfield, M. L.; Lyman, S. N.; O'Neil, T.; Jones, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Emissions from produced-water treatment ponds are poorly characterized sources in oil and gas emission inventories that play a critical role in studying elevated winter ozone events in the Uintah Basin, Utah, U.S. Information gaps include un-quantified amounts and compositions of gases emitted from these facilities. The emitted gases are often known as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which, beside nitrogen oxides (NOX), are major precursors for ozone formation in the near-surface layer. Field measurement campaigns using the flux-chamber technique have been performed to measure VOC emissions from a limited number of produced water ponds in the Uintah Basin of eastern Utah. Although the flux chamber provides accurate measurements at the point of sampling, it covers just a limited area of the ponds and is prone to altering environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, pressure). This fact raises the need to validate flux chamber measurements. In this study, we apply an inverse-dispersion modeling technique with evacuated canister sampling to validate the flux-chamber measurements. This modeling technique applies an initial and arbitrary emission rate to estimate pollutant concentrations at pre-defined receptors, and adjusts the emission rate until the estimated pollutant concentrations approximates measured concentrations at the receptors. The derived emission rates are then compared with flux-chamber measurements and differences are analyzed. Additionally, we investigate the applicability of the WATER9 wastewater emission model for the estimation of VOC emissions from produced-water ponds in the Uintah Basin. WATER9 estimates the emission of each gas based on properties of the gas, its concentration in the waste water, and the characteristics of the influent and treatment units. Results of VOC emission estimations using inverse-dispersion and WATER9 modeling techniques will be reported.

  11. Volatile organic compound emissions from dry mill fuel ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Brady, Daniel; Pratt, Gregory C

    2007-09-01

    Ethanol fuel production is growing rapidly in the rural Midwest, and this growth presents potential environmental impacts. In 2002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) entered into enforcement actions with 12 fuel ethanol plants in Minnesota. The enforcement actions uncovered underreported emissions and resulted in consent decrees that required pollution control equipment be installed. A key component of the consent decrees was a requirement to conduct emissions tests for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with the goal of improving the characterization and control of emissions. The conventional VOC stack test method was thought to underquantify total VOC emissions from ethanol plants. A hybrid test method was also developed that involved quantification of individual VOC species. The resulting database of total and speciated VOC emissions from 10 fuel ethanol plants is relatively small, but it is the most extensive to date and has been used to develop and gauge compliance with permit limits and to estimate health risks in Minnesota. Emissions were highly variable among facilities and emissions units. In addition to the variability, the small number of samples and the presence of many values below detection limits complicate the analysis of the data. To account for these issues, a nested bootstrap procedure on the Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate means and upper confidence limits. In general, the fermentation scrubbers and fluid bed coolers emitted the largest mass of VOC emissions. Across most facilities and emissions units ethanol was the pollutant emitted at the highest rate. Acetaldehyde, acetic acid, and ethyl acetate were also important emissions from some units. Emissions of total VOCs, ethanol, and some other species appeared to be a function of the beer feed rate, although the relationship was not reliable enough to develop a production rate-based emissions factor.

  12. Source signature of volatile organic compounds from oil and natural gas operations in northeastern Colorado.

    PubMed

    Gilman, J B; Lerner, B M; Kuster, W C; de Gouw, J A

    2013-02-05

    An extensive set of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was measured at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in winter 2011 in order to investigate the composition and influence of VOC emissions from oil and natural gas (O&NG) operations in northeastern Colorado. BAO is 30 km north of Denver and is in the southwestern section of Wattenberg Field, one of Colorado's most productive O&NG fields. We compare VOC concentrations at BAO to those of other U.S. cities and summertime measurements at two additional sites in northeastern Colorado, as well as the composition of raw natural gas from Wattenberg Field. These comparisons show that (i) the VOC source signature associated with O&NG operations can be clearly differentiated from urban sources dominated by vehicular exhaust, and (ii) VOCs emitted from O&NG operations are evident at all three measurement sites in northeastern Colorado. At BAO, the reactivity of VOCs with the hydroxyl radical (OH) was dominated by C(2)-C(6) alkanes due to their remarkably large abundances (e.g., mean propane = 27.2 ppbv). Through statistical regression analysis, we estimate that on average 55 ± 18% of the VOC-OH reactivity was attributable to emissions from O&NG operations indicating that these emissions are a significant source of ozone precursors.

  13. Global comparison of VOC and CO observations in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schneidemesser, Erika; Monks, Paul S.; Plass-Duelmer, Christian

    2010-12-01

    Speciated volatile organic compound (VOC) and carbon monoxide (CO) measurements from the Marylebone Road site in central London from 1998 through 2008 are presented. Long-term trends show statistically significant decreases for all the VOCs considered, ranging from -3% to -26% per year. Carbon monoxide decreased by -12% per year over the measurement period. The VOC trends observed at the kerbside site in London showed greater rates of decline relative to trends from monitoring sites in rural England (Harwell) and a remote high-altitude site (Hohenpeissenberg), which showed decreases for individual VOCs from -2% to -13% per year. Over the same 1998 through 2008 period VOC to CO ratios for London remained steady, an indication that emissions reduction measures affected the measured compounds equally. Relative trends comparing VOC to CO ratios between Marylebone Road and Hohenpeissenberg showed greater similarities than absolute trends, indicating that emissions reductions measures in urban areas are reflected by regional background locations. A comparison of VOC mixing ratios and VOC to CO ratios was undertaken for London and other global cities. Carbon monoxide and VOCs (alkanes greater than C 5, alkenes, and aromatics) were found to be strongly correlated (>0.8) in the Annex I countries, whereas only ethene and ethyne were strongly correlated with CO in the non-Annex I countries. The correlation results indicate significant emissions from traffic-related sources in Annex I countries, and a much larger influence of other sources, such as industry and LPG-related sources in non-Annex I countries. Yearly benzene to ethyne ratios for London from 2000 to 2008 ranged from 0.17 to 0.29 and compared well with previous results from US cities and three global megacities.

  14. Usefulness of toxicological validation of VOCs catalytic degradation by air-liquid interface exposure system.

    PubMed

    Al Zallouha, Margueritta; Landkocz, Yann; Brunet, Julien; Cousin, Renaud; Genty, Eric; Courcot, Dominique; Siffert, Stéphane; Shirali, Pirouz; Billet, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Toluene is one of the most used Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in the industry despite its major health impacts. Catalytic oxidation represents an efficient remediation technique in order to reduce its emission directly at the source, but it can release by-products. To complete the classical performance assessment using dedicated analytical chemistry methods, we propose to perform an untargeted toxicological validation on two efficient catalysts. Using biological system allows integrating synergy and antagonism in toxic effects of emitted VOCs and by-products, often described in case of multi-exposure condition. Catalysts Pd/α-Al2O3 and Pd/γ-Al2O3 developed for the oxidation of toluene were both coupled to a Vitrocell(®) Air-Liquid Interface (ALI) system, for exposure of human A549 lung cells during 1h to toluene or to catalysts exhaust before quantification of xenobiotics metabolizing enzymes. This study validated initially the Vitrocell(®) as an innovative, direct and dynamic model of ALI exposure in the assessment of the performances of new catalysts, showing the presence of chemically undetected by-products. The comparison of the two catalysts showed then that fewer organic compounds metabolizing genes were induced by Pd/γ-Al2O3 in comparison to Pd/α-Al2O3, suggesting that Pd/γ-Al2O3 is more efficient for toluene total oxidation from a toxicological point of view.

  15. Effects of liquid VOC concentration and salt content on partitioning equilibrium of hydrophilic VOC at air-sweat interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wen-Hsi; Chu, Fu-Sui; Su, Tzy-I.

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) must initially be absorbed by sweat on the surface of skin for human VOC dermal exposure. The partitioning equilibrium at the air-sweat interface is given by p=Cg*/C, where pc is the partitioning coefficient, and Cg* is the gaseous concentration in equilibrium with the aqueous VOC concentration ( CL) at a constant water temperature ( Tw). A series of thermodynamic functions of Cg*(C,T) are presented, as well as the values of pc, and the heat of gaseous-liquid phase transfer (Δ Htr) for tested VOCs, including iso-propanol (IPA, CL=12-120 mg L -1) and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK, CL=10-80 mg L -1) to determine the effects of liquid VOC concentration and salt contents of sweat on pc of hydrophilic VOCs. Experimental data reveal that the pc values of IPA and MEK drop as the liquid VOC concentrations increasing from 10 to 120 mg L -1. However, sodium salt content in human sweat (sodium chloride and sodium lactate) induces the effect of salt, indicating the increase in pc. Notably, neither urea nor ammonia in human sweat increase pc. Artificial sweat, consisting of sodium chloride 0.47%, urea 0.05%, ammonia 0.004% and sodium lactate 0.6%, was used to evaluate the increase in the pc values of IPA and MEK. The liquid VOC concentration effect simultaneously develops together with the salt effect on the partition at the interface of air-sweat for hydrophilic VOC solutions. The pc values of IPA for artificial sweat decrease as much as 32.5% as CL increases from 12 to 120 mg L -1 at 300 K, and those of MEK drop by as much as 70.9% as CL increases from 10 to 80 mg L -1 at 300 K. This investigation provides a basis for elucidating the assessment of human dermal exposure to hydrophilic VOCs.

  16. Emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds from semiconductor manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Chein, HungMin; Chen, Tzu Ming

    2003-08-01

    A huge amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is produced and emitted with waste gases from semiconductor manufacturing processes, such as cleaning, etching, and developing. VOC emissions from semiconductor factories located at Science-Based Industrial Park, Hsin-chu, Taiwan, were measured and characterized in this study. A total of nine typical semiconductor fabricators (fabs) were monitored over a 12-month period (October 2000-September 2001). A flame ionization analyzer was employed to measure the VOC emission rate continuously in a real-time fashion. The amount of chemical use was adopted from the data that were reported to the Environmental Protection Bureau in Hsin-chu County as per the regulation of the Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration. The VOC emission factor, defined as the emission rate (kg/month) divided by the amount of chemical use (L/month), was determined to be 0.038 +/- 0.016 kg/L. A linear regression equation is proposed to fit the data with the correlation coefficient (R2)=0.863. The emission profiles of VOCs, which were drawn using the gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer analysis method, show that isopropyl alcohol is the dominant compound in most of the fabs.

  17. Thermal response and recyclability of poly(stearylacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) gel as a VOCs absorbent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of absorbent materials for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is in demand for a variety of environmental applications including protective barriers for VOCs point sources. One of the challenges for the currently available VOCs absorbents is their recyclability. In this study, we syn...

  18. Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds by GC-MS in Rural Alabama during the 2013 SOAS Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, A.; Olson, K. F.; De Gouw, J. A.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a large class of chemicals that are emitted into the atmosphere by both human and natural biological activity. VOCs are comprised of both precursor compounds that drive oxidation chemistry and oxidation products. Extensive measurements of VOCs can help determine the relationships between precursor and secondary compounds, and the relative effects of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions on climate and air quality. The Southeastern US is a region of particular research interest, as it is strongly affected by both anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs. As part of the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol intensive study (SOAS), an in-situ gas-chromatograph mass spectrometer (GC-MS) was deployed at a forested site in rural Alabama. This site was dominated by biogenic emissions, but was also subject to anthropogenic influence. The GC-MS measured a large number of primary and secondary anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs in the C2 to C11 range, with a time resolution of 30 minutes. Measured compounds of particular interest include isoprene, speciated monoterpenes, methylvinylketone (MVK), methacrolein, C2 to C11 alkanes, lightweight unsaturated hydrocarbons including ethene, propene, and acetylene, C6 to C9 aromatics, C1 to C7 oxygenated VOCS (alcohols, ketones, aldehydes), halogenated VOCs, acetonitrile, and several sulfur-containing compounds. A summary of these measurements will be presented. This summary will include characterization of various anthropogenic and biogenic sources sampled at the site, relationships of the most important VOCs to basic meteorological conditions, and diurnal profiles that illustrate shifts in photochemistry and emissions. These GCMS measurements will provide key information for constraints in models and to aid in the interpretation of data from other instruments.

  19. The effects of operating conditions on semivolatile organic compounds emitted from light-duty, gasoline-powered motor vehicles

    EPA Science Inventory

    A thermal extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TE-GC-MS) method was used to quantitatively examine organic compounds in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) collected from light-duty, gasoline-powered vehicle (LDGV) exhaust. Emissions were analyzed from a subset of 18 vehi...

  20. EVALUATION OF SINK EFFECTS ON VOCS FROM A LATEX PAINT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sink strength of two common indoor materials, a carpet and a gypsum board, was evaluated by environmental chamber tests with four volatile organic compounds (VOCs): propylene glycol, ethylene glycol, 2-(2-butoxyethoxy)ethanol (BEE), and texanol. These oxygenated compounds rep...

  1. Volatile organic compounds from feces and their potential for diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Garner, Catherine E; Smith, Stephen; de Lacy Costello, Ben; White, Paul; Spencer, Robert; Probert, Chris S J; Ratcliffe, Norman M

    2007-06-01

    Little is known about the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in feces and their potential health consequences. Patients and healthcare professionals have observed that feces often smell abnormal during gastrointestinal disease. The aim of this work was to define the volatiles emitted from the feces of healthy donors and patients with gastrointestinal disease. Our hypotheses were that i) VOCs would be shared in health; ii) VOCs would be constant in individuals; and iii) specific changes in VOCs would occur in disease. Volatile emissions in health were defined in a cohort and a longitudinal study. Subsequently, the pattern of volatiles found in the cohort study were compared to that found from patients with ulcerative colitis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium difficile. Volatiles from feces were collected by solid-phase microextraction and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In the cohort study, 297 volatiles were identified. In all samples, ethanoic, butanoic, pentanoic acids, benzaldehyde, ethanal, carbon disulfide, dimethyldisulfide, acetone, 2-butanone, 2,3-butanedione, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, indole, and 4-methylphenol were found. Forty-four compounds were shared by 80% of subjects. In the longitudinal study, 292 volatiles were identified, with some inter and intra subject variations in VOC concentrations with time. When compared to healthy donors, volatile patterns from feces of patients with ulcerative colitis, C. difficile, and C. jejuni were each significantly different. These findings could lead the way to the development of a rapid diagnostic device based on VOC detection.

  2. Analyses of volatile organic compounds from human skin

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, M.; Wysocki, C.J.; Leyden, J.J.; Spielman, A.I.; Sun, X.; Preti, G.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background Human skin emits a variety of volatile metabolites, many of them odorous. Much previous work has focused upon chemical structure and biogenesis of metabolites produced in the axillae (underarms), which are a primary source of human body odour. Nonaxillary skin also harbours volatile metabolites, possibly with different biological origins than axillary odorants. Objectives To take inventory of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the upper back and forearm skin, and assess their relative quantitative variation across 25 healthy subjects. Methods Two complementary sampling techniques were used to obtain comprehensive VOC profiles, viz., solid-phase micro extraction and solvent extraction. Analyses were performed using both gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. Results Nearly 100 compounds were identified, some of which varied with age. The VOC profiles of the upper back and forearm within a subject were, for the most part, similar, although there were notable differences. Conclusions The natural variation in nonaxillary skin odorants described in this study provides a baseline of compounds we have identified from both endogenous and exogenous sources. Although complex, the profiles of volatile constituents suggest that the two body locations share a considerable number of compounds, but both quantitative and qualitative differences are present. In addition, quantitative changes due to ageing are also present. These data may provide future investigators of skin VOCs with a baseline against which any abnormalities can be viewed in searching for biomarkers of skin diseases. PMID:18637798

  3. Chemical composition of major VOC emission sources in the Seoul atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Na, Kwangsam; Kim, Yong Pyo; Moon, Il; Moon, Kil-Choo

    2004-04-01

    This paper describes a chemical analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for five emission sources in Seoul. The source categories included motor vehicle exhaust, gasoline evaporation, paint solvents, natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). These sources were selected because they have been known to emit significant quantities of VOCs in the Seoul area (more than 5% of the total emission inventory). Chemical compositions of the five emission sources are presented for a group of 45 C2-C9 VOCs. Motor vehicle exhaust profiles were developed by conducting an urban tunnel study. These emissions profiles were distinguished from the other emission profiles by a high weight percentage of butanes over seasons and propane in the wintertime. It was found that this is due to the wide use of butane-fueled vehicles. To obtain gasoline vapor profiles, gasoline samples from five major brands for each season were selected. The brands were blended on the basis of the marketshare of these brands in Seoul area. Raoult's law was used to calculate gasoline evaporative compositions based on the liquid gasoline compositions. The measured and estimated gasoline vapor compositions were found to be in good agreement. Vehicle and gasoline evaporation profiles were made over seasons because of the seasonal change in their compositions. Paint solvent emissions profiles were produced based on a product-use survey and sales figures. These profiles are a composite of four major oil-based paints and thinning solvent. The source profile of natural gas was made on a methane-free basis. It was found that Ethane and propane were the most abundant compounds accounting for 95% of the natural gas composition. LPG was largely composed of propane and ethane and the remaining components were minor contributors.

  4. Gap-filling strategies for annual VOC flux data sets.

    PubMed

    Bamberger, I; Hörtnagl, L; Walser, M; Hansel, A; Wohlfahrt, G

    2013-11-01

    Up to now the limited knowledge about the exchange of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) between the biosphere and the atmosphere is one of the factors which hinders more accurate climate predictions. Complete long-term flux data sets of several VOCs to quantify the annual exchange and validate recent VOC models are basically not available. In combination with long-term VOC flux measurements the application of gap-filling routines is inevitable in order to replace missing data and make an important step towards a better understanding of the VOC ecosystem-atmosphere exchange on longer time scales. We performed VOC flux measurements above a mountain meadow in Austria during two complete growing seasons (from snowmelt in spring to snow reestablishment in late autumn) and used this data set to test the performance of four different gap-filling routines, mean diurnal variation (MDV), mean gliding window (MGW), look up tables (LUT) and linear interpolation (LIP), in terms of their ability to replace missing flux data in order to obtain reliable VOC sums. According to our findings the MDV routine was outstanding with regard to the minimization of the gap-filling error for both years and all quantified VOCs. The other gap-filling routines, which performed gap-filling on 24 h average values, introduced considerably larger uncertainties. The error which was introduced by the application of the different filling routines increased linearly with the number of data gaps. Although average VOC fluxes measured during the winter period (complete snow coverage) were close to zero, these were highly variable and the filling of the winter period resulted in considerably higher uncertainties compared to the application of gap-filling during the measurement period. The annual patterns of the overall cumulative fluxes for the quantified VOCs showed a completely different behavior in 2009, which was an exceptional year due to the occurrence of a severe hailstorm, compared to 2011. Methanol

  5. Influence of control parameters in VOCs evolution during MSW trimming residues composting.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Rodríguez, Margarita; Ruiz-Montoya, Mercedes; Giraldez, Inmaculada; López, Rafael; Madejón, Engracia; Díaz, Manuel Jesús

    2011-12-28

    The influence of control parameters (aeration, moisture, and C/N ratio) during composting of a municipal solid waste (MSW)-legume-trimming residue (LTR) mixture was studied at a pilot plant scale. Factors measured included the composition of the main volatile organic carbons (VOCs) emitted including limonene, β-pinene, 2-butanone, undecane, phenol, toluene, and dimethyl disulfide. Polynomial models were found to reproduce the experimental results with errors at less than 10%. The relative influence of the independent variables on temperature and selected VOCs followed the order: aeration > moisture > C/N. A high aeration rate results in higher (strong negative effect) values on selected VOCs emissions (41-71% on emitted VOCs variation). Moisture had a positive and negative effect depending on the selected VOCs. A high C/N ratio caused lower production of VOCs except for undecane and 2-butanone. Providing an aerobic environment (0.05 Lair kg(-1) min(-1)), high C/N ratios (>50), and medium moisture (55%) minimize emitted VOCs during MSW composting, ultimately resulting in less odors in the surrounding environment.

  6. Volatile organic compounds from fungi isolated after hurricane katrina induce developmental defects and apoptosis in a Drosophila melanogaster model.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, Arati A; Bennett, Joan W

    2015-05-01

    In previous work, our laboratory developed a Drosophila model for studying the adverse effects of fungal volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by growing cultures of molds. In this report, we have extended these studies and compared the toxic effects of fungal VOCs emitted from living cultures of four molds isolated after Hurricane Katrina from a flooded home in New Orleans. Strains of Aspergillus, Mucor, Penicillium, and Trichoderma were grown with wild-type larvae and the toxic effects of volatile products on the developmental stages of Drosophila larvae were evaluated. Furthermore, heterozygous mutants of Drosophila carrying the apoptotic genes, reaper and dronc, were used to assess the role of apoptosis in fungal VOCs mediated toxicity. Third-instar larvae of Drosophila carrying these apoptotic genes were exposed to fungal VOCs emitted from growing mold cultures for 10 days. The larval strains carrying apoptopic genes survived longer than the control wild type larvae; moreover, of those that survived, heterozygous reaper and dronc strains progressed to pupae and adult phases more rapidly, suggesting that fungal VOCs may induce apoptotic changes in flies. These data lend support to the use of Drosophila as an inexpensive and genetically versatile toxicological model to investigate the mechanistic basis for some of the human illnesses/symptoms associated with exposure to mold-contaminated indoor air, especially after hurricanes.

  7. Measurement of VOCs in vehicle exhaust by extractive FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Bernhard; Paar, H.; Sturm, Peter J.

    2001-02-01

    12 The detection of benzene and other organic compounds in vehicle exhaust by FT-IR-spectroscopy is seriously limited by the strong interference of carbon dioxide and the rather weak absorption coefficient of the gases. Therefore, a measurement device was developed which separates the components of interest (mostly VOCs) from carbon dioxide, water and nitric oxide. In addition the VOCs have to be pre- concentrated. To avoid condensation of VOCs the measurements have to take place at higher temperatures. The vehicle exhaust was led through an activated charcoal tube where the organic compounds were adsorbed. Afterwards, the charcoal tube was heated in a furnace, the VOCs were desorbed thermically and were carried by (heated) nitrogen into a gas cell with a path-length of 10 m where the concentration of the different species was measured. With the help of this measurement device a lot of VOC- components like benzene, toluene, and xylene were detected successfully. Measurements were performed on an engine test bed and a chassis dynamometer for heavy duty vehicles. The detection limit of most of the VOCs was about 2 to 3 ppb for a sampling time of 20 min. Calibration measurements showed an accuracy of 15%.

  8. On speciation of VOC localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Chang, J.; Wang, J.

    2011-12-01

    Most of the gas-phase chemical mechanisms successfully used in gas-phase atmospheric chemical processes, such as CBM-Z, RADM2 or SAPRC-07, treat hundreds of VOC as lumped organic species by their chemical characteristics. Most of the model results are compared with total VOC observations, and it is not appropriate to compare lumped VOC simulations to observations even if there are separate VOC observations like Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS). While the PAMS Air Quality Model (PAMS-AQM) is developed, separate organic species observed by PAMS without a doubt can be directly compared with model simulations. From the past case study (Chen et al., 2010), it shows a major and very significant finding in that detailed emissions of VOC in the existing emissions database are often in error in Taiwan or other countries due to the fact that the annual VOC emissions are classified into hundreds of species-specific emissions by using the speciation factors following the protocol of the U.S. EPA (AP-42). Based on all PAMS observations from 2006-2007, four base cases with well comparable meteorological simulations were selected for the unified correction for all sources in Taiwan. After the PAMS species emissions are modified, the diurnal patterns and simulation-observation correlation for most of the PAMS species are improved, and the concentration levels are more comparable with those of observations. More expanded case studies also revealed necessary corrections for the PAMS species emissions. Sensitivity analyses for lumped organic species with modified PAMS species emissions are also conducted. After modified PAMS emissions are added into lumped VOC emissions, there is an increase of only 10% of totally VOC emissions. While the sources of the lumped VOC emissions are changed, ozone formation shows no significant change with modified lumped VOC emissions. This helps to support the argument that for ozone simulation, the lumped VOC processes balance out

  9. Modeling unsteady-state VOC transport in simulated waste drums. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Liekhus, K.J.; Gresham, G.L.; Peterson, E.S.; Rae, C.; Hotz, N.J.; Connolly, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    This report is a revision of an EG&G Idaho informal report originally titled Modeling VOC Transport in Simulated Waste Drums. A volatile organic compound (VOC) transport model has been developed to describe unsteady-state VOC permeation and diffusion within a waste drum. Model equations account for three primary mechanisms for VOC transport from a void volume within the drum. These mechanisms are VOC permeation across a polymer boundary, VOC diffusion across an opening in a volume boundary, and VOC solubilization in a polymer boundary. A series of lab-scale experiments was performed in which the VOC concentration was measured in simulated waste drums under different conditions. A lab-scale simulated waste drum consisted of a sized-down 55-gal metal drum containing a modified rigid polyethylene drum liner. Four polyethylene bags were sealed inside a large polyethylene bag, supported by a wire cage, and placed inside the drum liner. The small bags were filled with VOC-air gas mixture and the VOC concentration was measured throughout the drum over a period of time. Test variables included the type of VOC-air gas mixtures introduced into the small bags, the small bag closure type, and the presence or absence of a variable external heat source. Model results were calculated for those trials where the permeability had been measured.

  10. Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products: Progress report No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Boerner, J.; Su, Wei; Banerjee, Sujit; Shmulsky, Rubin; Thompson, Ashlie; Ingram, Leonard; Conners, Terry

    1997-03-01

    Studies on the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from wood or wood products were conducted. Steam-induced extraction of VOC from oriented strand board (OSB) was studied using a tube furnace at 130 C which resulted in over 50% removal in 30 minutes. RF treatment of softwood lumber removed up to 68% of VOC in 20 minutes. Studies on the transport of moisture in wood confirmed that transport is greatest in the transverse surface, followed by the tangential and radial faces.

  11. A review of aqueous-phase VOC transport in modern landfill liners.

    PubMed

    Edil, Tuncer B

    2003-01-01

    Leachates from municipal solid waste (MSW) and hazardous waste landfills contain a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in addition to inorganic compounds. VOCs have been shown to migrate and contaminate the surrounding environment and impair the use of groundwater. Therefore, the effectiveness of modern landfill liner systems to minimize migration of VOCs is of concern. Most modern landfills employ a composite liner consisting of a geomembrane overlying a compacted clay liner or a geosynthetic clay liner. The geomembrane is often believed to be the primary barrier to contaminant transport. However, for VOCs, the clay component usually controls the rate of transport since VOCs are shown to diffuse through geomembrane at appreciable rates. Additionally, analyses have shown that transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) generally is more critical than transport of inorganic compounds (e.g., toxic heavy metals), even though VOCs are often found at lower concentrations in leachates. Therefore, the effectiveness of modern landfill liner systems to minimize migration of VOCs and transport of VOCs through clay liners and modeling of transport through composite liners merit scrutiny. This paper presents a review of recent research by the author and others on these topics. A systematic and comprehensive approach to determine mass transport parameters for transport of VOCs in liquid phase through compacted clay liners, geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs), and geomembranes has enabled to develop realistic models to predict mass flux of VOCs through modern composite liners and provide a quantitative basis to evaluate potential for transport of dissolved VOCs and the equivalency of different composite liners.

  12. [Status and needs research for on-line monitoring of VOCs emissions from stationary sources].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Zhou, Gang; Zhong, Qi; Zhao, Jin-Bao; Yang, Kai

    2013-12-01

    Based on atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) pollution control requirements during the twelfth-five year plan and the current status of monitoring and management in the world, instrumental architecture and technical characteristics of continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS) for VOCs emission from stationary sources are investigated and researched. Technological development needs of VOCs emission on-line monitoring techniques for stationary sources in China are proposed from the system sampling pretreatment technology and analytical measurement techniques.

  13. The effects of operating conditions on semivolatile organic compounds emitted from light-duty, gasoline-powered motor vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrington, Jason S.; Hays, Michael D.; George, Barbara J.; Baldauf, Richard W.

    2012-07-01

    A thermal extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TE-GC-MS) method was utilized to quantitatively examine semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) collected from light-duty, gasoline-powered vehicle (LDGV) exhaust. Emissions were analyzed from a subset of 18 vehicles tested in the Kansas City Light-Duty Vehicle Emissions Study (KCVES). The KCVES applied the LA92 Unified Driving Cycle (UDC), consisting of "cold start", "hot stabilized running", and "warm start" phases. The sensitivity of the TE-GC-MS analysis provided the opportunity to examine the emission rates and proportions of SVOCs (including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), hopanes, and steranes) in PM2.5 on an individual vehicle basis for each UDC phase. Mean target SVOC emissions rates of 5.01 μg km-1, 0.28 μg km-1, and 0.63 μg km-1 were reported for the cold start, hot stabilized running, and warm start phases, respectively. Operating conditions as depicted by each UDC phase significantly affected SVOC emission rates and proportions in PM2.5. The cold start phase emission rates were significantly higher than the hot stabilized running and warm start phases for 89% of the target SVOCs. An increase in SVOC proportions in PM2.5 was observed during the warm start phase compared with the cold start and hot stabilized running phase. This observation was significant for 31% of the target compounds, including chrysene, benzo[a]anthracene, and pyrene. Vehicles tested in both summer and winter provided emissions data describing ambient temperature effects. Emission rates were significantly higher in the winter for 92% of the target SVOCs. Until now, observations of specific SVOCs in motor vehicle emissions produced under changing operating conditions were scant. Such emissions data may be useful for emissions modeling, source apportionment studies, and human exposure assessments.

  14. Organic compounds in PM 2.5 emitted from fireplace and woodstove combustion of typical Portuguese wood species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Cátia; Alves, Célia; Fernandes, Ana Patrícia; Monteiro, Cristina; Tarelho, Luís; Evtyugina, Margarita; Pio, Casimiro

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study is the further characterisation of PM 2.5 emissions from the residential wood combustion of common woods grown in Portugal. This new research extends to eight the number of biomass fuels studied and tries to understand the differences that the burning appliance (fireplace versus woodstove) and the combustion temperature (cold and hot start) have on emissions. Pinus pinaster (Maritime pine), Eucalyptus globulus (eucalypt), Quercus suber (cork oak), Acacia longifolia (Golden wattle), Quercus faginea (Portuguese oak), Olea europea (Olive), Quercus ilex rotundifolia (Holm oak) and briquettes produced from forest biomass waste were used in the combustion tests. Determinations included fine particle emission factors, carbonaceous content (OC and EC) by a thermal-optical transmission technique and detailed identification and quantification of organic compounds by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Fine particle emission factors from the woodstove were lower than those from the fireplace. For both combustion appliances, the OC/EC ratio was higher in "cold start" tests (1.56 ± 0.95 for woodstove and 2.03 ± 1.34 for fireplace). These "cold start" OC/EC values were, respectively, for the woodstove and the fireplace, 51% and 69% higher than those obtained in "hot start" experiments. The chromatographically resolved organics included n-alkanes, n-alkenes, PAHs, n-alkanals, ketones, n-alkanols, terpenoids, triterpenoids, phenolic compounds, phytosterols, alcohols, n-alkanoic acids, n-di-acids, unsaturated acids and alkyl esters of acids. The smoke emission rate and composition varied widely depending on fuel type, burning appliance and combustion temperature.

  15. Assessing HAP and VOC emissions from gasoline service stations

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Gas stations are not specifically regulated under the national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (NESHAP) or new source performance standards (NSPS) programs, and it is unlikely that a station would qualify as a major source by emitting 100 tons per year (tpy) or more of any single air pollutant. Determining gas stations` potential to emit VOCs and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) may become more important as the focus of the Part 70 program shifts from major sources to area (nonmajor) sources. HAP and VOC emissions from gas stations are generated primarily from four sources: (1) tank filling losses, (2) tank breathing losses, (3) automobile refueling displacement losses, and (4) gasoline spillage during dispensing. Each of these sources is discussed, and emission estimates are listed. 3 refs., 3 tabs.

  16. Use of a Dynamic Headspace GC-MS Method for the Study of Volatile Organic Compounds in Polyethylene Packaging. An Undergraduate Experiment in Polymer Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, Steven C.; Casey, R. John; Orbell, John D.; Bigger, Stephen W.

    2000-12-01

    A novel experiment is described for introducing senior undergraduate physical chemistry and food science students to a technique commonly used to identify volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted from polymers at ambient temperatures. The VOCs in food-grade low-density polyethylene (LDPE) pellets are purged with nitrogen and trapped at ambient temperature on a Tenax-GC (2,6-diphenyl-p-phenylene oxide polymer) sorbent. The VOCs are liberated using dynamic headspace desorption and are separated and identified using the technique of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The relationship between the chromatographic peak area of a given VOC and the temperature of desorption, as well as the relationship between the total chromatographic area and the temperature of desorption, are quantitatively modeled using a modified form of the van't Hoff isochore.

  17. [Study on volatile organic compounds emission of straw combustion and management countermeasure in Wuhan city].

    PubMed

    Huang, Bi-Jie

    2013-12-01

    Straw combustion is an important anthropogenic source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in China. Emissions of VOCs from straw combustion significantly affect climate forcing and human health. A reliable estimation of VOCs emission from the source is the important prerequisite for emission impact assessment and control strategy in the urban or regional areas. VOCs emissions from straw combustion in Wuhan City and the districts were estimated by factor analysis method, which was based on the yield of major farm crops in the period of 2005-2011. Moreover, Cultivated-land Emission Intensity (Ie) and Regional Emission Intensity (Ir) were also calculated. VOCs Emissions from straw combustion in Wuhan City were (3,163 +/- 139) t in the period of 2005-2011; Ie and Ir was (1.52 +/- 0.06) t x km(-2) and (0.37 +/- 0.02) t x km(-2), respectively; Straw combustion of grain and oilseed crops was the main source of the emissions; 21 kinds of VOCs should be listed as the priority control pollutants for straw combustion in Wuhan City. The order of successively decreasing VOCs emission of districts in Wuhan City was Huangpi District, Xinzhou District, Jiangxia District, Caidian District, Hannan District, and Dongxihu District, the former 4 districts contributed to almost 90% VOCs emissions of the Wuhan City. Huangpi District, Xinzhou District, Jiangxia District, and Hannan District should be regarded as priority control areas of VOCs emission from straw combustion in Wuhan City. Much attention should be paid to Jiangxia District, which was nationally representative. Ie and Ir are important basic data for ecological risk assessment of some kind of pollutants emitted from straw combustion in the urban or regional areas. Furthermore, straw utilization model according to agricultural cyclic economy is a feasible way to cope with the environmental problem of straw combustion.

  18. In Vivo Volatile Organic Compound Signatures of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Andreas; Trefz, Phillip; Fischer, Sina; Klepik, Klaus; Walter, Gudrun; Steffens, Markus; Ziller, Mario; Schubert, Jochen K.; Reinhold, Petra; Köhler, Heike; Miekisch, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of a chronic enteric disease of ruminants. Available diagnostic tests are complex and slow. In vitro, volatile organic compound (VOC) patterns emitted from MAP cultures mirrored bacterial growth and enabled distinction of different strains. This study was intended to determine VOCs in vivo in the controlled setting of an animal model. VOCs were pre-concentrated from breath and feces of 42 goats (16 controls and 26 MAP-inoculated animals) by means of needle trap microextraction (breath) and solid phase microextraction (feces) and analyzed by gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry. Analyses were performed 18, 29, 33, 41 and 48 weeks after inoculation. MAP-specific antibodies and MAP-specific interferon-γ-response were determined from blood. Identities of all marker-VOCs were confirmed through analysis of pure reference substances. Based on detection limits in the high pptV and linear ranges of two orders of magnitude more than 100 VOCs could be detected in breath and in headspace over feces. Twenty eight substances differed between inoculated and non-inoculated animals. Although patterns of most prominent substances such as furans, oxygenated substances and hydrocarbons changed in the course of infection, differences between inoculated and non-inoculated animals remained detectable at any time for 16 substances in feces and 3 VOCs in breath. Differences of VOC concentrations over feces reflected presence of MAP bacteria. Differences in VOC profiles from breath were linked to the host response in terms of interferon-γ-response. In a perspective in vivo analysis of VOCs may help to overcome limitations of established tests. PMID:25915653

  19. HENRY'S LAW CONSTANTS AND MICELLAR PARTITIONING OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SURFACTANT SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Partitioning of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into surfactant micelles affects the apparent vapor-liquid equilibrium of VOCs in surfactant solutions. This partitioning will complicate removal of VOCs from surfactant solutions by standard separation processes. Headspace expe...

  20. Emission of biogenic VOCs from trees in the Lower Fraser Valley, B.C.

    SciTech Connect

    Drewitt, G.; Styen, D.G.; Gillespie, T.; Curren, K.

    1996-12-31

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC`s) are known to participate in the formation of ground level ozone. It is possible that in the areas with high emission rates from local vegetation, biogenic hydrocarbons can be of comparable importance to anthropogenic hydrocarbons in the production of this secondary air pollutant. In order to implement an effective abatement strategy, the relative importance of these biogenic emissions to the atmospheric chemistry of an area must be known. The Lower Fraser Valley located in the southwestern corner of British Columbia experiences episodes of elevated ground level ozone concentrations during the summer under the influence of a stationary high pressure system and characterized by lush coastal rain forest vegetation and extensive agriculture surfaces. During the summer of 1995 a field campaign to determine the emission rate from natural sources in the region was conducted. The emission rate from natural sources in the region was conducted. The mission rate of biogenic hydrocarbons from four tree species, Western Red Cedar (Thuja Plicata), Cottonwood (Populus Balsemifera), Douglass Fir (Pseudotsuga Menziesii) and Hemlock (Tsuga Heterophylla) was measured in the field. It was found that Cottonwood trees emit isoprene at a rate approaching 100 times greater than any of the other three species.

  1. Development of a multi-VOC reference material for quality assurance in materials emission testing.

    PubMed

    Nohr, Michael; Horn, Wolfgang; Jann, Oliver; Richter, Matthias; Lorenz, Wilhelm

    2015-04-01

    Emission test chamber measurement is necessary to proof building materials as sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The results of such measurements are used to evaluate materials and label them according to their potential to emit harmful substances, polluting indoor air. If only labelled materials were installed indoors, this would improve indoor air quality and prevent negative impacts on human health. Because of the complex testing procedure, reference materials for the quality assurance are mandatory. Currently, there is a lack of such materials because most building products show a broad variation of emissions even within one batch. A previous study indicates lacquers, mixed with volatile organic pollutants, as reproducible emission source for a wide range of substances. In the present study, the curing of the lacquer-VOC mixture inside micro-chambers was optimised. Therefore, the humidity and the chamber flow were varied. Typical indoor air pollutants with a wide range of volatilities, for example, styrene, n-hexadecane, dimethyl and dibutyl phthalate were selected. It turned out that, under optimised curing parameters inside the micro-chamber, their emission can be reproduced with variations of less than 10 %. With this, a next important step towards a reference material for emission testing was achieved.

  2. Efficient control of odors and VOC emissions via activated carbon technology.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Farhana; Kim, James; Huang, Ruey; Nu, Huong Ton; Lorenzo, Vlad

    2014-07-01

    This research study was undertaken to enhance the efficiency and economy of carbon scrubbers in controlling odors and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at the wastewater collection and treatment facilities of the Bureau of Sanitation, City of Los Angeles. The butane activity and hydrogen sulfide breakthrough capacity of activated carbon were assessed. Air streams were measured for odorous gases and VOCs and removal efficiency (RE) determined. Carbon towers showed average to excellent removal of odorous compounds, VOCs, and siloxanes; whereas, wet scrubbers demonstrated good removal of odorous compounds but low to negative removal of VOCs. It was observed that the relative humidity and empty bed contact time are one of the most important operating parameters of carbon towers impacting the pollutant RE. Regular monitoring of activated carbon and VOCs has resulted in useful information on carbon change-out frequency, packing recommendations, and means to improve performance of carbon towers.

  3. The Venus flytrap attracts insects by the release of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Scheerer, Ursel; Kruse, Jörg; Burzlaff, Tim; Honsel, Anne; Alfarraj, Saleh; Georgiev, Plamen; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Ghirardo, Andrea; Kreuzer, Ines; Hedrich, Rainer; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2014-02-01

    Does Dionaea muscipula, the Venus flytrap, use a particular mechanism to attract animal prey? This question was raised by Charles Darwin 140 years ago, but it remains unanswered. This study tested the hypothesis that Dionaea releases volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to allure prey insects. For this purpose, olfactory choice bioassays were performed to elucidate if Dionaea attracts Drosophila melanogaster. The VOCs emitted by the plant were further analysed by GC-MS and proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The bioassays documented that Drosophila was strongly attracted by the carnivorous plant. Over 60 VOCs, including terpenes, benzenoids, and aliphatics, were emitted by Dionaea, predominantly in the light. This work further tested whether attraction of animal prey is affected by the nutritional status of the plant. For this purpose, Dionaea plants were fed with insect biomass to improve plant N status. However, although such feeding altered the VOC emission pattern by reducing terpene release, the attraction of Drosophila was not affected. From these results it is concluded that Dionaea attracts insects on the basis of food smell mimicry because the scent released has strong similarity to the bouquet of fruits and plant flowers. Such a volatile blend is emitted to attract insects searching for food to visit the deadly capture organ of the Venus flytrap.

  4. The Venus flytrap attracts insects by the release of volatile organic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Honsel, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Does Dionaea muscipula, the Venus flytrap, use a particular mechanism to attract animal prey? This question was raised by Charles Darwin 140 years ago, but it remains unanswered. This study tested the hypothesis that Dionaea releases volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to allure prey insects. For this purpose, olfactory choice bioassays were performed to elucidate if Dionaea attracts Drosophila melanogaster. The VOCs emitted by the plant were further analysed by GC-MS and proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The bioassays documented that Drosophila was strongly attracted by the carnivorous plant. Over 60 VOCs, including terpenes, benzenoids, and aliphatics, were emitted by Dionaea, predominantly in the light. This work further tested whether attraction of animal prey is affected by the nutritional status of the plant. For this purpose, Dionaea plants were fed with insect biomass to improve plant N status. However, although such feeding altered the VOC emission pattern by reducing terpene release, the attraction of Drosophila was not affected. From these results it is concluded that Dionaea attracts insects on the basis of food smell mimicry because the scent released has strong similarity to the bouquet of fruits and plant flowers. Such a volatile blend is emitted to attract insects searching for food to visit the deadly capture organ of the Venus flytrap. PMID:24420576

  5. Source Characterization of Volatile Organic Compounds Affecting the Air Quality in a Coastal Urban Area of South Texas

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Marciano; Karnae, Saritha; John, Kuruvilla

    2008-01-01

    Selected Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) emitted from various anthropogenic sources including industries and motor vehicles act as primary precursors of ozone, while some VOC are classified as air toxic compounds. Significantly large VOC emission sources impact the air quality in Corpus Christi, Texas. This urban area is located in a semi-arid region of South Texas and is home to several large petrochemical refineries and industrial facilities along a busy ship-channel. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality has setup two continuous ambient monitoring stations (CAMS 633 and 634) along the ship channel to monitor VOC concentrations in the urban atmosphere. The hourly concentrations of 46 VOC compounds were acquired from TCEQ for a comprehensive source apportionment study. The primary objective of this study was to identify and quantify the sources affecting the ambient air quality within this urban airshed. Principal Component Analysis/Absolute Principal Component Scores (PCA/APCS) was applied to the dataset. PCA identified five possible sources accounting for 69% of the total variance affecting the VOC levels measured at CAMS 633 and six possible sources affecting CAMS 634 accounting for 75% of the total variance. APCS identified natural gas emissions to be the major source contributor at CAMS 633 and it accounted for 70% of the measured VOC concentrations. The other major sources identified at CAMS 633 included flare emissions (12%), fugitive gasoline emissions (9%), refinery operations (7%), and vehicle exhaust (2%). At CAMS 634, natural gas sources were identified as the major source category contributing to 31% of the observed VOC. The other sources affecting this site included: refinery operations (24%), flare emissions (22%), secondary industrial processes (12%), fugitive gasoline emissions (8%) and vehicle exhaust (3%). PMID:19139530

  6. Source characterization of volatile organic compounds affecting the air quality in a coastal urban area of South Texas.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Marciano; Karnae, Saritha; John, Kuruvilla

    2008-09-01

    Selected Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) emitted from various anthropogenic sources including industries and motor vehicles act as primary precursors of ozone, while some VOC are classified as air toxic compounds. Significantly large VOC emission sources impact the air quality in Corpus Christi, Texas. This urban area is located in a semi-arid region of South Texas and is home to several large petrochemical refineries and industrial facilities along a busy ship-channel. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality has setup two continuous ambient monitoring stations (CAMS 633 and 634) along the ship channel to monitor VOC concentrations in the urban atmosphere. The hourly concentrations of 46 VOC compounds were acquired from TCEQ for a comprehensive source apportionment study. The primary objective of this study was to identify and quantify the sources affecting the ambient air quality within this urban airshed. Principal Component Analysis/Absolute Principal Component Scores (PCA/APCS) was applied to the dataset. PCA identified five possible sources accounting for 69% of the total variance affecting the VOC levels measured at CAMS 633 and six possible sources affecting CAMS 634 accounting for 75% of the total variance. APCS identified natural gas emissions to be the major source contributor at CAMS 633 and it accounted for 70% of the measured VOC concentrations. The other major sources identified at CAMS 633 included flare emissions (12%), fugitive gasoline emissions (9%), refinery operations (7%), and vehicle exhaust (2%). At CAMS 634, natural gas sources were identified as the major source category contributing to 31% of the observed VOC. The other sources affecting this site included: refinery operations (24%), flare emissions (22%), secondary industrial processes (12%), fugitive gasoline emissions (8%) and vehicle exhaust (3%).

  7. Plant Growth Promotion by Volatile Organic Compounds Produced by Bacillus subtilis SYST2

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, Hafiz A. S.; Gu, Qin; Wu, Huijun; Raza, Waseem; Hanif, Alwina; Wu, Liming; Colman, Massawe V.; Gao, Xuewen

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial volatiles play a significant role in promoting plant growth by regulating the synthesis or metabolism of phytohormones. In vitro and growth chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by the plant growth promoting rhizobacterium Bacillus subtilis strain SYST2 on hormone regulation and growth promotion in tomato plants. We observed a significant increase in plant biomass under both experimental conditions; we observed an increase in photosynthesis and in the endogenous contents of gibberellin, auxin, and cytokinin, while a decrease in ethylene levels was noted. VOCs emitted by SYST2 were identified through gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Of 11 VOCs tested in glass jars containing plants in test tubes, only two, albuterol and 1,3-propanediole, were found to promote plant growth. Furthermore, tomato plants showed differential expression of genes involved in auxin (SlIAA1. SlIAA3), gibberellin (GA20ox-1), cytokinin (SlCKX1), expansin (Exp2, Exp9. Exp 18), and ethylene (ACO1) biosynthesis or metabolism in roots and leaves in response to B. subtilis SYST2 VOCs. Our findings suggest that SYST2-derived VOCs promote plant growth by triggering growth hormone activity, and provide new insights into the mechanism of plant growth promotion by bacterial VOCs. PMID:28223976

  8. FULL-SCALE VIBRATING PERVAPORATION MEMBRANE UNIT: VOC REMOVAL FROM WATER AND SURFACTANT SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A commercial-scale vibrating membrane system was evaluated for the separation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from aqueous solutions by pervaporation. Experiments with surrogate solutions of up to five VOCs in the presence and absence of a surfactant were performed to compar...

  9. FULL-SCALE VIBRATING PERVAPORATION MEMBRANE UNIT: VOC REMOVAL FROM WATER AND SURFACTANT SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A commercial-scale vibrating membrane system with 10 square meters of membrane area was evaluated for the separation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from aqueous solutions by pervaporation. Experiments with surrogate solutions of up to five VOCs in the presence and absence o...

  10. Effect of wind tunnel air velocity on VOC flux rates from CAFO manure and wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind tunnels and flux chambers are often used to estimate volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from animal feeding operations (AFOs) without regard to air velocity or sweep air flow rates. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of wind tunnel air velocity on VOC emission ...

  11. Implementation of VOC source reduction practices in a manufactured house and in school classrooms

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, A.T.; Apte, M.G.; Shendell, D.G.; Beal, D.; McIlvaine, J.E.R.

    2002-01-01

    Detailed studies of a new manufactured house and four new industrialized relocatable school classrooms were conducted to determine the emission sources of formaldehyde and other VOCs and to identify and implement source reduction practices. Procedures were developed to generate VOC emission factors that allowed reasonably accurate predictions of indoor air VOC concentrations. Based on the identified sources of formaldehyde and other aldehydes, practices were developed to reduce the concentrations of these compounds in new house construction. An alternate ceiling panel reduced formaldehyde concentrations in the classrooms. Overall, the classrooms had relatively low VOC concentrations.

  12. Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products. Progress report No. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, P.; Yan, Hui; Banerjee, S.

    1997-10-01

    This progress report summarizes three accomplishments in a study of low volatile organic compound (VOC) drying of lumber and wood panel products. A mathematical model for predicting moisture emissions from particle was constructed and is being extended to VOCs. VOCs emissions from drying boards show that VOCs appear to be evenly released from all surfaces. Preliminary results from monthly analyses of loblolly pines indicate that resin acids appear to decrease between March to August, and that no consistent trends are apparent for terpenes. 3 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  13. [Correlation Analysis Between Characteristics of VOCs and Ozone Formation Potential in Summer in Nanjing Urban District].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-xiao; Tang, Li-li; Zhang, Yun-jiang; Mu, Ying-feng; Wang, Ming; Chen, Wen-tai; Zhou, Hong-cang; Hua, Yan; Jiang, Rong-xin

    2016-02-15

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is an important precursor of photochemical ozone pollution (O3) in the atmosphere. Their concentration variation directly affects the characteristics of the ozone pollution. The concentration, speciation of VOCs, ozone and its precursors in Nanjing were analyzed and measured using online gas detection systems in August 2013. VOCs/NOx discriminant method was used to get the sensitive control factors of ozone. The results showed that the averaged volume fraction of VOCs was 52. 05 x 10(-9), and the largest one reached 200 x 10(-9) in Nanjing urban district. The order of volume fraction of each species VOCs was alkane > oxygen-containing VOCs > alkene > aromatics. The averaged concentration of ozone was 76.5 microg x m(-1) and the exceeding concentration of hourly standard was 5.9%. The change trends of ozone precursors VOCs and NOx were basically identical and Ozone showed the obvious negative correlation during the period of high concentrations of ozone. There were some differences in the concentrations of the same VOCs in different ozone concentration periods. The ozone generation in Nanjing urban district was sensitive to VOCs, and Nanjing belonged to VOCs control area in summer.

  14. Significance of the Development of VOC Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Ichiro; Itoh, Toshio; Murayama, Norimitsu

    The environmental problems relevant to VOC, such as sick house syndrome and air pollution, have attracted attention more and more. Japanese government has recently set forth the measure to VOC by amendments to related codes and regulations. The measurement technology and sensors for hazardous chemical substances, formaldehyde, toluene and xylene, are important to control the VOC level. The development of VOC sensors is desired because it is possible to measure VOC concentration simply and quickly, which makes it possible to realize the constant self-management of VOC and to check the real time change of VOC level. Since the performance requirements to a VOC sensor depend much on the applications, it is necessary to figure out the required specifications before starting the development of target VOC sensors. High performance VOC sensors applicable to many application fields are required to construct a secure and safe society.

  15. Impacts of simulated herbivory on VOC emission profiles from coniferous plants

    DOE PAGES

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2014-09-18

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), blue spruce (Picea pungens), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), grand fir (Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugas menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate, an herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measured continuously with a gas chromatographmore » coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC-MS-FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.« less

  16. Impacts of simulated herbivory on VOC emission profiles from coniferous plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2014-09-01

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), blue spruce (Picea pungens), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), grand fir (Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugas menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate, an herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measured continuously with a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC-MS-FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.

  17. Water-quality assessment of part of the upper Mississippi River basin, Minnesota and Wisconsin - Volatile organic compounds in surface and ground water, 1978-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, W.J.; Fallon, J.D.; Kroening, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    Examination of water-quality data from widely distributed sampling networks of river sites and wells in the study area led to the following conclusions: 1) trace amounts of chlorinated VOC's were detected sporadically in waters of the Mississippi, Minnesota, St. Croix, and Vermillion Rivers; 2) benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and meta+paraxylene were detected sporadically in waters sampled from the chain of lakes used as the municipal supply for St. Paul, Minnesota; 3) the target VOC's were detected in less than five percent of ground-water samples at relatively low concentrations, generally near detection limits which ranged from 1 to 5 micrograms per liter; 4) VOC's were generally detected at similar frequencies, but at higher concentrations, in water samples from wells completed in sand and gravel aquifers than in water samples from wells completed in bedrock aquifers; 5) VOC's were most commonly detected in ground water in the vicinity of identifiable emission sites of VOC's, such as landfills, dumps, or major industries; 6) trichloroethene, a commonly used degreasing agent in dry cleaning, metal cleaning and cleaning septic lines, was the most frequently detected target VOC in ground water sampled from wells completed in both sand and gravel and bedrock aquifers; 7) wells producing water with detectable concentrations of the target VOC's tended to be shallower than wells producing water with no detectable concentrations of those compounds, but the differences in well depths were not statistically significant at a 95 percent confidence level; and 8) chlorination of water substantially increased the frequency of detection of trihalomethane compounds. The low frequencies of detection of the target VOC's and THM's in surface and ground water sampled from widely distributed sampling networks in the study area indicate that, although there are thousands of sites which can potentially emit these compounds to water, soil, and the atmosphere, these compounds have not

  18. Biosphere-atmosphere exchange of volatile organic compounds over C4 biofuel crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graus, Martin; Eller, Allyson S. D.; Fall, Ray; Yuan, Bin; Qian, Yaling; Westra, Philip; de Gouw, Joost; Warneke, Carsten

    2013-02-01

    Significant amounts of ethanol are produced from biofuel crops such as corn and, in the future, likely switchgrass. The atmospheric effects of growing these plant species on a large scale are investigated here by measuring the plant-atmosphere exchange of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Field grown corn and switchgrass emit VOCs at flux rates of 4.4 nmolC m-2 s-1 (10-9 mol carbon per square meter leaf area per second) and 2.4 nmolC m-2 s-1, respectively. Methanol contributes ˜60% to the molar flux but small emissions of carbonyls, aromatic compounds and terpenoids are relatively more important for potential air quality impacts. Switchgrass can act as a sink for carbonyls and aromatic compounds with compensation points of a few hundred pptv. In switchgrass moderate drought stress may induce enhanced emissions of monoterpenes, carbonyls and aromatics. Per liter of fuel ethanol produced, the estimated VOC emissions associated with the biomass growth of corn (7.8 g l-1) or switchgrass (6.2 g l-1) are in the same range as the VOC emissions from the use of one liter gasoline in vehicle engines. VOC emissions from the growing of biofuel crops can therefore be a significant contributor to the VOC emissions in the life cycle of biofuels. The VOC emissions from corn and switchgrass are small compared to those of tree species suggested as biofuel crops. Due to their reactivity with respect to OH the emissions from corn and switchgrass are not likely to have a significant impact on regional ozone formation.

  19. Emissions of oxygenated volatile organic compounds from open crop burning in Yangtze River Delta region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, H.; Kudo, S.; Pan, X.; Inomata, S.; Saito, S.; Kanaya, Y.; Wang, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were made by gas chromatography/flame ionization detection/mass spectrometry (GC/FID/MS) and proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) at Rudong, a rural area of Central East China in June 2010. During the campaign we identified several plumes originated from open biomass burning by the simultaneous enhancements of carbon monoxide and acetonitrile. Based on positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis, the contribution of biomass burning was in the range from 60 to 80% for the plumes. We found that oxygenated VOCs were predominant for these events. The emission ratios of OVOCs to CO for open crop burnings derived in this work were found to be high. Combined with the updated CO emissions of 12.7 Tg per year from crop burning, we estimated OVOC emissions from crop burning can be about 1.2 Tg per year, accounting for substantial amount of VOCs emitted from crop burning.

  20. Enhanced optical power of GaN-based light-emitting diode with compound photonic crystals by multiple-exposure nanosphere-lens lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yonghui; Wei, Tongbo Xiong, Zhuo; Shang, Liang; Tian, Yingdong; Zhao, Yun; Zhou, Pengyu; Wang, Junxi; Li, Jinmin

    2014-07-07

    The light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with single, twin, triple, and quadruple photonic crystals (PCs) on p-GaN are fabricated by multiple-exposure nanosphere-lens lithography (MENLL) process utilizing the focusing behavior of polystyrene spheres. Such a technique is easy and economical for use in fabricating compound nano-patterns. The optimized tilted angle is decided to be 26.6° through mathematic calculation to try to avoid the overlay of patterns. The results of scanning electron microscopy and simulations reveal that the pattern produced by MENLL is a combination of multiple ovals. Compared to planar-LED, the light output power of LEDs with single, twin, triple, and quadruple PCs is increased by 14.78%, 36.03%, 53.68%, and 44.85% under a drive current 350 mA, respectively. Furthermore, all PC-structures result in no degradation of the electrical properties. The stimulated results indicate that the highest light extraction efficiency of LED with the clover-shape triple PC is due to the largest scattering effect on propagation of light from GaN into air.

  1. Enhanced optical power of GaN-based light-emitting diode with compound photonic crystals by multiple-exposure nanosphere-lens lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yonghui; Wei, Tongbo; Xiong, Zhuo; Shang, Liang; Tian, Yingdong; Zhao, Yun; Zhou, Pengyu; Wang, Junxi; Li, Jinmin

    2014-07-01

    The light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with single, twin, triple, and quadruple photonic crystals (PCs) on p-GaN are fabricated by multiple-exposure nanosphere-lens lithography (MENLL) process utilizing the focusing behavior of polystyrene spheres. Such a technique is easy and economical for use in fabricating compound nano-patterns. The optimized tilted angle is decided to be 26.6° through mathematic calculation to try to avoid the overlay of patterns. The results of scanning electron microscopy and simulations reveal that the pattern produced by MENLL is a combination of multiple ovals. Compared to planar-LED, the light output power of LEDs with single, twin, triple, and quadruple PCs is increased by 14.78%, 36.03%, 53.68%, and 44.85% under a drive current 350 mA, respectively. Furthermore, all PC-structures result in no degradation of the electrical properties. The stimulated results indicate that the highest light extraction efficiency of LED with the clover-shape triple PC is due to the largest scattering effect on propagation of light from GaN into air.

  2. The major volatile organic compound emitted from Arabidopsis thaliana flowers, the sesquiterpene (E)-β-caryophyllene, is a defense against a bacterial pathogen.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mengsu; Sanchez-Moreiras, Adela M; Abel, Christian; Sohrabi, Reza; Lee, Sungbeom; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Tholl, Dorothea

    2012-03-01

    Flowers have a high risk of pathogen attack because of their rich nutrient and moisture content, and high frequency of insect visitors. We investigated the role of (E)-β-caryophyllene in floral defense against a microbial pathogen. This sesquiterpene is a common volatile compound emitted from flowers, and is a major volatile released from the stigma of Arabidopsis thaliana flowers. Arabidopsis thaliana lines lacking a functional (E)-β-caryophyllene synthase or constitutively overexpressing this gene were challenged with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, which is a bacterial pathogen of brassicaceous plants. Flowers of plant lines lacking (E)-β-caryophyllene emission showed greater bacterial growth on their stigmas than did wild-type flowers, and their seeds were lighter and misshapen. By contrast, plant lines with ectopic (E)-β-caryophyllene emission from vegetative parts were more resistant than wild-type plants to pathogen infection of leaves, and showed reduced cell damage and higher seed production. Based on in vitro experiments, (E)-β-caryophyllene seems to act by direct inhibition of bacterial growth, rather than by triggering defense signaling pathways. (E)-β-Caryophyllene thus appears to serve as a defense against pathogens that invade floral tissues and, like other floral volatiles, may play multiple roles in defense and pollinator attraction.

  3. Analysis of Plant Growth-Promoting Effects of Fluorescent Pseudomonas Strains Isolated from Mentha piperita Rhizosphere and Effects of Their Volatile Organic Compounds on Essential Oil Composition.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Maricel V; Bogino, Pablo C; Nocelli, Natalia; Cappellari, Lorena Del Rosario; Giordano, Walter F; Banchio, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Many species or strains of the genus Pseudomonas have been characterized as plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). We used a combination of phenotypic and genotypic techniques to analyze the community of fluorescent Pseudomonas strains in the rhizosphere of commercially grown Mentha piperita (peppermint). Biochemical techniques, Amplified rDNA Restriction Analysis (ARDRA), and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the majority of the isolated native fluorescent strains were P. putida. Use of two Repetitive Sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) techniques, BOX-PCR and ERIC-PCR, allowed us to evaluate diversity among the native strains and to more effectively distinguish among them. PGPR activity was tested for the native strains and reference strain P. fluorescens WCS417r. Micropropagated M. piperita plantlets were exposed to microbial volatile organic compounds (mVOCs) emitted by the bacterial strains, and plant biomass parameters and production of essential oils (EOs) were measured. mVOCs from 11 of the native strains caused an increase in shoot fresh weight. mVOCs from three native strains (SJ04, SJ25, SJ48) induced changes in M. pierita EO composition. The mVOCs caused a reduction of metabolites in the monoterpene pathway, for example menthofuran, and an increase in menthol production. Menthol production is the primary indicator of EO quality. The mVOCs produced by native strains SJ04, SJ25, SJ48, and strain WCS417r were analyzed. The obtained mVOC chromatographic profiles were unique for each of the three native strains analyzed, containing varying hydrocarbon, aromatic, and alogenic compounds. The differential effects of the strains were most likely due to the specific mixtures of mVOCs emitted by each strain, suggesting a synergistic effect occurs among the compounds present.

  4. Analysis of Plant Growth-Promoting Effects of Fluorescent Pseudomonas Strains Isolated from Mentha piperita Rhizosphere and Effects of Their Volatile Organic Compounds on Essential Oil Composition

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Maricel V.; Bogino, Pablo C.; Nocelli, Natalia; Cappellari, Lorena del Rosario; Giordano, Walter F.; Banchio, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Many species or strains of the genus Pseudomonas have been characterized as plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). We used a combination of phenotypic and genotypic techniques to analyze the community of fluorescent Pseudomonas strains in the rhizosphere of commercially grown Mentha piperita (peppermint). Biochemical techniques, Amplified rDNA Restriction Analysis (ARDRA), and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the majority of the isolated native fluorescent strains were P. putida. Use of two Repetitive Sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) techniques, BOX-PCR and ERIC-PCR, allowed us to evaluate diversity among the native strains and to more effectively distinguish among them. PGPR activity was tested for the native strains and reference strain P. fluorescens WCS417r. Micropropagated M. piperita plantlets were exposed to microbial volatile organic compounds (mVOCs) emitted by the bacterial strains, and plant biomass parameters and production of essential oils (EOs) were measured. mVOCs from 11 of the native strains caused an increase in shoot fresh weight. mVOCs from three native strains (SJ04, SJ25, SJ48) induced changes in M. pierita EO composition. The mVOCs caused a reduction of metabolites in the monoterpene pathway, for example menthofuran, and an increase in menthol production. Menthol production is the primary indicator of EO quality. The mVOCs produced by native strains SJ04, SJ25, SJ48, and strain WCS417r were analyzed. The obtained mVOC chromatographic profiles were unique for each of the three native strains analyzed, containing varying hydrocarbon, aromatic, and alogenic compounds. The differential effects of the strains were most likely due to the specific mixtures of mVOCs emitted by each strain, suggesting a synergistic effect occurs among the compounds present. PMID:27486441

  5. Global inventory of volatile organic compound emissions from anthropogenic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Piccot, S.D.; Watson, J.J.; Jones, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses the development of a global inventory of anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. It includes VOC estimates for seven classes of VOCs: paraffins, olefins, aromatics (benzene, toluene, xylene), formaldehyde, other aldehydes, other aromatics, and marginally reactive compounds. These classes represent general classes of VOC compounds that possess different chemical reactivities in the atmosphere. The inventory shows total global anthropogenic VOC emissions of about 110,000 Gg/yr, about 10% lower than global VOC inventories developed by other researchers. The study identifies the U.S. as the largest emitter (21% of the total global VOC), followed by the USSR, China, India, and Japan. Globally, fuel wood combustion and savanna burning were among the largest VOC emission sources, accounting for over 35% of the total global VOC emissions. The production and use of gasoline, refuse disposal activities, and organic chemical and rubber manufacturing were also found to be significant sources of global VOC emissions.

  6. ASSESSMENT OF EXISTING TEST REPORTS FOR EVALUATING VOC CONTROL EFFECTIVENESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report outlines the approach taken by EPA to review existing test reports for evaluating volatile organic compound (VOC) control device effectiveness and identifying missing control device effectiveness information. A format is presented to provide guidance and serve as the b...

  7. RESEARCH AND PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-VOC WOOD COATINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses a project, cofunded by the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) and the U.S. EPA, to develop a new, low volatile organic compound (VOC) wood coating. Traditional wood furniture coating technologies contain organic solvents which become air pol...

  8. DuPont Petition to Exempt HFO from VOC List

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Petition to exclude the chemcial 1, 1, 4, 4-hexafluorobut-2-ene (HFO 1336 mzz-Z) from the definition of volatile organic compound (VOC) and therefore allow it to be used in the US without regulation as a potential precursor to tropospheric ozone.

  9. CASE STUDIES: LOW-VOC/HAP WOOD FURNITURE COATINGS

    EPA Science Inventory


    The report gives results of a study in which wood furniture manufacturing facilities were identified that had converted at least one of their primary coating steps to low-volatile organic compound (VOC)/hazardous Air pollutant (HAP) wood furniture coatings: high-solids, water...

  10. Outdoor, indoor, and personal exposure to VOCs in children.

    PubMed

    Adgate, John L; Church, Timothy R; Ryan, Andrew D; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Fredrickson, Ann L; Stock, Thomas H; Morandi, Maria T; Sexton, Ken

    2004-10-01

    We measured volatile organic compound (VOC) exposures in multiple locations for a diverse population of children who attended two inner-city schools in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Fifteen common VOCs were measured at four locations: outdoors (O), indoors at school (S), indoors at home (H), and in personal samples (P). Concentrations of most VOCs followed the general pattern O approximately equal to S < P less than or equal to H across the measured microenvironments. The S and O environments had the smallest and H the largest influence on personal exposure to most compounds. A time-weighted model of P exposure using all measured microenvironments and time-activity data provided little additional explanatory power beyond that provided by using the H measurement alone. Although H and P concentrations of most VOCs measured in this study were similar to or lower than levels measured in recent personal monitoring studies of adults and children in the United States, p-dichlorobenzene was the notable exception to this pattern, with upper-bound exposures more than 100 times greater than those found in other studies of children. Median and upper-bound H and P exposures were well above health benchmarks for several compounds, so outdoor measurements likely underestimate long-term health risks from children's exposure to these compounds.

  11. Long-term study of VOCs measured with PTR-MS at a rural site in New Hampshire with urban influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, C.; Fitz, E.; Hagan, T.; Sive, B.; Frinak, E.; Haase, K.; Cottrell, L.; Buckley, S.; Talbot, R.

    2009-07-01

    A long-term, high time-resolution volatile organic compound (VOC) data set from a ground site that experiences urban, rural, and marine influences in the Northeastern United States is presented. A proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) was used to quantify 15 VOCs: a marine tracer dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a biomass burning tracer acetonitrile, biogenic compounds (monoterpenes, isoprene), oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs: methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) plus methacrolein (MACR), methanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), acetaldehyde, and acetic acid), and aromatic compounds (benzene, toluene, C8 and C9 aromatics). Time series, overall and seasonal medians, with 10th and 90th percentiles, seasonal mean diurnal profiles, and inter-annual comparisons of mean summer and winter diurnal profiles are shown. Methanol and acetone exhibit the highest overall median mixing ratios 1.44 and 1.02 ppbv, respectively. Comparing the mean diurnal profiles of less well understood compounds (e.g., MEK) with better known compounds (e.g., isoprene, monoterpenes, and MVK + MACR) that undergo various controls on their atmospheric mixing ratios provides insight into possible sources of the lesser known compounds. The constant diurnal value of ~0.7 for the toluene:benzene ratio in winter, may possibly indicate the influence of wood-based heating systems in this region. Methanol exhibits an initial early morning release in summer unlike any other OVOC (or isoprene) and a dramatic late afternoon mixing ratio increase in spring. Although several of the OVOCs appear to have biogenic sources, differences in features observed between isoprene, methanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, and MEK suggest they are produced or emitted in unique ways.

  12. Long-term study of VOCs measured with PTR-MS at a rural site in New Hampshire with urban influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, C.; Fitz, E.; Hagan, T.; Sive, B.; Frinak, E.; Haase, K.; Cottrell, L.; Buckley, S.; Talbot, R.

    2009-02-01

    A long-term, high time-resolution volatile organic compound (VOC) data set from a ground site that experiences urban, rural, and marine influences in the northeastern United States is presented. A proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) was used to quantify 15 VOCs: a marine tracer dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a biomass burning tracer acetonitrile, biogenic compounds (monoterpenes, isoprene), oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs: methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) plus methacrolein (MACR), methanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), acetaldehyde, and acetic acid), and aromatic compounds (benzene, toluene, C8 and C9 aromatics). Time series, overall and seasonal medians, with 10th and 90th percentiles, seasonal mean diurnal profiles, and inter-annual comparisons of mean summer and winter diurnal profiles are shown. Methanol and acetone exhibit the highest overall median mixing ratios 1.44 and 1.02 ppbv, respectively. Comparing the mean diurnal profiles of less well understood compounds (e.g., MEK) with better known compounds (e.g., isoprene, monoterpenes, and MVK+MACR) that undergo various controls on their atmospheric mixing ratios provides insight into possible sources of the lesser known compounds. The constant diurnal value of ≍0.7 for the toluene:benzene ratio in winter, may possibly indicate the influence of wood-based heating systems in this region. Methanol exhibits an initial early morning release in summer unlike any other OVOC (or isoprene) and a dramatic late afternoon mixing ratio increase in spring. Although several of the OVOCs appear to have biogenic sources, differences in features observed between isoprene, methanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, and MEK suggest they are produced or emitted in unique ways.

  13. Development of new VOC exposure metrics and their relationship to ''Sick Building Syndrome'' symptoms

    SciTech Connect

    Ten Brinke, JoAnn

    1995-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are suspected to contribute significantly to ''Sick Building Syndrome'' (SBS), a complex of subchronic symptoms that occurs during and in general decreases away from occupancy of the building in question. A new approach takes into account individual VOC potencies, as well as the highly correlated nature of the complex VOC mixtures found indoors. The new VOC metrics are statistically significant predictors of symptom outcomes from the California Healthy Buildings Study data. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to test the hypothesis that a summary measure of the VOC mixture, other risk factors, and covariates for each worker will lead to better prediction of symptom outcome. VOC metrics based on animal irritancy measures and principal component analysis had the most influence in the prediction of eye, dermal, and nasal symptoms. After adjustment, a water-based paints and solvents source was found to be associated with dermal and eye irritation. The more typical VOC exposure metrics used in prior analyses were not useful in symptom prediction in the adjusted model (total VOC (TVOC), or sum of individually identified VOCsVOCi)). Also not useful were three other VOC metrics that took into account potency, but did not adjust for the highly correlated nature of the data set, or the presence of VOCs that were not measured. High TVOC values (2--7 mg m-3) due to the presence of liquid-process photocopiers observed in several study spaces significantly influenced symptoms. Analyses without the high TVOC values reduced, but did not eliminate the ability of the VOC exposure metric based on irritancy and principal component analysis to explain symptom outcome.

  14. Clinical breath analysis: Discriminating between human endogenous compounds and exogenous (environmental) chemical confounders

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath originate from current or previous environmental exposures (exogenous compounds) and internal metabolic anabolic and catabolic) production (endogenous compounds). The origins of certain VOCs in breath presumed to be endogenous ...

  15. Measurements of VOC adsorption/desorption characteristics of typical interior building materials

    SciTech Connect

    An, Y.; Zhang, J.S.; Shaw, C.Y.

    2000-07-01

    The adsorption/desorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on interior building material surfaces (i.e., the sink effect) can affect the VOC concentrations in a building, and thus need to be accounted for an indoor air quality (IAQ) prediction model. In this study, the VOC adsorption/desorption characteristics (sink effect) were measured for four typical interior building materials including carpet, vinyl floor tile, painted drywall, and ceiling tile. The VOCs tested were ethylbenzene, cyclohexanone, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, benzaldehyde, and dodecane. These five VOCs were selected because they are representative of hydrocarbons, aromatics, ketones, aldehydes, and chlorine substituted compounds. The first order reversible adsorption/desorption model was based on the Langmuir isotherm was used to analyze the data and to determine the equilibrium constant of each VOC-material combination. It was found that the adsorption/desorption equilibrium constant, which is a measure of the sink capacity, increased linearly with the inverse of the VOC vapor pressure. For each compound, the adsorption/desorption equilibrium constant, and the adsorption rate constant differed significantly among the four materials tested. A detailed characterization of the material structure in the micro-scale would improve the understanding and modeling of the sink effect in the future. The results of this study can be used to estimate the impact of sink effect on the VOC concentrations in buildings.

  16. Annual cycle of volatile organic compound exchange between a boreal pine forest and the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rantala, P.; Aalto, J.; Taipale, R.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Rinne, J.

    2015-06-01

    Long-term flux measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC) over boreal forests are rare, although the forests are known to emit considerable amounts of VOCs into the atmosphere. Thus, we measured fluxes of several VOCs and oxygenated VOCs over a Scots pine dominated boreal forest semi-continuously between May 2010 and December 2013. The VOC profiles were obtained with a proton-transfer-reaction mass-spectrometry, and the fluxes were calculated using vertical concentration profiles and the surface layer profile method connected to the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. In total fluxes that differed significantly from zero on a monthly basis were observed for 14 out 27 measured masses. Monoterpenes had the highest net emission in all seasons and statistically significant positive fluxes were detected from March until November. Other important compounds emitted were methanol, ethanol/formic acid, acetone and isoprene/MBO. Oxygenated VOCs showed also deposition fluxes that were statistically different from zero. Isoprene/methylbutenol and monoterpene fluxes followed well the traditional isoprene algorithm and the hybrid algorithm, respectively. Emission potentials of monoterpenes were largest in late spring and fall which was possibly driven by growth processes and decaying of soil litter, respectively. Conversely, largest emission potentials of isoprene/methylbutenol were found in July. Thus, we concluded that most of the emissions of m/z 69 at the site consisted of isoprene that originated from broadleaved trees. Methanol had deposition fluxes especially before sunrise. This can be connected to water films on surfaces. Based on this assumption, we were able to build an empirical algorithm for bi-directional methanol exchange that described both emission term and deposition term. Methanol emissions were highest in May and June and deposition level increased towards fall, probably as a result of increasing relative humidity levels leading to predominance of

  17. Annual cycle of volatile organic compound exchange between a boreal pine forest and the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rantala, P.; Aalto, J.; Taipale, R.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Rinne, J.

    2015-10-01

    Long-term flux measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC) over boreal forests are rare, although the forests are known to emit considerable amounts of VOCs into the atmosphere. Thus, we measured fluxes of several VOCs and oxygenated VOCs over a Scots-pine-dominated boreal forest semi-continuously between May 2010 and December 2013. The VOC profiles were obtained with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, and the fluxes were calculated using vertical concentration profiles and the surface layer profile method connected to the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. In total fluxes that differed significantly from zero on a monthly basis were observed for 13 out of 27 measured masses. Monoterpenes had the highest net emission in all seasons and statistically significant positive fluxes were detected from March until October. Other important compounds emitted were methanol, ethanol+formic acid, acetone and isoprene+methylbutenol. Oxygenated VOCs showed also deposition fluxes that were statistically different from zero. Isoprene+methylbutenol and m