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Sample records for comprehensive microarray-based dna

  1. DNA Microarray-Based Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Marzancola, Mahsa Gharibi; Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2016-01-01

    The DNA microarray technology is currently a useful biomedical tool which has been developed for a variety of diagnostic applications. However, the development pathway has not been smooth and the technology has faced some challenges. The reliability of the microarray data and also the clinical utility of the results in the early days were criticized. These criticisms added to the severe competition from other techniques, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), impacting the growth of microarray-based tests in the molecular diagnostic market.Thanks to the advances in the underlying technologies as well as the tremendous effort offered by the research community and commercial vendors, these challenges have mostly been addressed. Nowadays, the microarray platform has achieved sufficient standardization and method validation as well as efficient probe printing, liquid handling and signal visualization. Integration of various steps of the microarray assay into a harmonized and miniaturized handheld lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device has been a goal for the microarray community. In this respect, notable progress has been achieved in coupling the DNA microarray with the liquid manipulation microsystem as well as the supporting subsystem that will generate the stand-alone LOC device.In this chapter, we discuss the major challenges that microarray technology has faced in its almost two decades of development and also describe the solutions to overcome the challenges. In addition, we review the advancements of the technology, especially the progress toward developing the LOC devices for DNA diagnostic applications.

  2. DNA microarray-based PCR ribotyping of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Schneeberg, Alexander; Ehricht, Ralf; Slickers, Peter; Baier, Vico; Neubauer, Heinrich; Zimmermann, Stefan; Rabold, Denise; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Seyboldt, Christian

    2015-02-01

    This study presents a DNA microarray-based assay for fast and simple PCR ribotyping of Clostridium difficile strains. Hybridization probes were designed to query the modularly structured intergenic spacer region (ISR), which is also the template for conventional and PCR ribotyping with subsequent capillary gel electrophoresis (seq-PCR) ribotyping. The probes were derived from sequences available in GenBank as well as from theoretical ISR module combinations. A database of reference hybridization patterns was set up from a collection of 142 well-characterized C. difficile isolates representing 48 seq-PCR ribotypes. The reference hybridization patterns calculated by the arithmetic mean were compared using a similarity matrix analysis. The 48 investigated seq-PCR ribotypes revealed 27 array profiles that were clearly distinguishable. The most frequent human-pathogenic ribotypes 001, 014/020, 027, and 078/126 were discriminated by the microarray. C. difficile strains related to 078/126 (033, 045/FLI01, 078, 126, 126/FLI01, 413, 413/FLI01, 598, 620, 652, and 660) and 014/020 (014, 020, and 449) showed similar hybridization patterns, confirming their genetic relatedness, which was previously reported. A panel of 50 C. difficile field isolates was tested by seq-PCR ribotyping and the DNA microarray-based assay in parallel. Taking into account that the current version of the microarray does not discriminate some closely related seq-PCR ribotypes, all isolates were typed correctly. Moreover, seq-PCR ribotypes without reference profiles available in the database (ribotype 009 and 5 new types) were correctly recognized as new ribotypes, confirming the performance and expansion potential of the microarray.

  3. Robust embryo identification using first polar body single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Treff, Nathan R; Su, Jing; Kasabwala, Natasha; Tao, Xin; Miller, Kathleen A; Scott, Richard T

    2010-05-01

    This study sought to validate a novel, minimally invasive system for embryo tracking by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based DNA fingerprinting of the first polar body. First polar body-based assignments of which embryos implanted and were delivered after multiple ET were 100% consistent with previously validated embryo DNA fingerprinting-based assignments.

  4. Rapid microarray-based DNA genoserotyping of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Geue, Lutz; Monecke, Stefan; Engelmann, Ines; Braun, Sascha; Slickers, Peter; Ehricht, Ralf

    2014-02-01

    In this study, an improvement in the oligonucleotide-based DNA microarray for the genoserotyping of Escherichia coli is presented. Primer and probes for additional 70 O antigen groups were developed. The microarray was transferred to a new platform, the ArrayStrip format, which allows high through-put tests in 96-well formats and fully automated microarray analysis. Thus, starting from a single colony, it is possible to determine within a few hours and a single experiment, 94 of the over 180 known O antigen groups as well as 47 of the 53 different H antigens. The microarray was initially validated with a set of defined reference strains that had previously been serotyped by conventional agglutination in various reference centers. For further validation of the microarray, 180 clinical E. coli isolates of human origin (from urine samples, blood cultures, bronchial secretions, and wound swabs) and 53 E. coli isolates from cattle, pigs, and poultry were used. A high degree of concordance between the results of classical antibody-based serotyping and DNA-based genoserotyping was demonstrated during validation of the new 70 O antigen groups as well as for the field strains of human and animal origin. Therefore, this oligonucleotide array is a diagnostic tool that is user-friendly and more efficient than classical serotyping by agglutination. Furthermore, the tests can be performed in almost every routine lab and are easily expanded and standardized.

  5. Microarray-based DNA methylation study of Ewing's sarcoma of the bone.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Rim; Jung, Woon-Won; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Park, Yong-Koo

    2014-10-01

    Alterations in DNA methylation patterns are a hallmark of malignancy. However, the majority of epigenetic studies of Ewing's sarcoma have focused on the analysis of only a few candidate genes. Comprehensive studies are thus lacking and are required. The aim of the present study was to identify novel methylation markers in Ewing's sarcoma using microarray analysis. The current study reports the microarray-based DNA methylation study of 1,505 CpG sites of 807 cancer-related genes from 69 Ewing's sarcoma samples. The Illumina GoldenGate Methylation Cancer Panel I microarray was used, and with the appropriate controls (n=14), a total of 92 hypermethylated genes were identified in the Ewing's sarcoma samples. The majority of the hypermethylated genes were associated with cell adhesion, cell regulation, development and signal transduction. The overall methylation mean values were compared between patients who survived and those that did not. The overall methylation mean was significantly higher in the patients who did not survive (0.25±0.03) than in those who did (0.22±0.05) (P=0.0322). However, the overall methylation mean was not found to significantly correlate with age, gender or tumor location. GDF10, OSM, APC and HOXA11 were the most significant differentially-methylated genes, however, their methylation levels were not found to significantly correlate with the survival rate. The DNA methylation profile of Ewing's sarcoma was characterized and 92 genes that were significantly hypermethylated were detected. A trend towards a more aggressive behavior was identified in the methylated group. The results of this study indicated that methylation may be significant in the development of Ewing's sarcoma.

  6. Microarray-based resonance light scattering assay for detecting DNA methylation and human DNA methyltransferase simultaneously with high sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lan; Su, Min; Li, Tao; Wang, Zhenxin

    2014-07-21

    A microarray-based resonance light scattering assay, with the combination of methylation-sensitive endonuclease and gold nanoparticle (GNP) probes, has been proposed to sensitively distinguish the DNA methylation level as low as 0.01% (10 pM methylated DNA in 100 nM total DNA) and detect human DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) down to 0.1 U mL(-1).

  7. DNA microarray-based detection of multiple pathogens: Mycoplasma spp. and Chlamydia spp.

    PubMed

    Schnee, Christiane; Sachse, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Rapid detection of slow-growing or non-culturable microorganisms, such as Mycoplasma spp. and Chlamydia spp., is still a challenge to diagnosticians in the veterinary field. In addition, as epidemiological evidence on the frequency of mixed infections involving two and more bacterial species has been emerging, detection methods allowing simultaneous identification of different pathogens are required. In the present chapter, we describe DNA microarray-based procedures for the detection of 83 Mollicutes species (Mycoplasma assay) and 11 Chlamydia spp. (Chlamydia assay). The assays are suitable for use in a routine diagnostic environment, as well as in microbiological research.

  8. A DNA microarray-based assay to detect dual infection with two dengue virus serotypes.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Badillo, Alvaro; Muñoz, María de Lourdes; Perez-Ramirez, Gerardo; Altuzar, Victor; Burgueño, Juan; Mendoza-Alvarez, Julio G; Martínez-Muñoz, Jorge P; Cisneros, Alejandro; Navarrete-Espinosa, Joel; Sanchez-Sinencio, Feliciano

    2014-01-01

    Here; we have described and tested a microarray based-method for the screening of dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. This DNA microarray assay is specific and sensitive and can detect dual infections with two dengue virus serotypes and single-serotype infections. Other methodologies may underestimate samples containing more than one serotype. This technology can be used to discriminate between the four DENV serotypes. Single-stranded DNA targets were covalently attached to glass slides and hybridised with specific labelled probes. DENV isolates and dengue samples were used to evaluate microarray performance. Our results demonstrate that the probes hybridized specifically to DENV serotypes; with no detection of unspecific signals. This finding provides evidence that specific probes can effectively identify single and double infections in DENV samples. PMID:24776933

  9. A DNA Microarray-Based Assay to Detect Dual Infection with Two Dengue Virus Serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Badillo, Alvaro; de Lourdes Muñoz, María; Perez-Ramirez, Gerardo; Altuzar, Victor; Burgueño, Juan; Mendoza-Alvarez, Julio G.; Martínez-Muñoz, Jorge P.; Cisneros, Alejandro; Navarrete-Espinosa, Joel; Sanchez-Sinencio, Feliciano

    2014-01-01

    Here; we have described and tested a microarray based-method for the screening of dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. This DNA microarray assay is specific and sensitive and can detect dual infections with two dengue virus serotypes and single-serotype infections. Other methodologies may underestimate samples containing more than one serotype. This technology can be used to discriminate between the four DENV serotypes. Single-stranded DNA targets were covalently attached to glass slides and hybridised with specific labelled probes. DENV isolates and dengue samples were used to evaluate microarray performance. Our results demonstrate that the probes hybridized specifically to DENV serotypes; with no detection of unspecific signals. This finding provides evidence that specific probes can effectively identify single and double infections in DENV samples. PMID:24776933

  10. A DNA microarray-based assay to detect dual infection with two dengue virus serotypes.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Badillo, Alvaro; Muñoz, María de Lourdes; Perez-Ramirez, Gerardo; Altuzar, Victor; Burgueño, Juan; Mendoza-Alvarez, Julio G; Martínez-Muñoz, Jorge P; Cisneros, Alejandro; Navarrete-Espinosa, Joel; Sanchez-Sinencio, Feliciano

    2014-01-01

    Here; we have described and tested a microarray based-method for the screening of dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. This DNA microarray assay is specific and sensitive and can detect dual infections with two dengue virus serotypes and single-serotype infections. Other methodologies may underestimate samples containing more than one serotype. This technology can be used to discriminate between the four DENV serotypes. Single-stranded DNA targets were covalently attached to glass slides and hybridised with specific labelled probes. DENV isolates and dengue samples were used to evaluate microarray performance. Our results demonstrate that the probes hybridized specifically to DENV serotypes; with no detection of unspecific signals. This finding provides evidence that specific probes can effectively identify single and double infections in DENV samples.

  11. Development and application of a DNA microarray-based yeast two-hybrid system

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Bernhard; Fontaine, Jean-Fred; Yildirimman, Reha; Raskó, Tamás; Schaefer, Martin H.; Rasche, Axel; Porras, Pablo; Vázquez-Álvarez, Blanca M.; Russ, Jenny; Rau, Kirstin; Foulle, Raphaele; Zenkner, Martina; Saar, Kathrin; Herwig, Ralf; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Wanker, Erich E.

    2013-01-01

    The yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system is the most widely applied methodology for systematic protein–protein interaction (PPI) screening and the generation of comprehensive interaction networks. We developed a novel Y2H interaction screening procedure using DNA microarrays for high-throughput quantitative PPI detection. Applying a global pooling and selection scheme to a large collection of human open reading frames, proof-of-principle Y2H interaction screens were performed for the human neurodegenerative disease proteins huntingtin and ataxin-1. Using systematic controls for unspecific Y2H results and quantitative benchmarking, we identified and scored a large number of known and novel partner proteins for both huntingtin and ataxin-1. Moreover, we show that this parallelized screening procedure and the global inspection of Y2H interaction data are uniquely suited to define specific PPI patterns and their alteration by disease-causing mutations in huntingtin and ataxin-1. This approach takes advantage of the specificity and flexibility of DNA microarrays and of the existence of solid-related statistical methods for the analysis of DNA microarray data, and allows a quantitative approach toward interaction screens in human and in model organisms. PMID:23275563

  12. Rapid extraction of genomic DNA from saliva for HLA typing on microarray based on magnetic nanobeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xin; Zhang, Xu; Yu, Bingbin; Gao, Huafang; Zhang, Huan; Fei, Weiyang

    2004-09-01

    A series of simplified protocols are developed for extracting genomic DNA from saliva by using the magnetic nanobeads as absorbents. In these protocols, both the enrichment of the target cells and the adsorption of DNA can be achieved simultaneously by our functionally modified magnetic beads in one step, and the DNA-nanobeads complex can be used as PCR templates. HLA typing based on an oligonucleotide array was conducted by hybridization with the PCR products. The result shows that the protocols are robust and sensitive.

  13. Influence of polymerase brand on microarray-based spoligotyping in low concentrations of mycobacterial DNA.

    PubMed

    Monecke, Stefan; Engelmann, Ines; Ehricht, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Spoligotyping is a widely used typing method for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Protocols and platforms can be adapted for direct use on patient samples. Serial dilutions of genomic DNA from Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain DSM45071 were spoligotyped by array hybridization using 32 different commercial PCR polymerase preparations. In samples with very low concentrations of mycobacterial DNA, commercially available PCR polymerases differed in their performance, and some yielded no, or false, identification. Direct spoligotyping from samples with very low concentrations of mycobacterial DNA thus requires careful selection of polymerase and strict standardization.

  14. A platform for combined DNA and protein microarrays based on total internal reflection fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Asanov, Alexander; Zepeda, Angélica; Vaca, Luis

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a novel microarray technology based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) in combination with DNA and protein bioassays immobilized at the TIRF surface. Unlike conventional microarrays that exhibit reduced signal-to-background ratio, require several stages of incubation, rinsing and stringency control, and measure only end-point results, our TIRF microarray technology provides several orders of magnitude better signal-to-background ratio, performs analysis rapidly in one step, and measures the entire course of association and dissociation kinetics between target DNA and protein molecules and the bioassays. In many practical cases detection of only DNA or protein markers alone does not provide the necessary accuracy for diagnosing a disease or detecting a pathogen. Here we describe TIRF microarrays that detect DNA and protein markers simultaneously, which reduces the probabilities of false responses. Supersensitive and multiplexed TIRF DNA and protein microarray technology may provide a platform for accurate diagnosis or enhanced research studies. Our TIRF microarray system can be mounted on upright or inverted microscopes or interfaced directly with CCD cameras equipped with a single objective, facilitating the development of portable devices. As proof-of-concept we applied TIRF microarrays for detecting molecular markers from Bacillus anthracis, the pathogen responsible for anthrax.

  15. A Platform for Combined DNA and Protein Microarrays Based on Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Asanov, Alexander; Zepeda, Angélica; Vaca, Luis

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a novel microarray technology based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) in combination with DNA and protein bioassays immobilized at the TIRF surface. Unlike conventional microarrays that exhibit reduced signal-to-background ratio, require several stages of incubation, rinsing and stringency control, and measure only end-point results, our TIRF microarray technology provides several orders of magnitude better signal-to-background ratio, performs analysis rapidly in one step, and measures the entire course of association and dissociation kinetics between target DNA and protein molecules and the bioassays. In many practical cases detection of only DNA or protein markers alone does not provide the necessary accuracy for diagnosing a disease or detecting a pathogen. Here we describe TIRF microarrays that detect DNA and protein markers simultaneously, which reduces the probabilities of false responses. Supersensitive and multiplexed TIRF DNA and protein microarray technology may provide a platform for accurate diagnosis or enhanced research studies. Our TIRF microarray system can be mounted on upright or inverted microscopes or interfaced directly with CCD cameras equipped with a single objective, facilitating the development of portable devices. As proof-of-concept we applied TIRF microarrays for detecting molecular markers from Bacillus anthracis, the pathogen responsible for anthrax. PMID:22438738

  16. Development of a DNA Microarray-Based Assay for the Detection of Sugar Beet Root Rot Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Liebe, Sebastian; Christ, Daniela S; Ehricht, Ralf; Varrelmann, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Sugar beet root rot diseases that occur during the cropping season or in storage are accompanied by high yield losses and a severe reduction of processing quality. The vast diversity of microorganism species involved in rot development requires molecular tools allowing simultaneous identification of many different targets. Therefore, a new microarray technology (ArrayTube) was applied in this study to improve diagnosis of sugar beet root rot diseases. Based on three marker genes (internal transcribed spacer, translation elongation factor 1 alpha, and 16S ribosomal DNA), 42 well-performing probes enabled the identification of prevalent field pathogens (e.g., Aphanomyces cochlioides), storage pathogens (e.g., Botrytis cinerea), and ubiquitous spoilage fungi (e.g., Penicillium expansum). All probes were proven for specificity with pure cultures from 73 microorganism species as well as for in planta detection of their target species using inoculated sugar beet tissue. Microarray-based identification of root rot pathogens in diseased field beets was successfully confirmed by classical detection methods. The high discriminatory potential was proven by Fusarium species differentiation based on a single nucleotide polymorphism. The results demonstrate that the ArrayTube constitute an innovative tool allowing a rapid and reliable detection of plant pathogens particularly when multiple microorganism species are present. PMID:26524545

  17. Genotyping and DNA microarray based characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from rabbit carcasses.

    PubMed

    Merz, Axel; Stephan, Roger; Johler, Sophia

    2016-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can cause staphylococcal food poisoning. Although the organism is frequently detected on rabbit carcasses, little is known about the characteristics of S. aureus strains contaminating rabbit meat. In this study, 137 S. aureus isolates originating from 137 rabbit carcasses were spa typed and characterized by DNA microarray. The isolates were assigned to CC5, CC7, CC8, CC15, CC96, CC101, CC121, and ST890, and to 13 spa types (t056, t085, t091, t160, t179, t681, t741, t745, t1190, t1773, t4770, t8456, t14871). Enterotoxin genes detected included sea, sed, sej, and ser. In addition, the egc operon, encoding the newly described staphylococcal enterotoxins SEG/SEI/SElM/SElN/SElO/SElU, was found in all isolates except those of t091. While none of the examined isolates presented genes conferring methicillin, vancomycin, or aminoglycoside resistance, we frequently detected blaZ/I/R conferring resistance to penicillin. The isolates represented a heterogeneous group assigned to clonal lineages detected among humans and animals, with two spa types exclusively associated with rabbit meat (t4770, t8456).

  18. Fast DNA Serotyping and Antimicrobial Resistance Gene Determination of Salmonella enterica with an Oligonucleotide Microarray-Based Assay

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Sascha D.; Ziegler, Albrecht; Methner, Ulrich; Slickers, Peter; Keiling, Silke; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Salmonellosis caused by Salmonella (S.) belongs to the most prevalent food-borne zoonotic diseases throughout the world. Therefore, serotype identification for all culture-confirmed cases of Salmonella infection is important for epidemiological purposes. As a standard, the traditional culture method (ISO 6579:2002) is used to identify Salmonella. Classical serotyping takes 4–5 days to be completed, it is labor-intensive, expensive and more than 250 non-standardized sera are necessary to characterize more than 2,500 Salmonella serovars currently known. These technical difficulties could be overcome with modern molecular methods. We developed a microarray based serogenotyping assay for the most prevalent Salmonella serovars in Europe and North America. The current assay version could theoretically discriminate 28 O-antigens and 86 H-antigens. Additionally, we included 77 targets analyzing antimicrobial resistance genes. The Salmonella assay was evaluated with a set of 168 reference strains representing 132 serovars previously serotyped by conventional agglutination through various reference centers. 117 of 132 (81%) tested serovars showed an unique microarray pattern. 15 of 132 serovars generated a pattern which was shared by multiple serovars (e.g., S. ser. Enteritidis and S. ser. Nitra). These shared patterns mainly resulted from the high similarity of the genotypes of serogroup A and D1. Using patterns of the known reference strains, a database was build which represents the basis of a new PatternMatch software that can serotype unknown Salmonella isolates automatically. After assay verification, the Salmonella serogenotyping assay was used to identify a field panel of 105 Salmonella isolates. All were identified as Salmonella and 93 of 105 isolates (88.6%) were typed in full concordance with conventional serotyping. This microarray based assay is a powerful tool for serogenotyping. PMID:23056321

  19. Fast DNA serotyping and antimicrobial resistance gene determination of salmonella enterica with an oligonucleotide microarray-based assay.

    PubMed

    Braun, Sascha D; Ziegler, Albrecht; Methner, Ulrich; Slickers, Peter; Keiling, Silke; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Salmonellosis caused by Salmonella (S.) belongs to the most prevalent food-borne zoonotic diseases throughout the world. Therefore, serotype identification for all culture-confirmed cases of Salmonella infection is important for epidemiological purposes. As a standard, the traditional culture method (ISO 6579:2002) is used to identify Salmonella. Classical serotyping takes 4-5 days to be completed, it is labor-intensive, expensive and more than 250 non-standardized sera are necessary to characterize more than 2,500 Salmonella serovars currently known. These technical difficulties could be overcome with modern molecular methods. We developed a microarray based serogenotyping assay for the most prevalent Salmonella serovars in Europe and North America. The current assay version could theoretically discriminate 28 O-antigens and 86 H-antigens. Additionally, we included 77 targets analyzing antimicrobial resistance genes. The Salmonella assay was evaluated with a set of 168 reference strains representing 132 serovars previously serotyped by conventional agglutination through various reference centers. 117 of 132 (81%) tested serovars showed an unique microarray pattern. 15 of 132 serovars generated a pattern which was shared by multiple serovars (e.g., S. ser. Enteritidis and S. ser. Nitra). These shared patterns mainly resulted from the high similarity of the genotypes of serogroup A and D1. Using patterns of the known reference strains, a database was build which represents the basis of a new PatternMatch software that can serotype unknown Salmonella isolates automatically. After assay verification, the Salmonella serogenotyping assay was used to identify a field panel of 105 Salmonella isolates. All were identified as Salmonella and 93 of 105 isolates (88.6%) were typed in full concordance with conventional serotyping. This microarray based assay is a powerful tool for serogenotyping. PMID:23056321

  20. A novel universal DNA labeling and amplification system for rapid microarray-based detection of 117 antibiotic resistance genes in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Christian; Endimiani, Andrea; Perreten, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and simple DNA labeling system has been developed for disposable microarrays and has been validated for the detection of 117 antibiotic resistance genes abundant in Gram-positive bacteria. The DNA was fragmented and amplified using phi-29 polymerase and random primers with linkers. Labeling and further amplification were then performed by classic PCR amplification using biotinylated primers specific for the linkers. The microarray developed by Perreten et al. (Perreten, V., Vorlet-Fawer, L., Slickers, P., Ehricht, R., Kuhnert, P., Frey, J., 2005. Microarray-based detection of 90 antibiotic resistance genes of gram-positive bacteria. J.Clin.Microbiol. 43, 2291-2302.) was improved by additional oligonucleotides. A total of 244 oligonucleotides (26 to 37 nucleotide length and with similar melting temperatures) were spotted on the microarray, including genes conferring resistance to clinically important antibiotic classes like β-lactams, macrolides, aminoglycosides, glycopeptides and tetracyclines. Each antibiotic resistance gene is represented by at least 2 oligonucleotides designed from consensus sequences of gene families. The specificity of the oligonucleotides and the quality of the amplification and labeling were verified by analysis of a collection of 65 strains belonging to 24 species. Association between genotype and phenotype was verified for 6 antibiotics using 77 Staphylococcus strains belonging to different species and revealed 95% test specificity and a 93% predictive value of a positive test. The DNA labeling and amplification is independent of the species and of the target genes and could be used for different types of microarrays. This system has also the advantage to detect several genes within one bacterium at once, like in Staphylococcus aureus strain BM3318, in which up to 15 genes were detected. This new microarray-based detection system offers a large potential for applications in clinical diagnostic, basic research, food safety and

  1. [DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling in diagnosis, assessing prognosis and predicting response to therapy in colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowski, Przemysław; Wierzbicki, Piotr; Kmieć, Andrzej; Godlewski, Janusz

    2012-06-11

     Colorectal cancer is the most common cancer of the gastrointestinal tract. It is considered as a biological model of a certain type of cancerogenesis process in which progression from an early to late stage adenoma and cancer is accompanied by distinct genetic alterations. Clinical and pathological parameters commonly used in clinical practice are often insufficient to determine groups of patients suitable for personalized treatment. Moreover, reliable molecular markers with high prognostic value have not yet been determined. Molecular studies using DNA-based microarrays have identified numerous genes involved in cell proliferation and differentiation during the process of cancerogenesis. Assessment of the genetic profile of colorectal cancer using the microarray technique might be a useful tool in determining the groups of patients with different clinical outcomes who would benefit from additional personalized treatment. The main objective of this study was to present the current state of knowledge on the practical application of gene profiling techniques using microarrays for determining diagnosis, prognosis and response to treatment in colorectal cancer.

  2. DNA microarray-based experimental strategy for trustworthy expression profiling of the hippocampal genes by astaxanthin supplementation in adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Yook, Jang Soo; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Soya, Hideaki

    2016-03-01

    Naturally occurring astaxantin (ASX) is one of the noticeable carotenoid and dietary supplement, which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and neuroprotective effects in the brain through crossing the blood-brain barrier. Specially, we are interested in the role of ASX as a brain food. Although ASX has been suggested to have potential benefit to the brain function, the underlying molecular mechanisms and events mediating such effect remain unknown. Here we examined molecular factors in the hippocampus of adult mouse fed ASX diets (0.1% and 0.5% doses) using DNA microarray (Agilent 4 × 44 K whole mouse genome chip) analysis. In this study, we described in detail our experimental workflow and protocol, and validated quality controls with the housekeeping gene expression (Gapdh and Beta-actin) on the dye-swap based approach to advocate our microarray data, which have been uploaded to Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE62197) as a gene resource for the scientific community. This data will also form an important basis for further detailed experiments and bioinformatics analysis with an aim to unravel the potential molecular pathways or mechanisms underlying the positive effects of ASX supplementation on the brain, in particular the hippocampus.

  3. DNA microarray-based experimental strategy for trustworthy expression profiling of the hippocampal genes by astaxanthin supplementation in adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Yook, Jang Soo; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Soya, Hideaki

    2016-03-01

    Naturally occurring astaxantin (ASX) is one of the noticeable carotenoid and dietary supplement, which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and neuroprotective effects in the brain through crossing the blood-brain barrier. Specially, we are interested in the role of ASX as a brain food. Although ASX has been suggested to have potential benefit to the brain function, the underlying molecular mechanisms and events mediating such effect remain unknown. Here we examined molecular factors in the hippocampus of adult mouse fed ASX diets (0.1% and 0.5% doses) using DNA microarray (Agilent 4 × 44 K whole mouse genome chip) analysis. In this study, we described in detail our experimental workflow and protocol, and validated quality controls with the housekeeping gene expression (Gapdh and Beta-actin) on the dye-swap based approach to advocate our microarray data, which have been uploaded to Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE62197) as a gene resource for the scientific community. This data will also form an important basis for further detailed experiments and bioinformatics analysis with an aim to unravel the potential molecular pathways or mechanisms underlying the positive effects of ASX supplementation on the brain, in particular the hippocampus. PMID:26981356

  4. DNA microarray-based experimental strategy for trustworthy expression profiling of the hippocampal genes by astaxanthin supplementation in adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yook, Jang Soo; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Soya, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Naturally occurring astaxantin (ASX) is one of the noticeable carotenoid and dietary supplement, which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and neuroprotective effects in the brain through crossing the blood–brain barrier. Specially, we are interested in the role of ASX as a brain food. Although ASX has been suggested to have potential benefit to the brain function, the underlying molecular mechanisms and events mediating such effect remain unknown. Here we examined molecular factors in the hippocampus of adult mouse fed ASX diets (0.1% and 0.5% doses) using DNA microarray (Agilent 4 × 44 K whole mouse genome chip) analysis. In this study, we described in detail our experimental workflow and protocol, and validated quality controls with the housekeeping gene expression (Gapdh and Beta-actin) on the dye-swap based approach to advocate our microarray data, which have been uploaded to Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE62197) as a gene resource for the scientific community. This data will also form an important basis for further detailed experiments and bioinformatics analysis with an aim to unravel the potential molecular pathways or mechanisms underlying the positive effects of ASX supplementation on the brain, in particular the hippocampus. PMID:26981356

  5. Non-instrumented DNA isolation, amplification and microarray-based hybridization for a rapid on-site detection of devastating Phytophthora kernoviae.

    PubMed

    Schwenkbier, Lydia; Pollok, Sibyll; Rudloff, Anne; Sailer, Sebastian; Cialla-May, Dana; Weber, Karina; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    A rapid and simple instrument-free detection system was developed for the identification of the plant pathogen Phytophthora kernoviae (P. kernoviae). The on-site operable analysis steps include magnetic particle based DNA isolation, helicase-dependent amplification (HDA) and chip-based DNA hybridization. The isothermal approach enabled the convenient amplification of the yeast GTP-binding protein (Ypt1) target gene in a miniaturized HDA-zeolite-heater (HZH) by an exothermic reaction. The amplicon detection on the chip was performed under room temperature conditions – either by successive hybridization and enzyme binding or by a combined step. A positive signal is displayed by enzymatically generated silver nanoparticle deposits, which serve as robust endpoint signals allowing an immediate visual readout. The hybridization assay enabled the reliable detection of 10 pg μL(-1) target DNA. This is the first report of an entirely electricity-free, field applicable detection approach for devastating Phytophthora species, exemplarily shown for P. kernoviae.

  6. Hybrid microarray based on double biomolecular markers of DNA and carbohydrate for simultaneous genotypic and phenotypic detection of cholera toxin-producing Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hwa Hui; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Chang Sup; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2016-05-15

    Life-threatening diarrheal cholera is usually caused by water or food contaminated with cholera toxin-producing Vibrio cholerae. For the prevention and surveillance of cholera, it is crucial to rapidly and precisely detect and identify the etiological causes, such as V. cholerae and/or its toxin. In the present work, we propose the use of a hybrid double biomolecular marker (DBM) microarray containing 16S rRNA-based DNA capture probe to genotypically identify V. cholerae and GM1 pentasaccharide capture probe to phenotypically detect cholera toxin. We employed a simple sample preparation method to directly obtain genomic DNA and secreted cholera toxin as target materials from bacterial cells. By utilizing the constructed DBM microarray and prepared samples, V. cholerae and cholera toxin were detected successfully, selectively, and simultaneously; the DBM microarray was able to analyze the pathogenicity of the identified V. cholerae regardless of whether the bacteria produces toxin. Therefore, our proposed DBM microarray is a new effective platform for identifying bacteria and analyzing bacterial pathogenicity simultaneously.

  7. Correlation Index-Based Responsible-Enzyme Gene Screening (CIRES), a Novel DNA Microarray-Based Method for Enzyme Gene Involved in Glycan Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Harumi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Fujinawa, Reiko; Naito, Yuko; Okuno, Yasushi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Suzuki, Akemi; Kozutsumi, Yasunori

    2007-01-01

    Background Glycan biosynthesis occurs though a multi-step process that requires a variety of enzymes ranging from glycosyltransferases to those involved in cytosolic sugar metabolism. In many cases, glycan biosynthesis follows a glycan-specific, linear pathway. As glycosyltransferases are generally regulated at the level of transcription, assessing the overall transcriptional profile for glycan biosynthesis genes seems warranted. However, a systematic approach for assessing the correlation between glycan expression and glycan-related gene expression has not been reported previously. Methodology To facilitate genetic analysis of glycan biosynthesis, we sought to correlate the expression of genes involved in cell-surface glycan formation with the expression of the glycans, as detected by glycan-recognizing probes. We performed cross-sample comparisons of gene expression profiles using a newly developed, glycan-focused cDNA microarray. Cell-surface glycan expression profiles were obtained using flow cytometry of cells stained with plant lectins. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for these profiles and were used to identify enzyme genes correlated with glycan biosynthesis. Conclusions This method, designated correlation index-based responsible-enzyme gene screening (CIRES), successfully identified genes already known to be involved in the biosynthesis of certain glycans. Our evaluation of CIRES indicates that it is useful for identifying genes involved in the biosynthesis of glycan chains that can be probed with lectins using flow cytometry. PMID:18043739

  8. DNA microarray-based solid-phase PCR on copoly (DMA-NAS-MAPS) silicon coated slides: An example of relevant clinical application.

    PubMed

    Damin, Francesco; Galbiati, Silvia; Ferrari, Maurizio; Chiari, Marcella

    2016-04-15

    In a previous study we developed a highly sensitive DNA microarray for the detection of common KRAS oncogenic mutations, which has been proven to be highly specific in assigning the correct genotype without any enrichment strategy even in the presence of minority mutated alleles. However, in this approach, the need of a spotter for the deposition of the purified PCR products on the substrates and the purification step of the conventional PCR are serious drawbacks. To overcome these limitations we have introduced the solid-phase polymerase chain reaction (SP-PCR) to form the array of PCR products starting from the oligonucleotide primers. This work was possible thanks to the great thermal stability of the copoly (DMA-NAS-MAPS) coating which withstands PCR thermal cycling temperatures. As an example of the application of this platform we performed the analysis of six common mutations in the codon 12 of KRAS gene (G12A, G12C, G12D, G12R, G12S, and G12V). In conclusion solid-phase PCR, combined with dual-color hybridization, allows mutation analysis in a shorter time span and is more suitable for automation.

  9. Microarray-Based Analysis of Methylation Status of CpGs in Placental DNA and Maternal Blood DNA – Potential New Epigenetic Biomarkers for Cell Free Fetal DNA-Based Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hatt, Lotte; Aagaard, Mads M.; Graakjaer, Jesper; Bach, Cathrine; Sommer, Steffen; Agerholm, Inge E.; Kølvraa, Steen; Bojesen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic markers for cell free fetal DNA in the maternal blood circulation are highly interesting in the field of non-invasive prenatal testing since such markers will offer a possibility to quantify the amount of fetal DNA derived from different chromosomes in a maternal blood sample. The aim of the present study was to define new fetal specific epigenetic markers present in placental DNA that can be utilized in non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. We have conducted a high-resolution methylation specific beadchip microarray study assessing more than 450.000 CpG sites. We have analyzed the DNA methylation profiles of 10 maternal blood samples and compared them to 12 1st trimesters chorionic samples from normal placentas, identifying a number of CpG sites that are differentially methylated in maternal blood cells compared to chorionic tissue. To strengthen the utility of these differentially methylated CpG sites to be used with methyl-sensitive restriction enzymes (MSRE) in PCR-based NIPD, we furthermore refined the list of selected sites, containing a restriction sites for one of 16 different methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes. We present a list of markers on chromosomes 13, 18 and 21 with a potential for aneuploidy testing as well as a list of markers for regions harboring sub-microscopic deletion- or duplication syndromes. PMID:26230497

  10. Microarray-Based Analysis of Methylation Status of CpGs in Placental DNA and Maternal Blood DNA--Potential New Epigenetic Biomarkers for Cell Free Fetal DNA-Based Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hatt, Lotte; Aagaard, Mads M; Graakjaer, Jesper; Bach, Cathrine; Sommer, Steffen; Agerholm, Inge E; Kølvraa, Steen; Bojesen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic markers for cell free fetal DNA in the maternal blood circulation are highly interesting in the field of non-invasive prenatal testing since such markers will offer a possibility to quantify the amount of fetal DNA derived from different chromosomes in a maternal blood sample. The aim of the present study was to define new fetal specific epigenetic markers present in placental DNA that can be utilized in non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. We have conducted a high-resolution methylation specific beadchip microarray study assessing more than 450.000 CpG sites. We have analyzed the DNA methylation profiles of 10 maternal blood samples and compared them to 12 1st trimesters chorionic samples from normal placentas, identifying a number of CpG sites that are differentially methylated in maternal blood cells compared to chorionic tissue. To strengthen the utility of these differentially methylated CpG sites to be used with methyl-sensitive restriction enzymes (MSRE) in PCR-based NIPD, we furthermore refined the list of selected sites, containing a restriction sites for one of 16 different methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes. We present a list of markers on chromosomes 13, 18 and 21 with a potential for aneuploidy testing as well as a list of markers for regions harboring sub-microscopic deletion- or duplication syndromes.

  11. Microarray-based genomic profiling as a diagnostic tool in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Simons, Annet; Stevens-Kroef, Marian; El Idrissi-Zaynoun, Najat; van Gessel, Sabine; Weghuis, Daniel Olde; van den Berg, Eva; Waanders, Esmé; Hoogerbrugge, Peter; Kuiper, Roland; van Kessel, Ad Geurts

    2011-12-01

    In acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) specific genomic abnormalities provide important clinical information. In most routine clinical diagnostic laboratories conventional karyotyping, in conjunction with targeted screens using e.g., fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), is currently considered as the gold standard to detect such aberrations. Conventional karyotyping, however, is limited in its resolution and yield, thus hampering the genetic diagnosis of ALL. We explored whether microarray-based genomic profiling would be feasible as an alternative strategy in a routine clinical diagnostic setting. To this end, we compared conventional karyotypes with microarray-deduced copy number aberration (CNA) karyotypes in 60 ALL cases. Microarray-based genomic profiling resulted in a CNA detection rate of 90%, whereas for conventional karyotyping this was 61%. In addition, many small (< 5 Mb) genetic lesions were encountered, frequently harboring clinically relevant ALL-related genes such as CDKN2A/B, ETV6, PAX5, and IKZF1. From our data we conclude that microarray-based genomic profiling serves as a robust tool in the genetic diagnosis of ALL, outreaching conventional karyotyping in CNA detection both in terms of sensitivity and specificity. We also propose a practical workflow for a comprehensive and objective interpretation of CNAs obtained through microarray-based genomic profiling, thereby facilitating its application in a routine clinical diagnostic setting.

  12. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1988-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:3368330

  13. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1989-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:2654889

  14. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1990-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:2333227

  15. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1987-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:3575113

  16. Multiple detection of single nucleotide polymorphism by microarray-based resonance light scattering assay with enlarged gold nanoparticle probes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiaxue; Ma, Lan; Lei, Zhen; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-03-01

    The mapping of specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in patients' genome is a critical process for the development of personalized therapy. In this work, a DNA microarray-based resonance light scattering (RLS) assay has been developed for multiplexed detection of breast cancer related SNPs with high sensitivity and selectivity. After hybridization of the desired target single-stranded DNAs (ssDNAs) with the ssDNA probes on a microarray, the polyvalent ssDNA modified 13 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are employed to label the hybridization reaction through the formation of a three-stranded DNA system. The H2O2-mediated enlargement of GNPs is then used to enhance the RLS signal. The microarray-based RLS assay provides a detection limit of 10 pM (S/N = 3) for the target ssDNA and determines an allele frequency as low as 1.0% in the target ssDNA cocktail. Combined with an asymmetric PCR technique, the proposed assay shows good accuracy and sensitivity in profiling 4 SNPs related to breast cancer of three selected cell lines.

  17. Multiple detection of single nucleotide polymorphism by microarray-based resonance light scattering assay with enlarged gold nanoparticle probes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiaxue; Ma, Lan; Lei, Zhen; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-03-01

    The mapping of specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in patients' genome is a critical process for the development of personalized therapy. In this work, a DNA microarray-based resonance light scattering (RLS) assay has been developed for multiplexed detection of breast cancer related SNPs with high sensitivity and selectivity. After hybridization of the desired target single-stranded DNAs (ssDNAs) with the ssDNA probes on a microarray, the polyvalent ssDNA modified 13 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are employed to label the hybridization reaction through the formation of a three-stranded DNA system. The H2O2-mediated enlargement of GNPs is then used to enhance the RLS signal. The microarray-based RLS assay provides a detection limit of 10 pM (S/N = 3) for the target ssDNA and determines an allele frequency as low as 1.0% in the target ssDNA cocktail. Combined with an asymmetric PCR technique, the proposed assay shows good accuracy and sensitivity in profiling 4 SNPs related to breast cancer of three selected cell lines. PMID:26899365

  18. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences—1990 update

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1991-01-01

    An updated list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome over the past year (1990) is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising both gene and pseudogene sequences. PMID:2041801

  19. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences—1991 update

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1992-01-01

    An updated list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome over the past year (1991) is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic probes comprising both gene and pseudogene sequences. PMID:1598240

  20. In Silico Analysis of Microarray-Based Gene Expression Profiles Predicts Tumor Cell Response to Withanolides

    PubMed Central

    Efferth, Thomas; Greten, Henry Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal (Indian ginseng, winter cherry, Solanaceae) is widely used in traditional medicine. Roots are either chewed or used to prepare beverages (aqueous decocts). The major secondary metabolites of Withania somnifera are the withanolides, which are C-28-steroidal lactone triterpenoids. Withania somnifera extracts exert chemopreventive and anticancer activities in vitro and in vivo. The aims of the present in silico study were, firstly, to investigate whether tumor cells develop cross-resistance between standard anticancer drugs and withanolides and, secondly, to elucidate the molecular determinants of sensitivity and resistance of tumor cells towards withanolides. Using IC50 concentrations of eight different withanolides (withaferin A, withaferin A diacetate, 3-azerininylwithaferin A, withafastuosin D diacetate, 4-B-hydroxy-withanolide E, isowithanololide E, withafastuosin E, and withaperuvin) and 19 established anticancer drugs, we analyzed the cross-resistance profile of 60 tumor cell lines. The cell lines revealed cross-resistance between the eight withanolides. Consistent cross-resistance between withanolides and nitrosoureas (carmustin, lomustin, and semimustin) was also observed. Then, we performed transcriptomic microarray-based COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses of mRNA expression to identify mRNA expression profiles predicting sensitivity or resistance towards withanolides. Genes from diverse functional groups were significantly associated with response of tumor cells to withaferin A diacetate, e.g. genes functioning in DNA damage and repair, stress response, cell growth regulation, extracellular matrix components, cell adhesion and cell migration, constituents of the ribosome, cytoskeletal organization and regulation, signal transduction, transcription factors, and others.

  1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and microarray-based analysis of protein location

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tong Ihn; Johnstone, Sarah E; Young, Richard A

    2010-01-01

    Genome-wide location analysis, also known as ChIP-Chip, combines chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA microarray analysis to identify protein-DNA interactions that occur in living cells. Protein-DNA interactions are captured in vivo by chemical crosslinking. Cell lysis, DNA fragmentation and immunoaffinity purification of the desired protein will co-purify DNA fragments that are associated with that protein. The enriched DNA population is then labeled, combined with a differentially labeled reference sample and applied to DNA microarrays to detect enriched signals. Various computational and bioinformatic approaches are then applied to normalize the enriched and reference channels, to connect signals to the portions of the genome that are represented on the DNA microarrays, to provide confidence metrics and to generate maps of protein-genome occupancy. Here, we describe the experimental protocols that we use from crosslinking of cells to hybridization of labeled material, together with insights into the aspects of these protocols that influence the results. These protocols require approximately 1 week to complete once sufficient numbers of cells have been obtained, and have been used to produce robust, high-quality ChIP-chip results in many different cell and tissue types. PMID:17406303

  2. Single-cell whole-genome amplification technique impacts the accuracy of SNP microarray-based genotyping and copy number analyses

    PubMed Central

    Treff, Nathan R.; Su, Jing; Tao, Xin; Northrop, Lesley E.; Scott, Richard T.

    2011-01-01

    Methods of comprehensive microarray-based aneuploidy screening in single cells are rapidly emerging. Whole-genome amplification (WGA) remains a critical component for these methods to be successful. A number of commercially available WGA kits have been independently utilized in previous single-cell microarray studies. However, direct comparison of their performance on single cells has not been conducted. The present study demonstrates that among previously published methods, a single-cell GenomePlex WGA protocol provides the best combination of speed and accuracy for single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based copy number (CN) analysis when compared with a REPLI-g- or GenomiPhi-based protocol. Alternatively, for applications that do not have constraints on turnaround time and that are directed at accurate genotyping rather than CN assignments, a REPLI-g-based protocol may provide the best solution. PMID:21177337

  3. Development and Use of Integrated Microarray-Based Genomic Technologies for Assessing Microbial Community Composition and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J.; Wu, L.; Gentry, T.; Schadt, C.; He, Z.; Li, X.

    2006-04-05

    To effectively monitor microbial populations involved in various important processes, a 50-mer-based oligonucleotide microarray was developed based on known genes and pathways involved in: biodegradation, metal resistance and reduction, denitrification, nitrification, nitrogen fixation, methane oxidation, methanogenesis, carbon polymer decomposition, and sulfate reduction. This array contains approximately 2000 unique and group-specific probes with <85% similarity to their non-target sequences. Based on artificial probes, our results showed that at hybridization conditions of 50 C and 50% formamide, the 50-mer microarray hybridization can differentiate sequences having <88% similarity. Specificity tests with representative pure cultures indicated that the designed probes on the arrays appeared to be specific to their corresponding target genes. Detection limits were about 5-10ng genomic DNA in the absence of background DNA, and 50-100ng ({approx}1.3{sup o} 10{sup 7} cells) in the presence background DNA. Strong linear relationships between signal intensity and target DNA and RNA concentration were observed (r{sup 2} = 0.95-0.99). Application of this microarray to naphthalene-amended enrichments and soil microcosms demonstrated that composition of the microflora varied depending on incubation conditions. While the naphthalene-degrading genes from Rhodococcus-type microorganisms were dominant in enrichments, the genes involved in naphthalene degradation from Gram-negative microorganisms such as Ralstonia, Comamonas, and Burkholderia were most abundant in the soil microcosms (as well as those for polyaromatic hydrocarbon and nitrotoluene degradation). Although naphthalene degradation is widely known and studied in Pseudomonas, Pseudomonas genes were not detected in either system. Real-time PCR analysis of 4 representative genes was consistent with microarray-based quantification (r{sup 2} = 0.95). Currently, we are also applying this microarray to the study of several

  4. Development and Use of Integrated Microarray-Based Genomic Technologies for Assessing Microbial Community Composition and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    J. Zhou; S.-K. Rhee; C. Schadt; T. Gentry; Z. He; X. Li; X. Liu; J. Liebich; S.C. Chong; L. Wu

    2004-03-17

    To effectively monitor microbial populations involved in various important processes, a 50-mer-based oligonucleotide microarray was developed based on known genes and pathways involved in: biodegradation, metal resistance and reduction, denitrification, nitrification, nitrogen fixation, methane oxidation, methanogenesis, carbon polymer decomposition, and sulfate reduction. This array contains approximately 2000 unique and group-specific probes with <85% similarity to their non-target sequences. Based on artificial probes, our results showed that at hybridization conditions of 50 C and 50% formamide, the 50-mer microarray hybridization can differentiate sequences having <88% similarity. Specificity tests with representative pure cultures indicated that the designed probes on the arrays appeared to be specific to their corresponding target genes. Detection limits were about 5-10ng genomic DNA in the absence of background DNA, and 50-100ng ({approx}1.3{sup o} 10{sup 7} cells) in the presence background DNA. Strong linear relationships between signal intensity and target DNA and RNA concentration were observed (r{sup 2} = 0.95-0.99). Application of this microarray to naphthalene-amended enrichments and soil microcosms demonstrated that composition of the microflora varied depending on incubation conditions. While the naphthalene-degrading genes from Rhodococcus-type microorganisms were dominant in enrichments, the genes involved in naphthalene degradation from Gram-negative microorganisms such as Ralstonia, Comamonas, and Burkholderia were most abundant in the soil microcosms (as well as those for polyaromatic hydrocarbon and nitrotoluene degradation). Although naphthalene degradation is widely known and studied in Pseudomonas, Pseudomonas genes were not detected in either system. Real-time PCR analysis of 4 representative genes was consistent with microarray-based quantification (r{sup 2} = 0.95). Currently, we are also applying this microarray to the study of several

  5. Comprehensive Screen of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles for DNA Adsorption, Fluorescence Quenching, and Anion Discrimination.

    PubMed

    Liu, Biwu; Liu, Juewen

    2015-11-11

    Although DNA has been quite successful in metal cation detection, anion detectioin remains challenging because of the charge repulsion. Metal oxides represent a very important class of materials, and different oxides might interact with anions differently. In this work, a comprehensive screen of common metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) was carried out for their ability to adsorb DNA, quench fluorescence, and release adsorbed DNA in the presence of target anions. A total of 19 MONPs were studied, including Al2O3, CeO2, CoO, Co3O4, Cr2O3, Fe2O3, Fe3O4, In2O3, ITO, Mn2O3, NiO, SiO2, SnO2, a-TiO2 (anatase), r-TiO2 (rutile), WO3, Y2O3, ZnO, ZrO2. These MONPs have different DNA adsorption affinity. Some adsorb DNA without quenching the fluorescence, while others strongly quench adsorbed fluorophores. They also display different affinity toward anions probed by DNA desorption. Finally, CeO2, Fe3O4, and ZnO were used to form a sensor array to discriminate phosphate, arsenate, and arsenite from the rest using linear discriminant analysis. This study not only provides a solution for anion discrimination using DNA as a signaling molecule but also provides insights into the interface of metal oxides and DNA.

  6. Compact, universal DNA microarrays to comprehensively determine transcription-factor binding site specificities

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Michael F.; Philippakis, Anthony A.; Qureshi, Aaron M.; He, Fangxue S.; Estep, Preston W.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate the expression of genes involved in myriad cellular processes through sequence-specific interactions with DNA. In order to predict DNA regulatory elements and the TFs targeting them with greater accuracy, detailed knowledge of the binding preferences of TFs is needed. Protein binding microarray (PBM) technology permits rapid, high-throughput characterization of the in vitro DNA binding specificities of proteins1. Here, we present a novel, maximally compact, synthetic DNA sequence design that represents all possible DNA sequence variants of a given length k (i.e., all “k-mers”) on a single, universal microarray. We constructed such all k-mer microarrays covering all 10 base pair (bp) binding sites by converting high-density single-stranded oligonucleotide arrays to double-stranded DNA arrays. Using these microarrays, we comprehensively determined the binding specificities over a full range of affinities for five TFs of diverse structural classes from yeast, worm, mouse, and human. Importantly, the unbiased coverage of all k-mers permits an interrogation of binding site preferences, including nucleotide interdependencies, at unprecedented resolution. PMID:16998473

  7. Microgel Tethering For Microarray-Based Nucleic Acid Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiaoguang

    Molecular diagnostics (MDx) have radically changed the process of clinical microbial identification based on identifying genetic information, MDx approaches are both specific and fast. They can identify microbes to the species and strain level over a time scale that can be as short as one hour. With such information clinicians can administer the most effective and appropriate antimicrobial treatment at an early time point with substantial implications both for patient well-being and for easing the burden on the health-care system. Among the different MDx approaches, such as fluorescence in-situ hybridization, microarrays, next-generation sequencing, and mass spectrometry, point-of-care MDx platforms are drawing particular interest due to their low cost, robustness, and wide application. This dissertation develops a novel MDx technology platform capable of high target amplification and detection performance. For nucleic acid target detection, we fabricate an array of electron-beam-patterned microgels on a standard glass microscope slide. The microgels can be as small as a few hundred nanometers. The unique way of energy deposition during electron-beam lithography provides the microgels with a very diffuse water -gel interface that enables them to not only serve as substrates to immobilize DNA probes but do so while preserving them in a highly hydrated environment that optimizes their performance. Benefiting from the high spatial resolution provided by such techniques as position-sensitive microspotting and dip-pen nanolithography, multiple oligonucleotide probes known as molecular beacons (MBs) can be patterned on microgels. Furthermore, nucleic acid target amplification can be conducted in direct contact with the microgel-tethered detection array. Specifically, we use an isothermal RNA amplification reaction - nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA). ssRNA amplicons of from the NASBA reaction can directly hybridize with microgel-tethered MBs, and the

  8. Comprehensibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettersson, Rune

    This paper addresses the difficulty involved in creating easily understood information. The act of communicating is not complete until the message has been both received and understood by the audience. Messages must always be comprehensible, otherwise they will have no effect. The readability, legibility, and reading value of a graphic message is…

  9. Microarray-based whole-genome hybridization as a tool for determining procaryotic species relatedness

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L.; Liu, X.; Fields, M.W.; Thompson, D.K.; Bagwell, C.E.; Tiedje, J. M.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2008-01-15

    The definition and delineation of microbial species are of great importance and challenge due to the extent of evolution and diversity. Whole-genome DNA-DNA hybridization is the cornerstone for defining procaryotic species relatedness, but obtaining pairwise DNA-DNA reassociation values for a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of procaryotes is tedious and time consuming. A previously described microarray format containing whole-genomic DNA (the community genome array or CGA) was rigorously evaluated as a high-throughput alternative to the traditional DNA-DNA reassociation approach for delineating procaryotic species relationships. DNA similarities for multiple bacterial strains obtained with the CGA-based hybridization were comparable to those obtained with various traditional whole-genome hybridization methods (r=0.87, P<0.01). Significant linear relationships were also observed between the CGA-based genome similarities and those derived from small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequences (r=0.79, P<0.0001), gyrB sequences (r=0.95, P<0.0001) or REP- and BOX-PCR fingerprinting profiles (r=0.82, P<0.0001). The CGA hybridization-revealed species relationships in several representative genera, including Pseudomonas, Azoarcus and Shewanella, were largely congruent with previous classifications based on various conventional whole-genome DNA-DNA reassociation, SSU rRNA and/or gyrB analyses. These results suggest that CGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization could serve as a powerful, high-throughput format for determining species relatedness among microorganisms.

  10. MitBASE : a comprehensive and integrated mitochondrial DNA database. The present status

    PubMed Central

    Attimonelli, M.; Altamura, N.; Benne, R.; Brennicke, A.; Cooper, J. M.; D’Elia, D.; Montalvo, A. de; Pinto, B. de; De Robertis, M.; Golik, P.; Knoop, V.; Lanave, C.; Lazowska, J.; Licciulli, F.; Malladi, B. S.; Memeo, F.; Monnerot, M.; Pasimeni, R.; Pilbout, S.; Schapira, A. H. V.; Sloof, P.; Saccone, C.

    2000-01-01

    MitBASE is an integrated and comprehensive database of mitochondrial DNA data which collects, under a single interface, databases for Plant, Vertebrate, Invertebrate, Human, Protist and Fungal mtDNA and a Pilot database on nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MitBASE reports all available information from different organisms and from intraspecies variants and mutants. Data have been drawn from the primary databases and from the literature; value adding information has been structured, e.g., editing information on protist mtDNA genomes, pathological information for human mtDNA variants, etc. The different databases, some of which are structured using commercial packages (Microsoft Access, File Maker Pro) while others use a flat-file format, have been integrated under ORACLE. Ad hoc retrieval systems have been devised for some of the above listed databases keeping into account their peculiarities. The database is resident at the EBI and is available at the following site: http://www3.ebi.ac.uk/Research/Mitbase/mitbase.pl . The impact of this project is intended for both basic and applied research. The study of mitochondrial genetic diseases and mitochondrial DNA intraspecies diversity are key topics in several biotechnological fields. The database has been funded within the EU Biotechnology programme. PMID:10592207

  11. GoldenBraid 2.0: a comprehensive DNA assembly framework for plant synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Sarrion-Perdigones, Alejandro; Vazquez-Vilar, Marta; Palací, Jorge; Castelijns, Bas; Forment, Javier; Ziarsolo, Peio; Blanca, José; Granell, Antonio; Orzaez, Diego

    2013-07-01

    Plant synthetic biology aims to apply engineering principles to plant genetic design. One strategic requirement of plant synthetic biology is the adoption of common standardized technologies that facilitate the construction of increasingly complex multigene structures at the DNA level while enabling the exchange of genetic building blocks among plant bioengineers. Here, we describe GoldenBraid 2.0 (GB2.0), a comprehensive technological framework that aims to foster the exchange of standard DNA parts for plant synthetic biology. GB2.0 relies on the use of type IIS restriction enzymes for DNA assembly and proposes a modular cloning schema with positional notation that resembles the grammar of natural languages. Apart from providing an optimized cloning strategy that generates fully exchangeable genetic elements for multigene engineering, the GB2.0 toolkit offers an evergrowing open collection of DNA parts, including a group of functionally tested, premade genetic modules to build frequently used modules like constitutive and inducible expression cassettes, endogenous gene silencing and protein-protein interaction tools, etc. Use of the GB2.0 framework is facilitated by a number of Web resources that include a publicly available database, tutorials, and a software package that provides in silico simulations and laboratory protocols for GB2.0 part domestication and multigene engineering. In short, GB2.0 provides a framework to exchange both information and physical DNA elements among bioengineers to help implement plant synthetic biology projects. PMID:23669743

  12. GoldenBraid 2.0: a comprehensive DNA assembly framework for plant synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Sarrion-Perdigones, Alejandro; Vazquez-Vilar, Marta; Palací, Jorge; Castelijns, Bas; Forment, Javier; Ziarsolo, Peio; Blanca, José; Granell, Antonio; Orzaez, Diego

    2013-07-01

    Plant synthetic biology aims to apply engineering principles to plant genetic design. One strategic requirement of plant synthetic biology is the adoption of common standardized technologies that facilitate the construction of increasingly complex multigene structures at the DNA level while enabling the exchange of genetic building blocks among plant bioengineers. Here, we describe GoldenBraid 2.0 (GB2.0), a comprehensive technological framework that aims to foster the exchange of standard DNA parts for plant synthetic biology. GB2.0 relies on the use of type IIS restriction enzymes for DNA assembly and proposes a modular cloning schema with positional notation that resembles the grammar of natural languages. Apart from providing an optimized cloning strategy that generates fully exchangeable genetic elements for multigene engineering, the GB2.0 toolkit offers an evergrowing open collection of DNA parts, including a group of functionally tested, premade genetic modules to build frequently used modules like constitutive and inducible expression cassettes, endogenous gene silencing and protein-protein interaction tools, etc. Use of the GB2.0 framework is facilitated by a number of Web resources that include a publicly available database, tutorials, and a software package that provides in silico simulations and laboratory protocols for GB2.0 part domestication and multigene engineering. In short, GB2.0 provides a framework to exchange both information and physical DNA elements among bioengineers to help implement plant synthetic biology projects.

  13. Microarray-based detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium transposon mutants that cannot survive in macrophages and mice.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kaman; Kim, Charles C; Falkow, Stanley

    2005-09-01

    DNA microarrays provide an opportunity to combine the principles of signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) with microarray technology to identify potentially important bacterial virulence genes. The scope of DNA microarrays allows for less laborious screening on a much larger scale than possible by STM alone. We have adapted a microarray-based transposon tracking strategy for use with a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium cDNA microarray in order to identify genes important for survival and replication in RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage-like cells or in the spleens of BALB/cJ mice. A 50,000-CFU transposon library of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344 was serially passaged in cultured macrophages or intraperitoneally inoculated into BALB/cJ mice. The bacterial genomic DNA was isolated and processed for analysis on the microarray. The novel application of this approach to identify mutants unable to survive in cultured cells resulted in the identification of components of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2), which is known to be critical for intracellular survival and replication. In addition, array results indicated that a number of SPI1-associated genes, currently not associated with intracellular survival, are negatively selected. However, of the SPI1-associated mutants individually tested for intracellular survival, only a sirA mutant exhibited reduced numbers relative to those of wild-type bacteria. Of the mutants unable to survive in mice, significant proportions are either components of the SPI2 pathogenicity island or involved in lipopolysaccharide synthesis. This observation is in agreement with results obtained in the original S. enterica serovar Typhimurium STM screen, illustrating the utility of this approach for the high-throughput identification of virulence factors important for survival in the host.

  14. A protocol for the systematic and quantitative measurement of protein-lipid interactions using the liposome-microarray-based assay.

    PubMed

    Saliba, Antoine-Emmanuel; Vonkova, Ivana; Deghou, Samy; Ceschia, Stefano; Tischer, Christian; Kugler, Karl G; Bork, Peer; Ellenberg, Jan; Gavin, Anne-Claude

    2016-06-01

    Lipids organize the activity of the cell's proteome through a complex network of interactions. The assembly of comprehensive atlases embracing all protein-lipid interactions is an important challenge that requires innovative methods. We recently developed a liposome-microarray-based assay (LiMA) that integrates liposomes, microfluidics and fluorescence microscopy and which is capable of measuring protein recruitment to membranes in a quantitative and high-throughput manner. Compared with previous assays that are labor-intensive and difficult to scale up, LiMA improves the protein-lipid interaction assay throughput by at least three orders of magnitude. Here we provide a step-by-step LiMA protocol that includes the following: (i) the serial and generic production of the liposome microarray; (ii) its integration into a microfluidic format; (iii) the measurement of fluorescently labeled protein (either purified proteins or from cell lysate) recruitment to liposomal membranes using high-throughput microscopy; (iv) automated image analysis pipelines to quantify protein-lipid interactions; and (v) data quality analysis. In addition, we discuss the experimental design, including the relevant quality controls. Overall, the protocol-including device preparation, assay and data analysis-takes 6-8 d. This protocol paves the way for protein-lipid interaction screens to be performed on the proteome and lipidome scales. PMID:27149326

  15. A protocol for the systematic and quantitative measurement of protein-lipid interactions using the liposome-microarray-based assay.

    PubMed

    Saliba, Antoine-Emmanuel; Vonkova, Ivana; Deghou, Samy; Ceschia, Stefano; Tischer, Christian; Kugler, Karl G; Bork, Peer; Ellenberg, Jan; Gavin, Anne-Claude

    2016-06-01

    Lipids organize the activity of the cell's proteome through a complex network of interactions. The assembly of comprehensive atlases embracing all protein-lipid interactions is an important challenge that requires innovative methods. We recently developed a liposome-microarray-based assay (LiMA) that integrates liposomes, microfluidics and fluorescence microscopy and which is capable of measuring protein recruitment to membranes in a quantitative and high-throughput manner. Compared with previous assays that are labor-intensive and difficult to scale up, LiMA improves the protein-lipid interaction assay throughput by at least three orders of magnitude. Here we provide a step-by-step LiMA protocol that includes the following: (i) the serial and generic production of the liposome microarray; (ii) its integration into a microfluidic format; (iii) the measurement of fluorescently labeled protein (either purified proteins or from cell lysate) recruitment to liposomal membranes using high-throughput microscopy; (iv) automated image analysis pipelines to quantify protein-lipid interactions; and (v) data quality analysis. In addition, we discuss the experimental design, including the relevant quality controls. Overall, the protocol-including device preparation, assay and data analysis-takes 6-8 d. This protocol paves the way for protein-lipid interaction screens to be performed on the proteome and lipidome scales.

  16. Quantitative characterization of conformational-specific protein-DNA binding using a dual-spectral interferometric imaging biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xirui; Daaboul, George G.; Spuhler, Philipp S.; Dröge, Peter; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2016-03-01

    DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, it was discovered that DNA-binding proteins recognize specific binding sites to carry out their functions through an indirect readout mechanism by recognizing and capturing DNA conformational flexibility and deformation. High-throughput DNA microarray-based methods that provide large-scale protein-DNA binding information have shown effective and comprehensive analysis of protein-DNA binding affinities, but do not provide information of DNA conformational changes in specific protein-DNA complexes. Building on the high-throughput capability of DNA microarrays, we demonstrate a quantitative approach that simultaneously measures the amount of protein binding to DNA and nanometer-scale DNA conformational change induced by protein binding in a microarray format. Both measurements rely on spectral interferometry on a layered substrate using a single optical instrument in two distinct modalities. In the first modality, we quantitate the amount of binding of protein to surface-immobilized DNA in each DNA spot using a label-free spectral reflectivity technique that accurately measures the surface densities of protein and DNA accumulated on the substrate. In the second modality, for each DNA spot, we simultaneously measure DNA conformational change using a fluorescence vertical sectioning technique that determines average axial height of fluorophores tagged to specific nucleotides of the surface-immobilized DNA. The approach presented in this paper, when combined with current high-throughput DNA microarray-based technologies, has the potential to serve as a rapid and simple method for quantitative and large-scale characterization of conformational specific protein-DNA interactions.DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are

  17. DNA Microarray-Based Identification of Genes Regulated by NtrC in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Franck, William L; Qiu, Jing; Lee, Hae-In; Chang, Woo-Suk; Stacey, Gary

    2015-08-15

    The Bradyrhizobium japonicum NtrBC two-component system is a critical regulator of cellular nitrogen metabolism, including the acquisition and catabolism of nitrogenous compounds. To better define the roles of this system, genome-wide transcriptional profiling was performed to identify the NtrC regulon during the response to nitrogen limitation. Upon cells perceiving low intracellular nitrogen, they stimulate the phosphorylation of NtrC, which induces genes responsible for alteration of the core glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase nitrogen assimilation pathway, including the genes for the glutamine synthetases and PII proteins. In addition, genes responsible for the import and utilization of multiple nitrogen sources, specifically nitrate and nitrite, were upregulated by NtrC activation. Mutational analysis of a candidate nitrite reductase revealed a role for NtrC in regulating the assimilation of nitrite, since mutations in both ntrC and the gene encoding the candidate nitrite reductase abolished the ability to grow on nitrite as a sole nitrogen source. PMID:26025905

  18. DNA microarray-based detection of Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An easy-to-handle microarray assay based on the cost-effective ArrayTube™ platform has been designed for the rapid and unequivocal identification of Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever. The gene targets include the chromosomally coded markers icd, omp/com1, and IS1111 as well as the plasmid coded markers cbbE and cbhE. Results A representative panel comprising 50 German C. burnetii isolates and 10 clinical samples was examined to validate the test. All tested isolates harboured plasmid QpH1 and were correctly identified, corresponding to 100% sensitivity. The assay’s limit of detection was 100 genome equivalents (GE) for icd, omp/com1, cbbE and cbhE and 10 GE for IS1111. Assay specificity was 100% as determined by analysing a panel of 37 non-Coxiella strains. Conclusions The present array is a rational assembly of established and evaluated targets for the rapid and unequivocal detection of C. burnetii. This array could be applied to the screening of vaginal swabs from small ruminants; screening of environmental samples e.g. on farms or screening of human samples. PMID:24886299

  19. DNA Microarray-Based Identification of Genes Regulated by NtrC in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Franck, William L.; Qiu, Jing; Lee, Hae-In; Stacey, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The Bradyrhizobium japonicum NtrBC two-component system is a critical regulator of cellular nitrogen metabolism, including the acquisition and catabolism of nitrogenous compounds. To better define the roles of this system, genome-wide transcriptional profiling was performed to identify the NtrC regulon during the response to nitrogen limitation. Upon cells perceiving low intracellular nitrogen, they stimulate the phosphorylation of NtrC, which induces genes responsible for alteration of the core glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase nitrogen assimilation pathway, including the genes for the glutamine synthetases and PII proteins. In addition, genes responsible for the import and utilization of multiple nitrogen sources, specifically nitrate and nitrite, were upregulated by NtrC activation. Mutational analysis of a candidate nitrite reductase revealed a role for NtrC in regulating the assimilation of nitrite, since mutations in both ntrC and the gene encoding the candidate nitrite reductase abolished the ability to grow on nitrite as a sole nitrogen source. PMID:26025905

  20. DNA Microarray-based Ecotoxicological Biomarker Discovery in a Small Fish Model Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper addresses several issues critical to use of zebrafish oligonucleotide microarrays for computational toxicology research on endocrine disrupting chemicals using small fish models, and more generally, the use of microarrays in aquatic toxicology.

  1. DNA Microarray-Based Identification of Genes Regulated by NtrC in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Franck, William L; Qiu, Jing; Lee, Hae-In; Chang, Woo-Suk; Stacey, Gary

    2015-08-15

    The Bradyrhizobium japonicum NtrBC two-component system is a critical regulator of cellular nitrogen metabolism, including the acquisition and catabolism of nitrogenous compounds. To better define the roles of this system, genome-wide transcriptional profiling was performed to identify the NtrC regulon during the response to nitrogen limitation. Upon cells perceiving low intracellular nitrogen, they stimulate the phosphorylation of NtrC, which induces genes responsible for alteration of the core glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase nitrogen assimilation pathway, including the genes for the glutamine synthetases and PII proteins. In addition, genes responsible for the import and utilization of multiple nitrogen sources, specifically nitrate and nitrite, were upregulated by NtrC activation. Mutational analysis of a candidate nitrite reductase revealed a role for NtrC in regulating the assimilation of nitrite, since mutations in both ntrC and the gene encoding the candidate nitrite reductase abolished the ability to grow on nitrite as a sole nitrogen source.

  2. DNA microarray-based typing of an atypical monophasic Salmonella enterica serovar.

    PubMed

    Garaizar, Javier; Porwollik, Steffen; Echeita, Aurora; Rementeria, Aitor; Herrera, Silvia; Wong, Rita Mei-Yi; Frye, Jonathan; Usera, Miguel A; McClelland, Michael

    2002-06-01

    A multidrug-resistant fljB-lacking Salmonella enterica serovar [4,5,12:i:-] emerged in Spain in 1997. We analyzed the genome from four strains of this serovar using a microarray containing almost all the predicted protein coding regions of serovar Typhimurium strain LT2, including the pSLT plasmid. Only a few differences from serovar Typhimurium LT2 were observed, suggesting the serovar to be Typhimurium as well. Six regions of interest were identified from the microarray data. Cluster I was a deletion of 13 genes, corresponding to part of the regulon responsible for the anaerobic assimilation of allantoin. Clusters II and IV were associated with the absence of the Fels-1 and Fels-2 prophage. Cluster III was a small group of Gifsy-1 prophage-related genes that appeared to be deleted or replaced. Cluster V was a deletion of 16 genes, including iroB and the operon fljAB, which is reflected in the serovar designation. Region VI was the gene STM2240, which appears to have an additional homologue in these strains. The regions spanning the deletions involving the allantoin operon and the fljAB operon were PCR amplified and sequenced. PCR across these regions may be an effective marker for this particular emergent serovar. While the microarray data for all isolates of the new serovar were essentially identical for all LT2 chromosomal genes, the isolates differed in their similarity to pSLT, consistent with the heterogeneity in plasmid content among isolates of the new serovar. Recent isolates have acquired a more-complete subset of homologues to this virulence plasmid. In general, microarrays can provide useful complementary data to other typing methods.

  3. DNA Microarray-Based Typing of an Atypical Monophasic Salmonella enterica Serovar

    PubMed Central

    Garaizar, Javier; Porwollik, Steffen; Echeita, Aurora; Rementeria, Aitor; Herrera, Silvia; Wong, Rita Mei-Yi; Frye, Jonathan; Usera, Miguel A.; McClelland, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A multidrug-resistant fljB-lacking Salmonella enterica serovar [4,5,12:i:−] emerged in Spain in 1997. We analyzed the genome from four strains of this serovar using a microarray containing almost all the predicted protein coding regions of serovar Typhimurium strain LT2, including the pSLT plasmid. Only a few differences from serovar Typhimurium LT2 were observed, suggesting the serovar to be Typhimurium as well. Six regions of interest were identified from the microarray data. Cluster I was a deletion of 13 genes, corresponding to part of the regulon responsible for the anaerobic assimilation of allantoin. Clusters II and IV were associated with the absence of the Fels-1 and Fels-2 prophage. Cluster III was a small group of Gifsy-1 prophage-related genes that appeared to be deleted or replaced. Cluster V was a deletion of 16 genes, including iroB and the operon fljAB, which is reflected in the serovar designation. Region VI was the gene STM2240, which appears to have an additional homologue in these strains. The regions spanning the deletions involving the allantoin operon and the fljAB operon were PCR amplified and sequenced. PCR across these regions may be an effective marker for this particular emergent serovar. While the microarray data for all isolates of the new serovar were essentially identical for all LT2 chromosomal genes, the isolates differed in their similarity to pSLT, consistent with the heterogeneity in plasmid content among isolates of the new serovar. Recent isolates have acquired a more-complete subset of homologues to this virulence plasmid. In general, microarrays can provide useful complementary data to other typing methods. PMID:12037067

  4. Comprehensive Census of Bacteria in Clean Rooms by Using DNA Microarray and Cloning Methods▿ †

    PubMed Central

    La Duc, Myron T.; Osman, Shariff; Vaishampayan, Parag; Piceno, Yvette; Andersen, Gary; Spry, J. A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2009-01-01

    A census of clean room surface-associated bacterial populations was derived from the results of both the cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and DNA microarray (PhyloChip) analyses. Samples from the Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Multiple Testing Facility (LMA-MTF), the Kennedy Space Center Payload Hazard and Servicing Facility (KSC-PHSF), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Spacecraft Assembly Facility (JPL-SAF) clean rooms were collected during the various assembly phases of the Phoenix and Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft. Clone library-derived analyses detected a larger bacterial diversity prior to the arrival of spacecraft hardware in these clean room facilities. PhyloChip results were in agreement with this trend but also unveiled the presence of anywhere from 9- to 70-fold more bacterial taxa than cloning approaches. Among the facilities sampled, the JPL-SAF (MSL mission) housed a significantly less diverse bacterial population than either the LMA-MTF or KSC-PHSF (Phoenix mission). Bacterial taxa known to thrive in arid conditions were frequently detected in MSL-associated JPL-SAF samples, whereas proteobacterial lineages dominated Phoenix-associated KSC-PHSF samples. Comprehensive bacterial censuses, such as that reported here, will help space-faring nations preemptively identify contaminant biomatter that may compromise extraterrestrial life detection experiments. The robust nature and high sensitivity of DNA microarray technologies should prove beneficial to a wide range of scientific, electronic, homeland security, medical, and pharmaceutical applications and to any other ventures with a vested interest in monitoring and controlling contamination in exceptionally clean environments. PMID:19700540

  5. Comprehensive census of bacteria in clean rooms by using DNA microarray and cloning methods.

    PubMed

    La Duc, Myron T; Osman, Shariff; Vaishampayan, Parag; Piceno, Yvette; Andersen, Gary; Spry, J A; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2009-10-01

    A census of clean room surface-associated bacterial populations was derived from the results of both the cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and DNA microarray (PhyloChip) analyses. Samples from the Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Multiple Testing Facility (LMA-MTF), the Kennedy Space Center Payload Hazard and Servicing Facility (KSC-PHSF), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Spacecraft Assembly Facility (JPL-SAF) clean rooms were collected during the various assembly phases of the Phoenix and Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft. Clone library-derived analyses detected a larger bacterial diversity prior to the arrival of spacecraft hardware in these clean room facilities. PhyloChip results were in agreement with this trend but also unveiled the presence of anywhere from 9- to 70-fold more bacterial taxa than cloning approaches. Among the facilities sampled, the JPL-SAF (MSL mission) housed a significantly less diverse bacterial population than either the LMA-MTF or KSC-PHSF (Phoenix mission). Bacterial taxa known to thrive in arid conditions were frequently detected in MSL-associated JPL-SAF samples, whereas proteobacterial lineages dominated Phoenix-associated KSC-PHSF samples. Comprehensive bacterial censuses, such as that reported here, will help space-faring nations preemptively identify contaminant biomatter that may compromise extraterrestrial life detection experiments. The robust nature and high sensitivity of DNA microarray technologies should prove beneficial to a wide range of scientific, electronic, homeland security, medical, and pharmaceutical applications and to any other ventures with a vested interest in monitoring and controlling contamination in exceptionally clean environments. PMID:19700540

  6. Microarray-Based Maps of Copy-Number Variant Regions in European and Sub-Saharan Populations

    PubMed Central

    Röthlisberger, Benno; Huber, Andreas; Filges, Isabel; Miny, Peter; Auschra, Bianca; Stetak, Attila; Demougin, Philippe; Vukojevic, Vanja; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Elbert, Thomas; de Quervain, Dominique J.-F.; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The genetic basis of phenotypic variation can be partially explained by the presence of copy-number variations (CNVs). Currently available methods for CNV assessment include high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays that have become an indispensable tool in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, insufficient concordance rates between different CNV assessment methods call for cautious interpretation of results from CNV-based genetic association studies. Here we provide a cross-population, microarray-based map of copy-number variant regions (CNVRs) to enable reliable interpretation of CNV association findings. We used the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 to scan the genomes of 1167 individuals from two ethnically distinct populations (Europe, N = 717; Rwanda, N = 450). Three different CNV-finding algorithms were tested and compared for sensitivity, specificity, and feasibility. Two algorithms were subsequently used to construct CNVR maps, which were also validated by processing subsamples with additional microarray platforms (Illumina 1M-Duo BeadChip, Nimblegen 385K aCGH array) and by comparing our data with publicly available information. Both algorithms detected a total of 42669 CNVs, 74% of which clustered in 385 CNVRs of a cross-population map. These CNVRs overlap with 862 annotated genes and account for approximately 3.3% of the haploid human genome. We created comprehensive cross-populational CNVR-maps. They represent an extendable framework that can leverage the detection of common CNVs and additionally assist in interpreting CNV-based association studies. PMID:21179565

  7. Microarray-based maps of copy-number variant regions in European and sub-Saharan populations.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Christian; Gschwind, Leo; Röthlisberger, Benno; Huber, Andreas; Filges, Isabel; Miny, Peter; Auschra, Bianca; Stetak, Attila; Demougin, Philippe; Vukojevic, Vanja; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Elbert, Thomas; de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2010-12-16

    The genetic basis of phenotypic variation can be partially explained by the presence of copy-number variations (CNVs). Currently available methods for CNV assessment include high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays that have become an indispensable tool in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, insufficient concordance rates between different CNV assessment methods call for cautious interpretation of results from CNV-based genetic association studies. Here we provide a cross-population, microarray-based map of copy-number variant regions (CNVRs) to enable reliable interpretation of CNV association findings. We used the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 to scan the genomes of 1167 individuals from two ethnically distinct populations (Europe, N=717; Rwanda, N=450). Three different CNV-finding algorithms were tested and compared for sensitivity, specificity, and feasibility. Two algorithms were subsequently used to construct CNVR maps, which were also validated by processing subsamples with additional microarray platforms (Illumina 1M-Duo BeadChip, Nimblegen 385K aCGH array) and by comparing our data with publicly available information. Both algorithms detected a total of 42669 CNVs, 74% of which clustered in 385 CNVRs of a cross-population map. These CNVRs overlap with 862 annotated genes and account for approximately 3.3% of the haploid human genome.We created comprehensive cross-populational CNVR-maps. They represent an extendable framework that can leverage the detection of common CNVs and additionally assist in interpreting CNV-based association studies.

  8. Minfi: a flexible and comprehensive Bioconductor package for the analysis of Infinium DNA methylation microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Aryee, Martin J.; Jaffe, Andrew E.; Corrada-Bravo, Hector; Ladd-Acosta, Christine; Feinberg, Andrew P.; Hansen, Kasper D.; Irizarry, Rafael A.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The recently released Infinium HumanMethylation450 array (the ‘450k’ array) provides a high-throughput assay to quantify DNA methylation (DNAm) at ∼450 000 loci across a range of genomic features. Although less comprehensive than high-throughput sequencing-based techniques, this product is more cost-effective and promises to be the most widely used DNAm high-throughput measurement technology over the next several years. Results: Here we describe a suite of computational tools that incorporate state-of-the-art statistical techniques for the analysis of DNAm data. The software is structured to easily adapt to future versions of the technology. We include methods for preprocessing, quality assessment and detection of differentially methylated regions from the kilobase to the megabase scale. We show how our software provides a powerful and flexible development platform for future methods. We also illustrate how our methods empower the technology to make discoveries previously thought to be possible only with sequencing-based methods. Availability and implementation: http://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/minfi.html. Contact: khansen@jhsph.edu; rafa@jimmy.harvard.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24478339

  9. Microarray-Based Phospho-Proteomic Profiling of Complex Biological Systems12

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, C. Rory; Woodard, Crystal L.; Zhou, Xin; Pan, Jianbo; Olivi, Alessandro; Xia, Shuli; Bettegowda, Chetan; Sciubba, Daniel M.; Pevsner, Jonathan; Zhu, Heng; Laterra, John

    2016-01-01

    Protein microarray technology has been successfully used for identifying substrates of purified activated kinases. We used protein microarrays to globally interrogate the effects of PTEN and Akt activity on the phospho-kinome of in vitro and in vivo glioma models and validated results in clinical pathological specimens. Whole cell lysates extracted from tumor samples can be applied to human kinome chip microarrays to profile the global kinase phosphorylation patterns in a high-throughput manner and identify novel substrates inherent to the tumor cell and the interactions with tumor microenvironment. Our findings identify a novel microarray-based method for assessing intracellular signaling events applicable to human oncogenesis and other pathophysiologic states. PMID:27084428

  10. The Peptide Microarray-Based Resonance Light Scattering Assay for Sensitively Detecting Intracellular Kinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Liu, Xia; Liu, Dianjun; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-01-01

    The peptide microarray technology is a robust, reliable, and efficient technique for large-scale determination of enzyme activities, and high-throughput profiling of substrate/inhibitor specificities of enzymes. Here, the activities of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) in different cell lysates have been detected by a peptide microarray-based resonance light scattering (RLS) assay with gold nanoparticle (GNP) probes. Highly sensitive detection of PKA activity in 0.1 μg total cell proteins of SHG-44 (human glioma cell) cell lysate (corresponding to 200 cells) is achieved by a selected peptide substrate. The experimental results also demonstrate that the RLS assay can be employed to evaluate the chemical regulation of intracellular kinase activity. PMID:26490469

  11. Microarray-Based Detection of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Genes Involved in Chicken Reproductive Tract Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Raspoet, R.; Appia-Ayme, C.; Shearer, N.; Martel, A.; Pasmans, F.; Haesebrouck, F.; Ducatelle, R.; Thompson, A.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis has developed the potential to contaminate table eggs internally, by colonization of the chicken reproductive tract and internalization in the forming egg. The serotype Enteritidis has developed mechanisms to colonize the chicken oviduct more successfully than other serotypes. Until now, the strategies exploited by Salmonella Enteritidis to do so have remained largely unknown. For that reason, a microarray-based transposon library screen was used to identify genes that are essential for the persistence of Salmonella Enteritidis inside primary chicken oviduct gland cells in vitro and inside the reproductive tract in vivo. A total of 81 genes with a potential role in persistence in both the oviduct cells and the oviduct tissue were identified. Major groups of importance include the Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1 and 2, genes involved in stress responses, cell wall, and lipopolysaccharide structure, and the region-of-difference genomic islands 9, 21, and 40. PMID:25281378

  12. Microarray-Based Phospho-Proteomic Profiling of Complex Biological Systems.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, C Rory; Woodard, Crystal L; Zhou, Xin; Pan, Jianbo; Olivi, Alessandro; Xia, Shuli; Bettegowda, Chetan; Sciubba, Daniel M; Pevsner, Jonathan; Zhu, Heng; Laterra, John

    2016-04-01

    Protein microarray technology has been successfully used for identifying substrates of purified activated kinases. We used protein microarrays to globally interrogate the effects of PTEN and Akt activity on the phospho-kinome of in vitro and in vivo glioma models and validated results in clinical pathological specimens. Whole cell lysates extracted from tumor samples can be applied to human kinome chip microarrays to profile the global kinase phosphorylation patterns in a high-throughput manner and identify novel substrates inherent to the tumor cell and the interactions with tumor microenvironment. Our findings identify a novel microarray-based method for assessing intracellular signaling events applicable to human oncogenesis and other pathophysiologic states. PMID:27084428

  13. SNP microarray-based 24 chromosome aneuploidy screening is significantly more consistent than FISH

    PubMed Central

    Treff, Nathan R.; Levy, Brynn; Su, Jing; Northrop, Lesley E.; Tao, Xin; Scott, Richard T.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies estimate that chromosomal mosaicism within the cleavage-stage human embryo is high. However, comparison of two unique methods of aneuploidy screening of blastomeres within the same embryo has not been conducted and may indicate whether mosaicism has been overestimated due to technical inconsistency rather than the biological phenomena. The present study investigates the prevalence of chromosomal abnormality and mosaicism found with two different single cell aneuploidy screening techniques. Thirteen arrested cleavage-stage embryos were studied. Each was biopsied into individual cells (n = 160). The cells from each embryo were randomized into two groups. Those destined for FISH-based aneuploidy screening (n = 75) were fixed, one cell per slide. Cells for SNP microarray-based aneuploidy screening (n = 85) were put into individual tubes. Microarray was significantly more reliable (96%) than FISH (83%) for providing an interpretable result (P = 0.004). Markedly different results were obtained when comparing microarray and FISH results from individual embryos. Mosaicism was significantly less commonly observed by microarray (31%) than by FISH (100%) (P = 0.0005). Although FISH evaluated fewer chromosomes per cell and fewer cells per embryo, FISH still displayed significantly more unique genetic diagnoses per embryo (3.2 ± 0.2) than microarray (1.3 ± 0.2) (P < 0.0001). This is the first prospective, randomized, blinded and paired comparison between microarray and FISH-based aneuploidy screening. SNP microarray-based 24 chromosome aneuploidy screening provides more complete and consistent results than FISH. These results also suggest that FISH technology may overestimate the contribution of mitotic error to the origin of aneuploidy at the cleavage stage of human embryogenesis. PMID:20484246

  14. cDNA microarray screening in food safety.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K

    2006-04-01

    The cDNA microarray technology and related bioinformatics tools presents a wide range of novel application opportunities. The technology may be productively applied to address food safety. In this mini-review article, we present an update highlighting the late breaking discoveries that demonstrate the vitality of cDNA microarray technology as a tool to analyze food safety with reference to microbial pathogens and genetically modified foods. In order to bring the microarray technology to mainstream food safety, it is important to develop robust user-friendly tools that may be applied in a field setting. In addition, there needs to be a standardized process for regulatory agencies to interpret and act upon microarray-based data. The cDNA microarray approach is an emergent technology in diagnostics. Its values lie in being able to provide complimentary molecular insight when employed in addition to traditional tests for food safety, as part of a more comprehensive battery of tests.

  15. Reaction path ensemble of the B-Z-DNA transition: a comprehensive atomistic study.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Babin, Volodymyr; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste

    2013-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1979, left-handed Z-DNA has evolved from an in vitro curiosity to a challenging DNA structure with crucial roles in gene expression, regulation and recombination. A fundamental question that has puzzled researchers for decades is how the transition from B-DNA, the prevalent right-handed form of DNA, to Z-DNA is accomplished. Due to the complexity of the B-Z-DNA transition, experimental and computational studies have resulted in several different, apparently contradictory models. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations coupled with state-of-the-art enhanced sampling techniques operating through non-conventional reaction coordinates, to investigate the B-Z-DNA transition at the atomic level. Our results show a complex free energy landscape, where several phenomena such as over-stretching, unpeeling, base pair extrusion and base pair flipping are observed resulting in interconversions between different DNA conformations such as B-DNA, Z-DNA and S-DNA. In particular, different minimum free energy paths allow for the coexistence of different mechanisms (such as zipper and stretch-collapse mechanisms) that previously had been proposed as independent, disconnected models. We find that the B-Z-DNA transition--in absence of other molecular partners--can encompass more than one mechanism of comparable free energy, and is therefore better described in terms of a reaction path ensemble. PMID:23104380

  16. Reaction path ensemble of the B–Z-DNA transition: a comprehensive atomistic study

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Babin, Volodymyr; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste

    2013-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1979, left-handed Z-DNA has evolved from an in vitro curiosity to a challenging DNA structure with crucial roles in gene expression, regulation and recombination. A fundamental question that has puzzled researchers for decades is how the transition from B-DNA, the prevalent right-handed form of DNA, to Z-DNA is accomplished. Due to the complexity of the B–Z-DNA transition, experimental and computational studies have resulted in several different, apparently contradictory models. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations coupled with state-of-the-art enhanced sampling techniques operating through non-conventional reaction coordinates, to investigate the B–Z-DNA transition at the atomic level. Our results show a complex free energy landscape, where several phenomena such as over-stretching, unpeeling, base pair extrusion and base pair flipping are observed resulting in interconversions between different DNA conformations such as B-DNA, Z-DNA and S-DNA. In particular, different minimum free energy paths allow for the coexistence of different mechanisms (such as zipper and stretch–collapse mechanisms) that previously had been proposed as independent, disconnected models. We find that the B–Z-DNA transition—in absence of other molecular partners—can encompass more than one mechanism of comparable free energy, and is therefore better described in terms of a reaction path ensemble. PMID:23104380

  17. The essential comet assay: a comprehensive guide to measuring DNA damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Azqueta, Amaya; Collins, Andrew R

    2013-06-01

    The comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) is the most common method for measuring DNA damage in eukaryotic cells or disaggregated tissues. The assay depends on the relaxation of supercoiled DNA in agarose-embedded nucleoids (the residual bodies remaining after lysis of cells with detergent and high salt), which allows the DNA to be drawn out towards the anode under electrophoresis, forming comet-like images as seen under fluorescence microscopy. The relative amount of DNA in the comet tail indicates DNA break frequency. The assay has been modified to detect various base alterations, by including digestion of nucleoids with a lesion-specific endonuclease. We describe here recent technical developments, theoretical aspects, limitations as well as advantages of the assay, and modifications to measure cellular antioxidant status and different types of DNA repair. We briefly describe the applications of this method in genotoxicity testing, human biomonitoring, and ecogenotoxicology.

  18. Comprehensive gene expression profiling following DNA vaccination of rainbow trout against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Nichols, Krista M.; Winton, James R.; Kurath, Gael; Thorgaard, Gary H.; Wheeler, Paul; Hansen, John D.; Herwig, Russell P.; Park, Linda K.

    2006-01-01

    The DNA vaccine based on the glycoprotein gene of Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus induces a non-specific anti-viral immune response and long-term specific immunity against IHNV. This study characterized gene expression responses associated with the early anti-viral response. Homozygous rainbow trout were injected intra-muscularly (I.M.) with vector DNA or the IHNV DNA vaccine. Gene expression in muscle tissue (I.M. site) was evaluated using a 16,008 feature salmon cDNA microarray. Eighty different genes were significantly modulated in the vector DNA group while 910 genes were modulated in the IHNV DNA vaccinate group relative to control group. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR was used to examine expression of selected immune genes at the I.M. site and in other secondary tissues. In the localized response (I.M. site), the magnitudes of gene expression changes were much greater in the vaccinate group relative to the vector DNA group for the majority of genes analyzed. At secondary systemic sites (e.g. gill, kidney and spleen), type I IFN-related genes were up-regulated in only the IHNV DNA vaccinated group. The results presented here suggest that the IHNV DNA vaccine induces up-regulation of the type I IFN system across multiple tissues, which is the functional basis of early anti-viral immunity.

  19. Microarray-based mRNA expression profiling of leukemia cells treated with the flavonoid, casticin.

    PubMed

    Righeschi, Chiara; Eichhorn, Tolga; Karioti, Anastasia; Bilia, Anna Rita; Efferth, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Natural polyphenols play an important role in tumor inhibition. We used a doxorubicin-sensitive acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia cell line (CCRF-CEM) and its multidrug-resistant subline (CEM/ADR5000) to evaluate the activity of 15 plant polyphenols isolated in our laboratory (hypericin and pseudohypericin, verbascoside, ellagic acid, casticin, kaempferol-3-O-(2'',6''-di-E-p-coumaroyl)-glucopyranoside, kaempferol-3-O-(3,4-diacetyl-2,6-di-E-p-coumaroyl) -glucopyranoside, tiliroside, salvianolic acid B, oleuropein, rosmarinic acid, bergenin) or of others from commercial sources (curcumin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, silymarin). Casticin was the most potent compound (IC50 values of 0.28 ± 0.02 μM in CCRF-CEM and 0.44 ± 0.17 μM in CEM/ADR5000 cells. The IC50 values of the other compounds tested ranged from 1.52 μM to 164.1 μM. A microarray-based mRNA expression profiling of CCRF-CEM cells treated with casticin was performed in order to identify genes with altered expression following casticin treatment. Networks related to NF-κB, p38MAPK, histones H3 and H4, and follicle stimulating hormone were identified.

  20. Animal Viruses Probe dataset (AVPDS) for microarray-based diagnosis and identification of viruses.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Brijesh S; Pokhriyal, Mayank; Vasishtha, Dinesh P; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2014-03-01

    AVPDS (Animal Viruses Probe dataset) is a dataset of virus-specific and conserve oligonucleotides for identification and diagnosis of viruses infecting animals. The current dataset contain 20,619 virus specific probes for 833 viruses and their subtypes and 3,988 conserved probes for 146 viral genera. Dataset of virus specific probe has been divided into two fields namely virus name and probe sequence. Similarly conserved probes for virus genera table have genus, and subgroup within genus name and probe sequence. The subgroup within genus is artificially divided subgroups with no taxonomic significance and contains probes which identifies viruses in that specific subgroup of the genus. Using this dataset we have successfully diagnosed the first case of Newcastle disease virus in sheep and reported a mixed infection of Bovine viral diarrhea and Bovine herpesvirus in cattle. These dataset also contains probes which cross reacts across species experimentally though computationally they meet specifications. These probes have been marked. We hope that this dataset will be useful in microarray-based detection of viruses. The dataset can be accessed through the link https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/94060831/avpds/HOME.html.

  1. Comprehensive Analysis of Pan-African Mitochondrial DNA Variation Provides New Insights into Continental Variation and Demography.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, María; Gusmão, Leonor; Černý, Viktor; Uddin, Nabeel; Syndercombe-Court, Denise; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Göbel, Tanja; Schneider, Peter M; Salas, Antonio

    2016-03-20

    Africa is the cradle of all human beings, and although it has been the focus of a number of genetic studies, there are many questions that remain unresolved. We have performed one of the largest and most comprehensive meta-analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages carried out in the African continent to date. We generated high-throughput mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data (230 SNPs) from 2024 Africans, where more than 500 of them were additionally genotyped for the control region. These data were analyzed together with over 12,700 control region profiles collected from the literature, representing more than 300 population samples from Africa. Insights into the African homeland of humans are discussed. Phylogeographic patterns for the African continent are shown at a high phylogeographic resolution as well as at the population and regional levels. The deepest branch of the mtDNA tree, haplogroup L0, shows the highest sub-haplogroup diversity in Southeast and East Africa, suggesting this region as the homeland for modern humans. Several demographic estimates point to the coast as a facilitator of human migration in Africa, but the data indicate complex patterns, perhaps mirroring the effect of recent continental-scaled demographic events in re-shaping African mtDNA variability.

  2. Comprehensive Analysis of Pan-African Mitochondrial DNA Variation Provides New Insights into Continental Variation and Demography.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, María; Gusmão, Leonor; Černý, Viktor; Uddin, Nabeel; Syndercombe-Court, Denise; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Göbel, Tanja; Schneider, Peter M; Salas, Antonio

    2016-03-20

    Africa is the cradle of all human beings, and although it has been the focus of a number of genetic studies, there are many questions that remain unresolved. We have performed one of the largest and most comprehensive meta-analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages carried out in the African continent to date. We generated high-throughput mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data (230 SNPs) from 2024 Africans, where more than 500 of them were additionally genotyped for the control region. These data were analyzed together with over 12,700 control region profiles collected from the literature, representing more than 300 population samples from Africa. Insights into the African homeland of humans are discussed. Phylogeographic patterns for the African continent are shown at a high phylogeographic resolution as well as at the population and regional levels. The deepest branch of the mtDNA tree, haplogroup L0, shows the highest sub-haplogroup diversity in Southeast and East Africa, suggesting this region as the homeland for modern humans. Several demographic estimates point to the coast as a facilitator of human migration in Africa, but the data indicate complex patterns, perhaps mirroring the effect of recent continental-scaled demographic events in re-shaping African mtDNA variability. PMID:27020033

  3. Comprehensive analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation across human polycystic ovary syndrome ovary granulosa cell

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhaofeng; Wang, Linlin; Du, Linqing; Niu, Wenbin; Sun, Yingpu

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects approximately 7% of the reproductive-age women. A growing body of evidence indicated that epigenetic mechanisms contributed to the development of PCOS. The role of DNA modification in human PCOS ovary granulosa cell is still unknown in PCOS progression. Global DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation were detected between PCOS’ and controls’ granulosa cell. Genome-wide DNA methylation was profiled to investigate the putative function of DNA methylaiton. Selected genes expressions were analyzed between PCOS’ and controls’ granulosa cell. Our results showed that the granulosa cell global DNA methylation of PCOS patients was significant higher than the controls’. The global DNA hydroxymethylation showed low level and no statistical difference between PCOS and control. 6936 differentially methylated CpG sites were identified between control and PCOS-obesity. 12245 differential methylated CpG sites were detected between control and PCOS-nonobesity group. 5202 methylated CpG sites were significantly differential between PCOS-obesity and PCOS-nonobesity group. Our results showed that DNA methylation not hydroxymethylation altered genome-wide in PCOS granulosa cell. The different methylation genes were enriched in development protein, transcription factor activity, alternative splicing, sequence-specific DNA binding and embryonic morphogenesis. YWHAQ, NCF2, DHRS9 and SCNA were up-regulation in PCOS-obesity patients with no significance different between control and PCOS-nonobesity patients, which may be activated by lower DNA methylaiton. Global and genome-wide DNA methylation alteration may contribute to different genes expression and PCOS clinical pathology. PMID:27056885

  4. Microarray-based Analysis of Microbial Community RNAs by Whole Community RNA Amplification (WCRA)

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Yang, Zamin Koo; Gentry, Terry; Wu, Liyou; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Zhou, Jizhong

    2007-01-01

    A new approach, termed whole-community RNA amplification (WCRA), was developed to provide sufficient amounts of mRNAs from environmental samples for microarray analysis. This method employs fusion primers (six to nine random nucleotides with an attached T7 promoter) for the first-strand synthesis. The shortest primer (T7N6S) gave the best results in terms of the yield and representativeness of amplification. About 1,200- to 1,800-fold amplification was obtained with amounts of the RNA templates ranging from 10 to 100 ng, and very representative detection was obtained with 50 to 100 ng total RNA. Evaluation with a Shewanella oneidensis {Delta}fur strain revealed that the amplification method which we developed could preserve the original abundance relationships of mRNAs. In addition, to determine whether representative detection of RNAs can be achieved with mixed community samples, amplification biases were evaluated with a mixture containing equal quantities of RNAs (100 ng each) from four bacterial species, and representative amplification was also obtained. Finally, the method which we developed was applied to the active microbial populations in a denitrifying fluidized bed reactor used for denitrification of contaminated groundwater and ethanol-stimulated groundwater samples for uranium reduction. The genes expressed were consistent with the expected functions of the bioreactor and groundwater system, suggesting that this approach is useful for analyzing the functional activities of microbial communities. This is one of the first demonstrations that microarray-based technology can be used to successfully detect the activities of microbial communities from real environmental samples in a high-throughput fashion.

  5. Comprehensive analysis of hydrogen bonds in regulatory protein DNA-complexes: in search of common principles.

    PubMed

    Mandel-Gutfreund, Y; Schueler, O; Margalit, H

    1995-10-20

    A systematic analysis of hydrogen bonds between regulatory proteins and their DNA targets is presented, based on 28 crystallographically solved complexes. All possible hydrogen bonds were screened and classified into different types: those that involve the amino acid side-chains and DNA base edges and those that involve the backbone atoms of the molecules. For each interaction type, all bonds were characterized and a statistical analysis was performed to reveal significant amino acid-base interdependence. The interactions between the amino acid side-chains and DNA backbone constitute about half of the interactions, but did not show any amino acid-base correlation. Interactions via the protein backbone were also observed, predominantly with the DNA backbone. As expected, the most significant pairing preference was demonstrated for interactions between the amino acid side-chains and the DNA base edges. The statistically significant relationships could mostly be explained by the chemical nature of the participants. However, correlations that could not be trivially predicted from the hydrogen bonding potential of the residues were also identified, like the preference of lysine for guanine over adenine, or the preference of glutamic acid for cystosine over adenine. While Lys x G interactions were very frequent and spread over various families, the Glu x C interactions were found mainly in the basic helix-loop-helix family. Further examination of the side-chain-base edge contacts at the atomic level revealed a trend of the amino acids to contact the DNA by their donor atoms, preferably at position W2 in the major groove. In most cases it seems that the interactions are not guided simply by the presence of a required atom in a specific position in the groove, but that the identity of the base possessing this atom is crucial. This may have important implications in molecular design experiments.

  6. Virtual Ribosome—a comprehensive DNA translation tool with support for integration of sequence feature annotation

    PubMed Central

    Wernersson, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    Virtual Ribosome is a DNA translation tool with two areas of focus. (i) Providing a strong translation tool in its own right, with an integrated ORF finder, full support for the IUPAC degenerate DNA alphabet and all translation tables defined by the NCBI taxonomy group, including the use of alternative start codons. (ii) Integration of sequences feature annotation—in particular, native support for working with files containing intron/exon structure annotation. The software is available for both download and online use at . PMID:16845033

  7. A comprehensive assay for targeted multiplex amplification of human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, Sujatha; Zheng, Jianbiao; Wilhelmy, Julie; Faham, Malek; Mindrinos, Michael; Davis, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    We developed a robust and reproducible methodology to amplify human sequences in parallel for use in downstream multiplexed sequence analyses. We call the methodology SMART (Spacer Multiplex Amplification Reaction), and it is based, in part, on padlock probe technology. As a proof of principle, we used SMART technology to simultaneously amplify 485 human exons ranging from 100 to 500 bp from human genomic DNA. In multiple repetitions, >90% of the targets were successfully amplified with a high degree of uniformity, with 70% of targets falling within a 10-fold range and all products falling within a 100-fold range of each other in abundance. We used long padlock probes (LPPs) >300 bases in length for the assay, and the increased length of these probes allowed for the capture of human sequences up to 500 bp in length, which is optimal for capturing most human exons. To engineer the LPPs, we developed a method that generates ssDNA molecules with precise ends, using an appropriately designed dsDNA template. The template has appropriate restriction sites engineered into it that can be digested to generate nucleotide overhangs that are suitable for lambda exonuclease digestion, producing a single-stranded probe from dsDNA. The SMART technology is flexible and can be easily adapted to multiplex tens of thousands of target sequences in a single reaction. PMID:18599465

  8. A comprehensive assay for targeted multiplex amplification of human DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Krishnakumar, Sujatha; Zheng, Jianbiao; Wilhelmy, Julie; Faham, Malek; Mindrinos, Michael; Davis, Ronald

    2008-07-01

    We developed a robust and reproducible methodology to amplify human sequences in parallel for use in downstream multiplexed sequence analyses. We call the methodology SMART (Spacer Multiplex Amplification Reaction), and it is based, in part, on padlock probe technology. As a proof of principle, we used SMART technology to simultaneously amplify 485 human exons ranging from 100 to 500 bp from human genomic DNA. In multiple repetitions, >90% of the targets were successfully amplified with a high degree of uniformity, with 70% of targets falling within a 10-fold range and all products falling within a 100-fold range of each other in abundance. We used long padlock probes (LPPs) >300 bases in length for the assay, and the increased length of these probes allowed for the capture of human sequences up to 500 bp in length, which is optimal for capturing most human exons. To engineer the LPPs, we developed a method that generates ssDNA molecules with precise ends, using an appropriately designed dsDNA template. The template has appropriate restriction sites engineered into it that can be digested to generate nucleotide overhangs that are suitable for lambda exonuclease digestion, producing a single-stranded probe from dsDNA. The SMART technology is flexible and can be easily adapted to multiplex tens of thousands of target sequences in a single reaction.

  9. Binding of cationic porphyrin to isolated and encapsidated viral DNA analyzed by comprehensive spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Zupán, Kristóf; Herényi, Levente; Tóth, Katalin; Majer, Zsuzsa; Csík, Gabriella

    2004-07-20

    The complexation of tetrakis(4-N-methylpyridyl)porphyrin (TMPyP) with free and encapsidated DNA of T7 bacteriophage was investigated. To identify binding modes and relative concentrations of bound TMPyP forms, the porphyrin absorption spectra at various base pair/porphyrin ratios were analyzed. Spectral decomposition, fluorescent lifetime, and circular dichroism measurements proved the presence of two main binding types of TMPyP, e.g., external binding and intercalation both in free and in encapsidated DNA. Optical melting studies revealed that TMPyP increases the strand separation temperature of both free and native phage DNA and does not change the phase transition temperature of phage capsid proteins. From these findings we concluded that TMPyP binding does not influence the protein structure and/or the protein-DNA interaction. A combined analysis of absorption spectra and fluorescence decay curves made possible the determination of concentrations of free, externally bound, and intercalated porphyrin. As a perspective, our results facilitate a qualitative analysis of the TMPyP binding process at various experimental conditions. PMID:15248772

  10. From High-Throughput Microarray-Based Screening to Clinical Application: The Development of a Second Generation Multigene Test for Breast Cancer Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Brase, Jan C.; Kronenwett, Ralf; Petry, Christoph; Denkert, Carsten; Schmidt, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Several multigene tests have been developed for breast cancer patients to predict the individual risk of recurrence. Most of the first generation tests rely on proliferation-associated genes and are commonly carried out in central reference laboratories. Here, we describe the development of a second generation multigene assay, the EndoPredict test, a prognostic multigene expression test for estrogen receptor (ER) positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2) negative (ER+/HER2−) breast cancer patients. The EndoPredict gene signature was initially established in a large high-throughput microarray-based screening study. The key steps for biomarker identification are discussed in detail, in comparison to the establishment of other multigene signatures. After biomarker selection, genes and algorithms were transferred to a diagnostic platform (reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR)) to allow for assaying formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. A comprehensive analytical validation was performed and a prospective proficiency testing study with seven pathological laboratories finally proved that EndoPredict can be reliably used in the decentralized setting. Three independent large clinical validation studies (n = 2,257) demonstrated that EndoPredict offers independent prognostic information beyond current clinicopathological parameters and clinical guidelines. The review article summarizes several important steps that should be considered for the development process of a second generation multigene test and offers a means for transferring a microarray signature from the research laboratory to clinical practice.

  11. Comprehensive Assessment of Oxidatively Induced Modifications of DNA in a Rat Model of Human Wilson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Guerrero, Candace R; Liu, Shuo; Amato, Nicholas J; Sharma, Yogeshwar; Gupta, Sanjeev; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-03-01

    Defective copper excretion from hepatocytes in Wilson's disease causes accumulation of copper ions with increased generation of reactive oxygen species via the Fenton-type reaction. Here we developed a nanoflow liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with the isotope-dilution method for the simultaneous quantification of oxidatively induced DNA modifications. This method enabled measurement, in microgram quantities of DNA, of four oxidative stress-induced lesions, including direct ROS-induced purine cyclonucleosides (cPus) and two exocyclic adducts induced by byproducts of lipid peroxidation, i.e. 1,N(6)-etheno-2'-deoxyadenosine (εdA) and 1,N(2)-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine (εdG). Analysis of liver tissues of Long-Evans Cinnamon rats, which constitute an animal model of human Wilson's disease, and their healthy counterparts [i.e. Long-Evans Agouti rats] showed significantly higher levels of all four DNA lesions in Long-Evans Cinnamon than Long-Evans Agouti rats. Moreover, cPus were present at much higher levels than εdA and εdG lesions. In contrast, the level of 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5-HmdC), an oxidation product of 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5-mdC), was markedly lower in the liver tissues of Long-Evans Cinnamon than Long-Evans Agouti rats, though no differences were observed for the levels of 5-mdC. In vitro biochemical assay showed that Cu(2+) ions could directly inhibit the activity of Tet enzymes. Together, these results suggest that aberrant copper accumulation may perturb genomic stability by elevating oxidatively induced DNA lesions, and by altering epigenetic pathways of gene regulation.

  12. A comprehensive DNA methylation profile of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Carmona, F Javier; Davalos, Veronica; Vidal, Enrique; Gomez, Antonio; Heyn, Holger; Hashimoto, Yutaka; Vizoso, Miguel; Martinez-Cardus, Anna; Sayols, Sergi; Ferreira, Humberto J; Sánchez-Mut, Jose V; Morán, Sebastián; Margelí, Mireia; Castella, Eva; Berdasco, Maria; Stefansson, Olafur A; Eyfjord, Jorunn E; Gonzalez-Suarez, Eva; Dopazo, Joaquín; Orozco, Modesto; Gut, Ivo G; Esteller, Manel

    2014-10-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a plastic process in which fully differentiated epithelial cells are converted into poorly differentiated, migratory and invasive mesenchymal cells, and it has been related to the metastasis potential of tumors. This is a reversible process and cells can also eventually undergo mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. The existence of a dynamic EMT process suggests the involvement of epigenetic shifts in the phenotype. Herein, we obtained the DNA methylomes at single-base resolution of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells undergoing EMT and translated the identified differentially methylated regions to human breast cancer cells undergoing a gain of migratory and invasive capabilities associated with the EMT phenotype. We noticed dynamic and reversible changes of DNA methylation, both on promoter sequences and gene-bodies in association with transcription regulation of EMT-related genes. Most importantly, the identified DNA methylation markers of EMT were present in primary mammary tumors in association with the epithelial or the mesenchymal phenotype of the studied breast cancer samples. PMID:25106427

  13. Evaluation of a viral microarray based on simultaneous extraction and amplification of viral nucleotide acid for detecting human herpesviruses and enteroviruses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Duan, Chunhong; Zhang, Chunxiu; Yang, Xiaomeng; Zhao, Yan; Dong, Rui; Zhou, Jiajing; Gai, Zhongtao

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a viral microarray based assay was developed to detect the human herpesviruses and enteroviruses associated with central nervous system infections, including herpes simplex virus type 1, type 2 (HSV1 and HSV2), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), enterovirus 71 (EV71), coxsackievirus A 16 (CA16) and B 5(CB5). The DNA polymerase gene of human herpesviruses and 5'-untranslated region of enteroviruses were selected as the targets to design primers and probes. Human herpesviruses DNA and enteroviruses RNA were extracted simultaneously by using a guanidinium thiocyanate acid buffer, and were subsequently amplified through a biotinylated asymmetry multiplex RT-PCR with the specific primer of enteroviruses. In total, 90 blood samples and 49 cerebrospinal fluids samples with suspected systemic or neurological virus infections were investigated. Out of 139 samples, 66 were identified as positive. The specificities of this multiplex RT-PCR microarray assay were over 96% but the sensitivities were various from 100% for HSV1, HSV2, EV71 and CB5, 95.83% for CMV, 80% for EBV to 71.43% for CA16 in comparison with reference standards of TaqMan qPCR/qRT-PCR. The high Kappa values (>0.90) from HSV1, HSV2, CMV, EV71 and CB5 were obtained, indicating almost perfect agreement in term of the 5 viruses detection. But lower Kappa values for EBV (0.63) and CA16 (0.74) displayed a moderate to substantial agreement. This study provides an innovation of simultaneous extraction, amplification, hybridization and detection of DNA viruses and RNA viruses with simplicity and specificity, and demonstrates a potential clinical utility for a variety of viruses' detection.

  14. A comprehensive phylogeny of birds (Aves) using targeted next-generation DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Prum, Richard O; Berv, Jacob S; Dornburg, Alex; Field, Daniel J; Townsend, Jeffrey P; Lemmon, Emily Moriarty; Lemmon, Alan R

    2015-10-22

    Although reconstruction of the phylogeny of living birds has progressed tremendously in the last decade, the evolutionary history of Neoaves--a clade that encompasses nearly all living bird species--remains the greatest unresolved challenge in dinosaur systematics. Here we investigate avian phylogeny with an unprecedented scale of data: >390,000 bases of genomic sequence data from each of 198 species of living birds, representing all major avian lineages, and two crocodilian outgroups. Sequence data were collected using anchored hybrid enrichment, yielding 259 nuclear loci with an average length of 1,523 bases for a total data set of over 7.8 × 10(7) bases. Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses yielded highly supported and nearly identical phylogenetic trees for all major avian lineages. Five major clades form successive sister groups to the rest of Neoaves: (1) a clade including nightjars, other caprimulgiforms, swifts, and hummingbirds; (2) a clade uniting cuckoos, bustards, and turacos with pigeons, mesites, and sandgrouse; (3) cranes and their relatives; (4) a comprehensive waterbird clade, including all diving, wading, and shorebirds; and (5) a comprehensive landbird clade with the enigmatic hoatzin (Opisthocomus hoazin) as the sister group to the rest. Neither of the two main, recently proposed Neoavian clades--Columbea and Passerea--were supported as monophyletic. The results of our divergence time analyses are congruent with the palaeontological record, supporting a major radiation of crown birds in the wake of the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) mass extinction.

  15. A comprehensive phylogeny of birds (Aves) using targeted next-generation DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Prum, Richard O; Berv, Jacob S; Dornburg, Alex; Field, Daniel J; Townsend, Jeffrey P; Lemmon, Emily Moriarty; Lemmon, Alan R

    2015-10-22

    Although reconstruction of the phylogeny of living birds has progressed tremendously in the last decade, the evolutionary history of Neoaves--a clade that encompasses nearly all living bird species--remains the greatest unresolved challenge in dinosaur systematics. Here we investigate avian phylogeny with an unprecedented scale of data: >390,000 bases of genomic sequence data from each of 198 species of living birds, representing all major avian lineages, and two crocodilian outgroups. Sequence data were collected using anchored hybrid enrichment, yielding 259 nuclear loci with an average length of 1,523 bases for a total data set of over 7.8 × 10(7) bases. Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses yielded highly supported and nearly identical phylogenetic trees for all major avian lineages. Five major clades form successive sister groups to the rest of Neoaves: (1) a clade including nightjars, other caprimulgiforms, swifts, and hummingbirds; (2) a clade uniting cuckoos, bustards, and turacos with pigeons, mesites, and sandgrouse; (3) cranes and their relatives; (4) a comprehensive waterbird clade, including all diving, wading, and shorebirds; and (5) a comprehensive landbird clade with the enigmatic hoatzin (Opisthocomus hoazin) as the sister group to the rest. Neither of the two main, recently proposed Neoavian clades--Columbea and Passerea--were supported as monophyletic. The results of our divergence time analyses are congruent with the palaeontological record, supporting a major radiation of crown birds in the wake of the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) mass extinction. PMID:26444237

  16. Multi-Platform, Multi-Site, Microarray-Based Human Tumor Classification

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Greg; Yang, Ivana V.; Boulware, David; Kwong, Ka Yin; Coppola, Domenico; Eschrich, Steven; Quackenbush, John; Yeatman, Timothy J.

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of gene expression profiling has resulted in the production of rich human data sets with potential for deciphering tumor diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. Here we demonstrate how artificial neural networks (ANNs) can be applied to two completely different microarray platforms (cDNA and oligonucleotide), or a combination of both, to build tumor classifiers capable of deciphering the identity of most human cancers. First, 78 tumors representing eight different types of histologically similar adenocarcinoma, were evaluated with a 32k cDNA microarray and correctly classified by a cDNA-based ANN, using independent training and test sets, with a mean accuracy of 83%. To expand our approach, oligonucleotide data derived from six independent performance sites, representing 463 tumors and 21 tumor types, were assembled, normalized, and scaled. An oligonucleotide-based ANN, trained on a random fraction of the tumors (n = 343), was 88% accurate in predicting known pathological origin of the remaining fraction of tumors (n = 120) not exposed to the training algorithm. Finally, a mixed-platform classifier using a combination of both cDNA and oligonucleotide microarray data from seven performance sites, normalized and scaled from a large and diverse tumor set (n = 539), produced similar results (85% accuracy) on independent test sets. Further validation of our classifiers was achieved by accurately (84%) predicting the known primary site of origin for an independent set of metastatic lesions (n = 50), resected from brain, lung, and liver, potentially addressing the vexing classification problems imposed by unknown primary cancers. These cDNA- and oligonucleotide-based classifiers provide a first proof of principle that data derived from multiple platforms and performance sites can be exploited to build multi-tissue tumor classifiers. PMID:14695313

  17. Comprehensive Phylogenetic Reconstruction of Amoebozoa Based on Concatenated Analyses of SSU-rDNA and Actin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lahr, Daniel J. G.; Grant, Jessica; Nguyen, Truc; Lin, Jian Hua; Katz, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    Evolutionary relationships within Amoebozoa have been the subject of controversy for two reasons: 1) paucity of morphological characters in traditional surveys and 2) haphazard taxonomic sampling in modern molecular reconstructions. These along with other factors have prevented the erection of a definitive system that resolves confidently both higher and lower-level relationships. Additionally, the recent recognition that many protosteloid amoebae are in fact scattered throughout the Amoebozoa suggests that phylogenetic reconstructions have been excluding an extensive and integral group of organisms. Here we provide a comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction based on 139 taxa using molecular information from both SSU-rDNA and actin genes. We provide molecular data for 13 of those taxa, 12 of which had not been previously characterized. We explored the dataset extensively by generating 18 alternative reconstructions that assess the effect of missing data, long-branched taxa, unstable taxa, fast evolving sites and inclusion of environmental sequences. We compared reconstructions with each other as well as against previously published phylogenies. Our analyses show that many of the morphologically established lower-level relationships (defined here as relationships roughly equivalent to Order level or below) are congruent with molecular data. However, the data are insufficient to corroborate or reject the large majority of proposed higher-level relationships (above the Order-level), with the exception of Tubulinea, Archamoebae and Myxogastrea, which are consistently recovered. Moreover, contrary to previous expectations, the inclusion of available environmental sequences does not significantly improve the Amoebozoa reconstruction. This is probably because key amoebozoan taxa are not easily amplified by environmental sequencing methodology due to high rates of molecular evolution and regular occurrence of large indels and introns. Finally, in an effort to facilitate

  18. Rapid identification of bacterial pathogens using a PCR- and microarray-based assay

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background During the course of a bacterial infection, the rapid identification of the causative agent(s) is necessary for the determination of effective treatment options. We have developed a method based on a modified broad-range PCR and an oligonucleotide microarray for the simultaneous detection and identification of 12 bacterial pathogens at the species level. The broad-range PCR primer mixture was designed using conserved regions of the bacterial topoisomerase genes gyrB and parE. The primer design allowed the use of a novel DNA amplification method, which produced labeled, single-stranded DNA suitable for microarray hybridization. The probes on the microarray were designed from the alignments of species- or genus-specific variable regions of the gyrB and parE genes flanked by the primers. We included mecA-specific primers and probes in the same assay to indicate the presence of methicillin resistance in the bacterial species. The feasibility of this assay in routine diagnostic testing was evaluated using 146 blood culture positive and 40 blood culture negative samples. Results Comparison of our results with those of a conventional culture-based method revealed a sensitivity of 96% (initial sensitivity of 82%) and specificity of 98%. Furthermore, only one cross-reaction was observed upon investigating 102 culture isolates from 70 untargeted bacteria. The total assay time was only three hours, including the time required for the DNA extraction, PCR and microarray steps in sequence. Conclusion The assay rapidly provides reliable data, which can guide optimal antimicrobial treatment decisions in a timely manner. PMID:19664269

  19. Role of β-catenin expression in paediatric mesenchymal lesions: a tissue microarray-based immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, A.; Pannone, G.; Errico, M.E.; Bifano, D.; Lastilla, G.; Bufo, P.; Loreto, C.; Donofrio, V.

    2012-01-01

    Beta-catenin is a major protein in the Wnt signalling pathway. Although it has been studied in various types of carcinoma, little is known about its expression in mesenchymal tumours. In this study 41 specimens of a variety of mesenchymal childhood tumours were compared to 24 samples of the corresponding adult tumours to assess the diagnostic value of nuclear β-catenin expression using tissue microarray-based immunohistochemistry. Similar to adult sarcoma and fibromatosis, β-catenin was not expressed in the majority of childhood sarcomas, and its nuclear translocation was detected in paediatric fibromatosis; non-negligible levels of nuclear staining in other tumour types demonstrate Wnt pathway activation in mesenchymal neoplasms of childhood and adolescence. PMID:23027341

  20. Rapid microarray-based genotyping of Chlamydia spp. strains from clinical tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Sachse, Konrad; Ruettger, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic Chlamydia (C.) psittaci and C. trachomatis strains can be genotyped based on variations in the ompA genomic locus. In the present chapter, we describe rapid genotyping assays for both chlamydial agents using the ArrayStrip™ (AS) microarray platform. The test is targeting multiple discriminatory sites in the variable domains of the ompA gene by using 35 (C. psittaci) and 61 (C. trachomatis) oligonucleotide probes representing genotype-specific polymorphisms. In addition to discrimination among the established genotypes, this approach allows identification of atypical strains that were not accessible to typing using previously established techniques, such as PCR-RFLP or serotyping. The present DNA microarray assay can be conducted directly on clinical tissue samples and is suitable for tracing epidemiological chains and exploring the dissemination of particular genotypes. The procedure is easy to handle and economically affordable, and it allows genotyping of up to 32 clinical samples per day, thus lending itself for routine diagnosis as well.

  1. Screening for DNA Alkylation Mono and Cross-Linked Adducts with a Comprehensive LC-MS(3) Adductomic Approach.

    PubMed

    Stornetta, Alessia; Villalta, Peter W; Hecht, Stephen S; Sturla, Shana J; Balbo, Silvia

    2015-12-01

    A high-resolution/accurate-mass DNA adductomic approach was developed to investigate anticipated and unknown DNA adducts induced by DNA alkylating agents in biological samples. Two new features were added to a previously developed approach to significantly broaden its scope, versatility, and selectivity. First, the neutral loss of a base (guanine, adenine, thymine, or cytosine) was added to the original methodology's neutral loss of the 2'-deoxyribose moiety to allow for the detection of all DNA base adducts. Second, targeted detection of anticipated DNA adducts based on the reactivity of the DNA alkylating agent was demonstrated by inclusion of an ion mass list for data dependent triggering of MS(2) fragmentation events and subsequent MS(3) fragmentation. Additionally, untargeted screening of the samples, based on triggering of an MS(2) fragmentation event for the most intense ions of the full scan, was included for detecting unknown DNA adducts. The approach was tested by screening for DNA mono and cross-linked adducts in purified DNA and in DNA extracted from cells treated with PR104A, an experimental DNA alkylating nitrogen mustard prodrug currently under investigation for the treatment of leukemia. The results revealed the ability of this new DNA adductomic approach to detect anticipated and unknown PR104A-induced mono and cross-linked DNA adducts in biological samples. This methodology is expected to be a powerful tool for screening for DNA adducts induced by endogenous or exogenous exposures.

  2. Comprehensive massive parallel DNA sequencing strategy for the genetic diagnosis of the neuro-cardio-facio-cutaneous syndromes.

    PubMed

    Justino, Ana; Dias, Patrícia; João Pina, Maria; Sousa, Sónia; Cirnes, Luís; Berta Sousa, Ana; Carlos Machado, José; Costa, José Luis

    2015-03-01

    Variants in 11 genes of the RAS/MAPK signaling pathway have been causally linked to the neuro-cardio-facio-cutaneous syndromes group (NCFCS). Recently, A2ML1 and RIT1 were also associated with these syndromes. Because of the genetic and clinical heterogeneity of NCFCS, it is challenging to define strategies for their molecular diagnosis. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a massive parallel sequencing (MPS)-based strategy for the molecular diagnosis of NCFCS. A multiplex PCR-based strategy for the enrichment of the 13 genes and a variant prioritization pipeline was established. Two sets of genomic DNA samples were studied using the Ion PGM System: (1) training set (n =15) to optimize the strategy and (2) validation set (n = 20) to validate and evaluate the power of the new methodology. Sanger sequencing was performed to confirm all variants and low covered regions. All variants identified by Sanger sequencing were detected with our MPS approach. The methodology resulted in an experimental approach with a specificity of 99.0% and a maximum analytical sensitivity of ≥ 98.2% with a confidence of 99%. Importantly, two patients (out of 20) harbored described disease-causing variants in genes that are not routinely tested (RIT1 and SHOC2). The addition of less frequently altered genes increased in ≈ 10% the diagnostic yield of the strategy currently used. The presented workflow provides a comprehensive genetic screening strategy for patients with NCFCS in a fast and cost-efficient manner. This approach demonstrates the potential of a combined MPS-Sanger sequencing-based strategy as an effective diagnostic tool for heterogeneous diseases.

  3. A molecular beacon microarray based on a quantum dot label for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingsheng; Bai, Zhixiong; Liu, Yuqian; Sun, Qingjiang

    2016-03-15

    In this work, we report the application of streptavidin-coated quantum dot (strAV-QD) in molecular beacon (MB) microarray assays by using the strAV-QD to label the immobilized MB, avoiding target labeling and meanwhile obviating the use of amplification. The MBs are stem-loop structured oligodeoxynucleotides, modified with a thiol and a biotin at two terminals of the stem. With the strAV-QD labeling an "opened" MB rather than a "closed" MB via streptavidin-biotin reaction, a sensitive and specific detection of label-free target DNA sequence is demonstrated by the MB microarray, with a signal-to-background ratio of 8. The immobilized MBs can be perfectly regenerated, allowing the reuse of the microarray. The MB microarray also is able to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms, exhibiting genotype-dependent fluorescence signals. It is demonstrated that the MB microarray can perform as a 4-to-2 encoder, compressing the genotype information into two outputs.

  4. A microarray-based detection system for genetically modified (GM) food ingredients.

    PubMed

    Leimanis, Serge; Hernández, Marta; Fernández, Sophie; Boyer, Francine; Burns, Malcolm; Bruderer, Shirin; Glouden, Thomas; Harris, Neil; Kaeppeli, Othmar; Philipp, Patrick; Pla, Maria; Puigdomènech, Pere; Vaitilingom, Marc; Bertheau, Yves; Remacle, José

    2006-05-01

    A multiplex DNA microarray chip was developed for simultaneous identification of nine genetically modified organisms (GMOs), five plant species and three GMO screening elements, i.e. the 35S promoter, the nos terminator and the nptII gene. The chips also include several controls, such as that for the possible presence of CaMV. The on-chip detection was performed directly with PCR amplified products. Particular emphasis was placed on the reduction of the number of PCR reactions required and on the number of primers present per amplification tube. The targets were biotin labelled and the arrays were detected using a colorimetric methodology. Specificity was provided by specific capture probes designed for each GMO and for the common screening elements. The sensitivity of the assay was tested by experiments carried out in five different laboratories. The limit of detection was lower than 0.3% GMO for all tests and in general around 0.1% for most GMOs. The chip detection system complies with the requirements of current EU regulations and other countries where thresholds are established for the labelling of GMO. PMID:16786296

  5. A microarray-based detection system for genetically modified (GM) food ingredients.

    PubMed

    Leimanis, Serge; Hernández, Marta; Fernández, Sophie; Boyer, Francine; Burns, Malcolm; Bruderer, Shirin; Glouden, Thomas; Harris, Neil; Kaeppeli, Othmar; Philipp, Patrick; Pla, Maria; Puigdomènech, Pere; Vaitilingom, Marc; Bertheau, Yves; Remacle, José

    2006-05-01

    A multiplex DNA microarray chip was developed for simultaneous identification of nine genetically modified organisms (GMOs), five plant species and three GMO screening elements, i.e. the 35S promoter, the nos terminator and the nptII gene. The chips also include several controls, such as that for the possible presence of CaMV. The on-chip detection was performed directly with PCR amplified products. Particular emphasis was placed on the reduction of the number of PCR reactions required and on the number of primers present per amplification tube. The targets were biotin labelled and the arrays were detected using a colorimetric methodology. Specificity was provided by specific capture probes designed for each GMO and for the common screening elements. The sensitivity of the assay was tested by experiments carried out in five different laboratories. The limit of detection was lower than 0.3% GMO for all tests and in general around 0.1% for most GMOs. The chip detection system complies with the requirements of current EU regulations and other countries where thresholds are established for the labelling of GMO.

  6. The MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC)-II study of common practices for the development and validation of microarray-based predictive models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The second phase of the MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC-II) project evaluated common practices for developing and validating microarray-based models aimed at predicting toxicological and clinical endpoints. Thirty-six teams developed classifiers for 13 endpoints - some easy, som...

  7. Quantitative characterization of conformational-specific protein-DNA binding using a dual-spectral interferometric imaging biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xirui; Daaboul, George G.; Spuhler, Philipp S.; Dröge, Peter; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2016-03-01

    DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, it was discovered that DNA-binding proteins recognize specific binding sites to carry out their functions through an indirect readout mechanism by recognizing and capturing DNA conformational flexibility and deformation. High-throughput DNA microarray-based methods that provide large-scale protein-DNA binding information have shown effective and comprehensive analysis of protein-DNA binding affinities, but do not provide information of DNA conformational changes in specific protein-DNA complexes. Building on the high-throughput capability of DNA microarrays, we demonstrate a quantitative approach that simultaneously measures the amount of protein binding to DNA and nanometer-scale DNA conformational change induced by protein binding in a microarray format. Both measurements rely on spectral interferometry on a layered substrate using a single optical instrument in two distinct modalities. In the first modality, we quantitate the amount of binding of protein to surface-immobilized DNA in each DNA spot using a label-free spectral reflectivity technique that accurately measures the surface densities of protein and DNA accumulated on the substrate. In the second modality, for each DNA spot, we simultaneously measure DNA conformational change using a fluorescence vertical sectioning technique that determines average axial height of fluorophores tagged to specific nucleotides of the surface-immobilized DNA. The approach presented in this paper, when combined with current high-throughput DNA microarray-based technologies, has the potential to serve as a rapid and simple method for quantitative and large-scale characterization of conformational specific protein-DNA interactions.DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are

  8. Comprehensive High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Analysis of DNA Phosphate Adducts Formed by the Tobacco-Specific Lung Carcinogen 4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK, 1) is a potent lung carcinogen in laboratory animals and is believed to play a key role in the development of lung cancer in smokers. Metabolic activation of NNK leads to the formation of pyridyloxobutyl DNA adducts, a critical step in its mechanism of carcinogenesis. In addition to DNA nucleobase adducts, DNA phosphate adducts can be formed by pyridyloxobutylation of the oxygen atoms of the internucleotidic phosphodiester linkages. We report the use of a liquid chromatography–nanoelectrospray ionization–high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry technique to characterize 30 novel pyridyloxobutyl DNA phosphate adducts in calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) treated with 4-(acetoxymethylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNKOAc, 2), a regiochemically activated form of NNK. A 15N3-labeled internal standard was synthesized for one of the most abundant phosphate adducts, dCp[4-oxo-4-(3-pyridyl)butyl]dC (CpopC), and this standard was used to quantify CpopC and to estimate the levels of other adducts in the NNKOAc-treated CT-DNA. Formation of DNA phosphate adducts by NNK in vivo was further investigated in rats treated with NNK acutely (0.1 mmol/kg once daily for 4 days by subcutaneous injection) and chronically (5 ppm in drinking water for 10, 30, 50, and 70 weeks). This study provides the first comprehensive structural identification and quantitation of a panel of DNA phosphate adducts of a structurally complex carcinogen and chemical support for future mechanistic studies of tobacco carcinogenesis in humans. PMID:26398225

  9. Microarray Based Gene Expression Analysis of Murine Brown and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue: Significance with Human

    PubMed Central

    Boparai, Ravneet K.; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran; Mantri, Shrikant; Bishnoi, Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    Background Two types of adipose tissues, white (WAT) and brown (BAT) are found in mammals. Increasingly novel strategies are being proposed for the treatment of obesity and its associated complications by altering amount and/or activity of BAT using mouse models. Methodology/Principle Findings The present study was designed to: (a) investigate the differential expression of genes in LACA mice subcutaneous WAT (sWAT) and BAT using mouse DNA microarray, (b) to compare mouse differential gene expression with previously published human data; to understand any inter- species differences between the two and (c) to make a comparative assessment with C57BL/6 mouse strain. In mouse microarray studies, over 7003, 1176 and 401 probe sets showed more than two-fold, five-fold and ten-fold change respectively in differential expression between murine BAT and WAT. Microarray data was validated using quantitative RT-PCR of key genes showing high expression in BAT (Fabp3, Ucp1, Slc27a1) and sWAT (Ms4a1, H2-Ob, Bank1) or showing relatively low expression in BAT (Pgk1, Cox6b1) and sWAT (Slc20a1, Cd74). Multi-omic pathway analysis was employed to understand possible links between the organisms. When murine two fold data was compared with published human BAT and sWAT data, 90 genes showed parallel differential expression in both mouse and human. Out of these 90 genes, 46 showed same pattern of differential expression whereas the pattern was opposite for the remaining 44 genes. Based on our microarray results and its comparison with human data, we were able to identify genes (targets) (a) which can be studied in mouse model systems to extrapolate results to human (b) where caution should be exercised before extrapolation of murine data to human. Conclusion Our study provides evidence for inter species (mouse vs human) differences in differential gene expression between sWAT and BAT. Critical understanding of this data may help in development of novel ways to engineer one form of adipose

  10. Caenorhabditis elegans par2.1/mtssb-1 is essential for mitochondrial DNA replication and its defect causes comprehensive transcriptional alterations including a hypoxia response

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Tomoko; Mori, Chihiro; Takanami, Takako; Sasagawa, Yohei; Saito, Rumiko; Ichiishi, Eiichiro; Higashitani, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    DNA polymerase {gamma} and mtSSB are key components of the mtDNA replication machinery. To study the biological influences of defects in mtDNA replication, we used RNAi to deplete the gene for a putative mtSSB, par2.1, in Caenorhabditis elegans. In previous systematic RNAi screens, downregulation of this gene has not caused any clearly defective phenotypes. Here, we continuously fed a dsRNA targeting par2.1 to C. elegans over generations. Seventy-nine percent of F1 progeny produced 60-72 h after feeding grew to adulthood but were completely sterile, with an arrest of germline cell proliferation. Analyses of mtDNA copy number and cell cytology indicated that the sterile hermaphrodites had fewer mitochondria. These results indicated that par2.1 essentially functions for germline cell proliferation through mtDNA replication; we therefore termed it mtssb-1. Comprehensive transcriptional alterations including hypoxia response induction dependent on and independent of hif-1 function, occurred by RNAi depletion of mtssb-1. Treatment with ethidium bromide, which impairs mtDNA replication and transcription, caused similar transcriptional alterations. In addition, the frequency of apoptosis in the germline cells was reduced in fertile progeny with a partial RNAi effect. These suggest that RNAi depletion of C. elegans mtssb-1 is useful as a model system of mitochondrial dysfunction.

  11. Discovery and validation of an INflammatory PROtein-driven GAstric cancer Signature (INPROGAS) using antibody microarray-based oncoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Costa, Manuel; Codina-Cazador, Antonio; Cortés-Pastoret, Elisabet; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Cufí, Sílvia; Flaquer, Sílvia; Llopis-Puigmarti, Francesca; Pujol-Amado, Eulalia; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Ortiz, Rosa; Lopez-Bonet, Eugeni; Queralt, Bernardo; Guardeño, Raquel; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Roig, Josep; Joven, Jorge; Menendez, Javier A.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to improve gastric cancer (GC) diagnosis by identifying and validating an INflammatory PROtein-driven GAstric cancer Signature (hereafter INPROGAS) using low-cost affinity proteomics. The detection of 120 cytokines, 43 angiogenic factors, 41 growth factors, 40 inflammatory factors and 10 metalloproteinases was performed using commercially available human antibody microarray-based arrays. We identified 21 inflammation-related proteins (INPROGAS) with significant differences in expression between GC tissues and normal gastric mucosa in a discovery cohort of matched pairs (n=10) of tumor/normal gastric tissues. Ingenuity pathway analysis confirmed the “inflammatory response”, “cellular movement” and “immune cell trafficking” as the most overrepresented biofunctions within INPROGAS. Using an expanded independent validation cohort (n = 22), INPROGAS classified gastric samples as “GC” or “non-GC” with a sensitivity of 82% (95% CI 59-94) and a specificity of 73% (95% CI 49-89). The positive predictive value and negative predictive value in this validation cohort were 75% (95% CI 53-90) and 80% (95% CI 56-94), respectively. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value in this validation cohort were 75% (95% CI 53-90) and 80% (95% CI 56-94), respectively. Antibody microarray analyses of the GC-associated inflammatory proteome identified a 21-protein INPROGAS that accurately discriminated GC from noncancerous gastric mucosa. PMID:24722433

  12. Glycoconjugate microarray based on an evanescent-field fluorescence-assisted detection principle for investigation of glycan-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Hiroaki; Mori, Atsushi; Uchiyama, Noboru; Yabe, Rikio; Iwaki, Jun; Shikanai, Toshihide; Angata, Takashi; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2008-10-01

    The extensive involvement of glycan-binding proteins (GBPs) as regulators in diverse biological phenomena provides a fundamental reason to investigate their glycan-binding specificities. Here, we developed a glycoconjugate microarray based on an evanescent-field fluorescence-assisted detection principle for investigation of GBPs. Eighty-nine selected multivalent glycoconjugates comprising natural glycoproteins, neo-glycoproteins, and polyacrylamide (PAA)-conjugated glycan epitopes were immobilized on an epoxy-activated glass slide. The GBP binding was monitored by an evanescent-field fluorescence-assisted scanner at equilibrium without washing steps. The detection principle also allows direct application of unpurified GBPs with the aid of specific antibodies. Model experiments using plant lectins (RCA120, ConA, and SNA), galectins (3 and 8), a C-type lectin (DC-SIGN) and a siglec (CD22) provided data consistent with previous work within 4 h using less than 40 ng of GBPs per analysis. As an application, serum profiling of antiglycan antibodies (IgG and IgM) was performed with Cy3-labeled secondary antibodies. Moreover, novel carbohydrate-binding ability was demonstrated for a human IL-18 binding protein. Thus, the developed glycan array is useful for investigation of various types of GBPs, with the added advantage of wash-free analysis.

  13. MBD-isolated Genome Sequencing provides a high-throughput and comprehensive survey of DNA methylation in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Serre, David; Lee, Byron H; Ting, Angela H

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification involved in both normal developmental processes and disease states through the modulation of gene expression and the maintenance of genomic organization. Conventional methods of DNA methylation analysis, such as bisulfite sequencing, methylation sensitive restriction enzyme digestion and array-based detection techniques, have major limitations that impede high-throughput genome-wide analysis. We describe a novel technique, MBD-isolated Genome Sequencing (MiGS), which combines precipitation of methylated DNA by recombinant methyl-CpG binding domain of MBD2 protein and sequencing of the isolated DNA by a massively parallel sequencer. We utilized MiGS to study three isogenic cancer cell lines with varying degrees of DNA methylation. We successfully detected previously known methylated regions in these cells and identified hundreds of novel methylated regions. This technique is highly specific and sensitive and can be applied to any biological settings to identify differentially methylated regions at the genomic scale.

  14. Microarray-based comparative genomic profiling of reference strains and selected Canadian field isolates of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Gouré, Julien; Findlay, Wendy A; Deslandes, Vincent; Bouevitch, Anne; Foote, Simon J; MacInnes, Janet I; Coulton, James W; Nash, John HE; Jacques, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Background Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, is a highly contagious respiratory pathogen that causes severe losses to the swine industry worldwide. Current commercially-available vaccines are of limited value because they do not induce cross-serovar immunity and do not prevent development of the carrier state. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridizations (M-CGH) were used to estimate whole genomic diversity of representative Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae strains. Our goal was to identify conserved genes, especially those predicted to encode outer membrane proteins and lipoproteins because of their potential for the development of more effective vaccines. Results Using hierarchical clustering, our M-CGH results showed that the majority of the genes in the genome of the serovar 5 A. pleuropneumoniae L20 strain were conserved in the reference strains of all 15 serovars and in representative field isolates. Fifty-eight conserved genes predicted to encode for outer membrane proteins or lipoproteins were identified. As well, there were several clusters of diverged or absent genes including those associated with capsule biosynthesis, toxin production as well as genes typically associated with mobile elements. Conclusion Although A. pleuropneumoniae strains are essentially clonal, M-CGH analysis of the reference strains of the fifteen serovars and representative field isolates revealed several classes of genes that were divergent or absent. Not surprisingly, these included genes associated with capsule biosynthesis as the capsule is associated with sero-specificity. Several of the conserved genes were identified as candidates for vaccine development, and we conclude that M-CGH is a valuable tool for reverse vaccinology. PMID:19239696

  15. Bridging the solution divide: comprehensive structural analyses of dynamic RNA, DNA, and protein assemblies by small angle X-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Rambo, Robert P.; Tainer, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) is changing how we perceive biological structures, because it reveals dynamic macromolecular conformations and assemblies in solution. SAXS information captures thermodynamic ensembles, enhances static structures detailed by high-resolution methods, uncovers commonalities among diverse macromolecules, and helps define biological mechanisms. SAXS-based experiments on RNA riboswitches and ribozymes and on DNA-protein complexes including DNA-PK and p53 discover flexibilities that better define structure-function relationships. Furthermore, SAXS results suggest conformational variation is a general functional feature of macromolecules. Thus, accurate structural analyses will require a comprehensive approach that assesses both flexibility, as seen by SAXS, and detail, as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR. Here, we review recent SAXS computational tools, technologies, and applications to nucleic acids and related structures. PMID:20097063

  16. Comprehensive study of mtDNA among Southwest Asian dogs contradicts independent domestication of wolf, but implies dog–wolf hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Ardalan, Arman; Kluetsch, Cornelya F C; Zhang, Ai-bing; Erdogan, Metin; Uhlén, Mathias; Houshmand, Massoud; Tepeli, Cafer; Ashtiani, Seyed Reza Miraei; Savolainen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Studies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diversity indicate explicitly that dogs were domesticated, probably exclusively, in southern East Asia. However, Southwest Asia (SwAsia) has had poor representation and geographical coverage in these studies. Other studies based on archaeological and genome-wide SNP data have suggested an origin of dogs in SwAsia. Hence, it has been suspected that mtDNA evidence for this scenario may have remained undetected. In the first comprehensive investigation of genetic diversity among SwAsian dogs, we analyzed 582 bp of mtDNA for 345 indigenous dogs from across SwAsia, and compared with 1556 dogs across the Old World. We show that 97.4% of SwAsian dogs carry haplotypes belonging to a universal mtDNA gene pool, but that only a subset of this pool, five of the 10 principal haplogroups, is represented in SwAsia. A high frequency of haplogroup B, potentially signifying a local origin, was not paralleled with the high genetic diversity expected for a center of origin. Meanwhile, 2.6% of the SwAsian dogs carried the rare non-universal haplogroup d2. Thus, mtDNA data give no indication that dogs originated in SwAsia through independent domestication of wolf, but dog–wolf hybridization may have formed the local haplogroup d2 within this region. Southern East Asia remains the only region with virtually full extent of genetic variation, strongly indicating it to be the primary and probably sole center of wolf domestication. An origin of dogs in southern East Asia may have been overlooked by other studies due to a substantial lack of samples from this region. PMID:22393507

  17. Crystallization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmrZ protein: development of a comprehensive method for obtaining and optimization of protein–DNA crystals

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, Edward E.; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Hollis, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The AmrZ protein from the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a transcription factor that activates and represses the genes for several potent virulence factors, which gives the bacteria a selective advantage in infection. AmrZ was crystallized in complex with DNA containing the amrZ1 repressor binding site. Obtaining crystals of the complex required the integration of a number of well known techniques along with the development of new methods. Here, these processes are organized and combined into a comprehensive method which yielded diffraction-quality crystals. Part of this method included thorough data mining of the crystallization conditions of protein–DNA complexes to create a new directed crystallization screen. An optimized technique for the verification of protein–DNA complexes in crystals is also presented. Taken together, the methods described in this article attempt to streamline the difficult process of obtaining diffraction-quality crystals of protein–DNA complexes through the organization of older methods combined with the introduction of new techniques. PMID:22869139

  18. CoDNaS 2.0: a comprehensive database of protein conformational diversity in the native state

    PubMed Central

    Monzon, Alexander Miguel; Rohr, Cristian Oscar; Fornasari, María Silvina; Parisi, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    CoDNaS (conformational diversity of the native state) is a protein conformational diversity database. Conformational diversity describes structural differences between conformers that define the native state of proteins. It is a key concept to understand protein function and biological processes related to protein functions. CoDNaS offers a well curated database that is experimentally driven, thoroughly linked, and annotated. CoDNaS facilitates the extraction of key information on small structural differences based on protein movements. CoDNaS enables users to easily relate the degree of conformational diversity with physical, chemical and biological properties derived from experiments on protein structure and biological characteristics. The new version of CoDNaS includes ∼70% of all available protein structures, and new tools have been added that run sequence searches, display structural flexibility profiles and allow users to browse the database for different structural classes. These tools facilitate the exploration of protein conformational diversity and its role in protein function. Database URL: http://ufq.unq.edu.ar/codnas PMID:27022160

  19. CoDNaS 2.0: a comprehensive database of protein conformational diversity in the native state.

    PubMed

    Monzon, Alexander Miguel; Rohr, Cristian Oscar; Fornasari, María Silvina; Parisi, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    CoDNaS (conformational diversity of the native state) is a protein conformational diversity database. Conformational diversity describes structural differences between conformers that define the native state of proteins. It is a key concept to understand protein function and biological processes related to protein functions. CoDNaS offers a well curated database that is experimentally driven, thoroughly linked, and annotated. CoDNaS facilitates the extraction of key information on small structural differences based on protein movements. CoDNaS enables users to easily relate the degree of conformational diversity with physical, chemical and biological properties derived from experiments on protein structure and biological characteristics. The new version of CoDNaS includes ∼70% of all available protein structures, and new tools have been added that run sequence searches, display structural flexibility profiles and allow users to browse the database for different structural classes. These tools facilitate the exploration of protein conformational diversity and its role in protein function. Database URL:http://ufq.unq.edu.ar/codnas. PMID:27022160

  20. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  1. Rapid identification of carbapenemase genes in gram-negative bacteria with an oligonucleotide microarray-based assay.

    PubMed

    Braun, Sascha D; Monecke, Stefan; Thürmer, Alexander; Ruppelt, Antje; Makarewicz, Oliwia; Pletz, Mathias; Reiβig, Annett; Slickers, Peter; Ehricht, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Rapid molecular identification of carbapenemase genes in Gram-negative bacteria is crucial for infection control and prevention, surveillance and for epidemiological purposes. Furthermore, it may have a significant impact upon determining the appropriate initial treatment and greatly benefit for critically ill patients. A novel oligonucleotide microarray-based assay was developed to simultaneously detect genes encoding clinically important carbapenemases as well as selected extended (ESBL) and narrow spectrum (NSBL) beta-lactamases directly from clonal culture material within few hours. Additionally, a panel of species specific markers was included to identify Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Citrobacter freundii/braakii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii. The assay was tested using a panel of 117 isolates collected from urinary, blood and stool samples. For these isolates, phenotypic identifications and susceptibility tests were available. An independent detection of carbapenemase, ESBL and NSBL genes was carried out by various external reference laboratories using PCR methods. In direct comparison, the microarray correctly identified 98.2% of the covered carbapenemase genes. This included blaVIM (13 out of 13), blaGIM (2/2), blaKPC (27/27), blaNDM (5/5), blaIMP-2/4/7/8/13/14/15/16/31 (10/10), blaOXA-23 (12/13), blaOXA-40-group (7/7), blaOXA-48-group (32/33), blaOXA-51 (1/1) and blaOXA-58 (1/1). Furthermore, the test correctly identified additional beta-lactamases [blaOXA-1 (16/16), blaOXA-2 (4/4), blaOXA-9 (33/33), OXA-10 (3/3), blaOXA-51 (25/25), blaOXA-58 (2/2), CTX-M1/M15 (17/17) and blaVIM (1/1)]. In direct comparison to phenotypical identification obtained by VITEK or MALDI-TOF systems, 114 of 117 (97.4%) isolates, including Acinetobacter baumannii (28/28), Enterobacter spec. (5/5), Escherichia coli (4/4), Klebsiella pneumoniae (62/63), Klebsiella oxytoca (0/2), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (12/12), Citrobacter freundii (1/1) and

  2. A comprehensive DNA barcode database for Central European beetles with a focus on Germany: adding more than 3500 identified species to BOLD.

    PubMed

    Hendrich, Lars; Morinière, Jérôme; Haszprunar, Gerhard; Hebert, Paul D N; Hausmann, Axel; Köhler, Frank; Balke, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Beetles are the most diverse group of animals and are crucial for ecosystem functioning. In many countries, they are well established for environmental impact assessment, but even in the well-studied Central European fauna, species identification can be very difficult. A comprehensive and taxonomically well-curated DNA barcode library could remedy this deficit and could also link hundreds of years of traditional knowledge with next generation sequencing technology. However, such a beetle library is missing to date. This study provides the globally largest DNA barcode reference library for Coleoptera for 15 948 individuals belonging to 3514 well-identified species (53% of the German fauna) with representatives from 97 of 103 families (94%). This study is the first comprehensive regional test of the efficiency of DNA barcoding for beetles with a focus on Germany. Sequences ≥500 bp were recovered from 63% of the specimens analysed (15 948 of 25 294) with short sequences from another 997 specimens. Whereas most specimens (92.2%) could be unambiguously assigned to a single known species by sequence diversity at CO1, 1089 specimens (6.8%) were assigned to more than one Barcode Index Number (BIN), creating 395 BINs which need further study to ascertain if they represent cryptic species, mitochondrial introgression, or simply regional variation in widespread species. We found 409 specimens (2.6%) that shared a BIN assignment with another species, most involving a pair of closely allied species as 43 BINs were involved. Most of these taxa were separated by barcodes although sequence divergences were low. Only 155 specimens (0.97%) show identical or overlapping clusters.

  3. methylKit: a comprehensive R package for the analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation profiles.

    PubMed

    Akalin, Altuna; Kormaksson, Matthias; Li, Sheng; Garrett-Bakelman, Francine E; Figueroa, Maria E; Melnick, Ari; Mason, Christopher E

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is a chemical modification of cytosine bases that is pivotal for gene regulation, cellular specification and cancer development. Here, we describe an R package, methylKit, that rapidly analyzes genome-wide cytosine epigenetic profiles from high-throughput methylation and hydroxymethylation sequencing experiments. methylKit includes functions for clustering, sample quality visualization, differential methylation analysis and annotation features, thus automating and simplifying many of the steps for discerning statistically significant bases or regions of DNA methylation. Finally, we demonstrate methylKit on breast cancer data, in which we find statistically significant regions of differential methylation and stratify tumor subtypes. methylKit is available at http://code.google.com/p/methylkit. PMID:23034086

  4. Comprehensive DNA Methylation Analysis Reveals a Common Ten-Gene Methylation Signature in Colorectal Adenomas and Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Patai, Árpád V.; Valcz, Gábor; Hollósi, Péter; Kalmár, Alexandra; Péterfia, Bálint; Patai, Árpád; Wichmann, Barnabás; Spisák, Sándor; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Leiszter, Katalin; Tóth, Kinga; Sipos, Ferenc; Kovalszky, Ilona; Péter, Zoltán; Miheller, Pál; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2015-01-01

    Microarray analysis of promoter hypermethylation provides insight into the role and extent of DNA methylation in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC) and may be co-monitored with the appearance of driver mutations. Colonic biopsy samples were obtained endoscopically from 10 normal, 23 adenoma (17 low-grade (LGD) and 6 high-grade dysplasia (HGD)), and 8 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients (4 active and 4 inactive). CRC samples were obtained from 24 patients (17 primary, 7 metastatic (MCRC)), 7 of them with synchronous LGD. Field effects were analyzed in tissues 1 cm (n = 5) and 10 cm (n = 5) from the margin of CRC. Tissue materials were studied for DNA methylation status using a 96 gene panel and for KRAS and BRAF mutations. Expression levels were assayed using whole genomic mRNA arrays. SFRP1 was further examined by immunohistochemistry. HT29 cells were treated with 5-aza-2’ deoxycytidine to analyze the reversal possibility of DNA methylation. More than 85% of tumor samples showed hypermethylation in 10 genes (SFRP1, SST, BNC1, MAL, SLIT2, SFRP2, SLIT3, ALDH1A3, TMEFF2, WIF1), whereas the frequency of examined mutations were below 25%. These genes distinguished precancerous and cancerous lesions from inflamed and healthy tissue. The mRNA alterations that might be caused by systematic methylation could be partly reversed by demethylation treatment. Systematic changes in methylation patterns were observed early in CRC carcinogenesis, occuring in precursor lesions and CRC. Thus we conclude that DNA hypermethylation is an early and systematic event in colorectal carcinogenesis, and it could be potentially reversed by systematic demethylation therapy, but it would need more in vitro and in vivo experiments to support this theory. PMID:26291085

  5. Design, synthesis, physicochemical studies, solvation, and DNA damage of quinoline-appended chalcone derivative: comprehensive spectroscopic approach toward drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Himank; Chattopadhyay, Anjan; Prasath, R; Devaraji, Vinod; Joshi, Ritika; Bhavana, P; Saini, Praveen; Ghosh, Sujit Kumar

    2014-07-01

    The present study epitomizes the design, synthesis, photophysics, solvation, and interaction with calf-thymus DNA of a potential antitumor, anticancer quinoline-appended chalcone derivative, (E)-3-(anthracen-10-yl)-1-(6,8-dibromo-2-methylquinolin-3-yl)prop-2-en-1-one (ADMQ) using steady state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, molecular modeling, molecular docking, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, and gel electrophoresis studies. ADMQ shows an unusual photophysical behavior in a variety of solvents of different polarity. The dual emission has been observed along with the formation of twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) excited state. The radiationless deactivation of the TICT state is found to be promoted strongly by hydrogen bonding. Quantum mechanical (DFT, TDDFT, and ZINDO-CI) calculations show that the ADMQ is sort of molecular rotor which undergoes intramolecular twist followed by a complete charge transfer in the optimized excited state. FTIR studies reveals that ADMQ undergoes important structural change from its native structure to a β-hydroxy keto form in water at physiological pH. The concentration-dependent DNA cleavage has been identified in agarose gel DNA electrophoresis experiment and has been further supported by MD simulation. ADMQ forms hydrogen bond with the deoxyribose sugar attached with the nucleobase adenine DA-17 (chain A) and result in significant structural changes which potentially cleave DNA double helix. The compound does not exhibit any deleterious effect or toxicity to the E. coli strain in cytotoxicity studies. The consolidated spectroscopic research described herein can provide enormous information to open up new avenues for designing and synthesizing chalcone derivatives with low systematic toxicity for medicinal chemistry research. PMID:24962605

  6. Microarrays in the 2010s: the contribution of microarray-based gene expression profiling to breast cancer classification, prognostication and prediction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer comprises a collection of diseases with distinctive clinical, histopathological, and molecular features. Importantly, tumors with similar histological features may display disparate clinical behaviors. Gene expression profiling using microarray technologies has improved our understanding of breast cancer biology and has led to the development of a breast cancer molecular taxonomy and of multigene 'signatures' to predict outcome and response to systemic therapies. The use of these prognostic and predictive signatures in routine clinical decision-making remains controversial. Here, we review the clinical relevance of microarray-based profiling of breast cancer and discuss its impact on patient management. PMID:21787441

  7. Comprehensive and high-resolution typing of swine leukocyte antigen DQA from genomic DNA and determination of 25 new SLA class II haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Le, M T; Choi, H; Choi, M-K; Nguyen, D T; Kim, J-H; Seo, H G; Cha, S-Y; Seo, K; Chun, T; Schook, L B; Park, C

    2012-12-01

    We previously reported the development of genomic-DNA-based high-resolution genotyping methods for SLA-DQB1 and DRB1. Here, we report the successful typing of SLA-DQA using similar methodological principles. We designed a method for comprehensive genotyping of SLA-DQA using intronic sequence information of SLA-DQA exon 2 that we had obtained from 12 animals with different SLA-DQB1 genotypes. We expanded our typing to 76 selected animals with diverse DQB1 and DRB1 genotypes, 140 random animals from 7 pig breeds, and 3 wild boars. This resulted in the identification of 17 DQA alleles with 49 genotypes. Two new alleles were identified from wild boars. Combine with SLA-DQB1, and DRB1 typing results, we identified 34 SLA class II haplotypes including 25 that were previously unreported.

  8. Comprehensive mapping of the human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA integration sites in cervical carcinomas by HPV capture technology

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ruiping; Ke, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA into the host genome can be a driver mutation in cervical carcinoma. Identification of HPV integration at base resolution has been a longstanding technical challenge, largely due to sensitivity masking by HPV in episomes or concatenated forms. The aim was to enhance the understanding of the precise localization of HPV integration sites using an innovative strategy. Using HPV capture technology combined with next generation sequencing, HPV prevalence and the exact integration sites of the HPV DNA in 47 primary cervical cancer samples and 2 cell lines were investigated. A total of 117 unique HPV integration sites were identified, including HPV16 (n = 101), HPV18 (n = 7), and HPV58 (n = 9). We observed that the HPV16 integration sites were broadly located across the whole viral genome. In addition, either single or multiple integration events could occur frequently for HPV16, ranging from 1 to 19 per sample. The viral integration sites were distributed across almost all the chromosomes, except chromosome 22. All the cervical cancer cases harboring more than four HPV16 integration sites showed clinical diagnosis of stage III carcinoma. A significant enrichment of overlapping nucleotides shared between the human genome and HPV genome at integration breakpoints was observed, indicating that it may play an important role in the HPV integration process. The results expand on knowledge from previous findings on HPV16 and HPV18 integration sites and allow a better understanding of the molecular basis of the pathogenesis of cervical carcinoma. PMID:26735580

  9. Comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of bacterial group II intron-encoded ORFs lacking the DNA endonuclease domain reveals new varieties.

    PubMed

    Toro, Nicolás; Martínez-Abarca, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Group II introns are self-splicing RNAs that act as mobile retroelements in the organelles of plants, fungi and protists. They are also widely distributed in bacteria, and are generally assumed to be the ancestors of nuclear spliceosomal introns. Most bacterial group II introns have a multifunctional intron-encoded protein (IEP) ORF within the ribozyme domain IV (DIV). This ORF encodes an N-terminal reverse transcriptase (RT) domain, followed by a putative RNA-binding domain with RNA splicing or maturase activity and, in some cases, a C-terminal DNA-binding (D) region followed by a DNA endonuclease (En) domain. In this study, we focused on bacterial group II intron ORF phylogenetic classes containing only reverse transcriptase/maturase open reading frames, with no recognizable D/En region (classes A, C, D, E, F and unclassified introns). On the basis of phylogenetic analyses of the maturase domain and its C-terminal extension, which appears to be a signature characteristic of ORF phylogenetic class, with support from the phylogeny inferred from the RT domain, we have revised the proposed new class F, defining new intron ORF varieties. Our results increase knowledge of the lineage of group II introns encoding proteins lacking the En-domain.

  10. Comprehensive analysis of sperm DNA fragmentation by five different assays: TUNEL assay, SCSA, SCD test and alkaline and neutral Comet assay.

    PubMed

    Ribas-Maynou, J; García-Peiró, A; Fernández-Encinas, A; Abad, C; Amengual, M J; Prada, E; Navarro, J; Benet, J

    2013-09-01

    Sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) is becoming an important test to assess male infertility. Several different tests are available, but no consensus has yet been reached as to which tests are most predictive of infertility. Few publications have reported a comprehensive analysis comparing these methods within the same population. The objective of this study was to analyze the differences between the five most common methodologies, to study their correlations and to establish their cut-off values, sensitivity and specificity in predicting male infertility. We found differences in SDF between fertile donors and infertile patients in TUNEL, SCSA, SCD and alkaline Comet assays, but none with the neutral Comet assay. The alkaline COMET assay was the best in predicting male infertility followed by TUNEL, SCD and SCSA, whereas the neutral COMET assay had no predictive power. For our patient population, threshold values for infertility were 20.05% for TUNEL assay, 18.90% for SCSA, 22.75% for the SCD test, 45.37% for alkaline Comet and 34.37% for neutral Comet. This work establishes in a comprehensive study that the all techniques except neutral Comet are useful to distinguish fertile and infertile men.

  11. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  12. Microarray-Based Analysis of Subnanogram Quantities of MicrobialCommunity DNAs by Using Whole-Community Genome Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Liyou; Liu, Xueduan; Schadt, Christopher W.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2006-06-01

    Microarray technology provides the opportunity to identifythousands of microbial genes or populations simultaneously, but lowmicrobial biomass often prevents application of this technology to manynatural microbial communities. We developed a whole-community genomeamplification-assisted microarray detection approach basedon multipledisplacement amplification. The representativeness of amplification wasevaluatedusing several types of microarrays and quantitative indexes.Representative detection of individual genes or genomes was obtained with1 to 100 ng DNA from individual or mixed genomes of equal or unequalabundance and with 1 to 500 ng community DNAs from groundwater. Lowerconcentrations of DNA (as low as 10 fg) could be detected, but the lowertemplate concentrations affected the representativeness of amplification.Robustquantitative detection was also observed by significant linearrelationships between signal intensities and initial DNA concentrationsranging from (i) 0.04 to 125 ng (r2 = 0.65 to 0.99) for DNA from purecultures as detected by whole-genome open reading frame arrays, (ii) 0.1to 1,000 ng (r2 = 0.91) for genomic DNA using community genome arrays,and (iii) 0.01 to 250 ng (r2 = 0.96 to 0.98) for community DNAs fromethanol amended groundwater using 50-mer functional gene arrays. Thismethod allowed us to investigate the oligotrophic microbial communitiesin groundwater contaminated with uranium and other metals. The resultsindicated that microorganisms containing genes involved in contaminantdegradation and immobilization are present in these communities, thattheir spatial distribution is heterogeneous, and that microbial diversityis greatly reduced in the highly contaminated environment.

  13. GRAIL-genQuest: A comprehensive computational system for DNA sequence analysis. Final report, DOE SBIR Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, Ruth Ann

    1999-01-05

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing and genome mapping technologies are making it possible, for the first time in history, to find genes in plants and animals and to elucidate their function. This means that diagnostics and therapeutics can be developed for human diseases such as cancer, obesity, hypertension, and cardiovascular problems. Crop and animal strains can be developed that are hardier, resistant to diseases, and produce higher yields. The challenge is to develop tools that will find the nucleotides in the DNA of a living organism that comprise a particular gene. In the human genome alone it is estimated that only about 51% of the approximately 3 billion pairs of nucleotides code for some 100,000 human genes. In this search for nucleotides within a genome which are active in the actual coding of proteins, efficient tools to locate and identify their function can be of significant value to mankind. Software tools such as ApoCom GRAIL{trademark} have assisted in this search. It can be used to analyze genome information, to identify exons (coding regions) and to construct gene models. Using a neural network approach, this software can ''learn'' sequence patterns and refine its ability to recognize a pattern as it is exposed to more and more examples of it. Since 1992 versions of GRAIL{trademark} have been publicly available over the Internet from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Because of the potential for security and patent compromise, these Internet versions are not available to many researchers in pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies who cannot send proprietary sequences past their data-secure firewalls. ApoCom is making available commercial versions of the GRAIL{trademark} software to run self-contained over local area networks. As part of the commercialization effort, ApoCom has developed a new Java{trademark}-based graphical user interface, the ApoCom Client Tool for Genomics (ACTG){trademark}. Two products, ApoCom GRAIL{trademark} Network Edition

  14. Comprehensive Analysis of Neonatal versus Adult Unilateral Decortication in a Mouse Model Using Behavioral, Neuroanatomical, and DNA Microarray Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Akira; Nakamachi, Tomoya; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Shioda, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Previously, studying the development, especially of corticospinal neurons, it was concluded that the main compensatory mechanism after unilateral brain injury in rat at the neonatal stage was due in part to non-lesioned ipsilateral corticospinal neurons that escaped selection by axonal elimination or neuronal apoptosis. However, previous results suggesting compensatory mechanism in neonate brain were not correlated with high functional recovery. Therefore, what is the difference among neonate and adult in the context of functional recovery and potential mechanism(s) therein? Here, we utilized a brain unilateral decortication mouse model and compared motor functional recovery mechanism post-neonatal brain hemisuction (NBH) with adult brain hemisuction (ABH). Three analyses were performed: (1) Quantitative behavioral analysis of forelimb movements using ladder walking test; (2) neuroanatomical retrograde tracing analysis of unlesioned side corticospinal neurons; and (3) differential global gene expressions profiling in unlesioned-side neocortex (rostral from bregma) in NBH and ABH on a 8 × 60 K mouse whole genome Agilent DNA chip. Behavioral data confirmed higher recovery ability in NBH over ABH is related to non-lesional frontal neocortex including rostral caudal forelimb area. A first inventory of differentially expressed genes genome-wide in the NBH and ABH mouse model is provided as a resource for the scientific community. PMID:25490135

  15. Microarray-Based Analysis of Methylation of 1st Trimester Trisomic Placentas from Down Syndrome, Edwards Syndrome and Patau Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hatt, Lotte; Aagaard, Mads M.; Bach, Cathrine; Graakjaer, Jesper; Sommer, Steffen; Agerholm, Inge E.; Bojesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Methylation-based non-invasive prenatal testing of fetal aneuploidies is an alternative method that could possibly improve fetal aneuploidy diagnosis, especially for trisomy 13(T13) and trisomy 18(T18). Our aim was to study the methylation landscape in placenta DNA from trisomy 13, 18 and 21 pregnancies in an attempt to find trisomy–specific methylation differences better suited for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. We have conducted high-resolution methylation specific bead chip microarray analyses assessing more than 450,000 CpGs analyzing placentas from 12 T21 pregnancies, 12 T18 pregnancies and 6 T13 pregnancies. We have compared the methylation landscape of the trisomic placentas to the methylation landscape from normal placental DNA and to maternal blood cell DNA. Comparing trisomic placentas to normal placentas we identified 217 and 219 differentially methylated CpGs for CVS T18 and CVS T13, respectively (delta β>0.2, FDR<0.05), but only three differentially methylated CpGs for T21. However, the methylation differences was only modest (delta β<0.4), making them less suitable as diagnostic markers. Gene ontology enrichment analysis revealed that the gene set connected to theT18 differentially methylated CpGs was highly enriched for GO terms related to”DNA binding” and “transcription factor binding” coupled to the RNA polymerase II transcription. In the gene set connected to the T13 differentially methylated CpGs we found no significant enrichments. PMID:27490343

  16. Microarray-Based Analysis of Methylation of 1st Trimester Trisomic Placentas from Down Syndrome, Edwards Syndrome and Patau Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hatt, Lotte; Aagaard, Mads M; Bach, Cathrine; Graakjaer, Jesper; Sommer, Steffen; Agerholm, Inge E; Kølvraa, Steen; Bojesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Methylation-based non-invasive prenatal testing of fetal aneuploidies is an alternative method that could possibly improve fetal aneuploidy diagnosis, especially for trisomy 13(T13) and trisomy 18(T18). Our aim was to study the methylation landscape in placenta DNA from trisomy 13, 18 and 21 pregnancies in an attempt to find trisomy-specific methylation differences better suited for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. We have conducted high-resolution methylation specific bead chip microarray analyses assessing more than 450,000 CpGs analyzing placentas from 12 T21 pregnancies, 12 T18 pregnancies and 6 T13 pregnancies. We have compared the methylation landscape of the trisomic placentas to the methylation landscape from normal placental DNA and to maternal blood cell DNA. Comparing trisomic placentas to normal placentas we identified 217 and 219 differentially methylated CpGs for CVS T18 and CVS T13, respectively (delta β>0.2, FDR<0.05), but only three differentially methylated CpGs for T21. However, the methylation differences was only modest (delta β<0.4), making them less suitable as diagnostic markers. Gene ontology enrichment analysis revealed that the gene set connected to theT18 differentially methylated CpGs was highly enriched for GO terms related to"DNA binding" and "transcription factor binding" coupled to the RNA polymerase II transcription. In the gene set connected to the T13 differentially methylated CpGs we found no significant enrichments. PMID:27490343

  17. A microarray-based comparative analysis of gene expression profiles during grain development in transgenic and wild type wheat.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Per L; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Holm, Preben B

    2005-12-01

    Global, comparative gene expression analysis is potentially a very powerful tool in the safety assessment of transgenic plants since it allows for the detection of differences in gene expression patterns between a transgenic line and the mother variety. In the present study, we compared the gene expression profile in developing seeds of wild type wheat and wheat transformed for endosperm-specific expression of an Aspergillus fumigatus phytase. High-level expression of the phytase gene was ensured by codon modification towards the prevalent codon usage of wheat genes and by using the wheat 1DX5HMW glutenin promoter for driving transgene expression. A 9K wheat unigene cDNA microarray was produced from cDNA libraries prepared mainly from developing wheat seed. The arrays were hybridised to flourescently labelled cDNA prepared from developing seeds of the transgenic wheat line and the mother variety, Bobwhite, at three developmental stages. Comparisons and statistical analyses of the gene expression profiles of the transgenic line vs. that of the mother line revealed only slight differences at the three developmental stages. In the few cases where differential expression was indicated by the statistical analysis it was primarily genes that were strongly expressed over a shorter interval of seed development such as genes encoding storage proteins. Accordingly, we interpret these differences in gene expression levels to result from minor asynchrony in seed development between the transgenic line and the mother line. In support of this, real time PCR validation of results from selected genes at the late developmental stage could not confirm differential expression of these genes. We conclude that the expression of the codon-modified A. fumigatus phytase gene in the wheat seed had no significant effects on the overall gene expression patterns in the developing seed.

  18. Traceback identification of plant components in commercial compound feed through an oligonucleotide microarray based on tubulin intron polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Ponzoni, Elena; Morello, Laura; Gianì, Silvia; Breviario, Diego

    2014-11-01

    According to EU Regulations, all components of commercial compound feed need to be declared on the label. Effective protection against fraud requires severe controls based on accurate analytical methods to ascertain what is declared by the producers. The aim of this work was to develop an oligonucleotide microarray for the molecular recognition of multiple plant components in commercial feeds. We tested the potential of the highly polymorphic first intron sequences from members of the plant β-tubulin gene family as a target for plant DNA identification. 23 oligonucleotide capture probes, targeting species-specific intron sequences, were assembled within a low density microarray for the identification of 10 plant species, selected from among those most commonly used in cattle feed formulation. The ability of the array to detect specific components in complex flour blends and in compound feed was evaluated.

  19. Effects of Laser Printer–Emitted Engineered Nanoparticles on Cytotoxicity, Chemokine Expression, Reactive Oxygen Species, DNA Methylation, and DNA Damage: A Comprehensive in Vitro Analysis in Human Small Airway Epithelial Cells, Macrophages, and Lymphoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Pirela, Sandra V.; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Lu, Xiaoyan; Castranova, Vincent; Thomas, Treye; Qian, Yong; Bello, Dhimiter; Kobzik, Lester; Koturbash, Igor; Demokritou, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Background Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) incorporated into toner formulations of printing equipment become airborne during consumer use. Although information on the complex physicochemical and toxicological properties of both toner powders and printer-emitted particles (PEPs) continues to grow, most toxicological studies have not used the actual PEPs but rather have primarily used raw toner powders, which are not representative of current exposures experienced at the consumer level during printing. Objectives We assessed the biological responses of a panel of human cell lines to PEPs. Methods Three physiologically relevant cell lines—small airway epithelial cells (SAECs), macrophages (THP-1 cells), and lymphoblasts (TK6 cells)—were exposed to PEPs at a wide range of doses (0.5–100 μg/mL) corresponding to human inhalation exposure durations at the consumer level of 8 hr or more. Following treatment, toxicological parameters reflecting distinct mechanisms were evaluated. Results PEPs caused significant membrane integrity damage, an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine release in different cell lines at doses equivalent to exposure durations from 7.8 to 1,500 hr. Furthermore, there were differences in methylation patterns that, although not statistically significant, demonstrate the potential effects of PEPs on the overall epigenome following exposure. Conclusions The in vitro findings obtained in this study suggest that laser printer–emitted engineered nanoparticles may be deleterious to lung cells and provide preliminary evidence of epigenetic modifications that might translate to pulmonary disorders. Citation Pirela SV, Miousse IR, Lu X, Castranova V, Thomas T, Qian Y, Bello D, Kobzik L, Koturbash I, Demokritou P. 2016. Effects of laser printer–emitted engineered nanoparticles on cytotoxicity, chemokine expression, reactive oxygen species, DNA methylation, and DNA damage: a comprehensive in

  20. Evolution of insect metamorphosis: a microarray-based study of larval and adult gene expression in the ant Camponotus festinatus.

    PubMed

    Goodisman, Michael A D; Isoe, Jun; Wheeler, Diana E; Wells, Michael A

    2005-04-01

    Holometabolous insects inhabit almost every terrestrial ecosystem. The evolutionary success of holometabolous insects stems partly from their developmental program, which includes discrete larval and adult stages. To gain an understanding of how development differs among holometabolous insect taxa, we used cDNA microarray technology to examine differences in gene expression between larval and adult Camponotus festinatus ants. We then compared expression patterns obtained from our study to those observed in the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. We found that many genes showed distinct patterns of expression between the larval and adult ant life stages, a result that was confirmed through quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Genes involved in protein metabolism and possessing structural activity tended to be more highly expressed in larval than adult ants. In contrast, genes relatively upregulated in adults possessed a greater diversity of functions and activities. We also discovered that patterns of expression observed for homologous genes in D. melanogaster differed substantially from those observed in C. festinatus. Our results suggest that the specific molecular mechanisms involved in metamorphosis will differ substantially between insect taxa. Systematic investigation of gene expression during development of other taxa will provide additional information on how developmental pathways evolve.

  1. Detection of human genome mutations associated with pregnancy complications using 3-D microarray based on macroporous polymer monoliths.

    PubMed

    Glotov, A S; Sinitsyna, E S; Danilova, M M; Vashukova, E S; Walter, J G; Stahl, F; Baranov, V S; Vlakh, E G; Tennikova, T B

    2016-01-15

    Analysis of variations in DNA structure using a low-density microarray technology for routine diagnostic in evidence-based medicine is still relevant. In this work the applicability of 3-D macroporous monolithic methacrylate-based platforms for detection of different pathogenic genomic substitutions was studied. The detection of nucleotide replacements in F5 (Leiden G/A, rs6025), MTHFR (C/T, rs1801133) and ITGB3 (T/C, rs5918), involved in coagulation, and COMT (C/G, rs4818), TPH2 (T/A, rs11178997), PON1 (T/A rs854560), AGTR2 (C/A, rs11091046) and SERPINE1 (5G/4G, rs1799889), associated with pregnancy complications, was performed. The effect of such parameters as amount and type of oligonucleotide probe, amount of PCR product on signal-to-noise ratio, as well as mismatch discrimination was analyzed. Sensitivity and specificity of mutation detections were coincided and equal to 98.6%. The analysis of SERPINE1 and MTHFR genotypes by both NGS and developed microarray was performed and compared. PMID:26592644

  2. A comprehensive molecular phylogeny of the starlings (Aves: Sturnidae) and mockingbirds (Aves: Mimidae): congruent mtDNA and nuclear trees for a cosmopolitan avian radiation.

    PubMed

    Lovette, Irby J; Rubenstein, Dustin R

    2007-09-01

    We generated a comprehensive phylogeny for the avian families Sturnidae (starlings, mynas, Rhabdornis, oxpeckers, and allies) and Mimidae (mockingbirds, thrashers, and allies) to explore patterns of morphological and behavioral diversification. Reconstructions were based on mitochondrial DNA sequences from five coding genes (4108 bp), and nuclear intron sequences from four loci (2974 bp), for most taxa, supplemented with NDII gene sequences (1041 bp) derived from museum skin specimens from additional taxa; together the 117 sampled taxa comprise 78% of the 151 species in these families and include representatives of all currently or recently recognized genera. Phylogenetic analyses consistently identified nine major clades. The basal lineage is comprised of the two Buphagus oxpeckers, which are presently confined to Africa where they are obligately associated with large mammals. Some species in nearly all of the other major clades also feed on or around large vertebrates, and this association may be an ancestral trait that fostered the world-wide dispersal of this group. The remaining taxa divide into sister clades representing the New-World Mimidae and Old-World Sturnidae. The Mimidae are divided into two subclades, a group of Central American and West Indian catbirds and thrashers, and a pan-American clade of mockingbirds and thrashers. The Sturnidae are subdivided into six clades. The Phillipine endemic Rhabdornis are the sister lineage to a larger and substantially more recent radiation of South Asian and Pacific island starlings and mynas. A clade of largely migratory or nomadic Eurasian starlings (within which the basal lineage is the model taxon Sturnus vulgaris) is allied to three groups of largely African species. These reconstructions confirm that Buphagus should not be included in the Sturnidae, and identify many genera that are not monophyletic. They also highlight the substantial diversity among the major Sturnidae subclades in rates of species

  3. Gametogenesis in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas: A Microarrays-Based Analysis Identifies Sex and Stage Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M.; Lelong, Christophe; Huvet, Arnaud; Kellner, Kristell; Dubos, Marie-Pierre; Riviere, Guillaume; Boudry, Pierre; Favrel, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Background The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca, Lophotrochozoa) is an alternative and irregular protandrous hermaphrodite: most individuals mature first as males and then change sex several times. Little is known about genetic and phenotypic basis of sex differentiation in oysters, and little more about the molecular pathways regulating reproduction. We have recently developed and validated a microarray containing 31,918 oligomers (Dheilly et al., 2011) representing the oyster transcriptome. The application of this microarray to the study of mollusk gametogenesis should provide a better understanding of the key factors involved in sex differentiation and the regulation of oyster reproduction. Methodology/Principal Findings Gene expression was studied in gonads of oysters cultured over a yearly reproductive cycle. Principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering showed a significant divergence in gene expression patterns of males and females coinciding with the start of gonial mitosis. ANOVA analysis of the data revealed 2,482 genes differentially expressed during the course of males and/or females gametogenesis. The expression of 434 genes could be localized in either germ cells or somatic cells of the gonad by comparing the transcriptome of female gonads to the transcriptome of stripped oocytes and somatic tissues. Analysis of the annotated genes revealed conserved molecular mechanisms between mollusks and mammals: genes involved in chromatin condensation, DNA replication and repair, mitosis and meiosis regulation, transcription, translation and apoptosis were expressed in both male and female gonads. Most interestingly, early expressed male-specific genes included bindin and a dpy-30 homolog and female-specific genes included foxL2, nanos homolog 3, a pancreatic lipase related protein, cd63 and vitellogenin. Further functional analyses are now required in order to investigate their role in sex differentiation in oysters. Conclusions

  4. Microarray based study on virulence-associated genes and resistance determinants of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from cattle.

    PubMed

    Monecke, Stefan; Kuhnert, Peter; Hotzel, Helmut; Slickers, Peter; Ehricht, Ralf

    2007-11-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common pathogen which can colonise and infect not only man, but also domestic animals. Especially, infection of cattle is of high economic relevance as S. aureus is an important causal agent of bovine mastitis. In the present contribution, a DNA microarray was applied for the study of 144 different gene targets, including resistance genes and genes encoding exotoxins, in S. aureus isolated from cows. One hundred and twenty-eight isolates from Germany and Switzerland were tested. These isolates were assigned to 20 different strains and nine clonal complexes. The majority of isolates belonged either to apparently closely related clonal complexes 8, 25, and 97 (together 34.4%) or were related to the sequenced bovine strain RF122 (48.4%). Notable characteristics of S. aureus of bovine origin are the carriage of intact haemolysin beta (in 82% of isolates tested), the absence of staphylokinase (in 89.1%), the presence of allelic variants of several exotoxins such as toxic shock syndrome toxin and enterotoxin N, and the occurrence of the leukocidin lukF-P83/lukM (in 53.1%). Two isolates were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). One of them was a clonal complex 8 MRSA related to the epidemic MRSA strain Irish 01. The other one belonged to ST398/spa-type 34 resembling a newly emerging MRSA strain which has been described to occur in humans as well as in domestic animals. The presence of these two strains highlights the possibility of transfers of S. aureus strains between different host species.

  5. SSHscreen and SSHdb, generic software for microarray based gene discovery: application to the stress response in cowpea

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Suppression subtractive hybridization is a popular technique for gene discovery from non-model organisms without an annotated genome sequence, such as cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp). We aimed to use this method to enrich for genes expressed during drought stress in a drought tolerant cowpea line. However, current methods were inefficient in screening libraries and management of the sequence data, and thus there was a need to develop software tools to facilitate the process. Results Forward and reverse cDNA libraries enriched for cowpea drought response genes were screened on microarrays, and the R software package SSHscreen 2.0.1 was developed (i) to normalize the data effectively using spike-in control spot normalization, and (ii) to select clones for sequencing based on the calculation of enrichment ratios with associated statistics. Enrichment ratio 3 values for each clone showed that 62% of the forward library and 34% of the reverse library clones were significantly differentially expressed by drought stress (adjusted p value < 0.05). Enrichment ratio 2 calculations showed that > 88% of the clones in both libraries were derived from rare transcripts in the original tester samples, thus supporting the notion that suppression subtractive hybridization enriches for rare transcripts. A set of 118 clones were chosen for sequencing, and drought-induced cowpea genes were identified, the most interesting encoding a late embryogenesis abundant Lea5 protein, a glutathione S-transferase, a thaumatin, a universal stress protein, and a wound induced protein. A lipid transfer protein and several components of photosynthesis were down-regulated by the drought stress. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR confirmed the enrichment ratio values for the selected cowpea genes. SSHdb, a web-accessible database, was developed to manage the clone sequences and combine the SSHscreen data with sequence annotations derived from BLAST and Blast2GO. The self

  6. Interlaboratory Performance of a Microarray-Based Gene Expression Test to Determine Tissue of Origin in Poorly Differentiated and Undifferentiated Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Dumur, Catherine I.; Lyons-Weiler, Maureen; Sciulli, Christin; Garrett, Carleton T.; Schrijver, Iris; Holley, Tara K.; Rodriguez-Paris, Juan; Pollack, Jonathan R.; Zehnder, James L.; Price, Melissa; Hagenkord, Jill M.; Rigl, C. Ted; Buturovic, Ljubomir J.; Anderson, Glenda G.; Monzon, Federico A.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical workup of metastatic malignancies of unknown origin is often arduous and expensive and is reported to be unsuccessful in 30 to 60% of cases. Accurate classification of uncertain primary cancers may improve with microarray-based gene expression testing. We evaluated the analytical performance characteristics of the Pathwork tissue of origin test, which uses expression signals from 1668 probe sets in a gene expression microarray, to quantify the similarity of tumor specimens to 15 known tissues of origin. Sixty archived tissue specimens from poorly and undifferentiated tumors (metastatic and primary) were analyzed at four laboratories representing a wide range of preanalytical conditions (eg, personnel, reagents, instrumentation, and protocols). Cross-laboratory comparisons showed highly reproducible results between laboratories, with correlation coefficients between 0.95 to 0.97 for measurements of similarity scores, and an average 93.8% overall concordance between laboratories in terms of final tissue calls. Bland-Altman plots (mean coefficients of reproducibility of 32.48 ± 3.97) and κ statistics (κ > 0.86) also indicated a high level of agreement between laboratories. We conclude that the Pathwork tissue of origin test is a robust assay that produces consistent results in diverse laboratory conditions reflecting the preanalytical variations found in the everyday clinical practice of molecular diagnostics laboratories. PMID:18083688

  7. Real-world performance of a microarray-based rapid diagnostic for Gram-positive bloodstream infections and potential utility for antimicrobial stewardship.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Samuel L; Hemmige, Vagish S; Koo, Hoonmo L; Vuong, Nancy N; Lasco, Todd M; Garey, Kevin W

    2015-01-01

    The Verigene Gram-positive blood culture assay (BC-GP) is a microarray-based rapid diagnostic test, which includes targets for 12 bacterial species and 3 resistance determinants. We prospectively compared the diagnostic accuracy of the BC-GP to routine microbiologic methods and evaluated the potential of the BC-GP for antimicrobial stewardship programs. A total of 143 consecutive patients with Gram-positive bacteremia were included in the analysis. BC-GP correctly identified 127/128 (99.2%) of organisms from monomicrobial blood cultures and 9/14 (64.3%) from polymicrobial, including all methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Stewardship interventions were possible in 51.0% of patients, most commonly stopping or preventing unnecessary vancomycin or starting a targeted therapy. In Monte Carlo simulations, unnecessary antibiotics could be stopped at least 24 hours earlier in 65.6% of cases, and targeted therapy could be started at least 24 hours earlier in 81.2%. BC-GP is a potentially useful test for antibiotic stewardship in patients with Gram-positive bacteremia.

  8. Identification of Novel Protein-Ligand Interactions by Exon Microarray Analysis of Yeast Surface Displayed cDNA Library Selection Outputs.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Yeast surface display is widely utilized to screen large libraries for proteins or protein fragments with specific binding properties. We have previously constructed and utilized yeast surface displayed human cDNA libraries to identify protein fragments that bind to various target ligands. Conventional approaches employ monoclonal screening and sequencing of polyclonal outputs that have been enriched for binding to a target molecule by several rounds of affinity-based selection. Frequently, a small number of clones will dominate the selection output, making it difficult to comprehensively identify potentially important interactions due to low representation in the selection output. We have developed a novel method to address this problem. By analyzing selection outputs using high-density human exon microarrays, the full potential of selection output diversity can be revealed in one experiment. FACS-based selection using yeast surface displayed human cDNA libraries combined with exon microarray analysis of the selection outputs is a powerful way of rapidly identifying protein fragments with affinity for any soluble ligand that can be fluorescently detected, including small biological molecules and drugs. In this report we present protocols for exon microarray-based analysis of yeast surface display human cDNA library selection outputs. PMID:26060075

  9. Clinical Impact of Laboratory Implementation of Verigene BC-GN Microarray-Based Assay for Detection of Gram-Negative Bacteria in Positive Blood Cultures.

    PubMed

    Walker, Tamar; Dumadag, Sandrea; Lee, Christine Jiyoun; Lee, Seung Heon; Bender, Jeffrey M; Cupo Abbott, Jennifer; She, Rosemary C

    2016-07-01

    Gram-negative bacteremia is highly fatal, and hospitalizations due to sepsis have been increasing worldwide. Molecular tests that supplement Gram stain results from positive blood cultures provide specific organism information to potentially guide therapy, but more clinical data on their real-world impact are still needed. We retrospectively reviewed cases of Gram-negative bacteremia in hospitalized patients over a 6-month period before (n = 98) and over a 6-month period after (n = 97) the implementation of a microarray-based early identification and resistance marker detection system (Verigene BC-GN; Nanosphere) while antimicrobial stewardship practices remained constant. Patient demographics, time to organism identification, time to effective antimicrobial therapy, and other key clinical parameters were compared. The two groups did not differ statistically with regard to comorbid conditions, sources of bacteremia, or numbers of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, active use of immunosuppressive therapy, neutropenia, or bacteremia due to multidrug-resistant organisms. The BC-GN panel yielded an identification in 87% of Gram-negative cultures and was accurate in 95/97 (98%) of the cases compared to results using conventional culture. Organism identifications were achieved more quickly post-microarray implementation (mean, 10.9 h versus 37.9 h; P < 0.001). Length of ICU stay, 30-day mortality, and mortality associated with multidrug-resistant organisms were significantly lower in the postintervention group (P < 0.05). More rapid implementation of effective therapy was statistically significant for postintervention cases of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing organisms (P = 0.049) but not overall (P = 0.12). The Verigene BC-GN assay is a valuable addition for the early identification of Gram-negative organisms that cause bloodstream infections and can significantly impact patient care, particularly when resistance markers are detected. PMID:27098961

  10. Clinical Impact of Laboratory Implementation of Verigene BC-GN Microarray-Based Assay for Detection of Gram-Negative Bacteria in Positive Blood Cultures.

    PubMed

    Walker, Tamar; Dumadag, Sandrea; Lee, Christine Jiyoun; Lee, Seung Heon; Bender, Jeffrey M; Cupo Abbott, Jennifer; She, Rosemary C

    2016-07-01

    Gram-negative bacteremia is highly fatal, and hospitalizations due to sepsis have been increasing worldwide. Molecular tests that supplement Gram stain results from positive blood cultures provide specific organism information to potentially guide therapy, but more clinical data on their real-world impact are still needed. We retrospectively reviewed cases of Gram-negative bacteremia in hospitalized patients over a 6-month period before (n = 98) and over a 6-month period after (n = 97) the implementation of a microarray-based early identification and resistance marker detection system (Verigene BC-GN; Nanosphere) while antimicrobial stewardship practices remained constant. Patient demographics, time to organism identification, time to effective antimicrobial therapy, and other key clinical parameters were compared. The two groups did not differ statistically with regard to comorbid conditions, sources of bacteremia, or numbers of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, active use of immunosuppressive therapy, neutropenia, or bacteremia due to multidrug-resistant organisms. The BC-GN panel yielded an identification in 87% of Gram-negative cultures and was accurate in 95/97 (98%) of the cases compared to results using conventional culture. Organism identifications were achieved more quickly post-microarray implementation (mean, 10.9 h versus 37.9 h; P < 0.001). Length of ICU stay, 30-day mortality, and mortality associated with multidrug-resistant organisms were significantly lower in the postintervention group (P < 0.05). More rapid implementation of effective therapy was statistically significant for postintervention cases of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing organisms (P = 0.049) but not overall (P = 0.12). The Verigene BC-GN assay is a valuable addition for the early identification of Gram-negative organisms that cause bloodstream infections and can significantly impact patient care, particularly when resistance markers are detected.

  11. Development of a protein microarray using sequence-specific DNA binding domain on DNA chip surface

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoo Seong; Pack, Seung Pil; Yoo, Young Je . E-mail: yjyoo@snu.ac.kr

    2005-04-22

    A protein microarray based on DNA microarray platform was developed to identify protein-protein interactions in vitro. The conventional DNA chip surface by 156-bp PCR product was prepared for a substrate of protein microarray. High-affinity sequence-specific DNA binding domain, GAL4 DNA binding domain, was introduced to the protein microarray as fusion partner of a target model protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein. The target protein was oriented immobilized directly on the DNA chip surface. Finally, monoclonal antibody of the target protein was used to identify the immobilized protein on the surface. This study shows that the conventional DNA chip can be used to make a protein microarray directly, and this novel protein microarray can be applicable as a tool for identifying protein-protein interactions.

  12. A Triclade DNA Vaccine Designed on the Basis of a Comprehensive Serologic Study Elicits Neutralizing Antibody Responses against All Clades and Subclades of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fan; Wang, Guiqin; Buchy, Philippe; Cai, Zhipeng; Chen, Honglin; Chen, Zhiwei; Cheng, Genhong; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Deubel, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Because of their rapid evolution, genetic diversity, broad host range, ongoing circulation in birds, and potential human-to-human transmission, H5N1 influenza viruses remain a major global health concern. Their high degree of genetic diversity also poses enormous burdens and uncertainties in developing effective vaccines. To overcome this, we took a new approach, i.e., the development of immunogens based on a comprehensive serologic study. We constructed DNA plasmids encoding codon-optimized hemagglutinin (HA) from 17 representative strains covering all reported clades and subclades of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses. Using DNA plasmids, we generated the corresponding H5N1 pseudotypes and immune sera. We performed an across-the-board pseudotype-based neutralization assay and determined antigenic clusters by cartography. We then designed a triclade DNA vaccine and evaluated its immunogenicity and protection in mice. We report here that (sub)clades 0, 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.1, and 9 were grouped into antigenic cluster 1, (sub)clades 2.1.3.2, 2.3.4, 2.4, 2.5, and 8 were grouped into another antigenic cluster, with subclade 2.2.1 loosely connected to it, and each of subclades 2.3.2.1 and 7.2 was by itself. Importantly, the triclade DNA vaccine encoding HAs of (sub)clades 0, 2.3.2.1, and 7.2 elicited broadly neutralizing antibody responses against all H5 clades and subclades and protected mice against high-lethal-dose heterologous H5N1 challenge. Thus, we conclude that broadly neutralizing antibodies against all H5 clades and subclades can indeed be elicited with immunogens on the basis of a comprehensive serologic study. Further evaluation and optimization of such an approach in ferrets and in humans is warranted. PMID:22496212

  13. Comprehensive Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Larger Text Print In this article A complex disease requires a comprehensive approach Today multiple sclerosis ( ... Your Whole Health, Your Whole Team: Managing Your Complex MS Symptoms Webinar/telelearning presented by Roz Kalb, ...

  14. RNA and DNA bacteriophages as molecular diagnosis controls in clinical virology: a comprehensive study of more than 45,000 routine PCR tests.

    PubMed

    Ninove, Laetitia; Nougairede, Antoine; Gazin, Celine; Thirion, Laurence; Delogu, Ilenia; Zandotti, Christine; Charrel, Remi N; De Lamballerie, Xavier

    2011-02-09

    Real-time PCR techniques are now commonly used for the detection of viral genomes in various human specimens and require for validation both external and internal controls (ECs and ICs). In particular, ICs added to clinical samples are necessary to monitor the extraction, reverse transcription, and amplification steps in order to detect false-negative results resulting from PCR-inhibition or errors in the technical procedure. Here, we performed a large scale evaluation of the use of bacteriophages as ICs in routine molecular diagnosis. This allowed to propose simple standardized procedures (i) to design specific ECs for both DNA and RNA viruses and (ii) to use T4 (DNA) or MS2 (RNA) phages as ICs in routine diagnosis. Various technical formats for using phages as ICs were optimised and validated. Subsequently, T4 and MS2 ICs were evaluated in routine real-time PCR or RT-PCR virological diagnostic tests, using a series of 8,950 clinical samples (representing 36 distinct specimen types) sent to our laboratory for the detection of a variety of DNA and RNA viruses. The frequency of inefficient detection of ICs was analyzed according to the nature of the sample. Inhibitors of enzymatic reactions were detected at high frequency in specific sample types such as heparinized blood and bone marrow (>70%), broncho-alveolar liquid (41%) and stools (36%). The use of T4 and MS2 phages as ICs proved to be cost-effective, flexible and adaptable to various technical procedures of real-time PCR detection in virology. It represents a valuable strategy for enhancing the quality of routine molecular diagnosis in laboratories that use in-house designed diagnostic systems, which can conveniently be associated to the use of specific synthetic ECs. The high rate of inhibitors observed in a variety of specimen types should stimulate the elaboration of improved technical protocols for the extraction and amplification of nucleic acids.

  15. Comprehensive phylogeny, biogeography and new classification of the diverse bee tribe Megachilini: Can we use DNA barcodes in phylogenies of large genera?

    PubMed

    Trunz, V; Packer, L; Vieu, J; Arrigo, N; Praz, C J

    2016-10-01

    Classification and evolutionary studies of particularly speciose clades pose important challenges, as phylogenetic analyses typically sample a small proportion of the existing diversity. We examine here one of the largest bee genera, the genus Megachile - the dauber and leafcutting bees. Besides presenting a phylogeny based on five nuclear genes (5480 aligned nucleotide positions), we attempt to use the phylogenetic signal of mitochondrial DNA barcodes, which are rapidly accumulating and already include a substantial proportion of the known species diversity in the genus. We used barcodes in two ways: first, to identify particularly divergent lineages and thus to guide taxon sampling in our nuclear phylogeny; second, to augment taxon sampling by combining nuclear markers (as backbone for ancient divergences) with DNA barcodes. Our results indicate that DNA barcodes bear phylogenetic signal limited to very recent divergences (3-4 my before present). Sampling within clades of very closely related species may be augmented using this technique, but our results also suggest statistically supported, but incongruent placements of some taxa. However, the addition of one single nuclear gene (LW-rhodopsin) to the DNA barcode data was enough to recover meaningful placement with high clade support values for nodes up to 15 million years old. We discuss different proposals for the generic classification of the tribe Megachilini. Finding a classification that is both in agreement with our phylogenetic hypotheses and practical in terms of diagnosability is particularly challenging as our analyses recover several well-supported clades that include morphologically heterogeneous lineages. We favour a classification that recognizes seven morphologically well-delimited genera in Megachilini: Coelioxys, Gronoceras, Heriadopsis, Matangapis, Megachile, Noteriades and Radoszkowskiana. Our results also lead to the following classification changes: the groups known as Dinavis, Neglectella

  16. Comprehensive phylogeny, biogeography and new classification of the diverse bee tribe Megachilini: Can we use DNA barcodes in phylogenies of large genera?

    PubMed

    Trunz, V; Packer, L; Vieu, J; Arrigo, N; Praz, C J

    2016-10-01

    Classification and evolutionary studies of particularly speciose clades pose important challenges, as phylogenetic analyses typically sample a small proportion of the existing diversity. We examine here one of the largest bee genera, the genus Megachile - the dauber and leafcutting bees. Besides presenting a phylogeny based on five nuclear genes (5480 aligned nucleotide positions), we attempt to use the phylogenetic signal of mitochondrial DNA barcodes, which are rapidly accumulating and already include a substantial proportion of the known species diversity in the genus. We used barcodes in two ways: first, to identify particularly divergent lineages and thus to guide taxon sampling in our nuclear phylogeny; second, to augment taxon sampling by combining nuclear markers (as backbone for ancient divergences) with DNA barcodes. Our results indicate that DNA barcodes bear phylogenetic signal limited to very recent divergences (3-4 my before present). Sampling within clades of very closely related species may be augmented using this technique, but our results also suggest statistically supported, but incongruent placements of some taxa. However, the addition of one single nuclear gene (LW-rhodopsin) to the DNA barcode data was enough to recover meaningful placement with high clade support values for nodes up to 15 million years old. We discuss different proposals for the generic classification of the tribe Megachilini. Finding a classification that is both in agreement with our phylogenetic hypotheses and practical in terms of diagnosability is particularly challenging as our analyses recover several well-supported clades that include morphologically heterogeneous lineages. We favour a classification that recognizes seven morphologically well-delimited genera in Megachilini: Coelioxys, Gronoceras, Heriadopsis, Matangapis, Megachile, Noteriades and Radoszkowskiana. Our results also lead to the following classification changes: the groups known as Dinavis, Neglectella

  17. On Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kintsch, Walter

    Attempts have been made to develop a model of the process of reading comprehension as a whole that would indicate under what conditions and for what reasons a long sentence might be more effective than several short ones, when repetition is helpful and when distracting, when content is better left implicit in a text, and how overexplicitness might…

  18. Microarray-Based Mapping for the Detection of Molecular Markers in Response to Aspergillus flavus Infection in Susceptible and Resistant Maize Lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate differential gene expression levels for resistance to A. flavus kernel infection in susceptible (Va35) and resistant (Mp313E) maize lines using Oligonucleotide and cDNA microarray analysis, (2) to evaluate differences in A. flavus accumulation betwee...

  19. Comprehensive characterization of the DNA amplification at 13q34 in human breast cancer reveals TFDP1 and CUL4A as likely candidate target genes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer subtypes exhibit different genomic aberration patterns with a tendency for high-level amplifications in distinct chromosomal regions. These genomic aberrations may drive carcinogenesis through the upregulation of proto-oncogenes. We have characterized DNA amplification at the human chromosomal region 13q34 in breast cancer. Methods A set of 414 familial and sporadic breast cancer cases was studied for amplification at region 13q34 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis on tissue microarrays. Defining the minimal common region of amplification in those cases with amplification at 13q34 was carried out using an array-based comparative genomic hybridization platform. We performed a quantitative real-time - polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) gene expression analysis of 11 candidate genes located within the minimal common region of amplification. Protein expression levels of two of these genes (TFDP1 and CUL4A) were assessed by immunohistochemical assays on the same tissue microarrays used for FISH studies, and correlated with the expression of a panel of 33 antibodies previously analyzed. Results We have found 13q34 amplification in 4.5% of breast cancer samples, but the frequency increased to 8.1% in BRCA1-associated tumors and to 20% in basal-like tumors. Tumors with 13q34 amplification were associated with high grade, estrogen receptor negativity, and expression of EGFR, CCNE, CK5, and P-Cadherin, among other basal cell markers. We have defined a 1.83 megabases minimal common region of genomic amplification and carried out mRNA expression analyses of candidate genes located therein, identifying CUL4A and TFDP1 as the most likely target genes. Moreover, we have confirmed that tumors with 13q34 amplification significantly overexpress CUL4A and TFDP1 proteins. Tumors overexpressing either CUL4A or TFDP1 were associated with tumor proliferation and cell cycle progression markers. Conclusions We conclude that 13q34 amplification

  20. Analysis of ssDNA Gaps and DSBs in Genetically Unstable Yeast Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jie; Raghuraman, M.K.; Feng, Wenyi

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication defects are an underlying cause of genome instability, which could stem from alterations in replication intermediates such as extensive single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Under replication stress, ssDNA is a precursor of the ultimate double-strand breaks (DSBs). Indeed, mutations that render the cell incapable of mediating and protecting the replication forks produce ssDNA genome-wide at high frequency and cause lethality when encountering DNA damage or replication perturbation. Here we describe two related microarray-based methods to query genetically unstable yeast cultures, such as the mec1 and rad53 mutants. These mutants are defective in central protein kinases in the checkpoint pathway. To induce ssDNA and DSB formation in these mutants, we utilize hydroxyurea, a drug that causes nucleotide shortage in the cell. PMID:24906332

  1. DNA Adductomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Systems toxicology is a broad-based approach to describe many of the toxicological features that occur within a living system under stress or subjected to exogenous or endogenous exposures. The ultimate goal is to capture an overview of all exposures and the ensuing biological responses of the body. The term exposome has been employed to refer to the totality of all exposures, and systems toxicology investigates how the exposome influences health effects and consequences of exposures over a lifetime. The tools to advance systems toxicology include high-throughput transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and adductomics, which is still in its infancy. A well-established methodology for the comprehensive measurement of DNA damage resulting from every day exposures is not fully developed. During the past several decades, the 32P-postlabeling technique has been employed to screen the damage to DNA induced by multiple classes of genotoxicants; however, more robust, specific, and quantitative methods have been sought to identify and quantify DNA adducts. Although triple quadrupole and ion trap mass spectrometry, particularly when using multistage scanning (LC–MSn), have shown promise in the field of DNA adductomics, it is anticipated that high-resolution and accurate-mass LC–MSn instrumentation will play a major role in assessing global DNA damage. Targeted adductomics should also benefit greatly from improved triple quadrupole technology. Once the analytical MS methods are fully mature, DNA adductomics along with other -omics tools will contribute greatly to the field of systems toxicology. PMID:24437709

  2. Gene-set activity toolbox (GAT): A platform for microarray-based cancer diagnosis using an integrative gene-set analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Engchuan, Worrawat; Meechai, Asawin; Tongsima, Sissades; Doungpan, Narumol; Chan, Jonathan H

    2016-08-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that cannot be diagnosed reliably using only single gene expression analysis. Using gene-set analysis on high throughput gene expression profiling controlled by various environmental factors is a commonly adopted technique used by the cancer research community. This work develops a comprehensive gene expression analysis tool (gene-set activity toolbox: (GAT)) that is implemented with data retriever, traditional data pre-processing, several gene-set analysis methods, network visualization and data mining tools. The gene-set analysis methods are used to identify subsets of phenotype-relevant genes that will be used to build a classification model. To evaluate GAT performance, we performed a cross-dataset validation study on three common cancers namely colorectal, breast and lung cancers. The results show that GAT can be used to build a reasonable disease diagnostic model and the predicted markers have biological relevance. GAT can be accessed from http://gat.sit.kmutt.ac.th where GAT's java library for gene-set analysis, simple classification and a database with three cancer benchmark datasets can be downloaded. PMID:27102089

  3. Next-generation sequencing and microarray-based interrogation of microRNAs from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue: Preliminary assessment of cross-platform concordance

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Andrew D.; Hill, Katherine E.; Correll, Mick; Hu, Lan; Wang, Yaoyu; Rubio, Renee; Duan, Shenghua; Quackenbush, John; Spentzos, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing is increasingly employed in biomedical investigations. Strong concordance between microarray and mRNA-seq levels has been reported in high quality specimens but information is lacking on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, and particularly for microRNA (miRNA) analysis. We conducted a preliminary examination of the concordance between miRNA-seq and cDNA-mediated annealing, selection, extension, and ligation (DASL) miRNA assays. Quantitative agreement between platforms is moderate (Spearman correlation 0.514–0.596) and there is discordance of detection calls on a subset of miRNAs. Quantitative PCR (q-RT-PCR) performed for several discordant miRNAs confirmed the presence of most sequences detected by miRNA-seq but not by DASL but also that miRNA-seq did not detect some sequences, which DASL confidently detected. Our results suggest that miRNA-seq is specific, with few false positive calls, but it may not detect certain abundant miRNAs in FFPE tissue. Further work is necessary to fully address these issues that are pertinent for translational research. PMID:23562991

  4. Estrogen-Receptor, Progesterone-Receptor and HER2 Status Determination in Invasive Breast Cancer. Concordance between Immuno-Histochemistry and MapQuant™ Microarray Based Assay

    PubMed Central

    Mouttet, D.; Laé, M.; Caly, M.; Gentien, D.; Carpentier, S.; Peyro-Saint-Paul, H.; Vincent-Salomon, A.; Rouzier, R.; Sigal-Zafrani, B.; Sastre-Garau, X.; Reyal, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hormone receptor status and HER2 status are of critical interest in determining the prognosis of breast cancer patients. Their status is routinely assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). However, it is subject to intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory variability. The aim of our study was to compare the estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and HER2 status as determined by the MapQuant™ test to the routine immuno-histochemical tests in early stage invasive breast cancer in a large comprehensive cancer center. Patients and Methods We retrospectively studied 163 invasive early-stage breast carcinoma with standard IHC status. The genomic status was determined using the MapQuant™ test providing the genomic grade index. Results We found only 4 tumours out of 161 (2.5%) with discrepant IHC and genomic results concerning ER status. The concordance rate between the two methods was 97.5% and the Cohen’s Kappa coefficient was 0.89. Comparison between the MapQuant™ PR status and the PR IHC status gave more discrepancies. The concordance rate between the two methods was 91.4% and the Cohen’s Kappa coefficient was 0.74. The HER2 MapQuant™ test was classified as « undetermined » in 2 out of 163 cases (1.2%). One HER2 IHC-negative tumour was found positive with a high HER2 MapQuant™ genomic score. The concordance rate between the two methods was 99.3% and the Cohen’s Kappa coefficient was 0.86. Conclusion Our results show that the MapQuant™ assay, based on mRNA expression assay, provides an objective and quantitative assessment of Estrogen receptor, Progesterone receptor and HER2 status in invasive breast cancer. PMID:26829108

  5. Comprehensibility maximization and humanly comprehensible representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Ryotaro

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a new information-theoretic method to measure the comprehensibility of network configurations in competitive learning. Comprehensibility is supposed to be measured by information contained in components in competitive networks. Thus, the increase in information corresponds to the increase in comprehensibility of network configurations. One of the most important characteristics of the method is that parameters can be explicitly determined so as to produce a state where the different types of comprehensibility can be mutually increased. We applied the method to two problems, namely an artificial data set and the ionosphere data from the well-known machine learning database. In both problems, we showed that improved performance could be obtained in terms of all types of comprehensibility and quantization errors. For the topographic errors, we found that updating connection weights prevented them from increasing. Then, the optimal values of comprehensibility could be explicitly determined, and clearer class boundaries were generated.

  6. Comprehension of Discourse Markers and Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khatib, Mohamad

    2011-01-01

    According to many research findings, the presence of discourse markers (DMs) enhances readers' comprehension of the texts they read. However, there is a paucity of research on the relationship between knowledge of DMs and reading comprehension (RC) and the present study explores the relationship between them. Knowledge of DMs is measured through…

  7. Identification of Gram-Negative Bacteria and Genetic Resistance Determinants from Positive Blood Culture Broths by Use of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Multiplex Microarray-Based Molecular Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ledeboer, Nathan A.; Lopansri, Bert K.; Dhiman, Neelam; Cavagnolo, Robert; Carroll, Karen C.; Granato, Paul; Thomson, Richard; Butler-Wu, Susan M.; Berger, Heather; Samuel, Linoj; Pancholi, Preeti; Swyers, Lettie; Hansen, Glen T.; Tran, Nam K.; Polage, Christopher R.; Thomson, Kenneth S.; Hanson, Nancy D.; Winegar, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Bloodstream infection is a serious condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The outcome of these infections can be positively affected by the early implementation of effective antibiotic therapy based on the identification of the infecting organism and genetic markers associated with antibiotic resistance. In this study, we evaluated the microarray-based Verigene Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GN) assay in the identification of 8 genus or species targets and 6 genetic resistance determinants in positive blood culture broths. A total of 1,847 blood cultures containing Gram-negative organisms were tested using the BC-GN assay. This comprised 729 prospective fresh, 781 prospective or retrospective frozen, and 337 simulated cultures representing 7 types of aerobic culture media. The results were compared to those with standard bacterial culture and biochemical identification with nucleic acid sequence confirmation of the resistance determinants. Among monomicrobial cultures, the positive percent agreement (PPA) of the BC-GN assay with the reference method was as follows; Escherichia coli, 100%; Klebsiella pneumoniae, 92.9%; Klebsiella oxytoca, 95.5%; Enterobacter spp., 99.3%; Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 98.9%; Proteus spp., 100%; Acinetobacter spp., 98.4%; and Citrobacter spp., 100%. All organism identification targets demonstrated >99.5% negative percent agreement (NPA) with the reference method. Of note, 25/26 cultures containing K. pneumoniae that were reported as not detected by the BC-GN assay were subsequently identified as Klebsiella variicola. The PPA for identification of resistance determinants was as follows; blaCTX-M, 98.9%; blaKPC, 100%; blaNDM, 96.2%; blaOXA, 94.3%; blaVIM, 100%; and blaIMP, 100%. All resistance determinant targets demonstrated >99.9% NPA. Among polymicrobial specimens, the BC-GN assay correctly identified at least one organism in 95.4% of the broths and correctly identified all organisms present in 54.5% of the broths

  8. Identification of Gram-Negative Bacteria and Genetic Resistance Determinants from Positive Blood Culture Broths by Use of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Multiplex Microarray-Based Molecular Assay.

    PubMed

    Ledeboer, Nathan A; Lopansri, Bert K; Dhiman, Neelam; Cavagnolo, Robert; Carroll, Karen C; Granato, Paul; Thomson, Richard; Butler-Wu, Susan M; Berger, Heather; Samuel, Linoj; Pancholi, Preeti; Swyers, Lettie; Hansen, Glen T; Tran, Nam K; Polage, Christopher R; Thomson, Kenneth S; Hanson, Nancy D; Winegar, Richard; Buchan, Blake W

    2015-08-01

    Bloodstream infection is a serious condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The outcome of these infections can be positively affected by the early implementation of effective antibiotic therapy based on the identification of the infecting organism and genetic markers associated with antibiotic resistance. In this study, we evaluated the microarray-based Verigene Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GN) assay in the identification of 8 genus or species targets and 6 genetic resistance determinants in positive blood culture broths. A total of 1,847 blood cultures containing Gram-negative organisms were tested using the BC-GN assay. This comprised 729 prospective fresh, 781 prospective or retrospective frozen, and 337 simulated cultures representing 7 types of aerobic culture media. The results were compared to those with standard bacterial culture and biochemical identification with nucleic acid sequence confirmation of the resistance determinants. Among monomicrobial cultures, the positive percent agreement (PPA) of the BC-GN assay with the reference method was as follows; Escherichia coli, 100%; Klebsiella pneumoniae, 92.9%; Klebsiella oxytoca, 95.5%; Enterobacter spp., 99.3%; Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 98.9%; Proteus spp., 100%; Acinetobacter spp., 98.4%; and Citrobacter spp., 100%. All organism identification targets demonstrated >99.5% negative percent agreement (NPA) with the reference method. Of note, 25/26 cultures containing K. pneumoniae that were reported as not detected by the BC-GN assay were subsequently identified as Klebsiella variicola. The PPA for identification of resistance determinants was as follows; blaCTX-M, 98.9%; blaKPC, 100%; blaNDM, 96.2%; blaOXA, 94.3%; blaVIM, 100%; and blaIMP, 100%. All resistance determinant targets demonstrated >99.9% NPA. Among polymicrobial specimens, the BC-GN assay correctly identified at least one organism in 95.4% of the broths and correctly identified all organisms present in 54.5% of the broths

  9. Identification of Gram-Negative Bacteria and Genetic Resistance Determinants from Positive Blood Culture Broths by Use of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Multiplex Microarray-Based Molecular Assay.

    PubMed

    Ledeboer, Nathan A; Lopansri, Bert K; Dhiman, Neelam; Cavagnolo, Robert; Carroll, Karen C; Granato, Paul; Thomson, Richard; Butler-Wu, Susan M; Berger, Heather; Samuel, Linoj; Pancholi, Preeti; Swyers, Lettie; Hansen, Glen T; Tran, Nam K; Polage, Christopher R; Thomson, Kenneth S; Hanson, Nancy D; Winegar, Richard; Buchan, Blake W

    2015-08-01

    Bloodstream infection is a serious condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The outcome of these infections can be positively affected by the early implementation of effective antibiotic therapy based on the identification of the infecting organism and genetic markers associated with antibiotic resistance. In this study, we evaluated the microarray-based Verigene Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GN) assay in the identification of 8 genus or species targets and 6 genetic resistance determinants in positive blood culture broths. A total of 1,847 blood cultures containing Gram-negative organisms were tested using the BC-GN assay. This comprised 729 prospective fresh, 781 prospective or retrospective frozen, and 337 simulated cultures representing 7 types of aerobic culture media. The results were compared to those with standard bacterial culture and biochemical identification with nucleic acid sequence confirmation of the resistance determinants. Among monomicrobial cultures, the positive percent agreement (PPA) of the BC-GN assay with the reference method was as follows; Escherichia coli, 100%; Klebsiella pneumoniae, 92.9%; Klebsiella oxytoca, 95.5%; Enterobacter spp., 99.3%; Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 98.9%; Proteus spp., 100%; Acinetobacter spp., 98.4%; and Citrobacter spp., 100%. All organism identification targets demonstrated >99.5% negative percent agreement (NPA) with the reference method. Of note, 25/26 cultures containing K. pneumoniae that were reported as not detected by the BC-GN assay were subsequently identified as Klebsiella variicola. The PPA for identification of resistance determinants was as follows; blaCTX-M, 98.9%; blaKPC, 100%; blaNDM, 96.2%; blaOXA, 94.3%; blaVIM, 100%; and blaIMP, 100%. All resistance determinant targets demonstrated >99.9% NPA. Among polymicrobial specimens, the BC-GN assay correctly identified at least one organism in 95.4% of the broths and correctly identified all organisms present in 54.5% of the broths

  10. Comprehension of Connected Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosberg, Ludwig; Shima, Fred

    A rationale was developed for researching reading comprehension based on information gain. Previous definitions of comprehension which were reviewed included operational vs. nonoperational and skills vs. processes. Comprehension was viewed as an informational processing event which includes a constellation of cognitive and learning processes. Two…

  11. Comprehension for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowball, Diane

    2006-01-01

    Teaching and learning about comprehension is of paramount importance, from the beginning of reading instruction right through all years of school, in all curriculum areas. Research has shown that comprehension instruction can improve the reading comprehension of all readers, even beginning readers and struggling older readers. This article offers…

  12. Teaching Comprehension Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Association of School Superintendents.

    Materials used in a one-day conference on teaching reading comprehension skills are summarized in this publication. Contents consist of three articles on teaching the comprehension skills, informal reading inventories in science and in geography, Lincoln's Gettysburg Address with comprehension questions, a checklist for the evaluation of teaching…

  13. Use of lymphoblastoid cells for the estimation of environmental insults to DNA. Comprehensive report of the overall activities of the contract during the past three years. Progress report, August 1, 1978-June 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    Research progress is reported on a study to detect chronic low-level exposure of individuals to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by analysis of DNA in cells with low turnover rates. The technique used was to measure the level of excision repair activity in lymphoblastoid and lymphoma cell lines. (ACR)

  14. Rapid and sensitive detection of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli from urine samples using a genotyping DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaolei; Susa, Milorad; Weile, Jan; Knabbe, Cornelius; Schmid, Rolf D; Bachmann, Till T

    2007-10-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common bacterial infections in humans, with Escherichia coli being the major cause of infection. Fluoroquinolone resistance of uropathogenic E. coli has increased significantly over the last decade. In this study a microarray-based assay was developed and applied, which provides a rapid, sensitive and specific detection of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli in urine. The capture probes were designed against previously identified and described hotspots for quinolone resistance (codons 83 and 87 of gyrA). The key goals of this development were to reduce assay time while increasing the sensitivity and specificity as compared with a pilot version of a gyrA genotyping DNA microarray. The performance of the assay was demonstrated with pure cultures of 30 E. coli isolates as well as with urine samples spiked with 6 E. coli isolates. The microarray results were confirmed by standard DNA sequencing and were in full agreement with the phenotypic antimicrobial susceptibility testing using standard methods. The DNA microarray test displayed an assay time of 3.5h, a sensitivity of 100CFU/ml, and the ability to detect fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli in the presence of a 10-fold excess of fluoroquinolone-susceptible E. coli cells. As a consequence, we believe that this microarray-based determination of antibiotics resistance has a true potential for the application in clinical routine laboratories in the future.

  15. Comprehensive Writing Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Harvey, Ed.; Maimon, Elaine, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Descriptions of comprehensive writing programs at nine colleges and universities and an essay on the topic are presented. Comprehensive writing programs transcend a single department or discipline and are designed to enhance liberal learning. Such programs not only teach students to write in the appropriate modes of various disciplines, but also…

  16. Teaching Main Idea Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, James F., Ed.

    Intended to help classroom teachers, curriculum developers, and researchers, this book provides current information on theoretical and instructional aspects of main idea comprehension. Titles and authors are as follows: "The Confused World of Main Idea" (James W. Cunningham and David W. Moore); "The Comprehension of Important Information in…

  17. Paraphrasing for Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisk, Candace; Hurst, Beth

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that paraphrasing can be useful to promote reading comprehension skills. Finds paraphrasing for comprehension to be an excellent tool for reinforcing reading skills, such as identifying the main ideas, finding supporting details, and identifying the author's voice. Discusses how helping students see practical applications of accurately…

  18. Disentangling Accent from Comprehensibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trofimovich, Pavel; Isaacs, Talia

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine which linguistic aspects of second language speech are related to accent and which to comprehensibility. To address this goal, 19 different speech measures in the oral productions of 40 native French speakers of English were examined in relation to accent and comprehensibility, as rated by 60 novice raters…

  19. Comprehension Processes in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balota, D. A., Ed.; And Others

    Focusing on the process of reading comprehension, this book contains chapters on some central topics relevant to understanding the processes associated with comprehending text. The articles and their authors are as follows: (1) "Comprehension Processes: Introduction" (K. Rayner); (2) "The Role of Meaning in Word Recognition" (D. A. Balota); (3)…

  20. Teaching Comprehension and Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdgrafer, Gary

    1982-01-01

    The uniform principle assuming that comprehension precedes production in language acquisition was examined using Down's Syndrome children taught to comprehend singular/plural nouns and produce such forms for another noun. Three subjects reached criterion production first and one reached comprehension first, suggesting the modes can develop…

  1. Mechanisms for radiation damadge in DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1994-11-01

    A comprehensive report is provided of the author`s research since 1986 on radiolysis of DNA as well as current state of knowledge in this area. In particular study areas such as the influence of hydration on the absolute yield of primary ionic free radicals in irradiated DNA at 77K, Ab Initio molecular orbital calculations of DNA base pairs and their radical ions, and radiation-induced DNA damage as a function of hydration are discussed.

  2. Phototyping: comprehensive DNA typing for HLA-A, B, C, DRB1, DRB3, DRB4, DRB5 & DQB1 by PCR with 144 primer mixes utilizing sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP).

    PubMed

    Bunce, M; O'Neill, C M; Barnardo, M C; Krausa, P; Browning, M J; Morris, P J; Welsh, K I

    1995-11-01

    We have developed a single DNA typing method which uses 144 sequence-specific primer (SSP) reactions to simultaneously detect all known HLA-A, B, C, DRB1, DRB3, DRB4, DRB5 and DQB1 specificities in an allele specific or group specific manner using the same method, reagents, PCR parameters and protocols for all loci. The results from this integrated class I & II method can be visualized on a single photographic or electronic image and hence is described as "Phototyping". Phototyping has an overall resolution greater than or equivalent to good serology and results can be obtained in under 3 hours making the method suitable for genotyping potential cadaver donor peripheral blood without serological backup. This in turn produces the potential for reducing cold ischaemia times in renal transplantation as well as the application of prospective matching to cardiac and liver transplantation. The method has capacity to detect new alleles, for example, novel amplification patterns suggestive of 4 new HLA-B alleles have been detected. The Phototyping set has been used as the sole method of HLA typing for over 1010 individuals. Phototyping is not problem-free; deviations from the standard protocol, poor quality DNA and unsuitable PCR machines can result in individual PCR failures or in incorrect assignment of antigens. Approximately 5% of genotypes were repeated (either partially or fully) because of incomplete or equivocal results.

  3. Interruptions disrupt reading comprehension.

    PubMed

    Foroughi, Cyrus K; Werner, Nicole E; Barragán, Daniela; Boehm-Davis, Deborah A

    2015-06-01

    Previous research suggests that being interrupted while reading a text does not disrupt the later recognition or recall of information from that text. This research is used as support for Ericsson and Kintsch's (1995) long-term working memory (LT-WM) theory, which posits that disruptions while reading (e.g., interruptions) do not impair subsequent text comprehension. However, to fully comprehend a text, individuals may need to do more than recognize or recall information that has been presented in the text at a later time. Reading comprehension often requires individuals to connect and synthesize information across a text (e.g., successfully identifying complex topics such as themes and tones) and not just make a familiarity-based decision (i.e., recognition). The goal for this study was to determine whether interruptions while reading disrupt reading comprehension when the questions assessing comprehension require participants to connect and synthesize information across the passage. In Experiment 1, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension. In Experiment 2, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension but not recognition of information from the text. In Experiment 3, the addition of a 15-s time-out prior to the interruption successfully removed these negative effects. These data suggest that the time it takes to process the information needed to successfully comprehend text when reading is greater than that required for recognition. Any interference (e.g., an interruption) that occurs during the comprehension process may disrupt reading comprehension. This evidence supports the need for transient activation of information in working memory for successful text comprehension and does not support LT-WM theory.

  4. DNA mini-barcodes.

    PubMed

    Hajibabaei, Mehrdad; McKenna, Charly

    2012-01-01

    Conventional DNA barcoding uses an approximately 650 bp DNA barcode of the mitochondrial gene COI for species identification in animal groups. Similar size fragments from chloroplast genes have been proposed as barcode markers for plants. While PCR amplification and sequencing of a 650 bp fragment is consistent in freshly collected and well-preserved specimens, it is difficult to obtain a full-length barcode in older museum specimens and samples which have been preserved in formalin or similar DNA-unfriendly preservatives. A comparable issue may prevent effective DNA-based authentication and testing in processed biological materials, such as food products, pharmaceuticals, and nutraceuticals. In these cases, shorter DNA sequences-mini-barcodes-have been robustly recovered and shown to be effective in identifying majority of specimens to a species level. Furthermore, short DNA regions can be utilized via high-throughput sequencing platforms providing an inexpensive and comprehensive means of large-scale species identification. These properties of mini-barcodes, coupled with the availability of standardized and universal primers make mini-barcodes a feasible option for DNA barcode analysis in museum samples and applied diagnostic and environmental biodiversity analysis.

  5. Comprehensive metabolic panel

    MedlinePlus

    A comprehensive metabolic panel is a group of blood tests. They provide an overall picture of your body's chemical balance and metabolism. Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes ...

  6. Comprehensive rotorcraft analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Wendell B.; Austin, Edward E.

    1988-01-01

    The development and application of comprehensive rotorcraft analysis methods in the field of rotorcraft technology are described. These large scale analyses and the resulting computer programs are intended to treat the complex aeromechanical phenomena that describe the behavior of rotorcraft. They may be used to predict rotor aerodynamics, acoustic, performance, stability and control, handling qualities, loads and vibrations, structures, dynamics, and aeroelastic stability characteristics for a variety of applications including research, preliminary and detail design, and evaluation and treatment of field problems. The principal comprehensive methods developed or under development in recent years and generally available to the rotorcraft community because of US Army Aviation Research and Technology Activity (ARTA) sponsorship of all or part of the software systems are the Rotorcraft Flight Simulation (C81), Dynamic System Coupler (DYSCO), Coupled Rotor/Airframe Vibration Analysis Program (SIMVIB), Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics (CAMRAD), General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program (GRASP), and Second Generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System (2GCHAS).

  7. Comprehensive Faculty Flow Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomfield, Stefan D.

    1977-01-01

    A comprehensive faculty flow model developed to forecast a "committed resources index" analyzes the future flexibility of a university. The model's construction, implementation, and assessment are described. (Editor/LBH)

  8. Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Families Guide Skip breadcrumb navigation Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Quick Links Facts For Families Guide Facts For ... Families Guide - Search No. 52; Updated November 2012 Evaluation by a child and adolescent psychiatrist is appropriate ...

  9. A survey of DNA diagnostic laboratories regarding DNA banking.

    PubMed

    McEwen, J E; Reilly, P R

    1995-06-01

    This article reports the findings of a survey of 148 academically based and commercial DNA diagnostic labs regarding DNA banking (defined as the storage of individual DNA samples in some form with identifiers for later retrieval). The population surveyed consisted of all laboratories listed with HELIX, a national directory of DNA diagnostic labs that includes a fairly comprehensive listing of clinical service labs as well as a large number of research labs. The survey was concerned primarily with the legal and ethical issues that the long-term storage of DNA may raise. The survey inquired into the respondents' policies and procedures concerning (1) the extent of DNA banking and of interest in developing DNA banking in academia and industry and (2) the degree to which DNA banks had developed written internal policies and/or a written depositor's agreement (a signed document defining the rights and obligations of the person from whom the sample was taken and the bank) designed to anticipate or prevent some of the ethical and legal problems that can arise from the long-term retention of DNA. Our research suggests that (1) the activity of DNA banking is growing, particularly in the academic setting, and (2) most academically based DNA banks lack written internal policies, written depositor's agreements, or other relevant documentation regarding important aspects of this activity. PMID:7762571

  10. A survey of DNA diagnostic laboratories regarding DNA banking

    SciTech Connect

    McEwen, J.E.; Reilly, P.R.

    1995-06-01

    This article reports the findings of a survey of 148 academically based and commercial DNA diagnostic labs regarding DNA banking (defined as the storage of individual DNA samples in some form with identifiers for later retrieval). The population surveyed consisted of all laboratories listed with HELIX, a national directory of DNA diagnostic labs that includes a fairly comprehensive listing of clinical service labs as well as a large number of research labs. The survey was concerned primarily with the legal and ethical issues that the long-term storage of DNA may raise. The survey inquired into the respondent`s policies and procedures concerning (1) the extent of DNA banking and of interest in developing DNA banking in academia and industry and (2) the degree to which DNA banks had developed written internal policies and/or a written depositor`s agreement (a signed document defining the rights and obligations of the person from whom the sample was taken and the bank) designed to anticipate or prevent some of the ethical and legal problems that can arise from the long-term retention of DNA. Our research suggests that (1) the activity of DNA banking is growing, particularly in the academic setting, and (2) most academically based DNA banks lack written internal policies, written depositor`s agreements, or other relevant documentation regarding important aspects of this activity. 10 refs., 10 tabs.

  11. Sequence variations of the locus-specific 5' untranslated regions of SLA class I genes and the development of a comprehensive genomic DNA-based high-resolution typing method for SLA-2.

    PubMed

    Choi, H; Le, M T; Lee, H; Choi, M-K; Cho, H-S; Nagasundarapandian, S; Kwon, O-J; Kim, J-H; Seo, K; Park, J-K; Lee, J-H; Ho, C-S; Park, C

    2015-10-01

    The genetic diversity of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules of pigs has not been well characterized. Therefore, the influence of MHC genetic diversity on the immune-related traits of pigs, including disease resistance and other MHC-dependent traits, is not well understood. Here, we attempted to develop an efficient method for systemic analysis of the polymorphisms in the epitope-binding region of swine leukocyte antigens (SLA) class I genes. We performed a comparative analysis of the last 92 bp of the 5' untranslated region (UTR) to the beginning of exon 4 of six SLA classical class I-related genes, SLA-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, and -9, from 36 different sequences. Based on this information, we developed a genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing-based comprehensive typing method for SLA-2. We successfully typed SLA-2 from 400 pigs and 8 cell lines, consisting of 9 different pig breeds, and identified 49 SLA-2 alleles, including 31 previously reported alleles and 18 new alleles. We observed differences in the composition of SLA-2 alleles among different breeds. Our method can be used to study other SLA class I loci and to deepen our knowledge of MHC class I genes in pigs.

  12. The significant role of the intermolecular CH⋯O/N hydrogen bonds in governing the biologically important pairs of the DNA and RNA modified bases: a comprehensive theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Yurenko, Yevgen P; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-01-01

    contribution of the CH⋯O and CH⋯N H-bonds into the base pairs stability varies from 3.0/4.2 to 35.1/31.2% and from 3.0/4.3 to 44.4/46.5% at the DFT/MP2 levels of theory, accordingly. Energy decomposition analysis performed for all base pairs involving canonical and modified nucleobases defines the electrostatic attraction and Pauli repulsion as dominant stabilizing forces in all complexes. This observation was additionally confirmed by the results of the QTAIM delocalization indexes analysis. The studies reported here advance our understanding of the biological role of the weak CH⋯O/N H-bonds, that dictates the requirements for the structural and dynamical similarity of the canonical and mismatched pairs with Watson-Crick (WC) geometry, which facilitates their enzymatic incorporation into the DNA double helix during DNA replication. Thus, these H-bonds in the base pairs with WC geometry may be also considered as "the last drop" at the transmission of the electronic signal that launches the chemical incorporation of the incoming nucleoside triphosphate into DNA.

  13. Support for comprehensive reuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, V. R.; Rombach, H. D.

    1991-01-01

    Reuse of products, processes, and other knowledge will be the key to enable the software industry to achieve the dramatic improvement in productivity and quality required to satisfy the anticipated growing demands. Although experience shows that certain kinds of reuse can be successful, general success has been elusive. A software life-cycle technology which allows comprehensive reuse of all kinds of software-related experience could provide the means to achieving the desired order-of-magnitude improvements. A comprehensive framework of models, model-based characterization schemes, and support mechanisms for better understanding, evaluating, planning, and supporting all aspects of reuse are introduced.

  14. Comprehensive objective maps of macromolecular conformations by quantitative SAXS analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hura, Greg L.; Budworth, Helen; Dyer, Kevin N.; Rambo, Robert P.; Hammel, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive perspectives of macromolecular conformations are required to connect structure to biology. Here we present a small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) Structural Similarity Map (SSM) and Volatility of Ratio (VR) metric providing comprehensive, quantitative and objective (superposition-independent) perspectives on solution state conformations. We validate VR and SSM utility on human MutSβ, a key ABC ATPase and chemotherapeutic target, by revealing MutSβ DNA sculpting and identifying multiple conformational states for biological activity. PMID:23624664

  15. DNA methylation presents distinct binding sites for human transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaohui; Wan, Jun; Su, Yijing; Song, Qifeng; Zeng, Yaxue; Nguyen, Ha Nam; Shin, Jaehoon; Cox, Eric; Rho, Hee Sool; Woodard, Crystal; Xia, Shuli; Liu, Shuang; Lyu, Huibin; Ming, Guo-Li; Wade, Herschel; Song, Hongjun; Qian, Jiang; Zhu, Heng

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation, especially CpG methylation at promoter regions, has been generally considered as a potent epigenetic modification that prohibits transcription factor (TF) recruitment, resulting in transcription suppression. Here, we used a protein microarray-based approach to systematically survey the entire human TF family and found numerous purified TFs with methylated CpG (mCpG)-dependent DNA-binding activities. Interestingly, some TFs exhibit specific binding activity to methylated and unmethylated DNA motifs of distinct sequences. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, we focused on Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), and decoupled its mCpG- and CpG-binding activities via site-directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, KLF4 binds specific methylated or unmethylated motifs in human embryonic stem cells in vivo. Our study suggests that mCpG-dependent TF binding activity is a widespread phenomenon and provides a new framework to understand the role and mechanism of TFs in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00726.001. PMID:24015356

  16. Graphics and Listening Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruhe, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of graphics as lecture comprehension supports for low-proficiency English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) listeners. The study compared the performance of Asian students in Canada listening to an audiotape while viewing an organizational graphic with that of a control group. Findings indicate that the graphics enhanced…

  17. The Comprehension Toolkit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Stephanie; Goudvis, Anne

    2005-01-01

    "The Comprehension Toolkit" focuses on reading, writing, talking, listening, and investigating, to deepen understanding of nonfiction texts. With a focus on strategic thinking, this toolkit's lessons provide a foundation for developing independent readers and learners. It also provides an alternative to the traditional assign and correct…

  18. Comprehensive Trail Making Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    The Comprehensive Trail Making Test (CTMT) is designed to be used in neuropsychological assessment for the purposes of detecting effects of brain defects and deficits and in tracking progress in rehabilitation. More specific purposes include the detection of frontal lobe deficits, problems with psychomotor speed, visual search and sequencing,…

  19. Comprehensive stormwater management study

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, T. ); Alter, M. ); Wassum, R.H. )

    1994-02-01

    This article examines Tucson, Arizona's approach to stormwater management. The topics of the article include the quantity and quality of stormwater, developing the stormwater master plan, meeting environmental and regulatory constraints. Tucson's comprehensive, watershed by watershed approach to public works planning and stormwater program development is described.

  20. Cognition, Curriculum, and Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, John T., Ed.

    The papers in this volume were initially presented at a seminar on the development of reading comprehension, which explored basic research and the teaching of reading comprehenison. Researchers in cognitive psychology and psycholinguistics and experts in curriculum design in reading gave presentations and reacted to one another's ideas. Each…

  1. The Comprehensive Health Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastern Iowa Community Coll. District, Davenport.

    This report contains information from a fall 1991 health occupations assessment of 1,021 health-related employers in Eastern Iowa and the Illinois Quad Cities area. Twelve chapters present comprehensive results of all surveys; results of 10 labor market survey instruments developed for chiropractic offices, dentists' offices, emergency medical…

  2. Designing a Comprehensive Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, T. L.

    1970-01-01

    A comprehensive rural "agribusiness industry" curriculum might include: (1) The World of Work (Grade 7 or 8), (2) Vocational Orientation (Grade 9), (3) Basic Agriculture and Industry (Grade 10), (4) Specialized Agribusiness Industry (Grade 11), and (5) Advanced Agribusiness Industry (Grade 12). (DM)

  3. Math Sense: Comprehensive Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Cathy Fillmore

    This book features a comprehensive review of the Math Sense series and is designed to help students gain the range of math skills they need to succeed in life, work, and on standardized tests; overcome math anxiety; discover math as interesting and purposeful; and develop good number sense. Topics covered in this book include whole numbers;…

  4. Comprehensive care in hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sáez, Arlette

    2012-04-01

    Hemophilia is a chronic and inherited X-linked bleeding disorder that requires life-long medical care. Hemophilia treatment is costly and complex partly because of the cost of the factor concentrates used in replacement therapy. However, the management of hemophilia is not based solely on achieving access to better treatment with safe factor concentrates; it also includes accurately diagnosing the disorder and providing specialized comprehensive care by a multidisciplinary team of specialists trained in hemophilia management. Comprehensive care for the person with hemophilia is defined as the continuous supervision of all medical and psychological aspects affecting the patient and his family and it demands the establishment of specialized centers, called Hemophilia Treatment Centers. The services that should be offered by a comprehensive hemophilia healthcare center are diverse and the multidisciplinary team should be coordinated preferably by a hematologist with the participation of other health professionals. It has been demonstrated that the benefits of establishing hemophilia centers are observed even in developing countries and that changes can be achieved when resources are re-organized, especially when education and training are provided at all levels. To reach these objectives, it is essential to have the participation of the patient and family members, and to strive to obtain the financial and legislative support from the State or Government in order to achieve a national comprehensive care program contemplating all the aspects needed for improving the quality of life for the community of patients with hemophilia and other bleeding disorders.

  5. Comprehensive School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertling, Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    This issue reviews publications that provide school leaders with guidance in determining how to choose and implement the schoolwide program that is best for their school. American Institutes for Research's "An Educator's Guide to Schoolwide Reform" provides educators with comprehensive profiles and evaluations of 24 of the leading schoolwide…

  6. Cognitive Correlates of Listening Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Young-Suk; Phillips, Beth

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to understand cognitive foundations of oral language comprehension (i.e., listening comprehension), we examined how inhibitory control, theory of mind, and comprehension monitoring are uniquely related to listening comprehension over and above vocabulary and age. A total of 156 children in kindergarten and first grade from…

  7. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  8. DNA Banking

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, P.R. )

    1992-11-01

    The author is involved in the ethical, legal, and social issues of banking of DNA and data from DNA analysis. In his attempt to determine the extent of DNA banking in the U.S., the author surveyed some commercial companies performing DNA banking services. This article summarizes the results of that survey, with special emphasis on the procedures the companies use to protect the privacy of individuals. 4 refs.

  9. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  10. Development and Clinical Evaluation of a Highly Sensitive DNA Microarray for Detection and Genotyping of Human Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Oh, TaeJeong; Kim, ChangJin; Woo, SukKyung; Kim, TaeSeung; Jeong, DongJun; Kim, MyungSoon; Lee, Sunwoo; Cho, HyunSill; An, Sungwhan

    2004-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been found in cervical cancer, tonsillar cancer, and certain types of head and neck cancers. We report on a DNA microarray-based method for the simultaneous detection and typing of HPVs. The genotype spectrum discriminated by this HPV DNA microarray includes 15 high-risk HPV genotypes and 12 low-risk HPV genotypes. The HPV DNA microarray showed high degrees of specificity and reproducibility. We evaluated the performance of the HPV DNA microarray by application to three HPV-positive cell lines (HeLa, Caski, and SiHa cells) and two HPV-negative cell lines (C33A and A549 cells). The HPV DNA microarray successfully identified the known types of HPV present in the cell lines. The detection limit of the HPV DNA microarray was at least 100-fold higher than that of PCR. To assess the clinical applicability of the HPV DNA microarray, we performed the HPV genotyping assay with 73 nonmalignant and malignant samples from 39 tonsillar cancer patients. Twenty-five of the 39 (64.1%) malignant samples were positive for HPV, whereas 3 of 34 (8.8%) nonmalignant samples were positive for HPV. This result shows a preferential association of HPV with tonsillar carcinomas. The correlations of the presence of HPV with the grade of differentiation and risk factors were not significant. Our data show that the HPV DNA microarray may be useful for the diagnosis and typing of HPV in large-scale epidemiological studies. PMID:15243092

  11. Cinnarizine: Comprehensive Profile.

    PubMed

    Haress, Nadia G

    2015-01-01

    Cinnarizine is a piperazine derivative with antihistaminic, antiserotonergic, antidopaminergic, and calcium channel-blocking activities. A comprehensive profile was performed on cinnarizine including its description and the different methods of analysis. The 1H NMR and 13C one- and two-dimensional NMR methods were used. In addition, infrared and mass spectral analyses were performed which all confirmed the structure of cinnarizine. PMID:26051684

  12. Comprehension Monitoring and Reading Comprehension in Bilingual Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolic-Vehovec, Svjetlana; Bajsanski, Igor

    2007-01-01

    This study explored comprehension monitoring, use of reading strategies and reading comprehension of bilingual students at different levels of perceived proficiency in Italian. The participants were bilingual fifth to eighth-grade elementary school students from four Italian schools in Rijeka, Croatia. Students' reading comprehension was assessed.…

  13. Emergent Comprehension: Understanding Comprehension Development among Young Literacy Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMunn Dooley, Caitlin; Matthews, Mona W.

    2009-01-01

    This article hones what is meant by "emergent comprehension". The authors define emergent comprehension as the period when young children, prior to conventional reading, engage in meaningful experiences that stimulate the development and use of meaning-making strategies with potential to affect later reading comprehension. The construct "emergent…

  14. Gout: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Rymal, Eric; Rizzolo, Denise

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence of gout in the US population is steadily increasing. Genome-wide research has found several variants of DNA sequences that predispose patients to irregular uric acid metabolism. Comorbidities linked to gout include obesity and cardiovascular disease. Though the formal diagnosis is made with arthrocentesis and subsequent analysis, CT and ultrasound findings supplement the diagnosis and monitor disease management. Newer immunologic agents are available for patients whose disease is refractory to standard therapy.

  15. GeoChip: A comprehensive microarray for investigatingbiogeochemical, ecological, and environmental processes

    SciTech Connect

    He, Z.; Gentry, T.J.; Schadt, C.W.; Wu, L.; Liebich, J.; Chong,S.C.; Wu, W.; Gu, B.; Jardine, P.; Criddle, C.; Zhou, J.

    2007-09-24

    Due to their vast diversity and as-yet uncultivated status,detection, characterization and quantification of microorganisms innatural settings are very challenging, and linking microbial diversity toecosystem processes and functions is even more difficult.Microarray-based genomic technology for detecting functional genes andprocesses has a great promise of overcoming such obstacles. Here, a novelcomprehensive microarray, termed GeoChip, has been developed, containing24,243 oligonucleotide (50mer) probes and covering>10,000 genes in>150 functional groups involved in nitrogen, carbon, sulfur andphosphorus cycling, metal reduction and resistance, and organiccontaminant degradation. The developed GeoChip was successfully used fortracking the dynamics of metal-reducing bacteria and associatedcommunities for an in situ bioremediation study, which is the first timeto demonstrate that uranium can be bioremediated to the concentrationsbelow the USA EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinking water.This is the first comprehensive microarray available for studyingbiogeochemical processes and functional activities of microbialcommunities important to human health, agriculture, energy, globalclimate change, ecosystem management, and environmental cleanup andrestoration. It is particularly useful for providing direct linkages ofmicrobial genes/populations to ecosystem processes andfunctions.

  16. Comprehensive identification of essential Staphylococcus aureus genes using Transposon-Mediated Differential Hybridisation (TMDH)

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Roy R; Allen, Andrew G; Owen, Paul J; Shalom, Gil; Stone, Karl; Harrison, Marcus; Burgis, Timothy A; Lockyer, Michael; Garcia-Lara, Jorge; Foster, Simon J; Pleasance, Stephen J; Peters, Sarah E; Maskell, Duncan J; Charles, Ian G

    2009-01-01

    Background In recent years there has been an increasing problem with Staphylococcus aureus strains that are resistant to treatment with existing antibiotics. An important starting point for the development of new antimicrobial drugs is the identification of "essential" genes that are important for bacterial survival and growth. Results We have developed a robust microarray and PCR-based method, Transposon-Mediated Differential Hybridisation (TMDH), that uses novel bioinformatics to identify transposon inserts in genome-wide libraries. Following a microarray-based screen, genes lacking transposon inserts are re-tested using a PCR and sequencing-based approach. We carried out a TMDH analysis of the S. aureus genome using a large random mariner transposon library of around a million mutants, and identified a total of 351 S. aureus genes important for survival and growth in culture. A comparison with the essential gene list experimentally derived for Bacillus subtilis highlighted interesting differences in both pathways and individual genes. Conclusion We have determined the first comprehensive list of S. aureus essential genes. This should act as a useful starting point for the identification of potential targets for novel antimicrobial compounds. The TMDH methodology we have developed is generic and could be applied to identify essential genes in other bacterial pathogens. PMID:19570206

  17. CPMs: A Kinesthetic Comprehension Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Cathy Collins; Parris, Sheri R.; Whiteley, Cinnamon S.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses a study to determine whether primary grade students can learn comprehension processes via hand motions to portray these mental processes. Comprehension Process Motions (CPMs) were designed to provide students with a way to make abstract comprehension processes more consciously accessible and also to give teachers a way to…

  18. Idiom Comprehension in Aphasic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papagno, Costanza; Tabossi, Patrizia; Colombo, Maria Rosa; Zampetti, Patrizia

    2004-01-01

    Idiom comprehension was assessed in 10 aphasic patients with semantic deficits by means of a string-to-picture matching task. Patients were also submitted to an oral explanation of the same idioms, and to a word comprehension task. The stimuli of this last task were the words following the verb in the idioms. Idiom comprehension was severely…

  19. Understanding and Teaching Cohesion Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Judith W., Ed.

    Concerned with improving student comprehension of text, this book focuses particularly on teaching students how sentences tie together. Articles in the three sections are grouped as follows: Part 1, What Is Cohesion Comprehension? contains "Cohesion, Coherence, and Comprehension" (Alden J. Moe and Judith W. Irwin); "Identifying Types of Anaphoric…

  20. Development of a sensitive DNA microarray suitable for rapid detection of Campylobacter spp.

    PubMed

    Keramas, Georgios; Bang, Dang Duong; Lund, Marianne; Madsen, Mogens; Rasmussen, Svend Erik; Bunkenborg, Henrik; Telleman, Pieter; Christensen, Claus Bo Vöge

    2003-08-01

    Campylobacter is the most common cause of human acute bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide, widely distributed and isolated from human clinical samples as well as from many other different sources. To comply with the demands of consumers for food safety, there is a need for development of a rapid, sensitive and specific detection method for Campylobacter. In this study, we present the development of a novel sensitive DNA-microarray based detection method, evaluated on Campylobacter and non-Campylobacter reference strains, to detect Campylobacter directly from the faecal cloacal swabs. The DNA-microarray method consists of two steps: first, both universal bacterial sequences and specific Campylobacter sequences (size range: 149-307 bp) are amplified and fluorescently labeled using multiplex-PCR, targeting the 16S rRNA, the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic region and specific Campylobacter genes. Secondly, the Cy5 labeled PCR-amplicons are hybridised to immobilised capture probes on the microarray. The method allows detection of three to thirty genome equivalents (6-60 fg DNA) of Campylobacter within 3 h, with a hands on time of only 15 min. Using the DNA-microarrays, two closely related Campylobacter species, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli could be detected and differentiated directly from chicken faeces. The DNA-microarray method has a high potential for automation and incorporation into a dedicated mass screening microsystem.

  1. Comprehensive national energy strategy

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This Comprehensive National Energy Strategy sets forth a set of five common sense goals for national energy policy: (1) improve the efficiency of the energy system, (2) ensure against energy disruptions, (3) promote energy production and use in ways that respect health and environmental values, (4) expand future energy choices, and (5) cooperate internationally on global issues. These goals are further elaborated by a series of objectives and strategies to illustrate how the goals will be achieved. Taken together, the goals, objectives, and strategies form a blueprint for the specific programs, projects, initiatives, investments, and other actions that will be developed and undertaken by the Federal Government, with significant emphasis on the importance of the scientific and technological advancements that will allow implementation of this Comprehensive National Energy Strategy. Moreover, the statutory requirement of regular submissions of national energy policy plans ensures that this framework can be modified to reflect evolving conditions, such as better knowledge of our surroundings, changes in energy markets, and advances in technology. This Strategy, then, should be thought of as a living document. Finally, this plan benefited from the comments and suggestions of numerous individuals and organizations, both inside and outside of government. The Summary of Public Comments, located at the end of this document, describes the public participation process and summarizes the comments that were received. 8 figs.

  2. The comprehensive peptaibiotics database.

    PubMed

    Stoppacher, Norbert; Neumann, Nora K N; Burgstaller, Lukas; Zeilinger, Susanne; Degenkolb, Thomas; Brückner, Hans; Schuhmacher, Rainer

    2013-05-01

    Peptaibiotics are nonribosomally biosynthesized peptides, which - according to definition - contain the marker amino acid α-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) and possess antibiotic properties. Being known since 1958, a constantly increasing number of peptaibiotics have been described and investigated with a particular emphasis on hypocrealean fungi. Starting from the existing online 'Peptaibol Database', first published in 1997, an exhaustive literature survey of all known peptaibiotics was carried out and resulted in a list of 1043 peptaibiotics. The gathered information was compiled and used to create the new 'The Comprehensive Peptaibiotics Database', which is presented here. The database was devised as a software tool based on Microsoft (MS) Access. It is freely available from the internet at http://peptaibiotics-database.boku.ac.at and can easily be installed and operated on any computer offering a Windows XP/7 environment. It provides useful information on characteristic properties of the peptaibiotics included such as peptide category, group name of the microheterogeneous mixture to which the peptide belongs, amino acid sequence, sequence length, producing fungus, peptide subfamily, molecular formula, and monoisotopic mass. All these characteristics can be used and combined for automated search within the database, which makes The Comprehensive Peptaibiotics Database a versatile tool for the retrieval of valuable information about peptaibiotics. Sequence data have been considered as to December 14, 2012. PMID:23681723

  3. Visualizing spatiotemporal dynamics of apoptosis after G1 arrest by human T cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax and insights into gene expression changes using microarray-based gene expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax is a potent activator of viral and cellular gene expression that interacts with a number of cellular proteins. Many reports show that Tax is capable of regulating cell cycle progression and apoptosis both positively and negatively. However, it still remains to understand why the Tax oncoprotein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, or whether Tax-induced apoptosis is dependent upon its ability to induce G1 arrest. The present study used time-lapse imaging to explore the spatiotemporal patterns of cell cycle dynamics in Tax-expressing HeLa cells containing the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator, Fucci2. A large-scale host cell gene profiling approach was also used to identify the genes involved in Tax-mediated cell signaling events related to cellular proliferation and apoptosis. Results Tax-expressing apoptotic cells showed a rounded morphology and detached from the culture dish after cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. Thus, it appears that Tax induces apoptosis through pathways identical to those involved in G1 arrest. To elucidate the mechanism(s) by which Tax induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, regulation of host cellular genes by Tax was analyzed using a microarray containing approximately 18,400 human mRNA transcripts. Seventeen genes related to cell cycle regulation were identified as being up or downregulated > 2.0-fold in Tax-expressing cells. Several genes, including SMAD3, JUN, GADD45B, DUSP1 and IL8, were involved in cellular proliferation, responses to cellular stress and DNA damage, or inflammation and immune responses. Additionally, 23 pro- and anti-apoptotic genes were deregulated by Tax, including TNFAIP3, TNFRS9, BIRC3 and IL6. Furthermore, the kinetics of IL8, SMAD3, CDKN1A, GADD45A, GADD45B and IL6 expression were altered following the induction of Tax, and correlated closely with the morphological changes observed by time-lapse imaging. Conclusions Taken

  4. The Validity of Reading Comprehension Rate: Reading Speed, Comprehension, and Comprehension Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Christopher H.; Williams, Jacqueline L.; Morrow, Jennifer Ann; Hale, Andre D.; Neddenriep, Christine E.; Hawkins, Renee O.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a secondary analysis of a brief reading comprehension rate measure, percent comprehension questions correct per minute spent reading (%C/M). This measure includes reading speed (seconds to read) in the denominator and percentage of comprehension questions answered correctly in the numerator. Participants were 22 4th-, 29…

  5. DNA nanomachines.

    PubMed

    Bath, Jonathan; Turberfield, Andrew J

    2007-05-01

    We are learning to build synthetic molecular machinery from DNA. This research is inspired by biological systems in which individual molecules act, singly and in concert, as specialized machines: our ambition is to create new technologies to perform tasks that are currently beyond our reach. DNA nanomachines are made by self-assembly, using techniques that rely on the sequence-specific interactions that bind complementary oligonucleotides together in a double helix. They can be activated by interactions with specific signalling molecules or by changes in their environment. Devices that change state in response to an external trigger might be used for molecular sensing, intelligent drug delivery or programmable chemical synthesis. Biological molecular motors that carry cargoes within cells have inspired the construction of rudimentary DNA walkers that run along self-assembled tracks. It has even proved possible to create DNA motors that move autonomously, obtaining energy by catalysing the reaction of DNA or RNA fuels.

  6. Comprehensive GMO detection using real-time PCR array: single-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Mano, Junichi; Harada, Mioko; Takabatake, Reona; Furui, Satoshi; Kitta, Kazumi; Nakamura, Kosuke; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Noritake, Hiromichi; Hatano, Shuko; Futo, Satoshi; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Iizuka, Tayoshi

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a real-time PCR array method to comprehensively detect genetically modified (GM) organisms. In the method, genomic DNA extracted from an agricultural product is analyzed using various qualitative real-time PCR assays on a 96-well PCR plate, targeting for individual GM events, recombinant DNA (r-DNA) segments, taxon-specific DNAs, and donor organisms of the respective r-DNAs. In this article, we report the single-laboratory validation of both DNA extraction methods and component PCR assays constituting the real-time PCR array. We selected some DNA extraction methods for specified plant matrixes, i.e., maize flour, soybean flour, and ground canola seeds, then evaluated the DNA quantity, DNA fragmentation, and PCR inhibition of the resultant DNA extracts. For the component PCR assays, we evaluated the specificity and LOD. All DNA extraction methods and component PCR assays satisfied the criteria set on the basis of previous reports.

  7. Comprehensive GMO detection using real-time PCR array: single-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Mano, Junichi; Harada, Mioko; Takabatake, Reona; Furui, Satoshi; Kitta, Kazumi; Nakamura, Kosuke; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Noritake, Hiromichi; Hatano, Shuko; Futo, Satoshi; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Iizuka, Tayoshi

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a real-time PCR array method to comprehensively detect genetically modified (GM) organisms. In the method, genomic DNA extracted from an agricultural product is analyzed using various qualitative real-time PCR assays on a 96-well PCR plate, targeting for individual GM events, recombinant DNA (r-DNA) segments, taxon-specific DNAs, and donor organisms of the respective r-DNAs. In this article, we report the single-laboratory validation of both DNA extraction methods and component PCR assays constituting the real-time PCR array. We selected some DNA extraction methods for specified plant matrixes, i.e., maize flour, soybean flour, and ground canola seeds, then evaluated the DNA quantity, DNA fragmentation, and PCR inhibition of the resultant DNA extracts. For the component PCR assays, we evaluated the specificity and LOD. All DNA extraction methods and component PCR assays satisfied the criteria set on the basis of previous reports. PMID:22649939

  8. Electric-field assisted immobilization and hybridization of DNA oligomers on thin-film microchips.

    PubMed

    Fixe, F; Branz, H M; Louro, N; Chu, V; Prazeres, D M F; Conde, J P

    2005-10-01

    Single, square voltage pulses in the microsecond timescale result in selective 5'-end covalent bonding (immobilization) of thiolated single-stranded (ss) DNA probes to a modified silicon dioxide flat surface and in specific hybridization of ssDNA targets to the immobilized probe. Immobilization and hybridization rates using microsecond voltage pulses at or below 1 V are at least 10(8) times faster than in the passive control reactions performed without electric field (E), and can be achieved with at least three differently functionalized thin-film surfaces on plastic or glass substrates. The systematic study of the effect of DNA probe and target concentrations, of DNA probe and target length, and the application of asymmetric pulses on E-assisted DNA immobilization and hybridization showed that: (1) the rapidly rising edge of the pulse is most critical to the E-assisted processes, but the duration of the pulse is also important; (2) E-assisted immobilization and hybridization can be performed with micrometre-sized pixels, proving the potential for use on microelectronic length scales, and the applied voltage can be scaled down together with the electrode spacing to as low as 25 mV; and (3) longer DNA chains reduce the yield in the E-assisted immobilization and hybridization because the density of physisorbed single-stranded DNA is reduced. The results show that the E-induced reactions can be used as a general method in DNA microarrays to produce high-density DNA chips (E-immobilization) and speed the microarray-based analysis (E-hybridization). PMID:20817972

  9. [DNA computing].

    PubMed

    Błasiak, Janusz; Krasiński, Tadeusz; Popławski, Tomasz; Sakowski, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Biocomputers can be an alternative for traditional "silicon-based" computers, which continuous development may be limited due to further miniaturization (imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle) and increasing the amount of information between the central processing unit and the main memory (von Neuman bottleneck). The idea of DNA computing came true for the first time in 1994, when Adleman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using short DNA oligomers and DNA ligase. In the early 2000s a series of biocomputer models was presented with a seminal work of Shapiro and his colleguas who presented molecular 2 state finite automaton, in which the restriction enzyme, FokI, constituted hardware and short DNA oligomers were software as well as input/output signals. DNA molecules provided also energy for this machine. DNA computing can be exploited in many applications, from study on the gene expression pattern to diagnosis and therapy of cancer. The idea of DNA computing is still in progress in research both in vitro and in vivo and at least promising results of these research allow to have a hope for a breakthrough in the computer science. PMID:21735816

  10. Comprehensive Water-Efficiency Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate

    2015-07-15

    Energy performance contracts can be an effective way to integrate comprehensive water-efficient technologies and solutions into energy efficiency projects. Current practices often miss key opportunities to incorporate a full suite of water measures primarily because a comprehensive approach is not taken in the assessment. This article provides information on how to develop a comprehensive water project that leads to innovative solutions and potential for large water reduction.

  11. Dancing DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    An imaging technique that uses fluorescent dyes and allows scientists to track DNA as it moves through gels or in solution is described. The importance, opportunities, and implications of this technique are discussed. (KR)

  12. DNA Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Michael D.

    1997-01-01

    Explains a method to enable students to understand DNA and protein synthesis using model-building and role-playing. Acquaints students with the triplet code and transcription. Includes copies of the charts used in this technique. (DDR)

  13. Application of DNA microarray technology in determining breast cancer prognosis and therapeutic response.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Donal J; O'Brien, Sallyann L; Fagan, Ailís; Culhane, Aedín C; Higgins, Desmond G; Duffy, Michael J; Gallagher, William M

    2005-08-01

    There are > 1.15 million cases of breast cancer diagnosed worldwide annually, and it is the second leading cause of cancer death in the European Union. The optimum management of patients with breast cancer requires accurate prognostic and predictive factors. At present, only a small number of such factors are used clinically. DNA microarrays have the potential to measure the expression of tens of thousands of genes simultaneously. Recent preliminary findings suggest that DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling can provide powerful and independent prognostic information in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer. As well as providing prognostic information, emerging results suggest that DNA microarrays can also be used for predicting response or resistance to treatment, especially to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Prior to clinical application, these preliminary findings must be validated using large-scale prospective studies. This article reviews these advances and also examines the role of DNA microarrays in reducing the number of patients who receive inappropriate chemotherapy. The most recent data supporting the integration of various publicly available data sets is also reviewed in detail.

  14. Comprehensive test ban negotiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grab, G. Allen; Heckrotte, Warren

    1983-10-01

    Although it has been a stated policy goal of American and Soviet leaders since 1958 (with the exception of Ronald Reagan), the world today is still without a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. Throughout their history, test an negotiatins have been plagued by a number of persistent problems. Chief among these is East-West differences on the verification question, with the United States concerned about the problem of possible Soviet cheating and the USSR concerned about the protection of its national sovereignty. In addition, internal bureaucratic politics have played a major role in preventing the successful conclusion of an agreement. Despite these problems, the superpowers have concluded several significant partial meausres: a brief (1958-1961) total moratorium on nuclear weapons tests; the Limited Test Ban Treaty of 1963, banning tests in the air, water and outer space; the Threshold Test Ban Treaty of 1974 (150 KT limit on underground explosions); and the Peaceful Nuclear Explosions Treaty of 1976 (150 KT limit on individal PNEs). Today, the main U.S. objections to a CTBT center is the nuclear weapons laboratories, the Department of Energy, and the Pentagon, who all stress the issues of stockpile reliability and verification. Those who remain committed to a CTBT emphasize and the potential political leverage it offers in checking both horizontal and vertical proliferation.

  15. Comprehensive eye evaluation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agurto, C.; Nemeth, S.; Zamora, G.; Vahtel, M.; Soliz, P.; Barriga, S.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, several research groups have developed automatic algorithms to detect diabetic retinopathy (DR) in individuals with diabetes (DM), using digital retinal images. Studies have indicated that diabetics have 1.5 times the annual risk of developing primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) as do people without DM. Moreover, DM patients have 1.8 times the risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Although numerous investigators are developing automatic DR detection algorithms, there have been few successful efforts to create an automatic algorithm that can detect other ocular diseases, such as POAG and AMD. Consequently, our aim in the current study was to develop a comprehensive eye evaluation algorithm that not only detects DR in retinal images, but also automatically identifies glaucoma suspects and AMD by integrating other personal medical information with the retinal features. The proposed system is fully automatic and provides the likelihood of each of the three eye disease. The system was evaluated in two datasets of 104 and 88 diabetic cases. For each eye, we used two non-mydriatic digital color fundus photographs (macula and optic disc centered) and, when available, information about age, duration of diabetes, cataracts, hypertension, gender, and laboratory data. Our results show that the combination of multimodal features can increase the AUC by up to 5%, 7%, and 8% in the detection of AMD, DR, and glaucoma respectively. Marked improvement was achieved when laboratory results were combined with retinal image features.

  16. Comprehensive catalyst management

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, S.

    2007-05-15

    From January 2009, as SCR season expands from five months to year-round to meet new US Clean Air Interstate Rule standards, new catalyst strategies are increasingly important. Power plants will need a comprehensive management strategy that accounts for a wide range of old and new issues to achieve peak performance. An optimum plan is necessary for catalyst replacement or addition. SCR systems should be inspected and evaluated at least once a year. Levels of deactivation agents, most often arsenic and calcium oxide, need to match the particular coals used. Tools such as Cormetech's FIELD Guide are available to quantify the effect on catalyst life under various fuel-firing scenarios. Tests should be conducted to evaluate the NH{sub 3}/NOx distribution over time to maximise catalyst performance. The article gives a case study of catalyst management at the Tennessee Valley Authority Allen plant. Recent changes have created new variables to be considered in a catalyst management process, notably the expansion of the operating temperature range, mercury oxidation and SO{sub 3} emission limits. Cormetech has researched these areas. 5 figs., 2 photos.

  17. Comprehensive piezoceramic actuator review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Chris J.; Washington, Gregory N.

    2002-07-01

    Piezoceramic actuation has become an area of increased interest in the past ten years. Having been used for many years as sensors in such applications as pressure transducers and smoke detectors, piezoceramics are now being used as prime movers in fuel injectors and valve lifters. In an effort to aid the engineering community, this paper will conduct a comprehensive review of several piezoceramic actuators. Classical design parameters will be derived for each actuator such as blocked force and free stroke. In addition, more esoteric entities such as mechanical efficiency and energy density will also be derived. The result will be design metrics of popular piezoceramic actuators containing vital design equations, validated with empirical data. Of the many different configurations of piezoceramic actuators, this paper will investigate the bimorph and unimorph bender. These actuator types are finding increased use in semi-active structural damping, energy harvesting and vibration control. The work in this paper will show experimental verification of various actuator types as well as theoretical derivations. In addition to unimorphs, bimorphs and stack actuators a novel type of unimorph bender, the THUNDER actuator (developed and licensed by NASA) will be included in the review.

  18. Comprehensive facilities plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s Comprehensive Facilities Plan (CFP) document provides analysis and policy guidance for the effective use and orderly future development of land and capital assets at the Berkeley Lab site. The CFP directly supports Berkeley Lab`s role as a multiprogram national laboratory operated by the University of California (UC) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The CFP is revised annually on Berkeley Lab`s Facilities Planning Website. Major revisions are consistent with DOE policy and review guidance. Facilities planing is motivated by the need to develop facilities for DOE programmatic needs; to maintain, replace and rehabilitate existing obsolete facilities; to identify sites for anticipated programmatic growth; and to establish a planning framework in recognition of site amenities and the surrounding community. The CFP presents a concise expression of the policy for the future physical development of the Laboratory, based upon anticipated operational needs of research programs and the environmental setting. It is a product of the ongoing planning processes and is a dynamic information source.

  19. Atomic Force Microscopy for DNA SNP Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valbusa, Ugo; Ierardi, Vincenzo

    The knowledge of the effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human genome greatly contributes to better comprehension of the relation between genetic factors and diseases. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA in different individuals reveals positions where variations that involve individual base substitutions can occur. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms are highly abundant and can have different consequences at phenotypic level. Several attempts were made to apply atomic force microscopy (AFM) to detect and map SNP sites in DNA strands. The most promising approach is the study of DNA mutations producing heteroduplex DNA strands and identifying the mismatches by means of a protein that labels the mismatches. MutS is a protein that is part of a well-known complex of mismatch repair, which initiates the process of repairing when the MutS binds to the mismatched DNA filament. The position of MutS on the DNA filament can be easily recorded by means of AFM imaging.

  20. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  1. Pragmatic Comprehension Development through Telecollaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafieyan, Vahid; Sharafi-Nejad, Maryam; Khavari, Zahra; Eng, Lin Siew; Mohamed, Abdul Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Pragmatic comprehension can be ideally developed through contact with target language speakers. This contact can be provided in English as Foreign Language contexts through telecollaboration. To test the actual effect of telecollaboration on the development of pragmatic comprehension, 30 Iranian undergraduates of English as a Foreign Language…

  2. Artificial Intelligence and Language Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC. Basic Skills Group. Learning Div.

    The three papers in this volume concerning artificial intelligence and language comprehension were commissioned by the National Institute of Education to further the understanding of the cognitive processes that enable people to comprehend what they read. The first paper, "Artificial Intelligence and Language Comprehension," by Terry Winograd,…

  3. Reading Strategies and Hypertext Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmeron, Ladislao, Canas, Jose J.; Kintsch, Walter; Fajardo, Immaculada

    2005-01-01

    The literature on assessing the cognitive processes involved in hypertext comprehension during the past 15 years has yielded contradictory results. In this article we explore a possible factor affecting this situation, mainly the fact that previous works did not control for the potential effects on comprehension of reading strategies in hypertext.…

  4. Comprehension Instruction: Perspectives and Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Gerald G., Ed.; And Others

    Prepared by members of the Institute for Research on Teaching and the Center for the Study of Reading, the papers in this collection examine reading comprehension as an interactive process and explore how comprehension instruction occurs in the complex workplace of the classroom. Specific topics discussed in 20 papers include the following: (1)…

  5. Reading Comprehension Strategy: Rainbow Dots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Claire; Lo, Lusa

    2008-01-01

    An action research study was conducted using the Rainbow Dots strategy to evaluate its effectiveness on reading comprehension skills in a third-grade class with students both with and without a specific learning disability. Results of the study indicated that students' overall performances in reading comprehension have increased. Students also…

  6. Basic Chad Arabic: Comprehension Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Absi, Samir Abu; Sinaud, Andre

    This text, principally designed for use in a three-volume course on Chad Arabic, complements the pre-speech and active phases of the course in that it provides the answers to comprehension exercises students are required to complete during the course. The comprehension exercises require that students listen to an instructor or tape and write…

  7. Expectation-Based Syntactic Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Roger

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of resource allocation as a source of processing difficulty in human sentence comprehension. The paper proposes a simple information-theoretic characterization of processing difficulty as the work incurred by resource reallocation during parallel, incremental, probabilistic disambiguation in sentence comprehension,…

  8. Comprehensive Guidance Programs That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gysbers, Norman C.; And Others

    This monograph describes how the comprehensive guidance model is transforming elementary-secondary school guidance and counseling programs in schools across the country. It incorporates the ideas and experiences of 12 guidance program developers in the actual use of the comprehensive guidance model in diverse school and cultural settings. The book…

  9. Ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2005-01-01

    In the past two decades, ancient DNA research has progressed from the retrieval of small fragments of mitochondrial DNA from a few late Holocene specimens, to large-scale studies of ancient populations, phenotypically important nuclear loci, and even whole mitochondrial genome sequences of extinct species. However, the field is still regularly marred by erroneous reports, which underestimate the extent of contamination within laboratories and samples themselves. An improved understanding of these processes and the effects of damage on ancient DNA templates has started to provide a more robust basis for research. Recent methodological advances have included the characterization of Pleistocene mammal populations and discoveries of DNA preserved in ancient sediments. Increasingly, ancient genetic information is providing a unique means to test assumptions used in evolutionary and population genetics studies to reconstruct the past. Initial results have revealed surprisingly complex population histories, and indicate that modern phylogeographic studies may give misleading impressions about even the recent evolutionary past. With the advent and uptake of appropriate methodologies, ancient DNA is now positioned to become a powerful tool in biological research and is also evolving new and unexpected uses, such as in the search for extinct or extant life in the deep biosphere and on other planets.

  10. Ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In the past two decades, ancient DNA research has progressed from the retrieval of small fragments of mitochondrial DNA from a few late Holocene specimens, to large-scale studies of ancient populations, phenotypically important nuclear loci, and even whole mitochondrial genome sequences of extinct species. However, the field is still regularly marred by erroneous reports, which underestimate the extent of contamination within laboratories and samples themselves. An improved understanding of these processes and the effects of damage on ancient DNA templates has started to provide a more robust basis for research. Recent methodological advances have included the characterization of Pleistocene mammal populations and discoveries of DNA preserved in ancient sediments. Increasingly, ancient genetic information is providing a unique means to test assumptions used in evolutionary and population genetics studies to reconstruct the past. Initial results have revealed surprisingly complex population histories, and indicate that modern phylogeographic studies may give misleading impressions about even the recent evolutionary past. With the advent and uptake of appropriate methodologies, ancient DNA is now positioned to become a powerful tool in biological research and is also evolving new and unexpected uses, such as in the search for extinct or extant life in the deep biosphere and on other planets. PMID:15875564

  11. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  12. Swabs to genomes: a comprehensive workflow

    PubMed Central

    Jospin, Guillaume; Darling, Aaron E.; Coil, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The sequencing, assembly, and basic analysis of microbial genomes, once a painstaking and expensive undertaking, has become much easier for research labs with access to standard molecular biology and computational tools. However, there are a confusing variety of options available for DNA library preparation and sequencing, and inexperience with bioinformatics can pose a significant barrier to entry for many who may be interested in microbial genomics. The objective of the present study was to design, test, troubleshoot, and publish a simple, comprehensive workflow from the collection of an environmental sample (a swab) to a published microbial genome; empowering even a lab or classroom with limited resources and bioinformatics experience to perform it. PMID:26020012

  13. DNA topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Wang, J C

    1996-01-01

    The various problems of disentangling DNA strands or duplexes in a cell are all rooted in the double-helical structure of DNA. Three distinct subfamilies of enzymes, known as the DNA topoisomerases, have evolved to solve these problems. This review focuses on work in the past decade on the mechanisms and cellular functions of these enzymes. Newly discovered members and recent biochemical and structural results are reviewed, and mechanistic implications of these results are summarized. The primary cellular functions of these enzymes, including their roles in replication, transcription, chromosome condensation, and the maintenance of genome stability, are then discussed. The review ends with a summary of the regulation of the cellular levels of these enzymes and a discussion of their association with other cellular proteins.

  14. Direct DNA Methylation Profiling Using Methyl Binding Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yinni; Blair, Steve; Gillespie, David; Jensen, Randy; Myszka, David G.; Badran, Ahmed H.; Ghosh, Indraneel; Chagovetz, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Methylation of DNA is responsible for gene silencing by establishing heterochromatin structure that represses transcription, and studies have shown that cytosine methylation of CpG islands in promoter regions acts as a precursor to early cancer development. The naturally occurring methyl binding domain (MBD) proteins from mammals are known to bind to the methylated CpG dinucleotide (mCpG), and subsequently recruit other chromatin-modifying proteins to suppress transcription. Conventional methods of detection for methylated DNA involve bisulfite treatment or immunoprecipitation prior to performing an assay. We focus on proof-of-concept studies for a direct microarray-based assay using surface-bound methylated probes. The recombinant protein 1xMBD-GFP recognizes hemi-methylation and symmetric methylation of the CpG sequence of hybridized dsDNA, while displaying greater affinity for the symmetric methylation motif, as evaluated by SPR. From these studies, for symmetric mCpG, the KD for 1xMBD-GFP ranged from 106 nM to 870 nM, depending upon the proximity of the methylation site to the sensor surface. The KD values for non-symmetrical methylation motifs were consistently greater (> 2 µM), but the binding selectivity between symmetric and hemi-methylation motifs ranged from 4 to 30, with reduced selectivity for sites close to the surface or multiple sites in proximity, which we attribute to steric effects. Fitting skew normal probability density functions to our data, we estimate an accuracy of 97.5% for our method in identifying methylated CpG loci, which can be improved through optimization of probe design and surface density. PMID:20507169

  15. Microarray-based genotyping of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from camels.

    PubMed

    Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf; Slickers, Peter; Wernery, Renate; Johnson, Bobby; Jose, Sherry; Wernery, Ulrich

    2011-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of mastitis and other diseases in camels. In order to obtain data on population structure as well as on the carriage of toxin genes and resistance markers, a collection of 45 isolates from dromedaries of Dubai, United Arab Emirates, were genotyped. These isolates belonged to clonal complexes CC6 (twenty isolates; 44.44%), CC30 (sixteen isolates; 35.56%), CC188 (five isolates; 11.11%), CC152 (1 isolate, 2.2%) and to a previously un-described sequence type (ST1755: arcc-18, aroe-115, glpf-6, gmk-2 pta-109, tpi-50 and yqil-2; three isolates; 6.67%). Resistance genes proved to be rare. Only three out of 45 isolates (6.67%) carried the beta-lactamase operon. The tetracycline resistance gene tetK was also detected in three isolates (6.67%). Neither the mecA gene, defining MRSA, nor other resistance genes were found. Common virulence markers included leukocidin genes lukD+lukE (in twenty-five isolates; 55.56%), the staphylokinase gene sak (twenty-two isolates; 48.89%), the enterotoxin gene cluster egc (fifteen isolates; 33.33%), and a distinct variant of the enterotoxin A gene (sea-320E, GenBank AY196686.1; thirteen isolates; 28.89%). One CC152 isolate was positive for genes encoding the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (lukF-PV+lukS-PV). This study provides first genotyping data on the population structure and the presence of toxin genes and resistance markers of S. aureus strains in Middle Eastern camels.

  16. Microarray-based sketches of the HERV transcriptome landscape.

    PubMed

    Pérot, Philippe; Mugnier, Nathalie; Montgiraud, Cécile; Gimenez, Juliette; Jaillard, Magali; Bonnaud, Bertrand; Mallet, François

    2012-01-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are spread throughout the genome and their long terminal repeats (LTRs) constitute a wide collection of putative regulatory sequences. Phylogenetic similarities and the profusion of integration sites, two inherent characteristics of transposable elements, make it difficult to study individual locus expression in a large-scale approach, and historically apart from some placental and testis-regulated elements, it was generally accepted that HERVs are silent due to epigenetic control. Herein, we have introduced a generic method aiming to optimally characterize individual loci associated with 25-mer probes by minimizing cross-hybridization risks. We therefore set up a microarray dedicated to a collection of 5,573 HERVs that can reasonably be assigned to a unique genomic position. We obtained a first view of the HERV transcriptome by using a composite panel of 40 normal and 39 tumor samples. The experiment showed that almost one third of the HERV repertoire is indeed transcribed. The HERV transcriptome follows tropism rules, is sensitive to the state of differentiation and, unexpectedly, seems not to correlate with the age of the HERV families. The probeset definition within the U3 and U5 regions was used to assign a function to some LTRs (i.e. promoter or polyA) and revealed that (i) autonomous active LTRs are broadly subjected to operational determinism (ii) the cellular gene density is substantially higher in the surrounding environment of active LTRs compared to silent LTRs and (iii) the configuration of neighboring cellular genes differs between active and silent LTRs, showing an approximately 8 kb zone upstream of promoter LTRs characterized by a drastic reduction in sense cellular genes. These gathered observations are discussed in terms of virus/host adaptive strategies, and together with the methods and tools developed for this purpose, this work paves the way for further HERV transcriptome projects.

  17. Protein Microarrays-Based Strategies for Life Detection in Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parro, Víctor; Rivas, Luis A.; Gómez-Elvira, Javier

    2008-03-01

    The detection of organic molecules of unambiguous biological origin is fundamental for the confirmation of present or past life. Planetary exploration requires the development of miniaturized apparatus for in situ life detection. Analytical techniques based on mass spectrometry have been traditionally used in space science. Following the Viking landers, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for organic detection has gained general acceptance and has been used successfully in the Cassini-Huygens mission to Titan. Microfluidics allows the development of miniaturized capillary electrophoresis devices for the detection of important molecules for life, like amino acids or nucleobases. Recently, a new approach is gaining acceptance in the space science community: the application of the well-known, highly specific, antibody-antigen affinity interaction for the detection and identification of organics and biochemical compounds. Antibodies can specifically bind a plethora of structurally different compounds of a broad range of molecular sizes, from amino acids level to whole cells. Antibody microarray technology allows us to look for the presence of thousands of different compounds in a single assay and in just one square centimeter. Herein, we discuss several important issues—most of which are common with other instruments dealing with life signature detection in the solar system—that must be addressed in order to use antibody microarrays for life detection and planetary exploration. These issues include (1) preservation of biomarkers, (2) the extraction techniques for biomarkers, (3) terrestrial analogues, (4) the antibody stability under space environments, (5) the selection of unequivocal biomarkers for the antibody production, or (6) the instrument design and implementation.

  18. Protein Microarrays-Based Strategies for Life Detection in Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parro, Víctor; Rivas, Luis A.; Gómez-Elvira, Javier

    The detection of organic molecules of unambiguous biological origin is fundamental for the confirmation of present or past life. Planetary exploration requires the development of miniaturized apparatus for in situ life detection. Analytical techniques based on mass spectrometry have been traditionally used in space science. Following the Viking landers, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for organic detection has gained general acceptance and has been used successfully in the Cassini-Huygens mission to Titan. Microfluidics allows the development of miniaturized capillary electrophoresis devices for the detection of important molecules for life, like amino acids or nucleobases. Recently, a new approach is gaining acceptance in the space science community: the application of the well-known, highly specific, antibody-antigen affinity interaction for the detection and identification of organics and biochemical compounds. Antibodies can specifically bind a plethora of structurally different compounds of a broad range of molecular sizes, from amino acids level to whole cells. Antibody microarray technology allows us to look for the presence of thousands of different compounds in a single assay and in just one square centimeter. Herein, we discuss several important issues—most of which are common with other instruments dealing with life signature detection in the solar system—that must be addressed in order to use antibody microarrays for life detection and planetary exploration. These issues include (1) preservation of biomarkers, (2) the extraction techniques for biomarkers, (3) terrestrial analogues, (4) the antibody stability under space environments, (5) the selection of unequivocal biomarkers for the antibody production, or (6) the instrument design and implementation.

  19. Microarray-based understanding of normal and malignant plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    De Vos, John; Hose, Dirk; Rème, Thierry; Tarte, Karin; Moreaux, Jérôme; Mahtouk, Karéne; Jourdan, Michel; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Rossi, Jean-François; Cremer, Friedrich W.; Klein, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Plasma cells develop from B-lymphocytes following stimulation by antigen and express a genetic program aimed at the synthesis of immunoglobulins. This program includes the induction of genes coding for transcription factors such as PRDM1 and XBP1, cell-surface molecules such as CD138/syndecan-1 and for the unfolded protein response (UPR). We review how the microarray technology has recently contributed to the understanding of the biology of this rare but essential cell population and its transformation into pre-malignant and malignant plasma cells. PMID:16623766

  20. Microarray-Based Sketches of the HERV Transcriptome Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Pérot, Philippe; Mugnier, Nathalie; Montgiraud, Cécile; Gimenez, Juliette; Jaillard, Magali; Bonnaud, Bertrand; Mallet, François

    2012-01-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are spread throughout the genome and their long terminal repeats (LTRs) constitute a wide collection of putative regulatory sequences. Phylogenetic similarities and the profusion of integration sites, two inherent characteristics of transposable elements, make it difficult to study individual locus expression in a large-scale approach, and historically apart from some placental and testis-regulated elements, it was generally accepted that HERVs are silent due to epigenetic control. Herein, we have introduced a generic method aiming to optimally characterize individual loci associated with 25-mer probes by minimizing cross-hybridization risks. We therefore set up a microarray dedicated to a collection of 5,573 HERVs that can reasonably be assigned to a unique genomic position. We obtained a first view of the HERV transcriptome by using a composite panel of 40 normal and 39 tumor samples. The experiment showed that almost one third of the HERV repertoire is indeed transcribed. The HERV transcriptome follows tropism rules, is sensitive to the state of differentiation and, unexpectedly, seems not to correlate with the age of the HERV families. The probeset definition within the U3 and U5 regions was used to assign a function to some LTRs (i.e. promoter or polyA) and revealed that (i) autonomous active LTRs are broadly subjected to operational determinism (ii) the cellular gene density is substantially higher in the surrounding environment of active LTRs compared to silent LTRs and (iii) the configuration of neighboring cellular genes differs between active and silent LTRs, showing an approximately 8 kb zone upstream of promoter LTRs characterized by a drastic reduction in sense cellular genes. These gathered observations are discussed in terms of virus/host adaptive strategies, and together with the methods and tools developed for this purpose, this work paves the way for further HERV transcriptome projects. PMID:22761958

  1. Comparison and optimization of ancient DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Rohland, Nadin; Hofreiter, Michael

    2007-03-01

    Ancient DNA analyses rely on the extraction of the tiny amounts of DNA remaining in samples that are hundreds to tens of thousands of years old. Despite the critical role extraction efficiency plays in this field of research, no study has comprehensively compared ancient DNA extraction techniques to date. There are a wide range of methods currently in use, which rely on such disparate principles as spin columns, alcohol precipitation, or binding to silica. We have compared a number of these methods using quantitative PCR and then optimized each step of the most promising method. We found that most chemicals routinely added to ancient DNA extraction buffers do not increase, and sometimes even decrease, DNA yields. Consequently, our optimized method uses a buffer consisting solely of EDTA and proteinase K for bone digestion and binding DNA to silica via guanidinium thiocyanate for DNA purification. In a comparison with published methods, this minimalist approach, on average, outperforms all other methods in terms of DNA yields as measured using quantitative PCR. We also found that the addition of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to the PCR helps to overcome inhibitors in ancient DNA extracts. Finally, we observed a marked difference in the performance between different types of DNA polymerases, as measured by amplification success.

  2. DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marinus, M.G.; Løbner-Olesen, A.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA of E. coli contains 19,120 6-methyladenines and 12,045 5-methylcytosines in addition to the four regular bases and these are formed by the postreplicative action of three DNA methyltransferases. The majority of the methylated bases are formed by the Dam and Dcm methyltransferases encoded by the dam (DNA adenine methyltransferase) and dcm (DNA cytosine methyltransferase) genes. Although not essential, Dam methylation is important for strand discrimination during repair of replication errors, controlling the frequency of initiation of chromosome replication at oriC, and regulation of transcription initiation at promoters containing GATC sequences. In contrast, there is no known function for Dcm methylation although Dcm recognition sites constitute sequence motifs for Very Short Patch repair of T/G base mismatches. In certain bacteria (e.g., Vibrio cholerae, Caulobacter crescentus) adenine methylation is essential and in C. crescentus, it is important for temporal gene expression which, in turn, is required for coordinating chromosome initiation, replication and division. In practical terms, Dam and Dcm methylation can inhibit restriction enzyme cleavage; decrease transformation frequency in certain bacteria; decrease the stability of short direct repeats; are necessary for site-directed mutagenesis; and to probe eukaryotic structure and function. PMID:26442938

  3. DNA Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  4. Stable isotope labeling methods for DNA.

    PubMed

    Nelissen, Frank H T; Tessari, Marco; Wijmenga, Sybren S; Heus, Hans A

    2016-08-01

    NMR is a powerful method for studying proteins and nucleic acids in solution. The study of nucleic acids by NMR is far more challenging than for proteins, which is mainly due to the limited number of building blocks and unfavorable spectral properties. For NMR studies of DNA molecules, (site specific) isotope enrichment is required to facilitate specific NMR experiments and applications. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of isotope-labeling strategies for obtaining stable isotope labeled DNA as well as specifically stable isotope labeled building blocks required for enzymatic DNA synthesis. PMID:27573183

  5. Comprehensive Solutions for Urban Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgore, Sally

    2005-01-01

    The comprehensive school reform (CSR) models build consistency throughout a district while addressing the needs of individual schools. The high-quality CSR programs offer a most effective option for urban education reform.

  6. Paraphrasing: An Effective Comprehension Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kletzien, Sharon B.

    2009-01-01

    Paraphrasing, somewhat different from retelling and summarizing, helps students monitor their understanding and incorporate new knowledge with what they already know about a topic. Paraphrasing helps students realize that comprehension is the goal of reading.

  7. Children's Comprehension of Complex Sentences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Richard J.

    1975-01-01

    Children, aged 4-12, performed four tasks designed to test their comprehension of complex sentences that contained main verbs taking underlying sentences as their complements. Tasks involved imperatives, semantic anomalies, truth questioning and short-term memory. (JMB)

  8. Comprehensive Pan-Genomic Characterization of Adrenocortical Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Siyuan; Cherniack, Andrew D; Dewal, Ninad; Moffitt, Richard A; Danilova, Ludmila; Murray, Bradley A; Lerario, Antonio M; Else, Tobias; Knijnenburg, Theo A; Ciriello, Giovanni; Kim, Seungchan; Assie, Guillaume; Morozova, Olena; Akbani, Rehan; Shih, Juliann; Hoadley, Katherine A; Choueiri, Toni K; Waldmann, Jens; Mete, Ozgur; Robertson, A Gordon; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Raphael, Benjamin J; Shao, Lina; Meyerson, Matthew; Demeure, Michael J; Beuschlein, Felix; Gill, Anthony J; Sidhu, Stan B; Almeida, Madson Q; Fragoso, Maria C B V; Cope, Leslie M; Kebebew, Electron; Habra, Mouhammed A; Whitsett, Timothy G; Bussey, Kimberly J; Rainey, William E; Asa, Sylvia L; Bertherat, Jérôme; Fassnacht, Martin; Wheeler, David A; Hammer, Gary D; Giordano, Thomas J; Verhaak, Roel G W

    2016-05-01

    We describe a comprehensive genomic characterization of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). Using this dataset, we expand the catalogue of known ACC driver genes to include PRKAR1A, RPL22, TERF2, CCNE1, and NF1. Genome wide DNA copy-number analysis revealed frequent occurrence of massive DNA loss followed by whole-genome doubling (WGD), which was associated with aggressive clinical course, suggesting WGD is a hallmark of disease progression. Corroborating this hypothesis were increased TERT expression, decreased telomere length, and activation of cell-cycle programs. Integrated subtype analysis identified three ACC subtypes with distinct clinical outcome and molecular alterations which could be captured by a 68-CpG probe DNA-methylation signature, proposing a strategy for clinical stratification of patients based on molecular markers. PMID:27165744

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of DNA Polymerase Clamp Loaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelch, Brian; Makino, Debora; Simonetta, Kyle; O'Donnell, Mike; Kuriyan, John

    Clamp loaders are ATP-driven multiprotein machines that couple ATP hydrolysis to the opening and closing of a circular protein ring around DNA. This ring-shaped clamp slides along DNA, and interacts with numerous proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA repair and cell cycle control. Recently determined structures of clamp loader complexes from prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases have revealed exciting new details of how these complex AAA+ machines perform this essential clamp loading function. This review serves as background to John Kuriyan's lecture at the 2010 Erice School, and is not meant as a comprehensive review of the contributions of the many scientists who have advanced this field. These lecture notes are derived from recent reviews and research papers from our groups.

  10. DNA-affinity-purified chip (DAP-chip) method to determine gene targets for bacterial two component regulatory systems.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric G; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2014-07-21

    In vivo methods such as ChIP-chip are well-established techniques used to determine global gene targets for transcription factors. However, they are of limited use in exploring bacterial two component regulatory systems with uncharacterized activation conditions. Such systems regulate transcription only when activated in the presence of unique signals. Since these signals are often unknown, the in vitro microarray based method described in this video article can be used to determine gene targets and binding sites for response regulators. This DNA-affinity-purified-chip method may be used for any purified regulator in any organism with a sequenced genome. The protocol involves allowing the purified tagged protein to bind to sheared genomic DNA and then affinity purifying the protein-bound DNA, followed by fluorescent labeling of the DNA and hybridization to a custom tiling array. Preceding steps that may be used to optimize the assay for specific regulators are also described. The peaks generated by the array data analysis are used to predict binding site motifs, which are then experimentally validated. The motif predictions can be further used to determine gene targets of orthologous response regulators in closely related species. We demonstrate the applicability of this method by determining the gene targets and binding site motifs and thus predicting the function for a sigma54-dependent response regulator DVU3023 in the environmental bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

  11. Enzyme-guided DNA Sewing Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, In Hyun; Shin, Seung Won; Park, Kyung Soo; Lansac, Yves; Jang, Yun Hee; Um, Soong Ho

    2015-12-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, a variety of nanoarchitectures with varied physicochemical properties have been designed. Owing to the unique characteristics, DNAs have been used as a functional building block for novel nanoarchitecture. In particular, a self-assembly of long DNA molecules via a piece DNA staple has been utilized to attain such constructs. However, it needs many talented prerequisites (e.g., complicated computer program) with fewer yields of products. In addition, it has many limitations to overcome: for instance, (i) thermal instability under moderate environments and (ii) restraint in size caused by the restricted length of scaffold strands. Alternatively, the enzymatic sewing linkage of short DNA blocks is simply designed into long DNA assemblies but it is more error-prone due to the undeveloped sequence data. Here, we present, for the first time, a comprehensive study for directly combining DNA structures into higher DNA sewing constructs through the 5‧-end cohesive ligation of T4 enzyme. Inspired by these achievements, the synthesized DNA nanomaterials were also utilized for effective detection and real-time diagnosis of cancer-specific and cytosolic RNA markers. This generalized protocol for generic DNA sewing is expected to be useful in several DNA nanotechnology as well as any nucleic acid-related fields.

  12. Enzyme-guided DNA Sewing Architecture.

    PubMed

    Song, In Hyun; Shin, Seung Won; Park, Kyung Soo; Lansac, Yves; Jang, Yun Hee; Um, Soong Ho

    2015-12-04

    With the advent of nanotechnology, a variety of nanoarchitectures with varied physicochemical properties have been designed. Owing to the unique characteristics, DNAs have been used as a functional building block for novel nanoarchitecture. In particular, a self-assembly of long DNA molecules via a piece DNA staple has been utilized to attain such constructs. However, it needs many talented prerequisites (e.g., complicated computer program) with fewer yields of products. In addition, it has many limitations to overcome: for instance, (i) thermal instability under moderate environments and (ii) restraint in size caused by the restricted length of scaffold strands. Alternatively, the enzymatic sewing linkage of short DNA blocks is simply designed into long DNA assemblies but it is more error-prone due to the undeveloped sequence data. Here, we present, for the first time, a comprehensive study for directly combining DNA structures into higher DNA sewing constructs through the 5'-end cohesive ligation of T4 enzyme. Inspired by these achievements, the synthesized DNA nanomaterials were also utilized for effective detection and real-time diagnosis of cancer-specific and cytosolic RNA markers. This generalized protocol for generic DNA sewing is expected to be useful in several DNA nanotechnology as well as any nucleic acid-related fields.

  13. Enzyme-guided DNA Sewing Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Song, In Hyun; Shin, Seung Won; Park, Kyung Soo; Lansac, Yves; Jang, Yun Hee; Um, Soong Ho

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, a variety of nanoarchitectures with varied physicochemical properties have been designed. Owing to the unique characteristics, DNAs have been used as a functional building block for novel nanoarchitecture. In particular, a self-assembly of long DNA molecules via a piece DNA staple has been utilized to attain such constructs. However, it needs many talented prerequisites (e.g., complicated computer program) with fewer yields of products. In addition, it has many limitations to overcome: for instance, (i) thermal instability under moderate environments and (ii) restraint in size caused by the restricted length of scaffold strands. Alternatively, the enzymatic sewing linkage of short DNA blocks is simply designed into long DNA assemblies but it is more error-prone due to the undeveloped sequence data. Here, we present, for the first time, a comprehensive study for directly combining DNA structures into higher DNA sewing constructs through the 5′-end cohesive ligation of T4 enzyme. Inspired by these achievements, the synthesized DNA nanomaterials were also utilized for effective detection and real-time diagnosis of cancer-specific and cytosolic RNA markers. This generalized protocol for generic DNA sewing is expected to be useful in several DNA nanotechnology as well as any nucleic acid-related fields. PMID:26634810

  14. A model of poetic comprehension

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, K.

    1996-12-31

    This article introduces an account of aesthetic comprehension and experience together with an implemented miniature which generates analogical interpretations from a semi-automatic parse of Wordsworth`s {open_quotes}Lines Written in Early Spring{close_quotes}. In our account, a poem serves as an analogy teaching machine by using formal structure to cue the formation of novel analogies. This account builds on an analogical model of comprehension previously applied to large corpora of newspaper summaries. In the miniature, an automatic grammatical and semantic analysis of the text is augmented with information about rhyme and rhythm. These formal cues allow the system to determine analogies which it would not otherwise consider. The article describes the comprehension framework, the annotated piece, and the matcher`s performance on the piece. It closes with a discussion of possible objections to aspects of the thesis or experiment and suggested directions for future work.

  15. Identifying specific protein-DNA interactions using SILAC-based quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Spruijt, Cornelia G; Baymaz, H Irem; Vermeulen, Michiel

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive identification of protein-DNA interactions that drive processes such as transcription and replication, both in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, remains a major technical challenge. In this chapter, we present a SILAC-based DNA affinity purification method that can be used to identify specific interactions between proteins and functional DNA elements in an unbiased manner.

  16. Help with Teaching Reading Comprehension: Comprehension Instructional Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Lauren Aimonette; Dole, Janice A.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents five instructional frameworks demonstrated by research as being effective in teaching reading comprehension: (1) The Scaffolded Reading Experience (SRE); (2) Questioning the Author (QtA); (3) Collaborative Strategic Reading (CSR); (4) Peer-Assisted Learning Strategies (PALS); and (5) Concept-Oriented Reading Instruction…

  17. Modern Standard Arabic: Aural Comprehension Course. Volume XX: Comprehension Drills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    The last of 20 volumes of lessons designed for use in a full-time, intensive training program in Arabic is presented. The 128 lessons in this volume contain various types of comprehension drills. Lessons 14-128 are completely in Arabic. (AMH)

  18. Selective Comprehensives: The Social Composition of Top Comprehensive Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton Trust, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This study looks at publicly available data on the proportion of pupils eligible and claiming for free school meals (FSM) in the top 500 comprehensive state schools and at how representative they are of their localities and of their school type. We have looked at the top 500 when measured by five good GCSEs including English and Maths and at the…

  19. DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, C.; Gidrol, X.

    Genomics has revolutionised biological and biomedical research. This revolution was predictable on the basis of its two driving forces: the ever increasing availability of genome sequences and the development of new technology able to exploit them. Up until now, technical limitations meant that molecular biology could only analyse one or two parameters per experiment, providing relatively little information compared with the great complexity of the systems under investigation. This gene by gene approach is inadequate to understand biological systems containing several thousand genes. It is essential to have an overall view of the DNA, RNA, and relevant proteins. A simple inventory of the genome is not sufficient to understand the functions of the genes, or indeed the way that cells and organisms work. For this purpose, functional studies based on whole genomes are needed. Among these new large-scale methods of molecular analysis, DNA microarrays provide a way of studying the genome and the transcriptome. The idea of integrating a large amount of data derived from a support with very small area has led biologists to call these chips, borrowing the term from the microelectronics industry. At the beginning of the 1990s, the development of DNA chips on nylon membranes [1, 2], then on glass [3] and silicon [4] supports, made it possible for the first time to carry out simultaneous measurements of the equilibrium concentration of all the messenger RNA (mRNA) or transcribed RNA in a cell. These microarrays offer a wide range of applications, in both fundamental and clinical research, providing a method for genome-wide characterisation of changes occurring within a cell or tissue, as for example in polymorphism studies, detection of mutations, and quantitative assays of gene copies. With regard to the transcriptome, it provides a way of characterising differentially expressed genes, profiling given biological states, and identifying regulatory channels.

  20. A Modified SDS-Based DNA Extraction Method for High Quality Environmental DNA from Seafloor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Vengadesh Perumal; Zhang, Xinxu; Morono, Yuki; Inagaki, Fumio; Wang, Fengping

    2016-01-01

    Recovering high quality genomic DNA from environmental samples is a crucial primary step to understand the genetic, metabolic, and evolutionary characteristics of microbial communities through molecular ecological approaches. However, it is often challenging because of the difficulty of effective cell lysis without fragmenting the genomic DNA. This work aims to improve the previous SDS-based DNA extraction methods for high-biomass seafloor samples, such as pelagic sediments and metal sulfide chimney, to obtain high quality and high molecular weight of the genomic DNA applicable for the subsequent molecular ecological analyses. In this regard, we standardized a modified SDS-based DNA extraction method (M-SDS), and its performance was then compared to those extracted by a recently developed hot-alkaline DNA extraction method (HA) and a commercial DNA extraction kit. Consequently, the M-SDS method resulted in higher DNA yield and cell lysis efficiency, lower DNA shearing, and higher diversity scores than other two methods, providing a comprehensive DNA assemblage of the microbial community on the seafloor depositional environment. PMID:27446026

  1. A Modified SDS-Based DNA Extraction Method for High Quality Environmental DNA from Seafloor Environments.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Vengadesh Perumal; Zhang, Xinxu; Morono, Yuki; Inagaki, Fumio; Wang, Fengping

    2016-01-01

    Recovering high quality genomic DNA from environmental samples is a crucial primary step to understand the genetic, metabolic, and evolutionary characteristics of microbial communities through molecular ecological approaches. However, it is often challenging because of the difficulty of effective cell lysis without fragmenting the genomic DNA. This work aims to improve the previous SDS-based DNA extraction methods for high-biomass seafloor samples, such as pelagic sediments and metal sulfide chimney, to obtain high quality and high molecular weight of the genomic DNA applicable for the subsequent molecular ecological analyses. In this regard, we standardized a modified SDS-based DNA extraction method (M-SDS), and its performance was then compared to those extracted by a recently developed hot-alkaline DNA extraction method (HA) and a commercial DNA extraction kit. Consequently, the M-SDS method resulted in higher DNA yield and cell lysis efficiency, lower DNA shearing, and higher diversity scores than other two methods, providing a comprehensive DNA assemblage of the microbial community on the seafloor depositional environment. PMID:27446026

  2. A Modified SDS-Based DNA Extraction Method for High Quality Environmental DNA from Seafloor Environments.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Vengadesh Perumal; Zhang, Xinxu; Morono, Yuki; Inagaki, Fumio; Wang, Fengping

    2016-01-01

    Recovering high quality genomic DNA from environmental samples is a crucial primary step to understand the genetic, metabolic, and evolutionary characteristics of microbial communities through molecular ecological approaches. However, it is often challenging because of the difficulty of effective cell lysis without fragmenting the genomic DNA. This work aims to improve the previous SDS-based DNA extraction methods for high-biomass seafloor samples, such as pelagic sediments and metal sulfide chimney, to obtain high quality and high molecular weight of the genomic DNA applicable for the subsequent molecular ecological analyses. In this regard, we standardized a modified SDS-based DNA extraction method (M-SDS), and its performance was then compared to those extracted by a recently developed hot-alkaline DNA extraction method (HA) and a commercial DNA extraction kit. Consequently, the M-SDS method resulted in higher DNA yield and cell lysis efficiency, lower DNA shearing, and higher diversity scores than other two methods, providing a comprehensive DNA assemblage of the microbial community on the seafloor depositional environment.

  3. Optical DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaywargi, Deepak; Lewis, Dave; Kirovski, Darko

    A certificate of authenticity (COA) is an inexpensive physical object with a random and unique structure S which is hard to near-exactly replicate. An inexpensive device should be able to scan object’s physical “fingerprint,” a set of features that represents S. In this paper, we explore one set of requirements that optical media such as DVDs should satisfy, to be considered as COAs. As manufacturing of such media produces inevitable errors, we use the locations and count of these errors as a “fingerprint” for each optical disc: its optical DNA. The “fingerprint” is signed using publisher’s private-key and the resulting signature is stored onto the optical medium using a post-production process. Standard DVD players with altered firmware that includes publisher’s public-key, should be able to verify the authenticity of DVDs protected with optical DNA. Our key finding is that for the proposed protocol, only DVDs with exceptional wear-and-tear characteristics would result in an inexpensive and viable anti-counterfeiting technology.

  4. Methylsorb: a simple method for quantifying DNA methylation using DNA-gold affinity interactions.

    PubMed

    Sina, Abu Ali Ibn; Carrascosa, Laura G; Palanisamy, Ramkumar; Rauf, Sakandar; Shiddiky, Muhammad J A; Trau, Matt

    2014-10-21

    The analysis of DNA methylation is becoming increasingly important both in the clinic and also as a research tool to unravel key epigenetic molecular mechanisms in biology. Current methodologies for the quantification of regional DNA methylation (i.e., the average methylation over a region of DNA in the genome) are largely affected by comprehensive DNA sequencing methodologies which tend to be expensive, tedious, and time-consuming for many applications. Herein, we report an alternative DNA methylation detection method referred to as "Methylsorb", which is based on the inherent affinity of DNA bases to the gold surface (i.e., the trend of the affinity interactions is adenine > cytosine ≥ guanine > thymine).1 Since the degree of gold-DNA affinity interaction is highly sequence dependent, it provides a new capability to detect DNA methylation by simply monitoring the relative adsorption of bisulfite treated DNA sequences onto a gold chip. Because the selective physical adsorption of DNA fragments to gold enable a direct read-out of regional DNA methylation, the current requirement for DNA sequencing is obviated. To demonstrate the utility of this method, we present data on the regional methylation status of two CpG clusters located in the EN1 and MIR200B genes in MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. The methylation status of these regions was obtained from the change in relative mass on gold surface with respect to relative adsorption of an unmethylated DNA source and this was detected using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in a label-free and real-time manner. We anticipate that the simplicity of this method, combined with the high level of accuracy for identifying the methylation status of cytosines in DNA, could find broad application in biology and diagnostics.

  5. Multiple markers for melanoma progression regulated by DNA methylation: insights from transcriptomic studies.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, William M; Bergin, Orla E; Rafferty, Mairin; Kelly, Zoë D; Nolan, Ilse-Maria; Fox, Edward J P; Culhane, Aedin C; McArdle, Linda; Fraga, Mario F; Hughes, Linda; Currid, Caroline A; O'Mahony, Fiona; Byrne, Aileen; Murphy, Alison A; Moss, Catherine; McDonnell, Susan; Stallings, Raymond L; Plumb, Jane A; Esteller, Manel; Brown, Robert; Dervan, Peter A; Easty, David J

    2005-11-01

    The incidence of melanoma is increasing rapidly, with advanced lesions generally failing to respond to conventional chemotherapy. Here, we utilized DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling techniques to identify molecular determinants of melanoma progression within a unique panel of isogenic human melanoma cell lines. When a poorly tumorigenic cell line, derived from an early melanoma, was compared with two increasingly aggressive derivative cell lines, the expression of 66 genes was significantly changed. A similar pattern of differential gene expression was found with an independently derived metastatic cell line. We further examined these melanoma progression-associated genes via use of a tailored TaqMan Low Density Array (LDA), representing the majority of genes within our cohort of interest. Considerable concordance was seen between the transcriptomic profiles determined by DNA microarray and TaqMan LDA approaches. A range of novel markers were identified that correlated here with melanoma progression. Most notable was TSPY, a Y chromosome-specific gene that displayed extensive down-regulation in expression between the parental and derivative cell lines. Examination of a putative CpG island within the TSPY gene demonstrated that this region was hypermethylated in the derivative cell lines, as well as metastatic melanomas from male patients. Moreover, treatment of the derivative cell lines with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 2'-deoxy-5-azacytidine (DAC), restored expression of the TSPY gene to levels comparable with that found in the parental cells. Additional DNA microarray studies uncovered a subset of 13 genes from the above-mentioned 66 gene cohort that displayed re-activation of expression following DAC treatment, including TSPY, CYBA and MT2A. DAC suppressed tumor cell growth in vitro. Moreover, systemic treatment of mice with DAC attenuated growth of melanoma xenografts, with consequent re-expression of TSPY mRNA. Overall, our data support

  6. Comprehensive Schools and the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that comprehensive reorganisation was not a one-off policy reform but a complex, bottom-up campaign for equity and fairness in education, with varied consequences and outcomes. Recent battles over student fees, free schools and academies show that the quest for democratic education does not lead to a permanent achievement but…

  7. Innovation Learning in Comprehensive Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindfors, Eila; Hilmola, Antti

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this article is to clarify the concept of innovation and by presenting a research on the basic education outcome assessment data from an innovation learning perspective, answer to a question: Do students learn innovation in comprehensive education? The empirical information in this research is based on data collected in the national…

  8. Analyzing Retellings To Assess Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feathers, Karen; And Others

    Three studies examined the impact of different instructional reading materials and subsequent analysis of comprehension by retellings. The first study investigated the influence of the presentation of the material. Subjects, 83 freshmen enrolled in a biology course, were shown one of four combinations of course material involving a slide…

  9. A Generic Comprehension Instructional Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, James F.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a practical strategy for teaching reading comprehension that is based on current research and consists of five steps: (1) introduction, (2) example, (3) direct instruction, (4) teacher-directed and (5) independent practice. Provides sample lessons for each step. (FL)

  10. BASIC TEST OF READING COMPREHENSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CLOWARD, ROBERT D.; COHEN, S. ALAN

    THE TEST WAS DESIGNED TO ASSESS SPEED OF READING COMPREHENSION. IT CONSISTED OF NUMBERED PASSAGES, ONE TO THREE SENTENCES IN LENGTH, ARRANGED IN PARAGRAPH FORM TO SIMULATE THE NORMAL READING EXERCISE. TOWARD THE END OF EACH PASSAGE, A WORD WAS INSERTED WHICH SPOILED THE MEANING OF THE PASSAGE. THE PUPILS WERE INSTRUCTED TO FIND THE WORD THAT…

  11. Comprehensive Evaluation: Benefit or Burden?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, K. Larry

    1982-01-01

    Reviews developments in faculty evaluation since 1968. Considers various evaluation models (e.g., Teacher Performance Test, comprehensive evaluation, and student evaluation). Concludes that rather than improving faculty performance, the emphasis on teacher evaluation has resulted in more faculty mistrust, lower self-esteem, less innovation and…

  12. Assessment Format and Comprehension Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seda, Ileana

    In response to the tradition of examining a new test's validity by comparing it with a well-established multiple-choice test, a study investigated whether multiple-choice tests with one right answer can measure the reading comprehension process as defined by constructivists. The study compared the information obtained from two different…

  13. A Comprehensive General Chemistry Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeder, Ryan D.; Jeffery, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the use of a comprehensive demonstration suitable for a high school or first-year undergraduate introductory chemistry class. The demonstration involves placing a burning candle in a container adjacent to a beaker containing a basic solution with indicator. After adding a lid, the candle will extinguish and the produced…

  14. Phonemic Support in Children's Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crain-Thoreson, Catherine; McCutchen, Deborah

    A study investigated the role of phonemic information in young readers' silent reading comprehension. Subjects, 56 children in grades 2 and 4, from Seattle parochial schools, were blocked into groups based on their grade and skill level (skilled and less skilled). Each subject saw 48 sentences presented in a random order on an Apple II…

  15. Quantifier Comprehension in Corticobasal Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Corey T.; Clark, Robin; Moore, Peachie; Grossman, Murray

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we investigated patients with focal neurodegenerative diseases to examine a formal linguistic distinction between classes of generalized quantifiers, like "some X" and "less than half of X." Our model of quantifier comprehension proposes that number knowledge is required to understand both first-order and higher-order quantifiers.…

  16. Guidelines for Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefkovich, Jacqueline; And Others

    These guidelines are designed to assist local school districts and their Boards of Education in developing and implementing comprehensive guidance and counseling services in thier school systems. The components of the comprehensive guidance program are comprehensive guidance services, certified personnel, and comprehensive guidance facilities.…

  17. DNA mimicry by proteins.

    PubMed

    Dryden, D T F; Tock, M R

    2006-04-01

    It has been discovered recently, via structural and biophysical analyses, that proteins can mimic DNA structures in order to inhibit proteins that would normally bind to DNA. Mimicry of the phosphate backbone of DNA, the hydrogen-bonding properties of the nucleotide bases and the bending and twisting of the DNA double helix are all present in the mimics discovered to date. These mimics target a range of proteins and enzymes such as DNA restriction enzymes, DNA repair enzymes, DNA gyrase and nucleosomal and nucleoid-associated proteins. The unusual properties of these protein DNA mimics may provide a foundation for the design of targeted inhibitors of DNA-binding proteins. PMID:16545103

  18. The RNA Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Giono, Luciana E; Nieto Moreno, Nicolás; Cambindo Botto, Adrián E; Dujardin, Gwendal; Muñoz, Manuel J; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2016-06-19

    Multicellular organisms must ensure genome integrity to prevent accumulation of mutations, cell death, and cancer. The DNA damage response (DDR) is a complex network that senses, signals, and executes multiple programs including DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. This entails regulation of a variety of cellular processes: DNA replication and transcription, RNA processing, mRNA translation and turnover, and post-translational modification, degradation, and relocalization of proteins. Accumulated evidence over the past decades has shown that RNAs and RNA metabolism are both regulators and regulated actors of the DDR. This review aims to present a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on the many interactions between the DNA damage and RNA fields.

  19. Targeting DNA Methylation for Epigenetic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaojing; Lay, Fides; Han, Han; Jones, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation patterns are established during embryonic development and faithfully copied through somatic cell divisions. Based on our understanding of DNA methylation and other interrelated epigenetic modifications, a comprehensive view of the epigenetic landscape and cancer epigenome is evolving. The cancer methylome is highly disrupted, making DNA methylation an excellent target for anti-cancer therapies. During the last few decades, an increasing number of drugs targeting DNA methylation have been developed in an effort to increase efficacy, stability and to decrease toxicity. The earliest and the most successful epigenetic drug to date, 5-Azacytidine, is currently recommended as the first-line treatment for high risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients. Encouraging results from clinical trials have prompted further efforts to elucidate epigenetic alterations in cancer and subsequently develop new epigenetic therapies. This review delineates the latest cancer epigenetic models, recent discovery of hypomethylation agents and their application in the clinic. PMID:20846732

  20. Comprehensive molecular characterization of gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Adam J.; Thorsson, Vesteinn; Shmulevich, Ilya; Reynolds, Sheila M.; Miller, Michael; Bernard, Brady; Hinoue, Toshinori; Laird, Peter W.; Curtis, Christina; Shen, Hui; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Shen, Ronglai; Weinhold, Nils; Kelsen, David P.; Bowlby, Reanne; Chu, Andy; Kasaian, Katayoon; Mungall, Andrew J.; Robertson, A. Gordon; Sipahimalani, Payal; Cherniack, Andrew; Getz, Gad; Liu, Yingchun; Noble, Michael S.; Pedamallu, Chandra; Sougnez, Carrie; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Akbani, Rehan; Lee, Ju-Seog; Liu, Wenbin; Mills, Gordon B.; Yang, Da; Zhang, Wei; Pantazi, Angeliki; Parfenov, Michael; Gulley, Margaret; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Schneider, Barbara G.; Kim, Jihun; Boussioutas, Alex; Sheth, Margi; Demchok, John A.; Rabkin, Charles S.; Willis, Joseph E.; Ng, Sam; Garman, Katherine; Beer, David G.; Pennathur, Arjun; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Odze, Robert; Kim, Hark K.; Bowen, Jay; Leraas, Kristen M.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; Weaver, Stephanie; McLellan, Michael; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Sakai, Ryo; Getz, Gad; Sougnez, Carrie; Lawrence, Michael S.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Lichtenstein, Lee; Fisher, Sheila; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Lander, Eric S.; Ding, Li; Niu, Beifang; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Birol, Inanc; Bowlby, Reanne; Brooks, Denise; Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Chu, Andy; Chu, Justin; Chuah, Eric; Chun, Hye-Jung E.; Clarke, Amanda; Dhalla, Noreen; Guin, Ranabir; Holt, Robert A.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Kasaian, Katayoon; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan A.; Lim, Emilia; Ma, Yussanne; Marra, Marco A.; Mayo, Michael; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Mungall, Karen L.; Nip, Ka Ming; Robertson, A. Gordon; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Sipahimalani, Payal; Tam, Angela; Thiessen, Nina; Beroukhim, Rameen; Carter, Scott L.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Cho, Juok; Cibulskis, Kristian; DiCara, Daniel; Frazer, Scott; Fisher, Sheila; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gehlenborg, Nils; Heiman, David I.; Jung, Joonil; Kim, Jaegil; Lander, Eric S.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Lichtenstein, Lee; Lin, Pei; Meyerson, Matthew; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Saksena, Gordon; Schumacher, Steven E.; Sougnez, Carrie; Stojanov, Petar; Tabak, Barbara; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Voet, Doug; Rosenberg, Mara; Zack, Travis I.; Zhang, Hailei; Zou, Lihua; Protopopov, Alexei; Santoso, Netty; Parfenov, Michael; Lee, Semin; Zhang, Jianhua; Mahadeshwar, Harshad S.; Tang, Jiabin; Ren, Xiaojia; Seth, Sahil; Yang, Lixing; Xu, Andrew W.; Song, Xingzhi; Pantazi, Angeliki; Xi, Ruibin; Bristow, Christopher A.; Hadjipanayis, Angela; Seidman, Jonathan; Chin, Lynda; Park, Peter J.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Akbani, Rehan; Ling, Shiyun; Liu, Wenbin; Rao, Arvind; Weinstein, John N.; Kim, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ju-Seog; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon; Laird, Peter W.; Hinoue, Toshinori; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Bootwalla, Moiz S.; Lai, Phillip H.; Shen, Hui; Triche, Timothy; Van Den Berg, David J.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Herman, James G.; Getz, Gad; Chin, Lynda; Liu, Yingchun; Murray, Bradley A.; Noble, Michael S.; Askoy, B. Arman; Ciriello, Giovanni; Dresdner, Gideon; Gao, Jianjiong; Gross, Benjamin; Jacobsen, Anders; Lee, William; Ramirez, Ricardo; Sander, Chris; Schultz, Nikolaus; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Sinha, Rileen; Sumer, S. Onur; Sun, Yichao; Weinhold, Nils; Thorsson, Vésteinn; Bernard, Brady; Iype, Lisa; Kramer, Roger W.; Kreisberg, Richard; Miller, Michael; Reynolds, Sheila M.; Rovira, Hector; Tasman, Natalie; Shmulevich, Ilya; Ng, Santa Cruz Sam; Haussler, David; Stuart, Josh M.; Akbani, Rehan; Ling, Shiyun; Liu, Wenbin; Rao, Arvind; Weinstein, John N.; Verhaak, Roeland G.W.; Mills, Gordon B.; Leiserson, Mark D. M.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Taylor, Barry S.; Black, Aaron D.; Bowen, Jay; Carney, Julie Ann; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Helsel, Carmen; Leraas, Kristen M.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; McAllister, Cynthia; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Tabler, Teresa R.; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Penny, Robert; Crain, Daniel; Gardner, Johanna; Lau, Kevin; Curely, Erin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph; Shelton, Troy; Shelton, Candace; Sherman, Mark; Benz, Christopher; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Fedosenko, Konstantin; Manikhas, Georgy; Potapova, Olga; Voronina, Olga; Belyaev, Smitry; Dolzhansky, Oleg; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Brzezinski, Jakub; Ibbs, Matthew; Korski, Konstanty; Kycler, Witold; ŁaŸniak, Radoslaw; Leporowska, Ewa; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Murawa, Dawid; Murawa, Pawel; Spychała, Arkadiusz; Suchorska, Wiktoria M.; Tatka, Honorata; Teresiak, Marek; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Abdel-Misih, Raafat; Bennett, Joseph; Brown, Jennifer; Iacocca, Mary; Rabeno, Brenda; Kwon, Sun-Young

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths, but analysis of its molecular and clinical characteristics has been complicated by histological and aetiological heterogeneity. Here we describe a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 295 primary gastric adenocarcinomas as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project. We propose a molecular classification dividing gastric cancer into four subtypes: tumours positive for Epstein–Barr virus, which display recurrent PIK3CA mutations, extreme DNA hypermethylation, and amplification of JAK2, CD274 (also known as PD-L1) and PDCD1LG2 (also knownasPD-L2); microsatellite unstable tumours, which show elevated mutation rates, including mutations of genes encoding targetable oncogenic signalling proteins; genomically stable tumours, which are enriched for the diffuse histological variant and mutations of RHOA or fusions involving RHO-family GTPase-activating proteins; and tumours with chromosomal instability, which show marked aneuploidy and focal amplification of receptor tyrosine kinases. Identification of these subtypes provides a roadmap for patient stratification and trials of targeted therapies. PMID:25079317

  1. Cell-free DNA screening and sex chromosome aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Mennuti, Michael T; Chandrasekaran, Suchitra; Khalek, Nahla; Dugoff, Lorraine

    2015-10-01

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) testing is increasingly being used to screen pregnant women for fetal aneuploidies. This technology may also identify fetal sex and can be used to screen for sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs). Physicians offering this screening will need to be prepared to offer comprehensive prenatal counseling about these disorders to an increasing number of patients. The purpose of this article is to consider the source of information to use for counseling, factors in parental decision-making, and the performance characteristics of cfDNA testing in screening for SCAs. Discordance between ultrasound examination and cfDNA results regarding fetal sex is also discussed.

  2. DNA ligase I, the replicative DNA ligase

    PubMed Central

    Howes, Timothy R.L.; Tomkinson, Alan E.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple DNA ligation events are required to join the Okazaki fragments generated during lagging strand DNA synthesis. In eukaryotes, this is primarily carried out by members of the DNA ligase I family. The C-terminal catalytic region of these enzymes is composed of three domains: a DNA binding domain, an adenylation domain and an OB-fold domain. In the absence of DNA, these domains adopt an extended structure but transition into a compact ring structure when they engage a DNA nick, with each of the domains contacting the DNA. The non-catalytic N-terminal region of eukaryotic DNA ligase I is responsible for the specific participation of these enzymes in DNA replication. This proline-rich unstructured region contains the nuclear localization signal and a PCNA interaction motif that is critical for localization to replication foci and efficient joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I initially engages the PCNA trimer via this interaction motif which is located at the extreme N-terminus of this flexible region. It is likely that this facilitates an additional interaction between the DNA binding domain and the PCNA ring. The similar size and shape of the rings formed by the PCNA trimer and the DNA ligase I catalytic region when it engages a DNA nick suggest that these proteins interact to form a double-ring structure during the joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I also interacts with replication factor C, the factor that loads the PCNA trimeric ring onto DNA. This interaction, which is regulated by phosphorylation of the non-catalytic N-terminus of DNA ligase I, also appears to be critical for DNA replication. PMID:22918593

  3. Comprehensive numerical modelling of tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Cohen, B.I.; Dubois, P.F.

    1991-01-03

    We outline a plan for the development of a comprehensive numerical model of tokamaks. The model would consist of a suite of independent, communicating packages describing the various aspects of tokamak performance (core and edge transport coefficients and profiles, heating, fueling, magnetic configuration, etc.) as well as extensive diagnostics. These codes, which may run on different computers, would be flexibly linked by a user-friendly shell which would allow run-time specification of packages and generation of pre- and post-processing functions, including workstation-based visualization of output. One package in particular, the calculation of core transport coefficients via gyrokinetic particle simulation, will become practical on the scale required for comprehensive modelling only with the advent of teraFLOP computers. Incremental effort at LLNL would be focused on gyrokinetic simulation and development of the shell.

  4. Comprehensible Presentation of Topological Information

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Gunther H.; Beketayev, Kenes; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Hamann, Bernd; Haranczyk, Maciej; Hlawitschka, Mario; Pascucci, Valerio

    2012-03-05

    Topological information has proven very valuable in the analysis of scientific data. An important challenge that remains is presenting this highly abstract information in a way that it is comprehensible even if one does not have an in-depth background in topology. Furthermore, it is often desirable to combine the structural insight gained by topological analysis with complementary information, such as geometric information. We present an overview over methods that use metaphors to make topological information more accessible to non-expert users, and we demonstrate their applicability to a range of scientific data sets. With the increasingly complex output of exascale simulations, the importance of having effective means of providing a comprehensible, abstract overview over data will grow. The techniques that we present will serve as an important foundation for this purpose.

  5. A comprehensive dairy valorization model.

    PubMed

    Banaszewska, A; Cruijssen, F; van der Vorst, J G A J; Claassen, G D H; Kampman, J L

    2013-02-01

    Dairy processors face numerous challenges resulting from both unsteady dairy markets and some specific characteristics of dairy supply chains. To maintain a competitive position on the market, companies must look beyond standard solutions currently used in practice. This paper presents a comprehensive dairy valorization model that serves as a decision support tool for mid-term allocation of raw milk to end products and production planning. The developed model was used to identify the optimal product portfolio composition. The model allocates raw milk to the most profitable dairy products while accounting for important constraints (i.e., recipes, composition variations, dairy production interdependencies, seasonality, demand, supply, capacities, and transportation flows). The inclusion of all relevant constraints and the ease of understanding dairy production dynamics make the model comprehensive. The developed model was tested at the international dairy processor FrieslandCampina (Amersfoort, the Netherlands). The structure of the model and its output were discussed in multiple sessions with and approved by relevant FrieslandCampina employees. The elements included in the model were considered necessary to optimally valorize raw milk. To illustrate the comprehensiveness and functionality of the model, we analyzed the effect of seasonality on milk valorization. A large difference in profit and a shift in the allocation of milk showed that seasonality has a considerable impact on the valorization of raw milk. PMID:23200469

  6. Predictive mechanisms in idiom comprehension.

    PubMed

    Vespignani, Francesco; Canal, Paolo; Molinaro, Nicola; Fonda, Sergio; Cacciari, Cristina

    2010-08-01

    Prediction is pervasive in human cognition and plays a central role in language comprehension. At an electrophysiological level, this cognitive function contributes substantially in determining the amplitude of the N400. In fact, the amplitude of the N400 to words within a sentence has been shown to depend on how predictable those words are: The more predictable a word, the smaller the N400 elicited. However, predictive processing can be based on different sources of information that allow anticipation of upcoming constituents and integration in context. In this study, we investigated the ERPs elicited during the comprehension of idioms, that is, prefabricated multiword strings stored in semantic memory. When a reader recognizes a string of words as an idiom before the idiom ends, she or he can develop expectations concerning the incoming idiomatic constituents. We hypothesized that the expectations driven by the activation of an idiom might differ from those driven by discourse-based constraints. To this aim, we compared the ERP waveforms elicited by idioms and two literal control conditions. The results showed that, in both cases, the literal conditions exhibited a more negative potential than the idiomatic condition. Our analyses suggest that before idiom recognition the effect is due to modulation of the N400 amplitude, whereas after idiom recognition a P300 for the idiomatic sentence has a fundamental role in the composition of the effect. These results suggest that two distinct predictive mechanisms are at work during language comprehension, based respectively on probabilistic information and on categorical template matching.

  7. DNA modifications: Another stable base in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazauskas, Pijus; Kriaucionis, Skirmantas

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation of 5-methylcytosine has been proposed to mediate active and passive DNA demethylation. Tracking the history of DNA modifications has now provided the first solid evidence that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is a stable epigenetic modification.

  8. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps=0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps=0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps=0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on sperm.

  9. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps=0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps=0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps=0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on sperm

  10. Synthesis of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2008-11-18

    A method of synthesizing a desired double-stranded DNA of a predetermined length and of a predetermined sequence. Preselected sequence segments that will complete the desired double-stranded DNA are determined. Preselected segment sequences of DNA that will be used to complete the desired double-stranded DNA are provided. The preselected segment sequences of DNA are assembled to produce the desired double-stranded DNA.

  11. DNA encoding a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-08-15

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  12. Managing DNA polymerases: coordinating DNA replication, DNA repair, and DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Sutton, M D; Walker, G C

    2001-07-17

    Two important and timely questions with respect to DNA replication, DNA recombination, and DNA repair are: (i) what controls which DNA polymerase gains access to a particular primer-terminus, and (ii) what determines whether a DNA polymerase hands off its DNA substrate to either a different DNA polymerase or to a different protein(s) for the completion of the specific biological process? These questions have taken on added importance in light of the fact that the number of known template-dependent DNA polymerases in both eukaryotes and in prokaryotes has grown tremendously in the past two years. Most notably, the current list now includes a completely new family of enzymes that are capable of replicating imperfect DNA templates. This UmuC-DinB-Rad30-Rev1 superfamily of DNA polymerases has members in all three kingdoms of life. Members of this family have recently received a great deal of attention due to the roles they play in translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), the potentially mutagenic replication over DNA lesions that act as potent blocks to continued replication catalyzed by replicative DNA polymerases. Here, we have attempted to summarize our current understanding of the regulation of action of DNA polymerases with respect to their roles in DNA replication, TLS, DNA repair, DNA recombination, and cell cycle progression. In particular, we discuss these issues in the context of the Gram-negative bacterium, Escherichia coli, that contains a DNA polymerase (Pol V) known to participate in most, if not all, of these processes.

  13. DNA polymerases and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sabine S.; Takata, Kei-ichi; Wood, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    There are fifteen different DNA polymerases encoded in mammalian genomes, which are specialized for replication, repair or the tolerance of DNA damage. New evidence is emerging for lesion-specific and tissue-specific functions of DNA polymerases. Many point mutations that occur in cancer cells arise from the error-generating activities of DNA polymerases. However, the ability of some of these enzymes to bypass DNA damage may actually defend against chromosome instability in cells and at least one DNA polymerase, POLζ, is a suppressor of spontaneous tumorigenesis. Because DNA polymerases can help cancer cells tolerate DNA damage, some of these enzymes may be viable targets for therapeutic strategies. PMID:21258395

  14. DNA systematics. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    This book discusses the following topics: PLANTS: PLANT DNA: Contents and Systematics. Repeated DNA Sequences and Polyploidy in Cereal Crops. Homology of Nonrepeated DNA Sequences in Phylogeny of Fungal Species. Chloropast DNA and Phylogenetic Relationships. rDNA: Evolution Over a Billion Years. 23S rRNA-derived Small Ribosomal RNAs: Their Structure and Evolution with Reference to Plant Phylogeny. Molecular Analysis of Plant DNA Genomes: Conserved and Diverged DNA Sequences. A Critical Review of Some Terminologies Used for Additional DNA in Plant Chromosomes and Index.

  15. Gel Electrophoresis of Gold-DNA Nanoconjugates

    DOE PAGES

    Pellegrino, T.; Sperling, R. A.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Parak, W. J.

    2007-01-01

    Gold-DNA conjugates were investigated in detail by a comprehensive gel electrophoresis study based on 1200 gels. A controlled number of single-stranded DNA of different length was attached specifically via thiol-Au bonds to phosphine-stabilized colloidal gold nanoparticles. Alternatively, the surface of the gold particles was saturated with single stranded DNA of different length either specifically via thiol-Au bonds or by nonspecific adsorption. From the experimentally determined electrophoretic mobilities, estimates for the effective diameters of the gold-DNA conjugates were derived by applying two different data treatment approaches. The first method is based on making a calibration curve for the relation between effectivemore » diameters and mobilities with gold nanoparticles of known diameter. The second method is based on Ferguson analysis which uses gold nanoparticles of known diameter as reference database. Our study shows that effective diameters derived from gel electrophoresis measurements are affected with a high error bar as the determined values strongly depend on the method of evaluation, though relative changes in size upon binding of molecules can be detected with high precision. Furthermore, in this study, the specific attachment of DNA via gold-thiol bonds to Au nanoparticles is compared to nonspecific adsorption of DNA. Also, the maximum number of DNA molecules that can be bound per particle was determined.« less

  16. Crystal structure of a DNA catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Salvatierra, Almudena; Wawrzyniak-Turek, Katarzyna; Steuerwald, Ulrich; Höbartner, Claudia; Pena, Vladimir

    2016-01-14

    Catalysis in biology is restricted to RNA (ribozymes) and protein enzymes, but synthetic biomolecular catalysts can also be made of DNA (deoxyribozymes) or synthetic genetic polymers. In vitro selection from synthetic random DNA libraries identified DNA catalysts for various chemical reactions beyond RNA backbone cleavage. DNA-catalysed reactions include RNA and DNA ligation in various topologies, hydrolytic cleavage and photorepair of DNA, as well as reactions of peptides and small molecules. In spite of comprehensive biochemical studies of DNA catalysts for two decades, fundamental mechanistic understanding of their function is lacking in the absence of three-dimensional models at atomic resolution. Early attempts to solve the crystal structure of an RNA-cleaving deoxyribozyme resulted in a catalytically irrelevant nucleic acid fold. Here we report the crystal structure of the RNA-ligating deoxyribozyme 9DB1 (ref. 14) at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure captures the ligation reaction in the post-catalytic state, revealing a compact folding unit stabilized by numerous tertiary interactions, and an unanticipated organization of the catalytic centre. Structure-guided mutagenesis provided insights into the basis for regioselectivity of the ligation reaction and allowed remarkable manipulation of substrate recognition and reaction rate. Moreover, the structure highlights how the specific properties of deoxyribose are reflected in the backbone conformation of the DNA catalyst, in support of its intricate three-dimensional organization. The structural principles underlying the catalytic ability of DNA elucidate differences and similarities in DNA versus RNA catalysts, which is relevant for comprehending the privileged position of folded RNA in the prebiotic world and in current organisms. PMID:26735012

  17. Crystal structure of a DNA catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Salvatierra, Almudena; Wawrzyniak-Turek, Katarzyna; Steuerwald, Ulrich; Höbartner, Claudia; Pena, Vladimir

    2016-01-14

    Catalysis in biology is restricted to RNA (ribozymes) and protein enzymes, but synthetic biomolecular catalysts can also be made of DNA (deoxyribozymes) or synthetic genetic polymers. In vitro selection from synthetic random DNA libraries identified DNA catalysts for various chemical reactions beyond RNA backbone cleavage. DNA-catalysed reactions include RNA and DNA ligation in various topologies, hydrolytic cleavage and photorepair of DNA, as well as reactions of peptides and small molecules. In spite of comprehensive biochemical studies of DNA catalysts for two decades, fundamental mechanistic understanding of their function is lacking in the absence of three-dimensional models at atomic resolution. Early attempts to solve the crystal structure of an RNA-cleaving deoxyribozyme resulted in a catalytically irrelevant nucleic acid fold. Here we report the crystal structure of the RNA-ligating deoxyribozyme 9DB1 (ref. 14) at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure captures the ligation reaction in the post-catalytic state, revealing a compact folding unit stabilized by numerous tertiary interactions, and an unanticipated organization of the catalytic centre. Structure-guided mutagenesis provided insights into the basis for regioselectivity of the ligation reaction and allowed remarkable manipulation of substrate recognition and reaction rate. Moreover, the structure highlights how the specific properties of deoxyribose are reflected in the backbone conformation of the DNA catalyst, in support of its intricate three-dimensional organization. The structural principles underlying the catalytic ability of DNA elucidate differences and similarities in DNA versus RNA catalysts, which is relevant for comprehending the privileged position of folded RNA in the prebiotic world and in current organisms.

  18. The logic of DNA replication in double-stranded DNA viruses: insights from global analysis of viral genomes

    PubMed Central

    Kazlauskas, Darius; Krupovic, Mart; Venclovas, Česlovas

    2016-01-01

    Genomic DNA replication is a complex process that involves multiple proteins. Cellular DNA replication systems are broadly classified into only two types, bacterial and archaeo-eukaryotic. In contrast, double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses feature a much broader diversity of DNA replication machineries. Viruses differ greatly in both completeness and composition of their sets of DNA replication proteins. In this study, we explored whether there are common patterns underlying this extreme diversity. We identified and analyzed all major functional groups of DNA replication proteins in all available proteomes of dsDNA viruses. Our results show that some proteins are common to viruses infecting all domains of life and likely represent components of the ancestral core set. These include B-family polymerases, SF3 helicases, archaeo-eukaryotic primases, clamps and clamp loaders of the archaeo-eukaryotic type, RNase H and ATP-dependent DNA ligases. We also discovered a clear correlation between genome size and self-sufficiency of viral DNA replication, the unanticipated dominance of replicative helicases and pervasive functional associations among certain groups of DNA replication proteins. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive view on the diversity and evolution of replication systems in the DNA virome and uncover fundamental principles underlying the orchestration of viral DNA replication. PMID:27112572

  19. The logic of DNA replication in double-stranded DNA viruses: insights from global analysis of viral genomes.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskas, Darius; Krupovic, Mart; Venclovas, Česlovas

    2016-06-01

    Genomic DNA replication is a complex process that involves multiple proteins. Cellular DNA replication systems are broadly classified into only two types, bacterial and archaeo-eukaryotic. In contrast, double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses feature a much broader diversity of DNA replication machineries. Viruses differ greatly in both completeness and composition of their sets of DNA replication proteins. In this study, we explored whether there are common patterns underlying this extreme diversity. We identified and analyzed all major functional groups of DNA replication proteins in all available proteomes of dsDNA viruses. Our results show that some proteins are common to viruses infecting all domains of life and likely represent components of the ancestral core set. These include B-family polymerases, SF3 helicases, archaeo-eukaryotic primases, clamps and clamp loaders of the archaeo-eukaryotic type, RNase H and ATP-dependent DNA ligases. We also discovered a clear correlation between genome size and self-sufficiency of viral DNA replication, the unanticipated dominance of replicative helicases and pervasive functional associations among certain groups of DNA replication proteins. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive view on the diversity and evolution of replication systems in the DNA virome and uncover fundamental principles underlying the orchestration of viral DNA replication. PMID:27112572

  20. Metaphor comprehension in Alzheimer's disease: novelty matters.

    PubMed

    Amanzio, Martina; Geminiani, Giuliano; Leotta, Daniela; Cappa, Stefano

    2008-10-01

    The comprehension of non-literal language was investigated in 20 probable Alzheimer's disease (pAD) patients by comparing their performance to that of 20 matched control subjects. pAD patients were unimpaired in the comprehension of conventional metaphors and idioms. However, their performance was significantly lower in the case of non-conventional (novel) metaphor comprehension. This ability was not related to global cognitive deterioration or to deficits in the cognitive domains of attention, memory and language comprehension. On the other hand, the impairment in verbal reasoning appeared to be relevant for both novel and conventional metaphor comprehension. The relationship between novel metaphor comprehension and performance in the visual-spatial planning task of the Behavioral Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS) suggests that executive impairment, possibly related to prefrontal dysfunction, may be responsible for the pAD patients' poor performance in novel metaphor comprehension. The present findings suggest a role of the prefrontal cortex in novel metaphor comprehension.

  1. On the importance of listening comprehension.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Tiffany P; Adlof, Suzanne M; Alonzo, Crystle N

    2014-06-01

    The simple view of reading highlights the importance of two primary components which account for individual differences in reading comprehension across development: word recognition (i.e., decoding) and listening comprehension. While assessments and interventions for decoding have been the focus of pedagogy in the past several decades, the importance of listening comprehension has received less attention. This paper reviews evidence showing that listening comprehension becomes the dominating influence on reading comprehension starting even in the elementary grades. It also highlights a growing number of children who fail to develop adequate reading comprehension skills, primarily due to deficient listening comprehension skills (i.e., poor comprehenders). Finally we discuss key language influences on listening comprehension for consideration during assessment and treatment of reading disabilities.

  2. On the importance of listening comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Tiffany P.; Adlof, Suzanne M.; Alonzo, Crystle

    2015-01-01

    The simple view of reading highlights the importance of two primary components which account for individual differences in reading comprehension across development: word recognition (i.e., decoding) and listening comprehension. While assessments and interventions for decoding have been the focus of pedagogy in the past several decades, the importance of listening comprehension has received less attention. This paper reviews evidence showing that listening comprehension becomes the dominating influence on reading comprehension starting even in the elementary grades. It also highlights a growing number of children who fail to develop adequate reading comprehension skills, primarily due to deficient listening comprehension skills: poor comprehenders. Finally it discusses key language influences on listening comprehension for consideration during assessment and treatment of reading disabilities. PMID:24833426

  3. How Do We Motivate Reading Comprehension?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Timothy

    1982-01-01

    Considers the nature of motivation and its place in the development of reading comprehension. Uses A. Maslow's hierarchy of motivation as a heuristic for examining the motivational quality of several teaching methods commonly proposed for comprehension instruction. (FL)

  4. On the importance of listening comprehension.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Tiffany P; Adlof, Suzanne M; Alonzo, Crystle N

    2014-06-01

    The simple view of reading highlights the importance of two primary components which account for individual differences in reading comprehension across development: word recognition (i.e., decoding) and listening comprehension. While assessments and interventions for decoding have been the focus of pedagogy in the past several decades, the importance of listening comprehension has received less attention. This paper reviews evidence showing that listening comprehension becomes the dominating influence on reading comprehension starting even in the elementary grades. It also highlights a growing number of children who fail to develop adequate reading comprehension skills, primarily due to deficient listening comprehension skills (i.e., poor comprehenders). Finally we discuss key language influences on listening comprehension for consideration during assessment and treatment of reading disabilities. PMID:24833426

  5. DNA Nanotechnology-- Architectures Designed with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dongran

    As the genetic information storage vehicle, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules are essential to all known living organisms and many viruses. It is amazing that such a large amount of information about how life develops can be stored in these tiny molecules. Countless scientists, especially some biologists, are trying to decipher the genetic information stored in these captivating molecules. Meanwhile, another group of researchers, nanotechnologists in particular, have discovered that the unique and concise structural features of DNA together with its information coding ability can be utilized for nano-construction efforts. This idea culminated in the birth of the field of DNA nanotechnology which is the main topic of this dissertation. The ability of rationally designed DNA strands to self-assemble into arbitrary nanostructures without external direction is the basis of this field. A series of novel design principles for DNA nanotechnology are presented here, from topological DNA nanostructures to complex and curved DNA nanostructures, from pure DNA nanostructures to hybrid RNA/DNA nanostructures. As one of the most important and pioneering fields in controlling the assembly of materials (both DNA and other materials) at the nanoscale, DNA nanotechnology is developing at a dramatic speed and as more and more construction approaches are invented, exciting advances will emerge in ways that we may or may not predict.

  6. DNA vaccines: a simple DNA sensing matter?

    PubMed

    Coban, Cevayir; Kobiyama, Kouji; Jounai, Nao; Tozuka, Miyuki; Ishii, Ken J

    2013-10-01

    Since the introduction of DNA vaccines two decades ago, this attractive strategy has been hampered by its low immunogenicity in humans. Studies conducted to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines have shown that understanding the mechanism of action of DNA vaccines might be the key to successfully improving their immunogenicity. Our current understanding is that DNA vaccines induce innate and adaptive immune responses in two ways: (1) encoded protein (or polypeptide) antigen(s) by the DNA plasmid can be expressed in stromal cells (i.e., muscle cells) as well as DCs, where these antigens are processed and presented to naïve CD4 or CD8 T cells either by direct or cross presentation, respectively; and (2) the transfected DNA plasmid itself may bind to an un-identified cytosolic DNA sensor and activate the TBK1-STING pathway and the production of type I interferons (IFNs) which function as an adjuvant. Recent studies investigating double-stranded cytosolic DNA sensor(s) have highlighted new mechanisms in which cytosolic DNA may release secondary metabolites, which are in turn recognized by a novel DNA sensing machinery. Here, we discuss these new metabolites and the possibilities of translating this knowledge into improved immunogenicity for DNA vaccines.

  7. Idiom Comprehension in Mandarin-Speaking Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Shelley Ching-Yu; Hsu, Chun-Chieh Natalie

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the effect of familiarity, context, and linguistic convention on idiom comprehension in Mandarin speaking children. Two experiments (a comprehension task followed by a comprehension task coupled with a metapragmatic task) were administered to test participants in three age groups (6 and 9-year-olds, and an adult control group).…

  8. Years Later, Comprehension Strategies Still at Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keene, Ellin Oliver; Zimmermann, Susan

    2013-01-01

    In this article, authors Ellin Oliver Keene and Susan Zimmermann reflect on comprehension strategy instruction 15 years after the publication of their book, "Mosaic of Thought: Teaching Comprehension in a Reader's Workshop." They reassert their claim that to teach comprehension well, we must first read widely and scrutinize our own reading…

  9. 33 CFR 238.5 - Comprehensive planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., responsible local planning organizations should provide information and assist the Corps in development of... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Comprehensive planning. 238.5... Comprehensive planning. Coordinated comprehensive planning at the regional or river basin level, or for an...

  10. 16 CFR 1018.43 - Comprehensive review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Comprehensive review. 1018.43 Section 1018.43 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT Records, Annual Reports and Audits § 1018.43 Comprehensive review. A comprehensive review of...

  11. DNA barcoding amphibians and reptiles.

    PubMed

    Vences, Miguel; Nagy, Zoltán T; Sonet, Gontran; Verheyen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Only a few major research programs are currently targeting COI barcoding of amphibians and reptiles (including chelonians and crocodiles), two major groups of tetrapods. Amphibian and reptile species are typically old, strongly divergent, and contain deep conspecific lineages which might lead to problems in species assignment with incomplete reference databases. As far as known, there is no single pair of COI primers that will guarantee a sufficient rate of success across all amphibian and reptile taxa, or within major subclades of amphibians and reptiles, which means that the PCR amplification strategy needs to be adjusted depending on the specific research question. In general, many more amphibian and reptile taxa have been sequenced for 16S rDNA, which for some purposes may be a suitable complementary marker, at least until a more comprehensive COI reference database becomes available. DNA barcoding has successfully been used to identify amphibian larval stages (tadpoles) in species-rich tropical assemblages. Tissue sampling, DNA extraction, and amplification of COI is straightforward in amphibians and reptiles. Single primer pairs are likely to have a failure rate between 5 and 50% if taxa of a wide taxonomic range are targeted; in such cases the use of primer cocktails or subsequent hierarchical usage of different primer pairs is necessary. If the target group is taxonomically limited, many studies have followed a strategy of designing specific primers which then allow an easy and reliable amplification of all samples.

  12. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to the DNA mapping and sequencing technologies. In particular, the present invention provides enhanced methods and compositions for the physical mapping and positional cloning of genomic DNA. The present invention also provides a useful analytical technique to directly map cloned DNA sequences onto individual stretched DNA molecules.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF DNA-BASED TOOLS FOR IDENTIFICATION AND MONITORING OF AQUATIC INTRODUCED SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Claims for potential applications of DNA taxonomy range from identification of unknown specimens and the discovery of new species to the study of biodiversity through comprehensive characterizations of complex biotic communities drawn from environmental samples. Recently, these a...

  14. Recent progress on the mechanics of sharply bent DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, PeiWen; Yan, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Despite extensive studies on the mechanics of DNA under external constrains, such as tension, torsion, and bending, several important aspects have remained poorly understood. One biologically important example is the mechanics of DNA under sharp bending conditions, which has been debated for a decade without thorough comprehension. The debate is about the interesting phenomenon raised from a series of different experiments: sharply bent DNA has a surprisingly high apparent bending flexibility that deviates from the canonical bending elasticity of DNA. This finding has motivated various theoretical models, which mainly incorporate the excitation of mechanical defects inside severely bent DNA molecules. Here, we review the recent progress on the understanding of the mechanics of sharply bent DNA and provide our view on this important question by interrogating the theoretical foundation of these experimental measurements.

  15. Temperature dependence of DNA translocations through solid-state nanopores.

    PubMed

    Verschueren, Daniel V; Jonsson, Magnus P; Dekker, Cees

    2015-06-12

    In order to gain a better physical understanding of DNA translocations through solid-state nanopores, we study the temperature dependence of λ-DNA translocations through 10 nm diameter silicon nitride nanopores, both experimentally and theoretically. The measured ionic conductance G, the DNA-induced ionic-conductance blockades [Formula: see text] and the event frequency Γ all increase with increasing temperature while the DNA translocation time τ decreases. G and [Formula: see text] are accurately described when bulk and surface conductances of the nanopore are considered and access resistance is incorporated appropriately. Viscous drag on the untranslocated part of the DNA coil is found to dominate the temperature dependence of the translocation times and the event rate is well described by a balance between diffusion and electrophoretic motion. The good fit between modeled and measured properties of DNA translocations through solid-state nanopores in this first comprehensive temperature study, suggest that our model captures the relevant physics of the process.

  16. DNA evidence: current perspective and future challenges in India.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sunil K; Goswami, Gajendra K

    2014-08-01

    Since the discovery of DNA fingerprinting technology in 1985 it has been used extensively as evidence in the court of law world-wide to establish the individual identity both in civil and criminal matters. In India, the first case of parentage dispute solved by the use of DNA fingerprinting technology was in 1989. Since then till date, the DNA technology has been used not only to resolve the cases of paternity and maternity disputes, but also for the establishment of individual identity in various criminal cases and for wildlife forensic identification. Since last half a decade, India is exercising to enact legislation on the use of DNA in the judicial realm and the draft 'Human DNA Bill-2012' is pending in the parliament. Largely, the promoters of forensic DNA testing have anticipated that DNA tests are nearly infallible and DNA technology could be the greatest single advance step in search for truth, conviction of the perpetrator, and acquittal of the innocent. The current article provides a comprehensive review on the status of DNA testing in India and elucidates the consequences of the admissibility of DNA as 'evidence' in the judicial dominion. In this backdrop of civil and criminal laws and changing ethical and societal attitudes, it is concluded that the DNA legislation in India and world-wide needs to be designed with utmost care.

  17. Who Did What to Whom? The Relationship between Syntactic Aspects of Sentence Comprehension and Text Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulsen, Mads; Gravgaard, Amalie K. D.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between syntactic comprehension at the sentence level and text-level comprehension. The study isolated the specific contribution of syntax by asking whether sentence comprehension efficiency of difficult syntactic constructions explained variance in text comprehension after controlling for sentence…

  18. Anticipatory Deaccenting in Language Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Carbary, Kathleen; Brown, Meredith; Gunlogson, Christine; McDonough, Joyce M.; Fazlipour, Aleksandra; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the hypothesis that listeners can generate expectations about upcoming input using anticipatory deaccenting, in which the absence of a nuclear pitch accent on an utterance-new noun is licensed by the subsequent repetition of that noun (e.g. Drag the SQUARE with the house to the TRIangle with the house). The phonemic restoration paradigm was modified to obscure word-initial segmental information uniquely identifying the final word in a spoken instruction, resulting in a stimulus compatible with two lexical alternatives (e.g. mouse/house). In Experiment 1, we measured participants’ final interpretations and response times. Experiment 2 used the same materials in a crowd-sourced gating study. Sentence interpretations at gated intervals, final interpretations, and response times provided converging evidence that the anticipatory deaccenting pattern contributed to listeners’ referential expectations. The results illustrate the availability and importance of sentence-level accent patterns in spoken language comprehension. PMID:25642426

  19. The Comprehensive Antibiotic Resistance Database

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Andrew G.; Waglechner, Nicholas; Nizam, Fazmin; Yan, Austin; Azad, Marisa A.; Baylay, Alison J.; Bhullar, Kirandeep; Canova, Marc J.; De Pascale, Gianfranco; Ejim, Linda; Kalan, Lindsay; King, Andrew M.; Koteva, Kalinka; Morar, Mariya; Mulvey, Michael R.; O'Brien, Jonathan S.; Pawlowski, Andrew C.; Piddock, Laura J. V.; Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Sutherland, Arlene D.; Tang, Irene; Taylor, Patricia L.; Thaker, Maulik; Wang, Wenliang; Yan, Marie; Yu, Tennison

    2013-01-01

    The field of antibiotic drug discovery and the monitoring of new antibiotic resistance elements have yet to fully exploit the power of the genome revolution. Despite the fact that the first genomes sequenced of free living organisms were those of bacteria, there have been few specialized bioinformatic tools developed to mine the growing amount of genomic data associated with pathogens. In particular, there are few tools to study the genetics and genomics of antibiotic resistance and how it impacts bacterial populations, ecology, and the clinic. We have initiated development of such tools in the form of the Comprehensive Antibiotic Research Database (CARD; http://arpcard.mcmaster.ca). The CARD integrates disparate molecular and sequence data, provides a unique organizing principle in the form of the Antibiotic Resistance Ontology (ARO), and can quickly identify putative antibiotic resistance genes in new unannotated genome sequences. This unique platform provides an informatic tool that bridges antibiotic resistance concerns in health care, agriculture, and the environment. PMID:23650175

  20. Comprehensive Glossary of Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlands, Tracy; Stone, Craig; Meyer, Richard

    2001-10-01

    We have developed a comprehensive glossary of terms covering the broad fields of nuclear and related areas of science. The glossary has been constructed with two sections. A primary section consists of over 6,000 terms covering the fields of nuclear and high energy physics, nuclear chemistry, radiochemistry, health physics, astrophysics, materials science, analytical science, environmental science, nuclear medicine, nuclear engineering, nuclear instrumentation, nuclear weapons, and nuclear safeguards. Approximately 1,500 terms of specific focus on military and nuclear weapons testing define the second section. The glossary is currently larger than many published glossaries and dictionaries covering the entire field of physics. Glossary terms have been defined using an extensive collection of current and historical publications. Historical texts extend back into the 1800's, the early days of atomic physics. The glossary has been developed both as a software application and as a hard copy document.

  1. Stereo Visualization and Map Comprehension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, D. N.; Culpepper, S.; Kirkby, K.; Morin, P.

    2004-12-01

    In this experiment, we assessed the use of stereo visualizations as effective tools for topographic map learning. In most Earth Science courses, students spend extended time learning how to read topographic maps, relying on the lines of the map as indicators of height and accompanying distance. These maps often necessitate extended training for students to acquire an understanding of what they represent, how they are to be used, and the implementation of these maps to solve problems. In fact instructors often comment that students fail to adequately use such maps, instead relying on prior spatial knowledge or experiences which may be inappropriate for understanding topographic displays. We asked participants to study maps that provided 3-dimensional or 2-dimensional views, and then answer a battery of questions about features and processes associated with the maps. The results will be described with respect to the cognitive utility of visualizations as tools for map comprehension tasks.

  2. Verifying a comprehensive test ban

    SciTech Connect

    van der Vink, G.E.

    1990-11-01

    Verification can never be accomplished with 100% certainty. Decisions about verification therefore involve judgments about acceptable levels of risk. Such judgments, in turn, can only be made by weighing the potential costs of undetected cheating against the expected benefits of a proposed treaty. Given the recent changes in the international political climate and shifts in the focus of US security concerns, the scale that balances these arguments may now be tipping in favor of a comprehensive test ban (CTB). In this new security environment, the potential advantages cited by CTB advocates - strengthening the nuclear nonproliferation regime, limiting the development of destabilizing new weapons, stopping the remaining environmental hazards of underground testing, and providing a first step toward nuclear disarmament - appear ever more important. Meanwhile, the disadvantages critics warn of - the uncertainties of verification, the need for testing to develop new weapons, and the alleged difficulties of maintaining high weapons reliability without testing - seem less compelling.

  3. DNA Damage, DNA Repair, Aging, and Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Scott; Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-09-18

    Aging in mammals is accompanied by a progressive atrophy of tissues and organs, and stochastic damage accumulation to the macromolecules DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. The sequence of the human genome represents our genetic blueprint, and accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may causally contribute to aging. Distinct evidence for a role of imperfect DNA repair in aging is that several premature aging syndromes have underlying genetic DNA repair defects. Accumulation of DNA damage may be particularly prevalent in the central nervous system owing to the low DNA repair capacity in postmitotic brain tissue. It is generally believed that the cumulative effects of the deleterious changes that occur in aging, mostly after the reproductive phase, contribute to species-specific rates of aging. In addition to nuclear DNA damage contributions to aging, there is also abundant evidence for a causative link between mitochondrial DNA damage and the major phenotypes associated with aging. Understanding the mechanistic basis for the association of DNA damage and DNA repair with aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration, would give insight into contravening age-related diseases and promoting a healthy life span.

  4. Large, Male Germ Cell-Specific Hypomethylated DNA Domains With Unique Genomic and Epigenomic Features on the Mouse X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Rieko; Shiura, Hirosuke; Numata, Koji; Sugimoto, Michihiko; Kondo, Masayo; Mise, Nathan; Suzuki, Masako; Greally, John M.; Abe, Kuniya

    2013-01-01

    To understand the epigenetic regulation required for germ cell-specific gene expression in the mouse, we analysed DNA methylation profiles of developing germ cells using a microarray-based assay adapted for a small number of cells. The analysis revealed differentially methylated sites between cell types tested. Here, we focused on a group of genomic sequences hypomethylated specifically in germline cells as candidate regions involved in the epigenetic regulation of germline gene expression. These hypomethylated sequences tend to be clustered, forming large (10 kb to ∼9 Mb) genomic domains, particularly on the X chromosome of male germ cells. Most of these regions, designated here as large hypomethylated domains (LoDs), correspond to segmentally duplicated regions that contain gene families showing germ cell- or testis-specific expression, including cancer testis antigen genes. We found an inverse correlation between DNA methylation level and expression of genes in these domains. Most LoDs appear to be enriched with H3 lysine 9 dimethylation, usually regarded as a repressive histone modification, although some LoD genes can be expressed in male germ cells. It thus appears that such a unique epigenomic state associated with the LoDs may constitute a basis for the specific expression of genes contained in these genomic domains. PMID:23861320

  5. DNA from plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Y; Bonner, W D

    1966-03-01

    DNA WAS ISOLATED FROM A MITOCHONDRIAL FRACTION OF EACH OF THE FOLLOWING PLANT MATERIALS: Mung bean (Phaseolus aureus) etiolated hypocotyl; turnip (Brassica rapa) root; sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) root; and onion (Allium cepa) bulb. It was found that all of these mitochondrial fractions contained DNA, the densities of which were identical (rho=1.706 g.cm(-3)). An additional DNA (rho=1.695) band found in the mitochondrial fraction of Brassica rapa, was identical to DNA separately isolated from the chloroplast-rich fraction. The origin of the second DNA from Allium mitochondrial fraction was not identified.Contrary to the identity of the mitochondrial DNA, DNA from nuclear fractions differed not only with each other but from the corresponding mitochondrial DNA.DNA from Phaseolus and Brassica mitochondria showed the hyperchromicity characteristic of double stranded, native DNA upon heating; Tm's in 0.0195 Na(+) were the same; 72.0 degrees . The amount of DNA within the mitochondrion of Phaseolus was estimated to be 5.0 x 10(-10) mug; this estimate was made by isolating the mitochondrial DNA concomitantly with the known amount of added (15)N(2)H B. subtilis DNA (rho=1.740). Approximately the same amount of DNA was present in the mitochondrion of Brassica or Ipomoea.

  6. Large-Scale Monitoring of Plants through Environmental DNA Metabarcoding of Soil: Recovery, Resolution, and Annotation of Four DNA Markers

    PubMed Central

    Fahner, Nicole A.; Shokralla, Shadi; Baird, Donald J.; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    In a rapidly changing world we need methods to efficiently assess biodiversity in order to monitor ecosystem trends. Ecological monitoring often uses plant community composition to infer quality of sites but conventional aboveground surveys only capture a snapshot of the actively growing plant diversity. Environmental DNA (eDNA) extracted from soil samples, however, can include taxa represented by both active and dormant tissues, seeds, pollen, and detritus. Analysis of this eDNA through DNA metabarcoding provides a more comprehensive view of plant diversity at a site from a single assessment but it is not clear which DNA markers are best used to capture this diversity. Sequence recovery, annotation, and sequence resolution among taxa were evaluated for four established DNA markers (matK, rbcL, ITS2, and the trnL P6 loop) in silico using database sequences and in situ using high throughput sequencing of 35 soil samples from a remote boreal wetland. Overall, ITS2 and rbcL are recommended for DNA metabarcoding of vascular plants from eDNA when not using customized or geographically restricted reference databases. We describe a new framework for evaluating DNA metabarcodes and, contrary to existing assumptions, we found that full length DNA barcode regions could outperform shorter markers for surveying plant diversity from soil samples. By using current DNA barcoding markers rbcL and ITS2 for plant metabarcoding, we can take advantage of existing resources such as the growing DNA barcode database. Our work establishes the value of standard DNA barcodes for soil plant eDNA analysis in ecological investigations and biomonitoring programs and supports the collaborative development of DNA barcoding and metabarcoding. PMID:27310720

  7. Large-Scale Monitoring of Plants through Environmental DNA Metabarcoding of Soil: Recovery, Resolution, and Annotation of Four DNA Markers.

    PubMed

    Fahner, Nicole A; Shokralla, Shadi; Baird, Donald J; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    In a rapidly changing world we need methods to efficiently assess biodiversity in order to monitor ecosystem trends. Ecological monitoring often uses plant community composition to infer quality of sites but conventional aboveground surveys only capture a snapshot of the actively growing plant diversity. Environmental DNA (eDNA) extracted from soil samples, however, can include taxa represented by both active and dormant tissues, seeds, pollen, and detritus. Analysis of this eDNA through DNA metabarcoding provides a more comprehensive view of plant diversity at a site from a single assessment but it is not clear which DNA markers are best used to capture this diversity. Sequence recovery, annotation, and sequence resolution among taxa were evaluated for four established DNA markers (matK, rbcL, ITS2, and the trnL P6 loop) in silico using database sequences and in situ using high throughput sequencing of 35 soil samples from a remote boreal wetland. Overall, ITS2 and rbcL are recommended for DNA metabarcoding of vascular plants from eDNA when not using customized or geographically restricted reference databases. We describe a new framework for evaluating DNA metabarcodes and, contrary to existing assumptions, we found that full length DNA barcode regions could outperform shorter markers for surveying plant diversity from soil samples. By using current DNA barcoding markers rbcL and ITS2 for plant metabarcoding, we can take advantage of existing resources such as the growing DNA barcode database. Our work establishes the value of standard DNA barcodes for soil plant eDNA analysis in ecological investigations and biomonitoring programs and supports the collaborative development of DNA barcoding and metabarcoding.

  8. Large-Scale Monitoring of Plants through Environmental DNA Metabarcoding of Soil: Recovery, Resolution, and Annotation of Four DNA Markers.

    PubMed

    Fahner, Nicole A; Shokralla, Shadi; Baird, Donald J; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    In a rapidly changing world we need methods to efficiently assess biodiversity in order to monitor ecosystem trends. Ecological monitoring often uses plant community composition to infer quality of sites but conventional aboveground surveys only capture a snapshot of the actively growing plant diversity. Environmental DNA (eDNA) extracted from soil samples, however, can include taxa represented by both active and dormant tissues, seeds, pollen, and detritus. Analysis of this eDNA through DNA metabarcoding provides a more comprehensive view of plant diversity at a site from a single assessment but it is not clear which DNA markers are best used to capture this diversity. Sequence recovery, annotation, and sequence resolution among taxa were evaluated for four established DNA markers (matK, rbcL, ITS2, and the trnL P6 loop) in silico using database sequences and in situ using high throughput sequencing of 35 soil samples from a remote boreal wetland. Overall, ITS2 and rbcL are recommended for DNA metabarcoding of vascular plants from eDNA when not using customized or geographically restricted reference databases. We describe a new framework for evaluating DNA metabarcodes and, contrary to existing assumptions, we found that full length DNA barcode regions could outperform shorter markers for surveying plant diversity from soil samples. By using current DNA barcoding markers rbcL and ITS2 for plant metabarcoding, we can take advantage of existing resources such as the growing DNA barcode database. Our work establishes the value of standard DNA barcodes for soil plant eDNA analysis in ecological investigations and biomonitoring programs and supports the collaborative development of DNA barcoding and metabarcoding. PMID:27310720

  9. LCAT DNA shearing.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Yuka; Lee, Abraham P

    2014-04-01

    We present a novel method to fragment DNA by using lateral cavity acoustic transducers (LCATs). DNA solution is placed within a microfluidic device containing LCATs. The LCATs cause microstreaming, which fragments DNA within the solution without any need for purification or downstream processing. The LCAT-based DNA fragmentation method offers an easy-to-use, low-cost, low-energy way to fragment DNA that is amenable to integration on microfluidic platforms to further automate DNA processing. Furthermore, the LCAT microdevice requires less than 10 µL of sample, and no external equipment is needed besides a piezoelectric transducer. PMID:23850863

  10. DNA repair in species with extreme lifespan differences.

    PubMed

    MacRae, Sheila L; Croken, Matthew McKnight; Calder, R B; Aliper, Alexander; Milholland, Brandon; White, Ryan R; Zhavoronkov, Alexander; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Vijg, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Differences in DNA repair capacity have been hypothesized to underlie the great range of maximum lifespans among mammals. However, measurements of individual DNA repair activities in cells and animals have not substantiated such a relationship because utilization of repair pathways among animals--depending on habitats, anatomical characteristics, and life styles--varies greatly between mammalian species. Recent advances in high-throughput genomics, in combination with increased knowledge of the genetic pathways involved in genome maintenance, now enable a comprehensive comparison of DNA repair transcriptomes in animal species with extreme lifespan differences. Here we compare transcriptomes of liver, an organ with high oxidative metabolism and abundant spontaneous DNA damage, from humans, naked mole rats, and mice, with maximum lifespans of ~120, 30, and 3 years, respectively, with a focus on genes involved in DNA repair. The results show that the longer-lived species, human and naked mole rat, share higher expression of DNA repair genes, including core genes in several DNA repair pathways. A more systematic approach of signaling pathway analysis indicates statistically significant upregulation of several DNA repair signaling pathways in human and naked mole rat compared with mouse. The results of this present work indicate, for the first time, that DNA repair is upregulated in a major metabolic organ in long-lived humans and naked mole rats compared with short-lived mice. These results strongly suggest that DNA repair can be considered a genuine longevity assurance system. PMID:26729707

  11. DNA repair in species with extreme lifespan differences

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, Sheila L.; Croken, Matthew McKnight; Calder, R.B.; Aliper, Alexander; Milholland, Brandon; White, Ryan R.; Zhavoronkov, Alexander; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera; Zhang, Zhengdong D.; Vijg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Differences in DNA repair capacity have been hypothesized to underlie the great range of maximum lifespans among mammals. However, measurements of individual DNA repair activities in cells and animals have not substantiated such a relationship because utilization of repair pathways among animals—depending on habitats, anatomical characteristics, and life styles—varies greatly between mammalian species. Recent advances in high-throughput genomics, in combination with increased knowledge of the genetic pathways involved in genome maintenance, now enable a comprehensive comparison of DNA repair transcriptomes in animal species with extreme lifespan differences. Here we compare transcriptomes of liver, an organ with high oxidative metabolism and abundant spontaneous DNA damage, from humans, naked mole rats, and mice, with maximum lifespans of ∼120, 30, and 3 years, respectively, with a focus on genes involved in DNA repair. The results show that the longer-lived species, human and naked mole rat, share higher expression of DNA repair genes, including core genes in several DNA repair pathways. A more systematic approach of signaling pathway analysis indicates statistically significant upregulation of several DNA repair signaling pathways in human and naked mole rat compared with mouse. The results of this present work indicate, for the first time, that DNA repair is upregulated in a major metabolic organ in long-lived humans and naked mole rats compared with short-lived mice. These results strongly suggest that DNA repair can be considered a genuine longevity assurance system. PMID:26729707

  12. [Uracil-DNA glycosylases].

    PubMed

    Pytel, Dariusz; Słupianek, Artur; Ksiazek, Dominika; Skórski, Tomasz; Błasiak, Janusz

    2008-01-01

    Uracil is one of four nitrogen bases, most frequently found in normal RNA. Uracyl can be found also in DNA as a result of enzymatic or non-enzymatic deamination of cytosine as well as misincorporation of dUMP instead of dTMP during DNA replication. Uracil from DNA can be removed by DNA repair enzymes with apirymidine site as an intermediate. However, if uracil is not removed from DNA a pair C:G in parental DNA can be changed into a T:A pair in the daughter DNA molecule. Therefore, uracil in DNA may lead to a mutation. Uracil in DNA, similarly to thymine, forms energetically most favorable hydrogen bonds with adenine, therefore uracil does not change the coding properties of DNA. Uracil in DNA is recognized by uracil DNA glycosylase (UDGs), which initiates DNA base excision repair, leading to removing of uracil from DNA and replacing it by thymine or cytosine, when arose as a result of cytosine deamination. Eukaryotes have at least four nuclear UDGs: UNG2, SMUG1, TDG i MBD4, while UNG1 operates in the mitochondrium. UNG2 is involved in DNA repair associated with DNA replication and interacts with PCNA and RPA proteins. Uracil can also be an intermediate product in the process of antigen-dependent antibody diversification in B lymphocytes. Enzymatic deamination of viral DNA by host cells can be a defense mechanism against viral infection, including HIV-1. UNG2, MBD4 and TDG glycosylases may cooperate with mismatch repair proteins and TDG can be involved in nucleotide excision repair system.

  13. Using next-generation sequencing for high resolution multiplex analysis of copy number variation from nanogram quantities of DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens.

    PubMed

    Wood, Henry M; Belvedere, Ornella; Conway, Caroline; Daly, Catherine; Chalkley, Rebecca; Bickerdike, Melissa; McKinley, Claire; Egan, Phil; Ross, Lisa; Hayward, Bruce; Morgan, Joanne; Davidson, Leslie; MacLennan, Ken; Ong, Thian K; Papagiannopoulos, Kostas; Cook, Ian; Adams, David J; Taylor, Graham R; Rabbitts, Pamela

    2010-08-01

    The use of next-generation sequencing technologies to produce genomic copy number data has recently been described. Most approaches, however, reply on optimal starting DNA, and are therefore unsuitable for the analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, which largely precludes the analysis of many tumour series. We have sought to challenge the limits of this technique with regards to quality and quantity of starting material and the depth of sequencing required. We confirm that the technique can be used to interrogate DNA from cell lines, fresh frozen material and FFPE samples to assess copy number variation. We show that as little as 5 ng of DNA is needed to generate a copy number karyogram, and follow this up with data from a series of FFPE biopsies and surgical samples. We have used various levels of sample multiplexing to demonstrate the adjustable resolution of the methodology, depending on the number of samples and available resources. We also demonstrate reproducibility by use of replicate samples and comparison with microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and digital PCR. This technique can be valuable in both the analysis of routine diagnostic samples and in examining large repositories of fixed archival material.

  14. Structural Organization of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    1986-01-01

    Explains the structural organization of DNA by providing information on the primary, secondary, tertiary, and higher organization levels of the molecule. Also includes illustrations and descriptions of sign-inversion and rotating models for supercoiling of DNA. (ML)

  15. DNA tagged microparticles

    DOEpatents

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2015-05-05

    A simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the simulant.

  16. Modeling DNA Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  17. Comprehensive approach to diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Satirapoj, Bancha; Adler, Sharon G.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with diabetes. This complication reflects a complex pathophysiology, whereby various genetic and environmental factors determine susceptibility and progression to end-stage renal disease. DN should be considered in patients with type 1 diabetes for at least 10 years who have microalbuminuria and diabetic retinopathy, as well as in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes with macroalbuminuria in whom other causes for proteinuria are absent. DN may also present as a falling estimated glomerular filtration rate with albuminuria as a minor presenting feature, especially in patients taking renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system inhibitors (RAASi). The pathological characteristic features of disease are three major lesions: diffuse mesangial expansion, diffuse thickened glomerular basement membrane, and hyalinosis of arterioles. Functionally, however, the pathophysiology is reflected in dysfunction of the mesangium, the glomerular capillary wall, the tubulointerstitium, and the vasculature. For all diabetic patients, a comprehensive approach to management including glycemic and hypertensive control with RAASi combined with lipid control, dietary salt restriction, lowering of protein intake, increased physical activity, weight reduction, and smoking cessation can reduce the rate of progression of nephropathy and minimize the risk for cardiovascular events. This review focuses on the latest published data dealing with the mechanisms, diagnosis, and current treatment of DN. PMID:26894033

  18. Reversing expectations during discourse comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Ming; Kuperberg, Gina

    2014-01-01

    In two ERP experiments, we asked whether comprehenders used the concessive connective, even so, to predict upcoming events. Participants read coherent and incoherent scenarios, with and without even so, e.g. “Elizabeth had a history exam on Monday. She took the test and aced/failed it. (Even so), she went home and celebrated wildly.”, as they rated coherence (Experiment 1) or simply answered intermittent comprehension questions (Experiment 2). The semantic function of even so was used to reverse real-world knowledge predictions, leading to an attenuated N400 to coherent versus incoherent target words (“celebrated”). Moreover, its pragmatic communicative function enhanced predictive processing, leading to more N400 attenuation to coherent targets in scenarios with than without even so. This benefit however, did not come for free: the detection of failed event predictions triggered a later posterior positivity and/or an anterior negativity effect, and costs of maintaining alternative likelihood relations manifest as a sustained negativity effect on sentence-final words. PMID:25914891

  19. Swine Flu -A Comprehensive View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vandana; Sood, Meenakshi

    2012-07-01

    The present article is aimed on comprehensive view of Swine flu. It was first isolated from pigs in 1930 in USA. Pandemic caused by H1N1 in 2009 brought it in limelight. Itís a viral respiratory disease caused by viruses that infects pigs, resulting in nasal secretions, barking cough, decreased appetite, and listless behavior. Swine virus consist of eight RNA strands, one strand derived from human flu strains, two from avian (bird) strains, and five from swine strains. Swine flu spreads from infected person to healthy person by inhalation or ingestion of droplets contaminated with virus while sneezing or coughing. Two antiviral agents have been reported to help prevent or reduce the effects of swine flu, flu shot and nasal spray. WHO recommended for pandemic period to prevent its future outbreaks through vaccines or non-vaccines means. Antiviral drugs effective against this virus are Tamiflu and Relenza. Rapid antigen testing (RIDT), DFA testing, viral culture, and molecular testing (RT-PCR) are used for its diagnosis in laboratory

  20. Comprehensive Analysis of Neptune's Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkoschka, Erich

    2007-07-01

    Hubble took an amazing data set of Neptune in nine GO programs between 1994 and 2006, consisting of 408 WFPC2 exposures with several filters present in each program. The PIs of these programs, Hammel, Sromovsky, and Rages, published a variety of results about Neptune's atmosphere based on each program. However, the typical size of the grants for each program did not allow all scientific questions of these rich data sets to be addressed.I propose to analyze these 400 images to create a consistent data set spanning 12 years, and I will make even the intermediate results available, such as 400 consistently calibrated images. The combined data set will then be able to address more far reaching questions than could be done by single data sets. Whereas previous studies focused on only a few center-to-limb measurements for a limited selection of latitudes and wavelengths, I will investigate the whole data set and analyze 16,000 center-to-limb curves. I will use the principal component analysis and various statistical tests to find the hidden variations on Neptune. I created software for a similar project on Hubble's Saturn images. I am ready to adapt and apply it to Hubble's Neptune images.The huge number of variable features on Neptune contain an ideal probe about atmospheric dynamics. Previous investigations have only scratched pieces of the surface of this treasure. It is time for a comprehensive study of the whole data to discover fundamenatal insights about atmospheric dynamics.

  1. Surface Information Loss in Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2014-01-01

    Shortly after a sentence has been comprehended, information about its exact surface form (e.g., its word order) becomes less available. The present research demonstrated this phenomenon during the comprehension of nonverbal stimuli (picture stories). In Experiment 1, significantly more surface (left/right orientation) information was lost after comprehending several picture stories than just one; in Experiment 2, more was lost after comprehending an entire picture story than half of one. In Experiment 3, subjects segmented the picture stories into their constituents; in Experiment 4, significantly more surface information was lost after crossing these constituents’ boundaries than before. The present research also investigated why surface information is lost. Four explanations were considered: Surface information loss is the result of performing grammatical transformations (the linguistic hypothesis), exceeding short-term memory limitations (the memory limitations hypothesis), integrating information into gist (the integration hypothesis), shifting from building one substructure to initiating another (the processing shift hypothesis). The linguistic and memory limitations hypotheses were considered inadequate; the integration and the processing shift hypotheses were tested in the last set of experiments. In Experiment 5 (using nonverbal stimuli), the predictions made by the processing shift hypothesis were confirmed; in Experiment 6 (using verbal stimuli), these results were replicated. Other implications of the processing shift hypothesis concerning surface information loss are discussed. PMID:25308975

  2. CEDR: Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies have a long history of epidemiologic research programs. The main focus of these programs has been the Health and Mortality Study of the DOE work force. This epidemiologic study began in 1964 with a feasibility study of workers at the Hanford facility. Studies of other populations exposed to radiation have also been supported, including the classic epidemiologic study of radium dial painters and studies of atomic bomb survivors. From a scientific perspective, these epidemiologic research program have been productive, highly credible, and formed the bases for many radiological protection standards. Recently, there has been concern that, although research results were available, the data on which these results were based were not easily obtained by interested investigators outside DOE. Therefore, as part of an effort to integrate and broaden access to its epidemiologic information, the DOE has developed the Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) Program. Included in this effort is the development of a computer information system for accessing the collection of CEDR data and its related descriptive information. The epidemiologic data currently available through the CEDAR Program consist of analytic data sets, working data sets, and their associated documentation files. In general, data sets are the result of epidemiologic studies that have been conducted on various groups of workers at different DOE facilities during the past 30 years.

  3. A Framework for Considering Comprehensibility in Modeling.

    PubMed

    Gleicher, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Comprehensibility in modeling is the ability of stakeholders to understand relevant aspects of the modeling process. In this article, we provide a framework to help guide exploration of the space of comprehensibility challenges. We consider facets organized around key questions: Who is comprehending? Why are they trying to comprehend? Where in the process are they trying to comprehend? How can we help them comprehend? How do we measure their comprehension? With each facet we consider the broad range of options. We discuss why taking a broad view of comprehensibility in modeling is useful in identifying challenges and opportunities for solutions.

  4. A Framework for Considering Comprehensibility in Modeling.

    PubMed

    Gleicher, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Comprehensibility in modeling is the ability of stakeholders to understand relevant aspects of the modeling process. In this article, we provide a framework to help guide exploration of the space of comprehensibility challenges. We consider facets organized around key questions: Who is comprehending? Why are they trying to comprehend? Where in the process are they trying to comprehend? How can we help them comprehend? How do we measure their comprehension? With each facet we consider the broad range of options. We discuss why taking a broad view of comprehensibility in modeling is useful in identifying challenges and opportunities for solutions. PMID:27441712

  5. Nomenclature of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes for Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graziano, Sara L.; Brown, K.H.; Nielsen, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    Congruence of genetic data is critical for comparative and collaborative studies on natural fish populations. A comprehensive list of reported mitochrondrial DNA haplotypes for Oncorhynchus mykiss generated using the S-Phe/P2 primer set is presented as a resource for future investigations of this species.

  6. NBS1 and multiple regulations of DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage response is finely tuned, with several pathways including those for DNA repair, chromatin remodeling and cell cycle checkpoint, although most studies to date have focused on single pathways. Genetic diseases characterized by genome instability have provided novel insights into the underlying mechanisms of DNA damage response. NBS1, a protein responsible for the radiation-sensitive autosomal recessive disorder Nijmegen breakage syndrome, is one of the first factors to accumulate at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). NBS1 binds to at least five key proteins, including ATM, RPA, MRE11, RAD18 and RNF20, in the conserved regions within a limited span of the C terminus, functioning in the regulation of chromatin remodeling, cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair in response to DSBs. In this article, we reviewed the functions of these binding proteins and their comprehensive association with NBS1. PMID:27068998

  7. Preparation and biomedical applications of programmable and multifunctional DNA nanoflowers

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yifan; Hu, Rong; Zhu, Guizhi; Zhang, Xiaobing; Mei, Lei; Liu, Qiaoling; Qiu, Liping; Wu, Cuichen; Tan, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    We describe a comprehensive protocol for the preparation of multifunctional DNA nanostructures termed nanoflowers (NFs), which are self-assembled from long DNA building blocks generated via rolling-circle replication (RCR) of a designed template. NF assembly is driven by liquid crystallization and dense packaging of building blocks, which eliminates the need for conventional Watson-Crick base pairing. As a result of dense DNA packaging, NFs are resistant to nuclease degradation, denaturation or dissociation at extremely low concentrations. By manually changing the template sequence, many different functional moieties including aptamers, bioimaging agents and drug-loading sites could be easily integrated into NF particles, making NFs ideal candidates for a variety of applications in biomedicine. In this protocol, the preparation of multifunctional DNA NFs with highly tunable sizes is described for applications in cell targeting, intracellular imaging and drug delivery. Preparation and characterization of functional DNA NFs takes ~5 d; the following biomedical applications take ~10 d. PMID:26357007

  8. DNA nanoarchitectonics: assembled DNA at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Howorka, Stefan

    2013-06-18

    DNA is a powerful biomaterial for creating rationally designed and functionally enhanced nanostructures. DNA nanoarchitectures positioned at substrate interfaces can offer unique advantages leading to improved surface properties relevant to biosensing, nanotechnology, materials science, and cell biology. This Perspective highlights the benefits and challenges of using assembled DNA as a nanoscale building block for interfacial layers and surveys their applications in three areas: homogeneous dense surface coatings, bottom-up nanopatterning, and 3D nanoparticle lattices. Possible future research developments are discussed at the end of the Perspective.

  9. The Many Sides of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores the meaning of DNA. Discusses histories of DNA, literature on DNA, the contributions of Max Delbruck and Barbara McClintock, life, views of control, current research, and the language of DNA. Contains 24 references. (JRH)

  10. DNA Sequencing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1992-01-01

    An automated DNA sequencing apparatus having a reactor for providing at least two series of DNA products formed from a single primer and a DNA strand, each DNA product of a series differing in molecular weight and having a chain terminating agent at one end; separating means for separating the DNA products to form a series bands, the intensity of substantially all nearby bands in a different series being different, band reading means for determining the position an This invention was made with government support including a grant from the U.S. Public Health Service, contract number AI-06045. The U.S. government has certain rights in the invention.

  11. Racemic DNA crystallography.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Pradeep K; Collie, Gavin W; Kauffmann, Brice; Huc, Ivan

    2014-12-22

    Racemates increase the chances of crystallization by allowing molecular contacts to be formed in a greater number of ways. With the advent of protein synthesis, the production of protein racemates and racemic-protein crystallography are now possible. Curiously, racemic DNA crystallography had not been investigated despite the commercial availability of L- and D-deoxyribo-oligonucleotides. Here, we report a study into racemic DNA crystallography showing the strong propensity of racemic DNA mixtures to form racemic crystals. We describe racemic crystal structures of various DNA sequences and folded conformations, including duplexes, quadruplexes, and a four-way junction, showing that the advantages of racemic crystallography should extend to DNA.

  12. University Students with Poor Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiou, George K.; Das, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the nature of the working memory and general cognitive ability deficits experienced by university students with a specific reading comprehension deficit. A total of 32 university students with poor reading comprehension but average word-reading skills and 60 age-word-matched controls with no comprehension…

  13. National Survey of Reading Comprehension in Finland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehto, Juhani E.; Scheinin, Patrik; Kupiainen, Sirkku; Hautamaki, Jarkko

    2001-01-01

    Examines the cognitively high-level text processing, or macro-processing, of expository passages. Investigates reading comprehension during the sixth and ninth school years. Finds that girls outperformed boys regardless of the comprehension measure and also finds that performance on both measures, but particularly on hierarchy-rating, correlated…

  14. Teaching Listening Comprehension: Bottom-Up Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khuziakhmetov, Anvar N.; Porchesku, Galina V.

    2016-01-01

    Improving listening comprehension skills is one of the urgent contemporary educational problems in the field of second language acquisition. Understanding how L2 listening comprehension works can have a serious influence on language pedagogy. The aim of the paper is to discuss the practical and methodological value of the notion of the perception…

  15. Effects of Cultural Familiarity on Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasaki, Yoshinori; And Others

    A study investigated the effect of cultural background on reading comprehension, specifically examining content knowledge (schemata) and overall familiarity with the setting. It tested the hypothesis that when a setting is familiar to readers, the text will be most readable, and will yield the shortest time to read, the best comprehension, and the…

  16. Does Monitoring Event Changes Improve Comprehension?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohn-Gettler, Catherine M.

    2014-01-01

    During narrative comprehension, reading times increase for changes in time, space, characters, goals, and causation. This study examined the extent to which instructional manipulations modify dimension monitoring during reading and whether this affects comprehension. Sixty-seven participants read three narratives (pretest). Half of the…

  17. Predictors of Nutrition Information Comprehension in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Lisa M. Soederberg; Gibson, Tanja N.; Applegate, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The goal of the present study was to examine relationships among several predictors of nutrition comprehension. We were particularly interested in exploring whether nutrition knowledge or motivation moderated the effects of attention on comprehension across a wide age range of adults. Methods Ninety-three participants, ages 18 to 80, completed measures of nutrition knowledge and motivation and then read nutrition information (from which attention allocation was derived) and answered comprehension questions. Results In general, predictor variables were highly intercorrelated. However, knowledge, but not motivation, had direct effects on comprehension accuracy. In contrast, motivation influenced attention, which in turn influenced accuracy. Results also showed that comprehension accuracy decreased- and knowledge increased -with age. When knowledge was statistically controlled, age declines in comprehension increased. Conclusion Knowledge is an important predictor of nutrition information comprehension and its role increases in later life. Motivation is also important; however, its effects on comprehension differ from knowledge. Practice Implications Health educators and clinicians should consider cognitive skills such as knowledge as well as motivation and age of patients when deciding how to best convey health information. The increased role of knowledge among older adults suggests that lifelong educational efforts may have important payoffs in later life. PMID:19854605

  18. Binding in agrammatic aphasia: Processing to comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Janet Choy, Jungwon; Thompson, Cynthia K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Theories of comprehension deficits in Broca’s aphasia have largely been based on the pattern of deficit found with movement constructions. However, some studies have found comprehension deficits with binding constructions, which do not involve movement. Aims This study investigates online processing and offline comprehension of binding constructions, such as reflexive (e.g., himself) and pronoun (e.g., him) constructions in unimpaired and aphasic individuals in an attempt to evaluate theories of agrammatic comprehension. Methods & Procedures Participants were eight individuals with agrammatic Broca’s aphasia and eight age-matched unimpaired individuals. We used eyetracking to examine online processing of binding constructions while participants listened to stories. Offline comprehension was also tested. Outcomes & Results The eye movement data showed that individuals with Broca’s aphasia were able to automatically process the correct antecedent of reflexives and pronouns. In addition, their syntactic processing of binding was not delayed compared to normal controls. Nevertheless, offline comprehension of both pronouns and reflexives was significantly impaired compared to the control participants. This comprehension failure was reflected in the aphasic participants’ eye movements at sentence end, where fixations to the competitor increased. Conclusions These data suggest that comprehension difficulties with binding constructions seen in agrammatic aphasic patients are not due to a deficit in automatic syntactic processing or delayed processing. Rather, they point to a possible deficit in lexical integration. PMID:20535243

  19. Learning Goals during Reading Comprehension Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schunk, Dale H.; Rice, Jo Mary

    A study investigated the effects of goal setting on children's self-efficacy and skillful performance during reading comprehension instruction. Subjects, 17 fourth graders and 16 fifth graders from one elementary school, had regularly received remedial reading comprehension instruction. Subjects were administered a pretest consisting of a…

  20. Strategy Value Information and Children's Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schunk, Dale H.; Rice, Jo Mary

    A study conducted during a training program, in which students were learning to find main ideas, investigated how different kinds of strategy value information influenced children's reading comprehension. Subjects, 15 fourth-grade and 15 fifth-grade students who regularly received remedial reading comprehension instruction, were divided into three…

  1. Financial planning on a comprehensive scale.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Simita

    2013-04-01

    Hospitals and health systems that wish to explore the shift to comprehensive care management should: Assess the investments in infrastructure necessary to support comprehensive care management, Gauge the financial implications and set quality and financial goals, Monitor performance using metrics such as patient satisfaction, avoidable admissions, out-of-group referrals, and average length of stay.

  2. Teaching Reading Comprehension through Collaborative Strategic Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Sharon; Klingner, Janette Kettman

    1999-01-01

    Provides an overview of collaborative strategic reading (CSR) as an approach to enhancing the reading-comprehension skills of students with learning disabilities. Procedures for implementing CSR with collaborative groups and techniques for teaching reading-comprehension skills are provided. The role of the teacher is described and sample teaching…

  3. Noteworthy Perspectives on Comprehensive School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mid-Continent Regional Educational Lab., Aurora, CO.

    This publication is intended to help schools develop and implement comprehensive reform initiatives. It provides an overview of comprehensive school reform and offers suggestions for selecting and implementing research-based instruction, which includes a step-by-step process for selecting and adopting research-based instructional methods that are…

  4. A Low Vision Reading Comprehension Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, G. R.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Fifty adults (ages 28-86) with macular degeneration were given the Low Vision Reading Comprehension Assessment (LVRCA) to test its reliability and validity in evaluating the reading comprehension of those with vision impairments. The LVRCA was found to take only nine minutes to administer and was a valid and reliable tool. (CR)

  5. Improving Reading Comprehension in the Content Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durley, Jill; Emlen, Rita; Knox, Kimberly; Meeker, Marcia; Rhea, Peggy

    This report describes a program implemented to improve reading comprehension in the content areas. The targeted population will consist of students in grades two, three, four, and five, in five midwestern schools, four public and one private. The problem of poor comprehension will be documented through test scores, parent and student surveys, and…

  6. Monitoring Local Comprehension Monitoring in Sentence Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorstius, Christian; Radach, Ralph; Mayer, Michael B.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    on ways to improve children's reading comprehension. However, processes and mechanisms underlying this skill are currently not well understood. This article describes one of the first attempts to study comprehension monitoring using eye-tracking methodology. Students in…

  7. Elementary School Teachers' Comprehension of Data Displays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobbe, Timothy; Horton, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated elementary school teachers' comprehension of data displays. Assessment, interview, and observation data were analyzed to determine their level of comprehension. Results revealed that the teachers were proficient at "reading the data" and computation types of "reading between the data" questions, but were unsuccessful with…

  8. Cognitive Mechanisms Underlying Second Language Listening Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Guiling

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation research investigates the cognitive mechanisms underlying second language (L2) listening comprehension. I use three types of sentential contexts, congruent, neutral and incongruent, to look at how L2 learners construct meaning in spoken sentence comprehension. The three types of contexts differ in their context predictability.…

  9. Metaphor Comprehension in Alzheimer's Disease: Novelty Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amanzio, Martina; Geminiani, Giuliano; Leotta, Daniela; Cappa, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    The comprehension of non-literal language was investigated in 20 probable Alzheimer's disease (pAD) patients by comparing their performance to that of 20 matched control subjects. pAD patients were unimpaired in the comprehension of conventional metaphors and idioms. However, their performance was significantly lower in the case of…

  10. Listening Comprehension: Process, Problems, and Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landolfi, Liliana

    An analysis of the skills involved in listening comprehension and techniques for developing them in students looks first at elements of the general process of interpretation, showing the essential importance of the interpretative functions as contrasted with simple comprehension of sounds and decoding of meaning. The first section looks at…

  11. Leadership Lessons from Comprehensive School Reforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Joseph, Ed.; Datnow, Amanda, Ed.

    This volume explores the role of leadership in comprehensive school reform (CSR). It consists of 12 chapters: (1) "The Development of Comprehensive School Reform" (Joseph Murphy and Amanda Datnow); (2) "Expeditionary Learning Schools: Tenacity, Leadership, and School Reform" (Greg Farrell); (3) "The Modern Red School House: Leadership in…

  12. 33 CFR 238.5 - Comprehensive planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DEFENSE WATER RESOURCES POLICIES AND AUTHORITIES: FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION MEASURES IN URBAN AREAS § 238.5 Comprehensive planning. Coordinated comprehensive planning at the regional or river basin level, or for an urban... about water related consequences of alternative land uses and drainage practices....

  13. 33 CFR 238.5 - Comprehensive planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DEFENSE WATER RESOURCES POLICIES AND AUTHORITIES: FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION MEASURES IN URBAN AREAS § 238.5 Comprehensive planning. Coordinated comprehensive planning at the regional or river basin level, or for an urban... about water related consequences of alternative land uses and drainage practices....

  14. 33 CFR 238.5 - Comprehensive planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DEFENSE WATER RESOURCES POLICIES AND AUTHORITIES: FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION MEASURES IN URBAN AREAS § 238.5 Comprehensive planning. Coordinated comprehensive planning at the regional or river basin level, or for an urban... about water related consequences of alternative land uses and drainage practices....

  15. Cognitive Aids for Guiding Graph Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mautone, Patricia D.; Mayer, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    This study sought to improve students' comprehension of scientific graphs by adapting scaffolding techniques used to aid text comprehension. In 3 experiments involving 121 female and 88 male college students, some students were shown cognitive aids prior to viewing 4 geography graphs whereas others were not; all students were then asked to write a…

  16. Comprehensive Education Portfolio with a Career Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruger, Evonne J.; Holtzman, Diane M.; Dagavarian, Debra A.

    2013-01-01

    There are many types of student portfolios used within academia: the prior learning portfolio, credentialing portfolio, developmental portfolio, capstone portfolio, individual course portfolio, and the comprehensive education portfolio. The comprehensive education portfolio (CEP), as used by the authors, is a student portfolio, developed over…

  17. Revisiting the Reader's Rudder: A Comprehension Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Cynthia

    2003-01-01

    Presents the structured comprehension method, a strategy that facilitates literal, inferential, and critical reading comprehension for passive readers who can decode but not comprehend. Uses the method to illustrate how other areas of students' instruction (e.g., vocabulary enhancement through morphemic analysis, use of a phonogram approach to…

  18. Alleviating Comprehension Problems in Movies. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatsuki, Donna

    This paper describes the various barriers to comprehension that learners may encounter when viewing feature films in a second language. Two clusters of interfacing factors that may contribute to comprehension hot spots emerged from a quantitative analysis of problems noted in student logbooks. One cluster had a strong acoustic basis, whereas the…

  19. A Dynamic Developmental Link between Verbal Comprehension-Knowledge (Gc) and Reading Comprehension: Verbal Comprehension-Knowledge Drives Positive Change in Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Matthew R.; Turek, Joshua J.

    2012-01-01

    Intelligence and general academic achievement have a well-established relation, but the interrelated development of the two constructs over time is less well-known. In this study, the dynamic developmental relation between verbal comprehension-knowledge (Gc) and reading comprehension was examined by applying bivariate dual change score models…

  20. Reading Comprehension in Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laws, Glynis; Brown, Heather; Main, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Two studies aimed to investigate the reading comprehension abilities of 14 readers with Down syndrome aged 6 years 8 months to 13 years relative to those of typically developing children matched on word reading ability, and to investigate how these abilities were associated with reading accuracy, listening comprehension, phonological awareness and…

  1. Tests of Reading Comprehension (TORCH) Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgon, J. R.

    A New Zealand pilot study examined Tests of Reading Comprehension (TORCH) scores compared to PAT: Reading Comprehension scores and compared with teacher ratings. TORCH is a reading test package published in 1987 by the Australian Council for Educational Research. It consists of 14 untimed passages intended to assess the extent to which readers in…

  2. Writing Composition Activities to Enhance Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Janet T.

    A program of written composition based on reading comprehension can help students gain greater in-depth understanding of reading materials. Once the reading comprehension skill has been clearly defined for the class, the writing activity can provide clarification by allowing for analysis of the definition through written manipulation of language.…

  3. Reading Strategies or Comprehension Monitoring Strategies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yu-Fen

    2006-01-01

    In order to probe the relationship between reading strategies and comprehension monitoring strategies and how they function to help readers in comprehension process, the present study utilizes think-aloud and retrospective verbal reports to examine 20 EFL readers' performances in reading texts. The results reveal that the engagement of reading…

  4. Promoting Persistence through Comprehensive Student Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnell, Rachel Pleasants; Soricone, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    This publication was developed to support the colleges Jobs For the Future (JFF) works with through Accelerating Opportunity, as well as other institutions in search of strategies to enhance their capacity to provide comprehensive supports. The goal of this paper is to provide clarity on what it means to provide comprehensive support services,…

  5. Reading Comprehension among African American Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Mayes, Eric; Arthur, Leslie; Johnson, Joseph; Robinson, Veronica; Ashe, Shante; Elbedour, Salman; Collins, Kathleen M. T.

    2004-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the reading comprehension performance of African American graduate students. The result showed that though the African American sample attained statistically significantly higher levels of reading comprehension than a normative sample of undergraduate students, they achieved lower levels of reading comprehension…

  6. DNA structure and function.

    PubMed

    Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2015-06-01

    The proposal of a double-helical structure for DNA over 60 years ago provided an eminently satisfying explanation for the heritability of genetic information. But why is DNA, and not RNA, now the dominant biological information store? We argue that, in addition to its coding function, the ability of DNA, unlike RNA, to adopt a B-DNA structure confers advantages both for information accessibility and for packaging. The information encoded by DNA is both digital - the precise base specifying, for example, amino acid sequences - and analogue. The latter determines the sequence-dependent physicochemical properties of DNA, for example, its stiffness and susceptibility to strand separation. Most importantly, DNA chirality enables the formation of supercoiling under torsional stress. We review recent evidence suggesting that DNA supercoiling, particularly that generated by DNA translocases, is a major driver of gene regulation and patterns of chromosomal gene organization, and in its guise as a promoter of DNA packaging enables DNA to act as an energy store to facilitate the passage of translocating enzymes such as RNA polymerase.

  7. DNA barcoding for plants.

    PubMed

    de Vere, Natasha; Rich, Tim C G; Trinder, Sarah A; Long, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    DNA barcoding uses specific regions of DNA in order to identify species. Initiatives are taking place around the world to generate DNA barcodes for all groups of living organisms and to make these data publically available in order to help understand, conserve, and utilize the world's biodiversity. For land plants the core DNA barcode markers are two sections of coding regions within the chloroplast, part of the genes, rbcL and matK. In order to create high quality databases, each plant that is DNA barcoded needs to have a herbarium voucher that accompanies the rbcL and matK DNA sequences. The quality of the DNA sequences, the primers used, and trace files should also be accessible to users of the data. Multiple individuals should be DNA barcoded for each species in order to check for errors and allow for intraspecific variation. The world's herbaria provide a rich resource of already preserved and identified material and these can be used for DNA barcoding as well as by collecting fresh samples from the wild. These protocols describe the whole DNA barcoding process, from the collection of plant material from the wild or from the herbarium, how to extract and amplify the DNA, and how to check the quality of the data after sequencing.

  8. Human DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Wood, R D; Mitchell, M; Sgouros, J; Lindahl, T

    2001-02-16

    Cellular DNA is subjected to continual attack, both by reactive species inside cells and by environmental agents. Toxic and mutagenic consequences are minimized by distinct pathways of repair, and 130 known human DNA repair genes are described here. Notable features presently include four enzymes that can remove uracil from DNA, seven recombination genes related to RAD51, and many recently discovered DNA polymerases that bypass damage, but only one system to remove the main DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet light. More human DNA repair genes will be found by comparison with model organisms and as common folds in three-dimensional protein structures are determined. Modulation of DNA repair should lead to clinical applications including improvement of radiotherapy and treatment with anticancer drugs and an advanced understanding of the cellular aging process. PMID:11181991

  9. A dynamic developmental link between verbal comprehension-knowledge (Gc) and reading comprehension: verbal comprehension-knowledge drives positive change in reading comprehension.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Matthew R; Turek, Joshua J

    2012-12-01

    Intelligence and general academic achievement have a well-established relation, but the interrelated development of the two constructs over time is less well-known. In this study, the dynamic developmental relation between verbal comprehension-knowledge (Gc) and reading comprehension was examined by applying bivariate dual change score models (McArdle, 2009) to longitudinal data collected from children aged 9 through 15 who were part of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (NICHD SECCYD). A unidirectional dynamic link was found in which higher levels of prior Gc led to increased positive change in reading comprehension scores. This unidirectional link was not altered by including intelligence measured at 24-months, SES, sex, basic reading, and reading volume as time-invariant covariates. Gc is a leading indicator of reading comprehension and should be considered when developing and monitoring long-term reading comprehension interventions for children.

  10. Facilitating pictorial comprehension with color highlighting.

    PubMed

    McDougald, Brannan R; Wogalter, Michael S

    2014-09-01

    Pictorials can aid in communicating warning information, but viewers may not always correctly comprehend them. Two experiments focused on whether the use of relevant highlighting could benefit pictorial comprehension. A set of warning-related pictorials were manipulated according to three-color highlighting conditions: highlighting areas more relevant to correct comprehension, highlighting areas less relevant to comprehension, and no highlighting. Participants were asked to describe the purpose and meaning of each pictorial presented to them. The findings from both experiments indicate that comprehension of warning pictorials is higher for the relevant highlighting condition than the other two conditions. The highlighting of less relevant areas reduced comprehension compared to no highlighting. Use of appropriately placed highlighting could benefit the design of a complex symbol by pointing out pertinent areas to aid in determining its intended conceptual meaning.

  11. Genome-wide profiling of DNA methylation and gene expression in Crassostrea gigas male gametes

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Claire E.; Roberts, Steven B.

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation patterns and functions are variable across invertebrate taxa. In order to provide a better understanding of DNA methylation in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), we characterized the genome-wide DNA methylation profile in male gamete cells using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing. RNA-Seq analysis was performed to examine the relationship between DNA methylation and transcript expression. Methylation status of over 7.6 million CpG dinucleotides was described with a majority of methylated regions occurring among intragenic regions. Overall, 15% of the CpG dinucleotides were determined to be methylated and the mitochondrial genome lacked DNA methylation. Integrative analysis of DNA methylation and RNA-Seq data revealed a positive association between methylation status, both in gene bodies and putative promoter regions, and expression. This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the distribution of DNA methylation in the oyster male gamete tissue and suggests that DNA methylation is involved in gene regulatory activity. PMID:24987376

  12. Raman spectroscopic evaluation of DNA adducts of a platinum containing anticancer drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jangir, Deepak K.; Mehrotra, Ranjana

    2014-09-01

    Mechanistic understanding of the interaction of drugs with their target molecules is important for better understanding of their mode of action and to improve their efficacy. Carboplatin is a platinum containing anticancer drug, used to treat different type of tumors. In the present work, we applied Raman spectroscopy to study the interaction of carboplatin with DNA at molecular level using different carboplatin-DNA molar ratios. These Raman spectroscopic results provide comprehensive understanding on the carboplatin-DNA interactions and indicate that DNA cross-linked adducts formed by carboplatin are similar to cisplatin adducts. The results indicate that guanine N7 and adenine N7 are the putative sites for carboplatin interaction. It is observed that carboplatin has some affinity toward cytosine in DNA. Phosphate sugar backbone of DNA showed conformation perturbation in DNA which were easily sensible at higher concentrations of carboplatin. Most importantly, carboplatin interaction induces intermediate A- and B-DNA conformations at the cross-linking sites.

  13. Listen, Listen, Listen and Listen: Building a Comprehension Corpus and Making It Comprehensible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mordaunt, Owen G.; Olson, Daniel W.

    2010-01-01

    Listening comprehension input is necessary for language learning and acculturation. One approach to developing listening comprehension skills is through exposure to massive amounts of naturally occurring spoken language input. But exposure to this input is not enough; learners also need to make the comprehension corpus meaningful to their learning…

  14. Readability and Its Effects on Reading Rate, Subjective Judgments of Comprehensibility and Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coke, Esther U.

    Prose passages read aloud or silently were rated for pronounceability and comprehensibility. The relationships of text-derived readability indices to reading rate, comprehensibility ratings and comprehension test scores were explored. Reading rate in syllables per minute was unrelated to readability. The high correlation between rate in words per…

  15. Relationship between Graphical Device Comprehension and Overall Text Comprehension for Third-Grade Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Kathryn L.; Norman, Rebecca R.; Cocco, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    This study examined relationships between reading comprehension, known predictors of reading comprehension (i.e., cognitive flexibility, fluency, reading motivation and attitude, vocabulary), and graphical device comprehension. One-hundred fifty-six third graders completed assessments of known predictor variables and an assessment tapping…

  16. The Effect of Explicit Teaching of Comprehension Strategies on Reading Comprehension in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, James Grant

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of explicit teaching of comprehension strategies on the comprehension performance of elementary school students. Two schools with similar demographics, including a significant proportion of students at risk for reading failure, participated in the study. One school utilized an explicit comprehension strategy…

  17. A New Comprehensive Final Exam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavsar, Suketu P.

    2015-01-01

    Instructors aspire for students to master all the material covered. The final exam should assess the breadth and depth of their learning and be a significant basis for the final grade. I insist on a comprehensive final because I want students to review early material in light of later topics. I believe that this helps students create connections, integrate understanding, and retain knowledge for the long term. For non-science majors, reviewing and retaining the large amount of astronomy material is daunting. I experimented with a final exam format that calmed their fears and encouraged thorough review. It is only practical for a class of about twenty students or less. I provided a number of challenging conceptual and problem solving questions (at least as many as there were students), crafted to interconnect and span the entire range of topics. The order of the questions reflected the sequence in which the topics had been discussed. Students received these questions in ample time to prepare prior to the final. A student could bring up to 5 standard sheets of notes to the final. At the final, each student picked a number out of a hat. This was the question they had to answer in a 5-minute presentation. They were allowed 15 minutes for a final preparation during which they could use their 5 pages of notes. The presentations were given in order, 1- 20. Written comments on at least 10 other talks, explaining what was missed or correcting a mistake were required. They were graded both on their talk and on their comments. This format required students to be prepared for any question and encouraged interaction and communication while studying. Knowing the questions beforehand provided a guide to their studying as well as allayed their fears about what could be asked. The students also received guidance to what constituted a good answer, namely accuracy (correct scientific argument, appropriate facts, no irrelevant material), thoroughness (answered the complete questions

  18. Comprehensive Assessments of RNA-seq by the SEQC Consortium: FDA-Led Efforts Advance Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Xu, Joshua; Gong, Binsheng; Wu, Leihong; Thakkar, Shraddha; Hong, Huixiao; Tong, Weida

    2016-01-01

    Studies on gene expression in response to therapy have led to the discovery of pharmacogenomics biomarkers and advances in precision medicine. Whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) is an emerging tool for profiling gene expression and has received wide adoption in the biomedical research community. However, its value in regulatory decision making requires rigorous assessment and consensus between various stakeholders, including the research community, regulatory agencies, and industry. The FDA-led SEquencing Quality Control (SEQC) consortium has made considerable progress in this direction, and is the subject of this review. Specifically, three RNA-seq platforms (Illumina HiSeq, Life Technologies SOLiD, and Roche 454) were extensively evaluated at multiple sites to assess cross-site and cross-platform reproducibility. The results demonstrated that relative gene expression measurements were consistently comparable across labs and platforms, but not so for the measurement of absolute expression levels. As part of the quality evaluation several studies were included to evaluate the utility of RNA-seq in clinical settings and safety assessment. The neuroblastoma study profiled tumor samples from 498 pediatric neuroblastoma patients by both microarray and RNA-seq. RNA-seq offers more utilities than microarray in determining the transcriptomic characteristics of cancer. However, RNA-seq and microarray-based models were comparable in clinical endpoint prediction, even when including additional features unique to RNA-seq beyond gene expression. The toxicogenomics study compared microarray and RNA-seq profiles of the liver samples from rats exposed to 27 different chemicals representing multiple toxicity modes of action. Cross-platform concordance was dependent on chemical treatment and transcript abundance. Though both RNA-seq and microarray are suitable for developing gene expression based predictive models with comparable prediction performance, RNA-seq offers

  19. Comprehensive Assessments of RNA-seq by the SEQC Consortium: FDA-Led Efforts Advance Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Xu, Joshua; Gong, Binsheng; Wu, Leihong; Thakkar, Shraddha; Hong, Huixiao; Tong, Weida

    2016-03-15

    Studies on gene expression in response to therapy have led to the discovery of pharmacogenomics biomarkers and advances in precision medicine. Whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) is an emerging tool for profiling gene expression and has received wide adoption in the biomedical research community. However, its value in regulatory decision making requires rigorous assessment and consensus between various stakeholders, including the research community, regulatory agencies, and industry. The FDA-led SEquencing Quality Control (SEQC) consortium has made considerable progress in this direction, and is the subject of this review. Specifically, three RNA-seq platforms (Illumina HiSeq, Life Technologies SOLiD, and Roche 454) were extensively evaluated at multiple sites to assess cross-site and cross-platform reproducibility. The results demonstrated that relative gene expression measurements were consistently comparable across labs and platforms, but not so for the measurement of absolute expression levels. As part of the quality evaluation several studies were included to evaluate the utility of RNA-seq in clinical settings and safety assessment. The neuroblastoma study profiled tumor samples from 498 pediatric neuroblastoma patients by both microarray and RNA-seq. RNA-seq offers more utilities than microarray in determining the transcriptomic characteristics of cancer. However, RNA-seq and microarray-based models were comparable in clinical endpoint prediction, even when including additional features unique to RNA-seq beyond gene expression. The toxicogenomics study compared microarray and RNA-seq profiles of the liver samples from rats exposed to 27 different chemicals representing multiple toxicity modes of action. Cross-platform concordance was dependent on chemical treatment and transcript abundance. Though both RNA-seq and microarray are suitable for developing gene expression based predictive models with comparable prediction performance, RNA-seq offers

  20. DNA methylation in plants.

    PubMed

    Vanyushin, B F

    2006-01-01

    DNA in plants is highly methylated, containing 5-methylcytosine (m5C) and N6-methyladenine (m6A); m5C is located mainly in symmetrical CG and CNG sequences but it may occur also in other non-symmetrical contexts. m6A but not m5C was found in plant mitochondrial DNA. DNA methylation in plants is species-, tissue-, organelle- and age-specific. It is controlled by phytohormones and changes on seed germination, flowering and under the influence of various pathogens (viral, bacterial, fungal). DNA methylation controls plant growth and development, with particular involvement in regulation of gene expression and DNA replication. DNA replication is accompanied by the appearance of under-methylated, newly formed DNA strands including Okazaki fragments; asymmetry of strand DNA methylation disappears until the end of the cell cycle. A model for regulation of DNA replication by methylation is suggested. Cytosine DNA methylation in plants is more rich and diverse compared with animals. It is carried out by the families of specific enzymes that belong to at least three classes of DNA methyltransferases. Open reading frames (ORF) for adenine DNA methyltransferases are found in plant and animal genomes, and a first eukaryotic (plant) adenine DNA methyltransferase (wadmtase) is described; the enzyme seems to be involved in regulation of the mitochondria replication. Like in animals, DNA methylation in plants is closely associated with histone modifications and it affects binding of specific proteins to DNA and formation of respective transcription complexes in chromatin. The same gene (DRM2) in Arabidopsis thaliana is methylated both at cytosine and adenine residues; thus, at least two different, and probably interdependent, systems of DNA modification are present in plants. Plants seem to have a restriction-modification (R-M) system. RNA-directed DNA methylation has been observed in plants; it involves de novo methylation of almost all cytosine residues in a region of siRNA-DNA

  1. Computer animation and improved student comprehension of basic science concepts.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Jack D

    2006-01-01

    Many medical students have difficulty learning basic science, either because they find the material challenging to comprehend or because they believe it has limited clinical application. Computer-assisted instruction (CAI)--ie, computer animation--can clarify instruction by allowing students to visualize complex, dynamic processes in an interesting presentation. At West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine (WVSOM) in Lewisburg, a series of computer animations have been developed to present concepts in molecular and cellular biology. The author conducted an investigation to compare the efficacy of one representative computer animation with that of traditional textbook material. The subjects were 22 students who had been admitted to WVSOM but who had not yet begun classes. The experimental design of the study consisted of a prelesson test, a lesson, and a postlesson test. The lesson explained the process of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) replication using either a computer animation (n=12) or a chapter from a textbook (n=10). Lesson comprehension as measured by the tests was significantly higher for subjects who used the computer animation than for subjects who used the textbook (P<.01). Furthermore, reviewing the text after studying with the computer animation did not raise test scores, suggesting that the animation was sufficient for learning and the text was unnecessary. After the study, a majority of subjects indicated a preference for the animation over the text. These results demonstrate that CAI can be an effective tool for relating basic science to medical students by improving comprehension and eliciting interest in the lessons.

  2. Computer animation and improved student comprehension of basic science concepts.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Jack D

    2006-01-01

    Many medical students have difficulty learning basic science, either because they find the material challenging to comprehend or because they believe it has limited clinical application. Computer-assisted instruction (CAI)--ie, computer animation--can clarify instruction by allowing students to visualize complex, dynamic processes in an interesting presentation. At West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine (WVSOM) in Lewisburg, a series of computer animations have been developed to present concepts in molecular and cellular biology. The author conducted an investigation to compare the efficacy of one representative computer animation with that of traditional textbook material. The subjects were 22 students who had been admitted to WVSOM but who had not yet begun classes. The experimental design of the study consisted of a prelesson test, a lesson, and a postlesson test. The lesson explained the process of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) replication using either a computer animation (n=12) or a chapter from a textbook (n=10). Lesson comprehension as measured by the tests was significantly higher for subjects who used the computer animation than for subjects who used the textbook (P<.01). Furthermore, reviewing the text after studying with the computer animation did not raise test scores, suggesting that the animation was sufficient for learning and the text was unnecessary. After the study, a majority of subjects indicated a preference for the animation over the text. These results demonstrate that CAI can be an effective tool for relating basic science to medical students by improving comprehension and eliciting interest in the lessons. PMID:16428683

  3. DNA motif elucidation using belief propagation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Chan, Tak-Ming; Peng, Chengbin; Li, Yue; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2013-09-01

    Protein-binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughout platform that can measure the DNA-binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. A typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all the possible DNA k-mers (k=8∼10); such comprehensive binding affinity data usually need to be reduced and represented as motif models before they can be further analyzed and applied. Since proteins can often bind to DNA in multiple modes, one of the major challenges is to decompose the comprehensive affinity data into multimodal motif representations. Here, we describe a new algorithm that uses Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and can derive precise and multimodal motifs using belief propagations. We describe an HMM-based approach using belief propagations (kmerHMM), which accepts and preprocesses PBM probe raw data into median-binding intensities of individual k-mers. The k-mers are ranked and aligned for training an HMM as the underlying motif representation. Multiple motifs are then extracted from the HMM using belief propagations. Comparisons of kmerHMM with other leading methods on several data sets demonstrated its effectiveness and uniqueness. Especially, it achieved the best performance on more than half of the data sets. In addition, the multiple binding modes derived by kmerHMM are biologically meaningful and will be useful in interpreting other genome-wide data such as those generated from ChIP-seq. The executables and source codes are available at the authors' websites: e.g. http://www.cs.toronto.edu/∼wkc/kmerHMM. PMID:23814189

  4. High-speed detection of DNA translocation in nanopipettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraccari, Raquel L.; Ciccarella, Pietro; Bahrami, Azadeh; Carminati, Marco; Ferrari, Giorgio; Albrecht, Tim

    2016-03-01

    We present a high-speed electrical detection scheme based on a custom-designed CMOS amplifier which allows the analysis of DNA translocation in glass nanopipettes on a microsecond timescale. Translocation of different DNA lengths in KCl electrolyte provides a scaling factor of the DNA translocation time equal to p = 1.22, which is different from values observed previously with nanopipettes in LiCl electrolyte or with nanopores. Based on a theoretical model involving electrophoresis, hydrodynamics and surface friction, we show that the experimentally observed range of p-values may be the result of, or at least be affected by DNA adsorption and friction between the DNA and the substrate surface.We present a high-speed electrical detection scheme based on a custom-designed CMOS amplifier which allows the analysis of DNA translocation in glass nanopipettes on a microsecond timescale. Translocation of different DNA lengths in KCl electrolyte provides a scaling factor of the DNA translocation time equal to p = 1.22, which is different from values observed previously with nanopipettes in LiCl electrolyte or with nanopores. Based on a theoretical model involving electrophoresis, hydrodynamics and surface friction, we show that the experimentally observed range of p-values may be the result of, or at least be affected by DNA adsorption and friction between the DNA and the substrate surface. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Gel electrophoresis confirming lengths and purity of DNA samples, comparison between Axopatch 200B and custom-built setup, comprehensive low-noise amplifier characterization, representative I-V curves of nanopipettes used, typical scatter plots of τ vs. peak amplitude for the four LDNA's used, table of most probable τ values, a comparison between different fitting models for the DNA translocation time distribution, further details on the stochastic numerical simulation of the scaling statistics and the derivation of the extended

  5. Inducing comprehension in the bilateral poor reader.

    PubMed

    Rattan, G; Dean, R S; Lowrie, R E

    1987-09-01

    The comprehension effects of changes in the spatial configuration of prose were examined with reading disabled children who differed in laterality preference. Specifically, 24 learning disabled boys were presented with prose materials in a standard, phrased, and backward (right to left) fashion. Measures of comprehension showed that text in the phrased and backward conditions differentially facilitated comprehension for the more bilateral subjects but had little effect on more right lateralized subjects. The results were discussed in terms of the instructional implications of alterations in the visual-spatial arrangement of prose materials for bilateral readers.

  6. Mental maps in memory retrieval and comprehension.

    PubMed

    Curiel, Jacqueline M; Radvansky, Gabriel A

    2002-03-01

    How do people use spatial information stored in maps? This question has been explored in a number of domains, such as memory and language comprehension, with differing results. Some studies of how experimentally learned maps are organised in memory, using primed recognition, have found temporal information to influence mental map organisation. In contrast, studies of narrative comprehension, using probe identification and anaphoric reading times, have observed spatial effects. This study combines these two research traditions and shows that the organisation observed in long-term memory differs from the organisation in narrative comprehension, even when both tasks refer to the same map.

  7. Ribonucleotides in Bacterial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Jeremy W.; Randall, Justin R.; Matthews, Lindsay A.; Simmons, Lyle A.

    2014-01-01

    In all living cells, DNA is the storage medium for genetic information. Being quite stable, DNA is well-suited for its role in storage and propagation of information, but RNA is also covalently included in DNA through various mechanisms. Recent studies also demonstrate useful aspects of including ribonucleotides in the genome during repair. Therefore, our understanding of the consequences of RNA inclusion into bacterial genomic DNA is just beginning, but with its high frequency of occurrence the consequences and potential benefits are likely to be numerous and diverse. In this review, we discuss the processes that cause ribonucleotide inclusion in genomic DNA, the pathways important for ribonucleotide removal and the consequences that arise should ribonucleotides remain nested in genomic DNA. PMID:25387798

  8. DNA profiles from fingermarks.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Jennifer E L; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    Criminal investigations would be considerably improved if DNA profiles could be routinely generated from single fingermarks. Here we report a direct DNA profiling method that was able to generate interpretable profiles from 71% of 170 fingermarks. The data are based on fingermarks from all 5 digits of 34 individuals. DNA was obtained from the fingermarks using a swab moistened with Triton-X, and the fibers were added directly to one of two commercial DNA profiling kits. All profiles were obtained without increasing the number of amplification cycles; therefore, our method is ideally suited for adoption by the forensic science community. We indicate the use of the technique in a criminal case in which a DNA profile was generated from a fingermark on tape that was wrapped around a drug seizure. Our direct DNA profiling approach is rapid and able to generate profiles from touched items when current forensic practices have little chance of success.

  9. Electrocatalysis in DNA Sensors.

    PubMed

    Furst, Ariel; Hill, Michael G; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2014-12-14

    Electrocatalysis is often thought of solely in the inorganic realm, most often applied to energy conversion in fuel cells. However, the ever-growing field of bioelectrocatalysis has made great strides in advancing technology for both biofuel cells as well as biological detection platforms. Within the context of bioelectrocatalytic detection systems, DNA-based platforms are especially prevalent. One subset of these platforms, the one we have developed, takes advantage of the inherent charge transport properties of DNA. Electrocatalysis coupled with DNA-mediated charge transport has enabled specific and sensitive detection of lesions, mismatches and DNA-binding proteins. Even greater signal amplification from these platforms is now being achieved through the incorporation of a secondary electrode to the platform both for patterning DNA arrays and for detection. Here, we describe the evolution of this new DNA sensor technology. PMID:25435647

  10. Electrocatalysis in DNA Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Furst, Ariel; Hill, Michael G.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2014-01-01

    Electrocatalysis is often thought of solely in the inorganic realm, most often applied to energy conversion in fuel cells. However, the ever-growing field of bioelectrocatalysis has made great strides in advancing technology for both biofuel cells as well as biological detection platforms. Within the context of bioelectrocatalytic detection systems, DNA-based platforms are especially prevalent. One subset of these platforms, the one we have developed, takes advantage of the inherent charge transport properties of DNA. Electrocatalysis coupled with DNA-mediated charge transport has enabled specific and sensitive detection of lesions, mismatches and DNA-binding proteins. Even greater signal amplification from these platforms is now being achieved through the incorporation of a secondary electrode to the platform both for patterning DNA arrays and for detection. Here, we describe the evolution of this new DNA sensor technology. PMID:25435647

  11. Detection and quantitation of single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    DNA mutation binding proteins alone and as chimeric proteins with nucleases are used with solid supports to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The solid supports may be flow cytometry beads, DNA chips, glass slides or DNA dips sticks. DNA molecules are coupled to solid supports to form DNA-support complexes. Labeled DNA is used with unlabeled DNA mutation binding proteins such at TthMutS to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by binding which gives an increase in signal. Unlabeled DNA is utilized with labeled chimeras to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by nuclease activity of the chimera which gives a decrease in signal.

  12. Capture Hybridization Analysis of DNA Targets.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Alec N; Machyna, Martin; Simon, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    There are numerous recent cases where chromatin modifying complexes associate with long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), stoking interest in lncRNA genomic localization and associated proteins. Capture Hybridization Analysis of RNA Targets (CHART) uses complementary oligonucleotides to purify an RNA with its associated genomic DNA or proteins from formaldehyde cross-linked chromatin. Deep sequencing of the purified DNA fragments gives a comprehensive profile of the potential lncRNA biological targets in vivo. The combined identification of the genomic localization of RNA and its protein partners can directly inform hypotheses about RNA function, including recruitment of chromatin modifying complexes. Here, we provide a detailed protocol on how to design antisense capture oligos and perform CHART in tissue culture cells. PMID:27659977

  13. DNA methylation in spermatogenesis and male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiangrong; Jing, Xuan; Wu, Xueqing; Yan, Meiqin; Li, Qiang; Shen, Yan; Wang, Zhenqiang

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a significant problem for human reproduction, with males and females equally affected. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying male infertility remain unclear. Spermatogenesis is a highly complex process involving mitotic cell division, meiosis cell division and spermiogenesis; during this period, unique and extensive chromatin and epigenetic modifications occur to bring about specific epigenetic profiles in spermatozoa. It has recently been suggested that the dysregulation of epigenetic modifications, in particular the methylation of sperm genomic DNA, may serve an important role in the development of numerous diseases. The present study is a comprehensive review on the topic of male infertility, aiming to elucidate the association between sperm genomic DNA methylation and poor semen quality in male infertility. In addition, the current status of the genetic and epigenetic determinants of spermatogenesis in humans is discussed. PMID:27698683

  14. DNA methylation in spermatogenesis and male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiangrong; Jing, Xuan; Wu, Xueqing; Yan, Meiqin; Li, Qiang; Shen, Yan; Wang, Zhenqiang

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a significant problem for human reproduction, with males and females equally affected. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying male infertility remain unclear. Spermatogenesis is a highly complex process involving mitotic cell division, meiosis cell division and spermiogenesis; during this period, unique and extensive chromatin and epigenetic modifications occur to bring about specific epigenetic profiles in spermatozoa. It has recently been suggested that the dysregulation of epigenetic modifications, in particular the methylation of sperm genomic DNA, may serve an important role in the development of numerous diseases. The present study is a comprehensive review on the topic of male infertility, aiming to elucidate the association between sperm genomic DNA methylation and poor semen quality in male infertility. In addition, the current status of the genetic and epigenetic determinants of spermatogenesis in humans is discussed.

  15. DNA-based machines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuan; Willner, Bilha; Willner, Itamar

    2014-01-01

    The base sequence in nucleic acids encodes substantial structural and functional information into the biopolymer. This encoded information provides the basis for the tailoring and assembly of DNA machines. A DNA machine is defined as a molecular device that exhibits the following fundamental features. (1) It performs a fuel-driven mechanical process that mimics macroscopic machines. (2) The mechanical process requires an energy input, "fuel." (3) The mechanical operation is accompanied by an energy consumption process that leads to "waste products." (4) The cyclic operation of the DNA devices, involves the use of "fuel" and "anti-fuel" ingredients. A variety of DNA-based machines are described, including the construction of "tweezers," "walkers," "robots," "cranes," "transporters," "springs," "gears," and interlocked cyclic DNA structures acting as reconfigurable catenanes, rotaxanes, and rotors. Different "fuels", such as nucleic acid strands, pH (H⁺/OH⁻), metal ions, and light, are used to trigger the mechanical functions of the DNA devices. The operation of the devices in solution and on surfaces is described, and a variety of optical, electrical, and photoelectrochemical methods to follow the operations of the DNA machines are presented. We further address the possible applications of DNA machines and the future perspectives of molecular DNA devices. These include the application of DNA machines as functional structures for the construction of logic gates and computing, for the programmed organization of metallic nanoparticle structures and the control of plasmonic properties, and for controlling chemical transformations by DNA machines. We further discuss the future applications of DNA machines for intracellular sensing, controlling intracellular metabolic pathways, and the use of the functional nanostructures for drug delivery and medical applications.

  16. DNA-based machines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuan; Willner, Bilha; Willner, Itamar

    2014-01-01

    The base sequence in nucleic acids encodes substantial structural and functional information into the biopolymer. This encoded information provides the basis for the tailoring and assembly of DNA machines. A DNA machine is defined as a molecular device that exhibits the following fundamental features. (1) It performs a fuel-driven mechanical process that mimics macroscopic machines. (2) The mechanical process requires an energy input, "fuel." (3) The mechanical operation is accompanied by an energy consumption process that leads to "waste products." (4) The cyclic operation of the DNA devices, involves the use of "fuel" and "anti-fuel" ingredients. A variety of DNA-based machines are described, including the construction of "tweezers," "walkers," "robots," "cranes," "transporters," "springs," "gears," and interlocked cyclic DNA structures acting as reconfigurable catenanes, rotaxanes, and rotors. Different "fuels", such as nucleic acid strands, pH (H⁺/OH⁻), metal ions, and light, are used to trigger the mechanical functions of the DNA devices. The operation of the devices in solution and on surfaces is described, and a variety of optical, electrical, and photoelectrochemical methods to follow the operations of the DNA machines are presented. We further address the possible applications of DNA machines and the future perspectives of molecular DNA devices. These include the application of DNA machines as functional structures for the construction of logic gates and computing, for the programmed organization of metallic nanoparticle structures and the control of plasmonic properties, and for controlling chemical transformations by DNA machines. We further discuss the future applications of DNA machines for intracellular sensing, controlling intracellular metabolic pathways, and the use of the functional nanostructures for drug delivery and medical applications. PMID:24647836

  17. Multiprotein DNA Looping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilar, Jose M. G.; Saiz, Leonor

    2006-06-01

    DNA looping plays a fundamental role in a wide variety of biological processes, providing the backbone for long range interactions on DNA. Here we develop the first model for DNA looping by an arbitrarily large number of proteins and solve it analytically in the case of identical binding. We uncover a switchlike transition between looped and unlooped phases and identify the key parameters that control this transition. Our results establish the basis for the quantitative understanding of fundamental cellular processes like DNA recombination, gene silencing, and telomere maintenance.

  18. DNA ELECTROPHORESIS AT SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    RAFAILOVICH, MIRIAM; SOKOLOV, JONATHAN; GERSAPPE, DILIP

    2003-09-01

    During this year we performed two major projects: I. We developed a detailed theoretical model which complements our experiments on surface DNA electrophoresis. We found that it was possible to enhance the separation of DNA chains by imposing a chemical nanoscale pattern on the surface. This approach utilized the surface interaction effect of the DNA chains with the substrate and is a refinement to our previous method in which DNA chains were separated on homogeneous flat surfaces. By introducing the nano-patterns on the surface, the conformational changes of DNA chains of different lengths can be amplified, which results in the different friction strengths with the substrate surface. Our results also show that, when compared to the DNA electrophoresis performed on homogeneous flat surfaces, nanopatterned surfaces offer a larger window in choosing different surface interactions to achieve separation. II. In collaboration with a large international manufacturer of skin care products we also embarked on a project involving photo toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, which are a key ingredient in sunscreen and cosmetic lotions. The results clearly implicated the nanoparticles in catalyzing damage to chromosomal DNA. We then used this knowledge to develop a polymer/anti-oxidant coating which prevented the photocatalytic reaction on DNA while still retaining the UV absorptive properties of the nanoparticles. The standard gel electrophoresis was not sufficient in determining the extent of the DNA damage. The conclusions of this study were based predominantly on analysis obtained with the surface electrophoresis method.

  19. DNA origami nanopores.

    PubMed

    Bell, Nicholas A W; Engst, Christian R; Ablay, Marc; Divitini, Giorgio; Ducati, Caterina; Liedl, Tim; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2012-01-11

    We demonstrate the assembly of functional hybrid nanopores for single molecule sensing by inserting DNA origami structures into solid-state nanopores. In our experiments, single artificial nanopores based on DNA origami are repeatedly inserted in and ejected from solid-state nanopores with diameters around 15 nm. We show that these hybrid nanopores can be employed for the detection of λ-DNA molecules. Our approach paves the way for future development of adaptable single-molecule nanopore sensors based on the combination of solid-state nanopores and DNA self-assembly.

  20. DNA polymerase profiling.

    PubMed

    Summerer, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    We report a simple homogeneous fluorescence assay for quantification of DNA polymerase function in high throughput. The fluorescence signal is generated by the DNA polymerase triggering opening of a molecular beacon extension of the template strand. A resulting distance alteration is reported by fluorescence resonance energy transfer between two dyes introduced into the molecular beacon stem. We describe real-time reaction profiling of two model DNA polymerases. We demonstrate kinetic characterization, rapid optimization of reaction conditions, and inhibitor profiling using the presented assay. Furthermore, to supersede purification steps in screening procedures of DNA polymerase mutant libraries, detection of enzymatic activity in bacterial expression lysates is described.

  1. DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Zotter, Angelika; Vermeulen, Wim

    2011-01-01

    Structural changes to DNA severely affect its functions, such as replication and transcription, and play a major role in age-related diseases and cancer. A complicated and entangled network of DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms, including multiple DNA repair pathways, damage tolerance processes, and cell-cycle checkpoints safeguard genomic integrity. Like transcription and replication, DDR is a chromatin-associated process that is generally tightly controlled in time and space. As DNA damage can occur at any time on any genomic location, a specialized spatio-temporal orchestration of this defense apparatus is required. PMID:20980439

  2. Context improves comprehension of fronted objects.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Line Burholt; Engberg-Pedersen, Elisabeth; Poulsen, Mads

    2014-04-01

    Object-initial clauses (OCs) are associated with more processing difficulties than subject-initial clauses (SCs) in a number of languages (e.g. English, German and Finnish), but a supportive context can reduce or neutralize the difference between SCs and OCs with respect to reading times. Still, it is unresolved how context can affect the comprehension of OCs. In the present self-paced reading study of Danish, we therefore investigated both reading times, comprehension accuracy and response times for OCs and SCs. In line with previous studies on word order processing, OCs in an unsupportive context showed longer reading times than SCs, longer response times and a comprehension accuracy as poor as chance level. A manipulation of context showed no effect of reading time, but a supportive context had a stronger facilitating effect on comprehension (response accuracy and response time) for OCs than for SCs.

  3. Mycoinsecticides: comprehensive list and current status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study aimed to assemble a comprehensive list of mycoinsecticides developed worldwide. A variety of sources, including scientific publications, personal communications, and websites from manufacturers and regulatory agencies, was accessed. During the last four decades, ca. 80 companies worldwide...

  4. Comprehensive Evaluation Model for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Suellen B.; Riley, William

    1979-01-01

    The comprehensive model for evaluating nursing education programs is described in terms of what is evaluated; who conducts the evaluation; and why it is conducted. A structure for further action and decision making is also presented. (GDC)

  5. Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2012-12-12

    This poster introduces the Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR), an electronic database with demographic, health outcome, and exposure information for over a million DOE nuclear plant and laboratory workers.

  6. Comprehensive Oncologic Emergencies Research Network (CONCERN)

    Cancer.gov

    The Comprehensive Oncologic Emergencies Research Network (CONCERN) was established in March 2015 with the goal to accelerate knowledge generation, synthesis and translation of oncologic emergency medicine research through multi-center collaborations.

  7. Practical Vocational Orientation in the Comprehensive School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orne, Ingegard

    1973-01-01

    This description of practical vocational orientation in the Swedish comprehensive schools has been excerpted from Pryo i Samverkan (1971), a publication of the Arbetsmarknadens Yrkesrad (Vocational Council of the Labor Market). (Editor)

  8. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA matching shapes metabolism and healthy ageing.

    PubMed

    Latorre-Pellicer, Ana; Moreno-Loshuertos, Raquel; Lechuga-Vieco, Ana Victoria; Sánchez-Cabo, Fátima; Torroja, Carlos; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Calvo, Enrique; Aix, Esther; González-Guerra, Andrés; Logan, Angela; Bernad-Miana, María Luisa; Romanos, Eduardo; Cruz, Raquel; Cogliati, Sara; Sobrino, Beatriz; Carracedo, Ángel; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Ruíz-Cabello, Jesús; Murphy, Michael P; Flores, Ignacio; Vázquez, Jesús; Enríquez, José Antonio

    2016-07-28

    Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) shows extensive within population sequence variability. Many studies suggest that mtDNA variants may be associated with ageing or diseases, although mechanistic evidence at the molecular level is lacking. Mitochondrial replacement has the potential to prevent transmission of disease-causing oocyte mtDNA. However, extension of this technology requires a comprehensive understanding of the physiological relevance of mtDNA sequence variability and its match with the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. Studies in conplastic animals allow comparison of individuals with the same nuclear genome but different mtDNA variants, and have provided both supporting and refuting evidence that mtDNA variation influences organismal physiology. However, most of these studies did not confirm the conplastic status, focused on younger animals, and did not investigate the full range of physiological and phenotypic variability likely to be influenced by mitochondria. Here we systematically characterized conplastic mice throughout their lifespan using transcriptomic, proteomic,metabolomic, biochemical, physiological and phenotyping studies. We show that mtDNA haplotype profoundly influences mitochondrial proteostasis and reactive oxygen species generation,insulin signalling, obesity, and ageing parameters including telomere shortening and mitochondrial dysfunction, resulting in profound differences in health longevity between conplastic strains. PMID:27383793

  9. The 18S rDNA sequence of Synchytrium endobioticum and its utility in microarrays for the simultaneous detection of fungal and viral pathogens of potato.

    PubMed

    Abdullahi, Ismail; Koerbler, Marianne; Stachewicz, Hans; Winter, Stephan

    2005-08-01

    Resting spores extracted from wart (Synchytrium endobioticum)-infected potato tubers were used for DNA extraction and amplification of 18S rDNA. Analysis of the cloned, sequenced fragment revealed high similarity to members of the Chytridiomycota. Using this information, specific oligonucleotide probes were designed and arrayed onto glass slides for detection of the pathogen. Viral sequence information available in the databank was retrieved, or new viral sequences were generated, and used to design probes for specific detection of important quarantine viruses of potato. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of the oligonucleotide probes, total RNA from infected plants was reverse transcribed, labelled with Cyanine 5, and hybridised with the microarray. A significant number of the oligonucleotide probes exhibited high specificity to S. endobioticum, Andean potato latent virus, Andean potato mottle virus, Potato black ringspot virus, and Potato spindle tuber viroid. Hybridisation signals of sub-arrays within slides were reproducible (r = 0.79) with a high correlation coefficient of hybridisation repetitions (0.73). Our results demonstrate the potential of microarray-based hybridisation for identification of multiple pathogen targets, which will find application in quarantine laboratories, where parallel testing for diverse pathogens is essential. PMID:15800764

  10. A History of Rotorcraft Comprehensive Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    A history of the development of rotorcraft comprehensive analyses is presented. Comprehensive analyses are digital computer programs that calculate the aeromechanical behavior of the rotor and aircraft, bringing together the most advanced models of the geometry, structure, dynamics, and aerodynamics available in rotary wing technology. The development of the major codes of the last five decades from industry, government, and universities is described. A number of common themes observed in this history are discussed.

  11. A Longitudinal Study of Idiom and Text Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levorato, M. Chiara; Roch, Maja; Nesi, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    The relation between text and idiom comprehension in children with poor text comprehension skills was investigated longitudinally. In the first phase of the study, six-year-old first graders with different levels of text comprehension were compared in an idiom and sentence comprehension task. Text comprehension was shown to be more closely related…

  12. Is Word-Problem Solving a Form of Text Comprehension?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Fuchs, Douglas; Compton, Donald L.; Hamlett, Carol L.; Wang, Amber Y.

    2015-01-01

    This study's hypotheses were that (a) word-problem (WP) solving is a form of text comprehension that involves language comprehension processes, working memory, and reasoning, but (b) WP solving differs from other forms of text comprehension by requiring WP-specific language comprehension as well as general language comprehension. At the start of…

  13. How Reading Comprehension Is Embodied and Why That Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenberg, Arthur M.

    2011-01-01

    Reading comprehension, much like comprehension of situations and comprehension of oral language, is embodied. In all cases, comprehension is the ability to take effective action on the basis of affordances related to the body, the physical world, and personal goals and cultural norms. In language contexts, action-based comprehension arises from…

  14. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) biogenesis: visualization and duel incorporation of BrdU and EdU into newly synthesized mtDNA in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Stephen I; Edwards, James L; Backus, Carey; McLean, Lisa L; Haines, Kristine M; Feldman, Eva L

    2010-02-01

    Mitochondria are key regulators of cellular energy and are the focus of a large number of studies examining the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and biogenesis in healthy and diseased conditions. One approach to monitoring mitochondrial biogenesis is to measure the rate of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. We developed a sensitive technique to visualize newly synthesized mtDNA in individual cells to study mtDNA replication within subcellular compartments of neurons. The technique combines the incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and/or 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into mtDNA, together with a tyramide signal amplification protocol. Employing this technique, we visualized and measured mtDNA biogenesis in individual cells. The labeling procedure for EdU allows for more comprehensive results by allowing the comparison of its incorporation with other intracellular markers, because it does not require the harsh acid or enzyme digests necessary to recover the BrdU epitope. In addition, the utilization of both BrdU and EdU permits sequential pulse-chase experiments to follow the intracellular localization of mtDNA replication. The ability to quantify mitochondrial biogenesis provides an essential tool for investigating the alterations in mitochondrial dynamics involved in the pathogenesis of multiple cellular disorders, including neuropathies and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19875847

  15. Computational analyses of multilevel discourse comprehension.

    PubMed

    Graesser, Arthur C; McNamara, Danielle S

    2011-04-01

    The proposed multilevel framework of discourse comprehension includes the surface code, the textbase, the situation model, the genre and rhetorical structure, and the pragmatic communication level. We describe these five levels when comprehension succeeds and also when there are communication misalignments and comprehension breakdowns. A computer tool has been developed, called Coh-Metrix, that scales discourse (oral or print) on dozens of measures associated with the first four discourse levels. The measurement of these levels with an automated tool helps researchers track and better understand multilevel discourse comprehension. Two sets of analyses illustrate the utility of Coh-Metrix in discourse theory and educational practice. First, Coh-Metrix was used to measure the cohesion of the text base and situation model, as well as potential extraneous variables, in a sample of published studies that manipulated text cohesion. This analysis helped us better understand what was precisely manipulated in these studies and the implications for discourse comprehension mechanisms. Second, Coh-Metrix analyses are reported for samples of narrative and science texts in order to advance the argument that traditional text difficulty measures are limited because they fail to accommodate most of the levels of the multilevel discourse comprehension framework.

  16. Comprehensive analysis of the specificity of transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Juillerat, Alexandre; Dubois, Gwendoline; Valton, Julien; Thomas, Séverine; Stella, Stefano; Maréchal, Alan; Langevin, Stéphanie; Benomari, Nassima; Bertonati, Claudia; Silva, George H.; Daboussi, Fayza; Epinat, Jean-Charles; Montoya, Guillermo; Duclert, Aymeric; Duchateau, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    A key issue when designing and using DNA-targeting nucleases is specificity. Ideally, an optimal DNA-targeting tool has only one recognition site within a genomic sequence. In practice, however, almost all designer nucleases available today can accommodate one to several mutations within their target site. The ability to predict the specificity of targeting is thus highly desirable. Here, we describe the first comprehensive experimental study focused on the specificity of the four commonly used repeat variable diresidues (RVDs; NI:A, HD:C, NN:G and NG:T) incorporated in transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN). The analysis of >15 500 unique TALEN/DNA cleavage profiles allowed us to monitor the specificity gradient of the RVDs along a TALEN/DNA binding array and to present a specificity scoring matrix for RVD/nucleotide association. Furthermore, we report that TALEN can only accommodate a relatively small number of position-dependent mismatches while maintaining a detectable activity at endogenous loci in vivo, demonstrating the high specificity of these molecular tools. We thus envision that the results we provide will allow for more deliberate choices of DNA binding arrays and/or DNA targets, extending our engineering capabilities. PMID:24569350

  17. Tissue mitochondrial DNA changes. A stochastic system.

    PubMed

    Kopsidas, G; Kovalenko, S A; Heffernan, D R; Yarovaya, N; Kramarova, L; Stojanovski, D; Borg, J; Islam, M M; Caragounis, A; Linnane, A W

    2000-06-01

    detected in gracilis muscle which is predominantly dependent upon glycolysis with regard to its energy requirements. Finally, a comprehensive hypothesis is presented that features the stochastic nature of the mitochondrial system. The basis of the hypothesis is that a dynamic relationship exists between endogenous mutagen production, DNA repair, mtDNA turnover, and nuclear control of mtDNA copy number and that age-associated changes in the dynamics of this relationship lead to a loss of functional full-length mtDNA that eventually leads to bioenergy decline.

  18. DNA Binding Mode Transitions of Escherichia coli HUαβ: Evidence for Formation of a Bent DNA – Protein Complex on Intact, Linear Duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Junseock; Saecker, Ruth M.; Record, M. Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Escherichia coli HUαβ, a major nucleoid associated protein (NAP), organizes the DNA chromosome and facilitates numerous DNA transactions. Using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and a series of DNA lengths (8, 15, 34, 38 and 160 base pairs) we establish that HUαβ interacts with duplex DNA using three different nonspecific binding modes. Both the HU to DNA mole ratio ([HU]/[DNA]) and DNA length dictate the dominant HU binding mode. On sufficiently long DNA (≥ 34 base pairs), at low [HU]/[DNA], HU populates a noncooperative 34 bp binding mode with a binding constant of 2.1 (± 0.4) × 106 M−1, and a binding enthalpy of +7.7 (± 0.6) kcal/mol at 15 °C and 0.15 M Na+. With increasing [HU]/[DNA], HU bound in the noncooperative 34 bp mode progressively converts to two cooperative (ω ~ 20) modes with site sizes of 10 bp and 6 bp. These latter modes exhibit smaller binding constants (1.1 (± 0.2) × 105 M−1 for the 10 bp mode, 3.5 (± 1.4) × 104 M−1 for the 6 bp mode) and binding enthalpies (4.2 (± 0.3) kcal/mol for the 10 bp mode, −1.6 (±0.3) kcal/mol for the 6 bp mode). As DNA length increases to 34 bp or more at low [HU]/[DNA], the small modes are replaced by the 34 bp binding mode. FRET data demonstrate that the 34 bp mode bends DNA by 143 ± 6° whereas the 6 and 10 bp modes do not. The model proposed in this study provides a novel quantitative and comprehensive framework for reconciling previous structural and solution studies of HU, including single molecule (force extension measurement, AFM), fluorescence, and electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays. In particular, it explains how HU condenses or extends DNA depending on the relative concentrations of HU and DNA. PMID:18657548

  19. Many Ways to Loop DNA

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Jack D.

    2013-01-01

    In the 1960s, I developed methods for directly visualizing DNA and DNA-protein complexes using an electron microscope. This made it possible to examine the shape of DNA and to visualize proteins as they fold and loop DNA. Early applications included the first visualization of true nucleosomes and linkers and the demonstration that repeating tracts of adenines can cause a curvature in DNA. The binding of DNA repair proteins, including p53 and BRCA2, has been visualized at three- and four-way junctions in DNA. The trombone model of DNA replication was directly verified, and the looping of DNA at telomeres was discovered. PMID:24005675

  20. DNA and RNA ligases: structural variations and shared mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pascal, John M

    2008-02-01

    DNA and RNA ligases join 3' OH and 5' PO4 ends in polynucleotide substrates using a three-step reaction mechanism that involves covalent modification of both the ligase enzyme and the polynucleotide substrate with AMP. In the past three years, several polynucleotide ligases have been crystallized in complex with nucleic acid, providing the introductory views of ligase enzymes engaging their substrates. Crystal structures for two ATP-dependent DNA ligases, an NAD+-dependent DNA ligase, and an ATP-dependent RNA ligase demonstrate how ligases utilize the AMP group and their multi-domain architectures to manipulate nucleic acid structure and catalyze the end-joining reaction. Together with unliganded crystal structures of DNA and RNA ligases, a more comprehensive and dynamic understanding of the multi-step ligation reaction mechanism has emerged.

  1. DomeTree: a canonical toolkit for mitochondrial DNA analyses in domesticated animals.

    PubMed

    Peng, Min-Sheng; Fan, Long; Shi, Ni-Ni; Ning, Tiao; Yao, Yong-Gang; Murphy, Robert W; Wang, Wen-Zhi; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is widely used in various genetic studies of domesticated animals. Many applications require comprehensive knowledge about the phylogeny of mtDNA variants. Herein, we provide the most up-to-date mtDNA phylogeny (i.e. haplogroup tree or matrilineal genealogy) and a standardized hierarchical haplogroup nomenclature system for domesticated cattle, dogs, goats, horses, pigs, sheep, yaks and chickens. These high-resolution mtDNA haplogroup trees based on 1240 complete or near-complete mtDNA genome sequences are available in open resource DomeTree (http://www.dometree.org). In addition, we offer the software MitoToolPy (http://www.mitotool.org/mp.html) to facilitate the mtDNA data analyses. We will continuously and regularly update DomeTree and MitoToolPy. PMID:25655564

  2. Routine DNA testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Routine DNA testing. It’s done once you’ve Marker-Assisted Breeding Pipelined promising Qantitative Trait Loci within your own breeding program and thereby established the performance-predictive power of each DNA test for your germplasm under your conditions. By then you are ready to screen your par...

  3. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  4. Translesion DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Vaisman, Alexandra; McDonald, John P.; Woodgate, Roger

    2014-01-01

    All living organisms are continually exposed to agents that damage their DNA, which threatens the integrity of their genome. As a consequence, cells are equipped with a plethora of DNA repair enzymes to remove the damaged DNA. Unfortunately, situations nevertheless arise where lesions persist, and these lesions block the progression of the cell’s replicase. Under these situations, cells are forced to choose between recombination-mediated “damage avoidance” pathways, or use a specialized DNA polymerase (pol) to traverse the blocking lesion. The latter process is referred to as Translesion DNA Synthesis (TLS). As inferred by its name, TLS not only results in bases being (mis)incorporated opposite DNA lesions, but also downstream of the replicase-blocking lesion, so as to ensure continued genome duplication and cell survival. Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium possess five DNA polymerases, and while all have been shown to facilitate TLS under certain experimental conditions, it is clear that the LexA-regulated and damage-inducible pols II, IV and V perform the vast majority of TLS under physiological conditions. Pol V can traverse a wide range of DNA lesions and performs the bulk of mutagenic TLS, whereas pol II and pol IV appear to be more specialized TLS polymerases. PMID:26442823

  5. Replicating repetitive DNA.

    PubMed

    Tognetti, Silvia; Speck, Christian

    2016-05-27

    The function and regulation of repetitive DNA, the 'dark matter' of the genome, is still only rudimentarily understood. Now a study investigating DNA replication of repetitive centromeric chromosome segments has started to expose a fascinating replication program that involves suppression of ATR signalling, in particular during replication stress. PMID:27230530

  6. Characterization of muntjac DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.C.

    1981-05-27

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in muntjac chromosomes is generally proportional to the chromosomal DNA content, but the SCE frequency is reduced in the heterochromatic neck region of the X chromosome. The physical properties of muntjac DNA and the kinetics of repair of UV damage in muntjac heterochromatin and euchromatin were examined and compared with the distribution of sister chromatid exchange.

  7. Curating DNA specimens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA data are used in a variety of ethnobiological disciplines including archaeology, conservation, ecology, medicinal plants and natural products research, taxonomy and systematics, crop evolution and domestication, and genetic diversity. It frequently is convenient to store and share DNA among coop...

  8. Modeling DNA Replication Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Broyde, S.; Roy, D.; Shapiro, R.

    1997-06-01

    While there is now available a great deal of information on double stranded DNA from X-ray crystallography, high resolution NMR and computer modeling, very little is known about structures that are representative of the DNA core of replication intermediates. DNA replication occurs at a single strand/double strand junction and bulged out intermediates near the junction can lead to frameshift mutations. The single stranded domains are particularly challenging. Our interest is focused on strategies for modeling the DNA of these types of replication intermediates. Modeling such structures presents special problems in addressing the multiple minimum problem and in treating the electrostatic component of the force field. We are testing a number of search strategies for locating low energy structures of these types and we are also investigating two different distance dependent dielectric functions in the coulombic term of the force field. We are studying both unmodified DNA and DNA damaged by aromatic amines, carcinogens present in the environment in tobacco smoke, barbecued meats and automobile exhaust. The nature of the structure adopted by the carcinogen modified DNA at the replication fork plays a key role in determining whether the carcinogen will cause a mutation during replication that can initiate the carcinogenic process. In the present work results are presented for unmodified DNA.

  9. Human Mitochondrial DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Ian J.; Reyes, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of the process of DNA replication in mitochondria is in its infancy. For many years, maintenance of the mitochondrial genome was regarded as greatly simplified compared to the nucleus. Mammalian mitochondria were reported to lack all DNA repair systems, to eschew DNA recombination, and to possess but a single DNA polymerase, polymerase γ. Polγ was said to replicate mitochondrial DNA exclusively via one mechanism, involving only two priming events and a handful of proteins. In this “strand-displacement model,” leading strand DNA synthesis begins at a specific site and advances approximately two-thirds of the way around the molecule before DNA synthesis is initiated on the “lagging” strand. Although the displaced strand was long-held to be coated with protein, RNA has more recently been proposed in its place. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA molecules with all the features of products of conventional bidirectional replication have been documented, suggesting that the process and regulation of replication in mitochondria is complex, as befits a genome that is a core factor in human health and longevity. PMID:23143808

  10. DNA-cell conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hsiao, Shih-Chia; Francis, Matthew B.; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mathies, Richard; Chandra, Ravi; Douglas, Erik; Twite, Amy; Toriello, Nicholas; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2016-05-03

    The present invention provides conjugates of DNA and cells by linking the DNA to a native functional group on the cell surface. The cells can be without cell walls or can have cell walls. The modified cells can be linked to a substrate surface and used in assay or bioreactors.

  11. Premeltons in DNA.

    PubMed

    Sobell, Henry M

    2016-03-01

    Premeltons are examples of emergent-structures (i.e., structural-solitons) that arise spontaneously in DNA due to the presence of nonlinear-excitations in its structure. They are of two kinds: B-B (or A-A) premeltons form at specific DNA-regions to nucleate site-specific DNA melting. These are stationary and, being globally-nontopological, undergo breather-motions that allow drugs and dyes to intercalate into DNA. B-A (or A-B) premeltons, on the other hand, are mobile, and being globally-topological, act as phase-boundaries transforming B- into A-DNA during the structural phase-transition. They are not expected to undergo breather motions. A key feature of both types of premeltons is the presence of an intermediate structural-form in their central regions (proposed as being a transition-state intermediate in DNA-melting and in the B- to A-transition), which differs from either A- or B-DNA. Called beta-DNA, this is both metastable and hyperflexible--and contains an alternating sugar-puckering pattern along the polymer backbone combined with the partial unstacking (in its lower energy-forms) of every-other base-pair. Beta-DNA is connected to either B- or to A-DNA on either side by boundaries possessing a gradation of nonlinear structural-change, these being called the kink and the antikink regions. The presence of premeltons in DNA leads to a unifying theory to understand much of DNA physical chemistry and molecular biology. In particular, premeltons are predicted to define the 5' and 3' ends of genes in naked-DNA and DNA in active-chromatin, this having important implications for understanding physical aspects of the initiation, elongation and termination of RNA-synthesis during transcription. For these and other reasons, the model will be of broader interest to the general-audience working in these areas. The model explains a wide variety of data, and carries with it a number of experimental predictions--all readily testable--as will be described in this review.

  12. Premeltons in DNA.

    PubMed

    Sobell, Henry M

    2016-03-01

    Premeltons are examples of emergent-structures (i.e., structural-solitons) that arise spontaneously in DNA due to the presence of nonlinear-excitations in its structure. They are of two kinds: B-B (or A-A) premeltons form at specific DNA-regions to nucleate site-specific DNA melting. These are stationary and, being globally-nontopological, undergo breather-motions that allow drugs and dyes to intercalate into DNA. B-A (or A-B) premeltons, on the other hand, are mobile, and being globally-topological, act as phase-boundaries transforming B- into A-DNA during the structural phase-transition. They are not expected to undergo breather motions. A key feature of both types of premeltons is the presence of an intermediate structural-form in their central regions (proposed as being a transition-state intermediate in DNA-melting and in the B- to A-transition), which differs from either A- or B-DNA. Called beta-DNA, this is both metastable and hyperflexible--and contains an alternating sugar-puckering pattern along the polymer backbone combined with the partial unstacking (in its lower energy-forms) of every-other base-pair. Beta-DNA is connected to either B- or to A-DNA on either side by boundaries possessing a gradation of nonlinear structural-change, these being called the kink and the antikink regions. The presence of premeltons in DNA leads to a unifying theory to understand much of DNA physical chemistry and molecular biology. In particular, premeltons are predicted to define the 5' and 3' ends of genes in naked-DNA and DNA in active-chromatin, this having important implications for understanding physical aspects of the initiation, elongation and termination of RNA-synthesis during transcription. For these and other reasons, the model will be of broader interest to the general-audience working in these areas. The model explains a wide variety of data, and carries with it a number of experimental predictions--all readily testable--as will be described in this review

  13. Parametric resonance in DNA.

    PubMed

    Lacitignola, Deborah; Saccomandi, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    We consider a simple mesoscopic model of DNA in which the binding of the RNA polymerase enzyme molecule to the promoter sequence of the DNA is included through a substrate energy term modeling the enzymatic interaction with the DNA strands. We focus on the differential system for solitary waves and derive conditions--in terms of the model parameters--for the occurrence of the parametric resonance phenomenon. We find that what truly matters for parametric resonance is not the ratio between the strength of the stacking and the inter-strand forces but the ratio between the substrate and the inter-strands. On the basis of these results, the standard objection that longitudinal motion is negligible because of the second order seems to fail, suggesting that all the studies involving the longitudinal degree of freedom in DNA should be reconsidered when the interaction of the RNA polymerase with the DNA macromolecule is not neglected. PMID:24510728

  14. Advances in DNA photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckman, Emily M.; Aga, Roberto S.; Fehrman Cory, Emily M.; Ouchen, Fahima; Lesko, Alyssa; Telek, Brian; Lombardi, Jack; Bartsch, Carrie M.; Grote, James G.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we present our current research in exploring a DNA biopolymer for photonics applications. A new processing technique has been adopted that employs a modified soxhlet-dialysis (SD) rinsing technique to completely remove excess ionic contaminants from the DNA biopolymer, resulting in a material with greater mechanical stability and enhanced performance reproducibility. This newly processed material has been shown to be an excellent material for cladding layers in poled polymer electro-optic (EO) waveguide modulator applications. Thin film poling results are reported for materials using the DNA biopolymer as a cladding layer, as are results for beam steering devices also using the DNA biopolymer. Finally, progress on fabrication of a Mach Zehnder EO modulator with DNA biopolymer claddings using nanoimprint lithography techniques is reported.

  15. Is Word-Problem Solving a Form of Text Comprehension?

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Fuchs, Douglas; Compton, Donald L.; Hamlett, Carol L.; Wang, Amber Y.

    2015-01-01

    This study’s hypotheses were that (a) word-problem (WP) solving is a form of text comprehension that involves language comprehension processes, working memory, and reasoning, but (b) WP solving differs from other forms of text comprehension by requiring WP-specific language comprehension as well as general language comprehension. At the start of the 2nd grade, children (n = 206; on average, 7 years, 6 months) were assessed on general language comprehension, working memory, nonlinguistic reasoning, processing speed (a control variable), and foundational skill (arithmetic for WPs; word reading for text comprehension). In spring, they were assessed on WP-specific language comprehension, WPs, and text comprehension. Path analytic mediation analysis indicated that effects of general language comprehension on text comprehension were entirely direct, whereas effects of general language comprehension on WPs were partially mediated by WP-specific language. By contrast, effects of working memory and reasoning operated in parallel ways for both outcomes. PMID:25866461

  16. Beyond the Story Map: Inferential Comprehension via Character Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McTigue, Erin; Douglass, April; Wright, Katherine L.; Hodges, Tracey S.; Franks, Amanda D.

    2015-01-01

    Inferential comprehension requires both emotional intelligence and cognitive skills, however instructional comprehension strategies typically underemphasize the emotional contribution. This article documents an intervention used by diverse third grade students which centers on teaching story comprehension through character perspective-taking…

  17. DNA supercoiling and its role in DNA decatenation and unknotting

    PubMed Central

    Witz, Guillaume; Stasiak, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    Chromosomal and plasmid DNA molecules in bacterial cells are maintained under torsional tension and are therefore supercoiled. With the exception of extreme thermophiles, supercoiling has a negative sign, which means that the torsional tension diminishes the DNA helicity and facilitates strand separation. In consequence, negative supercoiling aids such processes as DNA replication or transcription that require global- or local-strand separation. In extreme thermophiles, DNA is positively supercoiled which protects it from thermal denaturation. While the role of DNA supercoiling connected to the control of DNA stability, is thoroughly researched and subject of many reviews, a less known role of DNA supercoiling emerges and consists of aiding DNA topoisomerases in DNA decatenation and unknotting. Although DNA catenanes are natural intermediates in the process of DNA replication of circular DNA molecules, it is necessary that they become very efficiently decatenated, as otherwise the segregation of freshly replicated DNA molecules would be blocked. DNA knots arise as by-products of topoisomerase-mediated intramolecular passages that are needed to facilitate general DNA metabolism, including DNA replication, transcription or recombination. The formed knots are, however, very harmful for cells if not removed efficiently. Here, we overview the role of DNA supercoiling in DNA unknotting and decatenation. PMID:20026582

  18. Simple & Safe Genomic DNA Isolation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for purifying DNA using either bacteria or rat liver is presented. Directions for doing a qualitative DNA assay using diphenylamine and a quantitative DNA assay using spectroscopy are included. (KR)

  19. Studying DNA in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarins, Silja

    1993-01-01

    Outlines a workshop for teachers that illustrates a method of extracting DNA and provides instructions on how to do some simple work with DNA without sophisticated and expensive equipment. Provides details on viscosity studies and breaking DNA molecules. (DDR)

  20. Early Identification of Reading Comprehension Difficulties.

    PubMed

    Catts, Hugh W; Nielsen, Diane Corcoran; Bridges, Mindy Sittner; Liu, Yi-Syuan

    2016-09-01

    Most research on early identification of reading disabilities has focused on word reading problems and little attention has been given to reading comprehension difficulties. In this study, we investigated whether measures of language ability and/or response to language intervention in kindergarten uniquely predicted reading comprehension difficulties in third grade. A total of 366 children were administered a battery of screening measures at the beginning of kindergarten and progress monitoring probes across the school year. A subset of children also received a 26-week Tier 2 language intervention. Participants' achievement in word reading was assessed at the end of second grade, and their performance in reading comprehension was measured as the end of third grade. Results showed that measures of language ability in kindergarten significantly added to the prediction of reading comprehension difficulties over and above kindergarten word reading predictors and direct measures of word reading in second grade. Response to language intervention also proved to be a unique predictor of reading comprehension outcomes. Findings are discussed in terms of their relevance for the early identification of reading disabilities.

  1. Dichotic listening performance predicts language comprehension.

    PubMed

    Asbjørnsen, Arve E; Helland, Turid

    2006-05-01

    Dichotic listening performance is considered a reliable and valid procedure for the assessment of language lateralisation in the brain. However, the documentation of a relationship between language functions and dichotic listening performance is sparse, although it is accepted that dichotic listening measures language perception. In particular, language comprehension should show close correspondence to perception of language stimuli. In the present study, we tested samples of reading-impaired and normally achieving children between 10 and 13 years of age with tests of reading skills, language comprehension, and dichotic listening to consonant-vowel (CV) syllables. A high correlation between the language scores and the dichotic listening performance was expected. However, since the left ear score is believed to be an error when assessing language laterality, covariation was expected for the right ear scores only. In addition, directing attention to one ear input was believed to reduce the influence of random factors, and thus show a more concise estimate of left hemisphere language capacity. Thus, a stronger correlation between language comprehension skills and the dichotic listening performance when attending to the right ear was expected. The analyses yielded a positive correlation between the right ear score in DL and language comprehension, an effect that was stronger when attending to the right ear. The present results confirm the assumption that dichotic listening with CV syllables measures an aspect of language perception and language skills that is related to general language comprehension.

  2. Justice foundations for the Comprehensive Law Movement.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, Dale

    2010-01-01

    Authors examining the developing dispute resolution alternatives to the adversarial system have identified nine converging "vectors" or alternatives in what has been termed the Comprehensive Law Movement. These authors have sought to understand how the developing vectors can remain separate and vibrant movements while sharing common ground. Some analyze these developments as being within law and legal practice, others see them as alternative approaches to law, and still others take a combined approach. It will be impossible to understand how these vectors have meaningful differences from law and legal practice if the search is limited to looking within law and legal practice. It will be impossible to understand how these vectors have meaningful commonalities with law and legal practice if the search is limited to looking external to law and legal practice. Instead of comparing the vectors with the adversarial system, higher order criteria are required. What is needed is a comprehensive and internally consistent super-system of norms; one that can be used to evaluate the adversarial system and the evolving vectors on an equal footing. An Aristotelian natural law virtue theory of justice can: (a) provide a functional guiding definition of justice; (b) serve as a comprehensive and internally consistent super-system of norms; and (c) provide the theoretical and evaluative foundation required to clarify the relationships among the adversarial system and the developing vectors. Finally, it will become clear why the Comprehensive Law Movement might be more appropriately conceptualized as the Comprehensive Justice Movement. PMID:20880589

  3. Advances in high throughput DNA sequence data compression.

    PubMed

    Sardaraz, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad; Ikram, Ataul Aziz

    2016-06-01

    Advances in high throughput sequencing technologies and reduction in cost of sequencing have led to exponential growth in high throughput DNA sequence data. This growth has posed challenges such as storage, retrieval, and transmission of sequencing data. Data compression is used to cope with these challenges. Various methods have been developed to compress genomic and sequencing data. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of compression methods for genome and reads compression. Algorithms are categorized as referential or reference free. Experimental results and comparative analysis of various methods for data compression are presented. Finally, key challenges and research directions in DNA sequence data compression are highlighted. PMID:26846812

  4. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  5. DNA vaccines against influenza.

    PubMed

    Stachyra, Anna; Góra-Sochacka, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Genetic vaccine technology has been considerably developed within the last two decades. This cost effective and promising strategy can be applied for therapy of cancers and for curing allergy, chronic and infectious diseases, such as a seasonal and pandemic influenza. Despite numerous advantages, several limitations of this technology reduce its performance and can retard its commercial exploitation in humans and its veterinary applications. Inefficient delivery of the DNA vaccine into cells of immunized individuals results in low intracellular supply of suitable expression cassettes encoding an antigen, in its low expression level and, in turn, in reduced immune responses against the antigen. Improvement of DNA delivery into the host cells might significantly increase effectiveness of the DNA vaccine. A vast array of innovative methods and various experimental strategies have been applied in order to enhance the effectiveness of DNA vaccines. They include various strategies improving DNA delivery as well as expression and immunogenic potential of the proteins encoded by the DNA vaccines. Researchers focusing on DNA vaccines against influenza have applied many of these strategies. Recent examples of the most successful modern approaches are discussed in this review.

  6. HIV DNA Integration

    PubMed Central

    Craigie, Robert; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2012-01-01

    Retroviruses are distinguished from other viruses by two characteristic steps in the viral replication cycle. The first is reverse transcription, which results in the production of a double-stranded DNA copy of the viral RNA genome, and the second is integration, which results in covalent attachment of the DNA copy to host cell DNA. The initial catalytic steps of the integration reaction are performed by the virus-encoded integrase (IN) protein. The chemistry of the IN-mediated DNA breaking and joining steps is well worked out, and structures of IN-DNA complexes have now clarified how the overall complex assembles. Methods developed during these studies were adapted for identification of IN inhibitors, which received FDA approval for use in patients in 2007. At the chromosomal level, HIV integration is strongly favored in active transcription units, which may promote efficient viral gene expression after integration. HIV IN binds to the cellular factor LEDGF/p75, which promotes efficient infection and tethers IN to favored target sites. The HIV integration machinery must also interact with many additional host factors during infection, including nuclear trafficking and pore proteins during nuclear entry, histones during initial target capture, and DNA repair proteins during completion of the DNA joining steps. Models for some of the molecular mechanisms involved have been proposed, but important details remain to be clarified. PMID:22762018

  7. Reversible DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    In this review we summarize and discuss the different methods we can use to achieve reversible DNA compaction in vitro. Reversible DNA compaction is a natural process that occurs in living cells and viruses. As a result these process long sequences of DNA can be concentrated in a small volume (compacted) to be decompacted only when the information carried by the DNA is needed. In the current work we review the main artificial compacting agents looking at their suitability for decompaction. The different approaches used for decompaction are strongly influenced by the nature of the compacting agent that determines the mechanism of compaction. We focus our discussion on two main artificial compacting agents: multivalent cations and cationic surfactants that are the best known compacting agents. The reversibility of the process can be achieved by adding chemicals like divalent cations, alcohols, anionic surfactants, cyclodextrins or by changing the chemical nature of the compacting agents via pH modifications, light induced conformation changes or by redox-reactions. We stress the relevance of electrostatic interactions and self-assembly as a main approach in order to tune up the DNA conformation in order to create an on-off switch allowing a transition between coil and compact states. The recent advances to control DNA conformation in vitro, by means of molecular self-assembly, result in a better understanding of the fundamental aspects involved in the DNA behavior in vivo and serve of invaluable inspiration for the development of potential biomedical applications. PMID:24444152

  8. Sperm DNA damage and its relation with leukocyte DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Babazadeh, Zahra; Razavi, Shahnaz; Tavalaee, Marziyeh; Deemeh, Mohammad Reza; Shahidi, Maryam; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2010-01-01

    DNA fragmentation in human sperm has been related to endogenous and exogenous factors. Exogenous factors can also affect leukocyte DNA integrity. This study evaluated the relation between sperm DNA damage and leukocyte DNA integrity, as a predictor of exogenous factors. DNA damage in the sperm and leukocytes of 41 individuals undergoing ICSI were measured by Comet assay. In addition, sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD) was carried out on semen samples. A positive correlation was observed between the DNA integrity of sperm with leukocytes. When patients were divided into low and high DNA exposure groups, sperm DNA fragmentation was significantly different between the two groups. Cleavage rate and embryo quality showed significant correlation with leukocyte DNA integrity. The results showed that leukocyte DNA integrity could be used to identify individuals at high risk in order to reduce the extent of DNA damage in patients before ICSI in order to improve the subsequent outcome of this procedure.

  9. DNA-PK assay

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Connelly, Margery A.

    2004-10-12

    The present invention provides a method for detecting DNA-activated protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity in a biological sample. The method includes contacting a biological sample with a detectably-labeled phosphate donor and a synthetic peptide substrate defined by the following features to provide specific recognition and phosphorylation by DNA-PK: (1) a phosphate-accepting amino acid pair which may include serine-glutamine (Ser-Gln) (SQ), threonine-glutamine (Thr-Gln) (TQ), glutamine-serine (Gln-Ser) (QS), or glutamine-threonine (Gln-Thr) (QT); (2) enhancer amino acids which may include glutamic acid or glutamine immediately adjacent at the amino- or carboxyl- side of the amino acid pair and forming an amino acid pair-enhancer unit; (3) a first spacer sequence at the amino terminus of the amino acid pair-enhancer unit; (4) a second spacer sequence at the carboxyl terminus of the amino acid pair-enhancer unit, which spacer sequences may include any combination of amino acids that does not provide a phosphorylation site consensus sequence motif; and, (5) a tag moiety, which may be an amino acid sequence or another chemical entity that permits separating the synthetic peptide from the phosphate donor. A compostion and a kit for the detection of DNA-PK activity are also provided. Methods for detecting DNA, protein phosphatases and substances that alter the activity of DNA-PK are also provided. The present invention also provides a method of monitoring protein kinase and DNA-PK activity in living cells. -A composition and a kit for monitoring protein kinase activity in vitro and a composition and a kit for monitoring DNA-PK activities in living cells are also provided. A method for identifying agents that alter protein kinase activity in vitro and a method for identifying agents that alter DNA-PK activity in living cells are also provided.

  10. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  11. Validity of Highlighting on Text Comprehension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Joey C. Y.; Chan, Alan H. S.

    2009-10-01

    In this study, 38 university students were tested with a Chinese reading task on an LED display under different task conditions for determining the effects of the highlighting and its validity on comprehension performance on light-emitting diodes (LED) display for Chinese reading. Four levels of validity (0%, 33%, 67% and 100%) and a control condition with no highlighting were tested. Each subject was required to perform the five experimental conditions in which different passages were read and comprehended. The results showed that the condition with 100% validity of highlighting was found to have better comprehension performance than other validity levels and conditions with no highlighting. The comprehension score of the condition without highlighting effect was comparatively lower than those highlighting conditions with distracters, though not significant.

  12. Computing a Comprehensible Model for Spam Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Sepúlveda, Amparo; Triviño-Rodriguez, José L.; Morales-Bueno, Rafael

    In this paper, we describe the application of the Desicion Tree Boosting (DTB) learning model to spam email filtering.This classification task implies the learning in a high dimensional feature space. So, it is an example of how the DTB algorithm performs in such feature space problems. In [1], it has been shown that hypotheses computed by the DTB model are more comprehensible that the ones computed by another ensemble methods. Hence, this paper tries to show that the DTB algorithm maintains the same comprehensibility of hypothesis in high dimensional feature space problems while achieving the performance of other ensemble methods. Four traditional evaluation measures (precision, recall, F1 and accuracy) have been considered for performance comparison between DTB and others models usually applied to spam email filtering. The size of the hypothesis computed by a DTB is smaller and more comprehensible than the hypothesis computed by Adaboost and Naïve Bayes.

  13. Effects of Psychological Attention on Pronoun Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Jennifer E.; Lao, Shin-Yi C.

    2015-01-01

    Pronoun comprehension is facilitated for referents that are focused in the discourse context. Discourse focus has been described as a function of attention, especially shared attention, but few studies have explicitly tested this idea. Two experiments used an exogenous capture cue paradigm to demonstrate that listeners’ visual attention at the onset of a story influences their preferences during pronoun resolution later in the story. In both experiments trial-initial attention modulated listeners’ transitory biases while considering referents for the pronoun, whether it was in response to the capture cue or not. These biases even had a small influence on listeners’ final interpretation of the pronoun. These results provide independently-motivated evidence that the listener’s attention influences the on-line processes of pronoun comprehension. Trial-initial attentional shifts were made on the basis of non-shared, private information, demonstrating that attentional effects on pronoun comprehension are not restricted to shared attention among interlocutors. PMID:26191533

  14. Cellular processing and destinies of artificial DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Di Sheng; Qian, Hang; Tay, Chor Yong; Leong, David Tai

    2016-08-01

    Since many bionanotechnologies are targeted at cells, understanding how and where their interactions occur and the subsequent results of these interactions is important. Changing the intrinsic properties of DNA nanostructures and linking them with interactions presents a holistic and powerful strategy for understanding dual nanostructure-biological systems. With the recent advances in DNA nanotechnology, DNA nanostructures present a great opportunity to understand the often convoluted mass of information pertaining to nanoparticle-biological interactions due to the more precise control over their chemistry, sizes, and shapes. Coupling just some of these designs with an understanding of biological processes is both a challenge and a source of opportunities. Despite continuous advances in the field of DNA nanotechnology, the intracellular fate of DNA nanostructures has remained unclear and controversial. Because understanding its cellular processing and destiny is a necessary prelude to any rational design of exciting and innovative bionanotechnology, in this review, we will discuss and provide a comprehensive picture relevant to the intracellular processing and the fate of various DNA nanostructures which have been remained elusive for some time. We will also link the unique capabilities of DNA to some novel ideas for developing next-generation bionanotechnologies. PMID:27119124

  15. DNA Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    MARINUS, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair functions to correct replication errors in newly synthesized DNA and to prevent recombination between related, but not identical (homeologous), DNA sequences. The mechanism of mismatch repair is best understood in Escherichia coli and is the main focus of this review. The early genetic studies of mismatch repair are described as a basis for the subsequent biochemical characterization of the system. The effects of mismatch repair on homologous and homeologous recombination are described. The relationship of mismatch repair to cell toxicity induced by various drugs is included. The VSP (Very Short Patch) repair system is described in detail. PMID:26442827

  16. Focus: DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    Progress in the development of DNA probes for the identification and quantitation of specific genetic sequences in biological samples is reviewed. Current research efforts in the development of DNA probes for the diagnosis of a wide variety of bacterial, viral, and other infectious diseases, such as herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus, and inherited genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anemia are discussed. Progress in development of DNA probe assays for cancer diagnosis, detection of Salmonella food poisoning, tissue typing (detection of histocompatibility antigens), mutagen screening, and animal diseases, among other applications is included.

  17. Deconstructing Comprehensibility: Identifying the Linguistic Influences on Listeners' L2 Comprehensibility Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacs, Talia; Trofimovich, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Comprehensibility, a major concept in second language (L2) pronunciation research that denotes listeners' perceptions of how easily they understand L2 speech, is central to interlocutors' communicative success in real-world contexts. Although comprehensibility has been modeled in several L2 oral proficiency scales--for example, the Test of English…

  18. Reading Comprehension--A Critical Analysis of Selected Factors Affecting Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlak, Stephen A.

    The purpose of this study were to survey scientific research, professional literature, and doctoral dissertations on reading comprehension done from 1948 to 1972, to identify the reading factors believed to affect reading comprehension, to analyze the identified reading factors by studying the major available research and related literature, to…

  19. Prediction in Language Comprehension beyond Specific Words: An ERP Study on Sentence Comprehension in Polish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szewczyk, Jakub M.; Schriefers, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Recently, several ERP studies have shown that the human language comprehension system anticipates words that are highly likely continuations of a given text. However, it remains an open issue whether the language comprehension system can also make predictions that go beyond a specific word. Here, we address the question of whether readers predict…

  20. Improving Reading Comprehension by Predicting, Monitoring Comprehension, Remediation, and Personal Response Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobucci, Leanne; Richert, Judy; Ronan, Susan; Tanis, Ariana

    This report describes a program for improving inconsistent reading comprehension. The targeted population consisted of first, third, and fifth grade classrooms in a diverse middle class community located in Illinois. The problems of low academic achievement were documented through teacher observation, reading comprehension test scores, and low…