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Sample records for comprehensive microarray-based dna

  1. A Comprehensive Microarray-Based DNA Methylation Study of 367 Hematological Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Bibikova, Marina; Wickham-Garcia, Eliza; Agirre, Xabier; Alvarez, Sara; Brüggemann, Monika; Bug, Stefanie; Calasanz, Maria J.; Deckert, Martina; Dreyling, Martin; Du, Ming Q.; Dürig, Jan; Dyer, Martin J. S.; Fan, Jian-Bing; Gesk, Stefan; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Harder, Lana; Hartmann, Sylvia; Klapper, Wolfram; Küppers, Ralf; Montesinos-Rongen, Manuel; Nagel, Inga; Pott, Christiane; Richter, Julia; Román-Gómez, José; Seifert, Marc; Stein, Harald; Suela, Javier; Trümper, Lorenz; Vater, Inga; Prosper, Felipe; Haferlach, Claudia; Cigudosa, Juan Cruz; Siebert, Reiner

    2009-01-01

    Background Alterations in the DNA methylation pattern are a hallmark of leukemias and lymphomas. However, most epigenetic studies in hematologic neoplasms (HNs) have focused either on the analysis of few candidate genes or many genes and few HN entities, and comprehensive studies are required. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we report for the first time a microarray-based DNA methylation study of 767 genes in 367 HNs diagnosed with 16 of the most representative B-cell (n = 203), T-cell (n = 30), and myeloid (n = 134) neoplasias, as well as 37 samples from different cell types of the hematopoietic system. Using appropriate controls of B-, T-, or myeloid cellular origin, we identified a total of 220 genes hypermethylated in at least one HN entity. In general, promoter hypermethylation was more frequent in lymphoid malignancies than in myeloid malignancies, being germinal center mature B-cell lymphomas as well as B and T precursor lymphoid neoplasias those entities with highest frequency of gene-associated DNA hypermethylation. We also observed a significant correlation between the number of hypermethylated and hypomethylated genes in several mature B-cell neoplasias, but not in precursor B- and T-cell leukemias. Most of the genes becoming hypermethylated contained promoters with high CpG content, and a significant fraction of them are targets of the polycomb repressor complex. Interestingly, T-cell prolymphocytic leukemias show low levels of DNA hypermethylation and a comparatively large number of hypomethylated genes, many of them showing an increased gene expression. Conclusions/Significance We have characterized the DNA methylation profile of a wide range of different HNs entities. As well as identifying genes showing aberrant DNA methylation in certain HN subtypes, we also detected six genes—DBC1, DIO3, FZD9, HS3ST2, MOS, and MYOD1—that were significantly hypermethylated in B-cell, T-cell, and myeloid malignancies. These might therefore play

  2. DNA Microarray-Based Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Marzancola, Mahsa Gharibi; Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2016-01-01

    The DNA microarray technology is currently a useful biomedical tool which has been developed for a variety of diagnostic applications. However, the development pathway has not been smooth and the technology has faced some challenges. The reliability of the microarray data and also the clinical utility of the results in the early days were criticized. These criticisms added to the severe competition from other techniques, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), impacting the growth of microarray-based tests in the molecular diagnostic market.Thanks to the advances in the underlying technologies as well as the tremendous effort offered by the research community and commercial vendors, these challenges have mostly been addressed. Nowadays, the microarray platform has achieved sufficient standardization and method validation as well as efficient probe printing, liquid handling and signal visualization. Integration of various steps of the microarray assay into a harmonized and miniaturized handheld lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device has been a goal for the microarray community. In this respect, notable progress has been achieved in coupling the DNA microarray with the liquid manipulation microsystem as well as the supporting subsystem that will generate the stand-alone LOC device.In this chapter, we discuss the major challenges that microarray technology has faced in its almost two decades of development and also describe the solutions to overcome the challenges. In addition, we review the advancements of the technology, especially the progress toward developing the LOC devices for DNA diagnostic applications.

  3. DNA Microarray-Based PCR Ribotyping of Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Ehricht, Ralf; Slickers, Peter; Baier, Vico; Neubauer, Heinrich; Zimmermann, Stefan; Rabold, Denise; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Seyboldt, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a DNA microarray-based assay for fast and simple PCR ribotyping of Clostridium difficile strains. Hybridization probes were designed to query the modularly structured intergenic spacer region (ISR), which is also the template for conventional and PCR ribotyping with subsequent capillary gel electrophoresis (seq-PCR) ribotyping. The probes were derived from sequences available in GenBank as well as from theoretical ISR module combinations. A database of reference hybridization patterns was set up from a collection of 142 well-characterized C. difficile isolates representing 48 seq-PCR ribotypes. The reference hybridization patterns calculated by the arithmetic mean were compared using a similarity matrix analysis. The 48 investigated seq-PCR ribotypes revealed 27 array profiles that were clearly distinguishable. The most frequent human-pathogenic ribotypes 001, 014/020, 027, and 078/126 were discriminated by the microarray. C. difficile strains related to 078/126 (033, 045/FLI01, 078, 126, 126/FLI01, 413, 413/FLI01, 598, 620, 652, and 660) and 014/020 (014, 020, and 449) showed similar hybridization patterns, confirming their genetic relatedness, which was previously reported. A panel of 50 C. difficile field isolates was tested by seq-PCR ribotyping and the DNA microarray-based assay in parallel. Taking into account that the current version of the microarray does not discriminate some closely related seq-PCR ribotypes, all isolates were typed correctly. Moreover, seq-PCR ribotypes without reference profiles available in the database (ribotype 009 and 5 new types) were correctly recognized as new ribotypes, confirming the performance and expansion potential of the microarray. PMID:25411174

  4. DNA microarray-based PCR ribotyping of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Schneeberg, Alexander; Ehricht, Ralf; Slickers, Peter; Baier, Vico; Neubauer, Heinrich; Zimmermann, Stefan; Rabold, Denise; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Seyboldt, Christian

    2015-02-01

    This study presents a DNA microarray-based assay for fast and simple PCR ribotyping of Clostridium difficile strains. Hybridization probes were designed to query the modularly structured intergenic spacer region (ISR), which is also the template for conventional and PCR ribotyping with subsequent capillary gel electrophoresis (seq-PCR) ribotyping. The probes were derived from sequences available in GenBank as well as from theoretical ISR module combinations. A database of reference hybridization patterns was set up from a collection of 142 well-characterized C. difficile isolates representing 48 seq-PCR ribotypes. The reference hybridization patterns calculated by the arithmetic mean were compared using a similarity matrix analysis. The 48 investigated seq-PCR ribotypes revealed 27 array profiles that were clearly distinguishable. The most frequent human-pathogenic ribotypes 001, 014/020, 027, and 078/126 were discriminated by the microarray. C. difficile strains related to 078/126 (033, 045/FLI01, 078, 126, 126/FLI01, 413, 413/FLI01, 598, 620, 652, and 660) and 014/020 (014, 020, and 449) showed similar hybridization patterns, confirming their genetic relatedness, which was previously reported. A panel of 50 C. difficile field isolates was tested by seq-PCR ribotyping and the DNA microarray-based assay in parallel. Taking into account that the current version of the microarray does not discriminate some closely related seq-PCR ribotypes, all isolates were typed correctly. Moreover, seq-PCR ribotypes without reference profiles available in the database (ribotype 009 and 5 new types) were correctly recognized as new ribotypes, confirming the performance and expansion potential of the microarray.

  5. DNA microarray-based mutation discovery and genotyping.

    PubMed

    Gresham, David

    2011-01-01

    DNA microarrays provide an efficient means of identifying single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA samples and characterizing their frequencies in individual and mixed samples. We have studied the parameters that determine the sensitivity of DNA probes to SNPs and found that the melting temperature (T (m)) of the probe is the primary determinant of probe sensitivity. An isothermal-melting temperature DNA microarray design, in which the T (m) of all probes is tightly distributed, can be implemented by varying the length of DNA probes within a single DNA microarray. I describe guidelines for designing isothermal-melting temperature DNA microarrays and protocols for labeling and hybridizing DNA samples to DNA microarrays for SNP discovery, genotyping, and quantitative determination of allele frequencies in mixed samples.

  6. Robust embryo identification using first polar body single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Treff, Nathan R; Su, Jing; Kasabwala, Natasha; Tao, Xin; Miller, Kathleen A; Scott, Richard T

    2010-05-01

    This study sought to validate a novel, minimally invasive system for embryo tracking by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based DNA fingerprinting of the first polar body. First polar body-based assignments of which embryos implanted and were delivered after multiple ET were 100% consistent with previously validated embryo DNA fingerprinting-based assignments. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Microarray-based DNA methylation study of Ewing's sarcoma of the bone.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Rim; Jung, Woon-Won; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Park, Yong-Koo

    2014-10-01

    Alterations in DNA methylation patterns are a hallmark of malignancy. However, the majority of epigenetic studies of Ewing's sarcoma have focused on the analysis of only a few candidate genes. Comprehensive studies are thus lacking and are required. The aim of the present study was to identify novel methylation markers in Ewing's sarcoma using microarray analysis. The current study reports the microarray-based DNA methylation study of 1,505 CpG sites of 807 cancer-related genes from 69 Ewing's sarcoma samples. The Illumina GoldenGate Methylation Cancer Panel I microarray was used, and with the appropriate controls (n=14), a total of 92 hypermethylated genes were identified in the Ewing's sarcoma samples. The majority of the hypermethylated genes were associated with cell adhesion, cell regulation, development and signal transduction. The overall methylation mean values were compared between patients who survived and those that did not. The overall methylation mean was significantly higher in the patients who did not survive (0.25±0.03) than in those who did (0.22±0.05) (P=0.0322). However, the overall methylation mean was not found to significantly correlate with age, gender or tumor location. GDF10, OSM, APC and HOXA11 were the most significant differentially-methylated genes, however, their methylation levels were not found to significantly correlate with the survival rate. The DNA methylation profile of Ewing's sarcoma was characterized and 92 genes that were significantly hypermethylated were detected. A trend towards a more aggressive behavior was identified in the methylated group. The results of this study indicated that methylation may be significant in the development of Ewing's sarcoma.

  8. DNA microarray-based detection of multiple pathogens: Mycoplasma spp. and Chlamydia spp.

    PubMed

    Schnee, Christiane; Sachse, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Rapid detection of slow-growing or non-culturable microorganisms, such as Mycoplasma spp. and Chlamydia spp., is still a challenge to diagnosticians in the veterinary field. In addition, as epidemiological evidence on the frequency of mixed infections involving two and more bacterial species has been emerging, detection methods allowing simultaneous identification of different pathogens are required. In the present chapter, we describe DNA microarray-based procedures for the detection of 83 Mollicutes species (Mycoplasma assay) and 11 Chlamydia spp. (Chlamydia assay). The assays are suitable for use in a routine diagnostic environment, as well as in microbiological research.

  9. A DNA Microarray-Based Assay to Detect Dual Infection with Two Dengue Virus Serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Badillo, Alvaro; de Lourdes Muñoz, María; Perez-Ramirez, Gerardo; Altuzar, Victor; Burgueño, Juan; Mendoza-Alvarez, Julio G.; Martínez-Muñoz, Jorge P.; Cisneros, Alejandro; Navarrete-Espinosa, Joel; Sanchez-Sinencio, Feliciano

    2014-01-01

    Here; we have described and tested a microarray based-method for the screening of dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. This DNA microarray assay is specific and sensitive and can detect dual infections with two dengue virus serotypes and single-serotype infections. Other methodologies may underestimate samples containing more than one serotype. This technology can be used to discriminate between the four DENV serotypes. Single-stranded DNA targets were covalently attached to glass slides and hybridised with specific labelled probes. DENV isolates and dengue samples were used to evaluate microarray performance. Our results demonstrate that the probes hybridized specifically to DENV serotypes; with no detection of unspecific signals. This finding provides evidence that specific probes can effectively identify single and double infections in DENV samples. PMID:24776933

  10. A DNA microarray-based assay to detect dual infection with two dengue virus serotypes.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Badillo, Alvaro; Muñoz, María de Lourdes; Perez-Ramirez, Gerardo; Altuzar, Victor; Burgueño, Juan; Mendoza-Alvarez, Julio G; Martínez-Muñoz, Jorge P; Cisneros, Alejandro; Navarrete-Espinosa, Joel; Sanchez-Sinencio, Feliciano

    2014-04-25

    Here; we have described and tested a microarray based-method for the screening of dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. This DNA microarray assay is specific and sensitive and can detect dual infections with two dengue virus serotypes and single-serotype infections. Other methodologies may underestimate samples containing more than one serotype. This technology can be used to discriminate between the four DENV serotypes. Single-stranded DNA targets were covalently attached to glass slides and hybridised with specific labelled probes. DENV isolates and dengue samples were used to evaluate microarray performance. Our results demonstrate that the probes hybridized specifically to DENV serotypes; with no detection of unspecific signals. This finding provides evidence that specific probes can effectively identify single and double infections in DENV samples.

  11. Development and application of a DNA microarray-based yeast two-hybrid system

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Bernhard; Fontaine, Jean-Fred; Yildirimman, Reha; Raskó, Tamás; Schaefer, Martin H.; Rasche, Axel; Porras, Pablo; Vázquez-Álvarez, Blanca M.; Russ, Jenny; Rau, Kirstin; Foulle, Raphaele; Zenkner, Martina; Saar, Kathrin; Herwig, Ralf; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Wanker, Erich E.

    2013-01-01

    The yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system is the most widely applied methodology for systematic protein–protein interaction (PPI) screening and the generation of comprehensive interaction networks. We developed a novel Y2H interaction screening procedure using DNA microarrays for high-throughput quantitative PPI detection. Applying a global pooling and selection scheme to a large collection of human open reading frames, proof-of-principle Y2H interaction screens were performed for the human neurodegenerative disease proteins huntingtin and ataxin-1. Using systematic controls for unspecific Y2H results and quantitative benchmarking, we identified and scored a large number of known and novel partner proteins for both huntingtin and ataxin-1. Moreover, we show that this parallelized screening procedure and the global inspection of Y2H interaction data are uniquely suited to define specific PPI patterns and their alteration by disease-causing mutations in huntingtin and ataxin-1. This approach takes advantage of the specificity and flexibility of DNA microarrays and of the existence of solid-related statistical methods for the analysis of DNA microarray data, and allows a quantitative approach toward interaction screens in human and in model organisms. PMID:23275563

  12. A proof-of-principle demonstration of a novel microarray-based method for quantifying DNA methylation levels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujuan; Zhou, Dongrui; Zhao, Ming; Luo, Yongqi; Zhang, Peng; Lu, Zuhong; Lu, Qianjin

    2010-11-01

    Demethylation of CD11a (ITGAL; GeneID:3683; HGNC: 6148) and CD70 (TNFSF7; GeneID:970; HGNC:11937) regulatory regions in CD4(+) T cells contributes to the development of autoreactivity and autoantibody overstimulation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study, we present a novel approach for measuring the methylation status of CD11a and CD70 promoter sequences. The procedure combines the standard method of bisulfite conversion of methylated CpG pairs with high-throughput oligonucleotide microarray-based technology that allows for rapid quantification of deoxycytosine and deoxymethylcytosine content in bisulfite-treated DNA samples. The microarrays were first used to generate a standard curve from fully methylated and fully unmethylated DNA samples using a one-dimensional linear regression equation that calculated fluorescence emission as a function of methylation levels. The methylation status of the CD70 and CD11a promoters in SLE and control CD4(+) T cell samples were measured, and the microarray prediction was found to be highly accurate when compared to bisulfite sequencing. Furthermore, the microarrays were able to detect differences in the methylation status between SLE patient and healthy control samples. These results indicate that our new microarray-based assay could prove to be a highly reliable, rapid, and cost effective diagnostic and prognostic test for SLE.

  13. DNA Microarray-Based Screening and Characterization of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kiyama, Ryoiti

    2017-01-01

    The application of DNA microarray assay (DMA) has entered a new era owing to recent innovations in omics technologies. This review summarizes recent applications of DMA-based gene expression profiling by focusing on the screening and characterization of traditional Chinese medicine. First, herbs, mushrooms, and dietary plants analyzed by DMA along with their effective components and their biological/physiological effects are summarized and discussed by examining their comprehensive list and a list of representative effective chemicals. Second, the mechanisms of action of traditional Chinese medicine are summarized by examining the genes and pathways responsible for the action, the cell functions involved in the action, and the activities found by DMA (silent estrogens). Third, applications of DMA for traditional Chinese medicine are discussed by examining reported examples and new protocols for its use in quality control. Further innovations in the signaling pathway-based evaluation of beneficial effects and the assessment of potential risks of traditional Chinese medicine are expected, just as are observed in other closely related fields, such as the therapeutic, environmental, nutritional, and pharmacological fields. PMID:28146102

  14. Prevalence, identification by a DNA microarray-based assay of human and food isolates Listeria spp. from Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Hmaïed, F; Helel, S; Le Berre, V; François, J-M; Leclercq, A; Lecuit, M; Smaoui, H; Kechrid, A; Boudabous, A; Barkallah, I

    2014-02-01

    We aimed at evaluating the prevalence of Listeria species isolated from food samples and characterizing food and human cases isolates. Between 2005 and 2007, one hundred food samples collected in the markets of Tunis were analysed in our study. Five strains of Listeria monocytogenes responsible for human listeriosis isolated in hospital of Tunis were included. Multiplex PCR serogrouping and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) applying the enzyme AscI and ApaI were used for the characterization of isolates of L. monocytogenes. We have developed a rapid microarray-based assay to a reliable discrimination of species within the Listeria genus. The prevalence of Listeria spp. in food samples was estimated at 14% by using classical biochemical identification. Two samples were assigned to L. monocytogenes and 12 to L. innocua. DNA microarray allowed unambiguous identification of Listeria species. Our results obtained by microarray-based assay were in accordance with the biochemical identification. The two food L. monocytogenes isolates were assigned to the PCR serogroup IIa (serovar 1/2a). Whereas human L. monocytogenes isolates were of PCR serogroup IVb, (serovars 4b). These isolates present a high similarity in PFGE. Food L. monocytogenes isolates were classified into two different pulsotypes. These pulsotypes were different from that of the five strains responsible for the human cases. We confirmed the presence of Listeria spp. in variety of food samples in Tunis. Increased food and clinical surveillance must be taken into consideration in Tunisia to identify putative infections sources. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. A genome-wide study of preferential amplification/hybridization in microarray-based pooled DNA experiments

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H.-C.; Liang, Y.-J.; Huang, M.-C.; Li, L.-H.; Lin, C.-H.; Wu, J.-Y.; Chen, Y.-T.; Fann, C.S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Microarray-based pooled DNA methods overcome the cost bottleneck of simultaneously genotyping more than 100 000 markers for numerous study individuals. The success of such methods relies on the proper adjustment of preferential amplification/hybridization to ensure accurate and reliable allele frequency estimation. We performed a hybridization-based genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyping analysis to dissect preferential amplification/hybridization. The majority of SNPs had less than 2-fold signal amplification or suppression, and the lognormal distributions adequately modeled preferential amplification/hybridization across the human genome. Comparative analyses suggested that the distributions of preferential amplification/hybridization differed among genotypes and the GC content. Patterns among different ethnic populations were similar; nevertheless, there were striking differences for a small proportion of SNPs, and a slight ethnic heterogeneity was observed. To fulfill appropriate and gratuitous adjustments, databases of preferential amplification/hybridization for African Americans, Caucasians and Asians were constructed based on the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 100 K Set. The robustness of allele frequency estimation using this database was validated by a pooled DNA experiment. This study provides a genome-wide investigation of preferential amplification/hybridization and suggests guidance for the reliable use of the database. Our results constitute an objective foundation for theoretical development of preferential amplification/hybridization and provide important information for future pooled DNA analyses. PMID:16931491

  16. Rapid extraction of genomic DNA from saliva for HLA typing on microarray based on magnetic nanobeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xin; Zhang, Xu; Yu, Bingbin; Gao, Huafang; Zhang, Huan; Fei, Weiyang

    2004-09-01

    A series of simplified protocols are developed for extracting genomic DNA from saliva by using the magnetic nanobeads as absorbents. In these protocols, both the enrichment of the target cells and the adsorption of DNA can be achieved simultaneously by our functionally modified magnetic beads in one step, and the DNA-nanobeads complex can be used as PCR templates. HLA typing based on an oligonucleotide array was conducted by hybridization with the PCR products. The result shows that the protocols are robust and sensitive.

  17. A Platform for Combined DNA and Protein Microarrays Based on Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Asanov, Alexander; Zepeda, Angélica; Vaca, Luis

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a novel microarray technology based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) in combination with DNA and protein bioassays immobilized at the TIRF surface. Unlike conventional microarrays that exhibit reduced signal-to-background ratio, require several stages of incubation, rinsing and stringency control, and measure only end-point results, our TIRF microarray technology provides several orders of magnitude better signal-to-background ratio, performs analysis rapidly in one step, and measures the entire course of association and dissociation kinetics between target DNA and protein molecules and the bioassays. In many practical cases detection of only DNA or protein markers alone does not provide the necessary accuracy for diagnosing a disease or detecting a pathogen. Here we describe TIRF microarrays that detect DNA and protein markers simultaneously, which reduces the probabilities of false responses. Supersensitive and multiplexed TIRF DNA and protein microarray technology may provide a platform for accurate diagnosis or enhanced research studies. Our TIRF microarray system can be mounted on upright or inverted microscopes or interfaced directly with CCD cameras equipped with a single objective, facilitating the development of portable devices. As proof-of-concept we applied TIRF microarrays for detecting molecular markers from Bacillus anthracis, the pathogen responsible for anthrax. PMID:22438738

  18. A three-dimensional waveguide substrate for DNA-microarrays based on macroporous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dertinger, Stephan K.; Klühr, Marco; Sauermann, Alexander; Thein, Kerstin

    2005-06-01

    In this paper we present a three-dimensional waveguide structure with unique optical and fluidic properties and demonstrate its application as a substrate for DNA microarrays. The structure is fabricated by thermal oxidation of a macroporous silicon membrane with a periodic pattern of discrete microchannels running perpendicular through the substrate. Partial oxidation generates compartments with channel walls that are completely converted into SiO2 but leaves a rectangular grid of silicon walls separating the SiO2 compartments. We demonstrate that the SiO2 walls act as optical waveguides and the opaque silicon walls divide the substrate into optically isolated compartments. In DNA microarray experiments, we show that the silicon walls of the compartments prevent cross talk between adjacent DNA spots. The structure is compatible with all conventional read-out techniques such as fluorescence, chemiluminescence, and precipitation staining.

  19. Genotyping and DNA microarray based characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from rabbit carcasses.

    PubMed

    Merz, Axel; Stephan, Roger; Johler, Sophia

    2016-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can cause staphylococcal food poisoning. Although the organism is frequently detected on rabbit carcasses, little is known about the characteristics of S. aureus strains contaminating rabbit meat. In this study, 137 S. aureus isolates originating from 137 rabbit carcasses were spa typed and characterized by DNA microarray. The isolates were assigned to CC5, CC7, CC8, CC15, CC96, CC101, CC121, and ST890, and to 13 spa types (t056, t085, t091, t160, t179, t681, t741, t745, t1190, t1773, t4770, t8456, t14871). Enterotoxin genes detected included sea, sed, sej, and ser. In addition, the egc operon, encoding the newly described staphylococcal enterotoxins SEG/SEI/SElM/SElN/SElO/SElU, was found in all isolates except those of t091. While none of the examined isolates presented genes conferring methicillin, vancomycin, or aminoglycoside resistance, we frequently detected blaZ/I/R conferring resistance to penicillin. The isolates represented a heterogeneous group assigned to clonal lineages detected among humans and animals, with two spa types exclusively associated with rabbit meat (t4770, t8456).

  20. A novel universal DNA labeling and amplification system for rapid microarray-based detection of 117 antibiotic resistance genes in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Christian; Endimiani, Andrea; Perreten, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and simple DNA labeling system has been developed for disposable microarrays and has been validated for the detection of 117 antibiotic resistance genes abundant in Gram-positive bacteria. The DNA was fragmented and amplified using phi-29 polymerase and random primers with linkers. Labeling and further amplification were then performed by classic PCR amplification using biotinylated primers specific for the linkers. The microarray developed by Perreten et al. (Perreten, V., Vorlet-Fawer, L., Slickers, P., Ehricht, R., Kuhnert, P., Frey, J., 2005. Microarray-based detection of 90 antibiotic resistance genes of gram-positive bacteria. J.Clin.Microbiol. 43, 2291-2302.) was improved by additional oligonucleotides. A total of 244 oligonucleotides (26 to 37 nucleotide length and with similar melting temperatures) were spotted on the microarray, including genes conferring resistance to clinically important antibiotic classes like β-lactams, macrolides, aminoglycosides, glycopeptides and tetracyclines. Each antibiotic resistance gene is represented by at least 2 oligonucleotides designed from consensus sequences of gene families. The specificity of the oligonucleotides and the quality of the amplification and labeling were verified by analysis of a collection of 65 strains belonging to 24 species. Association between genotype and phenotype was verified for 6 antibiotics using 77 Staphylococcus strains belonging to different species and revealed 95% test specificity and a 93% predictive value of a positive test. The DNA labeling and amplification is independent of the species and of the target genes and could be used for different types of microarrays. This system has also the advantage to detect several genes within one bacterium at once, like in Staphylococcus aureus strain BM3318, in which up to 15 genes were detected. This new microarray-based detection system offers a large potential for applications in clinical diagnostic, basic research, food safety and

  1. A DNA methylation microarray-based study identifies ERG as a gene commonly methylated in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzman, Jacob; Mongoue-Tchokote, Solange; Gibbs, Angela; Gao, Lina; Corless, Christopher L; Jin, Jennifer; Zarour, Luai; Higano, Celestia; True, Lawrence D; Vessella, Robert L; Wilmot, Beth; Bottomly, Daniel; McWeeney, Shannon K; Bova, G. Steven; Partin, Alan W; Mori, Motomi

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation of promoter regions is a common event in prostate cancer, one of the most common cancers in men worldwide. Because prior reports demonstrating that DNA methylation is important in prostate cancer studied a limited number of genes, we systematically quantified the DNA methylation status of 1,505 CpG dinucleotides for 807 genes in 78 paraffin-embedded prostate cancer samples and three normal prostate samples. The ERG gene, commonly repressed in prostate cells in the absence of an oncogenic fusion to the TMPRSS2 gene, was one of the most commonly methylated genes, occurring in 74% of prostate cancer specimens. In an independent group of patient samples, we confirmed that ERG DNA methylation was common, occurring in 57% of specimens, and cancer-specific. The ERG promoter is marked by repressive chromatin marks mediated by polycomb proteins in both normal prostate cells and prostate cancer cells, which may explain ERG's predisposition to DNA methylation and the fact that tumors with ERG DNA methylation were more methylated, in general. These results demonstrate that bead arrays offer a high-throughput method to discover novel genes with promoter DNA methylation such as ERG, whose measurement may improve our ability to more accurately detect prostate cancer. PMID:21946329

  2. DNA microarray-based solid-phase RT-PCR for rapid detection and identification of influenza virus type A and subtypes H5 and H7.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Dhumpa, Raghuram; Bang, Dang Duong; Handberg, Kurt; Wolff, Anders

    2011-04-01

    Endemic of avian influenza virus (AIV) in Asia and epizootics in some European regions have caused considerable public concern on a possible pandemic of AIV. A rapid method for virus detection and effective surveillance in wild avian, poultry production as well as in humans is required. In this article, a DNA microarray-based solid-phase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach has been developed for rapid detection of influenza virus type A and for simultaneous identification of pathogenic virus subtypes H5 and H7. This solid-phase RT-PCR method combined reverse-transcription amplification of RNA extract in the liquid phase with sequence-specific nested PCR on the solid phase. A simple ultraviolet cross-linking method was used to immobilize the DNA probes over an unmodified glass surface, which makes solid-phase PCR a convenient possibility for AIV screening. The testing of 33 avian fecal and tracheal swab specimens was completed in less than 2 h with 94% accuracy.

  3. [DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling in diagnosis, assessing prognosis and predicting response to therapy in colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowski, Przemysław; Wierzbicki, Piotr; Kmieć, Andrzej; Godlewski, Janusz

    2012-06-11

     Colorectal cancer is the most common cancer of the gastrointestinal tract. It is considered as a biological model of a certain type of cancerogenesis process in which progression from an early to late stage adenoma and cancer is accompanied by distinct genetic alterations. Clinical and pathological parameters commonly used in clinical practice are often insufficient to determine groups of patients suitable for personalized treatment. Moreover, reliable molecular markers with high prognostic value have not yet been determined. Molecular studies using DNA-based microarrays have identified numerous genes involved in cell proliferation and differentiation during the process of cancerogenesis. Assessment of the genetic profile of colorectal cancer using the microarray technique might be a useful tool in determining the groups of patients with different clinical outcomes who would benefit from additional personalized treatment. The main objective of this study was to present the current state of knowledge on the practical application of gene profiling techniques using microarrays for determining diagnosis, prognosis and response to treatment in colorectal cancer.

  4. DNA microarray-based experimental strategy for trustworthy expression profiling of the hippocampal genes by astaxanthin supplementation in adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yook, Jang Soo; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Soya, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Naturally occurring astaxantin (ASX) is one of the noticeable carotenoid and dietary supplement, which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and neuroprotective effects in the brain through crossing the blood–brain barrier. Specially, we are interested in the role of ASX as a brain food. Although ASX has been suggested to have potential benefit to the brain function, the underlying molecular mechanisms and events mediating such effect remain unknown. Here we examined molecular factors in the hippocampus of adult mouse fed ASX diets (0.1% and 0.5% doses) using DNA microarray (Agilent 4 × 44 K whole mouse genome chip) analysis. In this study, we described in detail our experimental workflow and protocol, and validated quality controls with the housekeeping gene expression (Gapdh and Beta-actin) on the dye-swap based approach to advocate our microarray data, which have been uploaded to Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE62197) as a gene resource for the scientific community. This data will also form an important basis for further detailed experiments and bioinformatics analysis with an aim to unravel the potential molecular pathways or mechanisms underlying the positive effects of ASX supplementation on the brain, in particular the hippocampus. PMID:26981356

  5. Screening of deafness-causing DNA variants that are common in patients of European ancestry using a microarray-based approach.

    PubMed

    Yan, Denise; Xiang, Guangxin; Chai, Xingping; Qing, Jie; Shang, Haiqiong; Zou, Bing; Mittal, Rahul; Shen, Jun; Smith, Richard J H; Fan, Yao-Shan; Blanton, Susan H; Tekin, Mustafa; Morton, Cynthia; Xing, Wanli; Cheng, Jing; Liu, Xue Zhong

    2017-01-01

    The unparalleled heterogeneity in genetic causes of hearing loss along with remarkable differences in prevalence of causative variants among ethnic groups makes single gene tests technically inefficient. Although hundreds of genes have been reported to be associated with nonsyndromic hearing loss (NSHL), GJB2, GJB6, SLC26A4, and mitochondrial (mt) MT-RNR1 and MTTS are the major contributors. In order to provide a faster, more comprehensive and cost effective assay, we constructed a DNA fluidic array, CapitalBioMiamiOtoArray, for the detection of sequence variants in five genes that are common in most populations of European descent. They consist of c.35delG, p.W44C, p.L90P, c.167delT (GJB2); 309kb deletion (GJB6); p.L236P, p.T416P (SLC26A4); and m.1555A>G, m.7444G>A (mtDNA). We have validated our hearing loss array by analyzing a total of 160 DNAs samples. Our results show 100% concordance between the fluidic array biochip-based approach and the established Sanger sequencing method, thus proving its robustness and reliability at a relatively low cost.

  6. Screening of deafness-causing DNA variants that are common in patients of European ancestry using a microarray-based approach

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Denise; Xiang, Guangxin; Chai, Xingping; Qing, Jie; Shang, Haiqiong; Zou, Bing; Mittal, Rahul; Shen, Jun; Smith, Richard J. H.; Fan, Yao-Shan; Blanton, Susan H.; Tekin, Mustafa; Morton, Cynthia; Xing, Wanli; Cheng, Jing; Liu, Xue Zhong

    2017-01-01

    The unparalleled heterogeneity in genetic causes of hearing loss along with remarkable differences in prevalence of causative variants among ethnic groups makes single gene tests technically inefficient. Although hundreds of genes have been reported to be associated with nonsyndromic hearing loss (NSHL), GJB2, GJB6, SLC26A4, and mitochondrial (mt) MT-RNR1 and MTTS are the major contributors. In order to provide a faster, more comprehensive and cost effective assay, we constructed a DNA fluidic array, CapitalBioMiamiOtoArray, for the detection of sequence variants in five genes that are common in most populations of European descent. They consist of c.35delG, p.W44C, p.L90P, c.167delT (GJB2); 309kb deletion (GJB6); p.L236P, p.T416P (SLC26A4); and m.1555A>G, m.7444G>A (mtDNA). We have validated our hearing loss array by analyzing a total of 160 DNAs samples. Our results show 100% concordance between the fluidic array biochip-based approach and the established Sanger sequencing method, thus proving its robustness and reliability at a relatively low cost. PMID:28273078

  7. Hybrid microarray based on double biomolecular markers of DNA and carbohydrate for simultaneous genotypic and phenotypic detection of cholera toxin-producing Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hwa Hui; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Chang Sup; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2016-05-15

    Life-threatening diarrheal cholera is usually caused by water or food contaminated with cholera toxin-producing Vibrio cholerae. For the prevention and surveillance of cholera, it is crucial to rapidly and precisely detect and identify the etiological causes, such as V. cholerae and/or its toxin. In the present work, we propose the use of a hybrid double biomolecular marker (DBM) microarray containing 16S rRNA-based DNA capture probe to genotypically identify V. cholerae and GM1 pentasaccharide capture probe to phenotypically detect cholera toxin. We employed a simple sample preparation method to directly obtain genomic DNA and secreted cholera toxin as target materials from bacterial cells. By utilizing the constructed DBM microarray and prepared samples, V. cholerae and cholera toxin were detected successfully, selectively, and simultaneously; the DBM microarray was able to analyze the pathogenicity of the identified V. cholerae regardless of whether the bacteria produces toxin. Therefore, our proposed DBM microarray is a new effective platform for identifying bacteria and analyzing bacterial pathogenicity simultaneously.

  8. Evaluation of applicability of DNA microarray-based characterization of bovine Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolates using whole genome sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Barth, Stefanie A; Menge, Christian; Eichhorn, Inga; Semmler, Torsten; Pickard, Derek; Geue, Lutz

    2017-09-01

    We assessed the ability of a commercial DNA microarray to characterize bovine Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) isolates and evaluated the results using in silico hybridization of the microarray probes within whole genome sequencing scaffolds. From a total of 69,954 reactions (393 probes with 178 isolates), 68,706 (98.2%) gave identical results by DNA microarray and in silico probe hybridization. Results were more congruent when detecting the genoserotype (209 differing results from 19,758 in total; 1.1%) or antimicrobial resistance genes (AMRGs; 141 of 26,878; 0.5%) than when detecting virulence-associated genes (VAGs; 876 of 22,072; 4.0%). Owing to the limited coverage of O-antigens by the microarray, only 37.2% of the isolates could be genoserotyped. However, the microarray proved suitable to rapidly screen bovine STEC strains for the occurrence of high numbers of VAGs and AMRGs and is suitable for molecular surveillance workflows.

  9. Correlation Index-Based Responsible-Enzyme Gene Screening (CIRES), a Novel DNA Microarray-Based Method for Enzyme Gene Involved in Glycan Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Harumi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Fujinawa, Reiko; Naito, Yuko; Okuno, Yasushi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Suzuki, Akemi; Kozutsumi, Yasunori

    2007-01-01

    Background Glycan biosynthesis occurs though a multi-step process that requires a variety of enzymes ranging from glycosyltransferases to those involved in cytosolic sugar metabolism. In many cases, glycan biosynthesis follows a glycan-specific, linear pathway. As glycosyltransferases are generally regulated at the level of transcription, assessing the overall transcriptional profile for glycan biosynthesis genes seems warranted. However, a systematic approach for assessing the correlation between glycan expression and glycan-related gene expression has not been reported previously. Methodology To facilitate genetic analysis of glycan biosynthesis, we sought to correlate the expression of genes involved in cell-surface glycan formation with the expression of the glycans, as detected by glycan-recognizing probes. We performed cross-sample comparisons of gene expression profiles using a newly developed, glycan-focused cDNA microarray. Cell-surface glycan expression profiles were obtained using flow cytometry of cells stained with plant lectins. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for these profiles and were used to identify enzyme genes correlated with glycan biosynthesis. Conclusions This method, designated correlation index-based responsible-enzyme gene screening (CIRES), successfully identified genes already known to be involved in the biosynthesis of certain glycans. Our evaluation of CIRES indicates that it is useful for identifying genes involved in the biosynthesis of glycan chains that can be probed with lectins using flow cytometry. PMID:18043739

  10. DNA microarray-based solid-phase PCR on copoly (DMA-NAS-MAPS) silicon coated slides: An example of relevant clinical application.

    PubMed

    Damin, Francesco; Galbiati, Silvia; Ferrari, Maurizio; Chiari, Marcella

    2016-04-15

    In a previous study we developed a highly sensitive DNA microarray for the detection of common KRAS oncogenic mutations, which has been proven to be highly specific in assigning the correct genotype without any enrichment strategy even in the presence of minority mutated alleles. However, in this approach, the need of a spotter for the deposition of the purified PCR products on the substrates and the purification step of the conventional PCR are serious drawbacks. To overcome these limitations we have introduced the solid-phase polymerase chain reaction (SP-PCR) to form the array of PCR products starting from the oligonucleotide primers. This work was possible thanks to the great thermal stability of the copoly (DMA-NAS-MAPS) coating which withstands PCR thermal cycling temperatures. As an example of the application of this platform we performed the analysis of six common mutations in the codon 12 of KRAS gene (G12A, G12C, G12D, G12R, G12S, and G12V). In conclusion solid-phase PCR, combined with dual-color hybridization, allows mutation analysis in a shorter time span and is more suitable for automation.

  11. Microarray-Based Detection and Typing of the Rhizobium Nodulation Gene nodC: Potential of DNA Arrays To Diagnose Biological Functions of Interest†

    PubMed Central

    Bontemps, Cyril; Golfier, Geoffroy; Gris-Liebe, Carine; Carrere, Sébastien; Talini, Luc; Boivin-Masson, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Environmental screening of bacteria for the presence of genes of interest is a challenging problem, due to the high variability of the nucleotide sequence of a given gene between species. Here, we tackle this general issue using a particularly well-suited model system that consists of the nodulation gene nodC, which is shared by phylogenetically distant rhizobia. 41mer and 50mer oligonucleotides featuring the nucleotide diversity of two highly conserved regions of the NodC protein were spotted on glass slides and cross hybridized with the radioactive-labeled target genomic DNA under low-stringency conditions. Statistical analysis of the hybridization patterns allowed the detection of known, as well as new, nodC sequences and classified the rhizobial strains accordingly. The microarray was successfully used to type the nodC gene directly from legume nodules, thus eliminating the need of cultivation of the endosymbiont. This approach could be extended to a panel of diagnostic genes and constitute a powerful tool for studying the distribution of genes of interest in the environment, as well as for bacteria identification. PMID:16332784

  12. Microarray-Based Analysis of Methylation Status of CpGs in Placental DNA and Maternal Blood DNA – Potential New Epigenetic Biomarkers for Cell Free Fetal DNA-Based Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hatt, Lotte; Aagaard, Mads M.; Graakjaer, Jesper; Bach, Cathrine; Sommer, Steffen; Agerholm, Inge E.; Kølvraa, Steen; Bojesen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic markers for cell free fetal DNA in the maternal blood circulation are highly interesting in the field of non-invasive prenatal testing since such markers will offer a possibility to quantify the amount of fetal DNA derived from different chromosomes in a maternal blood sample. The aim of the present study was to define new fetal specific epigenetic markers present in placental DNA that can be utilized in non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. We have conducted a high-resolution methylation specific beadchip microarray study assessing more than 450.000 CpG sites. We have analyzed the DNA methylation profiles of 10 maternal blood samples and compared them to 12 1st trimesters chorionic samples from normal placentas, identifying a number of CpG sites that are differentially methylated in maternal blood cells compared to chorionic tissue. To strengthen the utility of these differentially methylated CpG sites to be used with methyl-sensitive restriction enzymes (MSRE) in PCR-based NIPD, we furthermore refined the list of selected sites, containing a restriction sites for one of 16 different methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes. We present a list of markers on chromosomes 13, 18 and 21 with a potential for aneuploidy testing as well as a list of markers for regions harboring sub-microscopic deletion- or duplication syndromes. PMID:26230497

  13. Human DNA ligases: a comprehensive new look for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deependra Kumar; Krishna, Shagun; Chandra, Sharat; Shameem, Mohammad; Deshmukh, Amit Laxmikant; Banerjee, Dibyendu

    2014-05-01

    Living organisms belonging to all three domains of life, viz., eubacteria, archaeabacteria, and eukaryotes encode one or more DNA ligases. DNA ligases are indispensable in various DNA repair and replication processes and a deficiency or an inhibition of their activity can lead to accumulation of DNA damage and strand breaks. DNA damage, specially strand breaks at unsustainable levels can lead to replication block and/or cell death. DNA ligases as potential anticancer targets have been realized only recently. There is enough rationale to suggest that ligases have a tremendous potential for novel therapeutics including anticancer and antibacterial therapy, specially when the world is facing acute problems of drug resistance and chemotherapy failure, with an immediate need for new therapeutic targets. Here, we review the current state of the art in the development of human ligase inhibitors, their structures, molecular mechanisms, physiological effects, and their potential in future cancer therapy. Citing examples, we focus on strategies for improving the activity and specificity of existing and novel inhibitors by using structure-based rational approaches. In the end, we describe potential new sites on the ligase I protein that can be targeted for the development of novel inhibitors. This is the first comprehensive review to compile all known human ligase inhibitors and to provide a rationale for the further development of ligase inhibitors for cancer therapy. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Comprehensive DNA barcoding of the herpetofauna of Germany.

    PubMed

    Hawlitschek, O; Morinière, J; Dunz, A; Franzen, M; Rödder, D; Glaw, F; Haszprunar, G

    2016-01-01

    We present the first comprehensive DNA barcoding study of German reptiles and amphibians representing likewise the first on the European herpetofauna. A total of 248 barcodes for all native species and subspecies in the country and a few additional taxa were obtained in the framework of the projects 'Barcoding Fauna Bavarica' (BFB) and 'German Barcode of Life' (GBOL). In contrast to many invertebrate groups, the success rate of the identification of mitochondrial lineages representing species via DNA barcode was almost 100% because no cases of Barcode Index Number (BIN) sharing were detected within German native reptiles and amphibians. However, as expected, a reliable identification of the hybridogenetic species complex in the frog genus Pelophylax was not possible. Deep conspecific lineages resulting in the identification of more than one BIN were found in Lissotriton vulgaris, Natrix natrix and the hybridogenetic Pelophylax complex. A high variety of lineages with different BINs was also found in the barcodes of wall lizards (Podarcis muralis), confirming the existence of many introduced lineages and the frequent occurrence of multiple introductions. Besides the reliable species identification of all life stages and even of tissue remains, our study highlights other potential applications of DNA barcoding concerning German amphibians and reptiles, such as the detection of allochthonous lineages, monitoring of gene flow and also noninvasive sampling via environmental DNA. DNA barcoding based on COI has now proven to be a reliable and efficient tool for studying most amphibians and reptiles as it is already for many other organism groups in zoology.

  15. DNA Microarray-Based Typing of Streptococcus agalactiae Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Nitschke, Heike; Slickers, Peter; Müller, Elke; Ehricht, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae frequently colonizes the urogenital tract, and it is a major cause of bacterial septicemia, meningitis, and pneumonia in newborns. For typing purposes, a microarray targeting group B streptococcus (GBS) virulence-associated markers and resistance genes was designed and validated with reference strains, as well as clinical and veterinary isolates. Selected isolates were also subjected to multilocus sequence typing. It was observed that putative typing markers, such as alleles of the alpha-like protein or capsule types, vary independently of each other, and they also vary independently from the affiliation to their multilocus sequence typing (MLST)-defined sequence types. Thus, it is not possible to assign isolates to sequence types based on the identification of a single distinct marker, such as a capsule type or alp allele. This suggests the occurrence of frequent genomic recombination. For array-based typing, a set of 11 markers (bac, alp, pil1 locus, pepS8, fbsB, capsule locus, hylB, abiG-I/-II plus Q8DZ34, pil2 locus, nss plus srr plus rogB2, and rgfC/A/D/B) was defined that provides a framework for splitting the tested 448 S. agalactiae isolates into 76 strains that clustered mainly according to MLST-defined clonal complexes. There was evidence for region- and host-specific differences in the population structure of S. agalactiae, as well as an overrepresentation of strains related to sequence type 17 among the invasive isolates. The arrays and typing scheme described here proved to be a convenient tool for genotyping large numbers of clinical/veterinary isolates and thus might help obtain insight into the epidemiology of S. agalactiae. PMID:25165085

  16. Comprehensive DNA barcode coverage of North American birds

    PubMed Central

    KERR, KEVIN C R; STOECKLE, MARK Y; DOVE, CARLA J; WEIGT, LEE A; FRANCIS, CHARLES M; HEBERT, PAUL D N

    2007-01-01

    DNA barcoding seeks to assemble a standardized reference library for DNA-based identification of eukaryotic species. The utility and limitations of this approach need to be tested on well-characterized taxonomic assemblages. Here we provide a comprehensive DNA barcode analysis for North American birds including 643 species representing 93% of the breeding and pelagic avifauna of the USA and Canada. Most (94%) species possess distinct barcode clusters, with average neighbour-joining bootstrap support of 98%. In the remaining 6%, barcode clusters correspond to small sets of closely related species, most of which hybridize regularly. Fifteen (2%) currently recognized species are comprised of two distinct barcode clusters, many of which may represent cryptic species. Intraspecific variation is weakly related to census population size and species age. This study confirms that DNA barcoding can be effectively applied across the geographical and taxonomic expanse of North American birds. The consistent finding of constrained intraspecific mitochondrial variation in this large assemblage of species supports the emerging view that selective sweeps limit mitochondrial diversity. PMID:18784793

  17. Comprehensive identification and analysis of human accelerated regulatory DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gittelman, Rachel M.; Hun, Enna; Ay, Ferhat; Madeoy, Jennifer; Pennacchio, Len; Noble, William S.; Hawkins, R. David; Akey, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been hypothesized that changes in gene regulation have played an important role in human evolution, but regulatory DNA has been much more difficult to study compared with protein-coding regions. Recent large-scale studies have created genome-scale catalogs of DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs), which demark potentially functional regulatory DNA. To better define regulatory DNA that has been subject to human-specific adaptive evolution, we performed comprehensive evolutionary and population genetics analyses on over 18 million DHSs discovered in 130 cell types. We identified 524 DHSs that are conserved in nonhuman primates but accelerated in the human lineage (haDHS), and estimate that 70% of substitutions in haDHSs are attributable to positive selection. Through extensive computational and experimental analyses, we demonstrate that haDHSs are often active in brain or neuronal cell types; play an important role in regulating the expression of developmentally important genes, including many transcription factors such as SOX6, POU3F2, and HOX genes; and identify striking examples of adaptive regulatory evolution that may have contributed to human-specific phenotypes. More generally, our results reveal new insights into conserved and adaptive regulatory DNA in humans and refine the set of genomic substrates that distinguish humans from their closest living primate relatives. PMID:26104583

  18. microDuMIP: target-enrichment technique for microarray-based duplex molecular inversion probes

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung-Ki; Ahn, Jinwoo; Kim, Han Sang; Han, Soo Min; Jang, Hoon; Lee, Min Goo; Lee, Ji Hyun; Bang, Duhee

    2015-01-01

    Molecular inversion probe (MIP)-based capture is a scalable and effective target-enrichment technology that can use synthetic single-stranded oligonucleotides as probes. Unlike the straightforward use of synthetic oligonucleotides for low-throughput target capture, high-throughput MIP capture has required laborious protocols to generate thousands of single-stranded probes from DNA microarray because of multiple enzymatic steps, gel purifications and extensive PCR amplifications. Here, we developed a simple and efficient microarray-based MIP preparation protocol using only one enzyme with double-stranded probes and improved target capture yields by designing probes with overlapping targets and unique barcodes. To test our strategy, we produced 11 510 microarray-based duplex MIPs (microDuMIPs) and captured 3554 exons of 228 genes in a HapMap genomic DNA sample (NA12878). Under our protocol, capture performance and precision of calling were compatible to conventional MIP capture methods, yet overlapping targets and unique barcodes allowed us to precisely genotype with as little as 50 ng of input genomic DNA without library preparation. microDuMIP method is simpler and cheaper, allowing broader applications and accurate target sequencing with a scalable number of targets. PMID:25414325

  19. Use of Microarray-based Genomic Technologies for Assessing Microbial Community Composition and Dynamics in Contaminated Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J.; Schadt, C.; Gentry, T.; He, Z.; Wu, L.; Rhee, S.; Liu, X.; Liebich, J.; Chong, S.; Yang, Z.; Gao, H.

    2004-12-01

    To effectively monitor microbial populations involved in various important processes, a 50-mer-based oligonucleotide microarray was developed based on known genes and pathways involved in: biodegradation, metal resistance and reduction, denitrification, nitrification, nitrogen fixation, methane oxidation, methanogenesis, carbon polymer decomposition, and sulfate reduction. This array contains approx 2000 unique and group-specific probes with <85% similarity to their non-target sequences. Based on artificial probes, our results showed that at hybridization conditions of 50oC and 50% formamide, the 50-mer microarray hybridization can differentiate sequences having <88% similarity. Specificity tests with representative pure cultures indicated that the designed probes on the arrays appeared to be specific to their corresponding target genes. Detection limits were about 5-10ng genomic DNA in the absence of background DNA, and 50-100ng ( ˜1.3 ¡A107 cells) in the presence background DNA. Strong linear relationships between signal intensity and target DNA and RNA concentration were observed (r2 = 0.95-0.99). Real-time PCR analysis of 12 representative genes was consistent with microarray-based quantification (r2 = 0.95). Also novel approaches were developed and used to increase microarray detection sensitivity of both DNA and mRNA. Application of these array-based technologies to analyze microbial communities in contaminated groundwaters from the US Department of Energy¡_s Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Program (NABIR) Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, TN, demonstrated that it is feasible to biostimulate the indigenous microbial populations for contaminant remediation but the process could be very complicated due to highly spatial heterogeneous microbial distributions. Based on these results, more comprehensive functional gene arrays containing ˜27,000 probes from the genes important for biogeochemical cycling of C, N, S, P, metal resistance and

  20. Rapid identification of novel antigens of Salmonella Enteritidis by microarray-based immunoscreening.

    PubMed

    Danckert, Lena; Hoppe, Sebastian; Bier, Frank F; von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus

    2014-01-01

    We report on an approach to rapidly screen thousands of Salmonella Enteritidis proteins with the goal of identifying novel immunodominant proteins. We used a microarray-based system that warrants high throughput and easy handling. Seven immunogenic candidates were selected after screening. Comparative analyses by ELISA and microarrays manifested their immunodominant character. The large repetitive protein (SEN4030) that plays a role as a putative adhesin in initial cell surface interaction and is highly specific to Salmonella is considered to be the most suitable protein for a diagnostic approach. The results further demonstrate that the strategy applied herein is convenient for specifically identifying immunogenic proteins of pathogenic microorganisms. Consequently, it enables a sound assessment of promising candidates for diagnostic applications and vaccine development. Moreover, the elucidation of immunogenic proteins may assist in unveiling unknown virulence-associated factors, thus furthering the understanding of the underlying pathogenicity of Salmonella in general, and of S. Enteritidis, one of the most frequently detected serovars of this pathogen, in particular. FigureThe microarray-based approach was aimed at identifying novel immunodominant proteins of S. Enteritidis. Seven antigens were revealed by screening a cDNA expression library. SEN4030, a large repetitive protein specific for salmonella, is considered an optimal candidate for future applications.

  1. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1988-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:3368330

  2. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1987-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:3575113

  3. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1989-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:2654889

  4. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1990-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:2333227

  5. Multiple detection of single nucleotide polymorphism by microarray-based resonance light scattering assay with enlarged gold nanoparticle probes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiaxue; Ma, Lan; Lei, Zhen; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-03-07

    The mapping of specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in patients' genome is a critical process for the development of personalized therapy. In this work, a DNA microarray-based resonance light scattering (RLS) assay has been developed for multiplexed detection of breast cancer related SNPs with high sensitivity and selectivity. After hybridization of the desired target single-stranded DNAs (ssDNAs) with the ssDNA probes on a microarray, the polyvalent ssDNA modified 13 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are employed to label the hybridization reaction through the formation of a three-stranded DNA system. The H2O2-mediated enlargement of GNPs is then used to enhance the RLS signal. The microarray-based RLS assay provides a detection limit of 10 pM (S/N = 3) for the target ssDNA and determines an allele frequency as low as 1.0% in the target ssDNA cocktail. Combined with an asymmetric PCR technique, the proposed assay shows good accuracy and sensitivity in profiling 4 SNPs related to breast cancer of three selected cell lines.

  6. Evaluating Japanese patients with the Marfan syndrome using high-throughput microarray-based mutational analysis of fibrillin-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Naomi; Imai, Yasushi; Takahashi, Yuji; Nawata, Kan; Hara, Kazuo; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Kato, Masayoshi; Takeda, Norifumi; Kohro, Takahide; Morita, Hiroyuki; Taketani, Tsuyoshi; Morota, Tetsuro; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Goto, Jun; Tsuji, Shoji; Takamoto, Shinichi; Nagai, Ryozo; Hirata, Yasunobu

    2011-12-15

    Marfan syndrome (MS) is an inherited connective tissue disorder, and detailed evaluations of multiple organ systems are required for its diagnosis. Genetic testing of the disease-causing fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1) is also important in this diagnostic scheme. The aim of this study was to define the clinical characteristics of Japanese patients with MS and enable the efficient and accurate diagnosis of MS with mutational analysis using a high-throughput microarray-based resequencing system. Fifty-three Japanese probands were recruited, and their clinical characteristics were evaluated using the Ghent criteria. For mutational analysis, an oligonucleotide microarray was designed to interrogate FBN1, and the entire exon and exon-intron boundaries of FBN1 were sequenced. Clinical evaluation revealed more pulmonary phenotypes and fewer skeletal phenotypes in Japanese patients with MS compared to Caucasians. The microarray-based resequencing system detected 35 kinds of mutations, including 23 new mutations. The mutation detection rate for patients who fulfilled the Ghent criteria reached 71%. Of note, splicing mutations accounted for 19% of all mutations, which is more than previously reported. In conclusion, this comprehensive approach successfully detected clinical phenotypes of Japanese patients with MS and demonstrated the usefulness and feasibility of this microarray-based high-throughput resequencing system for mutational analysis of MS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comprehensive DNA methylation analysis of the Aedes aegypti genome.

    PubMed

    Falckenhayn, Cassandra; Carneiro, Vitor Coutinho; de Mendonça Amarante, Anderson; Schmid, Katharina; Hanna, Katharina; Kang, Seokyoung; Helm, Mark; Dimopoulos, George; Fantappié, Marcelo Rosado; Lyko, Frank

    2016-11-02

    Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are important vectors of viral diseases. Mosquito host factors play key roles in virus control and it has been suggested that dengue virus replication is regulated by Dnmt2-mediated DNA methylation. However, recent studies have shown that Dnmt2 is a tRNA methyltransferase and that Dnmt2-dependent methylomes lack defined DNA methylation patterns, thus necessitating a systematic re-evaluation of the mosquito genome methylation status. We have now searched the Ae. aegypti genome for candidate DNA modification enzymes. This failed to reveal any known (cytosine-5) DNA methyltransferases, but identified homologues for the Dnmt2 tRNA methyltransferase, the Mettl4 (adenine-6) DNA methyltransferase, and the Tet DNA demethylase. All genes were expressed at variable levels throughout mosquito development. Mass spectrometry demonstrated that DNA methylation levels were several orders of magnitude below the levels that are usually detected in organisms with DNA methylation-dependent epigenetic regulation. Furthermore, whole-genome bisulfite sequencing failed to reveal any evidence of defined DNA methylation patterns. These results suggest that the Ae. aegypti genome is unmethylated. Interestingly, additional RNA bisulfite sequencing provided first evidence for Dnmt2-mediated tRNA methylation in mosquitoes. These findings have important implications for understanding the mechanism of Dnmt2-dependent virus regulation.

  8. Comprehensive DNA methylation analysis of the Aedes aegypti genome

    PubMed Central

    Falckenhayn, Cassandra; Carneiro, Vitor Coutinho; de Mendonça Amarante, Anderson; Schmid, Katharina; Hanna, Katharina; Kang, Seokyoung; Helm, Mark; Dimopoulos, George; Fantappié, Marcelo Rosado; Lyko, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are important vectors of viral diseases. Mosquito host factors play key roles in virus control and it has been suggested that dengue virus replication is regulated by Dnmt2-mediated DNA methylation. However, recent studies have shown that Dnmt2 is a tRNA methyltransferase and that Dnmt2-dependent methylomes lack defined DNA methylation patterns, thus necessitating a systematic re-evaluation of the mosquito genome methylation status. We have now searched the Ae. aegypti genome for candidate DNA modification enzymes. This failed to reveal any known (cytosine-5) DNA methyltransferases, but identified homologues for the Dnmt2 tRNA methyltransferase, the Mettl4 (adenine-6) DNA methyltransferase, and the Tet DNA demethylase. All genes were expressed at variable levels throughout mosquito development. Mass spectrometry demonstrated that DNA methylation levels were several orders of magnitude below the levels that are usually detected in organisms with DNA methylation-dependent epigenetic regulation. Furthermore, whole-genome bisulfite sequencing failed to reveal any evidence of defined DNA methylation patterns. These results suggest that the Ae. aegypti genome is unmethylated. Interestingly, additional RNA bisulfite sequencing provided first evidence for Dnmt2-mediated tRNA methylation in mosquitoes. These findings have important implications for understanding the mechanism of Dnmt2-dependent virus regulation. PMID:27805064

  9. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences—1990 update

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1991-01-01

    An updated list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome over the past year (1990) is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising both gene and pseudogene sequences. PMID:2041801

  10. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences—1991 update

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1992-01-01

    An updated list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome over the past year (1991) is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic probes comprising both gene and pseudogene sequences. PMID:1598240

  11. A protein microarray-based analysis of S-nitrosylation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Matthew W.; Forrester, Michael T.; Stamler, Jonathan S.

    2009-01-01

    The ubiquitous cellular influence of nitric oxide (NO) is exerted substantially through protein S-nitrosylation. Whereas NO is highly promiscuous, physiological S-nitrosylation is typically restricted to one or very few Cys residue(s) in target proteins. The molecular basis for this specificity may derive from properties of the target protein, the S-nitrosylating species, or both. Here, we describe a protein microarray-based approach to investigate determinants of S-nitrosylation by biologically relevant low-mass S-nitrosothiols (SNOs). We identify large sets of yeast and human target proteins, among which those with active-site Cys thiols residing at N termini of α-helices or within catalytic loops were particularly prominent. However, S-nitrosylation varied substantially even within these families of proteins (e.g., papain-related Cys-dependent hydrolases and rhodanese/Cdc25 phosphatases), suggesting that neither secondary structure nor intrinsic nucleophilicity of Cys thiols was sufficient to explain specificity. Further analyses revealed a substantial influence of NO-donor stereochemistry and structure on efficiency of S-nitrosylation as well as an unanticipated and important role for allosteric effectors. Thus, high-throughput screening and unbiased proteome coverage reveal multifactorial determinants of S-nitrosylation (which may be overlooked in alternative proteomic analyses), and support the idea that target specificity can be achieved through rational design of S-nitrosothiols. PMID:19864628

  12. A microarray-based method to perform nucleic acid selections.

    PubMed

    Aminova, Olga; Disney, Matthew D

    2010-01-01

    This method describes a microarray-based platform to perform nucleic acid selections. Chemical ligands to which a nucleic acid binder is desired are immobilized onto an agarose microarray surface; the array is then incubated with an RNA library. Bound RNA library members are harvested directly from the array surface via gel excision at the position on the array where a ligand was immobilized. The RNA is then amplified via RT-PCR, cloned, and sequenced. This method has the following advantages over traditional resin-based Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX): (1) multiple selections can be completed in parallel on a single microarray surface; (2) kinetic biases in the selections are mitigated since all RNA binders are harvested from an array via gel excision; (3) the amount of chemical ligand needed to perform a selection is minimized; (4) selections do not require expensive resins or equipment; and (5) the matrix used for selections is inexpensive and easy to prepare. Although this protocol was demonstrated for RNA selections, it should be applicable for any nucleic acid selection.

  13. A protein microarray-based analysis of S-nitrosylation.

    PubMed

    Foster, Matthew W; Forrester, Michael T; Stamler, Jonathan S

    2009-11-10

    The ubiquitous cellular influence of nitric oxide (NO) is exerted substantially through protein S-nitrosylation. Whereas NO is highly promiscuous, physiological S-nitrosylation is typically restricted to one or very few Cys residue(s) in target proteins. The molecular basis for this specificity may derive from properties of the target protein, the S-nitrosylating species, or both. Here, we describe a protein microarray-based approach to investigate determinants of S-nitrosylation by biologically relevant low-mass S-nitrosothiols (SNOs). We identify large sets of yeast and human target proteins, among which those with active-site Cys thiols residing at N termini of alpha-helices or within catalytic loops were particularly prominent. However, S-nitrosylation varied substantially even within these families of proteins (e.g., papain-related Cys-dependent hydrolases and rhodanese/Cdc25 phosphatases), suggesting that neither secondary structure nor intrinsic nucleophilicity of Cys thiols was sufficient to explain specificity. Further analyses revealed a substantial influence of NO-donor stereochemistry and structure on efficiency of S-nitrosylation as well as an unanticipated and important role for allosteric effectors. Thus, high-throughput screening and unbiased proteome coverage reveal multifactorial determinants of S-nitrosylation (which may be overlooked in alternative proteomic analyses), and support the idea that target specificity can be achieved through rational design of S-nitrosothiols.

  14. A comprehensive characterization of mitochondrial DNA mutations in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Vidone, Michele; Clima, Rosanna; Santorsola, Mariangela; Calabrese, Claudia; Girolimetti, Giulia; Kurelac, Ivana; Amato, Laura Benedetta; Iommarini, Luisa; Trevisan, Elisa; Leone, Marco; Soffietti, Riccardo; Morra, Isabella; Faccani, Giuliano; Attimonelli, Marcella; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant brain cancer in adults, with a poor prognosis, whose molecular stratification still represents a challenge in pathology and clinics. On the other hand, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in most tumors as modifiers of the bioenergetics state, albeit in GBM a characterization of the mtDNA status is lacking to date. Here, a characterization of the burden of mtDNA mutations in GBM samples was performed. First, investigation of tumor-specific vs. non tumor-specific mutations was carried out with the MToolBox bioinformatics pipeline by analyzing 45 matched tumor/blood samples, from whole genome or whole exome sequencing datasets obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) consortium. Additionally, the entire mtDNA sequence was obtained in a dataset of 104 fresh-frozen GBM samples. Mitochondrial mutations with potential pathogenic interest were prioritized based on heteroplasmic fraction, nucleotide variability, and in silico prediction of pathogenicity. A preliminary biochemical analysis of the activity of mitochondrial respiratory complexes was also performed on fresh-frozen GBM samples. Although a high number of mutations was detected, we report that the large majority of them does not pass the prioritization filters. Therefore, a relatively limited burden of pathogenic mutations is indeed carried by GBM, which did not appear to determine a general impairment of the respiratory chain. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis in neonates with congenital anomalies: detection of chromosomal imbalances.

    PubMed

    Emy Dorfman, Luiza; Leite, Júlio César L; Giugliani, Roberto; Riegel, Mariluce

    2015-01-01

    To identify chromosomal imbalances by whole-genome microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) in DNA samples of neonates with congenital anomalies of unknown cause from a birth defects monitoring program at a public maternity hospital. A blind genomic analysis was performed retrospectively in 35 stored DNA samples of neonates born between July of 2011 and December of 2012. All potential DNA copy number variations detected (CNVs) were matched with those reported in public genomic databases, and their clinical significance was evaluated. Out of a total of 35 samples tested, 13 genomic imbalances were detected in 12/35 cases (34.3%). In 4/35 cases (11.4%), chromosomal imbalances could be defined as pathogenic; in 5/35 (14.3%) cases, DNA CNVs of uncertain clinical significance were identified; and in 4/35 cases (11.4%), normal variants were detected. Among the four cases with results considered causally related to the clinical findings, two of the four (50%) showed causative alterations already associated with well-defined microdeletion syndromes. In two of the four samples (50%), the chromosomal imbalances found, although predicted as pathogenic, had not been previously associated with recognized clinical entities. Array-CGH analysis allowed for a higher rate of detection of chromosomal anomalies, and this determination is especially valuable in neonates with congenital anomalies of unknown etiology, or in cases in which karyotype results cannot be obtained. Moreover, although the interpretation of the results must be refined, this method is a robust and precise tool that can be used in the first-line investigation of congenital anomalies, and should be considered for prospective/retrospective analyses of DNA samples by birth defect monitoring programs. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Science in the jury box: jurors' comprehension of mitochondrial DNA evidence.

    PubMed

    Hans, Valerie P; Kaye, David H; Dann, B Michael; Farley, Erin J; Albertson, Stephanie

    2011-02-01

    Questions about how jurors understand and apply scientific evidence were addressed in a mock jury study in which 480 jury pool members watched a videotaped mock trial that included expert testimony about mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) evidence purportedly linking a defendant to a crime. Collectively, jurors showed moderately good comprehension of the mtDNA evidence, although some made definitional and inferential errors. Comprehension was better among jurors with higher educational attainment and more mathematics and science courses. Lower comprehension was associated with jurors' reservations about science and concerns about the contamination of mtDNA evidence. The results suggest that most jurors are capable of comprehending and employing scientific evidence presented during trial, although errors and doubts about the evidence should be anticipated.

  17. Microarray-based mutation detection in the dystrophin gene.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Madhuri R; Chin, Ephrem L H; Mulle, Jennifer G; Okou, David T; Warren, Stephen T; Zwick, Michael E

    2008-09-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are X-linked recessive neuromuscular disorders caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 males. The human dystrophin gene spans>2,200 kb, or roughly 0.1% of the genome, and is composed of 79 exons. The mutational spectrum of disease-causing alleles, including exonic copy number variations (CNVs), is complex. Deletions account for approximately 65% of DMD mutations and 85% of BMD mutations. Duplications occur in approximately 6 to 10% of males with either DMD or BMD. The remaining 30 to 35% of mutations consist of small deletions, insertions, point mutations, or splicing mutations, most of which introduce a premature stop codon. Laboratory analysis of dystrophin can be used to confirm a clinical diagnosis of DMD, characterize the type of dystrophin mutation, and perform prenatal testing and carrier testing for females. Current dystrophin diagnostic assays involve a variety of methodologies, including multiplex PCR, Southern blot analysis, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), detection of virtually all mutations-SSCP (DOVAM-S), and single condition amplification/internal primer sequencing (SCAIP); however, these methods are time-consuming, laborious, and do not accurately detect duplication mutations in the dystrophin gene. Furthermore, carrier testing in females is often difficult when a related affected male is unavailable. Here we describe the development, design, validation, and implementation of a high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarray-based approach capable of accurately detecting both deletions and duplications in the dystrophin gene. This assay can be readily adopted by clinical molecular testing laboratories and represents a rapid, cost-effective approach for screening a large gene, such as dystrophin.

  18. Microarray-based mutation detection in the dystrophin gene

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Madhuri R.; Chin, Ephrem L.H.; Mulle, Jennifer G.; Okou, David T.; Warren, Stephen T.; Zwick, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are X-linked recessive neuromuscular disorders caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 males. The human dystrophin gene spans > 2,200 kb, or roughly 0.1% of the genome, and is composed of 79 exons. The mutational spectrum of disease-causing alleles, including exonic copy number variations (CNVs), is complex. Deletions account for approximately 65% of DMD mutations and 85% of BMD mutations. Duplications occur in approximately 6–10% of males with either DMD or BMD. The remaining 30–35% of mutations consist of small deletions, insertions, point mutations, or splicing mutations, most of which introduce a premature stop codon. Laboratory analysis of dystrophin can be used to confirm a clinical diagnosis of DMD, characterize the type of dystrophin mutation, and perform prenatal testing and carrier testing for females. Current dystrophin diagnostic assays involve a variety of methodologies, including multiplex PCR, Southern blot analysis, MLPA, DOVAM-S, and SCAIP; however, these methods are time-consuming, laborious, and do not accurately detect duplication mutations in the dystrophin gene. Furthermore, carrier testing in females is often difficult when a related affected male is unavailable. Here we describe the development, design, validation, and implementation of a high-resolution CGH microarray-based approach capable of accurately detecting both deletions and duplications in the dystrophin gene. This assay can be readily adopted by clinical molecular testing laboratories and represents a rapid, cost-effective approach for screening a large gene, such as dystrophin. PMID:18663755

  19. A comprehensive characterization of rare mitochondrial DNA variants in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Pignataro, Piero; Lasorsa, Vito Alessandro; Hogarty, Michael D.; Castellano, Aurora; Conte, Massimo; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Iolascon, Achille; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Capasso, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuroblastoma, a tumor of the developing sympathetic nervous system, is a common childhood neoplasm that is often lethal. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in most tumors including neuroblastoma. We extracted mtDNA data from a cohort of neuroblastoma samples that had undergone Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) and also used snap-frozen samples in which mtDNA was entirely sequenced by Sanger technology. We next undertook the challenge of determining those mutations that are relevant to, or arisen during tumor development. The bioinformatics pipeline used to extract mitochondrial variants from matched tumor/blood samples was enriched by a set of filters inclusive of heteroplasmic fraction, nucleotide variability, and in silico prediction of pathogenicity. Results Our in silico multistep workflow applied both on WES and Sanger-sequenced neuroblastoma samples, allowed us to identify a limited burden of somatic and germline mitochondrial mutations with a potential pathogenic impact. Conclusions The few singleton germline and somatic mitochondrial mutations emerged, according to our in silico analysis, do not appear to impact on the development of neuroblastoma. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that most mitochondrial somatic mutations can be considered as ‘passengers’ and consequently have no discernible effect in this type of cancer. PMID:27351283

  20. A comprehensive characterization of rare mitochondrial DNA variants in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Francesco Maria; Clima, Rosanna; Pignataro, Piero; Lasorsa, Vito Alessandro; Hogarty, Michael D; Castellano, Aurora; Conte, Massimo; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Iolascon, Achille; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Capasso, Mario

    2016-08-02

    Neuroblastoma, a tumor of the developing sympathetic nervous system, is a common childhood neoplasm that is often lethal. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in most tumors including neuroblastoma. We extracted mtDNA data from a cohort of neuroblastoma samples that had undergone Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) and also used snap-frozen samples in which mtDNA was entirely sequenced by Sanger technology. We next undertook the challenge of determining those mutations that are relevant to, or arisen during tumor development. The bioinformatics pipeline used to extract mitochondrial variants from matched tumor/blood samples was enriched by a set of filters inclusive of heteroplasmic fraction, nucleotide variability, and in silico prediction of pathogenicity. Our in silico multistep workflow applied both on WES and Sanger-sequenced neuroblastoma samples, allowed us to identify a limited burden of somatic and germline mitochondrial mutations with a potential pathogenic impact. The few singleton germline and somatic mitochondrial mutations emerged, according to our in silico analysis, do not appear to impact on the development of neuroblastoma. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that most mitochondrial somatic mutations can be considered as 'passengers' and consequently have no discernible effect in this type of cancer.

  1. Oligonucleotide Fingerprint Identification for Microarray-Based Pathogen Diagnostic Assays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    Yersinia species), or a set of organisms that may or may not have any phylogenetic relationship (e.g. to detect a viral or a bacterial family) and (2) the... phylogenetic tree or published data. The target and neighbor will contain common DNA sequences, which, obviously, cannot be used as DNA fingerprints. DNA... Yersinia pestis and 250 fingerprints for Francisella tularensis are presented. Availability: The implemented algorithm is available upon request

  2. Microarray-based mutation detection and phenotypic characterization in Korean patients with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Cinoo; Kim, Kwang Joong; Bok, Jeong; Lee, Eun-Ju; Kim, Dong-Joon; Oh, Ji Hee; Park, Sung Pyo; Shin, Joo Young; Lee, Jong-Young

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate microarray-based genotyping technology for the detection of mutations responsible for retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and to perform phenotypic characterization of patients with pathogenic mutations. Methods DNA from 336 patients with RP and 360 controls was analyzed using the GoldenGate assay with microbeads containing 95 previously reported disease-associated mutations from 28 RP genes. Mutations identified by microarray-based genotyping were confirmed by direct sequencing. Segregation analysis and phenotypic characterization were performed in patients with mutations. The disease severity was assessed by visual acuity, electroretinography, optical coherence tomography, and kinetic perimetry. Results Ten RP-related mutations of five RP genes (PRP3 pre-mRNA processing factor 3 homolog [PRPF3], rhodopsin [RHO], phosphodiesterase 6B [PDE6B], peripherin 2 [PRPH2], and retinitis pigmentosa 1 [RP1]) were identified in 26 of the 336 patients (7.7%) and in six of the 360 controls (1.7%). The p.H557Y mutation in PDE6B, which was homozygous in four patients and heterozygous in nine patients, was the most frequent mutation (2.5%). Mutation segregation was assessed in four families. Among the patients with missense mutations, the most severe phenotype occurred in patients with p.D984G in RP1; less severe phenotypes occurred in patients with p.R135W in RHO; a relatively moderate phenotype occurred in patients with p.T494M in PRPF3, p.H557Y in PDE6B, or p.W316G in PRPH2; and a mild phenotype was seen in a patient with p.D190N in RHO. Conclusions The results reveal that the GoldenGate assay may not be an efficient method for molecular diagnosis in RP patients with rare mutations, although it has proven to be reliable and efficient for high-throughput genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. The clinical features varied according to the mutations. Continuous effort to identify novel RP genes and mutations in a population is needed to improve the efficiency and

  3. Integrated Microfluidic Devices for Automated Microarray-Based Gene Expression and Genotyping Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Robin H.; Lodes, Mike; Fuji, H. Sho; Danley, David; McShea, Andrew

    that the device identified influenza A hemagglutinin and neuraminidase subtypes and sequenced portions of both genes, demonstrating the potential of integrated microfluidic and microarray technology for multiple virus detection. The device provides a cost-effective solution to eliminate labor-intensive and time-consuming fluidic handling steps and allows microarray-based DNA analysis in a rapid and automated fashion.

  4. Microarray-based ultra-high resolution discovery of genomic deletion mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oligonucleotide microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) offers an attractive possible route for the rapid and cost-effective genome-wide discovery of deletion mutations. CGH typically involves comparison of the hybridization intensities of genomic DNA samples with microarray chip representations of entire genomes, and has widespread potential application in experimental research and medical diagnostics. However, the power to detect small deletions is low. Results Here we use a graduated series of Arabidopsis thaliana genomic deletion mutations (of sizes ranging from 4 bp to ~5 kb) to optimize CGH-based genomic deletion detection. We show that the power to detect smaller deletions (4, 28 and 104 bp) depends upon oligonucleotide density (essentially the number of genome-representative oligonucleotides on the microarray chip), and determine the oligonucleotide spacings necessary to guarantee detection of deletions of specified size. Conclusions Our findings will enhance a wide range of research and clinical applications, and in particular will aid in the discovery of genomic deletions in the absence of a priori knowledge of their existence. PMID:24655320

  5. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and microarray-based analysis of protein location

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tong Ihn; Johnstone, Sarah E; Young, Richard A

    2010-01-01

    Genome-wide location analysis, also known as ChIP-Chip, combines chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA microarray analysis to identify protein-DNA interactions that occur in living cells. Protein-DNA interactions are captured in vivo by chemical crosslinking. Cell lysis, DNA fragmentation and immunoaffinity purification of the desired protein will co-purify DNA fragments that are associated with that protein. The enriched DNA population is then labeled, combined with a differentially labeled reference sample and applied to DNA microarrays to detect enriched signals. Various computational and bioinformatic approaches are then applied to normalize the enriched and reference channels, to connect signals to the portions of the genome that are represented on the DNA microarrays, to provide confidence metrics and to generate maps of protein-genome occupancy. Here, we describe the experimental protocols that we use from crosslinking of cells to hybridization of labeled material, together with insights into the aspects of these protocols that influence the results. These protocols require approximately 1 week to complete once sufficient numbers of cells have been obtained, and have been used to produce robust, high-quality ChIP-chip results in many different cell and tissue types. PMID:17406303

  6. Development and Use of Integrated Microarray-Based Genomic Technologies for Assessing Microbial Community Composition and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    J. Zhou; S.-K. Rhee; C. Schadt; T. Gentry; Z. He; X. Li; X. Liu; J. Liebich; S.C. Chong; L. Wu

    2004-03-17

    To effectively monitor microbial populations involved in various important processes, a 50-mer-based oligonucleotide microarray was developed based on known genes and pathways involved in: biodegradation, metal resistance and reduction, denitrification, nitrification, nitrogen fixation, methane oxidation, methanogenesis, carbon polymer decomposition, and sulfate reduction. This array contains approximately 2000 unique and group-specific probes with <85% similarity to their non-target sequences. Based on artificial probes, our results showed that at hybridization conditions of 50 C and 50% formamide, the 50-mer microarray hybridization can differentiate sequences having <88% similarity. Specificity tests with representative pure cultures indicated that the designed probes on the arrays appeared to be specific to their corresponding target genes. Detection limits were about 5-10ng genomic DNA in the absence of background DNA, and 50-100ng ({approx}1.3{sup o} 10{sup 7} cells) in the presence background DNA. Strong linear relationships between signal intensity and target DNA and RNA concentration were observed (r{sup 2} = 0.95-0.99). Application of this microarray to naphthalene-amended enrichments and soil microcosms demonstrated that composition of the microflora varied depending on incubation conditions. While the naphthalene-degrading genes from Rhodococcus-type microorganisms were dominant in enrichments, the genes involved in naphthalene degradation from Gram-negative microorganisms such as Ralstonia, Comamonas, and Burkholderia were most abundant in the soil microcosms (as well as those for polyaromatic hydrocarbon and nitrotoluene degradation). Although naphthalene degradation is widely known and studied in Pseudomonas, Pseudomonas genes were not detected in either system. Real-time PCR analysis of 4 representative genes was consistent with microarray-based quantification (r{sup 2} = 0.95). Currently, we are also applying this microarray to the study of several

  7. Development and Use of Integrated Microarray-Based Genomic Technologies for Assessing Microbial Community Composition and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J.; Wu, L.; Gentry, T.; Schadt, C.; He, Z.; Li, X.

    2006-04-05

    To effectively monitor microbial populations involved in various important processes, a 50-mer-based oligonucleotide microarray was developed based on known genes and pathways involved in: biodegradation, metal resistance and reduction, denitrification, nitrification, nitrogen fixation, methane oxidation, methanogenesis, carbon polymer decomposition, and sulfate reduction. This array contains approximately 2000 unique and group-specific probes with <85% similarity to their non-target sequences. Based on artificial probes, our results showed that at hybridization conditions of 50 C and 50% formamide, the 50-mer microarray hybridization can differentiate sequences having <88% similarity. Specificity tests with representative pure cultures indicated that the designed probes on the arrays appeared to be specific to their corresponding target genes. Detection limits were about 5-10ng genomic DNA in the absence of background DNA, and 50-100ng ({approx}1.3{sup o} 10{sup 7} cells) in the presence background DNA. Strong linear relationships between signal intensity and target DNA and RNA concentration were observed (r{sup 2} = 0.95-0.99). Application of this microarray to naphthalene-amended enrichments and soil microcosms demonstrated that composition of the microflora varied depending on incubation conditions. While the naphthalene-degrading genes from Rhodococcus-type microorganisms were dominant in enrichments, the genes involved in naphthalene degradation from Gram-negative microorganisms such as Ralstonia, Comamonas, and Burkholderia were most abundant in the soil microcosms (as well as those for polyaromatic hydrocarbon and nitrotoluene degradation). Although naphthalene degradation is widely known and studied in Pseudomonas, Pseudomonas genes were not detected in either system. Real-time PCR analysis of 4 representative genes was consistent with microarray-based quantification (r{sup 2} = 0.95). Currently, we are also applying this microarray to the study of several

  8. Comprehensive DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation analysis in the human brain and its implication in mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tadafumi; Iwamoto, Kazuya

    2014-05-01

    Covalent modifications of nucleotides, such as methylation or hydroxymethylation of cytosine, regulate gene expression. Early environmental risk factors play a role in mental disorders in adulthood. This may be in part mediated by epigenetic DNA modifications. Methods for comprehensive analysis of DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation include DNA modification methods such as bisulfite sequencing, or collection of methylated, hydroxymethylated, or unmethylated DNA by specific binding proteins, antibodies, or restriction enzymes, followed by sequencing or microarray analysis. Results from these experiments should be interpreted with caution because each method gives different result. Cytosine hydroxymethylation has different effects on gene expression than cytosine methylation; methylation of CpG islands is associated with lower gene expression, whereas hydroxymethylation in intragenic regions is associated with higher gene expression. The role of hydroxymethylcytosine is of particular interest in mental disorders because the modification is enriched in the brain and synapse related genes, and it exhibits dynamic regulation during development. Many DNA methylation patterns are conserved across species, but there are also human specific signatures. Comprehensive analysis of DNA methylation shows characteristic changes associated with tissues, brain regions, cell types, and developmental states. Thus, differences in DNA methylation status between tissues, brain regions, cell types, and developmental stages should be considered when the role of DNA methylation in mental disorders is studied. Several disease-associated changes in methylation have been reported: hypermethylation of SOX10 in schizophrenia, hypomethylation of HCG9 (HLA complex group 9) in bipolar disorder, hypermethylation of PRIMA1, hypermethylation of SLC6A4 (serotonin transporter) in bipolar disorder, and hypomethylation of ST6GALNAC1 in bipolar disorder. These findings need to be replicated in

  9. Microarray-based Resequencing of Multiple Bacillus anthracis Isolates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-17

    The major technical challenge facing RA-based resequencing Radial tree showing inferred phylogenetic relationships of B. anthracis strains from this...studyFigure 3 Radial tree showing inferred phylogenetic relationships of B. anthracis strains from this study. The 37 variable positions identified in... Phylogenetic tree inference The 37 variable positions identified in this study were con- catenated together to create artificial sequence types. A DNA

  10. Osprey: a comprehensive tool employing novel methods for the design of oligonucleotides for DNA sequencing and microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Paul M. K.; Sensen, Christoph W.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a software package called Osprey for the calculation of optimal oligonucleotides for DNA sequencing and the creation of microarrays based on either PCR-products or directly spotted oligomers. It incorporates a novel use of position-specific scoring matrices, for the sensitive and specific identification of secondary binding sites anywhere in the target sequence. Using accelerated hardware is faster and more efficient than the traditional pairwise alignments used in most oligo-design software. Osprey consists of a module for target site selection based on user input, novel utilities for dealing with problematic sequences such as repeats, and a common code base for the identification of optimal oligonucleotides from the target list. Overall, these improvements provide a program that, without major increases in run time, reflects current DNA thermodynamics models, improves specificity and reduces the user's data preprocessing and parameterization requirements. Using a TimeLogic™ hardware accelerator, we report up to 50-fold reduction in search time versus a linear search strategy. Target sites may be derived from computer analysis of DNA sequence assemblies in the case of sequencing efforts, or genome or EST analysis in the case of microarray development in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. PMID:15456895

  11. Osprey: a comprehensive tool employing novel methods for the design of oligonucleotides for DNA sequencing and microarrays.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Paul M K; Sensen, Christoph W

    2004-09-29

    We have developed a software package called Osprey for the calculation of optimal oligonucleotides for DNA sequencing and the creation of microarrays based on either PCR-products or directly spotted oligomers. It incorporates a novel use of position-specific scoring matrices, for the sensitive and specific identification of secondary binding sites anywhere in the target sequence. Using accelerated hardware is faster and more efficient than the traditional pairwise alignments used in most oligo-design software. Osprey consists of a module for target site selection based on user input, novel utilities for dealing with problematic sequences such as repeats, and a common code base for the identification of optimal oligonucleotides from the target list. Overall, these improvements provide a program that, without major increases in run time, reflects current DNA thermodynamics models, improves specificity and reduces the user's data preprocessing and parameterization requirements. Using a TimeLogic hardware accelerator, we report up to 50-fold reduction in search time versus a linear search strategy. Target sites may be derived from computer analysis of DNA sequence assemblies in the case of sequencing efforts, or genome or EST analysis in the case of microarray development in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  12. In Silico Analysis of Microarray-Based Gene Expression Profiles Predicts Tumor Cell Response to Withanolides

    PubMed Central

    Efferth, Thomas; Greten, Henry Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal (Indian ginseng, winter cherry, Solanaceae) is widely used in traditional medicine. Roots are either chewed or used to prepare beverages (aqueous decocts). The major secondary metabolites of Withania somnifera are the withanolides, which are C-28-steroidal lactone triterpenoids. Withania somnifera extracts exert chemopreventive and anticancer activities in vitro and in vivo. The aims of the present in silico study were, firstly, to investigate whether tumor cells develop cross-resistance between standard anticancer drugs and withanolides and, secondly, to elucidate the molecular determinants of sensitivity and resistance of tumor cells towards withanolides. Using IC50 concentrations of eight different withanolides (withaferin A, withaferin A diacetate, 3-azerininylwithaferin A, withafastuosin D diacetate, 4-B-hydroxy-withanolide E, isowithanololide E, withafastuosin E, and withaperuvin) and 19 established anticancer drugs, we analyzed the cross-resistance profile of 60 tumor cell lines. The cell lines revealed cross-resistance between the eight withanolides. Consistent cross-resistance between withanolides and nitrosoureas (carmustin, lomustin, and semimustin) was also observed. Then, we performed transcriptomic microarray-based COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses of mRNA expression to identify mRNA expression profiles predicting sensitivity or resistance towards withanolides. Genes from diverse functional groups were significantly associated with response of tumor cells to withaferin A diacetate, e.g. genes functioning in DNA damage and repair, stress response, cell growth regulation, extracellular matrix components, cell adhesion and cell migration, constituents of the ribosome, cytoskeletal organization and regulation, signal transduction, transcription factors, and others. PMID:27605335

  13. Automated target preparation for microarray-based gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Frédéric; Metairon, Sylviane; Borner, Roland; Hofmann, Markus; Kussmann, Martin

    2006-09-15

    DNA microarrays have rapidly evolved toward a platform for massively paralleled gene expression analysis. Despite its widespread use, the technology has been criticized to be vulnerable to technical variability. Addressing this issue, recent comparative, interplatform, and interlaboratory studies have revealed that, given defined procedures for "wet lab" experiments and data processing, a satisfactory reproducibility and little experimental variability can be achieved. In view of these advances in standardization, the requirement for uniform sample preparation becomes evident, especially if a microarray platform is used as a facility, i.e., by different users working in the laboratory. While one option to reduce technical variability is to dedicate one laboratory technician to all microarray studies, we have decided to automate the entire RNA sample preparation implementing a liquid handling system coupled to a thermocycler and a microtiter plate reader. Indeed, automated RNA sample preparation prior to chip analysis enables (1) the reduction of experimentally caused result variability, (2) the separation of (important) biological variability from (undesired) experimental variation, and (3) interstudy comparison of gene expression results. Our robotic platform can process up to 24 samples in parallel, using an automated sample preparation method that produces high-quality biotin-labeled cRNA ready to be hybridized on Affymetrix GeneChips. The results show that the technical interexperiment variation is less pronounced than with manually prepared samples. Moreover, experiments using the same starting material showed that the automated process yields a good reproducibility between samples.

  14. Microarray-based Comparative Genomic Indexing of the Cronobacter genus (Enterobacter sakazakii)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cronobacter is a recently defined genus synonymous with Enterobacter sakazakii. This new genus currently comprises 6 genomospecies. To extend our understanding of the genetic relationship between Cronobacter sakazakii BAA-894 and the other species of this genus, microarray-based comparative genomi...

  15. Microgel Tethering For Microarray-Based Nucleic Acid Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiaoguang

    Molecular diagnostics (MDx) have radically changed the process of clinical microbial identification based on identifying genetic information, MDx approaches are both specific and fast. They can identify microbes to the species and strain level over a time scale that can be as short as one hour. With such information clinicians can administer the most effective and appropriate antimicrobial treatment at an early time point with substantial implications both for patient well-being and for easing the burden on the health-care system. Among the different MDx approaches, such as fluorescence in-situ hybridization, microarrays, next-generation sequencing, and mass spectrometry, point-of-care MDx platforms are drawing particular interest due to their low cost, robustness, and wide application. This dissertation develops a novel MDx technology platform capable of high target amplification and detection performance. For nucleic acid target detection, we fabricate an array of electron-beam-patterned microgels on a standard glass microscope slide. The microgels can be as small as a few hundred nanometers. The unique way of energy deposition during electron-beam lithography provides the microgels with a very diffuse water -gel interface that enables them to not only serve as substrates to immobilize DNA probes but do so while preserving them in a highly hydrated environment that optimizes their performance. Benefiting from the high spatial resolution provided by such techniques as position-sensitive microspotting and dip-pen nanolithography, multiple oligonucleotide probes known as molecular beacons (MBs) can be patterned on microgels. Furthermore, nucleic acid target amplification can be conducted in direct contact with the microgel-tethered detection array. Specifically, we use an isothermal RNA amplification reaction - nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA). ssRNA amplicons of from the NASBA reaction can directly hybridize with microgel-tethered MBs, and the

  16. Comprehensibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettersson, Rune

    This paper addresses the difficulty involved in creating easily understood information. The act of communicating is not complete until the message has been both received and understood by the audience. Messages must always be comprehensible, otherwise they will have no effect. The readability, legibility, and reading value of a graphic message is…

  17. Microarray-based whole-genome hybridization as a tool for determining procaryotic species relatedness

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L.; Liu, X.; Fields, M.W.; Thompson, D.K.; Bagwell, C.E.; Tiedje, J. M.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2008-01-15

    The definition and delineation of microbial species are of great importance and challenge due to the extent of evolution and diversity. Whole-genome DNA-DNA hybridization is the cornerstone for defining procaryotic species relatedness, but obtaining pairwise DNA-DNA reassociation values for a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of procaryotes is tedious and time consuming. A previously described microarray format containing whole-genomic DNA (the community genome array or CGA) was rigorously evaluated as a high-throughput alternative to the traditional DNA-DNA reassociation approach for delineating procaryotic species relationships. DNA similarities for multiple bacterial strains obtained with the CGA-based hybridization were comparable to those obtained with various traditional whole-genome hybridization methods (r=0.87, P<0.01). Significant linear relationships were also observed between the CGA-based genome similarities and those derived from small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequences (r=0.79, P<0.0001), gyrB sequences (r=0.95, P<0.0001) or REP- and BOX-PCR fingerprinting profiles (r=0.82, P<0.0001). The CGA hybridization-revealed species relationships in several representative genera, including Pseudomonas, Azoarcus and Shewanella, were largely congruent with previous classifications based on various conventional whole-genome DNA-DNA reassociation, SSU rRNA and/or gyrB analyses. These results suggest that CGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization could serve as a powerful, high-throughput format for determining species relatedness among microorganisms.

  18. GoldenBraid 2.0: a comprehensive DNA assembly framework for plant synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Sarrion-Perdigones, Alejandro; Vazquez-Vilar, Marta; Palací, Jorge; Castelijns, Bas; Forment, Javier; Ziarsolo, Peio; Blanca, José; Granell, Antonio; Orzaez, Diego

    2013-07-01

    Plant synthetic biology aims to apply engineering principles to plant genetic design. One strategic requirement of plant synthetic biology is the adoption of common standardized technologies that facilitate the construction of increasingly complex multigene structures at the DNA level while enabling the exchange of genetic building blocks among plant bioengineers. Here, we describe GoldenBraid 2.0 (GB2.0), a comprehensive technological framework that aims to foster the exchange of standard DNA parts for plant synthetic biology. GB2.0 relies on the use of type IIS restriction enzymes for DNA assembly and proposes a modular cloning schema with positional notation that resembles the grammar of natural languages. Apart from providing an optimized cloning strategy that generates fully exchangeable genetic elements for multigene engineering, the GB2.0 toolkit offers an evergrowing open collection of DNA parts, including a group of functionally tested, premade genetic modules to build frequently used modules like constitutive and inducible expression cassettes, endogenous gene silencing and protein-protein interaction tools, etc. Use of the GB2.0 framework is facilitated by a number of Web resources that include a publicly available database, tutorials, and a software package that provides in silico simulations and laboratory protocols for GB2.0 part domestication and multigene engineering. In short, GB2.0 provides a framework to exchange both information and physical DNA elements among bioengineers to help implement plant synthetic biology projects.

  19. Comprehensive DNA Adduct Analysis Reveals Pulmonary Inflammatory Response Contributes to Genotoxic Action of Magnetite Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ishino, Kousuke; Kato, Tatsuya; Kato, Mamoru; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Totsuka, Yukari

    2015-01-01

    Nanosized-magnetite (MGT) is widely utilized in medicinal and industrial fields; however, its toxicological properties are not well documented. In our previous report, MGT showed genotoxicity in both in vitro and in vivo assay systems, and it was suggested that inflammatory responses exist behind the genotoxicity. To further clarify mechanisms underlying the genotoxicity, a comprehensive DNA adduct (DNA adductome) analysis was conducted using DNA samples derived from the lungs of mice exposed to MGT. In total, 30 and 42 types of DNA adducts were detected in the vehicle control and MGT-treated groups, respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) against a subset of DNA adducts was applied and several adducts, which are deduced to be formed by inflammation or oxidative stress, as the case of etheno-deoxycytidine (εdC), revealed higher contributions to MGT exposure. By quantitative-LC-MS/MS analysis, εdC levels were significantly higher in MGT-treated mice than those of the vehicle control. Taken together with our previous data, it is suggested that inflammatory responses might be involved in the genotoxicity induced by MGT in the lungs of mice. PMID:25658799

  20. Comprehensive investigation of DNA methylation and gene expression in trisomy 21 placenta.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji Hyae; Kim, Shin Young; Han, Jung Yeol; Kim, Moon Young; Park, So Yeon; Ryu, Hyun Mee

    2016-06-01

    Trisomy 21 (T21) is the most common aneuploidy affecting humans and is caused by an extra copy of all or part of chromosome 21 (chr21). DNA methylation is an epigenetic event that plays an important role in human diseases via regulation of gene expression. However, the integrative association between DNA methylation and gene expression in T21 fetal placenta has yet to be determined. We profiled expression of 207 genes on chr21 and their DNA methylation patterns in placenta samples from normal and DS fetuses using microarray analysis and predicted the functions of differentially expressed genes using bioinformatics tools. We found 47 genes with significantly increased expression in the T21 placenta compared to the normal placenta. Hypomethylation of the 47 genes was observed in the T21 placenta. Most of hypomethylated DNA positions were intragenic regions, i.e. regions inside a gene. Moreover, gene expression and hypomethylated DNA position showed significantly positive associations. By analyzing the properties of the gene-disease network, we found that increased genes in the T21 placenta were significantly associated with T21 and T21 complications such as mental retardation, neurobehavioral manifestations, and congenital abnormalities. To our knowledge, this is the first study to comprehensively survey the association between gene expression and DNA methylation in chr21 of the T21 fetal placenta. Our findings provide a broad overview of the relationships between gene expression and DNA methylation in the placentas of fetuses with T21 and could contribute to future research efforts concerning genes involvement in disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of bacterial and fungal pathogens from positive blood culture bottles: a microarray-based approach.

    PubMed

    Raich, Teresa; Powell, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification and characterization of bacterial and fungal pathogens present in the bloodstream are essential for optimal patient management and are associated with improved patient outcomes, improved antimicrobial stewardship, improved infection control, and reduced healthcare costs. Microarrays serve as reliable platforms for the identification of these bloodstream pathogens and their associated antimicrobial resistance genes, if present. Nanosphere's (Nanosphere, Inc., Northbrook, IL, USA) Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture Nucleic-Acid Test (BC-GP) is one such microarray-based approach for the detection of bacteria that cause bloodstream infection. Here, we describe the design of the microarray-based Verigene BC-GP Test, the steps necessary for performing the test, and the different components of the test including nucleic acid extraction and hybridization of target nucleic acid to a microarray.

  2. Comprehensive DNA methylation analysis of hepatitis B virus genome in infected liver tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Surbhi; Chang, Ting-Tsung; Chen, Sitong; Boldbaatar, Batbold; Clemens, Adam; Lin, Selena Y.; Yan, Ran; Hu, Chi-Tan; Guo, Haitao; Block, Timothy M.; Song, Wei; Su, Ying-Hsiu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a hepatotropic virus causing hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The methylation status of the HBV DNA in its different forms can potentially provide insight into the pathogenesis of HBV-related liver diseases, including HCC, however this is unclear. The goal of this study is to obtain comprehensive DNA methylation profiles of the three putative CpG islands in the HBV DNA in infected livers, with respect to liver disease progression. The extent of methylation in these CpG islands was first assessed using bisulfite PCR sequencing with a small set of tissue samples, followed by analysis using both quantitative bisulfite-specific PCR and quantitative methylation-specific PCR assays in a larger sample size (n = 116). The level of HBV CpG island 3 methylation significantly correlated with hepatocarcinogenesis. We also obtained, for the first time, evidence of rare, non-CpG methylation in CpG island 2 of the HBV genome in infected liver. Comparing methylation of the HBV genome to three known HCC-associated host genes, APC, GSTP1, and RASSF1A, we did not identify a significant correlation between these two groups. PMID:26000761

  3. Comprehensive DNA methylation analysis of hepatitis B virus genome in infected liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Jain, Surbhi; Chang, Ting-Tsung; Chen, Sitong; Boldbaatar, Batbold; Clemens, Adam; Lin, Selena Y; Yan, Ran; Hu, Chi-Tan; Guo, Haitao; Block, Timothy M; Song, Wei; Su, Ying-Hsiu

    2015-05-22

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a hepatotropic virus causing hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The methylation status of the HBV DNA in its different forms can potentially provide insight into the pathogenesis of HBV-related liver diseases, including HCC, however this is unclear. The goal of this study is to obtain comprehensive DNA methylation profiles of the three putative CpG islands in the HBV DNA in infected livers, with respect to liver disease progression. The extent of methylation in these CpG islands was first assessed using bisulfite PCR sequencing with a small set of tissue samples, followed by analysis using both quantitative bisulfite-specific PCR and quantitative methylation-specific PCR assays in a larger sample size (n = 116). The level of HBV CpG island 3 methylation significantly correlated with hepatocarcinogenesis. We also obtained, for the first time, evidence of rare, non-CpG methylation in CpG island 2 of the HBV genome in infected liver. Comparing methylation of the HBV genome to three known HCC-associated host genes, APC, GSTP1, and RASSF1A, we did not identify a significant correlation between these two groups.

  4. Comprehensive discovery of DNA motifs in 349 human cells and tissues reveals new features of motifs.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yiyu; Li, Xiaoman; Hu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive motif discovery under experimental conditions is critical for the global understanding of gene regulation. To generate a nearly complete list of human DNA motifs under given conditions, we employed a novel approach to de novo discover significant co-occurring DNA motifs in 349 human DNase I hypersensitive site datasets. We predicted 845 to 1325 motifs in each dataset, for a total of 2684 non-redundant motifs. These 2684 motifs contained 54.02 to 75.95% of the known motifs in seven large collections including TRANSFAC. In each dataset, we also discovered 43 663 to 2 013 288 motif modules, groups of motifs with their binding sites co-occurring in a significant number of short DNA regions. Compared with known interacting transcription factors in eight resources, the predicted motif modules on average included 84.23% of known interacting motifs. We further showed new features of the predicted motifs, such as motifs enriched in proximal regions rarely overlapped with motifs enriched in distal regions, motifs enriched in 5' distal regions were often enriched in 3' distal regions, etc. Finally, we observed that the 2684 predicted motifs classified the cell or tissue types of the datasets with an accuracy of 81.29%. The resources generated in this study are available at http://server.cs.ucf.edu/predrem/. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Assembling and auditing a comprehensive DNA barcode reference library for European marine fishes.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, L M; Knebelsberger, T; Landi, M; Soares, P; Raupach, M J; Costa, F O

    2016-12-01

    A large-scale comprehensive reference library of DNA barcodes for European marine fishes was assembled, allowing the evaluation of taxonomic uncertainties and species genetic diversity that were otherwise hidden in geographically restricted studies. A total of 4118 DNA barcodes were assigned to 358 species generating 366 Barcode Index Numbers (BIN). Initial examination revealed as much as 141 BIN discordances (more than one species in each BIN). After implementing an auditing and five-grade (A-E) annotation protocol, the number of discordant species BINs was reduced to 44 (13% grade E), while concordant species BINs amounted to 271 (78% grades A and B) and 14 other had insufficient data (grade D). Fifteen species displayed comparatively high intraspecific divergences ranging from 2·6 to 18·5% (grade C), which is biologically paramount information to be considered in fish species monitoring and stock assessment. On balance, this compilation contributed to the detection of 59 European fish species probably in need of taxonomic clarification or re-evaluation. The generalized implementation of an auditing and annotation protocol for reference libraries of DNA barcodes is recommended.

  6. Universal protein binding microarrays for the comprehensive characterization of the DNA binding specificities of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Michael F.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2010-01-01

    Protein binding microarray (PBM) technology provides a rapid, high-throughput means of characterizing the in vitro DNA binding specificities of transcription factors (TFs). Using high-density, custom-designed microarrays containing all 10-mer sequence variants, one can obtain comprehensive binding site measurements for any TF, regardless of its structural class or species of origin. Here, we present a protocol for the examination and analysis of TF binding specificities at high resolution using such ‘all 10-mer’ universal PBMs. This procedure involves double-stranding a commercially synthesized DNA oligonucleotide array, binding a TF directly to the double-stranded DNA microarray, and labeling the protein-bound microarray with a fluorophore-conjugated antibody. We describe how to computationally extract the relative binding preferences of the examined TF for all possible contiguous and gapped 8-mers over the full range of affinities, from highest affinity sites to nonspecific sites. Multiple proteins can be tested in parallel in separate chambers on a single microarray, enabling the processing of a dozen or more TFs in a single day. PMID:19265799

  7. Microarray-based gene expression analysis as a process characterization tool to establish comparability of complex biological products: scale-up of a whole-cell immunotherapy product.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Senger, Ryan S; Paredes, Carlos; Banik, Gautam G; Lin, Andy; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2009-11-01

    Whole-cell immunotherapies and other cellular therapies have shown promising results in clinical trials. Due to the complex nature of the whole cell product and of the sometimes limited correlation of clinical potency with the proposed mechanism of action, these cellular immunotherapy products are generally not considered well characterized. Therefore, one major challenge in the product development of whole cell therapies is the ability to demonstrate comparability of product after changes in the manufacturing process. Such changes are nearly inevitable with increase in manufacturing experience leading to improved and robust processes that may have higher commercial feasibility. In order to comprehensively assess the impact of the process changes on the final product, and thus establish comparability, a matrix of characterization assays (in addition to lot release assays) assessing the various aspects of the cellular product are required. In this study, we assessed the capability of DNA-microarray-based, gene-expression analysis as a characterization tool using GVAX cancer immunotherapy cells manufactured by Cell Genesys, Inc. The GVAX immunotherapy product consists two prostate cancer cell lines (CG1940 and CG8711) engineered to secrete human GM-CSF. To demonstrate the capability of the assay, we assessed the transcriptional changes in the product when produced in the presence or absence of fetal bovine serum, and under normal and hypoxic conditions, both changes intended to stress the cell lines. We then assessed the impact of an approximately 10-fold process scale-up on the final product at the transcriptional level. These data were used to develop comparisons and statistical analyses suitable for characterizing culture reproducibility and cellular product similarity. Use of gene-expression data for process characterization proved to be a reproducible and sensitive method for detecting differences due to small or large changes in culture conditions as might be

  8. DNA Microarray-Based Identification of Genes Regulated by NtrC in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Franck, William L; Qiu, Jing; Lee, Hae-In; Chang, Woo-Suk; Stacey, Gary

    2015-08-15

    The Bradyrhizobium japonicum NtrBC two-component system is a critical regulator of cellular nitrogen metabolism, including the acquisition and catabolism of nitrogenous compounds. To better define the roles of this system, genome-wide transcriptional profiling was performed to identify the NtrC regulon during the response to nitrogen limitation. Upon cells perceiving low intracellular nitrogen, they stimulate the phosphorylation of NtrC, which induces genes responsible for alteration of the core glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase nitrogen assimilation pathway, including the genes for the glutamine synthetases and PII proteins. In addition, genes responsible for the import and utilization of multiple nitrogen sources, specifically nitrate and nitrite, were upregulated by NtrC activation. Mutational analysis of a candidate nitrite reductase revealed a role for NtrC in regulating the assimilation of nitrite, since mutations in both ntrC and the gene encoding the candidate nitrite reductase abolished the ability to grow on nitrite as a sole nitrogen source.

  9. DNA Microarray-based Ecotoxicological Biomarker Discovery in a Small Fish Model Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper addresses several issues critical to use of zebrafish oligonucleotide microarrays for computational toxicology research on endocrine disrupting chemicals using small fish models, and more generally, the use of microarrays in aquatic toxicology.

  10. DNA Microarray-based Ecotoxicological Biomarker Discovery in a Small Fish Model Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper addresses several issues critical to use of zebrafish oligonucleotide microarrays for computational toxicology research on endocrine disrupting chemicals using small fish models, and more generally, the use of microarrays in aquatic toxicology.

  11. Comparison of RNA-seq and microarray-based models for clinical endpoint prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenqian; Yu, Ying; Hertwig, Falk; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Zhang, Wenwei; Thierry-Mieg, Danielle; Wang, Jian; Furlanello, Cesare; Devanarayan, Viswanath; Cheng, Jie; Deng, Youping; Hero, Barbara; Hong, Huixiao; Jia, Meiwen; Li, Li; Lin, Simon M; Nikolsky, Yuri; Oberthuer, André; Qing, Tao; Su, Zhenqiang; Volland, Ruth; Wang, Charles; Wang, May D; Ai, Junmei; Albanese, Davide; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Avigad, Smadar; Bao, Wenjun; Bessarabova, Marina; Brilliant, Murray H; Brors, Benedikt; Chierici, Marco; Chu, Tzu-Ming; Zhang, Jibin; Grundy, Richard G; He, Min Max; Hebbring, Scott; Kaufman, Howard L; Lababidi, Samir; Lancashire, Lee J; Li, Yan; Lu, Xin X; Luo, Heng; Ma, Xiwen; Ning, Baitang; Noguera, Rosa; Peifer, Martin; Phan, John H; Roels, Frederik; Rosswog, Carolina; Shao, Susan; Shen, Jie; Theissen, Jessica; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Vandesompele, Jo; Wu, Po-Yen; Xiao, Wenzhong; Xu, Joshua; Xu, Weihong; Xuan, Jiekun; Yang, Yong; Ye, Zhan; Dong, Zirui; Zhang, Ke K; Yin, Ye; Zhao, Chen; Zheng, Yuanting; Wolfinger, Russell D; Shi, Tieliu; Malkas, Linda H; Berthold, Frank; Wang, Jun; Tong, Weida; Shi, Leming; Peng, Zhiyu; Fischer, Matthias

    2015-06-25

    Gene expression profiling is being widely applied in cancer research to identify biomarkers for clinical endpoint prediction. Since RNA-seq provides a powerful tool for transcriptome-based applications beyond the limitations of microarrays, we sought to systematically evaluate the performance of RNA-seq-based and microarray-based classifiers in this MAQC-III/SEQC study for clinical endpoint prediction using neuroblastoma as a model. We generate gene expression profiles from 498 primary neuroblastomas using both RNA-seq and 44 k microarrays. Characterization of the neuroblastoma transcriptome by RNA-seq reveals that more than 48,000 genes and 200,000 transcripts are being expressed in this malignancy. We also find that RNA-seq provides much more detailed information on specific transcript expression patterns in clinico-genetic neuroblastoma subgroups than microarrays. To systematically compare the power of RNA-seq and microarray-based models in predicting clinical endpoints, we divide the cohort randomly into training and validation sets and develop 360 predictive models on six clinical endpoints of varying predictability. Evaluation of factors potentially affecting model performances reveals that prediction accuracies are most strongly influenced by the nature of the clinical endpoint, whereas technological platforms (RNA-seq vs. microarrays), RNA-seq data analysis pipelines, and feature levels (gene vs. transcript vs. exon-junction level) do not significantly affect performances of the models. We demonstrate that RNA-seq outperforms microarrays in determining the transcriptomic characteristics of cancer, while RNA-seq and microarray-based models perform similarly in clinical endpoint prediction. Our findings may be valuable to guide future studies on the development of gene expression-based predictive models and their implementation in clinical practice.

  12. Quantitative characterization of conformational-specific protein-DNA binding using a dual-spectral interferometric imaging biosensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xirui; Daaboul, George G; Spuhler, Philipp S; Dröge, Peter; Ünlü, M Selim

    2016-03-14

    DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, it was discovered that DNA-binding proteins recognize specific binding sites to carry out their functions through an indirect readout mechanism by recognizing and capturing DNA conformational flexibility and deformation. High-throughput DNA microarray-based methods that provide large-scale protein-DNA binding information have shown effective and comprehensive analysis of protein-DNA binding affinities, but do not provide information of DNA conformational changes in specific protein-DNA complexes. Building on the high-throughput capability of DNA microarrays, we demonstrate a quantitative approach that simultaneously measures the amount of protein binding to DNA and nanometer-scale DNA conformational change induced by protein binding in a microarray format. Both measurements rely on spectral interferometry on a layered substrate using a single optical instrument in two distinct modalities. In the first modality, we quantitate the amount of binding of protein to surface-immobilized DNA in each DNA spot using a label-free spectral reflectivity technique that accurately measures the surface densities of protein and DNA accumulated on the substrate. In the second modality, for each DNA spot, we simultaneously measure DNA conformational change using a fluorescence vertical sectioning technique that determines average axial height of fluorophores tagged to specific nucleotides of the surface-immobilized DNA. The approach presented in this paper, when combined with current high-throughput DNA microarray-based technologies, has the potential to serve as a rapid and simple method for quantitative and large-scale characterization of conformational specific protein-DNA interactions.

  13. Comprehensive species set revealing the phylogeny and biogeography of Feliformia (Mammalia, Carnivora) based on mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian-Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Extant Feliformia species are one of the most diverse radiations of Carnivora (~123 species). Despite substantial recent interest in their conservation, diversification, and systematic study, no previous phylogeny contains a comprehensive species set, and no biogeography of this group is available. Here, we present a phylogenetic estimate for Feliformia with a comprehensive species set and establish a historical biogeography based on mitochondrial DNA. Both the Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogeny for Feliformia are elucidated in our analyses and are strongly consistent with many groups recognized in previous studies. The mitochondrial phylogenetic relationships of Felidae were for the first time successfully reconstructed in our analyses with strong supported. When divergence times and dispersal/vicariance histories were compared with historical sea level changes, four dispersal and six vicariance events were identified. These vicariance events were closely related with global sea level changes. The transgression of sea into the lowland plains between Eurasia and Africa may have caused the vicariance in these regions. A fall in the sea level during late Miocene to Pliocene produced the Bering strait land bridge, which assisted the migration of American Feliformia ancestors from Asia to North America. In contrast with the ‘sweepstakes hypothesis’, our results suggest that the climate cooling during 30–27 Ma assisted Feliformia migration from the African mainland to Madagascar by creating a short-lived ice bridge across the Mozambique Channel. Lineages-through-time plots revealed a large increase in lineages since the Mid-Miocene. During the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum, the ecosystems and population of Feliformia rapidly expanded. Subsequent climate cooling catalyzed immigration, speciation, and the extinction of Feliformia. PMID:28358848

  14. Comprehensive species set revealing the phylogeny and biogeography of Feliformia (Mammalia, Carnivora) based on mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Wang, Si-Rui; Ma, Jian-Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Extant Feliformia species are one of the most diverse radiations of Carnivora (~123 species). Despite substantial recent interest in their conservation, diversification, and systematic study, no previous phylogeny contains a comprehensive species set, and no biogeography of this group is available. Here, we present a phylogenetic estimate for Feliformia with a comprehensive species set and establish a historical biogeography based on mitochondrial DNA. Both the Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogeny for Feliformia are elucidated in our analyses and are strongly consistent with many groups recognized in previous studies. The mitochondrial phylogenetic relationships of Felidae were for the first time successfully reconstructed in our analyses with strong supported. When divergence times and dispersal/vicariance histories were compared with historical sea level changes, four dispersal and six vicariance events were identified. These vicariance events were closely related with global sea level changes. The transgression of sea into the lowland plains between Eurasia and Africa may have caused the vicariance in these regions. A fall in the sea level during late Miocene to Pliocene produced the Bering strait land bridge, which assisted the migration of American Feliformia ancestors from Asia to North America. In contrast with the 'sweepstakes hypothesis', our results suggest that the climate cooling during 30-27 Ma assisted Feliformia migration from the African mainland to Madagascar by creating a short-lived ice bridge across the Mozambique Channel. Lineages-through-time plots revealed a large increase in lineages since the Mid-Miocene. During the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum, the ecosystems and population of Feliformia rapidly expanded. Subsequent climate cooling catalyzed immigration, speciation, and the extinction of Feliformia.

  15. Comprehensive Census of Bacteria in Clean Rooms by Using DNA Microarray and Cloning Methods▿ †

    PubMed Central

    La Duc, Myron T.; Osman, Shariff; Vaishampayan, Parag; Piceno, Yvette; Andersen, Gary; Spry, J. A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2009-01-01

    A census of clean room surface-associated bacterial populations was derived from the results of both the cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and DNA microarray (PhyloChip) analyses. Samples from the Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Multiple Testing Facility (LMA-MTF), the Kennedy Space Center Payload Hazard and Servicing Facility (KSC-PHSF), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Spacecraft Assembly Facility (JPL-SAF) clean rooms were collected during the various assembly phases of the Phoenix and Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft. Clone library-derived analyses detected a larger bacterial diversity prior to the arrival of spacecraft hardware in these clean room facilities. PhyloChip results were in agreement with this trend but also unveiled the presence of anywhere from 9- to 70-fold more bacterial taxa than cloning approaches. Among the facilities sampled, the JPL-SAF (MSL mission) housed a significantly less diverse bacterial population than either the LMA-MTF or KSC-PHSF (Phoenix mission). Bacterial taxa known to thrive in arid conditions were frequently detected in MSL-associated JPL-SAF samples, whereas proteobacterial lineages dominated Phoenix-associated KSC-PHSF samples. Comprehensive bacterial censuses, such as that reported here, will help space-faring nations preemptively identify contaminant biomatter that may compromise extraterrestrial life detection experiments. The robust nature and high sensitivity of DNA microarray technologies should prove beneficial to a wide range of scientific, electronic, homeland security, medical, and pharmaceutical applications and to any other ventures with a vested interest in monitoring and controlling contamination in exceptionally clean environments. PMID:19700540

  16. Comprehensive census of bacteria in clean rooms by using DNA microarray and cloning methods.

    PubMed

    La Duc, Myron T; Osman, Shariff; Vaishampayan, Parag; Piceno, Yvette; Andersen, Gary; Spry, J A; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2009-10-01

    A census of clean room surface-associated bacterial populations was derived from the results of both the cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and DNA microarray (PhyloChip) analyses. Samples from the Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Multiple Testing Facility (LMA-MTF), the Kennedy Space Center Payload Hazard and Servicing Facility (KSC-PHSF), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Spacecraft Assembly Facility (JPL-SAF) clean rooms were collected during the various assembly phases of the Phoenix and Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft. Clone library-derived analyses detected a larger bacterial diversity prior to the arrival of spacecraft hardware in these clean room facilities. PhyloChip results were in agreement with this trend but also unveiled the presence of anywhere from 9- to 70-fold more bacterial taxa than cloning approaches. Among the facilities sampled, the JPL-SAF (MSL mission) housed a significantly less diverse bacterial population than either the LMA-MTF or KSC-PHSF (Phoenix mission). Bacterial taxa known to thrive in arid conditions were frequently detected in MSL-associated JPL-SAF samples, whereas proteobacterial lineages dominated Phoenix-associated KSC-PHSF samples. Comprehensive bacterial censuses, such as that reported here, will help space-faring nations preemptively identify contaminant biomatter that may compromise extraterrestrial life detection experiments. The robust nature and high sensitivity of DNA microarray technologies should prove beneficial to a wide range of scientific, electronic, homeland security, medical, and pharmaceutical applications and to any other ventures with a vested interest in monitoring and controlling contamination in exceptionally clean environments.

  17. Microarray-Based Maps of Copy-Number Variant Regions in European and Sub-Saharan Populations

    PubMed Central

    Röthlisberger, Benno; Huber, Andreas; Filges, Isabel; Miny, Peter; Auschra, Bianca; Stetak, Attila; Demougin, Philippe; Vukojevic, Vanja; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Elbert, Thomas; de Quervain, Dominique J.-F.; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The genetic basis of phenotypic variation can be partially explained by the presence of copy-number variations (CNVs). Currently available methods for CNV assessment include high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays that have become an indispensable tool in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, insufficient concordance rates between different CNV assessment methods call for cautious interpretation of results from CNV-based genetic association studies. Here we provide a cross-population, microarray-based map of copy-number variant regions (CNVRs) to enable reliable interpretation of CNV association findings. We used the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 to scan the genomes of 1167 individuals from two ethnically distinct populations (Europe, N = 717; Rwanda, N = 450). Three different CNV-finding algorithms were tested and compared for sensitivity, specificity, and feasibility. Two algorithms were subsequently used to construct CNVR maps, which were also validated by processing subsamples with additional microarray platforms (Illumina 1M-Duo BeadChip, Nimblegen 385K aCGH array) and by comparing our data with publicly available information. Both algorithms detected a total of 42669 CNVs, 74% of which clustered in 385 CNVRs of a cross-population map. These CNVRs overlap with 862 annotated genes and account for approximately 3.3% of the haploid human genome. We created comprehensive cross-populational CNVR-maps. They represent an extendable framework that can leverage the detection of common CNVs and additionally assist in interpreting CNV-based association studies. PMID:21179565

  18. Microarray-based maps of copy-number variant regions in European and sub-Saharan populations.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Christian; Gschwind, Leo; Röthlisberger, Benno; Huber, Andreas; Filges, Isabel; Miny, Peter; Auschra, Bianca; Stetak, Attila; Demougin, Philippe; Vukojevic, Vanja; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Elbert, Thomas; de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2010-12-16

    The genetic basis of phenotypic variation can be partially explained by the presence of copy-number variations (CNVs). Currently available methods for CNV assessment include high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays that have become an indispensable tool in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, insufficient concordance rates between different CNV assessment methods call for cautious interpretation of results from CNV-based genetic association studies. Here we provide a cross-population, microarray-based map of copy-number variant regions (CNVRs) to enable reliable interpretation of CNV association findings. We used the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 to scan the genomes of 1167 individuals from two ethnically distinct populations (Europe, N=717; Rwanda, N=450). Three different CNV-finding algorithms were tested and compared for sensitivity, specificity, and feasibility. Two algorithms were subsequently used to construct CNVR maps, which were also validated by processing subsamples with additional microarray platforms (Illumina 1M-Duo BeadChip, Nimblegen 385K aCGH array) and by comparing our data with publicly available information. Both algorithms detected a total of 42669 CNVs, 74% of which clustered in 385 CNVRs of a cross-population map. These CNVRs overlap with 862 annotated genes and account for approximately 3.3% of the haploid human genome.We created comprehensive cross-populational CNVR-maps. They represent an extendable framework that can leverage the detection of common CNVs and additionally assist in interpreting CNV-based association studies.

  19. Minfi: a flexible and comprehensive Bioconductor package for the analysis of Infinium DNA methylation microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Aryee, Martin J.; Jaffe, Andrew E.; Corrada-Bravo, Hector; Ladd-Acosta, Christine; Feinberg, Andrew P.; Hansen, Kasper D.; Irizarry, Rafael A.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The recently released Infinium HumanMethylation450 array (the ‘450k’ array) provides a high-throughput assay to quantify DNA methylation (DNAm) at ∼450 000 loci across a range of genomic features. Although less comprehensive than high-throughput sequencing-based techniques, this product is more cost-effective and promises to be the most widely used DNAm high-throughput measurement technology over the next several years. Results: Here we describe a suite of computational tools that incorporate state-of-the-art statistical techniques for the analysis of DNAm data. The software is structured to easily adapt to future versions of the technology. We include methods for preprocessing, quality assessment and detection of differentially methylated regions from the kilobase to the megabase scale. We show how our software provides a powerful and flexible development platform for future methods. We also illustrate how our methods empower the technology to make discoveries previously thought to be possible only with sequencing-based methods. Availability and implementation: http://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/minfi.html. Contact: khansen@jhsph.edu; rafa@jimmy.harvard.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24478339

  20. Genotypes, antibiotic resistance profiles and microarray-based characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from livestock and veterinarians in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Huber, H; Giezendanner, N; Stephan, R; Zweifel, C

    2011-08-01

    Using different typing methods (MLST, spa-, SCCmec- and agr-typing), PFGE and DNA microarray-based chip analysis, we characterized 20 MRSA strains isolated from livestock and veterinarians. PFGE analysis after macrorestriction with EagI provided seven different band patterns, which could be grouped into four clusters. One cluster consisted of all MRSA ST398 strains isolated from pigs, calves, mastitis milk and two veterinarians. One strain of ST398 from a veterinarian and the two strains of ST1 and ST8 formed the three other clusters. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that 15 of 20 strains were resistant to ampicillin, cefoxitin, clindamycin, erythromycin, oxacillin, penicillin and tetracycline. All strains were susceptible to rifampin and vancomycin, 19 were susceptible to ciprofloxacin and 18 were susceptible to sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim. Genes encoding different enterotoxins, leukotoxins and haemolysins were found in certain strains. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Identification of prognostic relevant chromosomal abnormalities in chronic lymphocytic leukemia using microarray-based genomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Kroef, Marian Jpl; van den Berg, Eva; Olde Weghuis, Daniel; Geurts van Kessel, Ad; Pfundt, Rolph; Linssen-Wiersma, Matty; Benjamins, Marloes; Dijkhuizen, Trijnie; Groenen, Patricia Jta; Simons, Annet

    2014-01-09

    Characteristic genomic abnormalities in patients with B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have been shown to provide important prognostic information. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), currently used in clinical diagnostics of CLL, are targeted tests aimed at specific genomic loci. Microarray-based genomic profiling is a new high-resolution tool that enables genome-wide analyses. The aim of this study was to compare two recently launched genomic microarray platforms, i.e., the CytoScan HD Array (Affymetrix) and the HumanOmniExpress Array (Illumina), with FISH and MLPA to ascertain whether these latter tests can be replaced by either one of the microarray platforms in a clinical diagnostic setting. Microarray-based genomic profiling and FISH were performed in all 28 CLL patients. For an unbiased comparison of the performance of both microarray platforms 9 patients were evaluated on both platforms, resulting in the identification of exactly identical genomic aberrations. To evaluate the detection limit of the microarray platforms we included 7 patients in which the genomic abnormalities were present in a relatively low percentage of the cells (range 5-28%) as previously determined by FISH. We found that both microarray platforms allowed the detection of copy number abnormalities present in as few as 16% of the cells. In addition, we found that microarray-based genomic profiling allowed the identification of genomic abnormalities that could not be detected by FISH and/or MLPA, including a focal TP53 loss and copy neutral losses of heterozygosity of chromosome 17p. From our results we conclude that although the microarray platforms exhibit a somewhat lower limit of detection compared to FISH, they still allow the detection of copy number abnormalities present in as few as 16% of the cells. By applying similar interpretation criteria, the results obtained from both platforms were comparable. In

  2. Combining microarray-based genomic selection (MGS) with the Illumina Genome Analyzer platform to sequence diploid target regions.

    PubMed

    Okou, David T; Locke, Adam E; Steinberg, Karyn M; Hagen, Katie; Athri, Prashanth; Shetty, Amol C; Patel, Viren; Zwick, Michael E

    2009-09-01

    Novel methods of targeted sequencing of unique regions from complex eukaryotic genomes have generated a great deal of excitement, but critical demonstrations of these methods efficacy with respect to diploid genotype calling and experimental variation are lacking. To address this issue, we optimized microarray-based genomic selection (MGS) for use with the Illumina Genome Analyzer (IGA). A set of 202 fragments (304 kb total) contained within a 1.7 Mb genomic region on human chromosome X were MGS/IGA sequenced in ten female HapMap samples generating a total of 2.4 GB of DNA sequence. At a minimum coverage threshold of 5X, 93.9% of all bases and 94.9% of segregating sites were called, while 57.7% of bases (57.4% of segregating sites) were called at a 50X threshold. Data accuracy at known segregating sites was 98.9% at 5X coverage, rising to 99.6% at 50X coverage. Accuracy at homozygous sites was 98.7% at 5X sequence coverage and 99.5% at 50X coverage. Although accuracy at heterozygous sites was modestly lower, it was still over 92% at 5X coverage and increased to nearly 97% at 50X coverage. These data provide the first demonstration that MGS/IGA sequencing can generate the very high quality sequence data necessary for human genetics research. All sequences generated in this study have been deposited in NCBI Short Read Archive (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Traces/sra, Accession # SRA007913).

  3. Prevalence of the sodC gene in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus by microarray-based hybridization.

    PubMed

    McCrea, Kirk W; Wang, Myron L; Xie, Jingping; Sandstedt, Sara A; Davis, Gregg S; Lee, Joseph H; Marrs, Carl F; Gilsdorf, Janet R

    2010-03-01

    The sodC gene has been reported to be a useful marker for differentiating nontypeable (NT) Haemophilus influenzae from Haemophilus haemolyticus in respiratory-tract samples, but discrepancies exist as to the prevalence of sodC in NT H. influenzae. Therefore, we used a microarray-based, "library-on-a-slide" method to differentiate the species and found that 21 of 169 (12.4%) NT H. influenzae strains and all 110 (100%) H. haemolyticus strains possessed the sodC gene. Multilocus sequence analysis confirmed that the 21 NT H. influenzae strains were H. influenzae and not H. haemolyticus. An inactive sodC gene has been reported in encapsulated H. influenzae strains belonging to phylogenetic division II. Capsule-specific Southern hybridization and PCR and a lack of copper/zinc-cofactored superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) expression indicated that 6 of the 21 sodC-containing NT H. influenzae strains in our study were likely capsule-deficient mutants belonging to phylogenetic division II. DNA sequence comparisons of the 21 H. influenzae sodC genes with sodC from H. haemolyticus or encapsulated H. influenzae demonstrated that the sodC genes of the six H. influenzae capsule-deficient mutants were, on average, 99% identical to sodC from encapsulated H. influenzae but only 85% identical to sodC from H. haemolyticus. The sodC genes from 2/15 NT H. influenzae strains were similarly more closely related to sodC from encapsulated strains, while sodC genes from 13 NT H. influenzae strains were almost 95% identical to sodC genes from H. haemolyticus, suggesting the possibility of interspecies recombination in these strains. In summary, this study demonstrates that sodC is not completely absent (9.2%) in true NT H. influenzae strains.

  4. Microarray-based analysis of gene expression in lycopersicon esculentum seedling roots in response to cadmium, chromium, mercury, and lead.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jing; Liu, Xinhui; Wang, Juan; Zhao, Shengnan; Cui, Baoshan

    2015-02-03

    The effects of heavy metals in agricultural soils have received special attention due to their potential for accumulation in crops, which can affect species at all trophic levels. Therefore, there is a critical need for reliable bioassays for assessing risk levels due to heavy metals in agricultural soil. In the present study, we used microarrays to investigate changes in gene expression of Lycopersicon esculentum in response to Cd-, Cr-, Hg-, or Pb-spiked soil. Exposure to (1)/10 median lethal concentrations (LC50) of Cd, Cr, Hg, or Pb for 7 days resulted in expression changes in 29 Cd-specific, 58 Cr-specific, 192 Hg-specific and 864 Pb-specific genes as determined by microarray analysis, whereas conventional morphological and physiological bioassays did not reveal any toxicant stresses. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed that the characteristic gene expression profiles induced by Cd, Cr, Hg, and Pb were distinct from not only the control but also one another. Furthermore, a total of three genes related to "ion transport" for Cd, 14 genes related to "external encapsulating structure organization", "reproductive developmental process", "lipid metabolic process" and "response to stimulus" for Cr, 11 genes related to "cellular metabolic process" and "cellular response to stimulus" for Hg, 78 genes related to 20 biological processes (e.g., DNA metabolic process, monosaccharide catabolic process, cell division) for Pb were identified and selected as their potential biomarkers. These findings demonstrated that microarray-based analysis of Lycopersicon esculentum was a sensitive tool for the early detection of potential toxicity of heavy metals in agricultural soil, as well as an effective tool for identifying the heavy metal-specific genes, which should be useful for assessing risk levels due to heavy metals in agricultural soil.

  5. Identification of novel peptoid agonists of fibroblast growth factor receptor using microarray-based screening†

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Junjie; Xia, Amy; Qi, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Drug development targeting fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) represents an emerging theme in the field of medicinal chemistry. Considering the fact that most of the currently identified FGFR agonists are long chain peptides with limited stability, the discovery of novel non-peptide FGFR ligands is still highly demanded. A linear one-bead-one-compound peptoid (oligomers of N-substituted glycine units) library with a theoretical diversity of 106 was designed and synthesized. Microarray-based screening led to the identification of four hit sequences 1-4 as FGFR1α ligands, which were further confirmed using both solution-phase and solid-phase binding assays. Western blot results indicated that peptoids 2-4 activated FGFR signaling pathways, resulting in increased levels of p-Akt and p-ERK in different cell lines. Our work discovered novel peptoid ligands as FGFR agonists, shedding new light on FGFR-based drug discovery. PMID:27721968

  6. Assessing karyotype precision by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization in the myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent genome-wide microarray-based research investigations have revealed a high frequency of submicroscopic copy number alterations (CNAs) in the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), suggesting microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has the potential to detect new clinically relevant genomic markers in a diagnostic laboratory. Results We performed an exploratory study on 30 cases of MDS, myeloproliferative neoplasia (MPN) or evolving acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (% bone marrow blasts ≤ 30%, range 0-30%, median, 8%) by aCGH, using a genome-wide bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) microarray. The sample data were compared to corresponding cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and clinical-pathological findings. Previously unidentified imbalances, in particular those considered submicroscopic aberrations (< 10 Mb), were confirmed by FISH analysis. CNAs identified by aCGH were concordant with the cytogenetic/FISH results in 25/30 (83%) of the samples tested. aCGH revealed new CNAs in 14/30 (47%) patients, including 28 submicroscopic or hidden aberrations verified by FISH studies. Cryptic 344-kb RUNX1 deletions were found in three patients at time of AML transformation. Other hidden CNAs involved 3q26.2/EVI1, 5q22/APC, 5q32/TCERG1,12p13.1/EMP1, 12q21.3/KITLG, and 17q11.2/NF1. Gains of CCND2/12p13.32 were detected in two patients. aCGH failed to detect a balanced translocation (n = 1) and low-level clonality (n = 4) in five karyotypically aberrant samples, revealing clinically important assay limitations. Conclusions The detection of previously known and unknown genomic alterations suggests that aCGH has considerable promise for identification of both recurring microscopic and submicroscopic genomic imbalances that contribute to myeloid disease pathogenesis and progression. These findings suggest that development of higher-resolution microarray platforms could improve karyotyping in clinical practice. PMID:21078186

  7. Comprehensive analysis of DNA polymerase III α subunits and their homologs in bacterial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Timinskas, Kęstutis; Balvočiūtė, Monika; Timinskas, Albertas; Venclovas, Česlovas

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of ∼2000 bacterial genomes revealed that they all, without a single exception, encode one or more DNA polymerase III α-subunit (PolIIIα) homologs. Classified into C-family of DNA polymerases they come in two major forms, PolC and DnaE, related by ancient duplication. While PolC represents an evolutionary compact group, DnaE can be further subdivided into at least three groups (DnaE1-3). We performed an extensive analysis of various sequence, structure and surface properties of all four polymerase groups. Our analysis suggests a specific evolutionary pathway leading to PolC and DnaE from the last common ancestor and reveals important differences between extant polymerase groups. Among them, DnaE1 and PolC show the highest conservation of the analyzed properties. DnaE3 polymerases apparently represent an ‘impaired’ version of DnaE1. Nonessential DnaE2 polymerases, typical for oxygen-using bacteria with large GC-rich genomes, have a number of features in common with DnaE3 polymerases. The analysis of polymerase distribution in genomes revealed three major combinations: DnaE1 either alone or accompanied by one or more DnaE2s, PolC + DnaE3 and PolC + DnaE1. The first two combinations are present in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, respectively. The third one (PolC + DnaE1), found in Clostridia, represents a novel, so far experimentally uncharacterized, set. PMID:24106089

  8. Comprehensive Analysis of Preeclampsia-Associated DNA Methylation in the Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Tianjiao; Bunce, Kimberly; Shaw, Patricia; Shridhar, Varsha; Althouse, Andrew; Hubel, Carl; Peters, David

    2014-01-01

    Background A small number of recent reports have suggested that altered placental DNA methylation may be associated with early onset preeclampsia. It is important that further studies be undertaken to confirm and develop these findings. We therefore undertook a systematic analysis of DNA methylation patterns in placental tissue from 24 women with preeclampsia and 24 with uncomplicated pregnancy outcome. Methods We analyzed the DNA methylation status of approximately 27,000 CpG sites in placental tissues in a massively parallel fashion using an oligonucleotide microarray. Follow up analysis of DNA methylation at specific CpG loci was performed using the Epityper MassArray approach and high-throughput bisulfite sequencing. Results Preeclampsia-specific DNA methylation changes were identified in placental tissue samples irrespective of gestational age of delivery. In addition, we identified a group of CpG sites within specific gene sequences that were only altered in early onset-preeclampsia (EOPET) although these DNA methylation changes did not correlate with altered mRNA transcription. We found evidence that fetal gender influences DNA methylation at autosomal loci but could find no clear association between DNA methylation and gestational age. Conclusion Preeclampsia is associated with altered placental DNA methylation. Fetal gender should be carefully considered during the design of future studies in which placental DNA is analyzed at the level of DNA methylation. Further large-scale analyses of preeclampsia-associated DNA methylation are necessary. PMID:25247495

  9. Comprehensive gene expression profiling following DNA vaccination of rainbow trout against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Nichols, Krista M.; Winton, James R.; Kurath, Gael; Thorgaard, Gary H.; Wheeler, Paul; Hansen, John D.; Herwig, Russell P.; Park, Linda K.

    2006-01-01

    The DNA vaccine based on the glycoprotein gene of Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus induces a non-specific anti-viral immune response and long-term specific immunity against IHNV. This study characterized gene expression responses associated with the early anti-viral response. Homozygous rainbow trout were injected intra-muscularly (I.M.) with vector DNA or the IHNV DNA vaccine. Gene expression in muscle tissue (I.M. site) was evaluated using a 16,008 feature salmon cDNA microarray. Eighty different genes were significantly modulated in the vector DNA group while 910 genes were modulated in the IHNV DNA vaccinate group relative to control group. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR was used to examine expression of selected immune genes at the I.M. site and in other secondary tissues. In the localized response (I.M. site), the magnitudes of gene expression changes were much greater in the vaccinate group relative to the vector DNA group for the majority of genes analyzed. At secondary systemic sites (e.g. gill, kidney and spleen), type I IFN-related genes were up-regulated in only the IHNV DNA vaccinated group. The results presented here suggest that the IHNV DNA vaccine induces up-regulation of the type I IFN system across multiple tissues, which is the functional basis of early anti-viral immunity.

  10. Animal Viruses Probe dataset (AVPDS) for microarray-based diagnosis and identification of viruses.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Brijesh S; Pokhriyal, Mayank; Vasishtha, Dinesh P; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2014-03-01

    AVPDS (Animal Viruses Probe dataset) is a dataset of virus-specific and conserve oligonucleotides for identification and diagnosis of viruses infecting animals. The current dataset contain 20,619 virus specific probes for 833 viruses and their subtypes and 3,988 conserved probes for 146 viral genera. Dataset of virus specific probe has been divided into two fields namely virus name and probe sequence. Similarly conserved probes for virus genera table have genus, and subgroup within genus name and probe sequence. The subgroup within genus is artificially divided subgroups with no taxonomic significance and contains probes which identifies viruses in that specific subgroup of the genus. Using this dataset we have successfully diagnosed the first case of Newcastle disease virus in sheep and reported a mixed infection of Bovine viral diarrhea and Bovine herpesvirus in cattle. These dataset also contains probes which cross reacts across species experimentally though computationally they meet specifications. These probes have been marked. We hope that this dataset will be useful in microarray-based detection of viruses. The dataset can be accessed through the link https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/94060831/avpds/HOME.html.

  11. Comprehensive Analysis of Pan-African Mitochondrial DNA Variation Provides New Insights into Continental Variation and Demography.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, María; Gusmão, Leonor; Černý, Viktor; Uddin, Nabeel; Syndercombe-Court, Denise; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Göbel, Tanja; Schneider, Peter M; Salas, Antonio

    2016-03-20

    Africa is the cradle of all human beings, and although it has been the focus of a number of genetic studies, there are many questions that remain unresolved. We have performed one of the largest and most comprehensive meta-analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages carried out in the African continent to date. We generated high-throughput mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data (230 SNPs) from 2024 Africans, where more than 500 of them were additionally genotyped for the control region. These data were analyzed together with over 12,700 control region profiles collected from the literature, representing more than 300 population samples from Africa. Insights into the African homeland of humans are discussed. Phylogeographic patterns for the African continent are shown at a high phylogeographic resolution as well as at the population and regional levels. The deepest branch of the mtDNA tree, haplogroup L0, shows the highest sub-haplogroup diversity in Southeast and East Africa, suggesting this region as the homeland for modern humans. Several demographic estimates point to the coast as a facilitator of human migration in Africa, but the data indicate complex patterns, perhaps mirroring the effect of recent continental-scaled demographic events in re-shaping African mtDNA variability. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. GoldenBraid 2.0: A Comprehensive DNA Assembly Framework for Plant Synthetic Biology1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sarrion-Perdigones, Alejandro; Vazquez-Vilar, Marta; Palací, Jorge; Castelijns, Bas; Forment, Javier; Ziarsolo, Peio; Blanca, José; Granell, Antonio; Orzaez, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Plant synthetic biology aims to apply engineering principles to plant genetic design. One strategic requirement of plant synthetic biology is the adoption of common standardized technologies that facilitate the construction of increasingly complex multigene structures at the DNA level while enabling the exchange of genetic building blocks among plant bioengineers. Here, we describe GoldenBraid 2.0 (GB2.0), a comprehensive technological framework that aims to foster the exchange of standard DNA parts for plant synthetic biology. GB2.0 relies on the use of type IIS restriction enzymes for DNA assembly and proposes a modular cloning schema with positional notation that resembles the grammar of natural languages. Apart from providing an optimized cloning strategy that generates fully exchangeable genetic elements for multigene engineering, the GB2.0 toolkit offers an ever-growing open collection of DNA parts, including a group of functionally tested, premade genetic modules to build frequently used modules like constitutive and inducible expression cassettes, endogenous gene silencing and protein-protein interaction tools, etc. Use of the GB2.0 framework is facilitated by a number of Web resources that include a publicly available database, tutorials, and a software package that provides in silico simulations and laboratory protocols for GB2.0 part domestication and multigene engineering. In short, GB2.0 provides a framework to exchange both information and physical DNA elements among bioengineers to help implement plant synthetic biology projects. PMID:23669743

  13. Comprehensive analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation across human polycystic ovary syndrome ovary granulosa cell

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhaofeng; Wang, Linlin; Du, Linqing; Niu, Wenbin; Sun, Yingpu

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects approximately 7% of the reproductive-age women. A growing body of evidence indicated that epigenetic mechanisms contributed to the development of PCOS. The role of DNA modification in human PCOS ovary granulosa cell is still unknown in PCOS progression. Global DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation were detected between PCOS’ and controls’ granulosa cell. Genome-wide DNA methylation was profiled to investigate the putative function of DNA methylaiton. Selected genes expressions were analyzed between PCOS’ and controls’ granulosa cell. Our results showed that the granulosa cell global DNA methylation of PCOS patients was significant higher than the controls’. The global DNA hydroxymethylation showed low level and no statistical difference between PCOS and control. 6936 differentially methylated CpG sites were identified between control and PCOS-obesity. 12245 differential methylated CpG sites were detected between control and PCOS-nonobesity group. 5202 methylated CpG sites were significantly differential between PCOS-obesity and PCOS-nonobesity group. Our results showed that DNA methylation not hydroxymethylation altered genome-wide in PCOS granulosa cell. The different methylation genes were enriched in development protein, transcription factor activity, alternative splicing, sequence-specific DNA binding and embryonic morphogenesis. YWHAQ, NCF2, DHRS9 and SCNA were up-regulation in PCOS-obesity patients with no significance different between control and PCOS-nonobesity patients, which may be activated by lower DNA methylaiton. Global and genome-wide DNA methylation alteration may contribute to different genes expression and PCOS clinical pathology. PMID:27056885

  14. A comprehensive approach to ascertain the binding mode of curcumin with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris, P.; Mary, Varughese; Aparna, P.; Dileep, K. V.; Sudarsanakumar, C.

    2017-03-01

    Curcumin is a natural phytochemical from the rhizoma of Curcuma longa, the popular Indian spice that exhibits a wide range of pharmacological properties like antioxidant, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antitumor, and antiviral activities. In the published literatures we can see different studies and arguments on the interaction of curcumin with DNA. The intercalative binding, groove binding and no binding of curcumin with DNA were reported. In this context, we conducted a detailed study to understand the mechanism of recognition of dimethylsulfoxide-solubilized curcumin by DNA. The interaction of curcumin with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) was confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The nature of binding and energetics of interaction were studied by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), UV-visible, fluorescence and melting temperature (Tm) analysis. The experimental data were compared with molecular modeling studies. Our investigation confirmed that dimethylsulfoxide-solubilized curcumin binds in the minor groove of the ctDNA without causing significant structural alteration to the DNA.

  15. A comprehensive approach to ascertain the binding mode of curcumin with DNA.

    PubMed

    Haris, P; Mary, Varughese; Aparna, P; Dileep, K V; Sudarsanakumar, C

    2017-03-15

    Curcumin is a natural phytochemical from the rhizoma of Curcuma longa, the popular Indian spice that exhibits a wide range of pharmacological properties like antioxidant, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antitumor, and antiviral activities. In the published literatures we can see different studies and arguments on the interaction of curcumin with DNA. The intercalative binding, groove binding and no binding of curcumin with DNA were reported. In this context, we conducted a detailed study to understand the mechanism of recognition of dimethylsulfoxide-solubilized curcumin by DNA. The interaction of curcumin with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) was confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The nature of binding and energetics of interaction were studied by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), UV-visible, fluorescence and melting temperature (Tm) analysis. The experimental data were compared with molecular modeling studies. Our investigation confirmed that dimethylsulfoxide-solubilized curcumin binds in the minor groove of the ctDNA without causing significant structural alteration to the DNA.

  16. Comprehensive scanning of somatic mitochondrial DNA alterations in acute leukemia developing from myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Linnartz, Bjoern; Anglmayer, Roswitha; Zanssen, Stefanie

    2004-03-15

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal myeloid disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis resulting in refractory cytopenias. Transformation resulting in acute myeloblastic leukemia is the final stage in the multistep process of MDS evolution. Functional relevant mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been related to sideroblastic anemia and MDS. To investigate the role of mtDNA in malignant transformation to acute leukemia, we used high-resolution techniques such as single-strand conformational polymorphism and fluorescence sequencing for investigation of the whole mitochondrial genome from blood cells of 10 patients with MDS. Functionally relevant point mutations in mitochondrial RNA and polypeptide-encoding genes were detected in 50% of patients with MDS. Their increasing mutation load connects MDS and the developing acute myeloid leukemias. Several point mutations of mtDNA, including secondary point mutations for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, occur in one bone marrow and may synergically affect bone marrow stem cells by an apoptotic pathway.

  17. Accurate and Rapid Identification of Candida spp. Frequently Associated with Fungemia by Using PCR and the Microarray-Based Prove-it Sepsis Assay

    PubMed Central

    Aittakorpi, Anne; Kuusela, Pentti; Koukila-Kähkölä, Pirkko; Vaara, Martti; Petrou, Michael; Gant, Vanya

    2012-01-01

    The rapid identification of microbes responsible for bloodstream infections (BSIs) allows more focused and effective therapies and outcomes. DNA sequence-based methods offer an opportunity for faster, accurate diagnosis and for effective therapy. As our objective of the study, the ability of the Prove-it Sepsis platform, already proven as a rapid PCR- and microarray-based assay for the majority of sepsis-causing bacteria, was extended to also rapidly identify clinically relevant yeasts in blood culture. The performance characteristics of this extended platform are described. We found that the extended diagnostic Prove-it Sepsis platform was found to be highly accurate when analyzing primary isolates, spiked blood cultures, nucleic acid extracts from a retrospective blood culture data set, and primary blood cultures. Comparison of the blood culture results from the Prove-it Sepsis platform with those from conventional culture-based methods or by gene sequencing demonstrated a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 98% for fungal targets (based on analysis of a total of 388 specimens). Total assay time was 3 h from DNA extraction to BSI diagnosis. These results extend the performance characteristics of the Prove-it platform for bacteria to the easy, rapid, and accurate detection and species identification of yeasts in positive blood cultures. Incorporation of this extended and rapid diagnostic platform into the tools for clinical patient management would allow possibly faster identification and more focused therapies for BSIs. PMID:22952267

  18. Comprehensive DNA Methylation and Gene Expression Profiling in Differentiating Human Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    van den Dungen, Myrthe W; Murk, Albertinka J; Kok, Dieuwertje E; Steegenga, Wilma T

    2016-12-01

    Insight into the processes controlling adipogenesis is important in the battle against the obesity epidemic and its related disorders. The transcriptional regulatory cascade involved in adipocyte differentiation has been extensively studied, however, the mechanisms driving the transcription activation are still poorly understood. In this study, we explored the involvement of DNA methylation in transcriptional regulation during adipocyte differentiation of primary human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Genome-wide changes in DNA methylation were measured using the Illumina 450K BeadChip. In addition, expression of 84 adipogenic genes was determined, of which 43 genes showed significant expression changes during the differentiation process. Among these 43 differentially expressed genes, differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were detected in only three genes. By comparing genome-wide DNA methylation profiles in undifferentiated and differentiated adipocytes 793 significant DMRs were detected. Pathway analysis revealed the adipogenesis pathway as the most statistically significant, although only a small number of genes were differentially methylated. Genome-wide DNA methylation changes for single probes were most often located in intergenic regions, and underrepresented close to the transcription start site. In conclusion, DNA methylation remained relatively stable during adipocyte differentiation, implying that changes in DNA methylation are not the underlying mechanism regulating gene expression during adipocyte differentiation. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2707-2718, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Microarray-based transcriptional profiling of Eimeria bovis-infected bovine endothelial host cells.

    PubMed

    Taubert, Anja; Wimmers, Klaus; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Jimenez, Cristina Arce; Zahner, Horst; Hermosilla, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Within its life cycle Eimeria bovis undergoes a long lasting intracellular development into large macromeronts in endothelial cells. Since little is known about the molecular basis of E. bovis-triggered host cell regulation we applied a microarray-based approach to define transcript variation in bovine endothelial cells early after sporozoite invasion (4 h post inoculation (p.i.)), during trophozoite establishment (4 days p.i.), during early parasite proliferation (8 days p.i.) and towards macromeront maturation (14 days p.i.). E. bovis infection led to significant changes in the abundance of many host cell gene transcripts. As infection progressed, the number of regulated genes increased such that 12, 45, 175 and 1184 sequences were modulated at 4 h, 4, 8 and 14 days p.i., respectively. These genes significantly interfered with several host cell functions, networks and canonical pathways, especially those involved in cellular development, cell cycle, cell death, immune response and metabolism. The correlation between stage of infection and the number of regulated genes involved in different aspects of metabolism suggest parasite-derived exploitation of host cell nutrients. The modulation of genes involved in cell cycle arrest and host cell apoptosis corresponds to morphological in vitro findings and underline the importance of these aspects for parasite survival. Nevertheless, the increasing numbers of modulated transcripts associated with immune responses also demonstrate the defensive capacity of the endothelial host cell. Overall, this work reveals a panel of novel candidate genes involved in E. bovis-triggered host cell modulation, providing a valuable tool for future work on this topic.

  20. Microarray-based Analysis of Microbial Community RNAs by Whole Community RNA Amplification (WCRA)

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Yang, Zamin Koo; Gentry, Terry; Wu, Liyou; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Zhou, Jizhong

    2007-01-01

    A new approach, termed whole-community RNA amplification (WCRA), was developed to provide sufficient amounts of mRNAs from environmental samples for microarray analysis. This method employs fusion primers (six to nine random nucleotides with an attached T7 promoter) for the first-strand synthesis. The shortest primer (T7N6S) gave the best results in terms of the yield and representativeness of amplification. About 1,200- to 1,800-fold amplification was obtained with amounts of the RNA templates ranging from 10 to 100 ng, and very representative detection was obtained with 50 to 100 ng total RNA. Evaluation with a Shewanella oneidensis {Delta}fur strain revealed that the amplification method which we developed could preserve the original abundance relationships of mRNAs. In addition, to determine whether representative detection of RNAs can be achieved with mixed community samples, amplification biases were evaluated with a mixture containing equal quantities of RNAs (100 ng each) from four bacterial species, and representative amplification was also obtained. Finally, the method which we developed was applied to the active microbial populations in a denitrifying fluidized bed reactor used for denitrification of contaminated groundwater and ethanol-stimulated groundwater samples for uranium reduction. The genes expressed were consistent with the expected functions of the bioreactor and groundwater system, suggesting that this approach is useful for analyzing the functional activities of microbial communities. This is one of the first demonstrations that microarray-based technology can be used to successfully detect the activities of microbial communities from real environmental samples in a high-throughput fashion.

  1. Repair of damaged DNA in-vivo. Comprehensive progress report, August 1980-August 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Hanawalt, P.C.

    1983-07-01

    We have extended our characterization of long patch excision repair (LPER) and have demonstrated that LPER is not mutagenic (or error-prone); that the recA function is required for LPER, at least for its regulation; that the substrate for LPER is produced as a linear (not an exponential) function of uv (254 nm) dose; and that LPER can occur in uvr/sup -/ cells treated with N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). We have developed 3 methods for measuring the frequency of interstrand crosslinks in DNA and are now applying these methods to the study of the formation and repair of DNA crosslinks in E.Coli. We have developed a monoclonal antibody specific for thymine glycol in DNA, and are using it to study the repair of thymine glycol in E. coli.

  2. Comprehensive screening of octopus amphiphiles as DNA activators in lipid bilayers: implications on transport, sensing and cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Javier; Fin, Andrea; Matile, Stefan

    2011-04-21

    Dynamic octopus amphiphiles contain one charged "head," here a guanidinium cation, together several hydrophobic "tails" (or "tentacles") that can be attached and exchanged in situ by reversible hydrazone formation. Quite surprisingly, their ability to activate DNA as transporters in lipid bilayer membranes was found to increase with the number of tails (up to four) as well as with their length (up to eight carbons). Both encouraged and puzzled by these results, we decided that a comprehensive screening of octopus amphiphiles with regard to number (from one to six) and length (from three to eighteen carbons) of their tails would be appropriate at this point. For this purpose, we here report the synthesis of cationic hexahydrazide peptide dendrons together with that of aldehydes with long, saturated, unsaturated and branched hydrophobic tails. Comprehensive screening of the completed collection of tails and heads reveals that the ability of octopus amphiphiles to activate DNA transporters shifts with increasing number of tails to decreasing length of the tails. Moreover, cis-alkenyl and branched alkyl tails are more active than their linear analogs, branched aromatic tails are best. These overall very meaningful trends for octopus amphiphiles will be of importance for sensing applications and fragrant cellular uptake.

  3. Comprehensive DNA methylation analysis of human neuroblastoma cells treated with blonanserin.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yui; Nishioka, Masaki; Bundo, Miki; Sunaga, Fumiko; Kasai, Kiyoto; Iwamoto, Kazuya

    2014-03-20

    Blonanserin is a second-generation antipsychotic drug for schizophrenia. The pharmacological actions of blonanserin are shown to be the antagonism of dopamine receptor 2 and serotonin receptors. However, its molecular mechanisms in brain cells have not been fully characterized. Accumulating evidence suggests that antipsychotic drugs and mood stabilizers show epigenetic effects on a wide range of genes in animal and cellular models. We performed genome-wide DNA methylation analysis targeting 479,814 CpG sites of cultured human neuroblastoma cells administered with blonanserin. We found that 3,057 CpG sites showed statistically significant changes in DNA methylation at two different doses of blonanserin (1.36 nM and 13.6 nM). These included hypermethylated CpG sites that were enriched in genes related to axonogenesis and cell morphogenesis involved in neuron differentiation. We also showed that the global effect on DNA methylome depends on the concentration of the drug. With a high dose of blonanserin, the overall methylation levels across all CpG sites significantly increased. These increases in DNA methylation were prominent in the CpG sites distant from promoter regions. We further examined DNA methylation changes in specific genes implicated for the actions of antipsychotic drugs, such as the dopamine receptor 2 (DRD2) gene and the serotonin receptor 2A (HTR2A) gene. We observed that CpG sites that were located within DRD2 and HTR2A genes were significantly hypermethylated by blonanserin. The DNA methylation changes induced by the treatment with blonanserin will be useful for understanding its pharmacological actions at the cellular level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Exploring the DNA-binding specificities of zinc fingers with DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Bulyk, Martha L.; Huang, Xiaohua; Choo, Yen; Church, George M.

    2001-01-01

    A key step in the regulation of networks that control gene expression is the sequence-specific binding of transcription factors to their DNA recognition sites. A more complete understanding of these DNA–protein interactions will permit a more comprehensive and quantitative mapping of the regulatory pathways within cells, as well as a deeper understanding of the potential functions of individual genes regulated by newly identified DNA-binding sites. Here we describe a DNA microarray-based method to characterize sequence-specific DNA recognition by zinc-finger proteins. A phage display library, prepared by randomizing critical amino acid residues in the second of three fingers of the mouse Zif268 domain, provided a rich source of zinc-finger proteins with variant DNA-binding specificities. Microarrays containing all possible 3-bp binding sites for the variable zinc fingers permitted the quantitation of the binding site preferences of the entire library, pools of zinc fingers corresponding to different rounds of selection from this library, as well as individual Zif268 variants that were isolated from the library by using specific DNA sequences. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using DNA microarrays for genome-wide identification of putative transcription factor-binding sites. PMID:11404456

  5. Pentaprobe: a comprehensive sequence for the one-step detection of DNA-binding activities

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Ann H. Y.; Czolij, Robert; Mackay, Joel P.; Crossley, Merlin

    2003-01-01

    The rapid increase in the number of novel proteins identified in genome projects necessitates simple and rapid methods for assigning function. We describe a strategy for determining whether novel proteins possess typical sequence-specific DNA-binding activity. Many proteins bind recognition sequences of 5 bp or less. Given that there are 45 possible 5 bp sites, one might expect the length of sequence required to cover all possibilities would be 45 × 5 or 5120 nt. But by allowing overlaps, utilising both strands and using a computer algorithm to generate the minimum sequence, we find the length required is only 516 base pairs. We generated this sequence as six overlapping double-stranded oligonucleotides, termed pentaprobe, and used it in gel retardation experiments to assess DNA binding by both known and putative DNA-binding proteins from several protein families. We have confirmed binding by the zinc finger proteins BKLF, Eos and Pegasus, the Ets domain protein PU.1 and the treble clef N- and C-terminal fingers of GATA-1. We also showed that the N-terminal zinc finger domain of FOG-1 does not behave as a typical DNA-binding domain. Our results suggest that pentaprobe, and related sequences such as hexaprobe, represent useful tools for probing protein function. PMID:14530457

  6. Pentaprobe: a comprehensive sequence for the one-step detection of DNA-binding activities.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Ann H Y; Czolij, Robert; Mackay, Joel P; Crossley, Merlin

    2003-10-15

    The rapid increase in the number of novel proteins identified in genome projects necessitates simple and rapid methods for assigning function. We describe a strategy for determining whether novel proteins possess typical sequence-specific DNA-binding activity. Many proteins bind recognition sequences of 5 bp or less. Given that there are 4(5) possible 5 bp sites, one might expect the length of sequence required to cover all possibilities would be 4(5) x 5 or 5120 nt. But by allowing overlaps, utilising both strands and using a computer algorithm to generate the minimum sequence, we find the length required is only 516 base pairs. We generated this sequence as six overlapping double-stranded oligonucleotides, termed pentaprobe, and used it in gel retardation experiments to assess DNA binding by both known and putative DNA-binding proteins from several protein families. We have confirmed binding by the zinc finger proteins BKLF, Eos and Pegasus, the Ets domain protein PU.1 and the treble clef N- and C-terminal fingers of GATA-1. We also showed that the N-terminal zinc finger domain of FOG-1 does not behave as a typical DNA-binding domain. Our results suggest that pentaprobe, and related sequences such as hexaprobe, represent useful tools for probing protein function.

  7. Binding of cationic porphyrin to isolated and encapsidated viral DNA analyzed by comprehensive spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Zupán, Kristóf; Herényi, Levente; Tóth, Katalin; Majer, Zsuzsa; Csík, Gabriella

    2004-07-20

    The complexation of tetrakis(4-N-methylpyridyl)porphyrin (TMPyP) with free and encapsidated DNA of T7 bacteriophage was investigated. To identify binding modes and relative concentrations of bound TMPyP forms, the porphyrin absorption spectra at various base pair/porphyrin ratios were analyzed. Spectral decomposition, fluorescent lifetime, and circular dichroism measurements proved the presence of two main binding types of TMPyP, e.g., external binding and intercalation both in free and in encapsidated DNA. Optical melting studies revealed that TMPyP increases the strand separation temperature of both free and native phage DNA and does not change the phase transition temperature of phage capsid proteins. From these findings we concluded that TMPyP binding does not influence the protein structure and/or the protein-DNA interaction. A combined analysis of absorption spectra and fluorescence decay curves made possible the determination of concentrations of free, externally bound, and intercalated porphyrin. As a perspective, our results facilitate a qualitative analysis of the TMPyP binding process at various experimental conditions.

  8. Comprehensive Assessment of Oxidatively Induced Modifications of DNA in a Rat Model of Human Wilson's Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Guerrero, Candace R.; Liu, Shuo; Amato, Nicholas J.; Sharma, Yogeshwar; Gupta, Sanjeev; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-01-01

    Defective copper excretion from hepatocytes in Wilson's disease causes accumulation of copper ions with increased generation of reactive oxygen species via the Fenton-type reaction. Here we developed a nanoflow liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with the isotope-dilution method for the simultaneous quantification of oxidatively induced DNA modifications. This method enabled measurement, in microgram quantities of DNA, of four oxidative stress-induced lesions, including direct ROS-induced purine cyclonucleosides (cPus) and two exocyclic adducts induced by byproducts of lipid peroxidation, i.e. 1,N6-etheno-2′-deoxyadenosine (εdA) and 1,N2-etheno-2′-deoxyguanosine (εdG). Analysis of liver tissues of Long-Evans Cinnamon rats, which constitute an animal model of human Wilson's disease, and their healthy counterparts [i.e. Long-Evans Agouti rats] showed significantly higher levels of all four DNA lesions in Long-Evans Cinnamon than Long-Evans Agouti rats. Moreover, cPus were present at much higher levels than εdA and εdG lesions. In contrast, the level of 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxycytidine (5-HmdC), an oxidation product of 5-methyl-2′-deoxycytidine (5-mdC), was markedly lower in the liver tissues of Long-Evans Cinnamon than Long-Evans Agouti rats, though no differences were observed for the levels of 5-mdC. In vitro biochemical assay showed that Cu2+ ions could directly inhibit the activity of Tet enzymes. Together, these results suggest that aberrant copper accumulation may perturb genomic stability by elevating oxidatively induced DNA lesions, and by altering epigenetic pathways of gene regulation. PMID:26362317

  9. Comprehensive Assessment of Oxidatively Induced Modifications of DNA in a Rat Model of Human Wilson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Guerrero, Candace R; Liu, Shuo; Amato, Nicholas J; Sharma, Yogeshwar; Gupta, Sanjeev; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-03-01

    Defective copper excretion from hepatocytes in Wilson's disease causes accumulation of copper ions with increased generation of reactive oxygen species via the Fenton-type reaction. Here we developed a nanoflow liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with the isotope-dilution method for the simultaneous quantification of oxidatively induced DNA modifications. This method enabled measurement, in microgram quantities of DNA, of four oxidative stress-induced lesions, including direct ROS-induced purine cyclonucleosides (cPus) and two exocyclic adducts induced by byproducts of lipid peroxidation, i.e. 1,N(6)-etheno-2'-deoxyadenosine (εdA) and 1,N(2)-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine (εdG). Analysis of liver tissues of Long-Evans Cinnamon rats, which constitute an animal model of human Wilson's disease, and their healthy counterparts [i.e. Long-Evans Agouti rats] showed significantly higher levels of all four DNA lesions in Long-Evans Cinnamon than Long-Evans Agouti rats. Moreover, cPus were present at much higher levels than εdA and εdG lesions. In contrast, the level of 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5-HmdC), an oxidation product of 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5-mdC), was markedly lower in the liver tissues of Long-Evans Cinnamon than Long-Evans Agouti rats, though no differences were observed for the levels of 5-mdC. In vitro biochemical assay showed that Cu(2+) ions could directly inhibit the activity of Tet enzymes. Together, these results suggest that aberrant copper accumulation may perturb genomic stability by elevating oxidatively induced DNA lesions, and by altering epigenetic pathways of gene regulation.

  10. Comprehensive Study On The Metastable Negative Ion Fragmentation Of Individual Dna Components And Larger Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingolfsson, O.; Flosadottir, H. D.; Omarsson, B.; Ilko, B.

    2010-07-01

    Here we present a systematic study on the unimolecular decay pathways of the deprotonated building blocks of DNA and RNA to address the following questions: 1. Are the negative ion fragmentation patterns observed in the metastable decay of individual DNA components still evident when these are combined to larger oligonucleotides? 2. What is the significance of the charge location in determining the fragmentation pathways in the metastable decay process? 3. Are those metastable decay channels relevant in dissociative electron attachment to DNA components? To address these questions we have studied the fragmentation patterns of the deprotonated ribose and ribose 5'-monophosphate, the fragmentation patterns of the individual bases, all nucleosides and all 2'-deoxynucleosides as well as the individual nucleotides and several combinations of hexameric oligonucleotides. Furthermore, to understand the significance of the charge location in determining the fragmentation path in the metastable decay process of these deprotonated ions we have also studied modified uridine and guanosine. These have been modified to block different deprotonation sites and thus to control the initial step in the in the fragmentation process i.e. the site of deprotonation. In addition to our experimental approach we have also simulated the metastable fragmentation of the deprotonated uridine and 2'-deoxyguanosine to clarify the mechanisms and fragmentation patterns observed. Where data is available, the results are compared to dissociative electron attachment to DNA components and discussed in context to the underlying mechanism. Experiments on modified nucleosides where selected deprotonation sites have been blocked are used to verify the predicted reaction paths and imulations on uridine and 2'-deoxyguanosine are compared to the experimental results and used to shed light on the mechanisms involved.

  11. Evaluation of a viral microarray based on simultaneous extraction and amplification of viral nucleotide acid for detecting human herpesviruses and enteroviruses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Duan, Chunhong; Zhang, Chunxiu; Yang, Xiaomeng; Zhao, Yan; Dong, Rui; Zhou, Jiajing; Gai, Zhongtao

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a viral microarray based assay was developed to detect the human herpesviruses and enteroviruses associated with central nervous system infections, including herpes simplex virus type 1, type 2 (HSV1 and HSV2), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), enterovirus 71 (EV71), coxsackievirus A 16 (CA16) and B 5(CB5). The DNA polymerase gene of human herpesviruses and 5'-untranslated region of enteroviruses were selected as the targets to design primers and probes. Human herpesviruses DNA and enteroviruses RNA were extracted simultaneously by using a guanidinium thiocyanate acid buffer, and were subsequently amplified through a biotinylated asymmetry multiplex RT-PCR with the specific primer of enteroviruses. In total, 90 blood samples and 49 cerebrospinal fluids samples with suspected systemic or neurological virus infections were investigated. Out of 139 samples, 66 were identified as positive. The specificities of this multiplex RT-PCR microarray assay were over 96% but the sensitivities were various from 100% for HSV1, HSV2, EV71 and CB5, 95.83% for CMV, 80% for EBV to 71.43% for CA16 in comparison with reference standards of TaqMan qPCR/qRT-PCR. The high Kappa values (>0.90) from HSV1, HSV2, CMV, EV71 and CB5 were obtained, indicating almost perfect agreement in term of the 5 viruses detection. But lower Kappa values for EBV (0.63) and CA16 (0.74) displayed a moderate to substantial agreement. This study provides an innovation of simultaneous extraction, amplification, hybridization and detection of DNA viruses and RNA viruses with simplicity and specificity, and demonstrates a potential clinical utility for a variety of viruses' detection.

  12. A comprehensive phylogeny of birds (Aves) using targeted next-generation DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Prum, Richard O; Berv, Jacob S; Dornburg, Alex; Field, Daniel J; Townsend, Jeffrey P; Lemmon, Emily Moriarty; Lemmon, Alan R

    2015-10-22

    Although reconstruction of the phylogeny of living birds has progressed tremendously in the last decade, the evolutionary history of Neoaves--a clade that encompasses nearly all living bird species--remains the greatest unresolved challenge in dinosaur systematics. Here we investigate avian phylogeny with an unprecedented scale of data: >390,000 bases of genomic sequence data from each of 198 species of living birds, representing all major avian lineages, and two crocodilian outgroups. Sequence data were collected using anchored hybrid enrichment, yielding 259 nuclear loci with an average length of 1,523 bases for a total data set of over 7.8 × 10(7) bases. Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses yielded highly supported and nearly identical phylogenetic trees for all major avian lineages. Five major clades form successive sister groups to the rest of Neoaves: (1) a clade including nightjars, other caprimulgiforms, swifts, and hummingbirds; (2) a clade uniting cuckoos, bustards, and turacos with pigeons, mesites, and sandgrouse; (3) cranes and their relatives; (4) a comprehensive waterbird clade, including all diving, wading, and shorebirds; and (5) a comprehensive landbird clade with the enigmatic hoatzin (Opisthocomus hoazin) as the sister group to the rest. Neither of the two main, recently proposed Neoavian clades--Columbea and Passerea--were supported as monophyletic. The results of our divergence time analyses are congruent with the palaeontological record, supporting a major radiation of crown birds in the wake of the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) mass extinction.

  13. Comprehensive evaluation of genome-wide 5-hydroxymethylcytosine profiling approaches in human DNA.

    PubMed

    Skvortsova, Ksenia; Zotenko, Elena; Luu, Phuc-Loi; Gould, Cathryn M; Nair, Shalima S; Clark, Susan J; Stirzaker, Clare

    2017-01-01

    The discovery that 5-methylcytosine (5mC) can be oxidized to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) by the ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins has prompted wide interest in the potential role of 5hmC in reshaping the mammalian DNA methylation landscape. The gold-standard bisulphite conversion technologies to study DNA methylation do not distinguish between 5mC and 5hmC. However, new approaches to mapping 5hmC genome-wide have advanced rapidly, although it is unclear how the different methods compare in accurately calling 5hmC. In this study, we provide a comparative analysis on brain DNA using three 5hmC genome-wide approaches, namely whole-genome bisulphite/oxidative bisulphite sequencing (WG Bis/OxBis-seq), Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip arrays coupled with oxidative bisulphite (HM450K Bis/OxBis) and antibody-based immunoprecipitation and sequencing of hydroxymethylated DNA (hMeDIP-seq). We also perform loci-specific TET-assisted bisulphite sequencing (TAB-seq) for validation of candidate regions. We show that whole-genome single-base resolution approaches are advantaged in providing precise 5hmC values but require high sequencing depth to accurately measure 5hmC, as this modification is commonly in low abundance in mammalian cells. HM450K arrays coupled with oxidative bisulphite provide a cost-effective representation of 5hmC distribution, at CpG sites with 5hmC levels >~10%. However, 5hmC analysis is restricted to the genomic location of the probes, which is an important consideration as 5hmC modification is commonly enriched at enhancer elements. Finally, we show that the widely used hMeDIP-seq method provides an efficient genome-wide profile of 5hmC and shows high correlation with WG Bis/OxBis-seq 5hmC distribution in brain DNA. However, in cell line DNA with low levels of 5hmC, hMeDIP-seq-enriched regions are not detected by WG Bis/OxBis or HM450K, either suggesting misinterpretation of 5hmC calls by hMeDIP or lack of sensitivity of the latter methods. We

  14. Comprehensive splicing functional analysis of DNA variants of the BRCA2 gene by hybrid minigenes.

    PubMed

    Acedo, Alberto; Sanz, David J; Durán, Mercedes; Infante, Mar; Pérez-Cabornero, Lucía; Miner, Cristina; Velasco, Eladio A

    2012-05-25

    The underlying pathogenic mechanism of a large fraction of DNA variants of disease-causing genes is the disruption of the splicing process. We aimed to investigate the effect on splicing of the BRCA2 variants c.8488-1G > A (exon 20) and c.9026_9030del (exon 23), as well as 41 BRCA2 variants reported in the Breast Cancer Information Core (BIC) mutation database. DNA variants were analyzed with the splicing prediction programs NNSPLICE and Human Splicing Finder. Functional analyses of candidate variants were performed by lymphocyte RT-PCR and/or hybrid minigene assays. Forty-one BIC variants of exons 19, 20, 23 and 24 were bioinformatically selected and generated by PCR-mutagenesis of the wild type minigenes. Lymphocyte RT-PCR of c.8488-1G > A showed intron 19 retention and a 12-nucleotide deletion in exon 20, whereas c.9026_9030del did not show any splicing anomaly. Minigene analysis of c.8488-1G > A displayed the aforementioned aberrant isoforms but also exon 20 skipping. We further evaluated the splicing outcomes of 41 variants of four BRCA2 exons by minigene analysis. Eighteen variants presented splicing aberrations. Most variants (78.9%) disrupted the natural splice sites, whereas four altered putative enhancers/silencers and had a weak effect. Fluorescent RT-PCR of minigenes accurately detected 14 RNA isoforms generated by cryptic site usage, exon skipping and intron retention events. Fourteen variants showed total splicing disruptions and were predicted to truncate or eliminate essential domains of BRCA2. A relevant proportion of BRCA2 variants are correlated with splicing disruptions, indicating that RNA analysis is a valuable tool to assess the pathogenicity of a particular DNA change. The minigene system is a straightforward and robust approach to detect variants with an impact on splicing and contributes to a better knowledge of this gene expression step.

  15. More comprehensive forensic genetic marker analyses for accurate human remains identification using massively parallel DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ambers, Angie D; Churchill, Jennifer D; King, Jonathan L; Stoljarova, Monika; Gill-King, Harrell; Assidi, Mourad; Abu-Elmagd, Muhammad; Buhmeida, Abdelbaset; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed; Budowle, Bruce

    2016-10-17

    Although the primary objective of forensic DNA analyses of unidentified human remains is positive identification, cases involving historical or archaeological skeletal remains often lack reference samples for comparison. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) offers an opportunity to provide biometric data in such cases, and these cases provide valuable data on the feasibility of applying MPS for characterization of modern forensic casework samples. In this study, MPS was used to characterize 140-year-old human skeletal remains discovered at a historical site in Deadwood, South Dakota, United States. The remains were in an unmarked grave and there were no records or other metadata available regarding the identity of the individual. Due to the high throughput of MPS, a variety of biometric markers could be typed using a single sample. Using MPS and suitable forensic genetic markers, more relevant information could be obtained from a limited quantity and quality sample. Results were obtained for 25/26 Y-STRs, 34/34 Y SNPs, 166/166 ancestry-informative SNPs, 24/24 phenotype-informative SNPs, 102/102 human identity SNPs, 27/29 autosomal STRs (plus amelogenin), and 4/8 X-STRs (as well as ten regions of mtDNA). The Y-chromosome (Y-STR, Y-SNP) and mtDNA profiles of the unidentified skeletal remains are consistent with the R1b and H1 haplogroups, respectively. Both of these haplogroups are the most common haplogroups in Western Europe. Ancestry-informative SNP analysis also supported European ancestry. The genetic results are consistent with anthropological findings that the remains belong to a male of European ancestry (Caucasian). Phenotype-informative SNP data provided strong support that the individual had light red hair and brown eyes. This study is among the first to genetically characterize historical human remains with forensic genetic marker kits specifically designed for MPS. The outcome demonstrates that substantially more genetic information can be obtained from

  16. A high-throughput assay for the comprehensive profiling of DNA ligase fidelity.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Gregory J S; Bauer, Robert J; Nichols, Nicole M; Mazzola, Laurie; Bybee, Joanna; Rivizzigno, Danielle; Cantin, Elizabeth; Evans, Thomas C

    2016-01-29

    DNA ligases have broad application in molecular biology, from traditional cloning methods to modern synthetic biology and molecular diagnostics protocols. Ligation-based detection of polynucleotide sequences can be achieved by the ligation of probe oligonucleotides when annealed to a complementary target sequence. In order to achieve a high sensitivity and low background, the ligase must efficiently join correctly base-paired substrates, while discriminating against the ligation of substrates containing even one mismatched base pair. In the current study, we report the use of capillary electrophoresis to rapidly generate mismatch fidelity profiles that interrogate all 256 possible base-pair combinations at a ligation junction in a single experiment. Rapid screening of ligase fidelity in a 96-well plate format has allowed the study of ligase fidelity in unprecedented depth. As an example of this new method, herein we report the ligation fidelity of Thermus thermophilus DNA ligase at a range of temperatures, buffer pH and monovalent cation strength. This screen allows the selection of reaction conditions that maximize fidelity without sacrificing activity, while generating a profile of specific mismatches that ligate detectably under each set of conditions. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Comprehensive characterization, annotation and innovative use of Infinium DNA methylation BeadChip probes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wanding; Laird, Peter W.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Illumina Infinium DNA Methylation BeadChips represent the most widely used genome-scale DNA methylation assays. Existing strategies for masking Infinium probes overlapping repeats or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are based largely on ad hoc assumptions and subjective criteria. In addition, the recently introduced MethylationEPIC (EPIC) array expands on the utility of this platform, but has not yet been well characterized. We present in this paper an extensive characterization of probes on the EPIC and HM450 microarrays, including mappability to the latest genome build, genomic copy number of the 3΄ nested subsequence and influence of polymorphisms including a previously unrecognized color channel switch for Type I probes. We show empirical evidence for exclusion criteria for underperforming probes, providing a sounder basis than current ad hoc criteria for exclusion. In addition, we describe novel probe uses, exemplified by the addition of a total of 1052 SNP probes to the existing 59 explicit SNP probes on the EPIC array and the use of these probes to predict ethnicity. Finally, we present an innovative out-of-band color channel application for the dual use of 62 371 probes as internal bisulfite conversion controls. PMID:27924034

  18. Measuring affinity constants of 1450 monoclonal antibodies to peptide targets with a microarray-based label-free assay platform.

    PubMed

    Landry, J P; Ke, Yaohuang; Yu, Guo-Liang; Zhu, X D

    2015-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are major reagents for research and clinical diagnosis. For their inherently high specificities to intended antigen targets and thus low toxicity in general, they are pursued as one of the major classes of new drugs. Yet binding properties of most monoclonal antibodies are not well characterized in terms of affinity constants and how they vary with presentations and/or conformational isomers of antigens, buffer compositions, and temperature. We here report a microarray-based label-free assay platform for high-throughput measurements of monoclonal antibody affinity constants to antigens immobilized on solid surfaces. Using this platform we measured affinity constants of over 1410 rabbit monoclonal antibodies and 46 mouse monoclonal antibodies to peptide targets that are immobilized through a terminal cysteine residue to a glass surface. The experimentally measured affinity constants vary from 10 pM to 200 pM with the median value at 66 pM. We compare the results obtained from the microarray-based platform with those from a benchmarking surface-plasmon-resonance-based (SPR) sensor (Biacore 3000).

  19. DNA Microarray-Based Identification of Genes Controlled by Autoinducer 2-Stimulated Quorum Sensing in Escherichia Coli

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    extracellular enzymes, N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homo- serine lactone, and pathogenicity in soft-rotting Erwinia spp . J. Bacteriol. 177:5108–5115. 13. de...1998. A negative regulator mediates quorum-sensing control of exopolysaccharide production in Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci

  20. DNA Microarray-Based Identification of Genes Controlled by Autoinducer 2-Stimulated Quorum Sensing in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    DeLisa, Matthew P.; Wu, Chi-Fang; Wang, Liang; Valdes, James J.; Bentley, William E.

    2001-01-01

    Bacterial cell-to-cell communication facilitates coordinated expression of specific genes in a growth rate-II and cell density-dependent manner, a process known as quorum sensing. While the discovery of a diffusible Escherichia coli signaling pheromone, termed autoinducer 2 (AI-2), has been made along with several quorum sensing genes, the overall number and coordination of genes controlled by quorum sensing through the AI-2 signal has not been studied systematically. We investigated global changes in mRNA abundance elicited by the AI-2 signaling molecule through the use of a luxS mutant that was unable to synthesize AI-2. Remarkably, 242 genes, comprising ca. 5.6% of the E. coli genome, exhibited significant transcriptional changes (either induction or repression) in response to a 300-fold AI-2 signaling differential, with many of the identified genes displaying high induction levels (more than fivefold). Significant induction of ygeV, a putative ς54-dependent transcriptional activator, and yhbH, a ς54 modulating protein, suggests ς54 may be involved in E. coli quorum sensing. PMID:11514505

  1. Comprehensive Phylogenetic Reconstruction of Amoebozoa Based on Concatenated Analyses of SSU-rDNA and Actin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lahr, Daniel J. G.; Grant, Jessica; Nguyen, Truc; Lin, Jian Hua; Katz, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    Evolutionary relationships within Amoebozoa have been the subject of controversy for two reasons: 1) paucity of morphological characters in traditional surveys and 2) haphazard taxonomic sampling in modern molecular reconstructions. These along with other factors have prevented the erection of a definitive system that resolves confidently both higher and lower-level relationships. Additionally, the recent recognition that many protosteloid amoebae are in fact scattered throughout the Amoebozoa suggests that phylogenetic reconstructions have been excluding an extensive and integral group of organisms. Here we provide a comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction based on 139 taxa using molecular information from both SSU-rDNA and actin genes. We provide molecular data for 13 of those taxa, 12 of which had not been previously characterized. We explored the dataset extensively by generating 18 alternative reconstructions that assess the effect of missing data, long-branched taxa, unstable taxa, fast evolving sites and inclusion of environmental sequences. We compared reconstructions with each other as well as against previously published phylogenies. Our analyses show that many of the morphologically established lower-level relationships (defined here as relationships roughly equivalent to Order level or below) are congruent with molecular data. However, the data are insufficient to corroborate or reject the large majority of proposed higher-level relationships (above the Order-level), with the exception of Tubulinea, Archamoebae and Myxogastrea, which are consistently recovered. Moreover, contrary to previous expectations, the inclusion of available environmental sequences does not significantly improve the Amoebozoa reconstruction. This is probably because key amoebozoan taxa are not easily amplified by environmental sequencing methodology due to high rates of molecular evolution and regular occurrence of large indels and introns. Finally, in an effort to facilitate

  2. Microarray-based genetic analyses for studying susceptibility to arterial and venous thrombotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Pollak, E S; Feng, L; Ahadian, H; Fortina, P

    2001-08-01

    We describe the potential of microarray technology for parallel, high-throughput approaches to molecular detection of DNA variations associated with progression to arterial and venous thrombotic diseases. The use of the newly commercialized NanoChip platform and a framework for genetic screening with a list of potential genetic targets useful to the evaluation of cardiovascular risk are presented. Implementation in clinical setting of analytical silicon and glass microarrays will facilitate early diagnosis, help direct specific advice to high-risk individuals and evaluate treatment strategies.

  3. A modifiable microarray-based universal sensor: providing sample-to-results automation.

    PubMed

    Yasmin, Rubina; Zhu, Hui; Chen, Zongyuan; Montagna, Richard A

    2016-10-01

    A microfluidic system consisting of generic single use cartridges which interface with a workstation allows the automatic performance of all necessary sample preparation, PCR analysis and interpretation of multiplex PCR assays. The cartridges contain a DNA array with 20 different 16mer DNA "universal" probes immobilized at defined locations. PCR amplicons can be detected via hybridization of user-defined "reporter" probes that are complementary at their 3' termini to one or more of the universal probes and complementary to the target amplicons at their 5' termini. The system was able to detect single-plex and multiplex PCR amplicons from various infectious agents as well as wild type and mutant alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms. The system's ease of use was further demonstrated by converting a published PCR assay for the detection of Mycobacterium genitalium in a fully automated manner. Excellent correlation between traditional manual methods and the automated analysis performed by the workstation suggests that the system can provide a means to easily design and implement a variety of customized PCR-based assays. The system will be useful to researchers or clinical investigators seeking to develop their own user defined assays. As the U.S. FDA continues to pursue regulatory oversight of LDTs, the system would also allow labs to continue to develop compliant assays.

  4. Microarray-based genomic profiling and in situ hybridization on fibrotic bone marrow biopsies for the identification of numerical chromosomal abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Kroef, Marian Jpl; Hebeda, Konnie M; Verwiel, Eugène T; Kamping, Eveline J; van Cleef, Patricia H; Kuiper, Roland P; Groenen, Patricia Jta

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of clonal hematological malignancies. In MDS patients with a fibrotic bone marrow the aspiration of cells often fails (dry-tap), which hampers standard karyotyping. Obtaining genetic data from these fibrotic marrows is therefore challenging, and up till now in situ hybridization applied to bone marrow biopsies is the only option. The microarray-based genomic profiling technology has already proven its value for bone marrow aspirates and peripheral blood samples, but has never been applied to the technically challenging bone marrow biopsies. We describe an approach for microarray-based genomic profiling on bone marrow biopsies and demonstrate its ability to obtain clinically relevant cytogenetic aberrations. In addition the data were compared with those obtained by in situ hybridization and karyotyping. We have evaluated the success rate of microarray-based genomic profiling by studying twenty-one bone marrow biopsies (7 fibrotic MDS, 12 non-fibrotic MDS and 2 reactive), by microarray-based genomic profiling and in situ hybridization (12 of 21 cases). The data obtained with these techniques were compared with conventional karyotyping data on corresponding bone marrow aspirates. Of the 15 copy number aberrations that were detected by in situ hybridization, 13 were concordant with microarray-based genomic profiling and karyotyping, whereas two hybridizations were misinterpreted. In 20 of 21 patients, the data obtained by microarray-based genomic profiling and karyotyping were identical or differences could be explained by the presence of marker chromosomes, complex karyotypes, clonal heterogeneity or disease progression. We demonstrate that genome wide microarray-based genomic profiling performed on bone marrow biopsies has a similar success rate compared to in situ hybridization, and prevents misinterpretation of chromosomal losses as observed by FISH. In addition, equal to even higher resolutions were

  5. Microarray-Based Analysis of Differential Gene Expression between Infective and Noninfective Larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Roshan; Varma, Sudhir; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Myers, Timothy G.; Nolan, Thomas J.; Abraham, David; Lok, James B.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Differences between noninfective first-stage (L1) and infective third-stage (L3i) larvae of parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis at the molecular level are relatively uncharacterized. DNA microarrays were developed and utilized for this purpose. Methods and Findings Oligonucleotide hybridization probes for the array were designed to bind 3,571 putative mRNA transcripts predicted by analysis of 11,335 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) obtained as part of the Nematode EST project. RNA obtained from S. stercoralis L3i and L1 was co-hybridized to each array after labeling the individual samples with different fluorescent tags. Bioinformatic predictions of gene function were developed using a novel cDNA Annotation System software. We identified 935 differentially expressed genes (469 L3i-biased; 466 L1-biased) having two-fold expression differences or greater and microarray signals with a p value<0.01. Based on a functional analysis, L1 larvae have a larger number of genes putatively involved in transcription (p = 0.004), and L3i larvae have biased expression of putative heat shock proteins (such as hsp-90). Genes with products known to be immunoreactive in S. stercoralis-infected humans (such as SsIR and NIE) had L3i biased expression. Abundantly expressed L3i contigs of interest included S. stercoralis orthologs of cytochrome oxidase ucr 2.1 and hsp-90, which may be potential chemotherapeutic targets. The S. stercoralis ortholog of fatty acid and retinol binding protein-1, successfully used in a vaccine against Ancylostoma ceylanicum, was identified among the 25 most highly expressed L3i genes. The sperm-containing glycoprotein domain, utilized in a vaccine against the nematode Cooperia punctata, was exclusively found in L3i biased genes and may be a valuable S. stercoralis target of interest. Conclusions A new DNA microarray tool for the examination of S. stercoralis biology has been developed and provides new and valuable insights regarding

  6. Rapid microarray-based genotyping of Chlamydia spp. strains from clinical tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Sachse, Konrad; Ruettger, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic Chlamydia (C.) psittaci and C. trachomatis strains can be genotyped based on variations in the ompA genomic locus. In the present chapter, we describe rapid genotyping assays for both chlamydial agents using the ArrayStrip™ (AS) microarray platform. The test is targeting multiple discriminatory sites in the variable domains of the ompA gene by using 35 (C. psittaci) and 61 (C. trachomatis) oligonucleotide probes representing genotype-specific polymorphisms. In addition to discrimination among the established genotypes, this approach allows identification of atypical strains that were not accessible to typing using previously established techniques, such as PCR-RFLP or serotyping. The present DNA microarray assay can be conducted directly on clinical tissue samples and is suitable for tracing epidemiological chains and exploring the dissemination of particular genotypes. The procedure is easy to handle and economically affordable, and it allows genotyping of up to 32 clinical samples per day, thus lending itself for routine diagnosis as well.

  7. Comprehensive Expression Profiling of Rice Grain Filling-Related Genes under High Temperature Using DNA Microarray[OA

    PubMed Central

    Yamakawa, Hiromoto; Hirose, Tatsuro; Kuroda, Masaharu; Yamaguchi, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    To elucidate the effect of high temperature on grain-filling metabolism, developing rice (Oryza sativa) ‘Nipponbare’ caryopses were exposed to high temperature (33°C/28°C) or control temperature (25°C/20°C) during the milky stage. Comprehensive gene screening by a 22-K DNA microarray and differential hybridization, followed by expression analysis by semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR, revealed that several starch synthesis-related genes, such as granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI) and branching enzymes, especially BEIIb, and a cytosolic pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase gene were down-regulated by high temperature, whereas those for starch-consuming α-amylases and heat shock proteins were up-regulated. Biochemical analyses of starch showed that the high temperature-ripened grains contained decreased levels of amylose and long chain-enriched amylopectin, which might be attributed to the repressed expression of GBSSI and BEIIb, respectively. SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analysis of storage proteins revealed decreased accumulation of 13-kD prolamin, which is consistent with the diminished expression of prolamin genes under elevated temperature. Ripening under high temperature resulted in the occurrence of grains with various degrees of chalky appearance and decreased weight. Among them, severely chalky grains contained amylopectin enriched particularly with long chains compared to slightly chalky grains, suggesting that such alterations of amylopectin structure might be involved in grain chalkiness. However, among high temperature-tolerant and sensitive cultivars, alterations of neither amylopectin chain-length distribution nor amylose content were correlated to the degree of grain chalkiness, but rather seemed to be correlated to grain weight decrease, implying different underlying mechanisms for the varietal difference in grain chalkiness. The possible metabolic pathways affected by high temperature and their relevance to grain chalkiness are

  8. Microarray-based detection of viruses causing vesicular or vesicular-like lesions in livestock animals

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Philippa J. M.; Amos-Ritchie, Rachel N.; Reverter, Antonio; Palacios, Gustavo; Quan, Phuong-Lan; Jabado, Omar; Briese, Thomas; Lipkin, W. Ian; Boyle, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of vesicular or vesicular-like lesions in livestock animals presents challenges both for veterinary clinicians and diagnostic laboratories. It is often impossible to diagnose the causative disease agent on a clinical basis alone and difficult to collect ample vesicular epithelium samples. Due to restrictions of time and sample size, once laboratory tests have ruled out foot-and-mouth disease, vesicular stomatitis and swine vesicular disease a definitive diagnosis may remain elusive. With the ability to test a small quantity of sample for a large number of pathogens simultaneously, DNA microarrays represent a potential solution to this problem. This study describes the application of a long oligonucleotide microarray assay to the identification of viruses known to cause vesicular or vesicular-like lesions in livestock animals. Eighteen virus isolates from cell culture were successfully identified to genus level, including representatives of each foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype, two species of vesicular stomatitis virus, swine vesicular disease virus, vesicular exanthema of swine virus, bovine herpesvirus 1, orf virus, pseudocowpox virus, bluetongue virus serotype 1 and bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1. Vesicular stomatitis virus and vesicular exanthema of swine virus were also identified in vesicular epithelium samples, with varying levels of sensitivity. The results indicate that with further development this microarray assay could be a valuable tool for the diagnosis of vesicular and vesicular-like diseases. PMID:18621489

  9. A molecular beacon microarray based on a quantum dot label for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingsheng; Bai, Zhixiong; Liu, Yuqian; Sun, Qingjiang

    2016-03-15

    In this work, we report the application of streptavidin-coated quantum dot (strAV-QD) in molecular beacon (MB) microarray assays by using the strAV-QD to label the immobilized MB, avoiding target labeling and meanwhile obviating the use of amplification. The MBs are stem-loop structured oligodeoxynucleotides, modified with a thiol and a biotin at two terminals of the stem. With the strAV-QD labeling an "opened" MB rather than a "closed" MB via streptavidin-biotin reaction, a sensitive and specific detection of label-free target DNA sequence is demonstrated by the MB microarray, with a signal-to-background ratio of 8. The immobilized MBs can be perfectly regenerated, allowing the reuse of the microarray. The MB microarray also is able to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms, exhibiting genotype-dependent fluorescence signals. It is demonstrated that the MB microarray can perform as a 4-to-2 encoder, compressing the genotype information into two outputs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A microarray-based detection system for genetically modified (GM) food ingredients.

    PubMed

    Leimanis, Serge; Hernández, Marta; Fernández, Sophie; Boyer, Francine; Burns, Malcolm; Bruderer, Shirin; Glouden, Thomas; Harris, Neil; Kaeppeli, Othmar; Philipp, Patrick; Pla, Maria; Puigdomènech, Pere; Vaitilingom, Marc; Bertheau, Yves; Remacle, José

    2006-05-01

    A multiplex DNA microarray chip was developed for simultaneous identification of nine genetically modified organisms (GMOs), five plant species and three GMO screening elements, i.e. the 35S promoter, the nos terminator and the nptII gene. The chips also include several controls, such as that for the possible presence of CaMV. The on-chip detection was performed directly with PCR amplified products. Particular emphasis was placed on the reduction of the number of PCR reactions required and on the number of primers present per amplification tube. The targets were biotin labelled and the arrays were detected using a colorimetric methodology. Specificity was provided by specific capture probes designed for each GMO and for the common screening elements. The sensitivity of the assay was tested by experiments carried out in five different laboratories. The limit of detection was lower than 0.3% GMO for all tests and in general around 0.1% for most GMOs. The chip detection system complies with the requirements of current EU regulations and other countries where thresholds are established for the labelling of GMO.

  11. An improved electronic microarray-based diagnostic assay for identification of MEFV mutations.

    PubMed

    Moutereau, Stéphane; Narwa, Rémy; Matheron, Catherine; Vongmany, Natalie; Simon, Emmanuelle; Goossens, Michel

    2004-06-01

    Recent technological advances, such as DNA chip devices that allow automated, high-throughput genotyping, promise to considerably improve the detection capability of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in clinically relevant genes. We used the NanoChip(R) Molecular Biology Workstation (Nanogen, www.nanogen.com) and recently introduced microelectronic array technology to develop a detection method for the more frequent mutations involved in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), an autosomal recessive disease that affects several ethnic groups in the Mediterranean population, whose early diagnosis is crucial if severe complications are to be prevented. We adapted the previously described Nanogen procedures to FMF mutation analysis, introducing modifications that notably improve the technique. First, as the original procedure makes use of costly dye-tagged reporter sequences, we devised a universal reporter strategy, which was first evaluated and validated on the robust, previously established factor V Leiden and factor II (prothrombin) NanoChip diagnostic assays. FMF (MEFV), factor V (F5), and factor II (F2) genotypes identified using this improved system were totally concordant with results of other genotyping methods (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis [DGGE], SSCP, and RFLP analysis). Second, we showed that the target sequences loaded on the NanoChip cartridges can be rehybridized several times in a highly reproducible manner, allowing sequential analysis of mutations. Thus, we devised a strategy that allows us to monitor the possible interference of additional mutations or SNPs at probe or stabilizer sequences. Finally, a comparative cost per sample analysis demonstrates that the accurate and reproducible FMF mutation detection assay we developed can be readily implemented in the clinical laboratory setting at reasonable expense. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Microarray-based comparison of three amplification methods for nanogram amounts of total RNA

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ruchira; Maganti, Rajanikanth J.; Jabba, Sairam V.; Wang, Martin; Deng, Glenn; Heath, Joe Don; Kurn, Nurith; Wangemann, Philine

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression profiling using microarrays requires microgram amounts of RNA, which limits its direct application for the study of nanogram RNA samples obtained using microdissection, laser capture microscopy, or needle biopsy. A novel system based on Ribo-SPIA technology (RS, Ovation-Biotin amplification and labeling system) was recently introduced. The utility of the RS system, an optimized prototype system for picogram RNA samples (pRS), and two T7-based systems involving one or two rounds of amplification (OneRA, Standard Protocol, or TwoRA, Small Sample Prototcol, version II) were evaluated in the present study. Mouse kidney (MK) and mouse universal reference (MUR) RNA samples, 0.3 ng to 10 μg, were analyzed using high-density Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430 2.0 GeneChip arrays. Call concordance between replicates, correlations of signal intensity, signal intensity ratios, and minimal fold increase necessary for significance were determined. All systems amplified partially overlapping sets of genes with similar signal intensity correlations. pRS amplified the highest number of genes from 10-ng RNA samples. We detected 24 of 26 genes verified by RT-PCR in samples prepared using pRS. TwoRA yielded somewhat higher call concordances than did RS and pRS (91.8% vs. 89.3% and 88.1%, respectively). Although all target preparation methods were suitable, pRS amplified the highest number of targets and was found to be suitable for amplification of as little as 0.3 ng of total RNA. In addition, RS and pRS were faster and simpler to use than the T7-based methods and resulted in the generation of cDNA, which is more stable than cRNA. PMID:15613496

  13. The MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC)-II study of common practices for the development and validation of microarray-based predictive models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The second phase of the MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC-II) project evaluated common practices for developing and validating microarray-based models aimed at predicting toxicological and clinical endpoints. Thirty-six teams developed classifiers for 13 endpoints - some easy, som...

  14. The MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC)-II study of common practices for the development and validation of microarray-based predictive models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The second phase of the MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC-II) project evaluated common practices for developing and validating microarray-based models aimed at predicting toxicological and clinical endpoints. Thirty-six teams developed classifiers for 13 endpoints - some easy, som...

  15. Microarray Based Gene Expression Analysis of Murine Brown and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue: Significance with Human

    PubMed Central

    Boparai, Ravneet K.; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran; Mantri, Shrikant; Bishnoi, Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    Background Two types of adipose tissues, white (WAT) and brown (BAT) are found in mammals. Increasingly novel strategies are being proposed for the treatment of obesity and its associated complications by altering amount and/or activity of BAT using mouse models. Methodology/Principle Findings The present study was designed to: (a) investigate the differential expression of genes in LACA mice subcutaneous WAT (sWAT) and BAT using mouse DNA microarray, (b) to compare mouse differential gene expression with previously published human data; to understand any inter- species differences between the two and (c) to make a comparative assessment with C57BL/6 mouse strain. In mouse microarray studies, over 7003, 1176 and 401 probe sets showed more than two-fold, five-fold and ten-fold change respectively in differential expression between murine BAT and WAT. Microarray data was validated using quantitative RT-PCR of key genes showing high expression in BAT (Fabp3, Ucp1, Slc27a1) and sWAT (Ms4a1, H2-Ob, Bank1) or showing relatively low expression in BAT (Pgk1, Cox6b1) and sWAT (Slc20a1, Cd74). Multi-omic pathway analysis was employed to understand possible links between the organisms. When murine two fold data was compared with published human BAT and sWAT data, 90 genes showed parallel differential expression in both mouse and human. Out of these 90 genes, 46 showed same pattern of differential expression whereas the pattern was opposite for the remaining 44 genes. Based on our microarray results and its comparison with human data, we were able to identify genes (targets) (a) which can be studied in mouse model systems to extrapolate results to human (b) where caution should be exercised before extrapolation of murine data to human. Conclusion Our study provides evidence for inter species (mouse vs human) differences in differential gene expression between sWAT and BAT. Critical understanding of this data may help in development of novel ways to engineer one form of adipose

  16. Very Important Pool (VIP) genes – an application for microarray-based molecular signatures

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhenqiang; Hong, Huixiao; Fang, Hong; Shi, Leming; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida

    2008-01-01

    Background Advances in DNA microarray technology portend that molecular signatures from which microarray will eventually be used in clinical environments and personalized medicine. Derivation of biomarkers is a large step beyond hypothesis generation and imposes considerably more stringency for accuracy in identifying informative gene subsets to differentiate phenotypes. The inherent nature of microarray data, with fewer samples and replicates compared to the large number of genes, requires identifying informative genes prior to classifier construction. However, improving the ability to identify differentiating genes remains a challenge in bioinformatics. Results A new hybrid gene selection approach was investigated and tested with nine publicly available microarray datasets. The new method identifies a Very Important Pool (VIP) of genes from the broad patterns of gene expression data. The method uses a bagging sampling principle, where the re-sampled arrays are used to identify the most informative genes. Frequency of selection is used in a repetitive process to identify the VIP genes. The putative informative genes are selected using two methods, t-statistic and discriminatory analysis. In the t-statistic, the informative genes are identified based on p-values. In the discriminatory analysis, disjoint Principal Component Analyses (PCAs) are conducted for each class of samples, and genes with high discrimination power (DP) are identified. The VIP gene selection approach was compared with the p-value ranking approach. The genes identified by the VIP method but not by the p-value ranking approach are also related to the disease investigated. More importantly, these genes are part of the pathways derived from the common genes shared by both the VIP and p-ranking methods. Moreover, the binary classifiers built from these genes are statistically equivalent to those built from the top 50 p-value ranked genes in distinguishing different types of samples. Conclusion The

  17. Microarray based gene expression analysis of murine brown and subcutaneous adipose tissue: significance with human.

    PubMed

    Baboota, Ritesh K; Sarma, Siddhartha M; Boparai, Ravneet K; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran; Mantri, Shrikant; Bishnoi, Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    Two types of adipose tissues, white (WAT) and brown (BAT) are found in mammals. Increasingly novel strategies are being proposed for the treatment of obesity and its associated complications by altering amount and/or activity of BAT using mouse models. The present study was designed to: (a) investigate the differential expression of genes in LACA mice subcutaneous WAT (sWAT) and BAT using mouse DNA microarray, (b) to compare mouse differential gene expression with previously published human data; to understand any inter- species differences between the two and (c) to make a comparative assessment with C57BL/6 mouse strain. In mouse microarray studies, over 7003, 1176 and 401 probe sets showed more than two-fold, five-fold and ten-fold change respectively in differential expression between murine BAT and WAT. Microarray data was validated using quantitative RT-PCR of key genes showing high expression in BAT (Fabp3, Ucp1, Slc27a1) and sWAT (Ms4a1, H2-Ob, Bank1) or showing relatively low expression in BAT (Pgk1, Cox6b1) and sWAT (Slc20a1, Cd74). Multi-omic pathway analysis was employed to understand possible links between the organisms. When murine two fold data was compared with published human BAT and sWAT data, 90 genes showed parallel differential expression in both mouse and human. Out of these 90 genes, 46 showed same pattern of differential expression whereas the pattern was opposite for the remaining 44 genes. Based on our microarray results and its comparison with human data, we were able to identify genes (targets) (a) which can be studied in mouse model systems to extrapolate results to human (b) where caution should be exercised before extrapolation of murine data to human. Our study provides evidence for inter species (mouse vs human) differences in differential gene expression between sWAT and BAT. Critical understanding of this data may help in development of novel ways to engineer one form of adipose tissue to another using murine model with focus on

  18. Comprehensive High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Analysis of DNA Phosphate Adducts Formed by the Tobacco-Specific Lung Carcinogen 4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bin; Villalta, Peter W; Zarth, Adam T; Kotandeniya, Delshanee; Upadhyaya, Pramod; Stepanov, Irina; Hecht, Stephen S

    2015-11-16

    The tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK, 1) is a potent lung carcinogen in laboratory animals and is believed to play a key role in the development of lung cancer in smokers. Metabolic activation of NNK leads to the formation of pyridyloxobutyl DNA adducts, a critical step in its mechanism of carcinogenesis. In addition to DNA nucleobase adducts, DNA phosphate adducts can be formed by pyridyloxobutylation of the oxygen atoms of the internucleotidic phosphodiester linkages. We report the use of a liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry technique to characterize 30 novel pyridyloxobutyl DNA phosphate adducts in calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) treated with 4-(acetoxymethylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNKOAc, 2), a regiochemically activated form of NNK. A (15)N3-labeled internal standard was synthesized for one of the most abundant phosphate adducts, dCp[4-oxo-4-(3-pyridyl)butyl]dC (CpopC), and this standard was used to quantify CpopC and to estimate the levels of other adducts in the NNKOAc-treated CT-DNA. Formation of DNA phosphate adducts by NNK in vivo was further investigated in rats treated with NNK acutely (0.1 mmol/kg once daily for 4 days by subcutaneous injection) and chronically (5 ppm in drinking water for 10, 30, 50, and 70 weeks). This study provides the first comprehensive structural identification and quantitation of a panel of DNA phosphate adducts of a structurally complex carcinogen and chemical support for future mechanistic studies of tobacco carcinogenesis in humans.

  19. Quantitative characterization of conformational-specific protein-DNA binding using a dual-spectral interferometric imaging biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xirui; Daaboul, George G.; Spuhler, Philipp S.; Dröge, Peter; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2016-03-01

    DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, it was discovered that DNA-binding proteins recognize specific binding sites to carry out their functions through an indirect readout mechanism by recognizing and capturing DNA conformational flexibility and deformation. High-throughput DNA microarray-based methods that provide large-scale protein-DNA binding information have shown effective and comprehensive analysis of protein-DNA binding affinities, but do not provide information of DNA conformational changes in specific protein-DNA complexes. Building on the high-throughput capability of DNA microarrays, we demonstrate a quantitative approach that simultaneously measures the amount of protein binding to DNA and nanometer-scale DNA conformational change induced by protein binding in a microarray format. Both measurements rely on spectral interferometry on a layered substrate using a single optical instrument in two distinct modalities. In the first modality, we quantitate the amount of binding of protein to surface-immobilized DNA in each DNA spot using a label-free spectral reflectivity technique that accurately measures the surface densities of protein and DNA accumulated on the substrate. In the second modality, for each DNA spot, we simultaneously measure DNA conformational change using a fluorescence vertical sectioning technique that determines average axial height of fluorophores tagged to specific nucleotides of the surface-immobilized DNA. The approach presented in this paper, when combined with current high-throughput DNA microarray-based technologies, has the potential to serve as a rapid and simple method for quantitative and large-scale characterization of conformational specific protein-DNA interactions.DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are

  20. Caenorhabditis elegans par2.1/mtssb-1 is essential for mitochondrial DNA replication and its defect causes comprehensive transcriptional alterations including a hypoxia response

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Tomoko; Mori, Chihiro; Takanami, Takako; Sasagawa, Yohei; Saito, Rumiko; Ichiishi, Eiichiro; Higashitani, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    DNA polymerase {gamma} and mtSSB are key components of the mtDNA replication machinery. To study the biological influences of defects in mtDNA replication, we used RNAi to deplete the gene for a putative mtSSB, par2.1, in Caenorhabditis elegans. In previous systematic RNAi screens, downregulation of this gene has not caused any clearly defective phenotypes. Here, we continuously fed a dsRNA targeting par2.1 to C. elegans over generations. Seventy-nine percent of F1 progeny produced 60-72 h after feeding grew to adulthood but were completely sterile, with an arrest of germline cell proliferation. Analyses of mtDNA copy number and cell cytology indicated that the sterile hermaphrodites had fewer mitochondria. These results indicated that par2.1 essentially functions for germline cell proliferation through mtDNA replication; we therefore termed it mtssb-1. Comprehensive transcriptional alterations including hypoxia response induction dependent on and independent of hif-1 function, occurred by RNAi depletion of mtssb-1. Treatment with ethidium bromide, which impairs mtDNA replication and transcription, caused similar transcriptional alterations. In addition, the frequency of apoptosis in the germline cells was reduced in fertile progeny with a partial RNAi effect. These suggest that RNAi depletion of C. elegans mtssb-1 is useful as a model system of mitochondrial dysfunction.

  1. Microarray-based method for monitoring yeast overexpression strains reveals small-molecule targets in TOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Rebecca A; Bhullar, Bhupinder S; Perlstein, Ethan O; Marsischky, Gerald; LaBaer, Joshua; Schreiber, Stuart L

    2006-02-01

    Identification of the cellular targets of small-molecule hits in phenotypic screens is a central challenge in the development of small molecules as biological tools and potential therapeutics. To facilitate the process of small-molecule target identification, we developed a global, microarray-based method for monitoring the growth of pools of yeast strains, each overexpressing a different protein, in the presence of small molecules. Specifically, the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains harboring approximately 3,900 different overexpression plasmids was monitored in the presence of rapamycin, which inhibits the target of rapamycin (TOR) proteins. TOR was successfully identified as a candidate rapamycin target, and many additional gene products were implicated in the TOR signaling pathway. We also characterized the mechanism of LY-83583, a small-molecule suppressor of rapamycin-induced growth inhibition. These data enabled functional links to be drawn between groups of genes implicated in the TOR pathway, identified several candidate targets for LY-83583, and suggested a role for mitochondrial respiration in mediating rapamycin sensitivity.

  2. A Comprehensive Approach for Accurate Measurement of Proton-Proton Coupling Constants in the Sugar Ring of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jiping; McAteer, Kathleen; Silks, Louis A.; Wu, Ruilian; Isern, Nancy G.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2000-10-01

    Stereo-selective deuteration has been explored in the 12 base pair DNA Dickerson sequence [d(CGCGAATTCGCG)2] as an approach for improving the accuracy of NMR derived, three-bond vicinal proton-proton coupling constants. The coupling constants are useful for DNA structure determination in restrained molecular dynamics calculations.

  3. Carrion fly-derived DNA as a tool for comprehensive and cost-effective assessment of mammalian biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien; Merkel, Kevin; Kutzner, Nadine; Kühl, Hjalmar; Boesch, Christophe; Kappeler, Peter M; Metzger, Sonja; Schubert, Grit; Leendertz, Fabian H

    2013-02-01

    Large-scale monitoring schemes are essential in assessing global mammalian biodiversity, and in this framework, leeches have recently been promoted as an indirect source of DNA from terrestrial mammal species. Carrion feeding flies are ubiquitous and can be expected to feed on many vertebrate carcasses. Hence, we tested whether fly-derived DNA analysis may also serve as a novel tool for mammalian diversity surveys. We screened DNA extracted from 201 carrion flies collected in tropical habitats of Côte d'Ivoire and Madagascar for mammal DNA using multiple PCR systems and retrieved DNA sequences from a diverse set of species (22 in Côte d'Ivoire, four in Madagascar) exploiting distinct forest strata and displaying a broad range of body sizes. Deep sequencing of amplicons generated from pools of flies performed equally well as individual sequencing approaches. We conclude that the analysis of fly-derived DNA can be implemented in a very rapid and cost-effective manner and will give a relatively unbiased picture of local mammal diversity. Carrion flies therefore represent an extraordinary and thus far unexploited resource of mammal DNA, which will probably prove useful for future inventories of wild mammal communities.

  4. Microarray based comparative genomic hybridization testing in deletion bearing patients with Angelman syndrome: genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, T; Peters, S U; Madduri, N S; Glaze, D G; German, J R; Bird, L M; Barbieri-Welge, R; Bichell, T J; Beaudet, A L; Bacino, C A

    2006-06-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by severe mental retardation, dysmorphic features, ataxia, seizures, and typical behavioural characteristics, including a happy sociable disposition. AS is caused by maternal deficiency of UBE3A (E6 associated protein ubiquitin protein ligase 3A gene), located in an imprinted region on chromosome 15q11-q13. Although there are four different molecular types of AS, deletions of the 15q11-q13 region account for approximately 70% of the AS patients. These deletions are usually detected by fluorescence in situ hybridisation studies. The deletions can also be subclassified based on their size into class I and class II, with the former being larger and encompassing the latter. We studied 22 patients with AS due to microdeletions using a microarray based comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH) assay to define the deletions and analysed their phenotypic severity, especially expression of the autism phenotype, in order to establish clinical correlations. Overall, children with larger, class I deletions were significantly more likely to meet criteria for autism, had lower cognitive scores, and lower expressive language scores compared with children with smaller, class II deletions. Children with class I deletions also required more medications to control their seizures than did those in the class II group. There are four known genes (NIPA1, NIPA2, CYFIP1, & GCP5) that are affected by class I but not class II deletions, thus raising the possibility of a role for these genes in autism as well as the development of expressive language skills.

  5. Differential expression of HSPA1 and HSPA2 proteins in human tissues; tissue microarray-based immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Scieglinska, Dorota; Piglowski, Wojciech; Chekan, Mykola; Mazurek, Agnieszka; Krawczyk, Zdzisław

    2011-04-01

    In the present study we determined the expression pattern of HSPA1 and HSPA2 proteins in various normal human tissues by tissue-microarray based immunohistochemical analysis. Both proteins belong to the HSPA (HSP70) family of heat shock proteins. The HSPA2 is encoded by the gene originally defined as testis-specific, while HSPA1 is encoded by the stress-inducible genes (HSPA1A and HSPA1B). Our study revealed that both proteins are expressed only in some tissues from the 24 ones examined. HSPA2 was detected in adrenal gland, bronchus, cerebellum, cerebrum, colon, esophagus, kidney, skin, small intestine, stomach and testis, but not in adipose tissue, bladder, breast, cardiac muscle, diaphragm, liver, lung, lymph node, pancreas, prostate, skeletal muscle, spleen, thyroid. Expression of HSPA1 was detected in adrenal gland, bladder, breast, bronchus, cardiac muscle, esophagus, kidney, prostate, skin, but not in other tissues examined. Moreover, HSPA2 and HSPA1 proteins were found to be expressed in a cell-type-specific manner. The most pronounced cell-type expression pattern was found for HSPA2 protein. In the case of stratified squamous epithelia of the skin and esophagus, as well as in ciliated pseudostratified columnar epithelium lining respiratory tract, the HSPA2 positive cells were located in the basal layer. In the colon, small intestine and bronchus epithelia HSPA2 was detected in goblet cells. In adrenal gland cortex HSPA2 expression was limited to cells of zona reticularis. The presented results clearly show that certain human tissues constitutively express varying levels of HSPA1 and HSPA2 proteins in a highly differentiated way. Thus, our study can help designing experimental models suitable for cell- and tissue-type-specific functional differences between HSPA2 and HSPA1 proteins in human tissues.

  6. Microarray-based comparative genomic profiling of reference strains and selected Canadian field isolates of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Gouré, Julien; Findlay, Wendy A; Deslandes, Vincent; Bouevitch, Anne; Foote, Simon J; MacInnes, Janet I; Coulton, James W; Nash, John HE; Jacques, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Background Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, is a highly contagious respiratory pathogen that causes severe losses to the swine industry worldwide. Current commercially-available vaccines are of limited value because they do not induce cross-serovar immunity and do not prevent development of the carrier state. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridizations (M-CGH) were used to estimate whole genomic diversity of representative Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae strains. Our goal was to identify conserved genes, especially those predicted to encode outer membrane proteins and lipoproteins because of their potential for the development of more effective vaccines. Results Using hierarchical clustering, our M-CGH results showed that the majority of the genes in the genome of the serovar 5 A. pleuropneumoniae L20 strain were conserved in the reference strains of all 15 serovars and in representative field isolates. Fifty-eight conserved genes predicted to encode for outer membrane proteins or lipoproteins were identified. As well, there were several clusters of diverged or absent genes including those associated with capsule biosynthesis, toxin production as well as genes typically associated with mobile elements. Conclusion Although A. pleuropneumoniae strains are essentially clonal, M-CGH analysis of the reference strains of the fifteen serovars and representative field isolates revealed several classes of genes that were divergent or absent. Not surprisingly, these included genes associated with capsule biosynthesis as the capsule is associated with sero-specificity. Several of the conserved genes were identified as candidates for vaccine development, and we conclude that M-CGH is a valuable tool for reverse vaccinology. PMID:19239696

  7. Comprehensive study of mtDNA among Southwest Asian dogs contradicts independent domestication of wolf, but implies dog–wolf hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Ardalan, Arman; Kluetsch, Cornelya F C; Zhang, Ai-bing; Erdogan, Metin; Uhlén, Mathias; Houshmand, Massoud; Tepeli, Cafer; Ashtiani, Seyed Reza Miraei; Savolainen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Studies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diversity indicate explicitly that dogs were domesticated, probably exclusively, in southern East Asia. However, Southwest Asia (SwAsia) has had poor representation and geographical coverage in these studies. Other studies based on archaeological and genome-wide SNP data have suggested an origin of dogs in SwAsia. Hence, it has been suspected that mtDNA evidence for this scenario may have remained undetected. In the first comprehensive investigation of genetic diversity among SwAsian dogs, we analyzed 582 bp of mtDNA for 345 indigenous dogs from across SwAsia, and compared with 1556 dogs across the Old World. We show that 97.4% of SwAsian dogs carry haplotypes belonging to a universal mtDNA gene pool, but that only a subset of this pool, five of the 10 principal haplogroups, is represented in SwAsia. A high frequency of haplogroup B, potentially signifying a local origin, was not paralleled with the high genetic diversity expected for a center of origin. Meanwhile, 2.6% of the SwAsian dogs carried the rare non-universal haplogroup d2. Thus, mtDNA data give no indication that dogs originated in SwAsia through independent domestication of wolf, but dog–wolf hybridization may have formed the local haplogroup d2 within this region. Southern East Asia remains the only region with virtually full extent of genetic variation, strongly indicating it to be the primary and probably sole center of wolf domestication. An origin of dogs in southern East Asia may have been overlooked by other studies due to a substantial lack of samples from this region. PMID:22393507

  8. CoDNaS 2.0: a comprehensive database of protein conformational diversity in the native state

    PubMed Central

    Monzon, Alexander Miguel; Rohr, Cristian Oscar; Fornasari, María Silvina; Parisi, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    CoDNaS (conformational diversity of the native state) is a protein conformational diversity database. Conformational diversity describes structural differences between conformers that define the native state of proteins. It is a key concept to understand protein function and biological processes related to protein functions. CoDNaS offers a well curated database that is experimentally driven, thoroughly linked, and annotated. CoDNaS facilitates the extraction of key information on small structural differences based on protein movements. CoDNaS enables users to easily relate the degree of conformational diversity with physical, chemical and biological properties derived from experiments on protein structure and biological characteristics. The new version of CoDNaS includes ∼70% of all available protein structures, and new tools have been added that run sequence searches, display structural flexibility profiles and allow users to browse the database for different structural classes. These tools facilitate the exploration of protein conformational diversity and its role in protein function. Database URL: http://ufq.unq.edu.ar/codnas PMID:27022160

  9. CoDNaS 2.0: a comprehensive database of protein conformational diversity in the native state.

    PubMed

    Monzon, Alexander Miguel; Rohr, Cristian Oscar; Fornasari, María Silvina; Parisi, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    CoDNaS (conformational diversity of the native state) is a protein conformational diversity database. Conformational diversity describes structural differences between conformers that define the native state of proteins. It is a key concept to understand protein function and biological processes related to protein functions. CoDNaS offers a well curated database that is experimentally driven, thoroughly linked, and annotated. CoDNaS facilitates the extraction of key information on small structural differences based on protein movements. CoDNaS enables users to easily relate the degree of conformational diversity with physical, chemical and biological properties derived from experiments on protein structure and biological characteristics. The new version of CoDNaS includes ∼70% of all available protein structures, and new tools have been added that run sequence searches, display structural flexibility profiles and allow users to browse the database for different structural classes. These tools facilitate the exploration of protein conformational diversity and its role in protein function. Database URL:http://ufq.unq.edu.ar/codnas.

  10. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  11. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  12. Comprehensive track-structure based evaluation of DNA damage by light ions from radiotherapy-relevant energies down to stopping

    PubMed Central

    Friedland, W.; Schmitt, E.; Kundrát, P.; Dingfelder, M.; Baiocco, G.; Barbieri, S.; Ottolenghi, A.

    2017-01-01

    Track structures and resulting DNA damage in human cells have been simulated for hydrogen, helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and neon ions with 0.25–256 MeV/u energy. The needed ion interaction cross sections have been scaled from those of hydrogen; Barkas scaling formula has been refined, extending its applicability down to about 10 keV/u, and validated against established stopping power data. Linear energy transfer (LET) has been scored from energy deposits in a cell nucleus; for very low-energy ions, it has been defined locally within thin slabs. The simulations show that protons and helium ions induce more DNA damage than heavier ions do at the same LET. With increasing LET, less DNA strand breaks are formed per unit dose, but due to their clustering the yields of double-strand breaks (DSB) increase, up to saturation around 300 keV/μm. Also individual DSB tend to cluster; DSB clusters peak around 500 keV/μm, while DSB multiplicities per cluster steadily increase with LET. Remarkably similar to patterns known from cell survival studies, LET-dependencies with pronounced maxima around 100–200 keV/μm occur on nanometre scale for sites that contain one or more DSB, and on micrometre scale for megabasepair-sized DNA fragments. PMID:28345622

  13. MitoLSDB: A Comprehensive Resource to Study Genotype to Phenotype Correlations in Human Mitochondrial DNA Variations

    PubMed Central

    K, Shamnamole; Jalali, Saakshi; Scaria, Vinod; Bhardwaj, Anshu

    2013-01-01

    Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes a set of 37 genes which are essential structural and functional components of the electron transport chain. Variations in these genes have been implicated in a broad spectrum of diseases and are extensively reported in literature and various databases. In this study, we describe MitoLSDB, an integrated platform to catalogue disease association studies on mtDNA (http://mitolsdb.igib.res.in). The main goal of MitoLSDB is to provide a central platform for direct submissions of novel variants that can be curated by the Mitochondrial Research Community. MitoLSDB provides access to standardized and annotated data from literature and databases encompassing information from 5231 individuals, 675 populations and 27 phenotypes. This platform is developed using the Leiden Open (source) Variation Database (LOVD) software. MitoLSDB houses information on all 37 genes in each population amounting to 132397 variants, 5147 unique variants. For each variant its genomic location as per the Revised Cambridge Reference Sequence, codon and amino acid change for variations in protein-coding regions, frequency, disease/phenotype, population, reference and remarks are also listed. MitoLSDB curators have also reported errors documented in literature which includes 94 phantom mutations, 10 NUMTs, six documentation errors and one artefactual recombination. MitoLSDB is the largest repository of mtDNA variants systematically standardized and presented using the LOVD platform. We believe that this is a good starting resource to curate mtDNA variants and will facilitate direct submissions enhancing data coverage, annotation in context of pathogenesis and quality control by ensuring non-redundancy in reporting novel disease associated variants. PMID:23585830

  14. methylKit: a comprehensive R package for the analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation profiles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is a chemical modification of cytosine bases that is pivotal for gene regulation, cellular specification and cancer development. Here, we describe an R package, methylKit, that rapidly analyzes genome-wide cytosine epigenetic profiles from high-throughput methylation and hydroxymethylation sequencing experiments. methylKit includes functions for clustering, sample quality visualization, differential methylation analysis and annotation features, thus automating and simplifying many of the steps for discerning statistically significant bases or regions of DNA methylation. Finally, we demonstrate methylKit on breast cancer data, in which we find statistically significant regions of differential methylation and stratify tumor subtypes. methylKit is available at http://code.google.com/p/methylkit. PMID:23034086

  15. Design, synthesis, physicochemical studies, solvation, and DNA damage of quinoline-appended chalcone derivative: comprehensive spectroscopic approach toward drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Himank; Chattopadhyay, Anjan; Prasath, R; Devaraji, Vinod; Joshi, Ritika; Bhavana, P; Saini, Praveen; Ghosh, Sujit Kumar

    2014-07-03

    The present study epitomizes the design, synthesis, photophysics, solvation, and interaction with calf-thymus DNA of a potential antitumor, anticancer quinoline-appended chalcone derivative, (E)-3-(anthracen-10-yl)-1-(6,8-dibromo-2-methylquinolin-3-yl)prop-2-en-1-one (ADMQ) using steady state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, molecular modeling, molecular docking, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, and gel electrophoresis studies. ADMQ shows an unusual photophysical behavior in a variety of solvents of different polarity. The dual emission has been observed along with the formation of twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) excited state. The radiationless deactivation of the TICT state is found to be promoted strongly by hydrogen bonding. Quantum mechanical (DFT, TDDFT, and ZINDO-CI) calculations show that the ADMQ is sort of molecular rotor which undergoes intramolecular twist followed by a complete charge transfer in the optimized excited state. FTIR studies reveals that ADMQ undergoes important structural change from its native structure to a β-hydroxy keto form in water at physiological pH. The concentration-dependent DNA cleavage has been identified in agarose gel DNA electrophoresis experiment and has been further supported by MD simulation. ADMQ forms hydrogen bond with the deoxyribose sugar attached with the nucleobase adenine DA-17 (chain A) and result in significant structural changes which potentially cleave DNA double helix. The compound does not exhibit any deleterious effect or toxicity to the E. coli strain in cytotoxicity studies. The consolidated spectroscopic research described herein can provide enormous information to open up new avenues for designing and synthesizing chalcone derivatives with low systematic toxicity for medicinal chemistry research.

  16. Comprehensive polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of pathogenic DNA in lymphoproliferative disorders of the ocular adnexa

    PubMed Central

    Usui, Yoshihiko; Rao, Narsing A.; Takase, Hiroshi; Tsubota, Kinya; Umazume, Kazuhiko; Diaz-Aguilar, Daniel; Kezuka, Takeshi; Mochizuki, Manabu; Goto, Hiroshi; Sugita, Sunao

    2016-01-01

    Infectious agents have been identified as a major cause of specific types of human cancers worldwide. Several microorganisms have been identified as potential aggravators of ocular adnexal neoplasms; however, given the rarity of these neoplasms, large epidemiological studies are difficult to coordinate. This study aimed to conduct an exhaustive search for pathogenic DNA in lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) of the ocular adnexa in a total of 70 patients who were diagnosed with LPD of the ocular adnexa between 2008 and 2013. Specimens were screened for bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic DNA by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and quantitative real-time PCR. Among cases of conjunctival mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, human herpes virus (HHV)-6, HHV-7, chlamydia, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA were detected. In cases of IgG4-related ocular disease, similar pathogens were detected but in a larger number of patients. Our PCR assays detected DNAs of various infectious agents in tumor specimens, especially HHV6, HHV7, and EBV, with different positive rates in various types of LPD. Chronic inflammatory stimulation or activation of oncogenes from these infectious agents might be involved in the pathogenesis of LPD of the ocular adnexa. PMID:27830722

  17. DNA chip analysis of comprehensive food function: inhibition of angiogenesis and telomerase activity with unsaturated vitamin E, tocotrienol.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Eitsuka, Takahiro; Inokuchi, Hitoshi; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2004-01-01

    Inhibition of angiogenesis and telomerase activity with vitamin E compounds, especially for tocotrienol (T3), has been investigated. Nutrigenomic tools have been used for elucidating the bioactive mechanisms of T3. In the cell culture experiments, T3 reduced the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-stimulated tube formation by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Among T3 isomers, delta-T3 appeared the highest activity. The T3 inhibited the new blood vessels formation on the growing chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM assay for an in vivo model of angiogenesis). In contrast, tocopherol did not. The findings suggested that the T3 has potential use for reducing angiogenic disorder. DNA chip analysis revealed that T3 specifically down-regulates the expression of VEGF receptor (VEGFR) in endothelial cells. It is well-known that VEGF regulates angiogenesis by binding to VEGFR. Therefore, T3 could block the intracellular signaling of VEGF via down-regulation of VEGFR, which resulted in the inhibition of angiogenesis. On the other hand, DNA chip analysis also revealed that T3 down-regulates the expression of protein kinase C (PKC) in the cultured HUVEC. Since PKC is involved with the control of telomerase activity, T3 has potential to act as anti-telomerase inhibitor via PKC inhibition. In this manner, DNA chip technology provides efficient access to genetic information regarding food function and its mechanism.

  18. Comprehensive SNP scan of DNA repair and DNA damage response genes reveal multiple susceptibility loci conferring risk to tobacco associated leukoplakia and oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Pinaki; Datta, Sayantan; Maiti, Guru Prasad; Baral, Aradhita; Jha, Ganga Nath; Panda, Chinmay Kumar; Chowdhury, Shantanu; Ghosh, Saurabh; Roy, Bidyut; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphic variants of DNA repair and damage response genes play major role in carcinogenesis. These variants are suspected as predisposition factors to Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). For identification of susceptible variants affecting OSCC development in Indian population, the "maximally informative" method of SNP selection from HapMap data to non-HapMap populations was applied. Three hundred twenty-five SNPs from 11 key genes involved in double strand break repair, mismatch repair and DNA damage response pathways were genotyped on a total of 373 OSCC, 253 leukoplakia and 535 unrelated control individuals. The significantly associated SNPs were validated in an additional cohort of 144 OSCC patients and 160 controls. The rs12515548 of MSH3 showed significant association with OSCC both in the discovery and validation phases (discovery P-value: 1.43E-05, replication P-value: 4.84E-03). Two SNPs (rs12360870 of MRE11A, P-value: 2.37E-07 and rs7003908 of PRKDC, P-value: 7.99E-05) were found to be significantly associated only with leukoplakia. Stratification of subjects based on amount of tobacco consumption identified SNPs that were associated with either high or low tobacco exposed group. The study reveals a synergism between associated SNPs and lifestyle factors in predisposition to OSCC and leukoplakia.

  19. A Comprehensive Genetic Characterization of Bacterial Motility

    PubMed Central

    Girgis, Hany S; Liu, Yirchung; Ryu, William S; Tavazoie, Saeed

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a powerful experimental framework that combines competitive selection and microarray-based genetic footprinting to comprehensively reveal the genetic basis of bacterial behaviors. Application of this method to Escherichia coli motility identifies 95% of the known flagellar and chemotaxis genes, and reveals three dozen novel loci that, to varying degrees and through diverse mechanisms, affect motility. To probe the network context in which these genes function, we developed a method that uncovers genome-wide epistatic interactions through comprehensive analyses of double-mutant phenotypes. This allows us to place the novel genes within the context of signaling and regulatory networks, including the Rcs phosphorelay pathway and the cyclic di-GMP second-messenger system. This unifying framework enables sensitive and comprehensive genetic characterization of complex behaviors across the microbial biosphere. PMID:17941710

  20. Comprehensive and high-resolution typing of swine leukocyte antigen DQA from genomic DNA and determination of 25 new SLA class II haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Le, M T; Choi, H; Choi, M-K; Nguyen, D T; Kim, J-H; Seo, H G; Cha, S-Y; Seo, K; Chun, T; Schook, L B; Park, C

    2012-12-01

    We previously reported the development of genomic-DNA-based high-resolution genotyping methods for SLA-DQB1 and DRB1. Here, we report the successful typing of SLA-DQA using similar methodological principles. We designed a method for comprehensive genotyping of SLA-DQA using intronic sequence information of SLA-DQA exon 2 that we had obtained from 12 animals with different SLA-DQB1 genotypes. We expanded our typing to 76 selected animals with diverse DQB1 and DRB1 genotypes, 140 random animals from 7 pig breeds, and 3 wild boars. This resulted in the identification of 17 DQA alleles with 49 genotypes. Two new alleles were identified from wild boars. Combine with SLA-DQB1, and DRB1 typing results, we identified 34 SLA class II haplotypes including 25 that were previously unreported. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Microarrays in the 2010s: the contribution of microarray-based gene expression profiling to breast cancer classification, prognostication and prediction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer comprises a collection of diseases with distinctive clinical, histopathological, and molecular features. Importantly, tumors with similar histological features may display disparate clinical behaviors. Gene expression profiling using microarray technologies has improved our understanding of breast cancer biology and has led to the development of a breast cancer molecular taxonomy and of multigene 'signatures' to predict outcome and response to systemic therapies. The use of these prognostic and predictive signatures in routine clinical decision-making remains controversial. Here, we review the clinical relevance of microarray-based profiling of breast cancer and discuss its impact on patient management. PMID:21787441

  2. Comprehensive mapping of the human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA integration sites in cervical carcinomas by HPV capture technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Lu, Zheming; Xu, Ruiping; Ke, Yang

    2016-02-02

    Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA into the host genome can be a driver mutation in cervical carcinoma. Identification of HPV integration at base resolution has been a longstanding technical challenge, largely due to sensitivity masking by HPV in episomes or concatenated forms. The aim was to enhance the understanding of the precise localization of HPV integration sites using an innovative strategy. Using HPV capture technology combined with next generation sequencing, HPV prevalence and the exact integration sites of the HPV DNA in 47 primary cervical cancer samples and 2 cell lines were investigated. A total of 117 unique HPV integration sites were identified, including HPV16 (n = 101), HPV18 (n = 7), and HPV58 (n = 9). We observed that the HPV16 integration sites were broadly located across the whole viral genome. In addition, either single or multiple integration events could occur frequently for HPV16, ranging from 1 to 19 per sample. The viral integration sites were distributed across almost all the chromosomes, except chromosome 22. All the cervical cancer cases harboring more than four HPV16 integration sites showed clinical diagnosis of stage III carcinoma. A significant enrichment of overlapping nucleotides shared between the human genome and HPV genome at integration breakpoints was observed, indicating that it may play an important role in the HPV integration process. The results expand on knowledge from previous findings on HPV16 and HPV18 integration sites and allow a better understanding of the molecular basis of the pathogenesis of cervical carcinoma.

  3. Comprehensive mapping of the human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA integration sites in cervical carcinomas by HPV capture technology

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ruiping; Ke, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA into the host genome can be a driver mutation in cervical carcinoma. Identification of HPV integration at base resolution has been a longstanding technical challenge, largely due to sensitivity masking by HPV in episomes or concatenated forms. The aim was to enhance the understanding of the precise localization of HPV integration sites using an innovative strategy. Using HPV capture technology combined with next generation sequencing, HPV prevalence and the exact integration sites of the HPV DNA in 47 primary cervical cancer samples and 2 cell lines were investigated. A total of 117 unique HPV integration sites were identified, including HPV16 (n = 101), HPV18 (n = 7), and HPV58 (n = 9). We observed that the HPV16 integration sites were broadly located across the whole viral genome. In addition, either single or multiple integration events could occur frequently for HPV16, ranging from 1 to 19 per sample. The viral integration sites were distributed across almost all the chromosomes, except chromosome 22. All the cervical cancer cases harboring more than four HPV16 integration sites showed clinical diagnosis of stage III carcinoma. A significant enrichment of overlapping nucleotides shared between the human genome and HPV genome at integration breakpoints was observed, indicating that it may play an important role in the HPV integration process. The results expand on knowledge from previous findings on HPV16 and HPV18 integration sites and allow a better understanding of the molecular basis of the pathogenesis of cervical carcinoma. PMID:26735580

  4. Comprehensive analysis of sperm DNA fragmentation by five different assays: TUNEL assay, SCSA, SCD test and alkaline and neutral Comet assay.

    PubMed

    Ribas-Maynou, J; García-Peiró, A; Fernández-Encinas, A; Abad, C; Amengual, M J; Prada, E; Navarro, J; Benet, J

    2013-09-01

    Sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) is becoming an important test to assess male infertility. Several different tests are available, but no consensus has yet been reached as to which tests are most predictive of infertility. Few publications have reported a comprehensive analysis comparing these methods within the same population. The objective of this study was to analyze the differences between the five most common methodologies, to study their correlations and to establish their cut-off values, sensitivity and specificity in predicting male infertility. We found differences in SDF between fertile donors and infertile patients in TUNEL, SCSA, SCD and alkaline Comet assays, but none with the neutral Comet assay. The alkaline COMET assay was the best in predicting male infertility followed by TUNEL, SCD and SCSA, whereas the neutral COMET assay had no predictive power. For our patient population, threshold values for infertility were 20.05% for TUNEL assay, 18.90% for SCSA, 22.75% for the SCD test, 45.37% for alkaline Comet and 34.37% for neutral Comet. This work establishes in a comprehensive study that the all techniques except neutral Comet are useful to distinguish fertile and infertile men.

  5. Exploring non-covalent interactions in guanine- and xanthine-based model DNA quadruplex structures: a comprehensive quantum chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Yurenko, Yevgen P; Novotný, Jan; Sklenář, Vladimir; Marek, Radek

    2014-02-07

    The study aimed to cast light on the structure and internal energetics of guanine- and xanthine-based model DNA quadruplexes and the physico-chemical nature of the non-covalent interactions involved. Several independent approaches were used for this purpose: DFT-D3 calculations, Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules, Natural Bond Orbital Analysis, Energy Decomposition Analysis, Compliance Constant Theory, and Non-Covalent Interaction Analysis. The results point to an excellent degree of structural and energetic compatibility between the two types of model quadruplexes. This fact stems from both the structural features (close values of van der Waals volumes, pore radii, geometrical parameters of the H-bonds) and the energetic characteristics (comparable values of the energies of formation). It was established that hydrogen bonding makes the greatest (∼50%) contribution to the internal stability of the DNA quadruplexes, whereas the aromatic base stacking and ion coordination terms are commensurable and account for the rest. Energy decomposition analysis performed for guanine (Gua) and xanthine (Xan) quartets B4 and higher-order structures consisting of two or three stacked quartets indicates that whereas Gua structures benefit from a high degree of H-bond cooperativity, Xan models are characterized by a more favorable and cooperative π-π stacking. The results of electron density topological analysis show that Na(+)/K(+) ion coordination deeply affects the network of non-covalent interactions in Gua models due to the change in the twist angle between the stacked tetrads. For Xan models, ion coordination makes tetrads in stacks more planar without changing the twist angle. Therefore, the presence of the ion seems to be essential for the formation of planar stacks in Xan-based DNA quadruplexes. Detailed study of the nature of ion-base coordination suggests that this interaction has a partially covalent character and cannot be considered as purely electrostatic

  6. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  7. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  8. Comprehensive examination of conventional and innovative body fluid identification approaches and DNA profiling of laundered blood- and saliva-stained pieces of cloths.

    PubMed

    Kulstein, G; Wiegand, P

    2017-09-29

    Body fluids like blood and saliva are commonly encountered during investigations of high volume crimes like homicides. The identification of the cellular origin and the composition of the trace can link suspects or victims to a certain crime scene and provide a probative value for criminal investigations. To erase all traces from the crime scene, perpetrators often wash away their traces. Characteristically, items that show exposed stains like blood are commonly cleaned or laundered to free them from potential visible leftovers. Mostly, investigators do not delegate the DNA analysis of laundered items. However, some studies have already revealed that items can still be used for DNA analysis even after they have been laundered. Nonetheless, a systematical evaluation of laundered blood and saliva traces that provides a comparison of different established and newly developed methods for body fluid identification (BFI) is still missing. Herein, we present the results of a comprehensive study of laundered blood- and saliva-stained pieces of cloths that were applied to a broad range of methods for BFI including conventional approaches as well as molecular mRNA profiling. The study included the evaluation of cellular origin as well as DNA profiling of blood- and saliva-stained (synthetic fiber and cotton) pieces of cloths, which have been washed at various washing temperatures for one or multiple times. Our experiments demonstrate that, while STR profiling seems to be sufficiently sensitive for the individualization of laundered items, there is a lack of approaches for BFI with the same sensitivity and specificity allowing to characterize the cellular origin of challenging, particularly laundered, blood and saliva samples.

  9. Measuring Affinity Constants of 1,450 Monoclonal Antibodies to Peptide Targets with a Microarray-based Label-Free Assay Platform

    PubMed Central

    Landry, J. P.; Ke, Yaohuang; Yu, Guo-Liang; Zhu, X. D.

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are major reagents for research and clinical diagnosis. For their inherently high specificities to intended antigen targets and thus low toxicity in general, they are pursued as one of the major classes of new drugs. Yet binding properties of most monoclonal antibodies are not well characterized in terms of affinity constants and how they vary with presentations and/or conformational isomers of antigens, buffer compositions, and temperature. We here report a microarray-based label-free assay platform for high-throughput measurements of monoclonal antibody affinity constants to antigens immobilized on solid surfaces. Using this platform we measured affinity constants of over 1,410 rabbit monoclonal antibodies and 46 mouse monoclonal antibodies to peptide targets that are immobilized through a terminal cysteine residue to a glass surface. The experimentally measured affinity constants vary from 10 pM to 200 pM with the median value at 66 pM. We compare results of the microarray-based platform with those of a benchmarking surface-plasmon-resonance-based (SPR) sensor (Biacore 3000). PMID:25536073

  10. GRAIL-genQuest: A comprehensive computational system for DNA sequence analysis. Final report, DOE SBIR Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, Ruth Ann

    1999-01-05

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing and genome mapping technologies are making it possible, for the first time in history, to find genes in plants and animals and to elucidate their function. This means that diagnostics and therapeutics can be developed for human diseases such as cancer, obesity, hypertension, and cardiovascular problems. Crop and animal strains can be developed that are hardier, resistant to diseases, and produce higher yields. The challenge is to develop tools that will find the nucleotides in the DNA of a living organism that comprise a particular gene. In the human genome alone it is estimated that only about 51% of the approximately 3 billion pairs of nucleotides code for some 100,000 human genes. In this search for nucleotides within a genome which are active in the actual coding of proteins, efficient tools to locate and identify their function can be of significant value to mankind. Software tools such as ApoCom GRAIL{trademark} have assisted in this search. It can be used to analyze genome information, to identify exons (coding regions) and to construct gene models. Using a neural network approach, this software can ''learn'' sequence patterns and refine its ability to recognize a pattern as it is exposed to more and more examples of it. Since 1992 versions of GRAIL{trademark} have been publicly available over the Internet from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Because of the potential for security and patent compromise, these Internet versions are not available to many researchers in pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies who cannot send proprietary sequences past their data-secure firewalls. ApoCom is making available commercial versions of the GRAIL{trademark} software to run self-contained over local area networks. As part of the commercialization effort, ApoCom has developed a new Java{trademark}-based graphical user interface, the ApoCom Client Tool for Genomics (ACTG){trademark}. Two products, ApoCom GRAIL{trademark} Network Edition

  11. Comprehensive Analysis of Neonatal versus Adult Unilateral Decortication in a Mouse Model Using Behavioral, Neuroanatomical, and DNA Microarray Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Akira; Nakamachi, Tomoya; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Shioda, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Previously, studying the development, especially of corticospinal neurons, it was concluded that the main compensatory mechanism after unilateral brain injury in rat at the neonatal stage was due in part to non-lesioned ipsilateral corticospinal neurons that escaped selection by axonal elimination or neuronal apoptosis. However, previous results suggesting compensatory mechanism in neonate brain were not correlated with high functional recovery. Therefore, what is the difference among neonate and adult in the context of functional recovery and potential mechanism(s) therein? Here, we utilized a brain unilateral decortication mouse model and compared motor functional recovery mechanism post-neonatal brain hemisuction (NBH) with adult brain hemisuction (ABH). Three analyses were performed: (1) Quantitative behavioral analysis of forelimb movements using ladder walking test; (2) neuroanatomical retrograde tracing analysis of unlesioned side corticospinal neurons; and (3) differential global gene expressions profiling in unlesioned-side neocortex (rostral from bregma) in NBH and ABH on a 8 × 60 K mouse whole genome Agilent DNA chip. Behavioral data confirmed higher recovery ability in NBH over ABH is related to non-lesional frontal neocortex including rostral caudal forelimb area. A first inventory of differentially expressed genes genome-wide in the NBH and ABH mouse model is provided as a resource for the scientific community. PMID:25490135

  12. Microarray-Based Analysis of Methylation of 1st Trimester Trisomic Placentas from Down Syndrome, Edwards Syndrome and Patau Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hatt, Lotte; Aagaard, Mads M; Bach, Cathrine; Graakjaer, Jesper; Sommer, Steffen; Agerholm, Inge E; Kølvraa, Steen; Bojesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Methylation-based non-invasive prenatal testing of fetal aneuploidies is an alternative method that could possibly improve fetal aneuploidy diagnosis, especially for trisomy 13(T13) and trisomy 18(T18). Our aim was to study the methylation landscape in placenta DNA from trisomy 13, 18 and 21 pregnancies in an attempt to find trisomy-specific methylation differences better suited for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. We have conducted high-resolution methylation specific bead chip microarray analyses assessing more than 450,000 CpGs analyzing placentas from 12 T21 pregnancies, 12 T18 pregnancies and 6 T13 pregnancies. We have compared the methylation landscape of the trisomic placentas to the methylation landscape from normal placental DNA and to maternal blood cell DNA. Comparing trisomic placentas to normal placentas we identified 217 and 219 differentially methylated CpGs for CVS T18 and CVS T13, respectively (delta β>0.2, FDR<0.05), but only three differentially methylated CpGs for T21. However, the methylation differences was only modest (delta β<0.4), making them less suitable as diagnostic markers. Gene ontology enrichment analysis revealed that the gene set connected to theT18 differentially methylated CpGs was highly enriched for GO terms related to"DNA binding" and "transcription factor binding" coupled to the RNA polymerase II transcription. In the gene set connected to the T13 differentially methylated CpGs we found no significant enrichments.

  13. A comprehensive complex systems approach to the study and analysis of mammalian cell cycle control system in the presence of DNA damage stress.

    PubMed

    Abroudi, Ali; Samarasinghe, Sandhya; Kulasiri, Don

    2017-09-21

    Not many models of mammalian cell cycle system exist due to its complexity. Some models are too complex and hard to understand, while some others are too simple and not comprehensive enough. Moreover, some essential aspects, such as the response of G1-S and G2-M checkpoints to DNA damage as well as the growth factor signalling, have not been investigated from a systems point of view in current mammalian cell cycle models. To address these issues, we bring a holistic perspective to cell cycle by mathematically modelling it as a complex system consisting of important sub-systems that interact with each other. This retains the functionality of the system and provides a clearer interpretation to the processes within it while reducing the complexity in comprehending these processes. To achieve this, we first update a published ODE mathematical model of cell cycle with current knowledge. Then the part of the mathematical model relevant to each sub-system is shown separately in conjunction with a diagram of the sub-system as part of this representation. The model sub-systems are Growth Factor, DNA damage, G1-S, and G2-M checkpoint signalling. To further simplify the model and better explore the function of sub-systems, they are further divided into modules. Here we also add important new modules of: chk-related rapid cell cycle arrest, p53 modules expanded to seamlessly integrate with the rapid arrest module, Tyrosine phosphatase modules that activate Cyc_Cdk complexes and play a crucial role in rapid and delay arrest at both G1-S and G2-M, Tyrosine Kinase module that is important for inactivating nuclear transport of CycB_cdk1 through Wee1 to resist M phase entry, Plk1-Related module that is crucial in activating Tyrosine phosphatases and inactivating Tyrosine kinase, and APC-Related module to show steps in CycB degradation. This multi-level systems approach incorporating all known aspects of cell cycle allowed us to (i) study, through dynamic simulation of an ODE model

  14. Microarray-Based Analysis of Methylation of 1st Trimester Trisomic Placentas from Down Syndrome, Edwards Syndrome and Patau Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hatt, Lotte; Aagaard, Mads M.; Bach, Cathrine; Graakjaer, Jesper; Sommer, Steffen; Agerholm, Inge E.; Bojesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Methylation-based non-invasive prenatal testing of fetal aneuploidies is an alternative method that could possibly improve fetal aneuploidy diagnosis, especially for trisomy 13(T13) and trisomy 18(T18). Our aim was to study the methylation landscape in placenta DNA from trisomy 13, 18 and 21 pregnancies in an attempt to find trisomy–specific methylation differences better suited for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. We have conducted high-resolution methylation specific bead chip microarray analyses assessing more than 450,000 CpGs analyzing placentas from 12 T21 pregnancies, 12 T18 pregnancies and 6 T13 pregnancies. We have compared the methylation landscape of the trisomic placentas to the methylation landscape from normal placental DNA and to maternal blood cell DNA. Comparing trisomic placentas to normal placentas we identified 217 and 219 differentially methylated CpGs for CVS T18 and CVS T13, respectively (delta β>0.2, FDR<0.05), but only three differentially methylated CpGs for T21. However, the methylation differences was only modest (delta β<0.4), making them less suitable as diagnostic markers. Gene ontology enrichment analysis revealed that the gene set connected to theT18 differentially methylated CpGs was highly enriched for GO terms related to”DNA binding” and “transcription factor binding” coupled to the RNA polymerase II transcription. In the gene set connected to the T13 differentially methylated CpGs we found no significant enrichments. PMID:27490343

  15. Novel calibration tools and validation concepts for microarray-based platforms used in molecular diagnostics and food safety control.

    PubMed

    Brunner, C; Hoffmann, K; Thiele, T; Schedler, U; Jehle, H; Resch-Genger, U

    2015-04-01

    Commercial platforms consisting of ready-to-use microarrays printed with target-specific DNA probes, a microarray scanner, and software for data analysis are available for different applications in medical diagnostics and food analysis, detecting, e.g., viral and bacteriological DNA sequences. The transfer of these tools from basic research to routine analysis, their broad acceptance in regulated areas, and their use in medical practice requires suitable calibration tools for regular control of instrument performance in addition to internal assay controls. Here, we present the development of a novel assay-adapted calibration slide for a commercialized DNA-based assay platform, consisting of precisely arranged fluorescent areas of various intensities obtained by incorporating different concentrations of a "green" dye and a "red" dye in a polymer matrix. These dyes present "Cy3" and "Cy5" analogues with improved photostability, chosen based upon their spectroscopic properties closely matching those of common labels for the green and red channel of microarray scanners. This simple tool allows to efficiently and regularly assess and control the performance of the microarray scanner provided with the biochip platform and to compare different scanners. It will be eventually used as fluorescence intensity scale for referencing of assays results and to enhance the overall comparability of diagnostic tests.

  16. Repetitive DNA in the pea (Pisum sativum L.) genome: comprehensive characterization using 454 sequencing and comparison to soybean and Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Macas, Jiří; Neumann, Pavel; Navrátilová, Alice

    2007-01-01

    Background Extraordinary size variation of higher plant nuclear genomes is in large part caused by differences in accumulation of repetitive DNA. This makes repetitive DNA of great interest for studying the molecular mechanisms shaping architecture and function of complex plant genomes. However, due to methodological constraints of conventional cloning and sequencing, a global description of repeat composition is available for only a very limited number of higher plants. In order to provide further data required for investigating evolutionary patterns of repeated DNA within and between species, we used a novel approach based on massive parallel sequencing which allowed a comprehensive repeat characterization in our model species, garden pea (Pisum sativum). Results Analysis of 33.3 Mb sequence data resulted in quantification and partial sequence reconstruction of major repeat families occurring in the pea genome with at least thousands of copies. Our results showed that the pea genome is dominated by LTR-retrotransposons, estimated at 140,000 copies/1C. Ty3/gypsy elements are less diverse and accumulated to higher copy numbers than Ty1/copia. This is in part due to a large population of Ogre-like retrotransposons which alone make up over 20% of the genome. In addition to numerous types of mobile elements, we have discovered a set of novel satellite repeats and two additional variants of telomeric sequences. Comparative genome analysis revealed that there are only a few repeat sequences conserved between pea and soybean genomes. On the other hand, all major families of pea mobile elements are well represented in M. truncatula. Conclusion We have demonstrated that even in a species with a relatively large genome like pea, where a single 454-sequencing run provided only 0.77% coverage, the generated sequences were sufficient to reconstruct and analyze major repeat families corresponding to a total of 35–48% of the genome. These data provide a starting point for

  17. Sequencing of the intergenic 16S-23S rRNA spacer (ITS) region of Mollicutes species and their identification using microarray-based assay and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Volokhov, Dmitriy V; George, Joseph; Liu, Sue X; Ikonomi, Pranvera; Anderson, Christine; Chizhikov, Vladimir

    2006-08-01

    We have completed sequencing the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region of most known Mycoplasma , Acholeplasma , Ureaplasma , Mesoplasma , and Spiroplasma species. Analysis of the sequence data revealed a significant interspecies variability and low intraspecies polymorphism of the ITS region among Mollicutes . This finding enabled the application of a combined polymerase chain reaction-microarray technology for identifying Mollicutes species. The microarray included individual species-specific oligonucleotide probes for characterizing human Mollicutes species and other species known to be common cell line contaminants. Evaluation of the microarray was conducted using multiple, previously characterized, Mollicutes species. The microarray analysis of the samples used demonstrated a highly specific assay, which is capable of rapid and accurate discrimination among Mollicutes species.

  18. Effects of Laser Printer–Emitted Engineered Nanoparticles on Cytotoxicity, Chemokine Expression, Reactive Oxygen Species, DNA Methylation, and DNA Damage: A Comprehensive in Vitro Analysis in Human Small Airway Epithelial Cells, Macrophages, and Lymphoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Pirela, Sandra V.; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Lu, Xiaoyan; Castranova, Vincent; Thomas, Treye; Qian, Yong; Bello, Dhimiter; Kobzik, Lester; Koturbash, Igor; Demokritou, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Background Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) incorporated into toner formulations of printing equipment become airborne during consumer use. Although information on the complex physicochemical and toxicological properties of both toner powders and printer-emitted particles (PEPs) continues to grow, most toxicological studies have not used the actual PEPs but rather have primarily used raw toner powders, which are not representative of current exposures experienced at the consumer level during printing. Objectives We assessed the biological responses of a panel of human cell lines to PEPs. Methods Three physiologically relevant cell lines—small airway epithelial cells (SAECs), macrophages (THP-1 cells), and lymphoblasts (TK6 cells)—were exposed to PEPs at a wide range of doses (0.5–100 μg/mL) corresponding to human inhalation exposure durations at the consumer level of 8 hr or more. Following treatment, toxicological parameters reflecting distinct mechanisms were evaluated. Results PEPs caused significant membrane integrity damage, an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine release in different cell lines at doses equivalent to exposure durations from 7.8 to 1,500 hr. Furthermore, there were differences in methylation patterns that, although not statistically significant, demonstrate the potential effects of PEPs on the overall epigenome following exposure. Conclusions The in vitro findings obtained in this study suggest that laser printer–emitted engineered nanoparticles may be deleterious to lung cells and provide preliminary evidence of epigenetic modifications that might translate to pulmonary disorders. Citation Pirela SV, Miousse IR, Lu X, Castranova V, Thomas T, Qian Y, Bello D, Kobzik L, Koturbash I, Demokritou P. 2016. Effects of laser printer–emitted engineered nanoparticles on cytotoxicity, chemokine expression, reactive oxygen species, DNA methylation, and DNA damage: a comprehensive in

  19. A combined computational and microarray-based approach identifies novel microRNAs encoded by human gamma-herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Grundhoff, Adam; Sullivan, Christopher S.; Ganem, Don

    2006-01-01

    We have developed an approach to identify microRNAs (miRNAs) that is based on bioinformatics and array-based technologies, without the use of cDNA cloning. The approach, designed for use on genomes of small size (<2 Mb), was tested on cells infected by either of two lymphotropic herpesviruses, KSHV and EBV. The viral genomes were scanned computationally for pre-miRNAs using an algorithm (VMir) we have developed. Candidate hairpins suggested by this analysis were then synthesized as oligonucleotides on microarrays, and the arrays were hybridized with small RNAs from infected cells. Candidate miRNAs that scored positive on the arrays were then subjected to confirmatory Northern blot analysis. Using this approach, 10 of the known KSHV pre-miRNAs were identified, as well as a novel pre-miRNA that had earlier escaped detection. This method also led to the identification of seven new EBV-encoded pre-miRNAs; by using additional computational approaches, we identified a total of 18 new EBV pre-miRNAs that produce 22 mature miRNA molecules, thereby more than quadrupling the total number of hitherto known EBV miRNAs. The advantages and limitations of the approach are discussed. PMID:16540699

  20. Progression in cutaneous malignant melanoma is associated with distinct expression profiles: a tissue microarray-based study.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Soledad R; Ortiz, Pablo; Pollán, Marina; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Sánchez, Lydia; Acuña, Ma Jesús; Pajares, Raquel; Martínez-Tello, Francisco J; Hortelano, Carlos M; Piris, Miguel A; Rodríguez-Peralto, José L

    2004-01-01

    Cutaneous malignant melanoma remains the leading cause of skin cancer death in industrialized countries. Clinical and histological variables that predict survival, such as Breslow's index, tumor size, ulceration, or vascular invasion have been identified in malignant melanoma. Nevertheless, the potential relevance of biological variables still awaits an in-depth exploration. Using tissue microarrays (TMAs), we retrospectively analyzed 165 malignant melanoma samples from 88 patients corresponding to distinct histological progression phases, radial, vertical, and metastases. A panel of 39 different antibodies for cell cycle, apoptosis, melanoma antigens, transcription factors, DNA mismatch repair, and other proteins was used. Integrating the information, the study has identified expression profiles distinguishing specific melanoma progression stages. Most of the detected alterations were linked to the control of cell cycle G1/S transition; cyclin D1 was expressed in radial cases 48% (12 of 25) with significant lost of expression in vertical cases 14% (9 of 65), P = 0.002; whereas p16(INK4a) (89% in vertical versus 71% in metastatic cases, P = 0.009) and p27(KIP1) (76% in radial versus 45% in vertical cases, P = 0.010) were diminished in advanced stages. The study also defines a combination of biological markers associated with shorter overall survival in patients with vertical growth phase melanoma, that provided a predictor model with four antibodies (Ki67, p16(INK4a), p21(CIP1), and Bcl-6). This predictor model was validated using an independent series of 72 vertical growth phase melanoma patients.

  1. A comprehensive molecular phylogeny of the starlings (Aves: Sturnidae) and mockingbirds (Aves: Mimidae): congruent mtDNA and nuclear trees for a cosmopolitan avian radiation.

    PubMed

    Lovette, Irby J; Rubenstein, Dustin R

    2007-09-01

    We generated a comprehensive phylogeny for the avian families Sturnidae (starlings, mynas, Rhabdornis, oxpeckers, and allies) and Mimidae (mockingbirds, thrashers, and allies) to explore patterns of morphological and behavioral diversification. Reconstructions were based on mitochondrial DNA sequences from five coding genes (4108 bp), and nuclear intron sequences from four loci (2974 bp), for most taxa, supplemented with NDII gene sequences (1041 bp) derived from museum skin specimens from additional taxa; together the 117 sampled taxa comprise 78% of the 151 species in these families and include representatives of all currently or recently recognized genera. Phylogenetic analyses consistently identified nine major clades. The basal lineage is comprised of the two Buphagus oxpeckers, which are presently confined to Africa where they are obligately associated with large mammals. Some species in nearly all of the other major clades also feed on or around large vertebrates, and this association may be an ancestral trait that fostered the world-wide dispersal of this group. The remaining taxa divide into sister clades representing the New-World Mimidae and Old-World Sturnidae. The Mimidae are divided into two subclades, a group of Central American and West Indian catbirds and thrashers, and a pan-American clade of mockingbirds and thrashers. The Sturnidae are subdivided into six clades. The Phillipine endemic Rhabdornis are the sister lineage to a larger and substantially more recent radiation of South Asian and Pacific island starlings and mynas. A clade of largely migratory or nomadic Eurasian starlings (within which the basal lineage is the model taxon Sturnus vulgaris) is allied to three groups of largely African species. These reconstructions confirm that Buphagus should not be included in the Sturnidae, and identify many genera that are not monophyletic. They also highlight the substantial diversity among the major Sturnidae subclades in rates of species

  2. Microarray-based analysis of IncA/C plasmid-associated genes from multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Rebecca L; Frye, Jonathan G; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Meinersmann, Richard J

    2011-10-01

    In the family Enterobacteriaceae, plasmids have been classified according to 27 incompatibility (Inc) or replicon types that are based on the inability of different plasmids with the same replication mechanism to coexist in the same cell. Certain replicon types such as IncA/C are associated with multidrug resistance (MDR). We developed a microarray that contains 286 unique 70-mer oligonucleotide probes based on sequences from five IncA/C plasmids: pYR1 (Yersinia ruckeri), pPIP1202 (Yersinia pestis), pP99-018 (Photobacterium damselae), pSN254 (Salmonella enterica serovar Newport), and pP91278 (Photobacterium damselae). DNA from 59 Salmonella enterica isolates was hybridized to the microarray and analyzed for the presence or absence of genes. These isolates represented 17 serovars from 14 different animal hosts and from different geographical regions in the United States. Qualitative cluster analysis was performed using CLUSTER 3.0 to group microarray hybridization results. We found that IncA/C plasmids occurred in two lineages distinguished by a major insertion-deletion (indel) region that contains genes encoding mostly hypothetical proteins. The most variable genes were represented by transposon-associated genes as well as four antimicrobial resistance genes (aphA, merP, merA, and aadA). Sixteen mercury resistance genes were identified and highly conserved, suggesting that mercury ion-related exposure is a stronger pressure than anticipated. We used these data to construct a core IncA/C genome and an accessory genome. The results of our studies suggest that the transfer of antimicrobial resistance determinants by transfer of IncA/C plasmids is somewhat less common than exchange within the plasmids orchestrated by transposable elements, such as transposons, integrating and conjugative elements (ICEs), and insertion sequence common regions (ISCRs), and thus pose less opportunity for exchange of antimicrobial resistance.

  3. Gametogenesis in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas: A Microarrays-Based Analysis Identifies Sex and Stage Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M.; Lelong, Christophe; Huvet, Arnaud; Kellner, Kristell; Dubos, Marie-Pierre; Riviere, Guillaume; Boudry, Pierre; Favrel, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Background The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca, Lophotrochozoa) is an alternative and irregular protandrous hermaphrodite: most individuals mature first as males and then change sex several times. Little is known about genetic and phenotypic basis of sex differentiation in oysters, and little more about the molecular pathways regulating reproduction. We have recently developed and validated a microarray containing 31,918 oligomers (Dheilly et al., 2011) representing the oyster transcriptome. The application of this microarray to the study of mollusk gametogenesis should provide a better understanding of the key factors involved in sex differentiation and the regulation of oyster reproduction. Methodology/Principal Findings Gene expression was studied in gonads of oysters cultured over a yearly reproductive cycle. Principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering showed a significant divergence in gene expression patterns of males and females coinciding with the start of gonial mitosis. ANOVA analysis of the data revealed 2,482 genes differentially expressed during the course of males and/or females gametogenesis. The expression of 434 genes could be localized in either germ cells or somatic cells of the gonad by comparing the transcriptome of female gonads to the transcriptome of stripped oocytes and somatic tissues. Analysis of the annotated genes revealed conserved molecular mechanisms between mollusks and mammals: genes involved in chromatin condensation, DNA replication and repair, mitosis and meiosis regulation, transcription, translation and apoptosis were expressed in both male and female gonads. Most interestingly, early expressed male-specific genes included bindin and a dpy-30 homolog and female-specific genes included foxL2, nanos homolog 3, a pancreatic lipase related protein, cd63 and vitellogenin. Further functional analyses are now required in order to investigate their role in sex differentiation in oysters. Conclusions

  4. Comparison of four DNA extraction methods for comprehensive assessment of 16S rRNA bacterial diversity in marine biofilms using high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Corcoll, Natàlia; Österlund, Tobias; Sinclair, Lucas; Eiler, Alexander; Kristiansson, Erik; Backhaus, Thomas; Eriksson, K Martin

    2017-08-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing technologies are increasingly used for the metagenomic characterisation of microbial biodiversity. However, basic issues, such as the choice of an appropriate DNA extraction method, are still not resolved for non-model microbial communities. This study evaluates four commonly used DNA extraction methods for marine periphyton biofilms in terms of DNA yield, efficiency, purity, integrity and resulting 16S rRNA bacterial diversity. Among the tested methods, the Plant DNAzol® Reagent (PlantDNAzol) and the FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil (FastDNA Soil) methods were best suited to extract high quantities of DNA (77-130 μg g wet wt-1). Lower amounts of DNA were obtained (<37 μg g wet wt-1) with the Power Plant® Pro DNA Isolation Kit (PowerPlant) and the Power Biofilm® DNA Isolation Kit (PowerBiofilm) methods, but integrity and purity of the extracted DNA were higher. Results from 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing demonstrate that the choice of a DNA extraction method significantly influences the bacterial community profiles generated. A higher number of bacterial OTUs were detected when DNA was extracted with the PowerBiofilm and the PlantDNAzol methods. Overall, this study demonstrates the potential bias in metagenomic diversity estimates associated with different DNA extraction methods. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Comparative genomics profiling of clinical isolates of Aeromonas salmonicida using DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Nash, John HE; Findlay, Wendy A; Luebbert, Christian C; Mykytczuk, Oksana L; Foote, Simon J; Taboada, Eduardo N; Carrillo, Catherine D; Boyd, Jessica M; Colquhoun, Duncan J; Reith, Michael E; Brown, Laura L

    2006-01-01

    Background Aeromonas salmonicida has been isolated from numerous fish species and shows wide variation in virulence and pathogenicity. As part of a larger research program to identify virulence genes and candidates for vaccine development, a DNA microarray was constructed using a subset of 2024 genes from the draft genome sequence of A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida strain A449. The microarray included genes encoding known virulence-associated factors in A. salmonicida and homologs of virulence genes of other pathogens. We used microarray-based comparative genomic hybridizations (M-CGH) to compare selected A. salmonicida sub-species and other Aeromonas species from different hosts and geographic locations. Results Results showed variable carriage of virulence-associated genes and generally increased variation in gene content across sub-species and species boundaries. The greatest variation was observed among genes associated with plasmids and transposons. There was little correlation between geographic region and degree of variation for all isolates tested. Conclusion We have used the M-CGH technique to identify subsets of conserved genes from amongst this set of A. salmonicida virulence genes for further investigation as potential vaccine candidates. Unlike other bacterial characterization methods that use a small number of gene or DNA-based functions, M-CGH examines thousands of genes and/or whole genomes and thus is a more comprehensive analytical tool for veterinary or even human health research. PMID:16522207

  6. SSHscreen and SSHdb, generic software for microarray based gene discovery: application to the stress response in cowpea

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Suppression subtractive hybridization is a popular technique for gene discovery from non-model organisms without an annotated genome sequence, such as cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp). We aimed to use this method to enrich for genes expressed during drought stress in a drought tolerant cowpea line. However, current methods were inefficient in screening libraries and management of the sequence data, and thus there was a need to develop software tools to facilitate the process. Results Forward and reverse cDNA libraries enriched for cowpea drought response genes were screened on microarrays, and the R software package SSHscreen 2.0.1 was developed (i) to normalize the data effectively using spike-in control spot normalization, and (ii) to select clones for sequencing based on the calculation of enrichment ratios with associated statistics. Enrichment ratio 3 values for each clone showed that 62% of the forward library and 34% of the reverse library clones were significantly differentially expressed by drought stress (adjusted p value < 0.05). Enrichment ratio 2 calculations showed that > 88% of the clones in both libraries were derived from rare transcripts in the original tester samples, thus supporting the notion that suppression subtractive hybridization enriches for rare transcripts. A set of 118 clones were chosen for sequencing, and drought-induced cowpea genes were identified, the most interesting encoding a late embryogenesis abundant Lea5 protein, a glutathione S-transferase, a thaumatin, a universal stress protein, and a wound induced protein. A lipid transfer protein and several components of photosynthesis were down-regulated by the drought stress. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR confirmed the enrichment ratio values for the selected cowpea genes. SSHdb, a web-accessible database, was developed to manage the clone sequences and combine the SSHscreen data with sequence annotations derived from BLAST and Blast2GO. The self

  7. Development of a Microarray-Based Tool To Characterize Vaginal Bacterial Fluctuations and Application to a Novel Antibiotic Treatment for Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Cruciani, Federica; Biagi, Elena; Severgnini, Marco; Consolandi, Clarissa; Calanni, Fiorella; Donders, Gilbert; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    The healthy vaginal microbiota is generally dominated by lactobacilli that confer antimicrobial protection and play a crucial role in health. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most prevalent lower genital tract infection in women in reproductive age and is characterized by a shift in the relative abundances of Lactobacillus spp. to a greater abundance of strictly anaerobic bacteria. In this study, we designed a new phylogenetic microarray-based tool (VaginArray) that includes 17 probe sets specific for the most representative bacterial groups of the human vaginal ecosystem. This tool was implemented using the ligase detection reaction-universal array (LDR-UA) approach. The entire probe set properly recognized the specific targets and showed an overall sensitivity of 6 to 12 ng per probe. The VaginArray was applied to assess the efficacy of rifaximin vaginal tablets for the treatment of BV, analyzing the vaginal bacterial communities of 22 BV-affected women treated with rifaximin vaginal tablets at a dosage of 25 mg/day for 5 days. Our results showed the ability of rifaximin to reduce the growth of various BV-related bacteria (Atopobium vaginae, Prevotella, Megasphaera, Mobiluncus, and Sneathia spp.), with the highest antibiotic susceptibility for A. vaginae and Sneathia spp. Moreover, we observed an increase of Lactobacillus crispatus levels in the subset of women who maintained remission after 1 month of therapy, opening new perspectives for the treatment of BV. PMID:25733514

  8. Real-world performance of a microarray-based rapid diagnostic for Gram-positive bloodstream infections and potential utility for antimicrobial stewardship.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Samuel L; Hemmige, Vagish S; Koo, Hoonmo L; Vuong, Nancy N; Lasco, Todd M; Garey, Kevin W

    2015-01-01

    The Verigene Gram-positive blood culture assay (BC-GP) is a microarray-based rapid diagnostic test, which includes targets for 12 bacterial species and 3 resistance determinants. We prospectively compared the diagnostic accuracy of the BC-GP to routine microbiologic methods and evaluated the potential of the BC-GP for antimicrobial stewardship programs. A total of 143 consecutive patients with Gram-positive bacteremia were included in the analysis. BC-GP correctly identified 127/128 (99.2%) of organisms from monomicrobial blood cultures and 9/14 (64.3%) from polymicrobial, including all methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Stewardship interventions were possible in 51.0% of patients, most commonly stopping or preventing unnecessary vancomycin or starting a targeted therapy. In Monte Carlo simulations, unnecessary antibiotics could be stopped at least 24 hours earlier in 65.6% of cases, and targeted therapy could be started at least 24 hours earlier in 81.2%. BC-GP is a potentially useful test for antibiotic stewardship in patients with Gram-positive bacteremia.

  9. Development of a microarray-based assay for rapid monitoring of genetic variants of West Nile virus circulating in the United States.

    PubMed

    Grinev, Andriyan; Chancey, Caren; Volkova, Evgeniya; Chizhikov, Vladimir; Rios, Maria

    2017-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) has become endemic in the Western Hemisphere since its first introduction in the United States in 1999. An important factor associated with annual reoccurrence of WNV outbreaks in the U.S. is viral adaptation to domestic mosquitoes and birds through accumulation of spontaneous mutations in the WNV genome. Newly emerged mutations in the viral genome can potentially negatively affect the performance of existing diagnostic and screening assays and future vaccines. Therefore, the genetic monitoring of the WNV viral population during annual outbreaks is extremely important for public health and can only be achieved by application of efficient sample preparation methods followed by high throughput genetic analysis. In this study, we developed and evaluated a method for specific isolation of WNV genomic RNA from plasma samples without cultivation of the virus in cells. In combination with the microarray-based genetic analysis of the isolated WNV genomic RNA, this approach is suitable for fast, high throughput genotyping of circulating WNV genetic variants. The methods were evaluated using WNV isolates from the 1999-2012U.S. epidemics. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Development of a microarray-based tool to characterize vaginal bacterial fluctuations and application to a novel antibiotic treatment for bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Cruciani, Federica; Biagi, Elena; Severgnini, Marco; Consolandi, Clarissa; Calanni, Fiorella; Donders, Gilbert; Brigidi, Patrizia; Vitali, Beatrice

    2015-05-01

    The healthy vaginal microbiota is generally dominated by lactobacilli that confer antimicrobial protection and play a crucial role in health. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most prevalent lower genital tract infection in women in reproductive age and is characterized by a shift in the relative abundances of Lactobacillus spp. to a greater abundance of strictly anaerobic bacteria. In this study, we designed a new phylogenetic microarray-based tool (VaginArray) that includes 17 probe sets specific for the most representative bacterial groups of the human vaginal ecosystem. This tool was implemented using the ligase detection reaction-universal array (LDR-UA) approach. The entire probe set properly recognized the specific targets and showed an overall sensitivity of 6 to 12 ng per probe. The VaginArray was applied to assess the efficacy of rifaximin vaginal tablets for the treatment of BV, analyzing the vaginal bacterial communities of 22 BV-affected women treated with rifaximin vaginal tablets at a dosage of 25 mg/day for 5 days. Our results showed the ability of rifaximin to reduce the growth of various BV-related bacteria (Atopobium vaginae, Prevotella, Megasphaera, Mobiluncus, and Sneathia spp.), with the highest antibiotic susceptibility for A. vaginae and Sneathia spp. Moreover, we observed an increase of Lactobacillus crispatus levels in the subset of women who maintained remission after 1 month of therapy, opening new perspectives for the treatment of BV. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Can tautomerization of the A·T Watson-Crick base pair via double proton transfer provoke point mutations during DNA replication? A comprehensive QM and QTAIM analysis.

    PubMed

    Brovarets, Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2014-01-01

    Trying to answer the question posed in the title, we have carried out a detailed theoretical investigation of the biologically important mechanism of the tautomerization of the A·T Watson-Crick DNA base pair, information that is hard to establish experimentally. By combining theoretical investigations at the MP2 and density functional theory levels of QM theory with quantum theory of atoms in molecules analysis, the tautomerization of the A·T Watson-Crick base pair by the double proton transfer (DPT) was comprehensively studied in vacuo and in the continuum with a low dielectric constant (ϵ = 4) corresponding to a hydrophobic interfaces of protein-nucleic acid interactions. Based on the sweeps of the electron-topological, geometric, and energetic parameters, which describe the course of the tautomerization along its intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC), it was proved that the A·T → A(∗)·T(∗) tautomerization through the DPT is a concerted (i.e. the pathway without an intermediate) and asynchronous (i.e. protons move with a time gap) process. The limiting stage of this phenomenon is the final PT along the N6H⋯O4 hydrogen bond (H-bond). The continuum with ϵ = 4 does not affect qualitatively the course of the tautomerization reaction: similar to that observed in vacuo, it proceeds via a concerted asynchronous process with the same structure of the transition state (TS). For the first time, the nine key points along the IRC of the A·T base pair tautomerization, which could be considered as electron-topological "fingerprints" of a concerted asynchronous process of the tautomerization via the DPT, have been identified and fully characterized. These nine key points have been used to define the reactant, TS, and product regions of the DPT in the A·T base pair. Considering the energy dependence of each of the three H-bonds, which stabilize the Watson-Crick and Löwdin's base pairs, along the IRC of the tautomerization, it was found that all these H

  12. Comprehensive study of interactions between DNA and new electroactive Schiff base ligands. Application to the detection of singly mismatched Helicobacter pylori sequences.

    PubMed

    Revenga-Parra, Mónica; García, Tania; Lorenzo, Encarnación; Pariente, Félix

    2007-05-15

    N,N'-Bis(3,4-dihydroxybenzylidene)-1,2-diaminobenzene (3,4-DHS) and N,N'-bis(2,5-dihydroxybenzylidene)-1,2-diaminobenzene (2,5-DHS) have been used as electrochemical probes in DNA sensing. These ligands, containing ortho and para quinone functional groups, respectively, as well as planar aromatic domains, are capable of binding to double stranded DNA (ds-DNA) more efficiently than to single stranded DNA (ss-DNA). Emphasis has been placed on the elucidation of the nature of the interaction by combining spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. From spectrophotometric titration experiments, the binding constants of 3,4-DHS and 2,5-DHS with ds-DNA were found to be (9.0+/-0.3) x 10(3) and (3.3+/-0.2) x 10(3)M(-1), respectively. These values are consistent with a binding mode dominated by interactions with the minor groove of ds-DNA. The electroactivity of the quinone moiety in 3,4-DHS bound to DNA could be employed as an electrochemical indicator to detect hybridization events in DNA biosensors. These biosensors have been constructed by immobilization of a thiolated capture probe sequence from Helicobacter pylori onto gold electrodes. After hybridization with the complementary target sequence, 3,4-DHS was accumulated within the double stranded DNA layer. Electrochemical detection was performed by differential pulse voltammetry over the potential range where the quinone moiety is redox active. Using this approach, complementary target sequences of H. pylori can be quantified over the range of 8.9-22.2 microM with a detection limit of 8.3+/-0.4 microM and a linear correlation coefficient of 0.989. In addition this approach is capable of detecting hybridization of complementary sequences containing a single mismatch.

  13. Microarray-based SNP genotyping to identify genetic risk factors of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) in South Indian population.

    PubMed

    Aravind Kumar, M; Singh, Vineeta; Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Shanker, Uday; Lakshmi Narasu, M

    2017-09-16

    In the view of aggressive nature of Triple-Negative Breast cancer (TNBC) due to the lack of receptors (ER, PR, HER2) and high incidence of drug resistance associated with it, a case-control association study was conducted to identify the contributing genetic risk factors for Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). A total of 30 TNBC patients and 50 age and gender-matched controls of Indian origin were screened for 9,00,000 SNP markers using microarray-based SNP genotyping approach. The initial PLINK association analysis (p < 0.01, MAF 0.14-0.44, OR 10-24) identified 28 non-synonymous SNPs and one stop gain mutation in the exonic region as possible determinants of TNBC risk. All the 29 SNPs were annotated using ANNOVAR. The interactions between these markers were evaluated using Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) analysis. The interactions were in the following order: exm408776 > exm1278309 > rs316389 > rs1651654 > rs635538 > exm1292477. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was performed to construct decision tree useful in predicting TNBC risk. As shown in this analysis, rs1651654 and exm585172 SNPs are found to be determinants of TNBC risk. Artificial neural network model was used to generate the Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC), which showed high sensitivity and specificity (AUC-0.94) of these markers. To conclude, among the 9,00,000 SNPs tested, CCDC42 exm1292477, ANXA3 exm408776, SASH1 exm585172 are found to be the most significant genetic predicting factors for TNBC. The interactions among exm408776, exm1278309, rs316389, rs1651654, rs635538, exm1292477 SNPs inflate the risk for TNBC further. Targeted analysis of these SNPs and genes alone also will have similar clinical utility in predicting TNBC.

  14. Development of a protein microarray using sequence-specific DNA binding domain on DNA chip surface

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoo Seong; Pack, Seung Pil; Yoo, Young Je . E-mail: yjyoo@snu.ac.kr

    2005-04-22

    A protein microarray based on DNA microarray platform was developed to identify protein-protein interactions in vitro. The conventional DNA chip surface by 156-bp PCR product was prepared for a substrate of protein microarray. High-affinity sequence-specific DNA binding domain, GAL4 DNA binding domain, was introduced to the protein microarray as fusion partner of a target model protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein. The target protein was oriented immobilized directly on the DNA chip surface. Finally, monoclonal antibody of the target protein was used to identify the immobilized protein on the surface. This study shows that the conventional DNA chip can be used to make a protein microarray directly, and this novel protein microarray can be applicable as a tool for identifying protein-protein interactions.

  15. Studies on the repair of damaged DNA in bacteriophage, bacterial and mammalian systems. Comprehensive report, 1 February 1981-15 September 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    We have explored the molecular mechanism of the repair of DNA at a number of different levels of biological organization, by investigating bacteriophage, bacterial, yeast and mammalian (including human) cells. We have demonstrated that uv endonuclease of phage T4 not only possesses pyrimidine dimer (PD)-DNA glycosylase activity but also apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease activity. The demonstration of both activities provided an explanation for the specific endonucleosytic cleavage of DNA at sites of pyrimidine dimers catalyzed by this small protein. A new apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease, specific for sites of of base loss in single stranded DNA has been isolated from E. celi and presumably recognizes these lesions in single stranded regions of duplex DNA. We have partially purified this enzyme and have carried out a preliminary characterization of the activity. We treated xeroderma pigmentosum and normal cells with sodium butyrate in the hope of restoring normal levels of excision repair to the former. Although this result was not obtained, we established that all cells treated with sodium butyrate show enhanced levels of repair synthesis, thus providing a means for increasing the sensitivity of this commonly used technique for measuring DNA repair in mammalian cells in culture.

  16. A triclade DNA vaccine designed on the basis of a comprehensive serologic study elicits neutralizing antibody responses against all clades and subclades of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fan; Wang, Guiqin; Buchy, Philippe; Cai, Zhipeng; Chen, Honglin; Chen, Zhiwei; Cheng, Genhong; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Deubel, Vincent; Zhou, Paul

    2012-06-01

    Because of their rapid evolution, genetic diversity, broad host range, ongoing circulation in birds, and potential human-to-human transmission, H5N1 influenza viruses remain a major global health concern. Their high degree of genetic diversity also poses enormous burdens and uncertainties in developing effective vaccines. To overcome this, we took a new approach, i.e., the development of immunogens based on a comprehensive serologic study. We constructed DNA plasmids encoding codon-optimized hemagglutinin (HA) from 17 representative strains covering all reported clades and subclades of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses. Using DNA plasmids, we generated the corresponding H5N1 pseudotypes and immune sera. We performed an across-the-board pseudotype-based neutralization assay and determined antigenic clusters by cartography. We then designed a triclade DNA vaccine and evaluated its immunogenicity and protection in mice. We report here that (sub)clades 0, 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.1, and 9 were grouped into antigenic cluster 1, (sub)clades 2.1.3.2, 2.3.4, 2.4, 2.5, and 8 were grouped into another antigenic cluster, with subclade 2.2.1 loosely connected to it, and each of subclades 2.3.2.1 and 7.2 was by itself. Importantly, the triclade DNA vaccine encoding HAs of (sub)clades 0, 2.3.2.1, and 7.2 elicited broadly neutralizing antibody responses against all H5 clades and subclades and protected mice against high-lethal-dose heterologous H5N1 challenge. Thus, we conclude that broadly neutralizing antibodies against all H5 clades and subclades can indeed be elicited with immunogens on the basis of a comprehensive serologic study. Further evaluation and optimization of such an approach in ferrets and in humans is warranted.

  17. A Triclade DNA Vaccine Designed on the Basis of a Comprehensive Serologic Study Elicits Neutralizing Antibody Responses against All Clades and Subclades of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fan; Wang, Guiqin; Buchy, Philippe; Cai, Zhipeng; Chen, Honglin; Chen, Zhiwei; Cheng, Genhong; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Deubel, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Because of their rapid evolution, genetic diversity, broad host range, ongoing circulation in birds, and potential human-to-human transmission, H5N1 influenza viruses remain a major global health concern. Their high degree of genetic diversity also poses enormous burdens and uncertainties in developing effective vaccines. To overcome this, we took a new approach, i.e., the development of immunogens based on a comprehensive serologic study. We constructed DNA plasmids encoding codon-optimized hemagglutinin (HA) from 17 representative strains covering all reported clades and subclades of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses. Using DNA plasmids, we generated the corresponding H5N1 pseudotypes and immune sera. We performed an across-the-board pseudotype-based neutralization assay and determined antigenic clusters by cartography. We then designed a triclade DNA vaccine and evaluated its immunogenicity and protection in mice. We report here that (sub)clades 0, 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.1, and 9 were grouped into antigenic cluster 1, (sub)clades 2.1.3.2, 2.3.4, 2.4, 2.5, and 8 were grouped into another antigenic cluster, with subclade 2.2.1 loosely connected to it, and each of subclades 2.3.2.1 and 7.2 was by itself. Importantly, the triclade DNA vaccine encoding HAs of (sub)clades 0, 2.3.2.1, and 7.2 elicited broadly neutralizing antibody responses against all H5 clades and subclades and protected mice against high-lethal-dose heterologous H5N1 challenge. Thus, we conclude that broadly neutralizing antibodies against all H5 clades and subclades can indeed be elicited with immunogens on the basis of a comprehensive serologic study. Further evaluation and optimization of such an approach in ferrets and in humans is warranted. PMID:22496212

  18. Comprehensive Profiling of Radiosensitive Human Cell Lines with DNA Damage Response Assays Identifies the Neutral Comet Assay as a Potential Surrogate for Clonogenic Survival

    PubMed Central

    Nahas, Shareef A.; Davies, Robert; Fike, Francesca; Nakamura, Kotoka; Du, Liutao; Kayali, Refik; Martin, Nathan T.; Concannon, Patrick; Gatti, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to explore the possible causes of human radiosensitivity and identify more rapid assays for cellular radiosensitivity, we interrogated a set of assays that evaluate cellular functions involved in recognition and repair of DNA double-strand breaks: (1) neutral comet assay, (2) radiation-induced γ-H2AX focus formation, (3) the temporal kinetics of structural maintenance of chromosomes 1 phosphorylation, (4) intra-S-phase checkpoint integrity, and (5) mitochondrial respiration. We characterized a unique panel of 19 “radiosensitive” human lymphoblastoid cell lines from individuals with undiagnosed diseases suggestive of a DNA repair disorder. Radiosensitivity was defined by reduced cellular survival using a clonogenic survival assay. Each assay identified cell lines with defects in DNA damage response functions. The highest concordance rate observed, 89% (17/19), was between an abnormal neutral comet assay and reduced survival by the colony survival assay. Our data also suggested that the neutral comet assay would be a more rapid surrogate for analyzing DNA repair/processing disorders. PMID:21962002

  19. Comprehensive Care

    MedlinePlus

    Emergency & Disaster Resources If you or a loved one have been affected—or may be affected—by a hurricane, ... our comprehensive information and resources on emergency and disaster planning . We can also connect you to emergency ...

  20. Comprehensive detection and identification of bacterial DNA in the blood of patients with sepsis and healthy volunteers using next-generation sequencing method - the observation of DNAemia.

    PubMed

    Gosiewski, T; Ludwig-Galezowska, A H; Huminska, K; Sroka-Oleksiak, A; Radkowski, P; Salamon, D; Wojciechowicz, J; Kus-Slowinska, M; Bulanda, M; Wolkow, P P

    2017-02-01

    Blood is considered to be a sterile microenvironment, in which bacteria appear only periodically. Previously used methods allowed only for the detection of either viable bacteria with low sensitivity or selected species of bacteria. The Next-Generation Sequencing method (NGS) enables the identification of all bacteria in the sample with their taxonomic classification. We used NGS for the analysis of blood samples from healthy volunteers (n = 23) and patients with sepsis (n = 62) to check whether any bacterial DNA exists in the blood of healthy people and to identify bacterial taxonomic profile in the blood of septic patients. The presence of bacterial DNA was found both in septic and healthy subjects; however, bacterial diversity was significantly different (P = 0.002) between the studied groups. Among healthy volunteers, a significant predominance of anaerobic bacteria (76.2 %), of which most were bacteria of the order Bifidobacteriales (73.0 %), was observed. In sepsis, the majority of detected taxa belonged to aerobic or microaerophilic microorganisms (75.1 %). The most striking difference was seen in the case of Actinobacteria phyla, the abundance of which was decreased in sepsis (P < 0.001) and Proteobacteria phyla which was decreased in the healthy volunteers (P < 0.001). Our research shows that bacterial DNA can be detected in the blood of healthy people and that its taxonomic composition is different from the one seen in septic patients. Detection of bacterial DNA in the blood of healthy people may suggest that bacteria continuously translocate into the blood, but not always cause sepsis; this observation can be called DNAemia.

  1. Comprehensive definition of genome features in Spirodela polyrhiza by high-depth physical mapping and short-read DNA sequencing strategies.

    PubMed

    Michael, Todd P; Bryant, Douglas; Gutierrez, Ryan; Borisjuk, Nikolai; Chu, Philomena; Zhang, Hanzhong; Xia, Jing; Zhou, Junfei; Peng, Hai; El Baidouri, Moaine; Ten Hallers, Boudewijn; Hastie, Alex R; Liang, Tiffany; Acosta, Kenneth; Gilbert, Sarah; McEntee, Connor; Jackson, Scott A; Mockler, Todd C; Zhang, Weixiong; Lam, Eric

    2017-02-01

    Spirodela polyrhiza is a fast-growing aquatic monocot with highly reduced morphology, genome size and number of protein-coding genes. Considering these biological features of Spirodela and its basal position in the monocot lineage, understanding its genome architecture could shed light on plant adaptation and genome evolution. Like many draft genomes, however, the 158-Mb Spirodela genome sequence has not been resolved to chromosomes, and important genome characteristics have not been defined. Here we deployed rapid genome-wide physical maps combined with high-coverage short-read sequencing to resolve the 20 chromosomes of Spirodela and to empirically delineate its genome features. Our data revealed a dramatic reduction in the number of the rDNA repeat units in Spirodela to fewer than 100, which is even fewer than that reported for yeast. Consistent with its unique phylogenetic position, small RNA sequencing revealed 29 Spirodela-specific microRNA, with only two being shared with Elaeis guineensis (oil palm) and Musa balbisiana (banana). Combining DNA methylation data and small RNA sequencing enabled the accurate prediction of 20.5% long terminal repeats (LTRs) that doubled the previous estimate, and revealed a high Solo:Intact LTR ratio of 8.2. Interestingly, we found that Spirodela has the lowest global DNA methylation levels (9%) of any plant species tested. Taken together our results reveal a genome that has undergone reduction, likely through eliminating non-essential protein coding genes, rDNA and LTRs. In addition to delineating the genome features of this unique plant, the methodologies described and large-scale genome resources from this work will enable future evolutionary and functional studies of this basal monocot family. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. RNA and DNA bacteriophages as molecular diagnosis controls in clinical virology: a comprehensive study of more than 45,000 routine PCR tests.

    PubMed

    Ninove, Laetitia; Nougairede, Antoine; Gazin, Celine; Thirion, Laurence; Delogu, Ilenia; Zandotti, Christine; Charrel, Remi N; De Lamballerie, Xavier

    2011-02-09

    Real-time PCR techniques are now commonly used for the detection of viral genomes in various human specimens and require for validation both external and internal controls (ECs and ICs). In particular, ICs added to clinical samples are necessary to monitor the extraction, reverse transcription, and amplification steps in order to detect false-negative results resulting from PCR-inhibition or errors in the technical procedure. Here, we performed a large scale evaluation of the use of bacteriophages as ICs in routine molecular diagnosis. This allowed to propose simple standardized procedures (i) to design specific ECs for both DNA and RNA viruses and (ii) to use T4 (DNA) or MS2 (RNA) phages as ICs in routine diagnosis. Various technical formats for using phages as ICs were optimised and validated. Subsequently, T4 and MS2 ICs were evaluated in routine real-time PCR or RT-PCR virological diagnostic tests, using a series of 8,950 clinical samples (representing 36 distinct specimen types) sent to our laboratory for the detection of a variety of DNA and RNA viruses. The frequency of inefficient detection of ICs was analyzed according to the nature of the sample. Inhibitors of enzymatic reactions were detected at high frequency in specific sample types such as heparinized blood and bone marrow (>70%), broncho-alveolar liquid (41%) and stools (36%). The use of T4 and MS2 phages as ICs proved to be cost-effective, flexible and adaptable to various technical procedures of real-time PCR detection in virology. It represents a valuable strategy for enhancing the quality of routine molecular diagnosis in laboratories that use in-house designed diagnostic systems, which can conveniently be associated to the use of specific synthetic ECs. The high rate of inhibitors observed in a variety of specimen types should stimulate the elaboration of improved technical protocols for the extraction and amplification of nucleic acids.

  3. Comprehensive phylogeny, biogeography and new classification of the diverse bee tribe Megachilini: Can we use DNA barcodes in phylogenies of large genera?

    PubMed

    Trunz, V; Packer, L; Vieu, J; Arrigo, N; Praz, C J

    2016-10-01

    Classification and evolutionary studies of particularly speciose clades pose important challenges, as phylogenetic analyses typically sample a small proportion of the existing diversity. We examine here one of the largest bee genera, the genus Megachile - the dauber and leafcutting bees. Besides presenting a phylogeny based on five nuclear genes (5480 aligned nucleotide positions), we attempt to use the phylogenetic signal of mitochondrial DNA barcodes, which are rapidly accumulating and already include a substantial proportion of the known species diversity in the genus. We used barcodes in two ways: first, to identify particularly divergent lineages and thus to guide taxon sampling in our nuclear phylogeny; second, to augment taxon sampling by combining nuclear markers (as backbone for ancient divergences) with DNA barcodes. Our results indicate that DNA barcodes bear phylogenetic signal limited to very recent divergences (3-4 my before present). Sampling within clades of very closely related species may be augmented using this technique, but our results also suggest statistically supported, but incongruent placements of some taxa. However, the addition of one single nuclear gene (LW-rhodopsin) to the DNA barcode data was enough to recover meaningful placement with high clade support values for nodes up to 15 million years old. We discuss different proposals for the generic classification of the tribe Megachilini. Finding a classification that is both in agreement with our phylogenetic hypotheses and practical in terms of diagnosability is particularly challenging as our analyses recover several well-supported clades that include morphologically heterogeneous lineages. We favour a classification that recognizes seven morphologically well-delimited genera in Megachilini: Coelioxys, Gronoceras, Heriadopsis, Matangapis, Megachile, Noteriades and Radoszkowskiana. Our results also lead to the following classification changes: the groups known as Dinavis, Neglectella

  4. E-Predict: a computational strategy for species identification based on observed DNA microarray hybridization patterns.

    PubMed

    Urisman, Anatoly; Fischer, Kael F; Chiu, Charles Y; Kistler, Amy L; Beck, Shoshannah; Wang, David; DeRisi, Joseph L

    2005-01-01

    DNA microarrays may be used to identify microbial species present in environmental and clinical samples. However, automated tools for reliable species identification based on observed microarray hybridization patterns are lacking. We present an algorithm, E-Predict, for microarray-based species identification. E-Predict compares observed hybridization patterns with theoretical energy profiles representing different species. We demonstrate the application of the algorithm to viral detection in a set of clinical samples and discuss its relevance to other metagenomic applications.

  5. Comprehension Clinchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcell, Barclay

    2006-01-01

    This author, an academic achievement teacher for second and third grade reading and math at Theodore Roosevelt Elementary School in Park Ridge, Illinois, contends that since fluency is such a measurable skill, over-emphasizing decoding and de-emphasizing comprehension results in short-changing students. In this article, she shares several reading…

  6. Microarray-Based Mapping for the Detection of Molecular Markers in Response to Aspergillus flavus Infection in Susceptible and Resistant Maize Lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate differential gene expression levels for resistance to A. flavus kernel infection in susceptible (Va35) and resistant (Mp313E) maize lines using Oligonucleotide and cDNA microarray analysis, (2) to evaluate differences in A. flavus accumulation betwee...

  7. Comprehensive analysis of fly ash induced changes in physiological/growth parameters, DNA damage and oxidative stress over the life cycle of Brassica juncea and Brassica alba.

    PubMed

    Jana, Aditi; Ghosh, Manosij; De, Arpita; Sinha, Sonali; Jothiramajayam, Manivannan; Mukherjee, Anita

    2017-11-01

    Fly ash (FA) being a heterogeneous mixture of heavy metal affects plant system in various ways. Previous studies have shown bioaccumulation of toxic metals in the plants and disturbance in cellular activities. Here, we have studied the impacts of FA treatment through the life cycle of economically important, annual crop plant mustard (Brassica juncea and Brassica alba). Result revealed that FA did not alter germination rate and photosynthetic pigment levels. Tolerance index of B. juncea was higher compared to B. alba. Seed setting was significantly affected by FA in B. alba. Significant increase in DNA damage was observed in both B. alba and B. juncea. Proline accumulation was significantly higher in B. alba. In B. juncea catalase activity and reduced glutathione content declined in initial days which were restored at the end of experimental period. Significant decrease in non-enzymatic antioxidants was noted in B. alba. Higher accumulation of Pb and As was noted in shoot of B. juncea and in B. alba Cu, Pb, Cr and As accumulated in shoots. As observed from these results, both plants could translocate certain toxic heavy metals from roots to the shoot which affected the physiological and biochemical balance and induced genotoxic response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comprehensive evaluation of medium and long range correlated density functionals in TD-DFT investigation of DNA bases and base pairs: gas phase and water solution study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Manoj K.; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2010-11-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the performance of the TD-DFT method using different density functionals including recently developed medium and long-range correlation corrected density functionals have been carried out for lower-lying electronic singlet valence transitions of nucleic acid bases and the Watson-Crick base pairs in the gas phase and in the water solution. The standard 6-311++G(d,p) basis set was used. Ground state geometries of bases and base pairs were optimized at the M05-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level. The nature of potential energy surfaces (PES) was ascertained through the harmonic vibrational frequency analysis; all geometries were found to be minima at the respective PES. Electronic singlet vertical transition energies were also computed at the CC2/def2-TZVP level in the gas phase. The effect of state-specific water solvation on TD-DFT computed transition energies was considered using the PCM model. For the isolated bases the performance of the B3LYP functional was generally found to be superior among all functionals, but it measurably fails for charge-transfer states in the base pairs. The CC2/def2-TZVP computed transition energies were also revealed to be inferior compared with B3LYP results for the isolated bases. The performance of the ωB97XD, CAM-B3LYP and BMK functionals were found to be similar and comparable with the CC2 results for the isolated bases. However, for the Watson-Crick adenine-thymine and guanine-cytosine base pairs the performance of the ωB97XD functional was found to be the best among all the studied functionals in the present work in predicting the locally excited transitions as well as charge transfer states.

  9. Comprehensive assessment of the association between DNA repair gene XRCC3 rs861539 C/T polymorphism and lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Ding, Gang; Xu, Weiguo; Hua, Hongwei; Huang, Qian; Liang, Hongxiang; Ni, Yufeng; Ding, Zhaoheng

    2013-10-01

    A few case-control studies were performed to assess the association between X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3) rs861539 C/T polymorphism and lung cancer susceptibility, but no consistent finding was reported. In the present study, we performed a meta-analysis of 14 case-control studies with a total of 7,869 lung cancer cases and 10,778 controls to provide a comprehensive assessment of the association between XRCC3 rs861539 C/T polymorphism and lung cancer risk. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CIs) were calculated to assess the strength of the association. Overall, there was no significant association between XRCC3 rs861539 C/T polymorphism and lung cancer risk under all genetic models [OR (95 % CI) for T versus C, 1.00 (0.89-1.13), P = 0.99; OR (95 % CI) for TT versus CC, 1.07 (0.81-1.41), P = 0.62; OR (95 % CI) for TT/CT versus CC, 0.95 (0.84-1.07), P = 0.39; OR (95 % CI) for TT versus CT/CC, 1.10 (0.86-1.39), P = 0.62]. In the subgroup analyses of both Asians and Caucasians, there was still no significant association between XRCC3 rs861539 C/T polymorphism and lung cancer risk under all genetic models (All P values were more than 0.05). However, there was an obvious association between XRCC3 rs861539 C/T polymorphism and decreased risk of lung cancer in the subgroup analysis of the mixed population (All P values were less than 0.05). In addition, there was some risk of publication bias in the meta-analysis, and there was obvious discrepancy in the findings between studies with large sample size and studies with small sample size in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis indicates that the association between XRCC3 rs861539 C/T polymorphism and lung cancer risk is still uncertain owing to the obvious discrepancy in the findings between studies with large sample size and studies with small sample size. More studies with large sample size are needed to further assess the association.

  10. Microarray based comparative genomic hybridisation (array-CGH) detects submicroscopic chromosomal deletions and duplications in patients with learning disability/mental retardation and dysmorphic features

    PubMed Central

    Shaw-Smith, C; Redon, R; Rickman, L; Rio, M; Willatt, L; Fiegler, H; Firth, H; Sanlaville, D; Winter, R; Colleaux, L; Bobrow, M; Carter, N

    2004-01-01

    The underlying causes of learning disability and dysmorphic features in many patients remain unidentified despite extensive investigation. Routine karyotype analysis is not sensitive enough to detect subtle chromosome rearrangements (less than 5 Mb). The presence of subtle DNA copy number changes was investigated by array-CGH in 50 patients with learning disability and dysmorphism, employing a DNA microarray constructed from large insert clones spaced at approximately 1 Mb intervals across the genome. Twelve copy number abnormalities were identified in 12 patients (24% of the total): seven deletions (six apparently de novo and one inherited from a phenotypically normal parent) and five duplications (one de novo and four inherited from phenotypically normal parents). Altered segments ranged in size from those involving a single clone to regions as large as 14 Mb. No recurrent deletion or duplication was identified within this cohort of patients. On the basis of these results, we anticipate that array-CGH will become a routine method of genome-wide screening for imbalanced rearrangements in children with learning disability. PMID:15060094

  11. Neural networks and Fuzzy clustering methods for assessing the efficacy of microarray based intrinsic gene signatures in breast cancer classification and the character and relations of identified subtypes.

    PubMed

    Samarasinghe, Sandhya; Chaiboonchoe, Amphun

    2015-01-01

    In the classification of breast cancer subtypes using microarray data, hierarchical clustering is commonly used. Although this form of clustering shows basic cluster patterns, more needs to be done to investigate the accuracy of clusters as well as to extract meaningful cluster characteristics and their relations to increase our confidence in their use in a clinical setting. In this study, an in-depth investigation of the efficacy of three reported gene subsets in distinguishing breast cancer subtypes was performed using four advanced computational intelligence methods-Self-Organizing Maps (SOM), Emergent Self-Organizing Maps (ESOM), Fuzzy Clustering by Local Approximation of Memberships (FLAME), and Fuzzy C-means (FCM)-each differing in the way they view data in terms of distance measures and fuzzy or crisp clustering. The gene subsets consisted of 71, 93, and 71 genes reported in the literature from three comprehensive experimental studies for distinguishing Luminal (A and B), Basal, Normal breast-like, and HER2 subtypes. Given the costly procedures involved in clinical studies, the proposed 93-gene set can be used for preliminary classification of breast cancer. Then, as a decision aid, SOM can be used to map the gene signature of a new patient to locate them with respect to all subtypes to get a comprehensive view of the classification. These can be followed by a deeper investigation in the light of the observations made in this study regarding overlapping subtypes. Results from the study could be used as the base for further refining the gene signatures from later experiments and from new experiments designed to separate overlapping clusters as well as to maximally separate all clusters.

  12. DNA adductomics.

    PubMed

    Balbo, Silvia; Turesky, Robert J; Villalta, Peter W

    2014-03-17

    Systems toxicology is a broad-based approach to describe many of the toxicological features that occur within a living system under stress or subjected to exogenous or endogenous exposures. The ultimate goal is to capture an overview of all exposures and the ensuing biological responses of the body. The term exposome has been employed to refer to the totality of all exposures, and systems toxicology investigates how the exposome influences health effects and consequences of exposures over a lifetime. The tools to advance systems toxicology include high-throughput transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and adductomics, which is still in its infancy. A well-established methodology for the comprehensive measurement of DNA damage resulting from every day exposures is not fully developed. During the past several decades, the (32)P-postlabeling technique has been employed to screen the damage to DNA induced by multiple classes of genotoxicants; however, more robust, specific, and quantitative methods have been sought to identify and quantify DNA adducts. Although triple quadrupole and ion trap mass spectrometry, particularly when using multistage scanning (LC-MS(n)), have shown promise in the field of DNA adductomics, it is anticipated that high-resolution and accurate-mass LC-MS(n) instrumentation will play a major role in assessing global DNA damage. Targeted adductomics should also benefit greatly from improved triple quadrupole technology. Once the analytical MS methods are fully mature, DNA adductomics along with other -omics tools will contribute greatly to the field of systems toxicology.

  13. Gene-set activity toolbox (GAT): A platform for microarray-based cancer diagnosis using an integrative gene-set analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Engchuan, Worrawat; Meechai, Asawin; Tongsima, Sissades; Doungpan, Narumol; Chan, Jonathan H

    2016-08-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that cannot be diagnosed reliably using only single gene expression analysis. Using gene-set analysis on high throughput gene expression profiling controlled by various environmental factors is a commonly adopted technique used by the cancer research community. This work develops a comprehensive gene expression analysis tool (gene-set activity toolbox: (GAT)) that is implemented with data retriever, traditional data pre-processing, several gene-set analysis methods, network visualization and data mining tools. The gene-set analysis methods are used to identify subsets of phenotype-relevant genes that will be used to build a classification model. To evaluate GAT performance, we performed a cross-dataset validation study on three common cancers namely colorectal, breast and lung cancers. The results show that GAT can be used to build a reasonable disease diagnostic model and the predicted markers have biological relevance. GAT can be accessed from http://gat.sit.kmutt.ac.th where GAT's java library for gene-set analysis, simple classification and a database with three cancer benchmark datasets can be downloaded.

  14. Microarray-based analysis of changes in diversity of microbial genes involved in organic carbon decomposition following land use/cover changes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuguang; Zhang, Xiaoquan; Liu, Xueduan; Xiao, Ye; Qu, Liangjian; Wu, Liyou; Zhou, Jizhong

    2007-01-01

    To increase our understanding of the impact of land use/cover changes on soil microbial decomposition genes involved in organic carbon decomposition, we analyzed soil samples in four sites with different land cover/use histories in a subalpine region of western Sichuan. One site was in a primitive Abies faxoniana forest, the second and the third sites were spruce plantations established in 1960's and 1980's, respectively, and the fourth site was in a cropland dating back to 1960's. The genomic DNA from the microbial community was isolated and hybridized against a functional gene microarray containing 1,961 probes. There were 39, 62, 41, and 28 gene probes with statistically significant positive signals and the gene diversity index (H') values were 3.59, 4.04, 3.70 and 3.16 in primitive forest, spruce plantations established in 1960s and 1980s and cropland, respectively. The results suggested that the number of functional genes and the gene diversity index were correlated with increasing amounts of soil organic carbon, except in the primitive Abies faxoniana forest site. cluster analysis demonstrated that primitive forest soil was clustered more closely to soil from the spruce plantation established in 1960s.

  15. Clinical Utility of Microarray-Based Gene Expression Profiling in the Diagnosis and Subclassification of Leukemia: Report From the International Microarray Innovations in Leukemia Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Haferlach, Torsten; Kohlmann, Alexander; Wieczorek, Lothar; Basso, Giuseppe; Kronnie, Geertruy Te; Béné, Marie-Christine; De Vos, John; Hernández, Jesus M.; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Mills, Ken I.; Gilkes, Amanda; Chiaretti, Sabina; Shurtleff, Sheila A.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Rassenti, Laura Z.; Yeoh, Allen E.; Papenhausen, Peter R.; Liu, Wei-min; Williams, P. Mickey; Foà, Robin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The Microarray Innovations in Leukemia study assessed the clinical utility of gene expression profiling as a single test to subtype leukemias into conventional categories of myeloid and lymphoid malignancies. Methods The investigation was performed in 11 laboratories across three continents and included 3,334 patients. An exploratory retrospective stage I study was designed for biomarker discovery and generated whole-genome expression profiles from 2,143 patients with leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes. The gene expression profiling–based diagnostic accuracy was further validated in a prospective second study stage of an independent cohort of 1,191 patients. Results On the basis of 2,096 samples, the stage I study achieved 92.2% classification accuracy for all 18 distinct classes investigated (median specificity of 99.7%). In a second cohort of 1,152 prospectively collected patients, a classification scheme reached 95.6% median sensitivity and 99.8% median specificity for 14 standard subtypes of acute leukemia (eight acute lymphoblastic leukemia and six acute myeloid leukemia classes, n = 693). In 29 (57%) of 51 discrepant cases, the microarray results had outperformed routine diagnostic methods. Conclusion Gene expression profiling is a robust technology for the diagnosis of hematologic malignancies with high accuracy. It may complement current diagnostic algorithms and could offer a reliable platform for patients who lack access to today's state-of-the-art diagnostic work-up. Our comprehensive gene expression data set will be submitted to the public domain to foster research focusing on the molecular understanding of leukemias. PMID:20406941

  16. An Efficient Microarray-Based Genotyping Platform for the Identification of Drug-Resistance Mutations in Majority and Minority Subpopulations of HIV-1 Quasispecies.

    PubMed

    Martín, Verónica; Perales, Celia; Fernández-Algar, María; Dos Santos, Helena G; Garrido, Patricia; Pernas, María; Parro, Víctor; Moreno, Miguel; García-Pérez, Javier; Alcamí, José; Torán, José Luis; Abia, David; Domingo, Esteban; Briones, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The response of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) quasispecies to antiretroviral therapy is influenced by the ensemble of mutants that composes the evolving population. Low-abundance subpopulations within HIV-1 quasispecies may determine the viral response to the administered drug combinations. However, routine sequencing assays available to clinical laboratories do not recognize HIV-1 minority variants representing less than 25% of the population. Although several alternative and more sensitive genotyping techniques have been developed, including next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods, they are usually very time consuming, expensive and require highly trained personnel, thus becoming unrealistic approaches in daily clinical practice. Here we describe the development and testing of a HIV-1 genotyping DNA microarray that detects and quantifies, in majority and minority viral subpopulations, relevant mutations and amino acid insertions in 42 codons of the pol gene associated with drug- and multidrug-resistance to protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors. A customized bioinformatics protocol has been implemented to analyze the microarray hybridization data by including a new normalization procedure and a stepwise filtering algorithm, which resulted in the highly accurate (96.33%) detection of positive/negative signals. This microarray has been tested with 57 subtype B HIV-1 clinical samples extracted from multi-treated patients, showing an overall identification of 95.53% and 89.24% of the queried PR and RT codons, respectively, and enough sensitivity to detect minority subpopulations representing as low as 5-10% of the total quasispecies. The developed genotyping platform represents an efficient diagnostic and prognostic tool useful to personalize antiviral treatments in clinical practice.

  17. An Efficient Microarray-Based Genotyping Platform for the Identification of Drug-Resistance Mutations in Majority and Minority Subpopulations of HIV-1 Quasispecies

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Verónica; Perales, Celia; Fernández-Algar, María; Dos Santos, Helena G.; Garrido, Patricia; Pernas, María; Parro, Víctor; Moreno, Miguel; García-Pérez, Javier; Alcamí, José; Torán, José Luis; Abia, David; Domingo, Esteban

    2016-01-01

    The response of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) quasispecies to antiretroviral therapy is influenced by the ensemble of mutants that composes the evolving population. Low-abundance subpopulations within HIV-1 quasispecies may determine the viral response to the administered drug combinations. However, routine sequencing assays available to clinical laboratories do not recognize HIV-1 minority variants representing less than 25% of the population. Although several alternative and more sensitive genotyping techniques have been developed, including next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods, they are usually very time consuming, expensive and require highly trained personnel, thus becoming unrealistic approaches in daily clinical practice. Here we describe the development and testing of a HIV-1 genotyping DNA microarray that detects and quantifies, in majority and minority viral subpopulations, relevant mutations and amino acid insertions in 42 codons of the pol gene associated with drug- and multidrug-resistance to protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors. A customized bioinformatics protocol has been implemented to analyze the microarray hybridization data by including a new normalization procedure and a stepwise filtering algorithm, which resulted in the highly accurate (96.33%) detection of positive/negative signals. This microarray has been tested with 57 subtype B HIV-1 clinical samples extracted from multi-treated patients, showing an overall identification of 95.53% and 89.24% of the queried PR and RT codons, respectively, and enough sensitivity to detect minority subpopulations representing as low as 5–10% of the total quasispecies. The developed genotyping platform represents an efficient diagnostic and prognostic tool useful to personalize antiviral treatments in clinical practice. PMID:27959928

  18. Portrait of Ependymoma Recurrence in Children: Biomarkers of Tumor Progression Identified by Dual-Color Microarray-Based Gene Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Andreiuolo, Felipe; Puget, Stéphanie; Lacroix, Ludovic; Drusch, Françoise; Scott, Véronique; Varlet, Pascale; Mauguen, Audrey; Dessen, Philippe; Lazar, Vladimir; Vassal, Gilles; Grill, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Background Children with ependymoma may experience a relapse in up to 50% of cases depending on the extent of resection. Key biological events associated with recurrence are unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings To discover the biology behind the recurrence of ependymomas, we performed CGHarray and a dual-color gene expression microarray analysis of 17 tumors at diagnosis co-hybridized with the corresponding 27 first or subsequent relapses from the same patient. As treatment and location had only limited influence on specific gene expression changes at relapse, we established a common signature for relapse. Eighty-seven genes showed an absolute fold change ≥2 in at least 50% of relapses and were defined as the gene expression signature of ependymoma recurrence. The most frequently upregulated genes are involved in the kinetochore (ASPM, KIF11) or in neural development (CD133, Wnt and Notch pathways). Metallothionein (MT) genes were downregulated in up to 80% of the recurrences. Quantitative PCR for ASPM, KIF11 and MT3 plus immunohistochemistry for ASPM and MT3 confirmed the microarray results. Immunohistochemistry on an independent series of 24 tumor pairs at diagnosis and at relapse confirmed the decrease of MT3 expression at recurrence in 17/24 tumor pairs (p = 0.002). Conversely, ASPM expression was more frequently positive at relapse (87.5% vs 37.5%, p = 0.03). Loss or deletion of the MT genes cluster was never observed at relapse. Promoter sequencing after bisulfite treatment of DNA from primary tumors and recurrences as well as treatment of short-term ependymoma cells cultures with a demethylating agent showed that methylation was not involved in MT3 downregulation. However, in vitro treatment with a histone deacetylase inhibitor or zinc restored MT3 expression. Conclusions/Significance The most frequent molecular events associated with ependymoma recurrence were over-expression of kinetochore proteins and down-regulation of metallothioneins

  19. Why the tautomerization of the G·C Watson-Crick base pair via the DPT does not cause point mutations during DNA replication? QM and QTAIM comprehensive analysis.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2014-01-01

    The ground-state tautomerization of the G·C Watson-Crick base pair by the double proton transfer (DPT) was comprehensively studied in vacuo and in the continuum with a low dielectric constant (ϵ = 4), corresponding to a hydrophobic interface of protein-nucleic acid interactions, using DFT and MP2 levels of quantum-mechanical (QM) theory and quantum theory "Atoms in molecules" (QTAIM). Based on the sweeps of the electron-topological, geometric, polar, and energetic parameters, which describe the course of the G·C ↔ G*·C* tautomerization (mutagenic tautomers of the G and C bases are marked with an asterisk) through the DPT along the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC), it was proved that it is, strictly speaking, a concerted asynchronous process both at the DFT and MP2 levels of theory, in which protons move with a small time gap in vacuum, while this time delay noticeably increases in the continuum with ϵ = 4. It was demonstrated using the conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM) that the continuum with ϵ = 4 does not qualitatively affect the course of the tautomerization reaction. The DPT in the G·C Watson-Crick base pair occurs without any intermediates both in vacuum and in the continuum with ϵ = 4 at the DFT/MP2 levels of theory. The nine key points along the IRC of the G·C base pair tautomerization, which could be considered as electron-topological "fingerprints" of a concerted asynchronous process of the tautomerization via the DPT, have been identified and fully characterized. These key points have been used to define the reactant, transition state, and product regions of the DPT reaction in the G·C base pair. Analysis of the energetic characteristics of the H-bonds allows us to arrive at a definite conclusion that the middle N1H⋯N3/N3H⋯N1 and the lower N2H⋯O2/N2H⋯O2 parallel H-bonds in the G·C/G*·C* base pairs, respectively, are anticooperative, that is, the strengthening of the middle H-bond is accompanied

  20. Analysis of DNA microarray expression data.

    PubMed

    Simon, Richard

    2009-06-01

    DNA microarrays are powerful tools for studying biological mechanisms and for developing prognostic and predictive classifiers for identifying the patients who require treatment and are best candidates for specific treatments. Because microarrays produce so much data from each specimen, they offer great opportunities for discovery and great dangers or producing misleading claims. Microarray based studies require clear objectives for selecting cases and appropriate analysis methods. Effective analysis of microarray data, where the number of measured variables is orders of magnitude greater than the number of cases, requires specialized statistical methods which have recently been developed. Recent literature reviews indicate that serious problems of analysis exist a substantial proportion of publications. This manuscript attempts to provide a non-technical summary of the key principles of statistical design and analysis for studies that utilize microarray expression profiling.

  1. Comprehensibility maximization and humanly comprehensible representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Ryotaro

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a new information-theoretic method to measure the comprehensibility of network configurations in competitive learning. Comprehensibility is supposed to be measured by information contained in components in competitive networks. Thus, the increase in information corresponds to the increase in comprehensibility of network configurations. One of the most important characteristics of the method is that parameters can be explicitly determined so as to produce a state where the different types of comprehensibility can be mutually increased. We applied the method to two problems, namely an artificial data set and the ionosphere data from the well-known machine learning database. In both problems, we showed that improved performance could be obtained in terms of all types of comprehensibility and quantization errors. For the topographic errors, we found that updating connection weights prevented them from increasing. Then, the optimal values of comprehensibility could be explicitly determined, and clearer class boundaries were generated.

  2. A Comparison of the Sensititre MycoTB Plate, the Bactec MGIT 960, and a Microarray-Based Molecular Assay for the Detection of Drug Resistance in Clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in Moscow, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Nosova, Elena Y.; Zimenkov, Danila V.; Khakhalina, Anastasia A.; Isakova, Alexandra I.; Krylova, Ludmila Y.; Makarova, Marina V.; Galkina, Ksenia Y.; Krasnova, Maria A.; Safonova, Svetlana G.; Litvinov, Vitaly I.; Gryadunov, Dmitry A.; Bogorodskaya, Elena M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to compare the consistency of three assays for the determination of the drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) strains with various resistance profiles isolated from the Moscow region. Methods A total of 144 MTB clinical isolates with a strong bias toward drug resistance were examined using Bactec MGIT 960, Sensititre MycoTB, and a microarray-based molecular assay TB-TEST to detect substitutions in the rpoB, katG, inhA, ahpC, gyrA, gyrB, rrs, eis, and embB genes that are associated with resistance to rifampin, isoniazid, fluoroquinolones, second-line injectable drugs and ethambutol. Results The average correlation for the identification of resistant and susceptible isolates using the three methods was approximately 94%. An association of mutations detected with variable resistance levels was shown. We propose a change in the breakpoint minimal inhibitory concentration for kanamycin to less than 5 μg/ml in the Sensititre MycoTB system. A pairwise comparison of the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of two different drugs revealed an increased correlation in the first-line drug group and a partial correlation in the second-line drug group, reflecting the history of the preferential simultaneous use of drugs from these groups. An increased correlation with the MICs was also observed for drugs sharing common resistance mechanisms. Conclusions The quantitative measures of phenotypic drug resistance produced by the Sensititre MycoTB and the timely detection of mutations using the TB-TEST assay provide guidance for clinicians for the choice of the appropriate drug regimen. PMID:27902737

  3. Application of DNA microarray technology to gerontological studies.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Kiyoshi; Kuwano, Yuki; Nishida, Kensei; Rokutan, Kazuhito

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression patterns change dramatically in aging and age-related events. The DNA microarray is now recognized as a useful device in molecular biology and widely used to identify the molecular mechanisms of aging and the biological effects of drugs for therapeutic purpose in age-related diseases. Recently, numerous technological advantages have led to the evolution of DNA microarrays and microarray-based techniques, revealing the genomic modification and all transcriptional activity. Here, we show the step-by-step methods currently used in our lab to handling the oligonucleotide microarray and miRNA microarray. Moreover, we introduce the protocols of ribonucleoprotein [RNP] immunoprecipitation followed by microarray analysis (RIP-chip) which reveal the target mRNA of age-related RNA-binding proteins.

  4. DNA synthesis security.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Ali; Chyba, Christopher F

    2012-01-01

    It is generally assumed that genetic engineering advances will, inevitably, facilitate the misapplication of biotechnology toward the production of biological weapons. Unexpectedly, however, some of these very advances in the areas of DNA synthesis and sequencing may enable the implementation of automated and nonintrusive safeguards to avert the illicit applications of biotechnology. In the case of DNA synthesis, automated DNA screening tools could be built into DNA synthesizers in order to block the synthesis of hazardous agents. In addition, a comprehensive safety and security regime for dual-use genetic engineering research could include nonintrusive monitoring of DNA sequencing. This is increasingly feasible as laboratories outsource this service to just a few centralized sequencing factories. The adoption of automated, nonintrusive monitoring and surveillance of the DNA synthesis and sequencing pipelines may avert many risks associated with dual-use biotechnology. Here, we describe the historical background and current challenges associated with dual-use biotechnologies and propose strategies to address these challenges.

  5. Readiness for Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiegel, Dixie Lee

    1983-01-01

    Presents picture-based and listening-based lessons designed to enhance teachers' awareness of the processes that lead to comprehension and to provide a framework within which they may develop their own lessons for comprehension awareness. (FL)

  6. Comprehension Before Word Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garman, Dorothy

    1977-01-01

    Examines Frank Smith's analysis of the reading process with respect to comprehension, specifically, his assertion that during the reading process, comprehension of meaning precedes word identification. Discusses the implications of Smith's analysis for the teaching of reading. (JM)

  7. DNA under Force: Mechanics, Electrostatics, and Hydration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingqiang; Wijeratne, Sithara S.; Qiu, Xiangyun; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the basic intra- and inter-molecular forces of DNA has helped us to better understand and further predict the behavior of DNA. Single molecule technique elucidates the mechanics of DNA under applied external forces, sometimes under extreme forces. On the other hand, ensemble studies of DNA molecular force allow us to extend our understanding of DNA molecules under other forces such as electrostatic and hydration forces. Using a variety of techniques, we can have a comprehensive understanding of DNA molecular forces, which is crucial in unraveling the complex DNA functions in living cells as well as in designing a system that utilizes the unique properties of DNA in nanotechnology.

  8. Plasmid DNA manufacturing technology.

    PubMed

    Carnes, Aaron E; Williams, James A

    2007-01-01

    Today, plasmid DNA is becoming increasingly important as the next generation of biotechnology products (gene medicines and DNA vaccines) make their way into clinical trials, and eventually into the pharmaceutical marketplace. This review summarizes recent patents and patent applications relating to plasmid manufacturing, in the context of a comprehensive description of the plasmid manufacturing intellectual property landscape. Strategies for plasmid manufacturers to develop or in-license key plasmid manufacturing technologies are described with the endpoint of efficiently producing kg quantities of plasmid DNA of a quality that meets anticipated European and FDA quality specifications for commercial plasmid products.

  9. Comprehensions and Interpretations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urquhart, Alexander H.

    1987-01-01

    Argues that second-language reading comprehension and its assessment can be usefully divided into two aspects: (1) comprehensions (different levels of comprehension the reader adopts to suit different purposes of reading); and (2) interpretations (different readings of the same text resulting from different background knowledge or preoccupations…

  10. Comprehension of Connected Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosberg, Ludwig; Shima, Fred

    A rationale was developed for researching reading comprehension based on information gain. Previous definitions of comprehension which were reviewed included operational vs. nonoperational and skills vs. processes. Comprehension was viewed as an informational processing event which includes a constellation of cognitive and learning processes. Two…

  11. Making the Comprehensive High School Comprehensive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midjaas, Carl Larsen

    1975-01-01

    Three occupational labs (child care, graphic arts, and food service) are featured as examples of vocational facilities in a new comprehensive high school in Troy, Michigan. The article stresses the planning that went into the project's development. (BP)

  12. Identification of Gram-Negative Bacteria and Genetic Resistance Determinants from Positive Blood Culture Broths by Use of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Multiplex Microarray-Based Molecular Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ledeboer, Nathan A.; Lopansri, Bert K.; Dhiman, Neelam; Cavagnolo, Robert; Carroll, Karen C.; Granato, Paul; Thomson, Richard; Butler-Wu, Susan M.; Berger, Heather; Samuel, Linoj; Pancholi, Preeti; Swyers, Lettie; Hansen, Glen T.; Tran, Nam K.; Polage, Christopher R.; Thomson, Kenneth S.; Hanson, Nancy D.; Winegar, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Bloodstream infection is a serious condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The outcome of these infections can be positively affected by the early implementation of effective antibiotic therapy based on the identification of the infecting organism and genetic markers associated with antibiotic resistance. In this study, we evaluated the microarray-based Verigene Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GN) assay in the identification of 8 genus or species targets and 6 genetic resistance determinants in positive blood culture broths. A total of 1,847 blood cultures containing Gram-negative organisms were tested using the BC-GN assay. This comprised 729 prospective fresh, 781 prospective or retrospective frozen, and 337 simulated cultures representing 7 types of aerobic culture media. The results were compared to those with standard bacterial culture and biochemical identification with nucleic acid sequence confirmation of the resistance determinants. Among monomicrobial cultures, the positive percent agreement (PPA) of the BC-GN assay with the reference method was as follows; Escherichia coli, 100%; Klebsiella pneumoniae, 92.9%; Klebsiella oxytoca, 95.5%; Enterobacter spp., 99.3%; Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 98.9%; Proteus spp., 100%; Acinetobacter spp., 98.4%; and Citrobacter spp., 100%. All organism identification targets demonstrated >99.5% negative percent agreement (NPA) with the reference method. Of note, 25/26 cultures containing K. pneumoniae that were reported as not detected by the BC-GN assay were subsequently identified as Klebsiella variicola. The PPA for identification of resistance determinants was as follows; blaCTX-M, 98.9%; blaKPC, 100%; blaNDM, 96.2%; blaOXA, 94.3%; blaVIM, 100%; and blaIMP, 100%. All resistance determinant targets demonstrated >99.9% NPA. Among polymicrobial specimens, the BC-GN assay correctly identified at least one organism in 95.4% of the broths and correctly identified all organisms present in 54.5% of the broths

  13. Identification of Gram-Negative Bacteria and Genetic Resistance Determinants from Positive Blood Culture Broths by Use of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Multiplex Microarray-Based Molecular Assay.

    PubMed

    Ledeboer, Nathan A; Lopansri, Bert K; Dhiman, Neelam; Cavagnolo, Robert; Carroll, Karen C; Granato, Paul; Thomson, Richard; Butler-Wu, Susan M; Berger, Heather; Samuel, Linoj; Pancholi, Preeti; Swyers, Lettie; Hansen, Glen T; Tran, Nam K; Polage, Christopher R; Thomson, Kenneth S; Hanson, Nancy D; Winegar, Richard; Buchan, Blake W

    2015-08-01

    Bloodstream infection is a serious condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The outcome of these infections can be positively affected by the early implementation of effective antibiotic therapy based on the identification of the infecting organism and genetic markers associated with antibiotic resistance. In this study, we evaluated the microarray-based Verigene Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GN) assay in the identification of 8 genus or species targets and 6 genetic resistance determinants in positive blood culture broths. A total of 1,847 blood cultures containing Gram-negative organisms were tested using the BC-GN assay. This comprised 729 prospective fresh, 781 prospective or retrospective frozen, and 337 simulated cultures representing 7 types of aerobic culture media. The results were compared to those with standard bacterial culture and biochemical identification with nucleic acid sequence confirmation of the resistance determinants. Among monomicrobial cultures, the positive percent agreement (PPA) of the BC-GN assay with the reference method was as follows; Escherichia coli, 100%; Klebsiella pneumoniae, 92.9%; Klebsiella oxytoca, 95.5%; Enterobacter spp., 99.3%; Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 98.9%; Proteus spp., 100%; Acinetobacter spp., 98.4%; and Citrobacter spp., 100%. All organism identification targets demonstrated >99.5% negative percent agreement (NPA) with the reference method. Of note, 25/26 cultures containing K. pneumoniae that were reported as not detected by the BC-GN assay were subsequently identified as Klebsiella variicola. The PPA for identification of resistance determinants was as follows; blaCTX-M, 98.9%; blaKPC, 100%; blaNDM, 96.2%; blaOXA, 94.3%; blaVIM, 100%; and blaIMP, 100%. All resistance determinant targets demonstrated >99.9% NPA. Among polymicrobial specimens, the BC-GN assay correctly identified at least one organism in 95.4% of the broths and correctly identified all organisms present in 54.5% of the broths

  14. Use of lymphoblastoid cells for the estimation of environmental insults to DNA. Comprehensive report of the overall activities of the contract during the past three years. Progress report, August 1, 1978-June 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    Research progress is reported on a study to detect chronic low-level exposure of individuals to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by analysis of DNA in cells with low turnover rates. The technique used was to measure the level of excision repair activity in lymphoblastoid and lymphoma cell lines. (ACR)

  15. Comprehensive Analysis of Silencing Mutants Reveals Complex Regulation of the Arabidopsis Methylome

    PubMed Central

    Stroud, Hume; Greenberg, Maxim V.C.; Feng, Suhua; Bernatavichute, Yana V.; Jacobsen, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Cytosine methylation is involved in various biological processes such as silencing of transposable elements (TEs) and imprinting. Multiple pathways regulate DNA methylation in different sequence contexts, but the factors that regulate DNA methylation at a given site in the genome largely remain unknown. Here we have surveyed the methylomes of a comprehensive list of 86 Arabidopsis gene silencing mutants by generating single-nucleotide resolution maps of DNA methylation. We find that DNA methylation is site specifically regulated by different factors. Furthermore, we have identified additional regulators of DNA methylation. These data and analyses will serve as a comprehensive community resource for further understanding the control of DNA methylation patterning. PMID:23313553

  16. Scaffolding Reading Comprehension Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salem, Ashraf Atta Mohamed Safein

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigates whether English language teachers use scaffolding strategies for developing their students' reading comprehension skills or just for assessing their comprehension. It also tries to demonstrate whether teachers are aware of these strategies or they use them as a matter of habit. A questionnaire as well as structured…

  17. Comprehension Processes in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balota, D. A., Ed.; And Others

    Focusing on the process of reading comprehension, this book contains chapters on some central topics relevant to understanding the processes associated with comprehending text. The articles and their authors are as follows: (1) "Comprehension Processes: Introduction" (K. Rayner); (2) "The Role of Meaning in Word Recognition"…

  18. Schemata, Context, and Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sharon L.; And Others

    The study of schema theory as part of the inquiry into the nature of language comprehension has drawn attention to the reader's central role in the construction of text-guided meaning. Contemporary schema theory represnts a major step in the effort to move away from a reductionist view of reading comprehension. Specifically, it focuses on wbat…

  19. Teaching Main Idea Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, James F., Ed.

    Intended to help classroom teachers, curriculum developers, and researchers, this book provides current information on theoretical and instructional aspects of main idea comprehension. Titles and authors are as follows: "The Confused World of Main Idea" (James W. Cunningham and David W. Moore); "The Comprehension of Important…

  20. Spectrum of Physics Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasiak, W.; Godlewska, M.; Rosiek, R.; Wcislo, D.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results of research on the relationship between self-assessed comprehension of physics lectures and final grades of junior high school students (aged 13-15), high school students (aged 16-18) and physics students at the Pedagogical University of Cracow, Poland (aged 21). Students' declared level of comprehension was measured…

  1. Teaching Main Idea Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, James F., Ed.

    Intended to help classroom teachers, curriculum developers, and researchers, this book provides current information on theoretical and instructional aspects of main idea comprehension. Titles and authors are as follows: "The Confused World of Main Idea" (James W. Cunningham and David W. Moore); "The Comprehension of Important…

  2. The Roots of Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasinski, Timothy; Padak, Nancy; Newton, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Wide vocabulary knowledge is associated with proficiency in reading comprehension and scores on tests involving comprehension. Yet assessments show that U.S. students at various grade levels have demonstrated no improvement in their vocabulary knowledge since 2009. Literacy expert Timothy Rasinski and colleagues argue that students need improved…

  3. The Roots of Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasinski, Timothy; Padak, Nancy; Newton, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Wide vocabulary knowledge is associated with proficiency in reading comprehension and scores on tests involving comprehension. Yet assessments show that U.S. students at various grade levels have demonstrated no improvement in their vocabulary knowledge since 2009. Literacy expert Timothy Rasinski and colleagues argue that students need improved…

  4. Teaching Language Through Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winitz, Harris; And Others

    In the comprehension approach to second language instruction, the major procedure is to provide students with comprehensible input, which it is the students' responsibility to understand. The aim is to encourage nucleation of the target language, that is the crystallization of the rule system. Teaching procedures focus on strategies for implicit…

  5. Teaching Language Through Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winitz, Harris; And Others

    In the comprehension approach to second language instruction, the major procedure is to provide students with comprehensible input, which it is the students' responsibility to understand. The aim is to encourage nucleation of the target language, that is the crystallization of the rule system. Teaching procedures focus on strategies for implicit…

  6. Processes in Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ransom, Grayce A.

    This examination of the processes in reading comprehension is divided into seven categories. "Theoretical Foundations" reviews some of the research conducted by Bruner, Piaget, and Bloom in the areas of cognition or comprehension processes of young children. "Development of a Spiraling Reading Curriculum" examines a spiraling taxonomy of reading…

  7. Imitation improves language comprehension.

    PubMed

    Adank, Patti; Hagoort, Peter; Bekkering, Harold

    2010-12-01

    Humans imitate each other during social interaction. This imitative behavior streamlines social interaction and aids in learning to replicate actions. However, the effect of imitation on action comprehension is unclear. This study investigated whether vocal imitation of an unfamiliar accent improved spoken-language comprehension. Following a pretraining accent comprehension test, participants were assigned to one of six groups. The baseline group received no training, but participants in the other five groups listened to accented sentences, listened to and repeated accented sentences in their own accent, listened to and transcribed accented sentences, listened to and imitated accented sentences, or listened to and imitated accented sentences without being able to hear their own vocalizations. Posttraining measures showed that accent comprehension was most improved for participants who imitated the speaker's accent. These results show that imitation may aid in streamlining interaction by improving spoken-language comprehension under adverse listening conditions.

  8. Mechanisms for radiation damadge in DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1994-11-01

    A comprehensive report is provided of the author`s research since 1986 on radiolysis of DNA as well as current state of knowledge in this area. In particular study areas such as the influence of hydration on the absolute yield of primary ionic free radicals in irradiated DNA at 77K, Ab Initio molecular orbital calculations of DNA base pairs and their radical ions, and radiation-induced DNA damage as a function of hydration are discussed.

  9. Interruptions disrupt reading comprehension.

    PubMed

    Foroughi, Cyrus K; Werner, Nicole E; Barragán, Daniela; Boehm-Davis, Deborah A

    2015-06-01

    Previous research suggests that being interrupted while reading a text does not disrupt the later recognition or recall of information from that text. This research is used as support for Ericsson and Kintsch's (1995) long-term working memory (LT-WM) theory, which posits that disruptions while reading (e.g., interruptions) do not impair subsequent text comprehension. However, to fully comprehend a text, individuals may need to do more than recognize or recall information that has been presented in the text at a later time. Reading comprehension often requires individuals to connect and synthesize information across a text (e.g., successfully identifying complex topics such as themes and tones) and not just make a familiarity-based decision (i.e., recognition). The goal for this study was to determine whether interruptions while reading disrupt reading comprehension when the questions assessing comprehension require participants to connect and synthesize information across the passage. In Experiment 1, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension. In Experiment 2, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension but not recognition of information from the text. In Experiment 3, the addition of a 15-s time-out prior to the interruption successfully removed these negative effects. These data suggest that the time it takes to process the information needed to successfully comprehend text when reading is greater than that required for recognition. Any interference (e.g., an interruption) that occurs during the comprehension process may disrupt reading comprehension. This evidence supports the need for transient activation of information in working memory for successful text comprehension and does not support LT-WM theory. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Oxidative DNA modifications.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Henrik E

    2005-07-01

    the separation procedure proper prior to detection. A large effort from 20+ laboratories supported by a grant from the EU has reduced artifacts considerably and work towards interlaboratory standardization of the methodology is in progress. The presently agreed "normal" levels of the most frequent known lesion 8-oxodG is about 5 per million dG's in DNA. A comprehensive evaluation of the evidence, from chemistry to clinical and epidemiological trials, linking oxidative modifications to cancer will be given. Finally, an estimate of the quantitative role oxidative DNA modifications play among the multiplicity of other insults is given. While there is no question that all of these oxidative mechanisms do exist, quantitative data on their importance for the human situation do not exist. Prospective human studies that can provide such quantitative data on different mechanisms are underway.

  11. Comprehensive rotorcraft analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Wendell B.; Austin, Edward E.

    1988-01-01

    The development and application of comprehensive rotorcraft analysis methods in the field of rotorcraft technology are described. These large scale analyses and the resulting computer programs are intended to treat the complex aeromechanical phenomena that describe the behavior of rotorcraft. They may be used to predict rotor aerodynamics, acoustic, performance, stability and control, handling qualities, loads and vibrations, structures, dynamics, and aeroelastic stability characteristics for a variety of applications including research, preliminary and detail design, and evaluation and treatment of field problems. The principal comprehensive methods developed or under development in recent years and generally available to the rotorcraft community because of US Army Aviation Research and Technology Activity (ARTA) sponsorship of all or part of the software systems are the Rotorcraft Flight Simulation (C81), Dynamic System Coupler (DYSCO), Coupled Rotor/Airframe Vibration Analysis Program (SIMVIB), Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics (CAMRAD), General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program (GRASP), and Second Generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System (2GCHAS).

  12. Spectrum of physics comprehension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasiak, W.; Godlewska, M.; Rosiek, R.; Wcislo, D.

    2012-05-01

    The paper presents the results of research on the relationship between self-assessed comprehension of physics lectures and final grades of junior high school students (aged 13-15), high school students (aged 16-18) and physics students at the Pedagogical University of Cracow, Poland (aged 21). Students' declared level of comprehension was measured during a physics lecture on a prearranged scale of 1-10 with the use of a personal response system designed for the purpose of this experiment. Through the use of this tool, we obtained about 2000 computer records of students' declared comprehension of a 45 min lecture, which we named ‘the spectrum of comprehension’. In this paper, we present and analyse the correlation between students' declared comprehension of the content presented in the lecture and their final learning results.

  13. A survey of DNA diagnostic laboratories regarding DNA banking.

    PubMed

    McEwen, J E; Reilly, P R

    1995-06-01

    This article reports the findings of a survey of 148 academically based and commercial DNA diagnostic labs regarding DNA banking (defined as the storage of individual DNA samples in some form with identifiers for later retrieval). The population surveyed consisted of all laboratories listed with HELIX, a national directory of DNA diagnostic labs that includes a fairly comprehensive listing of clinical service labs as well as a large number of research labs. The survey was concerned primarily with the legal and ethical issues that the long-term storage of DNA may raise. The survey inquired into the respondents' policies and procedures concerning (1) the extent of DNA banking and of interest in developing DNA banking in academia and industry and (2) the degree to which DNA banks had developed written internal policies and/or a written depositor's agreement (a signed document defining the rights and obligations of the person from whom the sample was taken and the bank) designed to anticipate or prevent some of the ethical and legal problems that can arise from the long-term retention of DNA. Our research suggests that (1) the activity of DNA banking is growing, particularly in the academic setting, and (2) most academically based DNA banks lack written internal policies, written depositor's agreements, or other relevant documentation regarding important aspects of this activity.

  14. A survey of DNA diagnostic laboratories regarding DNA banking.

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, J E; Reilly, P R

    1995-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a survey of 148 academically based and commercial DNA diagnostic labs regarding DNA banking (defined as the storage of individual DNA samples in some form with identifiers for later retrieval). The population surveyed consisted of all laboratories listed with HELIX, a national directory of DNA diagnostic labs that includes a fairly comprehensive listing of clinical service labs as well as a large number of research labs. The survey was concerned primarily with the legal and ethical issues that the long-term storage of DNA may raise. The survey inquired into the respondents' policies and procedures concerning (1) the extent of DNA banking and of interest in developing DNA banking in academia and industry and (2) the degree to which DNA banks had developed written internal policies and/or a written depositor's agreement (a signed document defining the rights and obligations of the person from whom the sample was taken and the bank) designed to anticipate or prevent some of the ethical and legal problems that can arise from the long-term retention of DNA. Our research suggests that (1) the activity of DNA banking is growing, particularly in the academic setting, and (2) most academically based DNA banks lack written internal policies, written depositor's agreements, or other relevant documentation regarding important aspects of this activity. PMID:7762571

  15. Sequence variations of the locus-specific 5' untranslated regions of SLA class I genes and the development of a comprehensive genomic DNA-based high-resolution typing method for SLA-2.

    PubMed

    Choi, H; Le, M T; Lee, H; Choi, M-K; Cho, H-S; Nagasundarapandian, S; Kwon, O-J; Kim, J-H; Seo, K; Park, J-K; Lee, J-H; Ho, C-S; Park, C

    2015-10-01

    The genetic diversity of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules of pigs has not been well characterized. Therefore, the influence of MHC genetic diversity on the immune-related traits of pigs, including disease resistance and other MHC-dependent traits, is not well understood. Here, we attempted to develop an efficient method for systemic analysis of the polymorphisms in the epitope-binding region of swine leukocyte antigens (SLA) class I genes. We performed a comparative analysis of the last 92 bp of the 5' untranslated region (UTR) to the beginning of exon 4 of six SLA classical class I-related genes, SLA-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, and -9, from 36 different sequences. Based on this information, we developed a genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing-based comprehensive typing method for SLA-2. We successfully typed SLA-2 from 400 pigs and 8 cell lines, consisting of 9 different pig breeds, and identified 49 SLA-2 alleles, including 31 previously reported alleles and 18 new alleles. We observed differences in the composition of SLA-2 alleles among different breeds. Our method can be used to study other SLA class I loci and to deepen our knowledge of MHC class I genes in pigs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The significant role of the intermolecular CH⋯O/N hydrogen bonds in governing the biologically important pairs of the DNA and RNA modified bases: a comprehensive theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Yurenko, Yevgen P; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-01-01

    contribution of the CH⋯O and CH⋯N H-bonds into the base pairs stability varies from 3.0/4.2 to 35.1/31.2% and from 3.0/4.3 to 44.4/46.5% at the DFT/MP2 levels of theory, accordingly. Energy decomposition analysis performed for all base pairs involving canonical and modified nucleobases defines the electrostatic attraction and Pauli repulsion as dominant stabilizing forces in all complexes. This observation was additionally confirmed by the results of the QTAIM delocalization indexes analysis. The studies reported here advance our understanding of the biological role of the weak CH⋯O/N H-bonds, that dictates the requirements for the structural and dynamical similarity of the canonical and mismatched pairs with Watson-Crick (WC) geometry, which facilitates their enzymatic incorporation into the DNA double helix during DNA replication. Thus, these H-bonds in the base pairs with WC geometry may be also considered as "the last drop" at the transmission of the electronic signal that launches the chemical incorporation of the incoming nucleoside triphosphate into DNA.

  17. A comprehensive transcript index of the human genome generated using microarrays and computational approaches

    PubMed Central

    Schadt, Eric E; Edwards, Stephen W; GuhaThakurta, Debraj; Holder, Dan; Ying, Lisa; Svetnik, Vladimir; Leonardson, Amy; Hart, Kyle W; Russell, Archie; Li, Guoya; Cavet, Guy; Castle, John; McDonagh, Paul; Kan, Zhengyan; Chen, Ronghua; Kasarskis, Andrew; Margarint, Mihai; Caceres, Ramon M; Johnson, Jason M; Armour, Christopher D; Garrett-Engele, Philip W; Tsinoremas, Nicholas F; Shoemaker, Daniel D

    2004-01-01

    Background Computational and microarray-based experimental approaches were used to generate a comprehensive transcript index for the human genome. Oligonucleotide probes designed from approximately 50,000 known and predicted transcript sequences from the human genome were used to survey transcription from a diverse set of 60 tissues and cell lines using ink-jet microarrays. Further, expression activity over at least six conditions was more generally assessed using genomic tiling arrays consisting of probes tiled through a repeat-masked version of the genomic sequence making up chromosomes 20 and 22. Results The combination of microarray data with extensive genome annotations resulted in a set of 28,456 experimentally supported transcripts. This set of high-confidence transcripts represents the first experimentally driven annotation of the human genome. In addition, the results from genomic tiling suggest that a large amount of transcription exists outside of annotated regions of the genome and serves as an example of how this activity could be measured on a genome-wide scale. Conclusions These data represent one of the most comprehensive assessments of transcriptional activity in the human genome and provide an atlas of human gene expression over a unique set of gene predictions. Before the annotation of the human genome is considered complete, however, the previously unannotated transcriptional activity throughout the genome must be fully characterized. PMID:15461792

  18. Achieving comprehensive critical care.

    PubMed

    Derham, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    The policy document, Comprehensive Critical Care, suggested that patients with critical care needs should expect the same standard of care wherever they are nursed, be that in a traditional critical care setting or in a general ward area. It is recognized that in order for this to occur, the developmental needs of ward nurses need to be met to enable them to care for patients with level 1 and level 2 needs. A second document, The Nursing Contribution to the Provision of Comprehensive Critical Care for Adults: A strategic Programme of Action, proposed a programme of action and outlined five priority areas to be considered to ensure the success of comprehensive critical care. Education, training and workforce development was one of the areas outlined, and thus, in response, the role of the practice development facilitator was created as a means of developing the critical care knowledge, skills and practice in ward areas. It became apparent that education and training alone were insufficient to ensure that the aims of comprehensive critical care were realized. The way in which the nurses approached and organized their work and the availability of resources had a great impact on the ability of staff to care for these patients. It is argued that achieving comprehensive critical care is complex and that a multi-dimensional approach to the implementation of policy is essential in order to realize its aims.

  19. Support for comprehensive reuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, V. R.; Rombach, H. D.

    1991-01-01

    Reuse of products, processes, and other knowledge will be the key to enable the software industry to achieve the dramatic improvement in productivity and quality required to satisfy the anticipated growing demands. Although experience shows that certain kinds of reuse can be successful, general success has been elusive. A software life-cycle technology which allows comprehensive reuse of all kinds of software-related experience could provide the means to achieving the desired order-of-magnitude improvements. A comprehensive framework of models, model-based characterization schemes, and support mechanisms for better understanding, evaluating, planning, and supporting all aspects of reuse are introduced.

  20. Allele-specific DNA methylation: beyond imprinting.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Benjamin

    2010-10-15

    Allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM) and allele-specific gene expression (ASE) have long been studied in genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation. But these types of allelic asymmetries, along with allele-specific transcription factor binding (ASTF), have turned out to be far more pervasive-affecting many non-imprinted autosomal genes in normal human tissues. ASM, ASE and ASTF have now been mapped genome-wide by microarray-based methods and NextGen sequencing. Multiple studies agree that all three types of allelic asymmetries, as well as the related phenomena of expression and methylation quantitative trait loci, are mostly accounted for by cis-acting regulatory polymorphisms. The precise mechanisms by which this occurs are not yet understood, but there are some testable hypotheses and already a few direct clues. Future challenges include achieving higher resolution maps to locate the epicenters of cis-regulated ASM, using this information to test mechanistic models, and applying genome-wide maps of ASE/ASM/ASTF to pinpoint functional regulatory polymorphisms influencing disease susceptibility.

  1. Cognitive Correlates of Listening Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Young-Suk; Phillips, Beth

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to understand cognitive foundations of oral language comprehension (i.e., listening comprehension), we examined how inhibitory control, theory of mind, and comprehension monitoring are uniquely related to listening comprehension over and above vocabulary and age. A total of 156 children in kindergarten and first grade from…

  2. Cognitive Correlates of Listening Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Young-Suk; Phillips, Beth

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to understand cognitive foundations of oral language comprehension (i.e., listening comprehension), we examined how inhibitory control, theory of mind, and comprehension monitoring are uniquely related to listening comprehension over and above vocabulary and age. A total of 156 children in kindergarten and first grade from…

  3. Assessing Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingner, Janette K.

    2004-01-01

    Generally, experts agree on what good readers do to comprehend text--they connect new text with past experiences, interpret, evaluate, synthesize, and consider alternative interpretations. Yet, traditional measures of reading comprehension only provide a general indicator of how well a student understands text. They do not provide information…

  4. Comprehensive Trail Making Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    The Comprehensive Trail Making Test (CTMT) is designed to be used in neuropsychological assessment for the purposes of detecting effects of brain defects and deficits and in tracking progress in rehabilitation. More specific purposes include the detection of frontal lobe deficits, problems with psychomotor speed, visual search and sequencing,…

  5. The Comprehensive Health Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastern Iowa Community Coll. District, Davenport.

    This report contains information from a fall 1991 health occupations assessment of 1,021 health-related employers in Eastern Iowa and the Illinois Quad Cities area. Twelve chapters present comprehensive results of all surveys; results of 10 labor market survey instruments developed for chiropractic offices, dentists' offices, emergency medical…

  6. Cinnarizine: Comprehensive Profile.

    PubMed

    Haress, Nadia G

    2015-01-01

    Cinnarizine is a piperazine derivative with antihistaminic, antiserotonergic, antidopaminergic, and calcium channel-blocking activities. A comprehensive profile was performed on cinnarizine including its description and the different methods of analysis. The 1H NMR and 13C one- and two-dimensional NMR methods were used. In addition, infrared and mass spectral analyses were performed which all confirmed the structure of cinnarizine.

  7. Reading Comprehension in Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuentes, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Argues that mathematics instruction is dependent not just on numbers and their manipulation, but on language, literacy, and comprehension. Uses original examples of mathematical texts to map out a rationale for the teaching of reading in math, and includes a range of practical suggestions for the math teacher that support the "spiraling" of…

  8. Designing a Comprehensive Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, T. L.

    1970-01-01

    A comprehensive rural "agribusiness industry" curriculum might include: (1) The World of Work (Grade 7 or 8), (2) Vocational Orientation (Grade 9), (3) Basic Agriculture and Industry (Grade 10), (4) Specialized Agribusiness Industry (Grade 11), and (5) Advanced Agribusiness Industry (Grade 12). (DM)

  9. Comprehensive Trail Making Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    The Comprehensive Trail Making Test (CTMT) is designed to be used in neuropsychological assessment for the purposes of detecting effects of brain defects and deficits and in tracking progress in rehabilitation. More specific purposes include the detection of frontal lobe deficits, problems with psychomotor speed, visual search and sequencing,…

  10. COMMUNICATION AND COMPREHENSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TRENAMAN, J.M.

    A SERIES OF BRITISH IMPACT STUDIES DEALT WITH ADULT AUDIENCE CHARACTERISTICS (COMPREHENSION, KNOWLEDGE, INTERESTS, ATTITUDES) AND FACTORS WITHIN THE MEDIUM THAT MAKE FOR EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION. FIVE DIFFERENT TYPES OF SUBJECT MATTER WERE PRESENTED TO MATCHED SAMPLES OF THE GENERAL PUBLIC BY MEANS OF RADIO, TELEVISION, AND PRINTED ARTICLES. THE…

  11. COMPREHENSIVE JUNIOR COLLEGES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NIKITAS, CHRISTUS M.; AND OTHERS

    TO MEET THE STATE'S HIGHER EDUCATION NEEDS, THE NEW HAMPSHIRE JUNIOR COLLEGE COMMISSION DEVELOPED A PLAN OF (1) GRADUAL AND SELECTIVE CONVERSION OF THE STATE'S TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS TO COMPREHENSIVE JUNIOR COLLEGES, (2) SELECTIVE ADDITION OF 2-YEAR PROGRAMS AT THE STATE COLLEGES AND INSTITUTES, AND (3) ESTABLISHMENT OF A STATE…

  12. Reading Comprehension Idea Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broward, Charles; And Others

    The 32 ideas for activities described in this document have been collected to help the reading teacher to teach reading comprehension skills. Activities, listed according to their purpose, concentrate on specific skill areas which give children difficulty, such as following directions, finding the main idea, recognizing sequence, understanding…

  13. Comprehensive Developmental Team Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pokorni, Judith

    The handbook explains the concept and operation of the Comprehensive Developmental Team (CDT) in screening, evaluating and planning for children with special needs in Head Start Programs. Considered are the following aspects of the CDT program: establishing a team (composed of such members as health coordinator, Head Start Director,…

  14. Writing for Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Randy; Pearman, Cathy; Hail, Cindy; Hurst, Beth

    2007-01-01

    Many educators continue to treat reading and writing as separate subjects. In response to this observation, the authors offer four research-based writing strategies that teachers can use to improve student reading comprehension through writing. The writing strategies--"About/Point", "Cubing", "Four Square Graphic Organizer", and "Read," "Respond",…

  15. Writing for Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Randy; Pearman, Cathy; Hail, Cindy; Hurst, Beth

    2007-01-01

    Many educators continue to treat reading and writing as separate subjects. In response to this observation, the authors offer four research-based writing strategies that teachers can use to improve student reading comprehension through writing. The writing strategies--"About/Point", "Cubing", "Four Square Graphic Organizer", and "Read," "Respond",…

  16. Math Sense: Comprehensive Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Cathy Fillmore

    This book features a comprehensive review of the Math Sense series and is designed to help students gain the range of math skills they need to succeed in life, work, and on standardized tests; overcome math anxiety; discover math as interesting and purposeful; and develop good number sense. Topics covered in this book include whole numbers;…

  17. Imagery and Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Rose

    If people can evoke mental images when listening to a story, they can extend the process by turning words on a printed page into speech and evoke images for the "speech on the page." This is an exercise for reading comprehension that does not come naturally but can be worked on deliberately. A few moments of self-observation, when…

  18. Comprehension Strategy Gloves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Gayle

    2002-01-01

    Describes the idea of creating a glove for each of the comprehension strategies for use with different text structures. Notes that the gloves serve as a multisensory approach by providing visual clues through icons on each finger and the palm. Discusses three different gloves: the prereading glove, the narrative text structure glove, and the…

  19. DNA Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2002-11-01

    DNA is one candidate of promising molecules for molecular electronic devices, since it has the double helix structure with pi-electron bases for electron transport, the address at 0.4 nm intervals, and the self-assembly. Electrical conductivity and nanostructure of DNA and modified DNA molecules are investigated in order to research the application of DNA in nanoelectronic devices. It has been revealed that DNA is a wide-gap semiconductor in the absence of doping. The conductivity of DNA has been controlled by chemical doping, electric field doping, and photo-doping. It has found that Poly(dG)[middle dot]Poly(dC) has the best conductivity and can function as a conducting nanowire. The pattern of DNA network is controlled by changing the concentration of the DNA solution.

  20. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  1. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  2. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  3. Comprehension Monitoring and Reading Comprehension in Bilingual Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolic-Vehovec, Svjetlana; Bajsanski, Igor

    2007-01-01

    This study explored comprehension monitoring, use of reading strategies and reading comprehension of bilingual students at different levels of perceived proficiency in Italian. The participants were bilingual fifth to eighth-grade elementary school students from four Italian schools in Rijeka, Croatia. Students' reading comprehension was assessed.…

  4. A whole-genome mouse BAC microarray with 1-Mb resolution for analysis of DNA copy number changes by array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yeun-Jun; Jonkers, Jos; Kitson, Hannah; Fiegler, Heike; Humphray, Sean; Scott, Carol; Hunt, Sarah; Yu, Yuejin; Nishijima, Ichiko; Velds, Arno; Holstege, Henne; Carter, Nigel; Bradley, Allan

    2004-01-01

    Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) has become a powerful method for the genome-wide detection of chromosomal imbalances. Although BAC microarrays have been used for mouse CGH studies, the resolving power of these analyses was limited because high-density whole-genome mouse BAC microarrays were not available. We therefore developed a mouse BAC microarray containing 2803 unique BAC clones from mouse genomic libraries at 1-Mb intervals. For the general amplification of BAC clone DNA prior to spotting, we designed a set of three novel degenerate oligonucleotide-primed (DOP) PCR primers that preferentially amplify mouse genomic sequences while minimizing unwanted amplification of contaminating Escherichia coli DNA. The resulting 3K mouse BAC microarrays reproducibly identified DNA copy number alterations in cell lines and primary tumors, such as single-copy deletions, regional amplifications, and aneuploidy.

  5. A molecular bar-coded DNA repair resource for pooled toxicogenomic screens.

    PubMed

    Rooney, John P; Patil, Ashish; Zappala, Maria R; Conklin, Douglas S; Cunningham, Richard P; Begley, Thomas J

    2008-11-01

    DNA damage from exogenous and endogenous sources can promote mutations and cell death. Fortunately, cells contain DNA repair and damage signaling pathways to reduce the mutagenic and cytotoxic effects of DNA damage. The identification of specific DNA repair proteins and the coordination of DNA repair pathways after damage has been a central theme to the field of genetic toxicology and we have developed a tool for use in this area. We have produced 99 molecular bar-coded Escherichia coli gene-deletion mutants specific to DNA repair and damage signaling pathways, and each bar-coded mutant can be tracked in pooled format using bar-code specific microarrays. Our design adapted bar-codes developed for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene-deletion project, which allowed us to utilize an available microarray product for pooled gene-exposure studies. Microarray-based screens were used for en masse identification of individual mutants sensitive to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). As expected, gene-deletion mutants specific to direct, base excision, and recombinational DNA repair pathways were identified as MMS-sensitive in our pooled assay, thus validating our resource. We have demonstrated that molecular bar-codes designed for S. cerevisiae are transferable to E. coli, and that they can be used with pre-existing microarrays to perform competitive growth experiments. Further, when comparing microarray to traditional plate-based screens both overlapping and distinct results were obtained, which is a novel technical finding, with discrepancies between the two approaches explained by differences in output measurements (DNA content versus cell mass). The microarray-based classification of Deltatag and DeltadinG cells as depleted after MMS exposure, contrary to plate-based methods, led to the discovery that Deltatag and DeltadinG cells show a filamentation phenotype after MMS exposure, thus accounting for the discrepancy. A novel biological finding is the observation that while

  6. DNA Flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widom, Jonathan

    2005-03-01

    Classic experimental and theoretical analyses led to a unified view of DNA as a semiflexible polymer, characterized by a bending persistence length, P, ˜50 nm (˜150 bp). In this view, DNA lengths that are greater than P are, on average, spontaneously gently bent, and require relatively little force to bend significantly, while DNA lengths that are shorter than P are nearly straight, and require great force to bend significantly. Nevertheless, sharply bent DNA plays important roles in biology. We used the method of ligase catalyzed DNA cyclization to investigate the spontaneous looping of short DNAs. Remarkably, DNAs as short as 84 bp spontaneously bend into circles, and 94 bp DNA sequences cyclize up to 10^5 times more easily than predicted from classic theories of DNA bending. In subsequent studies we find that the twistability of sharply looped DNAs exceeds the prediction of classic theories by up to 400-fold. These results can only be understood by greatly enhanced DNA flexibility, not by permanent bends. Our results provide striking support for two new theories of DNA mechanics based on local melted or kinked regions, and they establish DNA as an active participant in the formation and function of looped regulatory complexes in vivo.

  7. Gout: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Rymal, Eric; Rizzolo, Denise

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence of gout in the US population is steadily increasing. Genome-wide research has found several variants of DNA sequences that predispose patients to irregular uric acid metabolism. Comorbidities linked to gout include obesity and cardiovascular disease. Though the formal diagnosis is made with arthrocentesis and subsequent analysis, CT and ultrasound findings supplement the diagnosis and monitor disease management. Newer immunologic agents are available for patients whose disease is refractory to standard therapy.

  8. DNA Methylation in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pries, Lotta-Katrin; Gülöksüz, Sinan; Kenis, Gunter

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable psychiatric condition that displays a complex phenotype. A multitude of genetic susceptibility loci have now been identified, but these fail to explain the high heritability estimates of schizophrenia. In addition, epidemiologically relevant environmental risk factors for schizophrenia may lead to permanent changes in brain function. In conjunction with genetic liability, these environmental risk factors-likely through epigenetic mechanisms-may give rise to schizophrenia, a clinical syndrome characterized by florid psychotic symptoms and moderate to severe cognitive impairment. These pathophysiological features point to the involvement of epigenetic processes. Recently, a wave of studies examining aberrant DNA modifications in schizophrenia was published. This chapter aims to comprehensively review the current findings, from both candidate gene studies and genome-wide approaches, on DNA methylation changes in schizophrenia.

  9. Comprehensive multiplatform collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kundan; Wu, Xiaotao; Lennox, Jonathan; Schulzrinne, Henning G.

    2003-12-01

    We describe the architecture and implementation of our comprehensive multi-platform collaboration framework known as Columbia InterNet Extensible Multimedia Architecture (CINEMA). It provides a distributed architecture for collaboration using synchronous communications like multimedia conferencing, instant messaging, shared web-browsing, and asynchronous communications like discussion forums, shared files, voice and video mails. It allows seamless integration with various communication means like telephones, IP phones, web and electronic mail. In addition, it provides value-added services such as call handling based on location information and presence status. The paper discusses the media services needed for collaborative environment, the components provided by CINEMA and the interaction among those components.

  10. Idiom Comprehension in Aphasic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papagno, Costanza; Tabossi, Patrizia; Colombo, Maria Rosa; Zampetti, Patrizia

    2004-01-01

    Idiom comprehension was assessed in 10 aphasic patients with semantic deficits by means of a string-to-picture matching task. Patients were also submitted to an oral explanation of the same idioms, and to a word comprehension task. The stimuli of this last task were the words following the verb in the idioms. Idiom comprehension was severely…

  11. Understanding and Teaching Cohesion Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Judith W., Ed.

    Concerned with improving student comprehension of text, this book focuses particularly on teaching students how sentences tie together. Articles in the three sections are grouped as follows: Part 1, What Is Cohesion Comprehension? contains "Cohesion, Coherence, and Comprehension" (Alden J. Moe and Judith W. Irwin); "Identifying…

  12. Assessing Reading Comprehension in Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    August, Diane; Francis, David J.; Hsu, Han-Ya Annie; Snow, Catherine E.

    2006-01-01

    A new measure of reading comprehension, the Diagnostic Assessment of Reading Comprehension (DARC), designed to reflect central comprehension processes while minimizing decoding and language demands, was pilot tested. We conducted three pilot studies to assess the DARC's feasibility, reliability, comparability across Spanish and English,…

  13. Children's Comprehension of Natural Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Graeme

    This paper reviews current literature concerning the development of children's comprehension of the processes of natural languages and it recommends a new study approach designed to evaluate the joint effects of lexical and syntactic devices on comprehension. It discusses three main kinds of investigations--studies of the comprehension of…

  14. CPMs: A Kinesthetic Comprehension Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Cathy Collins; Parris, Sheri R.; Whiteley, Cinnamon S.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses a study to determine whether primary grade students can learn comprehension processes via hand motions to portray these mental processes. Comprehension Process Motions (CPMs) were designed to provide students with a way to make abstract comprehension processes more consciously accessible and also to give teachers a way to…

  15. Understanding and Teaching Cohesion Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Judith W., Ed.

    Concerned with improving student comprehension of text, this book focuses particularly on teaching students how sentences tie together. Articles in the three sections are grouped as follows: Part 1, What Is Cohesion Comprehension? contains "Cohesion, Coherence, and Comprehension" (Alden J. Moe and Judith W. Irwin); "Identifying…

  16. CPMs: A Kinesthetic Comprehension Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Cathy Collins; Parris, Sheri R.; Whiteley, Cinnamon S.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses a study to determine whether primary grade students can learn comprehension processes via hand motions to portray these mental processes. Comprehension Process Motions (CPMs) were designed to provide students with a way to make abstract comprehension processes more consciously accessible and also to give teachers a way to…

  17. Priming Ditransitive Structures in Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arai, Manabu; van Gompel, Roger P. G.; Scheepers, Cristoph

    2007-01-01

    Many studies have shown evidence for syntactic priming during language production (e.g., Bock, 1986). It is often assumed that comprehension and production share similar mechanisms and that priming also occurs during comprehension (e.g., Pickering & Garrod, 2004). Research investigating priming during comprehension (e.g., Branigan et al., 2005 and…

  18. DNA Camouflage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-08

    1 DNA Camouflage Supplementary Information Bijan Zakeri1,2*, Timothy K. Lu1,2*, Peter A. Carr2,3* 1Department of Electrical Engineering and...ll.mit.edu). Distribution A: Public Release   2 Supplementary Figure 1 DNA camouflage with the 2-state device. (a) In the presence of Cre, DSD-2[α...Supplementary Figure 2 DNA shuffling does not comprise sequencing outside of DSDs. (a) Sequencing of 1 kb downstream of DSD-2[α] produces high quality

  19. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  20. Comprehensive transcriptome analysis identifies pathways with therapeutic potential in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Campos-Parra, Alma Delia; Padua-Bracho, Alejandra; Pedroza-Torres, Abraham; Figueroa-González, Gabriela; Fernández-Retana, Jorge; Millan-Catalan, Oliver; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Cantú de León, David; Herrera, Luis A; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to provide genomic and transcriptomic information that may improve clinical outcomes for locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) patients by searching for therapeutic targets or potential biomarkers through the analysis of significantly altered signaling pathways in LACC. Microarray-based transcriptome profiling of 89 tumor samples from women with LACC was performed. Through Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis, significantly over-expressed genes in LACC were identified; these genes were validated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in an independent cohort, and the protein expression data were obtained from the Human Protein Atlas. A transcriptome analysis revealed 7530 significantly over-expressed genes in LACC samples. By KEGG analysis, we found 93 dysregulated signaling pathways, including the JAK-STAT, NOTCH and mTOR-autophagy pathways, which were significantly upregulated. We confirmed the overexpression of the relevant genes of each pathway, such as NOTCH1, JAK2, STAM1, SOS1, ADAM17, PSEN1, NCSTN, RPS6, STK11/LKB1 and MLTS8/GBL in LACC compared with normal cervical tissue epithelia. Through comprehensive genomic and transcriptomic analyses, this work provides information regarding signaling pathways with promising therapeutic targets, suggesting novel target therapies to be considered in future clinical trials for LACC patients. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of a fibrous DNA chip for cost-effective β-thalassemia genotyping.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Wakako; Osaka, Takashi; Sekizawa, Akihiko; Kitagawa, Michihiro; Honma, Ikuo

    2012-09-01

    β-thalassemia is one of the most common genetic disorders worldwide. Concerted efforts are being made to prevent the disease, as the medical and economic burden of thalassemia represents a major public health problem. The molecular diagnosis of the β-globin mutations that cause the disease currently involves a combination of classic methodologies. A microarray-based assay for parallel one-shot detection of mutations has been developed, but the assay remains too expensive for routine application. We developed a cost-effective plastic fiber-based DNA chip for the fast and reliable detection of 25 types of β-thalassemia mutations. Assay conditions were established and genotyping was successfully performed on a genomic sample from a β-thalassemia patient. Our data show that this β-thalassemia genotyping chip is an advantageous platform for mass genotyping because of its low cost, rapid results, and reliability.

  2. The comprehensive peptaibiotics database.

    PubMed

    Stoppacher, Norbert; Neumann, Nora K N; Burgstaller, Lukas; Zeilinger, Susanne; Degenkolb, Thomas; Brückner, Hans; Schuhmacher, Rainer

    2013-05-01

    Peptaibiotics are nonribosomally biosynthesized peptides, which - according to definition - contain the marker amino acid α-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) and possess antibiotic properties. Being known since 1958, a constantly increasing number of peptaibiotics have been described and investigated with a particular emphasis on hypocrealean fungi. Starting from the existing online 'Peptaibol Database', first published in 1997, an exhaustive literature survey of all known peptaibiotics was carried out and resulted in a list of 1043 peptaibiotics. The gathered information was compiled and used to create the new 'The Comprehensive Peptaibiotics Database', which is presented here. The database was devised as a software tool based on Microsoft (MS) Access. It is freely available from the internet at http://peptaibiotics-database.boku.ac.at and can easily be installed and operated on any computer offering a Windows XP/7 environment. It provides useful information on characteristic properties of the peptaibiotics included such as peptide category, group name of the microheterogeneous mixture to which the peptide belongs, amino acid sequence, sequence length, producing fungus, peptide subfamily, molecular formula, and monoisotopic mass. All these characteristics can be used and combined for automated search within the database, which makes The Comprehensive Peptaibiotics Database a versatile tool for the retrieval of valuable information about peptaibiotics. Sequence data have been considered as to December 14, 2012.

  3. Comprehensive national energy strategy

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This Comprehensive National Energy Strategy sets forth a set of five common sense goals for national energy policy: (1) improve the efficiency of the energy system, (2) ensure against energy disruptions, (3) promote energy production and use in ways that respect health and environmental values, (4) expand future energy choices, and (5) cooperate internationally on global issues. These goals are further elaborated by a series of objectives and strategies to illustrate how the goals will be achieved. Taken together, the goals, objectives, and strategies form a blueprint for the specific programs, projects, initiatives, investments, and other actions that will be developed and undertaken by the Federal Government, with significant emphasis on the importance of the scientific and technological advancements that will allow implementation of this Comprehensive National Energy Strategy. Moreover, the statutory requirement of regular submissions of national energy policy plans ensures that this framework can be modified to reflect evolving conditions, such as better knowledge of our surroundings, changes in energy markets, and advances in technology. This Strategy, then, should be thought of as a living document. Finally, this plan benefited from the comments and suggestions of numerous individuals and organizations, both inside and outside of government. The Summary of Public Comments, located at the end of this document, describes the public participation process and summarizes the comments that were received. 8 figs.

  4. A comprehensive simulation study on classification of RNA-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Zararsız, Gökmen; Goksuluk, Dincer; Korkmaz, Selcuk; Eldem, Vahap; Zararsiz, Gozde Erturk; Duru, Izzet Parug; Ozturk, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) is a powerful technique for the gene-expression profiling of organisms that uses the capabilities of next-generation sequencing technologies. Developing gene-expression-based classification algorithms is an emerging powerful method for diagnosis, disease classification and monitoring at molecular level, as well as providing potential markers of diseases. Most of the statistical methods proposed for the classification of gene-expression data are either based on a continuous scale (eg. microarray data) or require a normal distribution assumption. Hence, these methods cannot be directly applied to RNA-Seq data since they violate both data structure and distributional assumptions. However, it is possible to apply these algorithms with appropriate modifications to RNA-Seq data. One way is to develop count-based classifiers, such as Poisson linear discriminant analysis and negative binomial linear discriminant analysis. Another way is to bring the data closer to microarrays and apply microarray-based classifiers. In this study, we compared several classifiers including PLDA with and without power transformation, NBLDA, single SVM, bagging SVM (bagSVM), classification and regression trees (CART), and random forests (RF). We also examined the effect of several parameters such as overdispersion, sample size, number of genes, number of classes, differential-expression rate, and the transformation method on model performances. A comprehensive simulation study is conducted and the results are compared with the results of two miRNA and two mRNA experimental datasets. The results revealed that increasing the sample size, differential-expression rate and decreasing the dispersion parameter and number of groups lead to an increase in classification accuracy. Similar with differential-expression studies, the classification of RNA-Seq data requires careful attention when handling data overdispersion. We conclude that, as a count-based classifier, the power

  5. Multiplex cDNA quantification method that facilitates the standardization of gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Gotoh, Osamu; Murakami, Yasufumi; Suyama, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Microarray-based gene expression measurement is one of the major methods for transcriptome analysis. However, current microarray data are substantially affected by microarray platforms and RNA references because of the microarray method can provide merely the relative amounts of gene expression levels. Therefore, valid comparisons of the microarray data require standardized platforms, internal and/or external controls and complicated normalizations. These requirements impose limitations on the extensive comparison of gene expression data. Here, we report an effective approach to removing the unfavorable limitations by measuring the absolute amounts of gene expression levels on common DNA microarrays. We have developed a multiplex cDNA quantification method called GEP-DEAN (Gene expression profiling by DCN-encoding-based analysis). The method was validated by using chemically synthesized DNA strands of known quantities and cDNA samples prepared from mouse liver, demonstrating that the absolute amounts of cDNA strands were successfully measured with a sensitivity of 18 zmol in a highly multiplexed manner in 7 h. PMID:21415008

  6. Viral Discovery and Sequence Recovery Using DNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David; Urisman, Anatoly; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Springer, Michael; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Erdman, Dean D; Mardis, Elaine R; Hickenbotham, Matthew; Magrini, Vincent; Eldred, James; Latreille, J. Phillipe; Wilson, Richard K; Ganem, Don

    2003-01-01

    Because of the constant threat posed by emerging infectious diseases and the limitations of existing approaches used to identify new pathogens, there is a great demand for new technological methods for viral discovery. We describe herein a DNA microarray-based platform for novel virus identification and characterization. Central to this approach was a DNA microarray designed to detect a wide range of known viruses as well as novel members of existing viral families; this microarray contained the most highly conserved 70mer sequences from every fully sequenced reference viral genome in GenBank. During an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in March 2003, hybridization to this microarray revealed the presence of a previously uncharacterized coronavirus in a viral isolate cultivated from a SARS patient. To further characterize this new virus, approximately 1 kb of the unknown virus genome was cloned by physically recovering viral sequences hybridized to individual array elements. Sequencing of these fragments confirmed that the virus was indeed a new member of the coronavirus family. This combination of array hybridization followed by direct viral sequence recovery should prove to be a general strategy for the rapid identification and characterization of novel viruses and emerging infectious disease. PMID:14624234

  7. Visualizing spatiotemporal dynamics of apoptosis after G1 arrest by human T cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax and insights into gene expression changes using microarray-based gene expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax is a potent activator of viral and cellular gene expression that interacts with a number of cellular proteins. Many reports show that Tax is capable of regulating cell cycle progression and apoptosis both positively and negatively. However, it still remains to understand why the Tax oncoprotein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, or whether Tax-induced apoptosis is dependent upon its ability to induce G1 arrest. The present study used time-lapse imaging to explore the spatiotemporal patterns of cell cycle dynamics in Tax-expressing HeLa cells containing the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator, Fucci2. A large-scale host cell gene profiling approach was also used to identify the genes involved in Tax-mediated cell signaling events related to cellular proliferation and apoptosis. Results Tax-expressing apoptotic cells showed a rounded morphology and detached from the culture dish after cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. Thus, it appears that Tax induces apoptosis through pathways identical to those involved in G1 arrest. To elucidate the mechanism(s) by which Tax induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, regulation of host cellular genes by Tax was analyzed using a microarray containing approximately 18,400 human mRNA transcripts. Seventeen genes related to cell cycle regulation were identified as being up or downregulated > 2.0-fold in Tax-expressing cells. Several genes, including SMAD3, JUN, GADD45B, DUSP1 and IL8, were involved in cellular proliferation, responses to cellular stress and DNA damage, or inflammation and immune responses. Additionally, 23 pro- and anti-apoptotic genes were deregulated by Tax, including TNFAIP3, TNFRS9, BIRC3 and IL6. Furthermore, the kinetics of IL8, SMAD3, CDKN1A, GADD45A, GADD45B and IL6 expression were altered following the induction of Tax, and correlated closely with the morphological changes observed by time-lapse imaging. Conclusions Taken

  8. The Validity of Reading Comprehension Rate: Reading Speed, Comprehension, and Comprehension Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Christopher H.; Williams, Jacqueline L.; Morrow, Jennifer Ann; Hale, Andre D.; Neddenriep, Christine E.; Hawkins, Renee O.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a secondary analysis of a brief reading comprehension rate measure, percent comprehension questions correct per minute spent reading (%C/M). This measure includes reading speed (seconds to read) in the denominator and percentage of comprehension questions answered correctly in the numerator. Participants were 22 4th-, 29…

  9. Covalently linked tandem lesions in DNA.

    PubMed

    Patrzyc, Helen B; Dawidzik, Jean B; Budzinski, Edwin E; Freund, Harold G; Wilton, John H; Box, Harold C

    2012-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generate a type of DNA damage called tandem lesions, two adjacent nucleotides both modified. A subcategory of tandem lesions consists of adjacent nucleotides linked by a covalent bond. Covalently linked tandem lesions generate highly characteristic liquid chromotography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) elution profiles. We have used this property to comprehensively survey X-irradiated DNA for covalently linked tandem lesions. A total of 15 tandem lesions were detected in DNA irradiated in deoxygenated aqueous solution, five tandem lesions were detected in DNA that was irradiated in oxygenated solution.

  10. Covalently Linked Tandem Lesions in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Patrzyc, Helen B.; Dawidzik, Jean B.; Budzinski, Edwin E.; Freund, Harold G.; Wilton, John H.; Box, Harold C.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generate a type of DNA damage called tandem lesions, two adjacent nucleotides both modified. A subcategory of tandem lesions consists of adjacent nucleotides linked by a covalent bond. Covalently linked tandem lesions generate highly characteristic liquid chromotography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) elution profiles. We have used this property to comprehensively survey X-irradiated DNA for covalently linked tandem lesions. A total of 15 tandem lesions were detected in DNA irradiated in deoxygenated aqueous solution, five tandem lesions were detected in DNA that was irradiated in oxygenated solution. PMID:23106212

  11. Comprehensive GMO detection using real-time PCR array: single-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Mano, Junichi; Harada, Mioko; Takabatake, Reona; Furui, Satoshi; Kitta, Kazumi; Nakamura, Kosuke; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Noritake, Hiromichi; Hatano, Shuko; Futo, Satoshi; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Iizuka, Tayoshi

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a real-time PCR array method to comprehensively detect genetically modified (GM) organisms. In the method, genomic DNA extracted from an agricultural product is analyzed using various qualitative real-time PCR assays on a 96-well PCR plate, targeting for individual GM events, recombinant DNA (r-DNA) segments, taxon-specific DNAs, and donor organisms of the respective r-DNAs. In this article, we report the single-laboratory validation of both DNA extraction methods and component PCR assays constituting the real-time PCR array. We selected some DNA extraction methods for specified plant matrixes, i.e., maize flour, soybean flour, and ground canola seeds, then evaluated the DNA quantity, DNA fragmentation, and PCR inhibition of the resultant DNA extracts. For the component PCR assays, we evaluated the specificity and LOD. All DNA extraction methods and component PCR assays satisfied the criteria set on the basis of previous reports.

  12. DNA ligases.

    PubMed

    Tabor, S

    2001-05-01

    DNA ligases catalyze the formation of phosphodiester bonds between juxtaposed 5' phosphate and a 3'-hydroxyl terminus in duplex DNA. This activity can repair single-stranded nicks in duplex DNA and join duplex DNA restriction fragments having either blunt ends or homologous cohesive ends. Two ligases are used for nucleic acid research and their reaction conditions and applications are described in this unit: E. coli ligase and T4 ligase. These enzymes differ in two important properties. One is the source of energy: T4 ligase uses ATP, while E. coli ligase uses NAD. Another important difference is their ability to ligate blunt ends; under normal reaction conditions, only T4 DNA ligase will ligate blunt ends.

  13. Comprehensive Gerontological Development

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Maldonado, María de la Luz; Vivaldo-Martínez, Marissa; Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Human aging can only be understood within its social and historical contexts. It is largely determined by the complex interrelation of biological, cultural, social, political, and economic factors. Furthermore, the phenomenon of population aging can be considered as a social and economic burden or as an invaluable social asset if understood within the perspective of the enormous potential of our aging populations. This article is based on the tenet that aging can be an enriching and productive stage marked by a lifelong process of personal growth and development. That is, in our perspective, ageing should become a process oriented toward the improvement and promotion of the individual’s physical, psychological, and social potentialities to achieve the highest quality of life. The purpose of this article is to introduce the concept and practice of Comprehensive Gerontological Development that underlie current research at the Gerontological Research Unit of the Zaragoza Campus of the National Autonomous University of Mexico. PMID:28913371

  14. Comprehension of discharge instructions.

    PubMed

    Gilboy, Nicki; Howard, Patricia Kunz

    2009-01-01

    The Research to Practice column attempts to serve two purposes: (1) fine-tune the research critique skills of advanced practice nurses and (2) suggest strategies to translate findings from a research study into bedside practice. For each column, a topic and a particular research study are selected. The stage is set by introducing the importance of the topic. The research paper is then reviewed and critiqued, and finally, the implications for translation into practice are discussed. This particular column reviews the article: Engel, K., Heisler, M., Smith, D., Robinson, C., Forman, J., & Ubel, P. (in press). Patient comprehension of emergency department care and instructions: Are patients aware of when they do not understand? Annals of Emergency Medicine.

  15. Analysis of DNA methylation change induced by Dnmt3b in mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mayumi; Kamei, Yasutomi; Ehara, Tatsuya; Yuan, Xunmei; Suganami, Takayoshi; Takai-Igarashi, Takako; Hatada, Izuho; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2013-05-17

    DNA methylation is a key epigenetic contributor to gene regulation in mammals. We have recently found that in the mouse liver, the promoter region of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 1, a rate-limiting enzyme of de novo lipogenesis, is regulated by DNA methylation, which is mediated by Dnmt3b, an enzyme required for the initiation of de novo methylation. In this study, using primary cultures of mouse hepatocytes with adenoviral overexpression of Dnmt3b, we characterized Dnmt3b-dependent DNA methylation on a genome-wide basis. A genome-wide DNA methylation analysis, called microarray-based integrated analysis of methylation by isoschizomers, identified 108 genes with Dnmt3b dependent DNA methylation. In DNA expression array analysis, expression of some genes with Dnmt3b-dependent DNA methylation was suppressed. Studies with primary mouse hepatocytes overexpressing Dnmt3b or Dnmt3a revealed that many genes with Dnmt3b-dependent methylation are not methylated by Dnmt3a, whereas those methylated by Dnmt3a are mostly methylated by Dnmt3b. Bioinformatic analysis showed that the CANAGCTG and CCGGWNCSC (N denotes A, T, G, or C; W denotes A or T; and S denotes C or G) sequences are enriched in genes methylated by overexpression of Dnmt3b and Dnmt3a, respectively. We also observed a large number of genes with Dnmt3b-dependent DNA methylation in primary cultures of mouse hepatocytes with adenoviral overexpression of Dnmt3, suggesting that Dnmt3b is an important DNA methyltransferase in primary mouse hepatocytes, targets specific genes, and potentially plays a role in vivo.

  16. Patenting DNA.

    PubMed

    Bobrow, Martin; Thomas, Sandy

    2002-12-01

    The protection of inventions based on human DNA sequences has been achieved mainly through application of the patent system. Over the past decade, there has been continuing debate about whether this use of intellectual property rights is acceptable. Companies and universities have been active during this period in filing thousands of patent applications. Although many have argued that to claim a DNA sequence in a patent is to claim a discovery, patent law allows discoveries that are useful to be claimed as part of an invention. As the technology to isolate DNA sequences has advanced, the criterion for inventiveness, necessary for any invention to be eligible for filing, has become more difficult to justify in the case of claims to DNA sequences. Moreover, the discovery that a gene is associated with a particular disease is, it is argued, to discover a fact about the world and undeserving of the status of an invention. Careful examination of the grounds for allowing the patenting of DNA sequences as research tools suggests such rewards will rarely be justified. The patenting of DNA sequences as chemical intermediates necessary for the manufacture of therapeutic proteins is, however, reasonable given that the information within the sequence is applied to produce a tangible substance which has application as a medicine. Despite the legal, technical and political complexities of applying the flexibilities with the current law, it is argued that much could be achieved in the area of patenting DNA by raising the thresholds for patentability.

  17. [DNA computing].

    PubMed

    Błasiak, Janusz; Krasiński, Tadeusz; Popławski, Tomasz; Sakowski, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Biocomputers can be an alternative for traditional "silicon-based" computers, which continuous development may be limited due to further miniaturization (imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle) and increasing the amount of information between the central processing unit and the main memory (von Neuman bottleneck). The idea of DNA computing came true for the first time in 1994, when Adleman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using short DNA oligomers and DNA ligase. In the early 2000s a series of biocomputer models was presented with a seminal work of Shapiro and his colleguas who presented molecular 2 state finite automaton, in which the restriction enzyme, FokI, constituted hardware and short DNA oligomers were software as well as input/output signals. DNA molecules provided also energy for this machine. DNA computing can be exploited in many applications, from study on the gene expression pattern to diagnosis and therapy of cancer. The idea of DNA computing is still in progress in research both in vitro and in vivo and at least promising results of these research allow to have a hope for a breakthrough in the computer science.

  18. DNA Labeling Using DNA Methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Tomkuvienė, Miglė; Kriukienė, Edita; Klimašauskas, Saulius

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases) uniquely combine the ability to recognize and covalently modify specific target sequences in DNA using the ubiquitous cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet). Although DNA methylation plays important roles in biological signaling, the transferred methyl group is a poor reporter and is highly inert to further biocompatible derivatization. To unlock the biotechnological power of these enzymes, two major types of cofactor AdoMet analogs were developed that permit targeted MTase-directed attachment of larger moieties containing functional or reporter groups onto DNA. One such approach (named sequence-specific methyltransferase-induced labeling, SMILing) uses reactive aziridine or N-mustard mimics of the cofactor AdoMet, which render targeted coupling of a whole cofactor molecule to the target DNA. The second approach (methyltransferase-directed transfer of activated groups, mTAG) uses AdoMet analogs with a sulfonium-bound extended side chain replacing the methyl group, which permits MTase-directed covalent transfer of the activated side chain alone. As the enlarged cofactors are not always compatible with the active sites of native MTases, steric engineering of the active site has been employed to optimize their alkyltransferase activity. In addition to the described cofactor analogs, recently discovered atypical reactions of DNA cytosine-5 MTases involving non-cofactor-like compounds can also be exploited for targeted derivatization and labeling of DNA. Altogether, these approaches offer new powerful tools for sequence-specific covalent DNA labeling, which not only pave the way to developing a variety of useful techniques in DNA research, diagnostics, and nanotechnologies but have already proven practical utility for optical DNA mapping and epigenome studies.

  19. Comprehensive Water-Efficiency Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate

    2015-07-15

    Energy performance contracts can be an effective way to integrate comprehensive water-efficient technologies and solutions into energy efficiency projects. Current practices often miss key opportunities to incorporate a full suite of water measures primarily because a comprehensive approach is not taken in the assessment. This article provides information on how to develop a comprehensive water project that leads to innovative solutions and potential for large water reduction.

  20. Dancing DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    An imaging technique that uses fluorescent dyes and allows scientists to track DNA as it moves through gels or in solution is described. The importance, opportunities, and implications of this technique are discussed. (KR)

  1. DNA Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Michael D.

    1997-01-01

    Explains a method to enable students to understand DNA and protein synthesis using model-building and role-playing. Acquaints students with the triplet code and transcription. Includes copies of the charts used in this technique. (DDR)

  2. Dancing DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    An imaging technique that uses fluorescent dyes and allows scientists to track DNA as it moves through gels or in solution is described. The importance, opportunities, and implications of this technique are discussed. (KR)

  3. Comprehensive eye evaluation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agurto, C.; Nemeth, S.; Zamora, G.; Vahtel, M.; Soliz, P.; Barriga, S.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, several research groups have developed automatic algorithms to detect diabetic retinopathy (DR) in individuals with diabetes (DM), using digital retinal images. Studies have indicated that diabetics have 1.5 times the annual risk of developing primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) as do people without DM. Moreover, DM patients have 1.8 times the risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Although numerous investigators are developing automatic DR detection algorithms, there have been few successful efforts to create an automatic algorithm that can detect other ocular diseases, such as POAG and AMD. Consequently, our aim in the current study was to develop a comprehensive eye evaluation algorithm that not only detects DR in retinal images, but also automatically identifies glaucoma suspects and AMD by integrating other personal medical information with the retinal features. The proposed system is fully automatic and provides the likelihood of each of the three eye disease. The system was evaluated in two datasets of 104 and 88 diabetic cases. For each eye, we used two non-mydriatic digital color fundus photographs (macula and optic disc centered) and, when available, information about age, duration of diabetes, cataracts, hypertension, gender, and laboratory data. Our results show that the combination of multimodal features can increase the AUC by up to 5%, 7%, and 8% in the detection of AMD, DR, and glaucoma respectively. Marked improvement was achieved when laboratory results were combined with retinal image features.

  4. Comprehensive facilities plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s Comprehensive Facilities Plan (CFP) document provides analysis and policy guidance for the effective use and orderly future development of land and capital assets at the Berkeley Lab site. The CFP directly supports Berkeley Lab`s role as a multiprogram national laboratory operated by the University of California (UC) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The CFP is revised annually on Berkeley Lab`s Facilities Planning Website. Major revisions are consistent with DOE policy and review guidance. Facilities planing is motivated by the need to develop facilities for DOE programmatic needs; to maintain, replace and rehabilitate existing obsolete facilities; to identify sites for anticipated programmatic growth; and to establish a planning framework in recognition of site amenities and the surrounding community. The CFP presents a concise expression of the policy for the future physical development of the Laboratory, based upon anticipated operational needs of research programs and the environmental setting. It is a product of the ongoing planning processes and is a dynamic information source.

  5. Comprehensiveness of Career Planning: The Third C--Comprehensiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, James V.

    1996-01-01

    To be comprehensive, a career guidance program must acknowledge a broader meaning of career. Attributes of comprehensive programs include a structured career planning process, activities at all levels K-adult, adequate support information, a documented plan for each participant, ongoing plan revision, equity, subjective and objective assessment…

  6. Unravelling DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Rs; Danilowicz, C.

    2004-04-01

    The forces involved in the biology of life are carefully balanced between stopping thermal fluctuations ripping our DNA apart and having bonds weak enough to allow enzymes to function. The application of recently developed techniques for measuring piconewton forces and imaging at the nanometre scale on a molecule-by-molecule basis has dramatically increased the impact of single-molecule biophysics. This article describes the most commonly used techniques for imaging and manipulating single biomolecules. Using these techniques, the mechanical properties of DNA can be investigated, for example through measurements of the forces required to stretch and unzip the DNA double helix. These properties determine the ease with which DNA can be folded into the cell nucleus and the size and complexity of the accompanying cellular machinery. Part of this cellular machinery is enzymes, which manipulate, repair and transcribe the DNA helix. Enzymatic function is increasingly being investigated at the single molecule level to give better understanding of the forces and processes involved in the genetic cycle. One of the challenges is to transfer this understanding of single molecules into living systems. Already there have been some notable successes, such as the development of techniques for gene expression through the application of mechanical forces to cells, and the imaging and control of viral infection of a cell. This understanding and control of DNA has also been used to design molecules, which can self-assemble into a range of structures.

  7. DNA barcode goes two-dimensions: DNA QR code web server.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Shi, Linchun; Xu, Xiaolan; Li, Huan; Xing, Hang; Liang, Dong; Jiang, Kun; Pang, Xiaohui; Song, Jingyuan; Chen, Shilin

    2012-01-01

    The DNA barcoding technology uses a standard region of DNA sequence for species identification and discovery. At present, "DNA barcode" actually refers to DNA sequences, which are not amenable to information storage, recognition, and retrieval. Our aim is to identify the best symbology that can represent DNA barcode sequences in practical applications. A comprehensive set of sequences for five DNA barcode markers ITS2, rbcL, matK, psbA-trnH, and CO1 was used as the test data. Fifty-three different types of one-dimensional and ten two-dimensional barcode symbologies were compared based on different criteria, such as coding capacity, compression efficiency, and error detection ability. The quick response (QR) code was found to have the largest coding capacity and relatively high compression ratio. To facilitate the further usage of QR code-based DNA barcodes, a web server was developed and is accessible at http://qrfordna.dnsalias.org. The web server allows users to retrieve the QR code for a species of interests, convert a DNA sequence to and from a QR code, and perform species identification based on local and global sequence similarities. In summary, the first comprehensive evaluation of various barcode symbologies has been carried out. The QR code has been found to be the most appropriate symbology for DNA barcode sequences. A web server has also been constructed to allow biologists to utilize QR codes in practical DNA barcoding applications.

  8. Atomic Force Microscopy for DNA SNP Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valbusa, Ugo; Ierardi, Vincenzo

    The knowledge of the effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human genome greatly contributes to better comprehension of the relation between genetic factors and diseases. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA in different individuals reveals positions where variations that involve individual base substitutions can occur. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms are highly abundant and can have different consequences at phenotypic level. Several attempts were made to apply atomic force microscopy (AFM) to detect and map SNP sites in DNA strands. The most promising approach is the study of DNA mutations producing heteroduplex DNA strands and identifying the mismatches by means of a protein that labels the mismatches. MutS is a protein that is part of a well-known complex of mismatch repair, which initiates the process of repairing when the MutS binds to the mismatched DNA filament. The position of MutS on the DNA filament can be easily recorded by means of AFM imaging.

  9. A comprehensive computational model of facilitated diffusion in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Zabet, Nicolae Radu; Adryan, Boris

    2012-06-01

    Gene activity is mediated by site-specific transcription factors (TFs). Their binding to defined regions in the genome determines the rate at which their target genes are transcribed. We present a comprehensive computational model of the search process of TF for their genomic target site(s). The computational model considers: the DNA sequence, various TF species and the interaction of the individual molecules with the DNA or between themselves. We also demonstrate a systematic approach how to parametrize the system using available experimental data.

  10. Pragmatic Comprehension Development through Telecollaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafieyan, Vahid; Sharafi-Nejad, Maryam; Khavari, Zahra; Eng, Lin Siew; Mohamed, Abdul Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Pragmatic comprehension can be ideally developed through contact with target language speakers. This contact can be provided in English as Foreign Language contexts through telecollaboration. To test the actual effect of telecollaboration on the development of pragmatic comprehension, 30 Iranian undergraduates of English as a Foreign Language…

  11. Listening Comprehension: The Learners' Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings of an investigation into the perceptions held by English students aged 16-18 years regarding listening comprehension in French and how they view the reasons behind their success or lack of it in this skill. The study suggests that listening comprehension is the skill in which students in the post-compulsory phase…

  12. Principles for Classroom Comprehension Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valencia, Sheila W.; Pearson, P. David

    1988-01-01

    Principles that should guide reading comprehension assessment include acknowledging the complexity of reading, focusing on orchestrating rather than isolating skills, regarding reading as a dynamic process, developing techniques that encourage student-teacher interactions, and using a variety of reading comprehension measures. The principles are…

  13. Reading Comprehension Strategy: Rainbow Dots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Claire; Lo, Lusa

    2008-01-01

    An action research study was conducted using the Rainbow Dots strategy to evaluate its effectiveness on reading comprehension skills in a third-grade class with students both with and without a specific learning disability. Results of the study indicated that students' overall performances in reading comprehension have increased. Students also…

  14. Learning to Teach Listening Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinkler, Trevor

    This article describes a course in listening comprehension methodology in a College of Education in Holland. The main concern of the article is to examine the teacher-trainer's organization of the students' learning process. The course is divided into three sections: (1) group discussion of the concept of listening comprehension; (2) discussion of…

  15. Reading Strategies and Hypertext Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmeron, Ladislao, Canas, Jose J.; Kintsch, Walter; Fajardo, Immaculada

    2005-01-01

    The literature on assessing the cognitive processes involved in hypertext comprehension during the past 15 years has yielded contradictory results. In this article we explore a possible factor affecting this situation, mainly the fact that previous works did not control for the potential effects on comprehension of reading strategies in hypertext.…

  16. Reading comprehension in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Murray, Laura L; Rutledge, Stefanie

    2014-05-01

    Although individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) self-report reading problems and experience difficulties in cognitive-linguistic functions that support discourse-level reading, prior research has primarily focused on sentence-level processing and auditory comprehension. Accordingly, the authors investigated the presence and nature of reading comprehension in PD, hypothesizing that (a) individuals with PD would display impaired accuracy and/or speed on reading comprehension tests and (b) reading performances would be correlated with cognitive test results. Eleven adults with PD and 9 age- and education-matched control participants completed tests that evaluated reading comprehension; general language and cognitive abilities; and aspects of attention, memory, and executive functioning. The PD group obtained significantly lower scores on several, but not all, reading comprehension, language, and cognitive measures. Memory, language, and disease severity were significantly correlated with reading comprehension for the PD group. Individuals in the early stages of PD without dementia or broad cognitive deficits can display reading comprehension difficulties, particularly for high- versus basic-level reading tasks. These reading difficulties are most closely related to memory, high-level language, and PD symptom severity status. The findings warrant additional research to delineate further the types and nature of reading comprehension impairments experienced by individuals with PD.

  17. The Challenges Facing Comprehensive Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitty, Clyde

    2005-01-01

    This article is an edited version of a talk written for delivery at a conference organized to celebrate 50 years of Kidbrooke Comprehensive School with the overall theme "The Comprehensive Ideal: Taking It Beyond the Individual School." Having honored the pioneering work at Kidbrooke, Clyde Chitty then takes a close look at three key issues: the…

  18. Expectation-Based Syntactic Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Roger

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of resource allocation as a source of processing difficulty in human sentence comprehension. The paper proposes a simple information-theoretic characterization of processing difficulty as the work incurred by resource reallocation during parallel, incremental, probabilistic disambiguation in sentence comprehension,…

  19. Artificial Intelligence and Language Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC. Basic Skills Group. Learning Div.

    The three papers in this volume concerning artificial intelligence and language comprehension were commissioned by the National Institute of Education to further the understanding of the cognitive processes that enable people to comprehend what they read. The first paper, "Artificial Intelligence and Language Comprehension," by Terry Winograd,…

  20. Comprehensive Guidance Programs That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gysbers, Norman C.; And Others

    This monograph describes how the comprehensive guidance model is transforming elementary-secondary school guidance and counseling programs in schools across the country. It incorporates the ideas and experiences of 12 guidance program developers in the actual use of the comprehensive guidance model in diverse school and cultural settings. The book…

  1. Reading Comprehension Strategy: Rainbow Dots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Claire; Lo, Lusa

    2008-01-01

    An action research study was conducted using the Rainbow Dots strategy to evaluate its effectiveness on reading comprehension skills in a third-grade class with students both with and without a specific learning disability. Results of the study indicated that students' overall performances in reading comprehension have increased. Students also…

  2. Basic Chad Arabic: Comprehension Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Absi, Samir Abu; Sinaud, Andre

    This text, principally designed for use in a three-volume course on Chad Arabic, complements the pre-speech and active phases of the course in that it provides the answers to comprehension exercises students are required to complete during the course. The comprehension exercises require that students listen to an instructor or tape and write…

  3. DNA Repair Pathways in Trypanosomatids: from DNA Repair to Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Genois, Marie-Michelle; Paquet, Eric R.; Laffitte, Marie-Claude N.; Maity, Ranjan; Rodrigue, Amélie

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY All living organisms are continuously faced with endogenous or exogenous stress conditions affecting genome stability. DNA repair pathways act as a defense mechanism, which is essential to maintain DNA integrity. There is much to learn about the regulation and functions of these mechanisms, not only in human cells but also equally in divergent organisms. In trypanosomatids, DNA repair pathways protect the genome against mutations but also act as an adaptive mechanism to promote drug resistance. In this review, we scrutinize the molecular mechanisms and DNA repair pathways which are conserved in trypanosomatids. The recent advances made by the genome consortiums reveal the complete genomic sequences of several pathogens. Therefore, using bioinformatics and genomic sequences, we analyze the conservation of DNA repair proteins and their key protein motifs in trypanosomatids. We thus present a comprehensive view of DNA repair processes in trypanosomatids at the crossroads of DNA repair and drug resistance. PMID:24600040

  4. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  5. Swabs to genomes: a comprehensive workflow

    PubMed Central

    Jospin, Guillaume; Darling, Aaron E.; Coil, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The sequencing, assembly, and basic analysis of microbial genomes, once a painstaking and expensive undertaking, has become much easier for research labs with access to standard molecular biology and computational tools. However, there are a confusing variety of options available for DNA library preparation and sequencing, and inexperience with bioinformatics can pose a significant barrier to entry for many who may be interested in microbial genomics. The objective of the present study was to design, test, troubleshoot, and publish a simple, comprehensive workflow from the collection of an environmental sample (a swab) to a published microbial genome; empowering even a lab or classroom with limited resources and bioinformatics experience to perform it. PMID:26020012

  6. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  7. Ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In the past two decades, ancient DNA research has progressed from the retrieval of small fragments of mitochondrial DNA from a few late Holocene specimens, to large-scale studies of ancient populations, phenotypically important nuclear loci, and even whole mitochondrial genome sequences of extinct species. However, the field is still regularly marred by erroneous reports, which underestimate the extent of contamination within laboratories and samples themselves. An improved understanding of these processes and the effects of damage on ancient DNA templates has started to provide a more robust basis for research. Recent methodological advances have included the characterization of Pleistocene mammal populations and discoveries of DNA preserved in ancient sediments. Increasingly, ancient genetic information is providing a unique means to test assumptions used in evolutionary and population genetics studies to reconstruct the past. Initial results have revealed surprisingly complex population histories, and indicate that modern phylogeographic studies may give misleading impressions about even the recent evolutionary past. With the advent and uptake of appropriate methodologies, ancient DNA is now positioned to become a powerful tool in biological research and is also evolving new and unexpected uses, such as in the search for extinct or extant life in the deep biosphere and on other planets. PMID:15875564

  8. Genotyping of Bacillus cereus strains by microarray-based resequencing.

    PubMed

    Zwick, Michael E; Kiley, Maureen P; Stewart, Andrew C; Mateczun, Alfred; Read, Timothy D

    2008-07-02

    The ability to distinguish microbial pathogens from closely related but nonpathogenic strains is key to understanding the population biology of these organisms. In this regard, Bacillus anthracis, the bacterium that causes inhalational anthrax, is of interest because it is closely related and often difficult to distinguish from other members of the B. cereus group that can cause diverse diseases. We employed custom-designed resequencing arrays (RAs) based on the genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis to generate 422 kb of genomic sequence from a panel of 41 Bacillus cereus sensu lato strains. Here we show that RAs represent a "one reaction" genotyping technology with the ability to discriminate between highly similar B. anthracis isolates and more divergent strains of the B. cereus s.l. Clade 1. Our data show that RAs can be an efficient genotyping technology for pre-screening the genetic diversity of large strain collections to selected the best candidates for whole genome sequencing.

  9. Sensitivity of microarray based immunoassays using surface-attached hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Moschallski, Meike; Evers, Andreas; Brandstetter, Thomas; Rühe, Jürgen

    2013-06-05

    A promising pathway to improve on the sensitivity of protein microarrays is to immobilize the capture antibodies in a three dimensional hydrogel matrix. We describe a simple method based on printing of an aqueous protein solution containing a photosensitive polymer and the capture antibody onto a plastic chip surface. During short UV-exposure photocrosslinking occurs, which leads to formation of a hydrogel, which is simultaneously bound to the substrate surface. In the same reaction the antibody becomes covalently attached to the forming hydrogel. As the capture antibodies are immobilized in the three-dimensional hydrogel microstructures, high fluorescence intensities can be obtained. The chip system is designed such, that non-specific protein adsorption is strongly prevented. Thus, the background fluorescence is strongly reduced and very high signal-to-background ratios are obtained (SBR>6 for c(BSA)=1 pM; SBR>100 for c(BSA)>100 pM). The kinetics of antigen binding to the arrayed antibodies can be used to determine the concentration of a specific protein (for example the tumor marker β2-microglobulin) in solution for a broad range of analyte concentrations. By varying size and composition of the protein-filled hydrogel microstructures as well as adjusting the extent of labeling it is possible to easily adapt the surface concentration of the probe molecules such that the fluorescence signal intensity is tuned to the prevalence of the protein in the analyte. As a consequence, the signal tuning allows to analyze solutions, which contain both proteins with high (here: upper mg mL(-1) range) and with very low concentrations (here: lower μg mL(-1) range). This way quantitative analysis with an exceptionally large dynamic range can be performed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Genotyping of Bacillus cereus Strains by Microarray-Based Resequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zwick, Michael E.; Kiley, Maureen P.; Stewart, Andrew C.; Mateczun, Alfred; Read, Timothy D.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to distinguish microbial pathogens from closely related but nonpathogenic strains is key to understanding the population biology of these organisms. In this regard, Bacillus anthracis, the bacterium that causes inhalational anthrax, is of interest because it is closely related and often difficult to distinguish from other members of the B. cereus group that can cause diverse diseases. We employed custom-designed resequencing arrays (RAs) based on the genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis to generate 422 kb of genomic sequence from a panel of 41 Bacillus cereus sensu lato strains. Here we show that RAs represent a “one reaction” genotyping technology with the ability to discriminate between highly similar B. anthracis isolates and more divergent strains of the B. cereus s.l. Clade 1. Our data show that RAs can be an efficient genotyping technology for pre-screening the genetic diversity of large strain collections to selected the best candidates for whole genome sequencing. PMID:18596941

  11. Recruitment of terminal protein to the ends of Streptomyces linear plasmids and chromosomes by a novel telomere-binding protein essential for linear DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Kai; Cohen, Stanley N.

    2003-01-01

    Bidirectional replication of Streptomyces linear plasmids and chromosomes from a central origin produces unpaired 3′-leading-strand overhangs at the telomeres of replication intermediates. Filling in of these overhangs leaves a terminal protein attached covalently to the 5′ DNA ends of mature replicons. We report here the essential role of a novel 80-kD DNA-binding protein (telomere-associated protein, Tap) in this process. Biochemical studies, yeast two-hybrid analysis, and immunoprecipitation/immunodepletion experiments indicate that Tap binds tightly to specific sequences in 3′ overhangs and also interacts with Tpg, bringing Tpg to telomere termini. Using DNA microarrays to analyze the chromosomes of tap mutant bacteria, we demonstrate that survivors of Tap ablation undergo telomere deletion, chromosome circularization, and amplification of subtelomeric DNA. Microarray-based chromosome mapping at single-ORF resolution revealed common endpoints for independent deletions, identified amplified chromosomal ORFs adjacent to these endpoints, and quantified the copy number of these ORFs. Sequence analysis confirmed chromosome circularization and revealed the insertion of adventitious DNA between joined chromosome ends. Our results show that Tap is required for linear DNA replication in Streptomyces and suggest that it functions to recruit and position Tpg at the telomeres of replication intermediates. They also identify hotspots for the telomeric deletions and subtelomeric DNA amplifications that accompany chromosome circularization. PMID:12651895

  12. DNA codes

    SciTech Connect

    Torney, D. C.

    2001-01-01

    We have begun to characterize a variety of codes, motivated by potential implementation as (quaternary) DNA n-sequences, with letters denoted A, C The first codes we studied are the most reminiscent of conventional group codes. For these codes, Hamming similarity was generalized so that the score for matched letters takes more than one value, depending upon which letters are matched [2]. These codes consist of n-sequences satisfying an upper bound on the similarities, summed over the letter positions, of distinct codewords. We chose similarity 2 for matches of letters A and T and 3 for matches of the letters C and G, providing a rough approximation to double-strand bond energies in DNA. An inherent novelty of DNA codes is 'reverse complementation'. The latter may be defined, as follows, not only for alphabets of size four, but, more generally, for any even-size alphabet. All that is required is a matching of the letters of the alphabet: a partition into pairs. Then, the reverse complement of a codeword is obtained by reversing the order of its letters and replacing each letter by its match. For DNA, the matching is AT/CG because these are the Watson-Crick bonding pairs. Reversal arises because two DNA sequences form a double strand with opposite relative orientations. Thus, as will be described in detail, because in vitro decoding involves the formation of double-stranded DNA from two codewords, it is reasonable to assume - for universal applicability - that the reverse complement of any codeword is also a codeword. In particular, self-reverse complementary codewords are expressly forbidden in reverse-complement codes. Thus, an appropriate distance between all pairs of codewords must, when large, effectively prohibit binding between the respective codewords: to form a double strand. Only reverse-complement pairs of codewords should be able to bind. For most applications, a DNA code is to be bi-partitioned, such that the reverse-complementary pairs are separated

  13. Stable isotope labeling methods for DNA.

    PubMed

    Nelissen, Frank H T; Tessari, Marco; Wijmenga, Sybren S; Heus, Hans A

    2016-08-01

    NMR is a powerful method for studying proteins and nucleic acids in solution. The study of nucleic acids by NMR is far more challenging than for proteins, which is mainly due to the limited number of building blocks and unfavorable spectral properties. For NMR studies of DNA molecules, (site specific) isotope enrichment is required to facilitate specific NMR experiments and applications. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of isotope-labeling strategies for obtaining stable isotope labeled DNA as well as specifically stable isotope labeled building blocks required for enzymatic DNA synthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. DNA origami nanopores for controlling DNA translocation.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ainsa, Silvia; Bell, Nicholas A W; Thacker, Vivek V; Göpfrich, Kerstin; Misiunas, Karolis; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2013-07-23

    We combine DNA origami structures with glass nanocapillaries to reversibly form hybrid DNA origami nanopores. Trapping of the DNA origami onto the nanocapillary is proven by imaging fluorescently labeled DNA origami structures and simultaneous ionic current measurements of the trapping events. We then show two applications highlighting the versatility of these DNA origami nanopores. First, by tuning the pore size we can control the folding of dsDNA molecules ("physical control"). Second, we show that the specific introduction of binding sites in the DNA origami nanopore allows selective detection of ssDNA as a function of the DNA sequence ("chemical control").

  15. DNA Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  16. DNA Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Carol; della Villa, Paula

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students reverse-translate proteins from their amino acid sequences back to their DNA sequences then assign musical notes to represent the adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine bases. Data is obtained from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on the Internet. (DDR)

  17. DNA Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  18. DNA Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Carol; della Villa, Paula

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students reverse-translate proteins from their amino acid sequences back to their DNA sequences then assign musical notes to represent the adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine bases. Data is obtained from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on the Internet. (DDR)

  19. DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marinus, M.G.; Løbner-Olesen, A.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA of E. coli contains 19,120 6-methyladenines and 12,045 5-methylcytosines in addition to the four regular bases and these are formed by the postreplicative action of three DNA methyltransferases. The majority of the methylated bases are formed by the Dam and Dcm methyltransferases encoded by the dam (DNA adenine methyltransferase) and dcm (DNA cytosine methyltransferase) genes. Although not essential, Dam methylation is important for strand discrimination during repair of replication errors, controlling the frequency of initiation of chromosome replication at oriC, and regulation of transcription initiation at promoters containing GATC sequences. In contrast, there is no known function for Dcm methylation although Dcm recognition sites constitute sequence motifs for Very Short Patch repair of T/G base mismatches. In certain bacteria (e.g., Vibrio cholerae, Caulobacter crescentus) adenine methylation is essential and in C. crescentus, it is important for temporal gene expression which, in turn, is required for coordinating chromosome initiation, replication and division. In practical terms, Dam and Dcm methylation can inhibit restriction enzyme cleavage; decrease transformation frequency in certain bacteria; decrease the stability of short direct repeats; are necessary for site-directed mutagenesis; and to probe eukaryotic structure and function. PMID:26442938

  20. Comprehensive Solutions for Urban Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgore, Sally

    2005-01-01

    The comprehensive school reform (CSR) models build consistency throughout a district while addressing the needs of individual schools. The high-quality CSR programs offer a most effective option for urban education reform.

  1. Comprehensive Solutions for Urban Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgore, Sally

    2005-01-01

    The comprehensive school reform (CSR) models build consistency throughout a district while addressing the needs of individual schools. The high-quality CSR programs offer a most effective option for urban education reform.

  2. Paraphrasing: An Effective Comprehension Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kletzien, Sharon B.

    2009-01-01

    Paraphrasing, somewhat different from retelling and summarizing, helps students monitor their understanding and incorporate new knowledge with what they already know about a topic. Paraphrasing helps students realize that comprehension is the goal of reading.

  3. Enhancing Older Adults' Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemper, Susan; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Investigates older adults' reading comprehension skills through syntactic measures and measures of sentence content. Analyzes the apparent reading difficulties of older adults. Provides guidelines for the preparation of prose materials for older readers. (HB)

  4. Comprehensive Pan-Genomic Characterization of Adrenocortical Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Siyuan; Cherniack, Andrew D; Dewal, Ninad; Moffitt, Richard A; Danilova, Ludmila; Murray, Bradley A; Lerario, Antonio M; Else, Tobias; Knijnenburg, Theo A; Ciriello, Giovanni; Kim, Seungchan; Assie, Guillaume; Morozova, Olena; Akbani, Rehan; Shih, Juliann; Hoadley, Katherine A; Choueiri, Toni K; Waldmann, Jens; Mete, Ozgur; Robertson, A Gordon; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Raphael, Benjamin J; Shao, Lina; Meyerson, Matthew; Demeure, Michael J; Beuschlein, Felix; Gill, Anthony J; Sidhu, Stan B; Almeida, Madson Q; Fragoso, Maria C B V; Cope, Leslie M; Kebebew, Electron; Habra, Mouhammed A; Whitsett, Timothy G; Bussey, Kimberly J; Rainey, William E; Asa, Sylvia L; Bertherat, Jérôme; Fassnacht, Martin; Wheeler, David A; Hammer, Gary D; Giordano, Thomas J; Verhaak, Roel G W

    2016-05-09

    We describe a comprehensive genomic characterization of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). Using this dataset, we expand the catalogue of known ACC driver genes to include PRKAR1A, RPL22, TERF2, CCNE1, and NF1. Genome wide DNA copy-number analysis revealed frequent occurrence of massive DNA loss followed by whole-genome doubling (WGD), which was associated with aggressive clinical course, suggesting WGD is a hallmark of disease progression. Corroborating this hypothesis were increased TERT expression, decreased telomere length, and activation of cell-cycle programs. Integrated subtype analysis identified three ACC subtypes with distinct clinical outcome and molecular alterations which could be captured by a 68-CpG probe DNA-methylation signature, proposing a strategy for clinical stratification of patients based on molecular markers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of DNA Polymerase Clamp Loaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelch, Brian; Makino, Debora; Simonetta, Kyle; O'Donnell, Mike; Kuriyan, John

    Clamp loaders are ATP-driven multiprotein machines that couple ATP hydrolysis to the opening and closing of a circular protein ring around DNA. This ring-shaped clamp slides along DNA, and interacts with numerous proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA repair and cell cycle control. Recently determined structures of clamp loader complexes from prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases have revealed exciting new details of how these complex AAA+ machines perform this essential clamp loading function. This review serves as background to John Kuriyan's lecture at the 2010 Erice School, and is not meant as a comprehensive review of the contributions of the many scientists who have advanced this field. These lecture notes are derived from recent reviews and research papers from our groups.

  6. Enzyme-guided DNA Sewing Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, In Hyun; Shin, Seung Won; Park, Kyung Soo; Lansac, Yves; Jang, Yun Hee; Um, Soong Ho

    2015-12-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, a variety of nanoarchitectures with varied physicochemical properties have been designed. Owing to the unique characteristics, DNAs have been used as a functional building block for novel nanoarchitecture. In particular, a self-assembly of long DNA molecules via a piece DNA staple has been utilized to attain such constructs. However, it needs many talented prerequisites (e.g., complicated computer program) with fewer yields of products. In addition, it has many limitations to overcome: for instance, (i) thermal instability under moderate environments and (ii) restraint in size caused by the restricted length of scaffold strands. Alternatively, the enzymatic sewing linkage of short DNA blocks is simply designed into long DNA assemblies but it is more error-prone due to the undeveloped sequence data. Here, we present, for the first time, a comprehensive study for directly combining DNA structures into higher DNA sewing constructs through the 5‧-end cohesive ligation of T4 enzyme. Inspired by these achievements, the synthesized DNA nanomaterials were also utilized for effective detection and real-time diagnosis of cancer-specific and cytosolic RNA markers. This generalized protocol for generic DNA sewing is expected to be useful in several DNA nanotechnology as well as any nucleic acid-related fields.

  7. Enzyme-guided DNA Sewing Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Song, In Hyun; Shin, Seung Won; Park, Kyung Soo; Lansac, Yves; Jang, Yun Hee; Um, Soong Ho

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, a variety of nanoarchitectures with varied physicochemical properties have been designed. Owing to the unique characteristics, DNAs have been used as a functional building block for novel nanoarchitecture. In particular, a self-assembly of long DNA molecules via a piece DNA staple has been utilized to attain such constructs. However, it needs many talented prerequisites (e.g., complicated computer program) with fewer yields of products. In addition, it has many limitations to overcome: for instance, (i) thermal instability under moderate environments and (ii) restraint in size caused by the restricted length of scaffold strands. Alternatively, the enzymatic sewing linkage of short DNA blocks is simply designed into long DNA assemblies but it is more error-prone due to the undeveloped sequence data. Here, we present, for the first time, a comprehensive study for directly combining DNA structures into higher DNA sewing constructs through the 5′-end cohesive ligation of T4 enzyme. Inspired by these achievements, the synthesized DNA nanomaterials were also utilized for effective detection and real-time diagnosis of cancer-specific and cytosolic RNA markers. This generalized protocol for generic DNA sewing is expected to be useful in several DNA nanotechnology as well as any nucleic acid-related fields. PMID:26634810

  8. Enzyme-guided DNA Sewing Architecture.

    PubMed

    Song, In Hyun; Shin, Seung Won; Park, Kyung Soo; Lansac, Yves; Jang, Yun Hee; Um, Soong Ho

    2015-12-04

    With the advent of nanotechnology, a variety of nanoarchitectures with varied physicochemical properties have been designed. Owing to the unique characteristics, DNAs have been used as a functional building block for novel nanoarchitecture. In particular, a self-assembly of long DNA molecules via a piece DNA staple has been utilized to attain such constructs. However, it needs many talented prerequisites (e.g., complicated computer program) with fewer yields of products. In addition, it has many limitations to overcome: for instance, (i) thermal instability under moderate environments and (ii) restraint in size caused by the restricted length of scaffold strands. Alternatively, the enzymatic sewing linkage of short DNA blocks is simply designed into long DNA assemblies but it is more error-prone due to the undeveloped sequence data. Here, we present, for the first time, a comprehensive study for directly combining DNA structures into higher DNA sewing constructs through the 5'-end cohesive ligation of T4 enzyme. Inspired by these achievements, the synthesized DNA nanomaterials were also utilized for effective detection and real-time diagnosis of cancer-specific and cytosolic RNA markers. This generalized protocol for generic DNA sewing is expected to be useful in several DNA nanotechnology as well as any nucleic acid-related fields.

  9. DNA Origami: Scaffolds for Creating Higher Order Structures.

    PubMed

    Hong, Fan; Zhang, Fei; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2017-06-12

    DNA has become one of the most extensively used molecular building blocks for engineering self-assembling materials. DNA origami is a technique that uses hundreds of short DNA oligonucleotides, called staple strands, to fold a long single-stranded DNA, which is called a scaffold strand, into various designer nanoscale architectures. DNA origami has dramatically improved the complexity and scalability of DNA nanostructures. Due to its high degree of customization and spatial addressability, DNA origami provides a versatile platform with which to engineer nanoscale structures and devices that can sense, compute, and actuate. These capabilities open up opportunities for a broad range of applications in chemistry, biology, physics, material science, and computer science that have often required programmed spatial control of molecules and atoms in three-dimensional (3D) space. This review provides a comprehensive survey of recent developments in DNA origami structure, design, assembly, and directed self-assembly, as well as its broad applications.

  10. Towards a comprehensive structural variation map of an individual human genome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Several genomes have now been sequenced, with millions of genetic variants annotated. While significant progress has been made in mapping single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and small (<10 bp) insertion/deletions (indels), the annotation of larger structural variants has been less comprehensive. It is still unclear to what extent a typical genome differs from the reference assembly, and the analysis of the genomes sequenced to date have shown varying results for copy number variation (CNV) and inversions. Results We have combined computational re-analysis of existing whole genome sequence data with novel microarray-based analysis, and detect 12,178 structural variants covering 40.6 Mb that were not reported in the initial sequencing of the first published personal genome. We estimate a total non-SNP variation content of 48.8 Mb in a single genome. Our results indicate that this genome differs from the consensus reference sequence by approximately 1.2% when considering indels/CNVs, 0.1% by SNPs and approximately 0.3% by inversions. The structural variants impact 4,867 genes, and >24% of structural variants would not be imputed by SNP-association. Conclusions Our results indicate that a large number of structural variants have been unreported in the individual genomes published to date. This significant extent and complexity of structural variants, as well as the growing recognition of their medical relevance, necessitate they be actively studied in health-related analyses of personal genomes. The new catalogue of structural variants generated for this genome provides a crucial resource for future comparison studies. PMID:20482838

  11. Prokaryotic DNA ligases unwind superhelical DNA.

    PubMed

    Ivanchenko, M; van Holde, K; Zlatanova, J

    1996-09-13

    We have studied the effect on DNA topology of binding of prokaryotic DNA ligases (T4 and E. coli) to superhelical or nicked circular DNA. Performing topoisomerase I-mediated relaxation in the presence of increasing amounts of T4 ligase led to a shift in the topoisomer distribution to increasingly more negative values. This result suggested that T4 ligase unwound the DNA and was further substantiated by ligation of nicked circular molecules by E. coli DNA ligase in the presence of increasing amounts of T4 ligase. Such an experiment was possible since the two DNA ligases require different cofactors for enzymatic activity. Performing a similar experiment with reverse partners, using E. coli DNA ligase as ligand, and T4 ligase as sealing agent, we observed that the E. coli enzyme also unwound the DNA. Thus, prokaryotic DNA ligases can be added to an ever-growing list of DNA-binding proteins that unwind the DNA upon binding.

  12. DNA-affinity-purified chip (DAP-chip) method to determine gene targets for bacterial two component regulatory systems.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric G; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2014-07-21

    In vivo methods such as ChIP-chip are well-established techniques used to determine global gene targets for transcription factors. However, they are of limited use in exploring bacterial two component regulatory systems with uncharacterized activation conditions. Such systems regulate transcription only when activated in the presence of unique signals. Since these signals are often unknown, the in vitro microarray based method described in this video article can be used to determine gene targets and binding sites for response regulators. This DNA-affinity-purified-chip method may be used for any purified regulator in any organism with a sequenced genome. The protocol involves allowing the purified tagged protein to bind to sheared genomic DNA and then affinity purifying the protein-bound DNA, followed by fluorescent labeling of the DNA and hybridization to a custom tiling array. Preceding steps that may be used to optimize the assay for specific regulators are also described. The peaks generated by the array data analysis are used to predict binding site motifs, which are then experimentally validated. The motif predictions can be further used to determine gene targets of orthologous response regulators in closely related species. We demonstrate the applicability of this method by determining the gene targets and binding site motifs and thus predicting the function for a sigma54-dependent response regulator DVU3023 in the environmental bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

  13. A model of poetic comprehension

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, K.

    1996-12-31

    This article introduces an account of aesthetic comprehension and experience together with an implemented miniature which generates analogical interpretations from a semi-automatic parse of Wordsworth`s {open_quotes}Lines Written in Early Spring{close_quotes}. In our account, a poem serves as an analogy teaching machine by using formal structure to cue the formation of novel analogies. This account builds on an analogical model of comprehension previously applied to large corpora of newspaper summaries. In the miniature, an automatic grammatical and semantic analysis of the text is augmented with information about rhyme and rhythm. These formal cues allow the system to determine analogies which it would not otherwise consider. The article describes the comprehension framework, the annotated piece, and the matcher`s performance on the piece. It closes with a discussion of possible objections to aspects of the thesis or experiment and suggested directions for future work.

  14. Embodied cognition and linguistic comprehension.

    PubMed

    Weiskopf, Daniel A

    2010-09-01

    Traditionally, the language faculty was supposed to be a device that maps linguistic inputs to semantic or conceptual representations. These representations themselves were supposed to be distinct from the representations manipulated by the hearer's perceptual and motor systems. Recently this view of language has been challenged by advocates of embodied cognition. Drawing on empirical studies of linguistic comprehension, they have proposed that the language faculty reuses the very representations and processes deployed in perceiving and acting. I review some of the evidence and arguments in favor of the embodied view of language comprehension, and argue that none of it is conclusive. Moreover, the embodied view itself blurs two important distinctions: first, the distinction between linguistic comprehension and its typical consequences; and second, the distinction between representational content and vehicles. Given that these distinctions are well-motivated, we have good reason to reject the embodied view of linguistic understanding.

  15. Help with Teaching Reading Comprehension: Comprehension Instructional Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Lauren Aimonette; Dole, Janice A.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents five instructional frameworks demonstrated by research as being effective in teaching reading comprehension: (1) The Scaffolded Reading Experience (SRE); (2) Questioning the Author (QtA); (3) Collaborative Strategic Reading (CSR); (4) Peer-Assisted Learning Strategies (PALS); and (5) Concept-Oriented Reading Instruction…

  16. Describing Comprehension: Teachers' Observations of Students' Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Does, Susan Lubow

    2012-01-01

    Teachers' observations of student performance in reading are abundant and insightful but often remain internal and unarticulated. As a result, such observations are an underutilized and undervalued source of data. Given the gaps in knowledge about students' reading comprehension that exist in formal assessments, the frequent calls for teachers'…

  17. Describing Comprehension: Teachers' Observations of Students' Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Does, Susan Lubow

    2012-01-01

    Teachers' observations of student performance in reading are abundant and insightful but often remain internal and unarticulated. As a result, such observations are an underutilized and undervalued source of data. Given the gaps in knowledge about students' reading comprehension that exist in formal assessments, the frequent calls for teachers'…

  18. Help with Teaching Reading Comprehension: Comprehension Instructional Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Lauren Aimonette; Dole, Janice A.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents five instructional frameworks demonstrated by research as being effective in teaching reading comprehension: (1) The Scaffolded Reading Experience (SRE); (2) Questioning the Author (QtA); (3) Collaborative Strategic Reading (CSR); (4) Peer-Assisted Learning Strategies (PALS); and (5) Concept-Oriented Reading Instruction…

  19. Selective Comprehensives: The Social Composition of Top Comprehensive Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton Trust, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This study looks at publicly available data on the proportion of pupils eligible and claiming for free school meals (FSM) in the top 500 comprehensive state schools and at how representative they are of their localities and of their school type. We have looked at the top 500 when measured by five good GCSEs including English and Maths and at the…

  20. Selective Comprehensives: The Social Composition of Top Comprehensive Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton Trust, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This study looks at publicly available data on the proportion of pupils eligible and claiming for free school meals (FSM) in the top 500 comprehensive state schools and at how representative they are of their localities and of their school type. We have looked at the top 500 when measured by five good GCSEs including English and Maths and at the…

  1. Reading comprehension among graduate students.

    PubMed

    Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J; Collins, Kathleen M T

    2002-06-01

    The present purpose was to examine graduate students' reading comprehension and reading vocabulary by comparing their scores on a standardized reading rest with scores obtained by a large normative sample of undergraduates. Participants were 59 graduate students from various disciplines, enrolled in three sections of an introductory educational research course at a southeastern university. These students were administered the Nelson-Denny Reading Test-Form G. Analysis showed these students had higher scores on the reading comprehension portion than did the normative sample of 5,000 undergraduate students from 38 institutions (Cohen d=.71). Also, the graduate students' scores on the reading vocabulary portion were higher (d=.45).

  2. Conceptual Combination During Sentence Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Swinney, David; Love, Tracy; Walenski, Matthew; Smith, Edward E.

    2008-01-01

    This experiment examined the time course of integration of modifier-noun (conceptual) combinations during auditory sentence comprehension using cross-modal lexical priming. The study revealed that during ongoing comprehension, there is initial activation of features of the noun prior to activation of (emergent) features of the entire conceptual combination. These results support compositionality in conceptual combination; that is, they indicate that features of the individual words constituting a conceptual combination are activated prior to combination of the words into a new concept. PMID:17576278

  3. A Modified SDS-Based DNA Extraction Method for High Quality Environmental DNA from Seafloor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Vengadesh Perumal; Zhang, Xinxu; Morono, Yuki; Inagaki, Fumio; Wang, Fengping

    2016-01-01

    Recovering high quality genomic DNA from environmental samples is a crucial primary step to understand the genetic, metabolic, and evolutionary characteristics of microbial communities through molecular ecological approaches. However, it is often challenging because of the difficulty of effective cell lysis without fragmenting the genomic DNA. This work aims to improve the previous SDS-based DNA extraction methods for high-biomass seafloor samples, such as pelagic sediments and metal sulfide chimney, to obtain high quality and high molecular weight of the genomic DNA applicable for the subsequent molecular ecological analyses. In this regard, we standardized a modified SDS-based DNA extraction method (M-SDS), and its performance was then compared to those extracted by a recently developed hot-alkaline DNA extraction method (HA) and a commercial DNA extraction kit. Consequently, the M-SDS method resulted in higher DNA yield and cell lysis efficiency, lower DNA shearing, and higher diversity scores than other two methods, providing a comprehensive DNA assemblage of the microbial community on the seafloor depositional environment. PMID:27446026

  4. Guidelines for Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefkovich, Jacqueline; And Others

    These guidelines are designed to assist local school districts and their Boards of Education in developing and implementing comprehensive guidance and counseling services in thier school systems. The components of the comprehensive guidance program are comprehensive guidance services, certified personnel, and comprehensive guidance facilities.…

  5. Optical DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaywargi, Deepak; Lewis, Dave; Kirovski, Darko

    A certificate of authenticity (COA) is an inexpensive physical object with a random and unique structure S which is hard to near-exactly replicate. An inexpensive device should be able to scan object’s physical “fingerprint,” a set of features that represents S. In this paper, we explore one set of requirements that optical media such as DVDs should satisfy, to be considered as COAs. As manufacturing of such media produces inevitable errors, we use the locations and count of these errors as a “fingerprint” for each optical disc: its optical DNA. The “fingerprint” is signed using publisher’s private-key and the resulting signature is stored onto the optical medium using a post-production process. Standard DVD players with altered firmware that includes publisher’s public-key, should be able to verify the authenticity of DVDs protected with optical DNA. Our key finding is that for the proposed protocol, only DVDs with exceptional wear-and-tear characteristics would result in an inexpensive and viable anti-counterfeiting technology.

  6. Memory mechanisms supporting syntactic comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to characterize the memory system that supports sentence comprehension have historically drawn extensively on short-term memory as a source of mechanisms that might apply to sentences. The focus of these efforts has changed significantly in the past decade. As a result of changes in models of short-term working memory (ST-WM) and developments in models of sentence comprehension, the effort to relate entire components of an ST-WM system, such as those in the model developed by Baddeley (Nature Reviews Neuroscience 4: 829–839, 2003) to sentence comprehension has largely been replaced by an effort to relate more specific mechanisms found in modern models of ST-WM to memory processes that support one aspect of sentence comprehension—the assignment of syntactic structure (parsing) and its use in determining sentence meaning (interpretation) during sentence comprehension. In this article, we present the historical background to recent studies of the memory mechanisms that support parsing and interpretation and review recent research into this relation. We argue that the results of this research do not converge on a set of mechanisms derived from ST-WM that apply to parsing and interpretation. We argue that the memory mechanisms supporting parsing and interpretation have features that characterize another memory system that has been postulated to account for skilled performance—long-term working memory. We propose a model of the relation of different aspects of parsing and interpretation to ST-WM and long-term working memory. PMID:23319178

  7. SCUP 32: Comprehensive Enrollment Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Chuck

    Comprehensive enrollment management (CEM) ensures that academic, student, and fiscal planning are done in concert in order to acknowledge the turbulence confronting an institution. A four-phase model of CEM has been developed that can be replicated at any college or university. In phase 1 of the model, the past 25 years of institutional enrollment…

  8. A Comprehensive General Chemistry Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeder, Ryan D.; Jeffery, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the use of a comprehensive demonstration suitable for a high school or first-year undergraduate introductory chemistry class. The demonstration involves placing a burning candle in a container adjacent to a beaker containing a basic solution with indicator. After adding a lid, the candle will extinguish and the produced…

  9. Comprehensive Schools and the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that comprehensive reorganisation was not a one-off policy reform but a complex, bottom-up campaign for equity and fairness in education, with varied consequences and outcomes. Recent battles over student fees, free schools and academies show that the quest for democratic education does not lead to a permanent achievement but…

  10. Public Assistance Comprehensive Education (PACE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Shirley

    The Public Assistance Comprehensive Education (PACE) Program at Bronx Community College provides programs and services to assist students on welfare to successfully overcome barriers they meet while becoming productive members of the workforce. Each semester, PACE will recruit 200 students from the COPE program and work intensively in addressing…

  11. Innovation Learning in Comprehensive Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindfors, Eila; Hilmola, Antti

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this article is to clarify the concept of innovation and by presenting a research on the basic education outcome assessment data from an innovation learning perspective, answer to a question: Do students learn innovation in comprehensive education? The empirical information in this research is based on data collected in the national…

  12. Anaphoric Relations, Comprehension and Readability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutka, Julia To

    The relationship between anaphoric nominal substitution and reading comprehension was studied. The Diagnostic Reading Test and the Substitution Test were administered to 80 college juniors, seniors, and graduate students in teacher certification courses, and to 92 college freshmen seeking assistance in improving their reading skills. Positive and…

  13. Improving Reading Comprehension through Vocabulary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Andy; Cressman, Kelley Shea; Pfanz, Tomi

    An action research project described an implementation of vocabulary strategies designed to increase reading comprehension. The targeted population consisted of inner city elementary students located in central Illinois. Research shows that some children from low-income environments have below average reading abilities. Analysis of probable cause…

  14. Assessment Format and Comprehension Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seda, Ileana

    In response to the tradition of examining a new test's validity by comparing it with a well-established multiple-choice test, a study investigated whether multiple-choice tests with one right answer can measure the reading comprehension process as defined by constructivists. The study compared the information obtained from two different…

  15. Metacomprehension during Rare Word Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mcginnis, Debra; Saunders, Nikola N.; Burns, Ryan J.

    2007-01-01

    To examine metacomprehension during comprehension, undergraduates (n = 133) were asked to provide descriptions of how they determined the meaning of four rare words presented in short passages. Content analysis of these written descriptions revealed task-specific metacomprehension reflecting lexical, textbase, and situation model processes.…

  16. Children's Comprehension of Live Theatre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Jeanne; Fitch, Marguerite

    Two studies investigate the way in which children make sense of a play and the visual, aural, and psychological components of theatre which contribute to this comprehension. In the first study, 32 fifth graders saw "Don Quixote of La Mancha." In the second study, 45 third graders saw "Monkey, Monkey" (about the Chinese Monkey King). The day after…

  17. Expectation-based syntactic comprehension.

    PubMed

    Levy, Roger

    2008-03-01

    This paper investigates the role of resource allocation as a source of processing difficulty in human sentence comprehension. The paper proposes a simple information-theoretic characterization of processing difficulty as the work incurred by resource reallocation during parallel, incremental, probabilistic disambiguation in sentence comprehension, and demonstrates its equivalence to the theory of Hale [Hale, J. (2001). A probabilistic Earley parser as a psycholinguistic model. In Proceedings of NAACL (Vol. 2, pp. 159-166)], in which the difficulty of a word is proportional to its surprisal (its negative log-probability) in the context within which it appears. This proposal subsumes and clarifies findings that high-constraint contexts can facilitate lexical processing, and connects these findings to well-known models of parallel constraint-based comprehension. In addition, the theory leads to a number of specific predictions about the role of expectation in syntactic comprehension, including the reversal of locality-based difficulty patterns in syntactically constrained contexts, and conditions under which increased ambiguity facilitates processing. The paper examines a range of established results bearing on these predictions, and shows that they are largely consistent with the surprisal theory.

  18. Metacomprehension during Rare Word Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mcginnis, Debra; Saunders, Nikola N.; Burns, Ryan J.

    2007-01-01

    To examine metacomprehension during comprehension, undergraduates (n = 133) were asked to provide descriptions of how they determined the meaning of four rare words presented in short passages. Content analysis of these written descriptions revealed task-specific metacomprehension reflecting lexical, textbase, and situation model processes.…

  19. BASIC TEST OF READING COMPREHENSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CLOWARD, ROBERT D.; COHEN, S. ALAN

    THE TEST WAS DESIGNED TO ASSESS SPEED OF READING COMPREHENSION. IT CONSISTED OF NUMBERED PASSAGES, ONE TO THREE SENTENCES IN LENGTH, ARRANGED IN PARAGRAPH FORM TO SIMULATE THE NORMAL READING EXERCISE. TOWARD THE END OF EACH PASSAGE, A WORD WAS INSERTED WHICH SPOILED THE MEANING OF THE PASSAGE. THE PUPILS WERE INSTRUCTED TO FIND THE WORD THAT…

  20. Problem Solving & Comprehension. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whimbey, Arthur; Lochhead, Jack

    This book shows how to increase one's power to analyze and comprehend problems. First, it outlines and illustrates the methods that good problem solvers use in attacking complex ideas. Then it gives some practice in applying these methods to a variety of questions in comprehension and reasoning. Chapters include: (1) "Test Your Mind--See How…

  1. Quantifier Comprehension in Corticobasal Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Corey T.; Clark, Robin; Moore, Peachie; Grossman, Murray

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we investigated patients with focal neurodegenerative diseases to examine a formal linguistic distinction between classes of generalized quantifiers, like "some X" and "less than half of X." Our model of quantifier comprehension proposes that number knowledge is required to understand both first-order and higher-order quantifiers.…

  2. Contextual Information and Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teale, William H.

    Following a discussion of the differences between oral and written speech, this paper examines the act of reading written speech and the role that contextual information plays in reading comprehension. It notes the interaction that occurs between reader and text, points out the way in which written language makes demands upon readers'…

  3. Fanciful Literature and Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salesi, Rosemary A.

    Some children lack the framework of prior experience necessary for the comprehension and enjoyment of fanciful literature. Fanciful literature, though grounded in reality, deals not only with what is, but also with what could be or might have been. Since readers actively construct meaning by relating what they read to their conceptual systems,…

  4. Literature, Comprehension, and Gifted Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Helen

    Many gifted children enter kindergarten already reading and in need of reading instruction that is different from the regular program. A reading program for gifted youngsters that is literature-based will help develop comprehension skills at the highest cognitive levels and will also foster the desire to read. Beginning with the interpretation of…

  5. Quantifier Comprehension in Corticobasal Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Corey T.; Clark, Robin; Moore, Peachie; Grossman, Murray

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we investigated patients with focal neurodegenerative diseases to examine a formal linguistic distinction between classes of generalized quantifiers, like "some X" and "less than half of X." Our model of quantifier comprehension proposes that number knowledge is required to understand both first-order and higher-order quantifiers.…

  6. Innovation Learning in Comprehensive Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindfors, Eila; Hilmola, Antti

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this article is to clarify the concept of innovation and by presenting a research on the basic education outcome assessment data from an innovation learning perspective, answer to a question: Do students learn innovation in comprehensive education? The empirical information in this research is based on data collected in the national…

  7. A Comprehensive General Chemistry Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeder, Ryan D.; Jeffery, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the use of a comprehensive demonstration suitable for a high school or first-year undergraduate introductory chemistry class. The demonstration involves placing a burning candle in a container adjacent to a beaker containing a basic solution with indicator. After adding a lid, the candle will extinguish and the produced…

  8. Phonemic Support in Children's Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crain-Thoreson, Catherine; McCutchen, Deborah

    A study investigated the role of phonemic information in young readers' silent reading comprehension. Subjects, 56 children in grades 2 and 4, from Seattle parochial schools, were blocked into groups based on their grade and skill level (skilled and less skilled). Each subject saw 48 sentences presented in a random order on an Apple II…

  9. Preschool Children's Comprehension of Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robin

    A new methodology for testing preschool children's comprehension of television is described and the results of the first experiment with this method are presented. Original program material was created by filming 30 second animated stories in color and transferring them to videotape for subsequent editing and addition of sound. Thirty-five…

  10. Electrochemical biosensing strategies for DNA methylation analysis.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Tanvir; Mahmudunnabi, Golam; Masud, Mostafa Kamal; Islam, Md Nazmul; Ooi, Lezanne; Konstantinov, Konstantin; Hossain, Md Shahriar Al; Martinac, Boris; Alici, Gursel; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Shiddiky, Muhammad J A

    2017-02-17

    DNA methylation is one of the key epigenetic modifications of DNA that results from the enzymatic addition of a methyl group at the fifth carbon of the cytosine base. It plays a crucial role in cellular development, genomic stability and gene expression. Aberrant DNA methylation is responsible for the pathogenesis of many diseases including cancers. Over the past several decades, many methodologies have been developed to detect DNA methylation. These methodologies range from classical molecular biology and optical approaches, such as bisulfite sequencing, microarrays, quantitative real-time PCR, colorimetry, Raman spectroscopy to the more recent electrochemical approaches. Among these, electrochemical approaches offer sensitive, simple, specific, rapid, and cost-effective analysis of DNA methylation. Additionally, electrochemical methods are highly amenable to miniaturization and possess the potential to be multiplexed. In recent years, several reviews have provided information on the detection strategies of DNA methylation. However, to date, there is no comprehensive evaluation of electrochemical DNA methylation detection strategies. Herein, we address the recent developments of electrochemical DNA methylation detection approaches. Furthermore, we highlight the major technical and biological challenges involved in these strategies and provide suggestions for the future direction of this important field.

  11. DNA nanostructure meets nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guomei; Surwade, Sumedh P; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Haitao

    2013-04-07

    Recent advances in DNA nanotechnology have made it possible to construct DNA nanostructures of almost arbitrary shapes with 2-3 nm of precision in their dimensions. These DNA nanostructures are ideal templates for bottom-up nanofabrication. This review highlights the challenges and recent advances in three areas that are directly related to DNA-based nanofabrication: (1) fabrication of large scale DNA nanostructures; (2) pattern transfer from DNA nanostructure to an inorganic substrate; and (3) directed assembly of DNA nanostructures.

  12. The RNA Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Giono, Luciana E; Nieto Moreno, Nicolás; Cambindo Botto, Adrián E; Dujardin, Gwendal; Muñoz, Manuel J; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2016-06-19

    Multicellular organisms must ensure genome integrity to prevent accumulation of mutations, cell death, and cancer. The DNA damage response (DDR) is a complex network that senses, signals, and executes multiple programs including DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. This entails regulation of a variety of cellular processes: DNA replication and transcription, RNA processing, mRNA translation and turnover, and post-translational modification, degradation, and relocalization of proteins. Accumulated evidence over the past decades has shown that RNAs and RNA metabolism are both regulators and regulated actors of the DDR. This review aims to present a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on the many interactions between the DNA damage and RNA fields.

  13. Genomic shotgun array: a procedure linking large-scale DNA sequencing with regional transcript mapping.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling-Hui; Li, Jian-Chiuan; Lin, Yung-Feng; Lin, Chung-Yen; Chen, Chung-Yung; Tsai, Shih-Feng

    2004-02-11

    To facilitate transcript mapping and to investigate alterations in genomic structure and gene expression in a defined genomic target, we developed a novel microarray-based method to detect transcriptional activity of the human chromosome 4q22-24 region. Loss of heterozygosity of human 4q22-24 is frequently observed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). One hundred and eighteen well-characterized genes have been identified from this region. We took previously sequenced shotgun subclones as templates to amplify overlapping sequences for the genomic segment and constructed a chromosome-region-specific microarray. Using genomic DNA fragments as probes, we detected transcriptional activity from within this region among five different tissues. The hybridization results indicate that there are new transcripts that have not yet been identified by other methods. The existence of new transcripts encoded by genes in this region was confirmed by PCR cloning or cDNA library screening. The procedure reported here allows coupling of shotgun sequencing with transcript mapping and, potentially, detailed analysis of gene expression and chromosomal copy of the genomic sequence for the putative HCC tumor suppressor gene(s) in the 4q candidate region.

  14. Comprehensive molecular characterization of gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Adam J.; Thorsson, Vesteinn; Shmulevich, Ilya; Reynolds, Sheila M.; Miller, Michael; Bernard, Brady; Hinoue, Toshinori; Laird, Peter W.; Curtis, Christina; Shen, Hui; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Shen, Ronglai; Weinhold, Nils; Kelsen, David P.; Bowlby, Reanne; Chu, Andy; Kasaian, Katayoon; Mungall, Andrew J.; Robertson, A. Gordon; Sipahimalani, Payal; Cherniack, Andrew; Getz, Gad; Liu, Yingchun; Noble, Michael S.; Pedamallu, Chandra; Sougnez, Carrie; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Akbani, Rehan; Lee, Ju-Seog; Liu, Wenbin; Mills, Gordon B.; Yang, Da; Zhang, Wei; Pantazi, Angeliki; Parfenov, Michael; Gulley, Margaret; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Schneider, Barbara G.; Kim, Jihun; Boussioutas, Alex; Sheth, Margi; Demchok, John A.; Rabkin, Charles S.; Willis, Joseph E.; Ng, Sam; Garman, Katherine; Beer, David G.; Pennathur, Arjun; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Odze, Robert; Kim, Hark K.; Bowen, Jay; Leraas, Kristen M.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; Weaver, Stephanie; McLellan, Michael; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Sakai, Ryo; Getz, Gad; Sougnez, Carrie; Lawrence, Michael S.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Lichtenstein, Lee; Fisher, Sheila; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Lander, Eric S.; Ding, Li; Niu, Beifang; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Birol, Inanc; Bowlby, Reanne; Brooks, Denise; Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Chu, Andy; Chu, Justin; Chuah, Eric; Chun, Hye-Jung E.; Clarke, Amanda; Dhalla, Noreen; Guin, Ranabir; Holt, Robert A.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Kasaian, Katayoon; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan A.; Lim, Emilia; Ma, Yussanne; Marra, Marco A.; Mayo, Michael; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Mungall, Karen L.; Nip, Ka Ming; Robertson, A. Gordon; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Sipahimalani, Payal; Tam, Angela; Thiessen, Nina; Beroukhim, Rameen; Carter, Scott L.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Cho, Juok; Cibulskis, Kristian; DiCara, Daniel; Frazer, Scott; Fisher, Sheila; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gehlenborg, Nils; Heiman, David I.; Jung, Joonil; Kim, Jaegil; Lander, Eric S.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Lichtenstein, Lee; Lin, Pei; Meyerson, Matthew; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Saksena, Gordon; Schumacher, Steven E.; Sougnez, Carrie; Stojanov, Petar; Tabak, Barbara; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Voet, Doug; Rosenberg, Mara; Zack, Travis I.; Zhang, Hailei; Zou, Lihua; Protopopov, Alexei; Santoso, Netty; Parfenov, Michael; Lee, Semin; Zhang, Jianhua; Mahadeshwar, Harshad S.; Tang, Jiabin; Ren, Xiaojia; Seth, Sahil; Yang, Lixing; Xu, Andrew W.; Song, Xingzhi; Pantazi, Angeliki; Xi, Ruibin; Bristow, Christopher A.; Hadjipanayis, Angela; Seidman, Jonathan; Chin, Lynda; Park, Peter J.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Akbani, Rehan; Ling, Shiyun; Liu, Wenbin; Rao, Arvind; Weinstein, John N.; Kim, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ju-Seog; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon; Laird, Peter W.; Hinoue, Toshinori; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Bootwalla, Moiz S.; Lai, Phillip H.; Shen, Hui; Triche, Timothy; Van Den Berg, David J.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Herman, James G.; Getz, Gad; Chin, Lynda; Liu, Yingchun; Murray, Bradley A.; Noble, Michael S.; Askoy, B. Arman; Ciriello, Giovanni; Dresdner, Gideon; Gao, Jianjiong; Gross, Benjamin; Jacobsen, Anders; Lee, William; Ramirez, Ricardo; Sander, Chris; Schultz, Nikolaus; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Sinha, Rileen; Sumer, S. Onur; Sun, Yichao; Weinhold, Nils; Thorsson, Vésteinn; Bernard, Brady; Iype, Lisa; Kramer, Roger W.; Kreisberg, Richard; Miller, Michael; Reynolds, Sheila M.; Rovira, Hector; Tasman, Natalie; Shmulevich, Ilya; Ng, Santa Cruz Sam; Haussler, David; Stuart, Josh M.; Akbani, Rehan; Ling, Shiyun; Liu, Wenbin; Rao, Arvind; Weinstein, John N.; Verhaak, Roeland G.W.; Mills, Gordon B.; Leiserson, Mark D. M.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Taylor, Barry S.; Black, Aaron D.; Bowen, Jay; Carney, Julie Ann; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Helsel, Carmen; Leraas, Kristen M.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; McAllister, Cynthia; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Tabler, Teresa R.; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Penny, Robert; Crain, Daniel; Gardner, Johanna; Lau, Kevin; Curely, Erin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph; Shelton, Troy; Shelton, Candace; Sherman, Mark; Benz, Christopher; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Fedosenko, Konstantin; Manikhas, Georgy; Potapova, Olga; Voronina, Olga; Belyaev, Smitry; Dolzhansky, Oleg; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Brzezinski, Jakub; Ibbs, Matthew; Korski, Konstanty; Kycler, Witold; ŁaŸniak, Radoslaw; Leporowska, Ewa; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Murawa, Dawid; Murawa, Pawel; Spychała, Arkadiusz; Suchorska, Wiktoria M.; Tatka, Honorata; Teresiak, Marek; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Abdel-Misih, Raafat; Bennett, Joseph; Brown, Jennifer; Iacocca, Mary; Rabeno, Brenda; Kwon, Sun-Young; Penny, Robert; Gardner, Johanna; Kemkes, Ariane; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Shelton, Troy; Shelton, Candace; Curley, Erin; Alexopoulou, Iakovina; Engel, Jay; Bartlett, John; Albert, Monique; Park, Do-Youn; Dhir, Rajiv; Luketich, James; Landreneau, Rodney; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Kelsen, David P.; Cho, Eunjung; Ladanyi, Marc; Tang, Laura; McCall, Shannon J.; Park, Young S.; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Ajani, Jaffer; Camargo, M. Constanza; Alonso, Shelley; Ayala, Brenda; Jensen, Mark A.; Pihl, Todd; Raman, Rohini; Walton, Jessica; Wan, Yunhu; Demchok, John A.; Eley, Greg; Mills Shaw, Kenna R.; Sheth, Margi; Tarnuzzer, Roy; Wang, Zhining; Yang, Liming; Zenklusen, Jean Claude; Davidsen, Tanja; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Sofia, Heidi J.; Burton, Robert; Chudamani, Sudha; Liu, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths, but analysis of its molecular and clinical characteristics has been complicated by histological and aetiological heterogeneity. Here we describe a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 295 primary gastric adenocarcinomas as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project. We propose a molecular classification dividing gastric cancer into four subtypes: tumours positive for Epstein–Barr virus, which display recurrent PIK3CA mutations, extreme DNA hypermethylation, and amplification of JAK2, CD274 (also known as PD-L1) and PDCD1LG2 (also knownasPD-L2); microsatellite unstable tumours, which show elevated mutation rates, including mutations of genes encoding targetable oncogenic signalling proteins; genomically stable tumours, which are enriched for the diffuse histological variant and mutations of RHOA or fusions involving RHO-family GTPase-activating proteins; and tumours with chromosomal instability, which show marked aneuploidy and focal amplification of receptor tyrosine kinases. Identification of these subtypes provides a roadmap for patient stratification and trials of targeted therapies. PMID:25079317

  15. Comprehensible Presentation of Topological Information

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Gunther H.; Beketayev, Kenes; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Hamann, Bernd; Haranczyk, Maciej; Hlawitschka, Mario; Pascucci, Valerio

    2012-03-05

    Topological information has proven very valuable in the analysis of scientific data. An important challenge that remains is presenting this highly abstract information in a way that it is comprehensible even if one does not have an in-depth background in topology. Furthermore, it is often desirable to combine the structural insight gained by topological analysis with complementary information, such as geometric information. We present an overview over methods that use metaphors to make topological information more accessible to non-expert users, and we demonstrate their applicability to a range of scientific data sets. With the increasingly complex output of exascale simulations, the importance of having effective means of providing a comprehensible, abstract overview over data will grow. The techniques that we present will serve as an important foundation for this purpose.

  16. Comprehensive care plus creative architecture.

    PubMed

    Easter, James G

    2005-01-01

    The delivery of high-quality, comprehensive cancer care and the treatment environment go hand in hand with the patient's recovery. When the planning and design of a comprehensive cancer care program runs parallel to the operational expectations and functional standards, the building users (patients, staff, and physicians) benefit significantly. This behavioral response requires a sensitive interface during the campus master planning, architectural programming, and design phases. Each building component and user functioning along the "continuum of care" will have different expectations, programmatic needs, and design responses. This article addresses the community- and hospital-based elements of this continuum. The environment does affect the patient care and the care-giving team members. It may be a positive or, unfortunately, a negative response.

  17. DNA ligase I, the replicative DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Howes, Timothy R L; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2012-01-01

    Multiple DNA ligation events are required to join the Okazaki fragments generated during lagging strand DNA synthesis. In eukaryotes, this is primarily carried out by members of the DNA ligase I family. The C-terminal catalytic region of these enzymes is composed of three domains: a DNA binding domain, an adenylation domain and an OB-fold domain. In the absence of DNA, these domains adopt an extended structure but transition into a compact ring structure when they engage a DNA nick, with each of the domains contacting the DNA. The non-catalytic N-terminal region of eukaryotic DNA ligase I is responsible for the specific participation of these enzymes in DNA replication. This proline-rich unstructured region contains the nuclear localization signal and a PCNA interaction motif that is critical for localization to replication foci and efficient joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I initially engages the PCNA trimer via this interaction motif which is located at the extreme N-terminus of this flexible region. It is likely that this facilitates an additional interaction between the DNA binding domain and the PCNA ring. The similar size and shape of the rings formed by the PCNA trimer and the DNA ligase I catalytic region when it engages a DNA nick suggest that these proteins interact to form a double-ring structure during the joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I also interacts with replication factor C, the factor that loads the PCNA trimeric ring onto DNA. This interaction, which is regulated by phosphorylation of the non-catalytic N-terminus of DNA ligase I, also appears to be critical for DNA replication.

  18. Text Comprehension Processes in Bilinguals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    IN BILINGUALS I APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; ISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED NAVY PERSONNEL RESEARCH AND SDEVELOPMENT CENTER Son Diego, Calforia 92152 i 8 00...SinDieo830liorna291 p’.. .. . . . . . . . . -- 1 ’ NPRDC TR 85-34 August 1985 TEXT COMPREHENSION PROCESSES IN BILINGUALS Frederick R. Chang...IN BILINGUALS 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Chang, Frederick R. and Lare, Cosette M. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 14 DATE OF REPORT Year Month, Day) 5

  19. Comprehensive treatment of generalized parodontitis.

    PubMed

    Mdinaradze, N

    2006-06-01

    The complexity of pathogenesis of periodontitis makes the use of comprehensive treatment necessary. We observed 60 patients, 20 women and 40 men among them aged from 20 to 50. In the course of parodontitis, we determined the intensity of inflammatory-destructive changes (Pi) in the course of periodontitis, the degree of fang denudation, the depth of gum and parodontal recesses, degree of the teeth becoming loose; we conducted the microbiological study of the oral cavity microflora and drew up an antibiotic graph. We included laser therapy in the comprehensive treatment course of generalized parodontitis. We divided the patients into two groups. The patients of the first group were treated in two stages. We used peridex, composed of chlorhexidine for antiseptic treatment of oral cavity. We used a combined solution of sage, eucalyptus, camomile and calendula to irrigate the oral cavity. At the second stage we used ointment applications with the composition of 3% indometacin, heparin, vitamins, sea-buckthorn oil and antibiotics. In the course of comprehensive treatment of the patients of the II group we included laser therapy. Our interest in the laser beam, as in the means of parodontitis treatment was stimulated by a number of properties of the laser beam and namely, its anti-inflammatory, desensitizing and antibacterial action promotes intensifying the reparation processes and does not entail any complications. The mentioned method has produced the best therapeutic results and has resulted in the reduced treatment period.

  20. Predictive mechanisms in idiom comprehension.

    PubMed

    Vespignani, Francesco; Canal, Paolo; Molinaro, Nicola; Fonda, Sergio; Cacciari, Cristina

    2010-08-01

    Prediction is pervasive in human cognition and plays a central role in language comprehension. At an electrophysiological level, this cognitive function contributes substantially in determining the amplitude of the N400. In fact, the amplitude of the N400 to words within a sentence has been shown to depend on how predictable those words are: The more predictable a word, the smaller the N400 elicited. However, predictive processing can be based on different sources of information that allow anticipation of upcoming constituents and integration in context. In this study, we investigated the ERPs elicited during the comprehension of idioms, that is, prefabricated multiword strings stored in semantic memory. When a reader recognizes a string of words as an idiom before the idiom ends, she or he can develop expectations concerning the incoming idiomatic constituents. We hypothesized that the expectations driven by the activation of an idiom might differ from those driven by discourse-based constraints. To this aim, we compared the ERP waveforms elicited by idioms and two literal control conditions. The results showed that, in both cases, the literal conditions exhibited a more negative potential than the idiomatic condition. Our analyses suggest that before idiom recognition the effect is due to modulation of the N400 amplitude, whereas after idiom recognition a P300 for the idiomatic sentence has a fundamental role in the composition of the effect. These results suggest that two distinct predictive mechanisms are at work during language comprehension, based respectively on probabilistic information and on categorical template matching.

  1. A comprehensive dairy valorization model.

    PubMed

    Banaszewska, A; Cruijssen, F; van der Vorst, J G A J; Claassen, G D H; Kampman, J L

    2013-02-01

    Dairy processors face numerous challenges resulting from both unsteady dairy markets and some specific characteristics of dairy supply chains. To maintain a competitive position on the market, companies must look beyond standard solutions currently used in practice. This paper presents a comprehensive dairy valorization model that serves as a decision support tool for mid-term allocation of raw milk to end products and production planning. The developed model was used to identify the optimal product portfolio composition. The model allocates raw milk to the most profitable dairy products while accounting for important constraints (i.e., recipes, composition variations, dairy production interdependencies, seasonality, demand, supply, capacities, and transportation flows). The inclusion of all relevant constraints and the ease of understanding dairy production dynamics make the model comprehensive. The developed model was tested at the international dairy processor FrieslandCampina (Amersfoort, the Netherlands). The structure of the model and its output were discussed in multiple sessions with and approved by relevant FrieslandCampina employees. The elements included in the model were considered necessary to optimally valorize raw milk. To illustrate the comprehensiveness and functionality of the model, we analyzed the effect of seasonality on milk valorization. A large difference in profit and a shift in the allocation of milk showed that seasonality has a considerable impact on the valorization of raw milk. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Geometric formalism for DNA quadruplex folding.

    PubMed

    Webba da Silva, Mateus

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the control of self-assembly and stereochemical properties of DNA higher order architectural folds is of fundamental importance in biology as well as biochemical technological applications. Guanine-rich DNA sequences can form tetrahelical architectures termed quadruplexes. A formalism is presented describing the interdependency of a set of structural descriptors as a geometric basis for folding of unimolecular quadruplex topologies. It represents a standard for interpretation of structural characteristics of quadruplexes, and is comprehensive in explicitly harmonizing the results of published literature with a unified language. The formalism is a fundamental step towards prediction of unimolecular quadruplex folding topologies from primary sequence.

  3. DNA modifications: Another stable base in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazauskas, Pijus; Kriaucionis, Skirmantas

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation of 5-methylcytosine has been proposed to mediate active and passive DNA demethylation. Tracking the history of DNA modifications has now provided the first solid evidence that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is a stable epigenetic modification.

  4. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps = 0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps = 0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps = 0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on

  5. Synthesis of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2008-11-18

    A method of synthesizing a desired double-stranded DNA of a predetermined length and of a predetermined sequence. Preselected sequence segments that will complete the desired double-stranded DNA are determined. Preselected segment sequences of DNA that will be used to complete the desired double-stranded DNA are provided. The preselected segment sequences of DNA are assembled to produce the desired double-stranded DNA.

  6. Electrostatic effects in DNA bending by GCN4 mutants.

    PubMed

    Strauss-Soukup, J K; Maher, L J

    1998-01-27

    DNA architecture has been shown to be important for cellular processes such as activation of transcription, recombination, and replication. Many proteins reconfigure the shape of duplex DNA upon binding. Previous experiments have shown that some members of the eukaryotic bZIP family of DNA binding proteins appear to bend DNA, while others do not. We are exploring the role of electrostatic effects in DNA bending by bZIP proteins. The yeast bZIP transcription factor GCN4 does not induce DNA bending in vitro. Previously we substituted basic residues for three neutral amino acids in GCN4 to produce a GCN4 derivative that bends DNA by approximately 15 degrees. This result is consistent with a model of induced DNA bending wherein excess positive charge in proximity to one face of the double helix neutralizes local phosphate diester anions resulting in a laterally-asymmetric charge distribution along the DNA. Such an unbalanced charge distribution can result in collapse of the DNA toward the neutralized surface. We now present a more comprehensive analysis of electrostatic effects in DNA bending by GCN4 derivatives. It is shown that the direction and extent of DNA bending by these derivatives are a linear function of the charges of the amino acids adjacent to the basic domain of the protein. This relation holds over the charge range +6 (16 degrees bend toward the minor groove) to -6 (25 degrees bend toward the major groove).

  7. Transcription of foreign DNA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Warren, René L; Freeman, John D; Levesque, Roger C; Smailus, Duane E; Flibotte, Stephane; Holt, Robert A

    2008-11-01

    Propagation of heterologous DNA in E. coli host cells is central to molecular biology. DNA constructs are often engineered for expression of recombinant protein in E. coli, but the extent of incidental transcription arising from natural regulatory sequences in cloned DNA remains underexplored. Here, we have used programmable microarrays and RT-PCR to measure, comprehensively, the transcription of H. influenzae, P. aeruginosa, and human DNA propagating in E. coli as bacterial artificial chromosomes. We find evidence that at least half of all H. influenzae genes are transcribed in E. coli. Highly transcribed genes are principally involved in energy metabolism, and their proximal promoter regions are significantly enriched with E. coli sigma(70) (also known as RpoD) binding sites. H. influenzae genes acquired from an ancient bacteriophage Mu insertion are also highly transcribed. Compared with H. influenzae, a smaller proportion of P. aeruginosa genes are transcribed in E. coli, and in E. coli there is punctuated transcription of human DNA. The presence of foreign DNA in E. coli disturbs the host transcriptional profile, with expression of the E. coli phage shock protein operon and the flagellar gene cluster being particularly strongly up-regulated. While cross-species transcriptional activation is expected to be enabling for horizontal gene transfer in bacteria, incidental expression of toxic genes can be problematic for DNA cloning. Ongoing characterization of cross-expression will help inform the design of biosynthetic gene clusters and synthetic microbial genomes.

  8. Optical biosensing strategies for DNA methylation analysis.

    PubMed

    Nazmul Islam, Md; Yadav, Sharda; Hakimul Haque, Md; Munaz, Ahmed; Islam, Farhadul; Al Hossain, Md Shahriar; Gopalan, Vinod; Lam, Alfred K; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Shiddiky, Muhammad J A

    2017-06-15

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification of DNA, where a methyl group is added at the fifth carbon of the cytosine base to form 5 methyl cytosine (5mC) without altering the DNA sequences. It plays important roles in regulating many cellular processes by modulating key genes expression. Alteration in DNA methylation patterns becomes particularly important in the aetiology of different diseases including cancers. Abnormal methylation pattern could contribute to the pathogenesis of cancer either by silencing key tumor suppressor genes or by activating oncogenes. Thus, DNA methylation biosensing can help in the better understanding of cancer prognosis and diagnosis and aid the development of therapies. Over the last few decades, a plethora of optical detection techniques have been developed for analyzing DNA methylation using fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), electrochemiluminescence and colorimetric readouts. This paper aims to comprehensively review the optical strategies for DNA methylation detection. We also present an overview of the remaining challenges of optical strategies that still need to be focused along with the lesson learnt while working with these techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Gel Electrophoresis of Gold-DNA Nanoconjugates

    DOE PAGES

    Pellegrino, T.; Sperling, R. A.; Alivisatos, A. P.; ...

    2007-01-01

    Gold-DNA conjugates were investigated in detail by a comprehensive gel electrophoresis study based on 1200 gels. A controlled number of single-stranded DNA of different length was attached specifically via thiol-Au bonds to phosphine-stabilized colloidal gold nanoparticles. Alternatively, the surface of the gold particles was saturated with single stranded DNA of different length either specifically via thiol-Au bonds or by nonspecific adsorption. From the experimentally determined electrophoretic mobilities, estimates for the effective diameters of the gold-DNA conjugates were derived by applying two different data treatment approaches. The first method is based on making a calibration curve for the relation between effectivemore » diameters and mobilities with gold nanoparticles of known diameter. The second method is based on Ferguson analysis which uses gold nanoparticles of known diameter as reference database. Our study shows that effective diameters derived from gel electrophoresis measurements are affected with a high error bar as the determined values strongly depend on the method of evaluation, though relative changes in size upon binding of molecules can be detected with high precision. Furthermore, in this study, the specific attachment of DNA via gold-thiol bonds to Au nanoparticles is compared to nonspecific adsorption of DNA. Also, the maximum number of DNA molecules that can be bound per particle was determined.« less

  10. DNA encoding a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-08-15

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  11. DNA systematics. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    This book discusses the following topics: PLANTS: PLANT DNA: Contents and Systematics. Repeated DNA Sequences and Polyploidy in Cereal Crops. Homology of Nonrepeated DNA Sequences in Phylogeny of Fungal Species. Chloropast DNA and Phylogenetic Relationships. rDNA: Evolution Over a Billion Years. 23S rRNA-derived Small Ribosomal RNAs: Their Structure and Evolution with Reference to Plant Phylogeny. Molecular Analysis of Plant DNA Genomes: Conserved and Diverged DNA Sequences. A Critical Review of Some Terminologies Used for Additional DNA in Plant Chromosomes and Index.

  12. Crystal structure of a DNA catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Salvatierra, Almudena; Wawrzyniak-Turek, Katarzyna; Steuerwald, Ulrich; Höbartner, Claudia; Pena, Vladimir

    2016-01-14

    Catalysis in biology is restricted to RNA (ribozymes) and protein enzymes, but synthetic biomolecular catalysts can also be made of DNA (deoxyribozymes) or synthetic genetic polymers. In vitro selection from synthetic random DNA libraries identified DNA catalysts for various chemical reactions beyond RNA backbone cleavage. DNA-catalysed reactions include RNA and DNA ligation in various topologies, hydrolytic cleavage and photorepair of DNA, as well as reactions of peptides and small molecules. In spite of comprehensive biochemical studies of DNA catalysts for two decades, fundamental mechanistic understanding of their function is lacking in the absence of three-dimensional models at atomic resolution. Early attempts to solve the crystal structure of an RNA-cleaving deoxyribozyme resulted in a catalytically irrelevant nucleic acid fold. Here we report the crystal structure of the RNA-ligating deoxyribozyme 9DB1 (ref. 14) at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure captures the ligation reaction in the post-catalytic state, revealing a compact folding unit stabilized by numerous tertiary interactions, and an unanticipated organization of the catalytic centre. Structure-guided mutagenesis provided insights into the basis for regioselectivity of the ligation reaction and allowed remarkable manipulation of substrate recognition and reaction rate. Moreover, the structure highlights how the specific properties of deoxyribose are reflected in the backbone conformation of the DNA catalyst, in support of its intricate three-dimensional organization. The structural principles underlying the catalytic ability of DNA elucidate differences and similarities in DNA versus RNA catalysts, which is relevant for comprehending the privileged position of folded RNA in the prebiotic world and in current organisms.

  13. The logic of DNA replication in double-stranded DNA viruses: insights from global analysis of viral genomes.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskas, Darius; Krupovic, Mart; Venclovas, Česlovas

    2016-06-02

    Genomic DNA replication is a complex process that involves multiple proteins. Cellular DNA replication systems are broadly classified into only two types, bacterial and archaeo-eukaryotic. In contrast, double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses feature a much broader diversity of DNA replication machineries. Viruses differ greatly in both completeness and composition of their sets of DNA replication proteins. In this study, we explored whether there are common patterns underlying this extreme diversity. We identified and analyzed all major functional groups of DNA replication proteins in all available proteomes of dsDNA viruses. Our results show that some proteins are common to viruses infecting all domains of life and likely represent components of the ancestral core set. These include B-family polymerases, SF3 helicases, archaeo-eukaryotic primases, clamps and clamp loaders of the archaeo-eukaryotic type, RNase H and ATP-dependent DNA ligases. We also discovered a clear correlation between genome size and self-sufficiency of viral DNA replication, the unanticipated dominance of replicative helicases and pervasive functional associations among certain groups of DNA replication proteins. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive view on the diversity and evolution of replication systems in the DNA virome and uncover fundamental principles underlying the orchestration of viral DNA replication. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. The logic of DNA replication in double-stranded DNA viruses: insights from global analysis of viral genomes

    PubMed Central

    Kazlauskas, Darius; Krupovic, Mart; Venclovas, Česlovas

    2016-01-01

    Genomic DNA replication is a complex process that involves multiple proteins. Cellular DNA replication systems are broadly classified into only two types, bacterial and archaeo-eukaryotic. In contrast, double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses feature a much broader diversity of DNA replication machineries. Viruses differ greatly in both completeness and composition of their sets of DNA replication proteins. In this study, we explored whether there are common patterns underlying this extreme diversity. We identified and analyzed all major functional groups of DNA replication proteins in all available proteomes of dsDNA viruses. Our results show that some proteins are common to viruses infecting all domains of life and likely represent components of the ancestral core set. These include B-family polymerases, SF3 helicases, archaeo-eukaryotic primases, clamps and clamp loaders of the archaeo-eukaryotic type, RNase H and ATP-dependent DNA ligases. We also discovered a clear correlation between genome size and self-sufficiency of viral DNA replication, the unanticipated dominance of replicative helicases and pervasive functional associations among certain groups of DNA replication proteins. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive view on the diversity and evolution of replication systems in the DNA virome and uncover fundamental principles underlying the orchestration of viral DNA replication. PMID:27112572

  15. On the importance of listening comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Tiffany P.; Adlof, Suzanne M.; Alonzo, Crystle

    2015-01-01

    The simple view of reading highlights the importance of two primary components which account for individual differences in reading comprehension across development: word recognition (i.e., decoding) and listening comprehension. While assessments and interventions for decoding have been the focus of pedagogy in the past several decades, the importance of listening comprehension has received less attention. This paper reviews evidence showing that listening comprehension becomes the dominating influence on reading comprehension starting even in the elementary grades. It also highlights a growing number of children who fail to develop adequate reading comprehension skills, primarily due to deficient listening comprehension skills: poor comprehenders. Finally it discusses key language influences on listening comprehension for consideration during assessment and treatment of reading disabilities. PMID:24833426

  16. On the importance of listening comprehension.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Tiffany P; Adlof, Suzanne M; Alonzo, Crystle N

    2014-06-01

    The simple view of reading highlights the importance of two primary components which account for individual differences in reading comprehension across development: word recognition (i.e., decoding) and listening comprehension. While assessments and interventions for decoding have been the focus of pedagogy in the past several decades, the importance of listening comprehension has received less attention. This paper reviews evidence showing that listening comprehension becomes the dominating influence on reading comprehension starting even in the elementary grades. It also highlights a growing number of children who fail to develop adequate reading comprehension skills, primarily due to deficient listening comprehension skills (i.e., poor comprehenders). Finally we discuss key language influences on listening comprehension for consideration during assessment and treatment of reading disabilities.

  17. Monitoring Local Comprehension Monitoring in Sentence Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorstius, Christian; Radach, Ralph; Mayer, Michael B.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    on ways to improve children's reading comprehension. However, processes and mechanisms underlying this skill are currently not well understood. This article describes one of the first attempts to study comprehension monitoring using eye-tracking methodology. Students in fifth…

  18. Monitoring Local Comprehension Monitoring in Sentence Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorstius, Christian; Radach, Ralph; Mayer, Michael B.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    on ways to improve children's reading comprehension. However, processes and mechanisms underlying this skill are currently not well understood. This article describes one of the first attempts to study comprehension monitoring using eye-tracking methodology. Students in fifth…

  19. Comprehension of Figurative Language in Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nippold, Marilyn A.

    1985-01-01

    A review of developmental studies concerning metaphor, idiom, and proverb comprehension suggest a variety of assessment tasks for language impaired children. Also suggested are such intervention considerations as the comprehension of literal meaning of figurative expressions before nonliteral meanings. (CL)

  20. Molecular DNA switches and DNA chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabanayagam, Chandran R.; Berkey, Cristin; Lavi, Uri; Cantor, Charles R.; Smith, Cassandra L.

    1999-06-01

    We present an assay to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms on a chip using molecular DNA switches and isothermal rolling- circle amplification. The basic principle behind the switch is an allele-specific oligonucleotide circularization, mediated by DNA ligase. A DNA switch is closed when perfect hybridization between the probe oligonucleotide and target DNA allows ligase to covalently circularize the probe. Mismatches around the ligation site prevent probe circularization, resulting in an open switch. DNA polymerase is then used to preferentially amplify the closed switches, via rolling-circle amplification. The stringency of the molecular switches yields 102 - 103 fold discrimination between matched and mismatched sequences.

  1. An automated microfluidic system for single-stranded DNA preparation and magnetic bead-based microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuaiqin; Sun, Yujia; Liu, Yan; Xiang, Guangxin; Wang, Lei; Cheng, Jing; Liu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    We present an integrated microfluidic device capable of performing single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) preparation and magnetic bead-based microarray analysis with a white-light detection for detecting mutations that account for hereditary hearing loss. The entire operation process, which includes loading of streptavidin-coated magnetic beads (MBs) and biotin-labeled polymerase chain reaction products, active dispersion of the MBs with DNA for binding, alkaline denaturation of DNA, dynamic hybridization of the bead-labeled ssDNA to a tag array, and white-light detection, can all be automatically accomplished in a single chamber of the microchip, which was operated on a self-contained instrument with all the necessary components for thermal control, fluidic control, and detection. Two novel mixing valves with embedded polydimethylsiloxane membranes, which can alternately generate a 3-μl pulse flow at a peak rate of around 160 mm/s, were integrated into the chip for thoroughly dispersing magnetic beads in 2 min. The binding efficiency of biotinylated oligonucleotides to beads was measured to be 80.6% of that obtained in a tube with the conventional method. To critically test the performance of this automated microsystem, we employed a commercial microarray-based detection kit for detecting nine mutation loci that account for hereditary hearing loss. The limit of detection of the microsystem was determined as 2.5 ng of input K562 standard genomic DNA using this kit. In addition, four blood samples obtained from persons with mutations were all correctly typed by our system in less than 45 min per run. The fully automated, “amplicon-in-answer-out” operation, together with the white-light detection, makes our system an excellent platform for low-cost, rapid genotyping in clinical diagnosis. PMID:25825617

  2. Epididymal Region-Specific miRNA Expression and DNA Methylation and Their Roles in Controlling Gene Expression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shuanggang; Zhang, Jinsong; Xie, Shengsong; Ma, Wubin; Ni, Minjie; Tang, Chunhua; Zhou, Lu; Zhou, Yuchuan; Liu, Mofang; Li, Yixue; Zhang, Yonglian

    2015-01-01

    Region-specific gene expression is an intriguing feature of the mammalian epididymis. This unique property is essential for sperm maturation and storage, and it also implicates stringent and multi-level regulations of gene expression. Over the past decade, the androgen-driven activation of epididymal gene transcription has been extensively studied. However, it still remains largely unexplored whether and how other regulatory mechanisms, such as miRNAs and DNA methylation, are involved in controlling regional gene expression in the epididymis. Using microarray-based approaches, we studied the regional miRNA expression and DNA methylation profiles in 4 distinct epididymal regions (initial segment, caput, corpus and cauda) of rats. We found that the miR-200 family members were more expressed in caput, compared with cauda. By GSEA analysis, the differential expression of miR-200 family between caput and cauda was shown to be negatively correlated with their predicted target genes, among which 4 bona fide targets were verified by luciferase reporter assay. Predicted target genes of miR-200 family have enriched functions in anti-apoptosis, cell transportation and development, implying the regional diversity in epididymal functions. On the other hand, we revealed epididymal DNA methylation of 2002 CpG islands and 2771 gene promoters (-3.88-0.97kb), among which 1350 (67.43%) CpG islands and 2095 (75.60%) promoters contained region-specific DNA methylation. We observed significant and distinct functional enrichment in genes with specifically methylated promoters in each epididymal regions, but these DNA methylations did not show significant correlation with repressed gene transcription in the mature epididymis. Conclusively, we investigated the regional miRNA expression and DNA methylation in the rat epididymis and revealed a potential role of miR-200 family in gene expression regulation between caput and cauda. This may contribute to the distinct physiological function in

  3. DNA vaccines: a simple DNA sensing matter?

    PubMed

    Coban, Cevayir; Kobiyama, Kouji; Jounai, Nao; Tozuka, Miyuki; Ishii, Ken J

    2013-10-01

    Since the introduction of DNA vaccines two decades ago, this attractive strategy has been hampered by its low immunogenicity in humans. Studies conducted to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines have shown that understanding the mechanism of action of DNA vaccines might be the key to successfully improving their immunogenicity. Our current understanding is that DNA vaccines induce innate and adaptive immune responses in two ways: (1) encoded protein (or polypeptide) antigen(s) by the DNA plasmid can be expressed in stromal cells (i.e., muscle cells) as well as DCs, where these antigens are processed and presented to naïve CD4 or CD8 T cells either by direct or cross presentation, respectively; and (2) the transfected DNA plasmid itself may bind to an un-identified cytosolic DNA sensor and activate the TBK1-STING pathway and the production of type I interferons (IFNs) which function as an adjuvant. Recent studies investigating double-stranded cytosolic DNA sensor(s) have highlighted new mechanisms in which cytosolic DNA may release secondary metabolites, which are in turn recognized by a novel DNA sensing machinery. Here, we discuss these new metabolites and the possibilities of translating this knowledge into improved immunogenicity for DNA vaccines.

  4. DNA Repair by Reversal of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chengqi; He, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous factors constantly challenge cellular DNA, generating cytotoxic and/or mutagenic DNA adducts. As a result, organisms have evolved different mechanisms to defend against the deleterious effects of DNA damage. Among these diverse repair pathways, direct DNA-repair systems provide cells with simple yet efficient solutions to reverse covalent DNA adducts. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the field of direct DNA repair, namely, photolyase-, alkyltransferase-, and dioxygenase-mediated repair processes. We present specific examples to describe new findings of known enzymes and appealing discoveries of new proteins. At the end of this article, we also briefly discuss the influence of direct DNA repair on other fields of biology and its implication on the discovery of new biology. PMID:23284047

  5. Idiom Comprehension in Mandarin-Speaking Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Shelley Ching-Yu; Hsu, Chun-Chieh Natalie

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the effect of familiarity, context, and linguistic convention on idiom comprehension in Mandarin speaking children. Two experiments (a comprehension task followed by a comprehension task coupled with a metapragmatic task) were administered to test participants in three age groups (6 and 9-year-olds, and an adult control group).…

  6. 33 CFR 238.5 - Comprehensive planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Comprehensive planning. 238.5... DEFENSE WATER RESOURCES POLICIES AND AUTHORITIES: FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION MEASURES IN URBAN AREAS § 238.5 Comprehensive planning. Coordinated comprehensive planning at the regional or river basin level, or for an...

  7. 33 CFR 238.5 - Comprehensive planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Comprehensive planning. 238.5... DEFENSE WATER RESOURCES POLICIES AND AUTHORITIES: FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION MEASURES IN URBAN AREAS § 238.5 Comprehensive planning. Coordinated comprehensive planning at the regional or river basin level, or for an...

  8. 33 CFR 238.5 - Comprehensive planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Comprehensive planning. 238.5... DEFENSE WATER RESOURCES POLICIES AND AUTHORITIES: FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION MEASURES IN URBAN AREAS § 238.5 Comprehensive planning. Coordinated comprehensive planning at the regional or river basin level, or for an...

  9. 33 CFR 238.5 - Comprehensive planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Comprehensive planning. 238.5... DEFENSE WATER RESOURCES POLICIES AND AUTHORITIES: FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION MEASURES IN URBAN AREAS § 238.5 Comprehensive planning. Coordinated comprehensive planning at the regional or river basin level, or for an...

  10. Years Later, Comprehension Strategies Still at Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keene, Ellin Oliver; Zimmermann, Susan

    2013-01-01

    In this article, authors Ellin Oliver Keene and Susan Zimmermann reflect on comprehension strategy instruction 15 years after the publication of their book, "Mosaic of Thought: Teaching Comprehension in a Reader's Workshop." They reassert their claim that to teach comprehension well, we must first read widely and scrutinize our own reading…

  11. 33 CFR 238.5 - Comprehensive planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Comprehensive planning. 238.5... Comprehensive planning. Coordinated comprehensive planning at the regional or river basin level, or for an urban.... This planning is particularly important in areas where significant portions of a watershed are...

  12. Guided Comprehension in the Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Maureen

    Intended as a response to recent developments in reading research and a demand by primary-grade teachers for a comprehension-based instructional framework, this book adapts the Guided Comprehension Model introduced in the author/educator's book "Guided Comprehension: A Teaching Model for Grades 3-8." According to the book, the Guided…

  13. 16 CFR 1018.43 - Comprehensive review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Comprehensive review. 1018.43 Section 1018.43 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT Records, Annual Reports and Audits § 1018.43 Comprehensive review. A comprehensive review of...

  14. Text Comprehension Strategy Instruction with Poor Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Bos, Kees P.; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Aarnoutse, Cor A. J.

    1998-01-01

    Investigates effects of teaching text-comprehension strategies to children with decoding and reading-comprehension problems and with a poor or normal listening ability. Finds no differential program effects for the two listening levels. Finds no stable evidence of transfer of comprehension strategy-training to standardized general listening and…

  15. 75 FR 27805 - Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ...] Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA) AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD. ACTION: Notice... good repair. The Comprehensive Needs Assessment is a description of current and future needs and... following information: Title of Proposal: Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA). OMB Approval Number: 2502...

  16. Comprehensive preimplantation genetic screening and sperm deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation from three males carrying balanced chromosome rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Laia; Daina, Gemma; Del Rey, Javier; Ribas-Maynou, Jordi; Fernández-Encinas, Alba; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Boada, Montserrat; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2015-09-01

    To assess whether preimplantation genetic screening can successfully identify cytogenetically normal embryos in couples carrying balanced chromosome rearrangements in addition to increased sperm DNA fragmentation. Comprehensive preimplantation genetic screening was performed on three couples carrying chromosome rearrangements. Sperm DNA fragmentation was assessed for each patient. Academic center. One couple with the male partner carrying a chromosome 2 pericentric inversion and two couples with the male partners carrying a Robertsonian translocation (13:14 and 14:21, respectively). A single blastomere from each of the 18 cleavage-stage embryos obtained was analysed by metaphase comparative genomic hybridization. Single- and double-strand sperm DNA fragmentation was determined by the alkaline and neutral Comet assays. Single- and double-strand sperm DNA fragmentation values and incidence of chromosome imbalances in the blastomeres were analyzed. The obtained values of single-strand sperm DNA fragmentation were between 47% and 59%, and the double-strand sperm DNA fragmentation values were between 43% and 54%. No euploid embryos were observed in the couple showing the highest single-strand sperm DNA fragmentation. However, euploid embryos were observed in the other two couples: embryo transfer was performed, and pregnancy was achieved by the couple showing the lowest sperm DNA fragmentation values. Preimplantation genetic screening enables the detection of euploid embryos in couples affected by balanced chromosome rearrangements and increased sperm DNA fragmentation. Even though sperm DNA fragmentation may potentially have clinical consequences on fertility, comprehensive preimplantation genetic screening allows for the identification and transfer of euploid embryos. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF DNA-BASED TOOLS FOR IDENTIFICATION AND MONITORING OF AQUATIC INTRODUCED SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Claims for potential applications of DNA taxonomy range from identification of unknown specimens and the discovery of new species to the study of biodiversity through comprehensive characterizations of complex biotic communities drawn from environmental samples. Recently, these a...

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF DNA-BASED TOOLS FOR IDENTIFICATION AND MONITORING OF AQUATIC INTRODUCED SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Claims for potential applications of DNA taxonomy range from identification of unknown specimens and the discovery of new species to the study of biodiversity through comprehensive characterizations of complex biotic communities drawn from environmental samples. Recently, these a...

  19. DNA Sequencing Sensors: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Cardenas, Jose Antonio; Garcia-Maroto, Federico; Alvarez-Bermejo, Jose Antonio; Manzano-Agugliaro, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The first sequencing of a complete genome was published forty years ago by the double Nobel Prize in Chemistry winner Frederick Sanger. That corresponded to the small sized genome of a bacteriophage, but since then there have been many complex organisms whose DNA have been sequenced. This was possible thanks to continuous advances in the fields of biochemistry and molecular genetics, but also in other areas such as nanotechnology and computing. Nowadays, sequencing sensors based on genetic material have little to do with those used by Sanger. The emergence of mass sequencing sensors, or new generation sequencing (NGS) meant a quantitative leap both in the volume of genetic material that was able to be sequenced in each trial, as well as in the time per run and its cost. One can envisage that incoming technologies, already known as fourth generation sequencing, will continue to cheapen the trials by increasing DNA reading lengths in each run. All of this would be impossible without sensors and detection systems becoming smaller and more precise. This article provides a comprehensive overview on sensors for DNA sequencing developed within the last 40 years. PMID:28335417

  20. DNA barcoding amphibians and reptiles.

    PubMed

    Vences, Miguel; Nagy, Zoltán T; Sonet, Gontran; Verheyen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Only a few major research programs are currently targeting COI barcoding of amphibians and reptiles (including chelonians and crocodiles), two major groups of tetrapods. Amphibian and reptile species are typically old, strongly divergent, and contain deep conspecific lineages which might lead to problems in species assignment with incomplete reference databases. As far as known, there is no single pair of COI primers that will guarantee a sufficient rate of success across all amphibian and reptile taxa, or within major subclades of amphibians and reptiles, which means that the PCR amplification strategy needs to be adjusted depending on the specific research question. In general, many more amphibian and reptile taxa have been sequenced for 16S rDNA, which for some purposes may be a suitable complementary marker, at least until a more comprehensive COI reference database becomes available. DNA barcoding has successfully been used to identify amphibian larval stages (tadpoles) in species-rich tropical assemblages. Tissue sampling, DNA extraction, and amplification of COI is straightforward in amphibians and reptiles. Single primer pairs are likely to have a failure rate between 5 and 50% if taxa of a wide taxonomic range are targeted; in such cases the use of primer cocktails or subsequent hierarchical usage of different primer pairs is necessary. If the target group is taxonomically limited, many studies have followed a strategy of designing specific primers which then allow an easy and reliable amplification of all samples.

  1. Temperature dependence of DNA translocations through solid-state nanopores.

    PubMed

    Verschueren, Daniel V; Jonsson, Magnus P; Dekker, Cees

    2015-06-12

    In order to gain a better physical understanding of DNA translocations through solid-state nanopores, we study the temperature dependence of λ-DNA translocations through 10 nm diameter silicon nitride nanopores, both experimentally and theoretically. The measured ionic conductance G, the DNA-induced ionic-conductance blockades [Formula: see text] and the event frequency Γ all increase with increasing temperature while the DNA translocation time τ decreases. G and [Formula: see text] are accurately described when bulk and surface conductances of the nanopore are considered and access resistance is incorporated appropriately. Viscous drag on the untranslocated part of the DNA coil is found to dominate the temperature dependence of the translocation times and the event rate is well described by a balance between diffusion and electrophoretic motion. The good fit between modeled and measured properties of DNA translocations through solid-state nanopores in this first comprehensive temperature study, suggest that our model captures the relevant physics of the process.

  2. Prediction During Natural Language Comprehension.

    PubMed

    Willems, Roel M; Frank, Stefan L; Nijhof, Annabel D; Hagoort, Peter; van den Bosch, Antal

    2016-06-01

    The notion of prediction is studied in cognitive neuroscience with increasing intensity. We investigated the neural basis of 2 distinct aspects of word prediction, derived from information theory, during story comprehension. We assessed the effect of entropy of next-word probability distributions as well as surprisal A computational model determined entropy and surprisal for each word in 3 literary stories. Twenty-four healthy participants listened to the same 3 stories while their brain activation was measured using fMRI. Reversed speech fragments were presented as a control condition. Brain areas sensitive to entropy were left ventral premotor cortex, left middle frontal gyrus, right inferior frontal gyrus, left inferior parietal lobule, and left supplementary motor area. Areas sensitive to surprisal were left inferior temporal sulcus ("visual word form area"), bilateral superior temporal gyrus, right amygdala, bilateral anterior temporal poles, and right inferior frontal sulcus. We conclude that prediction during language comprehension can occur at several levels of processing, including at the level of word form. Our study exemplifies the power of combining computational linguistics with cognitive neuroscience, and additionally underlines the feasibility of studying continuous spoken language materials with fMRI.

  3. Comprehensive Environmental Assessment Applied to ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In September 2013, EPA announced the availability of the final report, Comprehensive Environmental Assessment Applied to Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Flame-Retardant Coatings in Upholstery Textiles: A Case Study Presenting Priority Research Gaps for Future Risk Assessments. This final report presents a case study of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs); it focuses on the specific example of MWCNTs as used in flame-retardant coatings applied to upholstery textiles. This case study is organized around the comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) framework, which structures available information pertaining to the product life cycle, environmental transport and fate, exposure-dose in receptors (i.e., humans, ecological populations, and the environment), and potential impacts in these receptors. A group of experts representing multiple disciplines and multiple sector perspectives used an earlier draft of the case study in conjunction with a structured workshop process to identify and prioritize research gaps that, if pursued, could inform future MWCNT assessment efforts. The final report is not a health, risk, or exposure assessment and as such does not draw conclusions about potential risks, or present an exhaustive review of the literature. Rather, it presents the MWCNT research priorities that experts identified in this application of CEA in order to aid research planning throughout the scientific community. The outcomes of these research efforts may subsequ

  4. Medicinal marijuana: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Gurley, R J; Aranow, R; Katz, M

    1998-01-01

    Considerable controversy exists regarding the role of marijuana as a therapeutic agent; however, many practitioners are taught very little about existing marijuana data. The authors therefore undertook a comprehensive literature review of the topic. References were identified using textbooks, review and opinion articles, and a primary literature review in MEDLINE. Sources were included in this review based primarily on the quality of the data. Some data exists that lends credence to many of the claims about marijuana's properties. In general, however, the body of literature about marijuana is extremely poor in quality. Marijuana and/or its components may help alleviate suffering in patients with a variety of serious illnesses. Health care providers can best minimize short term adverse consequences and drug interactions for terminally ill patients by having a thorough understanding of the pharmacology of marijuana, potential adverse reactions, infection risks, and drug interactions (along with on-going monitoring of the patient). For chronic conditions, the significance and risk of short and long term adverse effects must be weighed against the desired benefit. Patients who are best suited to medicinal marijuana will be those who will gain substantial benefit to offset these risks, and who have failed a well-documented, compliant and comprehensive approach to standard therapies.

  5. Comprehensive Environmental Assessment Applied to ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In September 2013, EPA announced the availability of the final report, Comprehensive Environmental Assessment Applied to Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Flame-Retardant Coatings in Upholstery Textiles: A Case Study Presenting Priority Research Gaps for Future Risk Assessments. This final report presents a case study of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs); it focuses on the specific example of MWCNTs as used in flame-retardant coatings applied to upholstery textiles. This case study is organized around the comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) framework, which structures available information pertaining to the product life cycle, environmental transport and fate, exposure-dose in receptors (i.e., humans, ecological populations, and the environment), and potential impacts in these receptors. A group of experts representing multiple disciplines and multiple sector perspectives used an earlier draft of the case study in conjunction with a structured workshop process to identify and prioritize research gaps that, if pursued, could inform future MWCNT assessment efforts. The final report is not a health, risk, or exposure assessment and as such does not draw conclusions about potential risks, or present an exhaustive review of the literature. Rather, it presents the MWCNT research priorities that experts identified in this application of CEA in order to aid research planning throughout the scientific community. The outcomes of these research efforts may subsequ

  6. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to the DNA mapping and sequencing technologies. In particular, the present invention provides enhanced methods and compositions for the physical mapping and positional cloning of genomic DNA. The present invention also provides a useful analytical technique to directly map cloned DNA sequences onto individual stretched DNA molecules.

  7. Mechanisms of DNA disentangling by type II topoisomerases. Comment on "Disentangling DNA molecules" by Alexander Vologodskii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jie

    2016-09-01

    In this article [1] Dr. Vologodskii presents a comprehensive discussion on the mechanisms by which the type II topoisomerases unknot/disentangle DNA molecules. It is motivated by a mysterious capability of the nanometer-size enzymes to keep the steady-state probability of DNA entanglement/knot almost two orders of magnitude below that expected from thermal equilibrium [2-5]. In spite of obvious functional advantages of the enzymes, it raises a question regarding how such high efficiency could be achieved. The off-equilibrium steady state distribution of DNA topology is powered by ATP consumption. However, it remains unclear how this energy is utilized to bias the distribution toward disentangled/unknotted topological states of DNA.

  8. DNA evidence: current perspective and future challenges in India.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sunil K; Goswami, Gajendra K

    2014-08-01

    Since the discovery of DNA fingerprinting technology in 1985 it has been used extensively as evidence in the court of law world-wide to establish the individual identity both in civil and criminal matters. In India, the first case of parentage dispute solved by the use of DNA fingerprinting technology was in 1989. Since then till date, the DNA technology has been used not only to resolve the cases of paternity and maternity disputes, but also for the establishment of individual identity in various criminal cases and for wildlife forensic identification. Since last half a decade, India is exercising to enact legislation on the use of DNA in the judicial realm and the draft 'Human DNA Bill-2012' is pending in the parliament. Largely, the promoters of forensic DNA testing have anticipated that DNA tests are nearly infallible and DNA technology could be the greatest single advance step in search for truth, conviction of the perpetrator, and acquittal of the innocent. The current article provides a comprehensive review on the status of DNA testing in India and elucidates the consequences of the admissibility of DNA as 'evidence' in the judicial dominion. In this backdrop of civil and criminal laws and changing ethical and societal attitudes, it is concluded that the DNA legislation in India and world-wide needs to be designed with utmost care.

  9. Poxvirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses are large, enveloped viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm and encode proteins for DNA replication and gene expression. Hairpin ends link the two strands of the linear, double-stranded DNA genome. Viral proteins involved in DNA synthesis include a 117-kDa polymerase, a helicase–primase, a uracil DNA glycosylase, a processivity factor, a single-stranded DNA-binding protein, a protein kinase, and a DNA ligase. A viral FEN1 family protein participates in double-strand break repair. The DNA is replicated as long concatemers that are resolved by a viral Holliday junction endonuclease. PMID:23838441

  10. Single-molecule studies reveal reciprocating of WRN helicase core along ssDNA during DNA unwinding

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-Qiang; Hou, Xi-Miao; Zhang, Bo; Fossé, Philippe; René, Brigitte; Mauffret, Olivier; Li, Ming; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Xi, Xu-Guang

    2017-01-01

    Werner syndrome is caused by mutations in the WRN gene encoding WRN helicase. A knowledge of WRN helicase’s DNA unwinding mechanism in vitro is helpful for predicting its behaviors in vivo, and then understanding their biological functions. In the present study, for deeply understanding the DNA unwinding mechanism of WRN, we comprehensively characterized the DNA unwinding properties of chicken WRN helicase core in details, by taking advantages of single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) method. We showed that WRN exhibits repetitive DNA unwinding and translocation behaviors on different DNA structures, including forked, overhanging and G-quadruplex-containing DNAs with an apparently limited unwinding processivity. It was further revealed that the repetitive behaviors were caused by reciprocating of WRN along the same ssDNA, rather than by complete dissociation from and rebinding to substrates or by strand switching. The present study sheds new light on the mechanism for WRN functioning. PMID:28266653

  11. Single-molecule studies reveal reciprocating of WRN helicase core along ssDNA during DNA unwinding.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Qiang; Hou, Xi-Miao; Zhang, Bo; Fossé, Philippe; René, Brigitte; Mauffret, Olivier; Li, Ming; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Xi, Xu-Guang

    2017-03-07

    Werner syndrome is caused by mutations in the WRN gene encoding WRN helicase. A knowledge of WRN helicase's DNA unwinding mechanism in vitro is helpful for predicting its behaviors in vivo, and then understanding their biological functions. In the present study, for deeply understanding the DNA unwinding mechanism of WRN, we comprehensively characterized the DNA unwinding properties of chicken WRN helicase core in details, by taking advantages of single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) method. We showed that WRN exhibits repetitive DNA unwinding and translocation behaviors on different DNA structures, including forked, overhanging and G-quadruplex-containing DNAs with an apparently limited unwinding processivity. It was further revealed that the repetitive behaviors were caused by reciprocating of WRN along the same ssDNA, rather than by complete dissociation from and rebinding to substrates or by strand switching. The present study sheds new light on the mechanism for WRN functioning.

  12. Who Did What to Whom? The Relationship between Syntactic Aspects of Sentence Comprehension and Text Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulsen, Mads; Gravgaard, Amalie K. D.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between syntactic comprehension at the sentence level and text-level comprehension. The study isolated the specific contribution of syntax by asking whether sentence comprehension efficiency of difficult syntactic constructions explained variance in text comprehension after controlling for sentence…

  13. Who Did What to Whom? The Relationship between Syntactic Aspects of Sentence Comprehension and Text Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulsen, Mads; Gravgaard, Amalie K. D.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between syntactic comprehension at the sentence level and text-level comprehension. The study isolated the specific contribution of syntax by asking whether sentence comprehension efficiency of difficult syntactic constructions explained variance in text comprehension after controlling for sentence…

  14. Nursing supervision for care comprehensiveness.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Lucieli Dias Pedreschi; Mininel, Vivian Aline; Silva, Jaqueline Alcântara Marcelino da; Alves, Larissa Roberta; Silva, Maria Ferreira da; Camelo, Silvia Helena Henriques

    2017-01-01

    To reflect on nursing supervision as a management tool for care comprehensiveness by nurses, considering its potential and limits in the current scenario. A reflective study based on discourse about nursing supervision, presenting theoretical and practical concepts and approaches. Limits on the exercise of supervision are related to the organization of healthcare services based on the functional and clinical model of care, in addition to possible gaps in the nurse training process and work overload. Regarding the potential, researchers emphasize that supervision is a tool for coordinating care and management actions, which may favor care comprehensiveness, and stimulate positive attitudes toward cooperation and contribution within teams, co-responsibility, and educational development at work. Nursing supervision may help enhance care comprehensiveness by implying continuous reflection on including the dynamics of the healthcare work process and user needs in care networks. refletir a supervisão de enfermagem como instrumento gerencial do enfermeiro para integralidade do cuidado, considerando suas potencialidades e limitações no cenário atual. estudo reflexivo baseado na formulação discursiva sobre a supervisão de enfermagem, apresentando conceitos e enfoques teóricos e/ou práticos. limitações no exercício da supervisão estão relacionadas à organização dos serviços de saúde embasada no modelo funcional e clínico de atenção, assim como possíveis lacunas no processo de formação do enfermeiro e sobrecarga de trabalho. Quanto às potencialidades, destaca-se a supervisão como instrumento de articulação de ações assistenciais e gerenciais, que pode favorecer integralidade da atenção, estimular atitudes de cooperação e colaboração em equipe, além da corresponsabilização e promoção da educação no trabalho. supervisão de enfermagem pode contribuir para fortalecimento da integralidade do cuidado, pressupondo reflexão cont

  15. SITE COMPREHENSIVE LISTING (CERCLIS) (Superfund)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) (Superfund) Public Access Database contains a selected set of non-enforcement confidential information and is updated by the regions every 90 days. The data describes what has happened at Superfund sites prior to this quarter (updated quarterly). This database includes lists of involved parties (other Federal Agencies, states, and tribes), Human Exposure and Ground Water Migration, and Site Wide Ready for Reuse, Construction Completion, and Final Assessment Decision (GPRA-like measures) for fund lead sites. Other information that is included has been included only as a service to allow public evaluations utilizing this data. EPA does not have specific Data Quality Objectives for use of the data. Independent Quality Assessments may be made of this data by reviewing the Quality Assurance Action Plan (QAPP).

  16. A comprehensive approach to bereavement.

    PubMed

    Steen, K F

    1998-03-01

    Bereavement is associated with significant mental and physical health consequences, and risk factors for illness associated with bereavement have been demonstrated. Although bereavement cannot be eliminated as a health risk, primary care providers can screen for it, facilitate the normal grief process, and mitigate risks for bereavement complications and health deterioration. Considering the time constraints in today's fast-paced health care environment, this article offers a clear and comprehensive framework for primary care of grieving people. The framework presented here includes (1) empirically shown risk factors for health deterioration in bereavement; (2) an assessment and screening patient history format suitable for primary bereavement care; (3) primary care guidelines for differential diagnosis of bereavement; and (4) principles of primary care for the bereaved. This article also addresses primary care for bereaved children, parents, and other specific bereaved populations, and discusses pharmacotherapy and multicultural considerations in bereavement.

  17. Ocular parasitoses: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Padhi, Tapas Ranjan; Das, Sujata; Sharma, Savitri; Rath, Soveeta; Rath, Suryasnata; Tripathy, Devjyoti; Panda, Krushna Gopal; Basu, Soumyava; Besirli, Cagri G

    Parasitic infections of the eyes are a major cause of ocular diseases across the globe. The causative agents range from simple organisms such as unicellular protozoans to complex metazoan helminths. The disease spectrum varies depending on the geographic location, prevailing hygiene, living and eating habits of the inhabitants, and the type of animals that surround them. They cause enormous ocular morbidity and mortality not because they are untreatable, but largely due to late or misdiagnosis, often from unfamiliarity with the diseases produced. We provide an up-to-date comprehensive overview of the ophthalmic parasitoses. Each section describes the causative agent, mode of transmission, geographic distribution, ocular pathologies, and their management for common parasites with brief mention of the ones that are rare. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Retrieval interference in sentence comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyke, Julie A.; McElree, Brian

    2007-01-01

    The role of interference effects in sentence processing has recently begun to receive attention, however whether these effects arise during encoding or retrieval remains unclear. This paper draws on basic memory research to help distinguish these explanations and reports data from an experiment that manipulates the possibility for retrieval interference while holding encoding conditions constant. We found clear support for the principle of cue-overload, wherein cues available at retrieval cannot uniquely distinguish among competitors, thus giving rise to interference effects. We discuss the data in relation to a cue-based parsing framework (Van Dyke & Lewis, 2003) and other interference effects observed in sentence processing (e.g., Gordon, Hendrick, & Johnson, 2001, 2004). We conclude from the available data that the memory system that subserves language comprehension operates according to similar principles as memory in other domains. PMID:18209744

  19. Mycobacterial endocarditis: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Shi-Min, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Objective A systematic analysis was made in view of the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and main outcomes of mycobacterial endocarditis. Methods The data source of the present study was based on a comprehensive literature search in MEDLINE, Highwire Press and Google search engine for publications on mycobacterial endocarditis published between 2000 and 2013. Results The rapidly growing mycobacteria become the predominant pathogens with Mycobacterium chelonae being the most common. This condition has changed significantly in terms of epidemiology since the 21st century, with more broad patient age range, longer latency, prevailed mitral valve infections and better prognosis. Conclusion Mycobacterial endocarditis is rare and the causative pathogens are predominantly the rapidly growing mycobacteria. Amikacin, ciprofloxacin and clarithromycin are the most frequently used targeted antimicrobial agents but often show poor responses. Patients with deep infections may warrant a surgical operation or line withdrawal. With periodic multidrug therapy guided by drug susceptibility testing, and surgical managements, patients may achieve good therapeutic results. PMID:25859873

  20. Anticipatory Deaccenting in Language Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Carbary, Kathleen; Brown, Meredith; Gunlogson, Christine; McDonough, Joyce M.; Fazlipour, Aleksandra; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the hypothesis that listeners can generate expectations about upcoming input using anticipatory deaccenting, in which the absence of a nuclear pitch accent on an utterance-new noun is licensed by the subsequent repetition of that noun (e.g. Drag the SQUARE with the house to the TRIangle with the house). The phonemic restoration paradigm was modified to obscure word-initial segmental information uniquely identifying the final word in a spoken instruction, resulting in a stimulus compatible with two lexical alternatives (e.g. mouse/house). In Experiment 1, we measured participants’ final interpretations and response times. Experiment 2 used the same materials in a crowd-sourced gating study. Sentence interpretations at gated intervals, final interpretations, and response times provided converging evidence that the anticipatory deaccenting pattern contributed to listeners’ referential expectations. The results illustrate the availability and importance of sentence-level accent patterns in spoken language comprehension. PMID:25642426