Science.gov

Sample records for compression station despressurizacao

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas Fueling Stations

    Science.gov Websites

    infrastructure: time-fill and fast-fill. The main structural differences between the two systems are the amount fuel dispensed and the time it takes for CNG to be delivered. Most CNG stations include one of these into account. Learn more about filling CNG tanks. Time-Fill CNG Station Enlarge illustration Time-fill

  2. Hydrogen Fueling Station Using Thermal Compression: a techno-economic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kriha, Kenneth; Petitpas, Guillaume; Melchionda, Michael

    The goal of this project was to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of using thermal compression to create the hydrogen pressure necessary to operate vehicle hydrogen fueling stations. The concept of utilizing the exergy within liquid hydrogen to build pressure rather than mechanical components such as compressors or cryogenic liquid pumps has several advantages. In theory, the compressor-less hydrogen station will have lower operating and maintenance costs because the compressors found in conventional stations require large amounts of electricity to run and are prone to mechanical breakdowns. The thermal compression station also utilizes some of the energy used tomore » liquefy the hydrogen as work to build pressure, this is energy that in conventional stations is lost as heat to the environment.« less

  3. Design and Analysis of a Hydrogen Compression and Storage Station

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-12-01

    Holmes THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704–0188 Public reporting burden for this collection...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF ABSTRACT Unclassified 20. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU NSN 7540–01-280-5500 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 2–89...than fossil fuels [2]. Renewably generated hydrogen gas, such as the hydrogen station demonstrated at NPS, falls into this category of alternative

  4. Investigating the Methane Footprint of Compressed Natural Gas Stations in the Los Angeles Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carranza, V.; Hopkins, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Bush, S.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Miu, J.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, natural gas has taken on a larger role in the United States' discourse on energy policy because it is seen as a fuel that can alleviate the country's dependence on foreign energy while simultaneously reducing greenhouse gas emissions. To this end, the State of California promotes the use of vehicles fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG). However, the implications of increased CNG vehicles for greenhouse gas emission reduction are not fully understood. Specifically, methane (CH4) leakages from natural gas infrastructure could make the switch from conventional to CNG vehicles a source of CH4 to the atmosphere, and negate the greenhouse-gas reduction benefit of this policy. The goal of our research is to provide an analysis of potential CH4 leakages from thirteen CNG filling stations in Orange County, California. To improve our understanding of CH4 leakages, we used a mobile laboratory, which is a Ford Transit van equipped with cavity-ring down Picarro spectrometers, to measure CH4 mixing ratios in these CNG stations. MATLAB and ArcGIS were used to conduct statistical analysis and to construct spatial and temporal maps for each transect. We observed mean levels of excess CH4 (relative to background CH4 mixing ratios) ranging from 60 to 1700 ppb at the CNG stations we sampled. Repeated sampling of CNG stations revealed higher levels of excess CH4 during the daytime compared to the nighttime. From our observations, CNG storage tanks and pumps have approximately the same CH4 leakage levels. By improving our understanding of the spatial and temporal patterns of CH4 emissions from CNG stations, our research can provide valuable information to reduce the climate footprint of the natural gas industry.

  5. Control of Warm Compression Stations Using Model Predictive Control: Simulation and Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonne, F.; Alamir, M.; Bonnay, P.

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with multivariable constrained model predictive control for Warm Compression Stations (WCS). WCSs are subject to numerous constraints (limits on pressures, actuators) that need to be satisfied using appropriate algorithms. The strategy is to replace all the PID loops controlling the WCS with an optimally designed model-based multivariable loop. This new strategy leads to high stability and fast disturbance rejection such as those induced by a turbine or a compressor stop, a key-aspect in the case of large scale cryogenic refrigeration. The proposed control scheme can be used to achieve precise control of pressures in normal operation or to avoid reaching stopping criteria (such as excessive pressures) under high disturbances (such as a pulsed heat load expected to take place in future fusion reactors, expected in the cryogenic cooling systems of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ITER or the Japan Torus-60 Super Advanced fusion experiment JT-60SA). The paper details the simulator used to validate this new control scheme and the associated simulation results on the SBTs WCS. This work is partially supported through the French National Research Agency (ANR), task agreement ANR-13-SEED-0005.

  6. Design and the parametric testing of the space station prototype integrated vapor compression distillation water recovery module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, W. F.; Nuccio, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    Potable water for the Space Station Prototype life support system is generated by the vapor compression technique of vacuum distillation. A description of a complete three-man modular vapor compression water renovation loop that was built and tested is presented; included are all of the pumps, tankage, chemical post-treatment, instrumentation, and controls necessary to make the loop representative of an automatic, self-monitoring, null gravity system. The design rationale is given and the evolved configuration is described. Presented next are the results of an extensive parametric test during which distilled water was generated from urine and urinal flush water with concentration of solids in the evaporating liquid increasing progressively to 60 percent. Water quality, quantity and production rate are shown together with measured energy consumption rate in terms of watt-hours per kilogram of distilled water produced.

  7. Model based multivariable controller for large scale compression stations. Design and experimental validation on the LHC 18KW cryorefrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bonne, François; Bonnay, Patrick; Alamir, Mazen

    2014-01-29

    In this paper, a multivariable model-based non-linear controller for Warm Compression Stations (WCS) is proposed. The strategy is to replace all the PID loops controlling the WCS with an optimally designed model-based multivariable loop. This new strategy leads to high stability and fast disturbance rejection such as those induced by a turbine or a compressor stop, a key-aspect in the case of large scale cryogenic refrigeration. The proposed control scheme can be used to have precise control of every pressure in normal operation or to stabilize and control the cryoplant under high variation of thermal loads (such as a pulsedmore » heat load expected to take place in future fusion reactors such as those expected in the cryogenic cooling systems of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ITER or the Japan Torus-60 Super Advanced fusion experiment JT-60SA). The paper details how to set the WCS model up to synthesize the Linear Quadratic Optimal feedback gain and how to use it. After preliminary tuning at CEA-Grenoble on the 400W@1.8K helium test facility, the controller has been implemented on a Schneider PLC and fully tested first on the CERN's real-time simulator. Then, it was experimentally validated on a real CERN cryoplant. The efficiency of the solution is experimentally assessed using a reasonable operating scenario of start and stop of compressors and cryogenic turbines. This work is partially supported through the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) Goal Oriented Training Program, task agreement WP10-GOT-GIRO.« less

  8. Model based multivariable controller for large scale compression stations. Design and experimental validation on the LHC 18KW cryorefrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonne, François; Alamir, Mazen; Bonnay, Patrick; Bradu, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a multivariable model-based non-linear controller for Warm Compression Stations (WCS) is proposed. The strategy is to replace all the PID loops controlling the WCS with an optimally designed model-based multivariable loop. This new strategy leads to high stability and fast disturbance rejection such as those induced by a turbine or a compressor stop, a key-aspect in the case of large scale cryogenic refrigeration. The proposed control scheme can be used to have precise control of every pressure in normal operation or to stabilize and control the cryoplant under high variation of thermal loads (such as a pulsed heat load expected to take place in future fusion reactors such as those expected in the cryogenic cooling systems of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ITER or the Japan Torus-60 Super Advanced fusion experiment JT-60SA). The paper details how to set the WCS model up to synthesize the Linear Quadratic Optimal feedback gain and how to use it. After preliminary tuning at CEA-Grenoble on the 400W@1.8K helium test facility, the controller has been implemented on a Schneider PLC and fully tested first on the CERN's real-time simulator. Then, it was experimentally validated on a real CERN cryoplant. The efficiency of the solution is experimentally assessed using a reasonable operating scenario of start and stop of compressors and cryogenic turbines. This work is partially supported through the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) Goal Oriented Training Program, task agreement WP10-GOT-GIRO.

  9. Distribution profile, health risk and elimination of model atmospheric SVOCs associated with a typical municipal garbage compressing station in Guangzhou, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guiying; Sun, Hongwei; Zhang, Zhengyong; An, Taicheng; Hu, Jianfang

    2013-09-01

    Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) air pollution caused by municipal garbage compressing process was investigated at a garbage compressing station (GCS). The most abundant contaminants were phthalate esters (PAEs), followed by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organic chlorinated pesticides (OCPs). ∑16PAHs concentrations ranged from 58.773 to 68.840 ng m-3 in gas and from 6.489 to 17.291 ng m-3 in particulate phase; ∑20OCPs ranged from 4.181 to 5.550 ng m-3 and from 0.823 to 2.443 ng m-3 in gas and particulate phase, respectively; ∑15PAEs ranged from 46.498 to 87.928 ng m-3 and from 414.765 to 763.009 ng m-3 in gas and particulate phase. Lung-cancer risk due to PAHs exposure was 1.13 × 10-4. Both non-cancer and cancer risk levels due to OCPs exposure were acceptable. Non-cancer hazard index of PAEs was 4.57 × 10-3, suggesting safety of workers as only exposure to PAEs at GCS. At pilot scale, 60.18% of PAHs, 70.89% of OCPs and 63.2% of PAEs were removed by an integrated biotrickling filter-photocatalytic reactor at their stable state, and health risk levels were reduced about 50%, demonstrating high removal capacity of integrated reactor.

  10. The Compressibility Burble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stack, John

    1935-01-01

    Simultaneous air-flow photographs and pressure-distribution measurements have been made of the NACA 4412 airfoil at high speeds in order to determine the physical nature of the compressibility burble. The flow photographs were obtained by the Schlieren method and the pressures were simultaneously measured for 54 stations on the 5-inch-chord wing by means of a multiple-tube photographic manometer. Pressure-measurement results and typical Schlieren photographs are presented. The general nature of the phenomenon called the "compressibility burble" is shown by these experiments. The source of the increased drag is the compression shock that occurs, the excess drag being due to the conversion of a considerable amount of the air-stream kinetic energy into heat at the compression shock.

  11. DNABIT Compress - Genome compression algorithm.

    PubMed

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-22

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, "DNABIT Compress" for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that "DNABIT Compress" algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases.

  12. Orbiting dynamic compression laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Vreeland, T., Jr.; Kasiraj, P.; Frisch, B.

    1984-01-01

    In order to examine the feasibility of carrying out dynamic compression experiments on a space station, the possibility of using explosive gun launchers is studied. The question of whether powders of a refractory metal (molybdenum) and a metallic glass could be well considered by dynamic compression is examined. In both cases extremely good bonds are obtained between grains of metal and metallic glass at 180 and 80 kb, respectively. When the oxide surface is reduced and the dynamic consolidation is carried out in vacuum, in the case of molybdenum, tensile tests of the recovered samples demonstrated beneficial ultimate tensile strengths.

  13. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%.

  14. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  15. Vapor Compression Distillation Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchens, Cindy F.

    2002-01-01

    One of the major requirements associated with operating the International Space Station is the transportation -- space shuttle and Russian Progress spacecraft launches - necessary to re-supply station crews with food and water. The Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) Flight Experiment, managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., is a full-scale demonstration of technology being developed to recycle crewmember urine and wastewater aboard the International Space Station and thereby reduce the amount of water that must be re-supplied. Based on results of the VCD Flight Experiment, an operational urine processor will be installed in Node 3 of the space station in 2005.

  16. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method.

  17. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-03-10

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique is disclosed. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method. 11 figs.

  18. Space Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-01-01

    In 1982, the Space Station Task Force was formed, signaling the initiation of the Space Station Freedom Program, and eventually resulting in the Marshall Space Flight Center's responsibilities for Space Station Work Package 1.

  19. Video Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Optivision developed two PC-compatible boards and associated software under a Goddard Space Flight Center Small Business Innovation Research grant for NASA applications in areas such as telerobotics, telesciences and spaceborne experimentation. From this technology, the company used its own funds to develop commercial products, the OPTIVideo MPEG Encoder and Decoder, which are used for realtime video compression and decompression. They are used in commercial applications including interactive video databases and video transmission. The encoder converts video source material to a compressed digital form that can be stored or transmitted, and the decoder decompresses bit streams to provide high quality playback.

  20. Metal Hydride Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Terry A.; Bowman, Robert; Smith, Barton

    Conventional hydrogen compressors often contribute over half of the cost of hydrogen stations, have poor reliability, and have insufficient flow rates for a mature FCEV market. Fatigue associated with their moving parts including cracking of diaphragms and failure of seal leads to failure in conventional compressors, which is exacerbated by the repeated starts and stops expected at fueling stations. Furthermore, the conventional lubrication of these compressors with oil is generally unacceptable at fueling stations due to potential fuel contamination. Metal hydride (MH) technology offers a very good alternative to both conventional (mechanical) and newly developed (electrochemical, ionic liquid pistons) methodsmore » of hydrogen compression. Advantages of MH compression include simplicity in design and operation, absence of moving parts, compactness, safety and reliability, and the possibility to utilize waste industrial heat to power the compressor. Beyond conventional H2 supplies of pipelines or tanker trucks, another attractive scenario is the on-site generating, pressuring and delivering pure H 2 at pressure (≥ 875 bar) for refueling vehicles at electrolysis, wind, or solar generating production facilities in distributed locations that are too remote or widely distributed for cost effective bulk transport. MH hydrogen compression utilizes a reversible heat-driven interaction of a hydride-forming metal alloy with hydrogen gas to form the MH phase and is a promising process for hydrogen energy applications [1,2]. To deliver hydrogen continuously, each stage of the compressor must consist of multiple MH beds with synchronized hydrogenation & dehydrogenation cycles. Multistage pressurization allows achievement of greater compression ratios using reduced temperature swings compared to single stage compressors. The objectives of this project are to investigate and demonstrate on a laboratory scale a two-stage MH hydrogen (H 2) gas compressor with a feed pressure

  1. Compressed Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Erlich, Yaniv; Gordon, Assaf; Brand, Michael; Hannon, Gregory J.; Mitra, Partha P.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past three decades we have steadily increased our knowledge on the genetic basis of many severe disorders. Nevertheless, there are still great challenges in applying this knowledge routinely in the clinic, mainly due to the relatively tedious and expensive process of genotyping. Since the genetic variations that underlie the disorders are relatively rare in the population, they can be thought of as a sparse signal. Using methods and ideas from compressed sensing and group testing, we have developed a cost-effective genotyping protocol to detect carriers for severe genetic disorders. In particular, we have adapted our scheme to a recently developed class of high throughput DNA sequencing technologies. The mathematical framework presented here has some important distinctions from the ’traditional’ compressed sensing and group testing frameworks in order to address biological and technical constraints of our setting. PMID:21451737

  2. Fast Lossless Compression of Multispectral-Image Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimesh, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    An algorithm that effects fast lossless compression of multispectral-image data is based on low-complexity, proven adaptive-filtering algorithms. This algorithm is intended for use in compressing multispectral-image data aboard spacecraft for transmission to Earth stations. Variants of this algorithm could be useful for lossless compression of three-dimensional medical imagery and, perhaps, for compressing image data in general.

  3. Space Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-01-01

    This is an artist's concept of a modular space station. In 1970 the Marshall Space Flight Center arnounced the completion of a study concerning a modular space station that could be launched by the planned-for reusable Space Shuttle. The study envisioned a space station composed of cylindrical sections 14 feet in diameter and of varying lengths joined to form any one of a number of possible shapes. The sections were restricted to 14 feet in diameter and 58 feet in length to be consistent with a shuttle cargo bay size of 15 by 60 feet. Center officials said that the first elements of the space station could be in orbit by about 1978 and could be manned by three or six men. This would be an interim space station with sections that could be added later to form a full 12-man station by the early 1980s.

  4. Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderton, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The official start of a bold new space program, essential to maintain the United States' leadership in space was signaled by a Presidential directive to move aggressively again into space by proceeding with the development of a space station. Development concepts for a permanently manned space station are discussed. Reasons for establishing an inhabited space station are given. Cost estimates and timetables are also cited.

  5. Compressible Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.

    1997-06-01

    We present a model to treat fully compressible, nonlocal, time-dependent turbulent convection in the presence of large-scale flows and arbitrary density stratification. The problem is of interest, for example, in stellar pulsation problems, especially since accurate helioseismological data are now available, as well as in accretion disks. Owing to the difficulties in formulating an analytical model, it is not surprising that most of the work has gone into numerical simulations. At present, there are three analytical models: one by the author, which leads to a rather complicated set of equations; one by Yoshizawa; and one by Xiong. The latter two use a Reynolds stress model together with phenomenological relations with adjustable parameters whose determination on the basis of terrestrial flows does not guarantee that they may be extrapolated to astrophysical flows. Moreover, all third-order moments representing nonlocality are taken to be of the down gradient form (which in the case of the planetary boundary layer yields incorrect results). In addition, correlations among pressure, temperature, and velocities are often neglected or treated as in the incompressible case. To avoid phenomenological relations, we derive the full set of dynamic, time-dependent, nonlocal equations to describe all mean variables, second- and third-order moments. Closures are carried out at the fourth order following standard procedures in turbulence modeling. The equations are collected in an Appendix. Some of the novelties of the treatment are (1) new flux conservation law that includes the large-scale flow, (2) increase of the rate of dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy owing to compressibility and thus (3) a smaller overshooting, and (4) a new source of mean temperature due to compressibility; moreover, contrary to some phenomenological suggestions, the adiabatic temperature gradient depends only on the thermal pressure, while in the equation for the large-scale flow, the physical

  6. Space Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1952-01-01

    This is a von Braun 1952 space station concept. In a 1952 series of articles written in Collier's, Dr. Wernher von Braun, then Technical Director of the Army Ordnance Guided Missiles Development Group at Redstone Arsenal, wrote of a large wheel-like space station in a 1,075-mile orbit. This station, made of flexible nylon, would be carried into space by a fully reusable three-stage launch vehicle. Once in space, the station's collapsible nylon body would be inflated much like an automobile tire. The 250-foot-wide wheel would rotate to provide artificial gravity, an important consideration at the time because little was known about the effects of prolonged zero-gravity on humans. Von Braun's wheel was slated for a number of important missions: a way station for space exploration, a meteorological observatory and a navigation aid. This concept was illustrated by artist Chesley Bonestell.

  7. Vapor compression distillation module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuccio, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    A Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) module was developed and evaluated as part of a Space Station Prototype (SSP) environmental control and life support system. The VCD module includes the waste tankage, pumps, post-treatment cells, automatic controls and fault detection instrumentation. Development problems were encountered with two components: the liquid pumps, and the waste tank and quantity gauge. Peristaltic pumps were selected instead of gear pumps, and a sub-program of materials and design optimization was undertaken leading to a projected life greater than 10,000 hours of continuous operation. A bladder tank was designed and built to contain the waste liquids and deliver it to the processor. A detrimental pressure pattern imposed upon the bladder by a force-operated quantity gauge was corrected by rearranging the force application, and design goals were achieved. System testing has demonstrated that all performance goals have been fulfilled.

  8. Space Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-01-01

    This picture illustrates a concept of a 33-Foot-Diameter Space Station Leading to a Space Base. In-house work of the Marshall Space Flight Center, as well as a Phase B contract with the McDornel Douglas Astronautics Company, resulted in a preliminary design for a space station in 1969 and l970. The Marshall-McDonnel Douglas approach envisioned the use of two common modules as the core configuration of a 12-man space station. Each common module was 33 feet in diameter and 40 feet in length and provided the building blocks, not only for the space station, but also for a 50-man space base. Coupled together, the two modules would form a four-deck facility: two decks for laboratories and two decks for operations and living quarters. Zero-gravity would be the normal mode of operation, although the station would have an artificial gravity capability. This general-purpose orbital facility was to provide wide-ranging research capabilities. The design of the facility was driven by the need to accommodate a broad spectrum of activities in support of astronomy, astrophysics, aerospace medicine, biology, materials processing, space physics, and space manufacturing. To serve the needs of Earth observations, the station was to be placed in a 242-nautical-mile orbit at a 55-degree inclination. An Intermediate-21 vehicle (comprised of Saturn S-IC and S-II stages) would have launched the station in 1977.

  9. Space Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-01-01

    This artist's concept depicts the Space Station Freedom as it would look orbiting the Earth, illustrated by Marshall Space Flight Center artist, Tom Buzbee. Scheduled to be completed in late 1999, this smaller configuration of the Space Station featured a horizontal truss structure that supported U.S., European, and Japanese Laboratory Modules; the U.S. Habitation Module; and three sets of solar arrays. The Space Station Freedom was an international, permanently marned, orbiting base to be assembled in orbit by a series of Space Shuttle missions that were to begin in the mid-1990's.

  10. Space Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-01-01

    This artist's concept depicts the Space Station Freedom as it would look orbiting the Earth; illustrated by Marshall Space Flight Center artist, Tom Buzbee. Scheduled to be completed in late 1999, this smaller configuration of the Space Station features a horizontal truss structure that supported U.S., European, and Japanese Laboratory Modules; the U.S. Habitation Module; and three sets of solar arrays. The Space Station Freedom was an international, permanently marned, orbiting base to be assembled in orbit by a series of Space Shuttle missions that were to begin in the mid-1990's.

  11. Stations Outdoors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madison, John P.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Described is a program of outdoor education utilizing activity-oriented learning stations. Described are 13 activities including: a pond study, orienteering, nature crafts, outdoor mathematics, linear distance measurement, and area measurement. (SL)

  12. Alternative Fueling Station Locator - Android

    SciTech Connect

    The Alternative Fueling Station Locator app helps users locate fueling stations that offer electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, E85, propane, or hydrogen. The users' current location or a custom location can be used to find the 20 closest stations within a 30-mile radius. View the stations on a map or see a list of stations ordered by distance from your location. Select your alternative fuel of choice and adjust the custom filters to fit your needs. Select a station from the map or list to view contact info and other details: address, phone number, and hours of operation; payment types accepted;more » public or private access; special services; compression (natural gas); vehicle size access (natural gas); number and types of chargers (electric); blends available (biodiesel); and blender pumps (ethanol) The app draws information from the U.S. Department of Energy's Alternative Fuels Data Center, which houses the most comprehensive, up-to-date database of alternative fueling stations in the United States. The database contains location information for more than 20,000 alternative fueling stations throughout the country.« less

  13. Space Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-01-01

    This is an illustration of the Space Base concept. In-house work of the Marshall Space Flight Center, as well as a Phase B contract with the McDornel Douglas Astronautics Company, resulted in a preliminary design for a space station in 1969 and l970. The Marshall-McDonnel Douglas approach envisioned the use of two common modules as the core configuration of a 12-man space station. Each common module was 33 feet in diameter and 40 feet in length and provided the building blocks, not only for the space station, but also for a 50-man space base. Coupled together, the two modules would form a four-deck facility: two decks for laboratories and two decks for operations and living quarters. Zero-gravity would be the normal mode of operation, although the station would have an artificial-gravity capability. This general-purpose orbital facility was to provide wide-ranging research capabilities. The design of the facility was driven by the need to accommodate a broad spectrum of activities in support of astronomy, astrophysics, aerospace medicine, biology, materials processing, space physics, and space manufacturing. To serve the needs of Earth observations, the station was to be placed in a 242-nautical-mile orbit at a 55-degree inclination. An Intermediate-21 vehicle (comprised of Saturn S-IC and S-II stages) would have launched the station in 1977.

  14. DNABIT Compress – Genome compression algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-01

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, “DNABIT Compress” for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that “DNABIT Compress” algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases. PMID:21383923

  15. Space Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-01-01

    This is an artist's concept of the Research and Applications Modules (RAM). Evolutionary growth was an important consideration in space station plarning, and another project was undertaken in 1971 to facilitate such growth. The RAM study, conducted through a Marshall Space Flight Center contract with General Dynamics Convair Aerospace, resulted in the conceptualization of a series of RAM payload carrier-sortie laboratories, pallets, free-flyers, and payload and support modules. The study considered two basic manned systems. The first would use RAM hardware for sortie mission, where laboratories were carried into space and remained attached to the Shuttle for operational periods up to 7 days. The second envisioned a modular space station capability that could be evolved by mating RAM modules to the space station core configuration. The RAM hardware was to be built by Europeans, thus fostering international participation in the space program.

  16. Space Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1986-08-01

    In response to President Reagan's directive to NASA to develop a permanent marned Space Station within a decade, part of the State of the Union message to Congress on January 25, 1984, NASA and the Administration adopted a phased approach to Station development. This approach provided an initial capability at reduced costs, to be followed by an enhanced Space Station capability in the future. This illustration depicts a configuration with enhanced capabilities. It builds on the horizontal boom and module pattern of the revised baseline. This configuration would feature dual keels, two vertical spines 105-meters long joined by upper and lower booms. The structure carrying the modules would become a transverse boom of a basically rectangular structure. The two new booms, 45-meters in length, would provide extensive accommodations for attached payloads, and would offer a wide field of view. Power would be increased significantly, with the addition if a 50-kW solar dynamic power system.

  17. Compressed television transmission: A market survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizak, R. M.; Cagan, L. Q.

    1981-01-01

    NASA's compressed television transmission technology is described, and its potential market is considered; a market that encompasses teleconferencing, remote medical diagnosis, patient monitoring, transit station surveillance, as well as traffic management and control. In addition, current and potential television transmission systems and their costs and potential manufacturers are considered.

  18. Space Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1985-12-01

    Skylab's success proved that scientific experimentation in a low gravity environment was essential to scientific progress. A more permanent structure was needed to provide this space laboratory. President Ronald Reagan, on January 25, 1984, during his State of the Union address, claimed that the United States should exploit the new frontier of space, and directed NASA to build a permanent marned space station within a decade. The idea was that the space station would not only be used as a laboratory for the advancement of science and medicine, but would also provide a staging area for building a lunar base and manned expeditions to Mars and elsewhere in the solar system. President Reagan invited the international community to join with the United States in this endeavour. NASA and several countries moved forward with this concept. By December 1985, the first phase of the space station was well underway with the design concept for the crew compartments and laboratories. Pictured are two NASA astronauts, at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS), practicing construction techniques they later used to construct the space station after it was deployed.

  19. Space Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1989-08-01

    In response to President Reagan's directive to NASA to develop a permanent marned Space Station within a decade, part of the State of the Union message to Congress on January 25, 1984, NASA and the Administration adopted a phased approach to Station development. This approach provided an initial capability at reduced costs, to be followed by an enhanced Space Station capability in the future. This illustration depicts the baseline configuration, which features a 110-meter-long horizontal boom with four pressurized modules attached in the middle. Located at each end are four photovoltaic arrays generating a total of 75-kW of power. Two attachment points for external payloads are provided along this boom. The four pressurized modules include the following: A laboratory and habitation module provided by the United States; two additional laboratories, one each provided by the European Space Agency (ESA) and Japan; and an ESA-provided Man-Tended Free Flyer, a pressurized module capable of operations both attached to and separate from the Space Station core. Canada was expected to provide the first increment of a Mobile Serving System.

  20. Turbulence in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lecture notes for the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) Special Course on 'Turbulence in Compressible Flows' have been assembled in this report. The following topics were covered: Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers, Compressible Turbulent Free Shear Layers, Turbulent Combustion, DNS/LES and RANS Simulations of Compressible Turbulent Flows, and Case Studies of Applications of Turbulence Models in Aerospace.

  1. Computer networking at SLR stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, Antonin

    1993-06-01

    There are several existing communication methods to deliver data from the satellite laser ranging (SLR) station to the SLR data center and back: telephonmodem, telex, and computer networks. The SLR scientific community has been exploiting mainly INTERNET, BITNET/EARN, and SPAN. The total of 56 countries are connected to INTERNET and the number of nodes is exponentially growing. The computer networks mentioned above and others are connected through E-mail protocol. The scientific progress of SLR requires the increase of communication speed and the amount of the transmitted data. The TOPEX/POSEIDON test campaign required to deliver Quick Look data (1.7 kB/pass) from a SLR site to SLR data center within 8 hours and full rate data (up to 500 kB/pass) within 24 hours. We developed networking for the remote SLR station in Helwan, Egypt. The reliable scheme for data delivery consists of: compression of MERIT2 format (up to 89 percent), encoding to ASCII Me (files); and e-mail sending from SLR station--e-mail receiving, decoding, and decompression at the center. We do propose to use the ZIP method for compression/decompression and the UUCODE method for ASCII encoding/decoding. This method will be useful for stations connected via telephonemodems or commercial networks. The electronics delivery could solve the problem of the too late receiving of the FR data by SLR data center.

  2. Computer networking at SLR stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novotny, Antonin

    1993-01-01

    There are several existing communication methods to deliver data from the satellite laser ranging (SLR) station to the SLR data center and back: telephonmodem, telex, and computer networks. The SLR scientific community has been exploiting mainly INTERNET, BITNET/EARN, and SPAN. The total of 56 countries are connected to INTERNET and the number of nodes is exponentially growing. The computer networks mentioned above and others are connected through E-mail protocol. The scientific progress of SLR requires the increase of communication speed and the amount of the transmitted data. The TOPEX/POSEIDON test campaign required to deliver Quick Look data (1.7 kB/pass) from a SLR site to SLR data center within 8 hours and full rate data (up to 500 kB/pass) within 24 hours. We developed networking for the remote SLR station in Helwan, Egypt. The reliable scheme for data delivery consists of: compression of MERIT2 format (up to 89 percent), encoding to ASCII Me (files); and e-mail sending from SLR station--e-mail receiving, decoding, and decompression at the center. We do propose to use the ZIP method for compression/decompression and the UUCODE method for ASCII encoding/decoding. This method will be useful for stations connected via telephonemodems or commercial networks. The electronics delivery could solve the problem of the too late receiving of the FR data by SLR data center.

  3. Costs Associated With Compressed Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.; Gonzales, J.

    2014-09-01

    This document is designed to help fleets understand the cost factors associated with fueling infrastructure for compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles. It provides estimated cost ranges for various sizes and types of CNG fueling stations and an overview of factors that contribute to the total cost of an installed station. The information presented is based on input from professionals in the natural gas industry who design, sell equipment for, and/or own and operate CNG stations.

  4. Compressed gas manifold

    DOEpatents

    Hildebrand, Richard J.; Wozniak, John J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas storage cell interconnecting manifold including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and a port for connecting the compressed gas storage cells to a motor vehicle power source and to a refueling adapter. The manifold is mechanically and pneumatically connected to a compressed gas storage cell by a bolt including a gas passage therein.

  5. Universal data compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, R. A.; Cox, B. V.

    Universal and adaptive data compression techniques have the capability to globally compress all types of data without loss of information but have the disadvantage of complexity and computation speed. Advances in hardware speed and the reduction of computational costs have made universal data compression feasible. Implementations of the Adaptive Huffman and Lempel-Ziv compression algorithms are evaluated for performance. Compression ratios versus run times for different size data files are graphically presented and discussed in the paper. Required adjustments needed for optimum performance of the algorithms relative to theoretical achievable limits will be outlined.

  6. Video bandwidth compression system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludington, D.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of this program was the development of a Video Bandwidth Compression brassboard model for use by the Air Force Avionics Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, in evaluation of bandwidth compression techniques for use in tactical weapons and to aid in the selection of particular operational modes to be implemented in an advanced flyable model. The bandwidth compression system is partitioned into two major divisions: the encoder, which processes the input video with a compression algorithm and transmits the most significant information; and the decoder where the compressed data is reconstructed into a video image for display.

  7. Recce imagery compression options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Donald J.

    1995-09-01

    The errors introduced into reconstructed RECCE imagery by ATARS DPCM compression are compared to those introduced by the more modern DCT-based JPEG compression algorithm. For storage applications in which uncompressed sensor data is available JPEG provides better mean-square-error performance while also providing more flexibility in the selection of compressed data rates. When ATARS DPCM compression has already been performed, lossless encoding techniques may be applied to the DPCM deltas to achieve further compression without introducing additional errors. The abilities of several lossless compression algorithms including Huffman, Lempel-Ziv, Lempel-Ziv-Welch, and Rice encoding to provide this additional compression of ATARS DPCM deltas are compared. It is shown that the amount of noise in the original imagery significantly affects these comparisons.

  8. Compression for radiological images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Dennis L.

    1992-07-01

    The viewing of radiological images has peculiarities that must be taken into account in the design of a compression technique. The images may be manipulated on a workstation to change the contrast, to change the center of the brightness levels that are viewed, and even to invert the images. Because of the possible consequences of losing information in a medical application, bit preserving compression is used for the images used for diagnosis. However, for archiving the images may be compressed to 10 of their original size. A compression technique based on the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) takes the viewing factors into account by compressing the changes in the local brightness levels. The compression technique is a variation of the CCITT JPEG compression that suppresses the blocking of the DCT except in areas of very high contrast.

  9. 18. VIEW OF EAST SIDE INTERIOR OF MST AT STATIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VIEW OF EAST SIDE INTERIOR OF MST AT STATIONS 3 AND 12, FACING WEST. COMPRESSED AIR TANK AND GENERATOR AT STATION 3. CURTAIN FOR NORTH ENVIRONMENTAL DOOR VISIBLE ON LEFT SIDE OF PHOTOGRAPH; RAIL VISIBLE AT BOTTOM OF PHOTOGRAPH. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  10. Radiological Image Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Chung Benedict

    The movement toward digital images in radiology presents the problem of how to conveniently and economically store, retrieve, and transmit the volume of digital images. Basic research into image data compression is necessary in order to move from a film-based department to an efficient digital -based department. Digital data compression technology consists of two types of compression technique: error-free and irreversible. Error -free image compression is desired; however, present techniques can only achieve compression ratio of from 1.5:1 to 3:1, depending upon the image characteristics. Irreversible image compression can achieve a much higher compression ratio; however, the image reconstructed from the compressed data shows some difference from the original image. This dissertation studies both error-free and irreversible image compression techniques. In particular, some modified error-free techniques have been tested and the recommended strategies for various radiological images are discussed. A full-frame bit-allocation irreversible compression technique has been derived. A total of 76 images which include CT head and body, and radiographs digitized to 2048 x 2048, 1024 x 1024, and 512 x 512 have been used to test this algorithm. The normalized mean -square-error (NMSE) on the difference image, defined as the difference between the original and the reconstructed image from a given compression ratio, is used as a global measurement on the quality of the reconstructed image. The NMSE's of total of 380 reconstructed and 380 difference images are measured and the results tabulated. Three complex compression methods are also suggested to compress images with special characteristics. Finally, various parameters which would effect the quality of the reconstructed images are discussed. A proposed hardware compression module is given in the last chapter.

  11. Comparison of reversible methods for data compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heer, Volker K.; Reinfelder, Hans-Erich

    1990-07-01

    Widely differing methods for data compression described in the ACR-NEMA draft are used in medical imaging. In our contribution we will review various methods briefly and discuss the relevant advantages and disadvantages. In detail we evaluate 1st order DPCM pyramid transformation and S transformation. We compare as coding algorithms both fixed and adaptive Huffman coding and Lempel-Ziv coding. Our comparison is performed on typical medical images from CT MR DSA and DLR (Digital Luminescence Radiography). Apart from the achieved compression factors we take into account CPU time required and main memory requirement both for compression and for decompression. For a realistic comparison we have implemented the mentioned algorithms in the C program language on a MicroVAX II and a SPARC station 1. 2.

  12. Compressed domain indexing of losslessly compressed images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Gerald

    2001-12-01

    Image retrieval and image compression have been pursued separately in the past. Only little research has been done on a synthesis of the two by allowing image retrieval to be performed directly in the compressed domain of images without the need to uncompress them first. In this paper methods for image retrieval in the compressed domain of losslessly compressed images are introduced. While most image compression techniques are lossy, i.e. discard visually less significant information, lossless techniques are still required in fields like medical imaging or in situations where images must not be changed due to legal reasons. The algorithms in this paper are based on predictive coding methods where a pixel is encoded based on the pixel values of its (already encoded) neighborhood. The first method is based on an understanding that predictively coded data is itself indexable and represents a textural description of the image. The second method operates directly on the entropy encoded data by comparing codebooks of images. Experiments show good image retrieval results for both approaches.

  13. Parallel image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reif, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A parallel compression algorithm for the 16,384 processor MPP machine was developed. The serial version of the algorithm can be viewed as a combination of on-line dynamic lossless test compression techniques (which employ simple learning strategies) and vector quantization. These concepts are described. How these concepts are combined to form a new strategy for performing dynamic on-line lossy compression is discussed. Finally, the implementation of this algorithm in a massively parallel fashion on the MPP is discussed.

  14. Sequential neural text compression.

    PubMed

    Schmidhuber, J; Heil, S

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show that neural networks may be promising tools for data compression without loss of information. We combine predictive neural nets and statistical coding techniques to compress text files. We apply our methods to certain short newspaper articles and obtain compression ratios exceeding those of the widely used Lempel-Ziv algorithms (which build the basis of the UNIX functions "compress" and "gzip"). The main disadvantage of our methods is that they are about three orders of magnitude slower than standard methods.

  15. Biological sequence compression algorithms.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, T; Sadakane, K; Imai, H

    2000-01-01

    Today, more and more DNA sequences are becoming available. The information about DNA sequences are stored in molecular biology databases. The size and importance of these databases will be bigger and bigger in the future, therefore this information must be stored or communicated efficiently. Furthermore, sequence compression can be used to define similarities between biological sequences. The standard compression algorithms such as gzip or compress cannot compress DNA sequences, but only expand them in size. On the other hand, CTW (Context Tree Weighting Method) can compress DNA sequences less than two bits per symbol. These algorithms do not use special structures of biological sequences. Two characteristic structures of DNA sequences are known. One is called palindromes or reverse complements and the other structure is approximate repeats. Several specific algorithms for DNA sequences that use these structures can compress them less than two bits per symbol. In this paper, we improve the CTW so that characteristic structures of DNA sequences are available. Before encoding the next symbol, the algorithm searches an approximate repeat and palindrome using hash and dynamic programming. If there is a palindrome or an approximate repeat with enough length then our algorithm represents it with length and distance. By using this preprocessing, a new program achieves a little higher compression ratio than that of existing DNA-oriented compression algorithms. We also describe new compression algorithm for protein sequences.

  16. International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is responsible for designing and building the life support systems that will provide the crew of the International Space Station (ISS) a comfortable environment in which to live and work. Scientists and engineers at the MSFC are working together to provide the ISS with systems that are safe, efficient, and cost-effective. These compact and powerful systems are collectively called the Environmental Control and Life Support Systems, or simply, ECLSS. This photograph shows the fifth generation Urine Processor Development Hardware. The Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) is a part of the Water Recovery System (WRS) on the ISS. It uses a chase change process called vapor compression distillation technology to remove contaminants from urine. The UPA accepts and processes pretreated crewmember urine to allow it to be processed along with other wastewaters in the Water Processor Assembly (WPA). The WPA removes free gas, organic, and nonorganic constituents before the water goes through a series of multifiltration beds for further purification. Product water quality is monitored primarily through conductivity measurements. Unacceptable water is sent back through the WPA for reprocessing. Clean water is sent to a storage tank.

  17. Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS) is enabling the integration of design, training, and operations capabilities into an intelligent virtual station for the International Space Station (ISS). A viewgraph of the IVS Remote Server is presented.

  18. Widefield compressive multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Alemohammad, Milad; Shin, Jaewook; Tran, Dung N; Stroud, Jasper R; Chin, Sang Peter; Tran, Trac D; Foster, Mark A

    2018-06-15

    A single-pixel compressively sensed architecture is exploited to simultaneously achieve a 10× reduction in acquired data compared with the Nyquist rate, while alleviating limitations faced by conventional widefield temporal focusing microscopes due to scattering of the fluorescence signal. Additionally, we demonstrate an adaptive sampling scheme that further improves the compression and speed of our approach.

  19. Compression Ratio Adjuster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akkerman, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    New mechanism alters compression ratio of internal-combustion engine according to load so that engine operates at top fuel efficiency. Ordinary gasoline, diesel and gas engines with their fixed compression ratios are inefficient at partial load and at low-speed full load. Mechanism ensures engines operate as efficiently under these conditions as they do at highload and high speed.

  20. Improved waste water vapor compression distillation technology. [for Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. L.; Nuccio, P. P.; Reveley, W. F.

    1977-01-01

    The vapor compression distillation process is a method of recovering potable water from crewman urine in a manned spacecraft or space station. A description is presented of the research and development approach to the solution of the various problems encountered with previous vapor compression distillation units. The design solutions considered are incorporated in the preliminary design of a vapor compression distillation subsystem. The new design concepts are available for integration in the next generation of support systems and, particularly, the regenerative life support evaluation intended for project Spacelab.

  1. Hyperspectral data compression using a Wiener filter predictor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villeneuve, Pierre V.; Beaven, Scott G.; Stocker, Alan D.

    2013-09-01

    The application of compression to hyperspectral image data is a significant technical challenge. A primary bottleneck in disseminating data products to the tactical user community is the limited communication bandwidth between the airborne sensor and the ground station receiver. This report summarizes the newly-developed "Z-Chrome" algorithm for lossless compression of hyperspectral image data. A Wiener filter prediction framework is used as a basis for modeling new image bands from already-encoded bands. The resulting residual errors are then compressed using available state-of-the-art lossless image compression functions. Compression performance is demonstrated using a large number of test data collected over a wide variety of scene content from six different airborne and spaceborne sensors .

  2. Compression fractures of the back

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatments. Surgery can include: Balloon kyphoplasty Vertebroplasty Spinal fusion Other surgery may be done to remove bone ... Alternative Names Vertebral compression fractures; Osteoporosis - compression fracture Images Compression fracture References Cosman F, de Beur SJ, ...

  3. CSAM: Compressed SAM format.

    PubMed

    Cánovas, Rodrigo; Moffat, Alistair; Turpin, Andrew

    2016-12-15

    Next generation sequencing machines produce vast amounts of genomic data. For the data to be useful, it is essential that it can be stored and manipulated efficiently. This work responds to the combined challenge of compressing genomic data, while providing fast access to regions of interest, without necessitating decompression of whole files. We describe CSAM (Compressed SAM format), a compression approach offering lossless and lossy compression for SAM files. The structures and techniques proposed are suitable for representing SAM files, as well as supporting fast access to the compressed information. They generate more compact lossless representations than BAM, which is currently the preferred lossless compressed SAM-equivalent format; and are self-contained, that is, they do not depend on any external resources to compress or decompress SAM files. An implementation is available at https://github.com/rcanovas/libCSAM CONTACT: canovas-ba@lirmm.frSupplementary Information: Supplementary data is available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Data Compression Techniques for Maps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Lempel - Ziv compression is applied to the classified and unclassified images as also to the output of the compression algorithms . The algorithms ...resulted in a compression of 7:1. The output of the quadtree coding algorithm was then compressed using Lempel - Ziv coding. The compression ratio achieved...using Lempel - Ziv coding. The unclassified image gave a compression ratio of only 1.4:1. The K means classified image

  5. Phase change water processing for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdankiewicz, E. M.; Price, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    The use of a vapor compression distillation subsystem (VCDS) for water recovery on the Space Station is analyzed. The self-contained automated system can process waste water at a rate of 32.6 kg/day and requires only 115 W of electric power. The improvements in the mechanical components of VCDS are studied. The operation of VCDS in the normal mode is examined. The VCDS preprototype is evaluated based on water quality, water production rate, and specific energy. The relation between water production rate and fluids pump speed is investigated; it is concluded that a variable speed fluids pump will optimize water production. Components development and testing currently being conducted are described. The properties and operation of the proposed phase change water processing system for the Space Station, based on vapor compression distillation, are examined.

  6. Space station user's handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A user's handbook for the modular space station concept is presented. The document is designed to acquaint science personnel with the overall modular space station program, the general nature and capabilities of the station itself, some of the scientific opportunities presented by the station, the general policy governing its operation, and the relationship between the program and participants from the scientific community.

  7. Deregulation and Station Trafficking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Benjamin J.

    To test whether the revocation of the Federal Communications Commission's "Anti-Trafficking" rule (requiring television station owners to keep a station for three years before transferring its license to another party) impacted station owner behavior, a study compared the behavior of television station "traffickers" (owners…

  8. Focus on Compression Stockings

    MedlinePlus

    ... sion apparel is used to prevent or control edema The post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) is a complication ( ... complication. abdomen. This swelling is referred to as edema. If you have edema, compression therapy may be ...

  9. External Compression Headaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... People likely to get external compression headaches include construction workers, people in the military, police officers and ... If protective headwear, such as a sports or construction helmet, is necessary, make sure it fits properly ...

  10. Alternative Compression Garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Lee, S. M. C.; Ribeiro, L. C.; Brown, A. K.; Westby, C. M.; Platts, S. H.

    2011-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance after spaceflight is still an issue for astronauts as no in-flight countermeasure has been 100% effective. Future anti-gravity suits (AGS) may be similar to the Shuttle era inflatable AGS or may be a mechanical compression device like the Russian Kentavr. We have evaluated the above garments as well as elastic, gradient compression garments of varying magnitude and determined that breast-high elastic compression garments may be a suitable replacement to the current AGS. This new garment should be more comfortable than the AGS, easy to don and doff, and as effective a countermeasure to orthostatic intolerance. Furthermore, these new compression garments could be worn for several days after space flight as necessary if symptoms persisted. We conducted two studies to evaluate elastic, gradient compression garments. The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the comfort and efficacy of an alternative compression garment (ACG) immediately after actual space flight and 6 degree head-down tilt bed rest as a model of space flight, and to determine if they would impact recovery if worn for up to three days after bed rest.

  11. Image compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Chi-Yung; Petrich, Loren I.

    1997-01-01

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace's equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image.

  12. Intelligent bandwith compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, D. Y.; Bullock, B. L.; Olin, K. E.; Kandt, R. K.; Olsen, J. D.

    1980-02-01

    The feasibility of a 1000:1 bandwidth compression ratio for image transmission has been demonstrated using image-analysis algorithms and a rule-based controller. Such a high compression ratio was achieved by first analyzing scene content using auto-cueing and feature-extraction algorithms, and then transmitting only the pertinent information consistent with mission requirements. A rule-based controller directs the flow of analysis and performs priority allocations on the extracted scene content. The reconstructed bandwidth-compressed image consists of an edge map of the scene background, with primary and secondary target windows embedded in the edge map. The bandwidth-compressed images are updated at a basic rate of 1 frame per second, with the high-priority target window updated at 7.5 frames per second. The scene-analysis algorithms used in this system together with the adaptive priority controller are described. Results of simulated 1000:1 band width-compressed images are presented. A video tape simulation of the Intelligent Bandwidth Compression system has been produced using a sequence of video input from the data base.

  13. Image compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1997-03-25

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace`s equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image. 16 figs.

  14. Role of Compressibility on Tsunami Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolali, Ali; Kirby, James T.

    2017-12-01

    In the present paper, we aim to reduce the discrepancies between tsunami arrival times evaluated from tsunami models and real measurements considering the role of ocean compressibility. We perform qualitative studies to reveal the phase speed reduction rate via a modified version of the Mild Slope Equation for Weakly Compressible fluid (MSEWC) proposed by Sammarco et al. (2013). The model is validated against a 3-D computational model. Physical properties of surface gravity waves are studied and compared with those for waves evaluated from an incompressible flow solver over realistic geometry for 2011 Tohoku-oki event, revealing reduction in phase speed.Plain Language SummarySubmarine earthquakes and submarine mass failures (SMFs), can generate long gravitational waves (or tsunamis) that propagate at the free surface. Tsunami waves can travel long distances and are known for their dramatic effects on coastal areas. Nowadays, numerical models are used to reconstruct the tsunamigenic events for many scientific and socioeconomic aspects i.e. Tsunami Early Warning Systems, inundation mapping, risk and hazard analysis, etc. A number of typically neglected parameters in these models cause discrepancies between model outputs and observations. Most of the tsunami models predict tsunami arrival times at distant <span class="hlt">stations</span> slightly early in comparison to observations. In this study, we show how ocean <span class="hlt">compressibility</span> would affect the tsunami wave propagation speed. In this framework, an efficient two-dimensional model equation for the weakly <span class="hlt">compressible</span> ocean has been developed, validated and tested for simplified and real cases against three dimensional and incompressible solvers. Taking the effect of <span class="hlt">compressibility</span>, the phase speed of surface gravity waves is reduced compared to that of an incompressible fluid. Then, we used the model for the case of devastating Tohoku-Oki 2011 tsunami event, improving the model accuracy. This</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090032129','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090032129"><span>Lossless <span class="hlt">Compression</span> of Classification-Map Data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hua, Xie; Klimesh, Matthew</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>A lossless image-data-<span class="hlt">compression</span> algorithm intended specifically for application to classification-map data is based on prediction, context modeling, and entropy coding. The algorithm was formulated, in consideration of the differences between classification maps and ordinary images of natural scenes, so as to be capable of <span class="hlt">compressing</span> classification- map data more effectively than do general-purpose image-data-<span class="hlt">compression</span> algorithms. Classification maps are typically generated from remote-sensing images acquired by instruments aboard aircraft (see figure) and spacecraft. A classification map is a synthetic image that summarizes information derived from one or more original remote-sensing image(s) of a scene. The value assigned to each pixel in such a map is the index of a class that represents some type of content deduced from the original image data for example, a type of vegetation, a mineral, or a body of water at the corresponding location in the scene. When classification maps are generated onboard the aircraft or spacecraft, it is desirable to <span class="hlt">compress</span> the classification-map data in order to reduce the volume of data that must be transmitted to a ground <span class="hlt">station</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1980SPIE..205...76T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1980SPIE..205...76T"><span>Intelligent bandwidth <span class="hlt">compression</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tseng, D. Y.; Bullock, B. L.; Olin, K. E.; Kandt, R. K.; Olsen, J. D.</p> <p>1980-02-01</p> <p>The feasibility of a 1000:1 bandwidth <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratio for image transmission has been demonstrated using image-analysis algorithms and a rule-based controller. Such a high <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratio was achieved by first analyzing scene content using auto-cueing and feature-extraction algorithms, and then transmitting only the pertinent information consistent with mission requirements. A rule-based controller directs the flow of analysis and performs priority allocations on the extracted scene content. The reconstructed bandwidth-<span class="hlt">compressed</span> image consists of an edge map of the scene background, with primary and secondary target windows embedded in the edge map. The bandwidth-<span class="hlt">compressed</span> images are updated at a basic rate of 1 frame per second, with the high-priority target window updated at 7.5 frames per second. The scene-analysis algorithms used in this system together with the adaptive priority controller are described. Results of simulated 1000:1 bandwidth-<span class="hlt">compressed</span> images are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110013043','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110013043"><span><span class="hlt">Compressible</span> Flow Toolbox</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Melcher, Kevin J.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Compressible</span> Flow Toolbox is primarily a MATLAB-language implementation of a set of algorithms that solve approximately 280 linear and nonlinear classical equations for <span class="hlt">compressible</span> flow. The toolbox is useful for analysis of one-dimensional steady flow with either constant entropy, friction, heat transfer, or Mach number greater than 1. The toolbox also contains algorithms for comparing and validating the equation-solving algorithms against solutions previously published in open literature. The classical equations solved by the <span class="hlt">Compressible</span> Flow Toolbox are as follows: The isentropic-flow equations, The Fanno flow equations (pertaining to flow of an ideal gas in a pipe with friction), The Rayleigh flow equations (pertaining to frictionless flow of an ideal gas, with heat transfer, in a pipe of constant cross section), The normal-shock equations, The oblique-shock equations, and The expansion equations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9706217.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9706217.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1997-07-20</p> <p>Photograph shows the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Laboratory Module under fabrication at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Building 4708 West High Bay. Although management of the U.S. elements for the <span class="hlt">Station</span> were consolidated in 1994, module and node development continued at MSFC by Boeing Company, the prime contractor for the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA183893','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA183893"><span>Leadership at Antarctic <span class="hlt">Stations</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1987-03-01</p> <p>expeditioners, and amongst OICs themselves. Leadership in Antarctica stirs images associated with names such as Scott, Shackleton and Mawson , of men...operates three Antarctic <span class="hlt">stations</span> - Casey, Davis, and Mawson , and one sub-Antarctic <span class="hlt">station</span> - Macquarie Island. <span class="hlt">Station</span> populations vary, but are</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JMFM....7S.254S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JMFM....7S.254S"><span>On <span class="hlt">Compressible</span> Vortex Sheets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Secchi, Paolo</p> <p>2005-05-01</p> <p>We introduce the main known results of the theory of incompressible and <span class="hlt">compressible</span> vortex sheets. Moreover, we present recent results obtained by the author with J. F. Coulombel about supersonic <span class="hlt">compressible</span> vortex sheets in two space dimensions. The problem is a nonlinear free boundary hyperbolic problem with two difficulties: the free boundary is characteristic and the Lopatinski condition holds only in a weak sense, yielding losses of derivatives. Under a supersonic condition that precludes violent instabilities, we prove an energy estimate for the boundary value problem obtained by linearization around an unsteady piecewise solution.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li class="active"><span>4</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_4 --> <div id="page_5" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="81"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120010460','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120010460"><span>Algorithm for <span class="hlt">Compressing</span> Time-Series Data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hawkins, S. Edward, III; Darlington, Edward Hugo</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>An algorithm based on Chebyshev polynomials effects lossy <span class="hlt">compression</span> of time-series data or other one-dimensional data streams (e.g., spectral data) that are arranged in blocks for sequential transmission. The algorithm was developed for use in transmitting data from spacecraft scientific instruments to Earth <span class="hlt">stations</span>. In spite of its lossy nature, the algorithm preserves the information needed for scientific analysis. The algorithm is computationally simple, yet <span class="hlt">compresses</span> data streams by factors much greater than two. The algorithm is not restricted to spacecraft or scientific uses: it is applicable to time-series data in general. The algorithm can also be applied to general multidimensional data that have been converted to time-series data, a typical example being image data acquired by raster scanning. However, unlike most prior image-data-<span class="hlt">compression</span> algorithms, this algorithm neither depends on nor exploits the two-dimensional spatial correlations that are generally present in images. In order to understand the essence of this <span class="hlt">compression</span> algorithm, it is necessary to understand that the net effect of this algorithm and the associated decompression algorithm is to approximate the original stream of data as a sequence of finite series of Chebyshev polynomials. For the purpose of this algorithm, a block of data or interval of time for which a Chebyshev polynomial series is fitted to the original data is denoted a fitting interval. Chebyshev approximation has two properties that make it particularly effective for <span class="hlt">compressing</span> serial data streams with minimal loss of scientific information: The errors associated with a Chebyshev approximation are nearly uniformly distributed over the fitting interval (this is known in the art as the "equal error property"); and the maximum deviations of the fitted Chebyshev polynomial from the original data have the smallest possible values (this is known in the art as the "min-max property").</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19990104362&hterms=ansys&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dansys','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19990104362&hterms=ansys&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dansys"><span>The International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Assembly on Schedule</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>As engineers continue to prepare the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) for in-orbit assembly in the year 2002, ANSYS software has proven instrumental in resolving a structural problem in the project's two primary <span class="hlt">station</span> modules -- Nodes 1 and 2. Proof pressure tests performed in May revealed "low temperature, post-yield creep" in some of the Nodes' gussets, which were designed to reinforce ports for loads from <span class="hlt">station</span> keeping and reboost motion of the entire space <span class="hlt">station</span>. An extensive effort was undertaken to characterize the creep behavior of the 2219-T851 aluminum forging material from which the gussets were made. Engineers at Sverdrup Technology, Inc. (Huntsville, AL) were responsible for conducting a combined elastic-plastic-creep analysis of the gussets to determine the amount of residual <span class="hlt">compressive</span> stress which existed in the gussets following the proof pressure tests, and to determine the stress-strain history in the gussets while on-orbit. Boeing, NASA's Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> prime contractor, supplied the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model geometry and developed the creep equations from the experimental data taken by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and Langley Research Center. The goal of this effort was to implement the uniaxial creep equations into a three dimensional finite element program, and to determine analytically whether or not the creep was something that the space <span class="hlt">station</span> program could live with. The objective was to show analytically that either the creep rate was at an acceptable level, or that the node module had to be modified to lower the stress levels to where creep did not occur. The elastic-plastic-creep analysis was performed using the ANSYS finite element program of ANSYS, Inc. (Houston, PA). The analysis revealed that the gussets encountered a <span class="hlt">compressive</span> stress of approximately 30,000 pounds per square inch (psi) when unloaded. This <span class="hlt">compressive</span> residual stress significantly lowered the maximum tension stress in the gussets which</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19670000302','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19670000302"><span>Improved <span class="hlt">compression</span> molding process</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Heier, W. C.</p> <p>1967-01-01</p> <p>Modified <span class="hlt">compression</span> molding process produces plastic molding compounds that are strong, homogeneous, free of residual stresses, and have improved ablative characteristics. The conventional method is modified by applying a vacuum to the mold during the molding cycle, using a volatile sink, and exercising precise control of the mold closure limits.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AIPC..643..338F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AIPC..643..338F"><span>Centrifugal Gas <span class="hlt">Compression</span> Cycle</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fultun, Roy</p> <p>2002-11-01</p> <p>A centrifuged gas of kinetic, elastic hard spheres <span class="hlt">compresses</span> isothermally and without flow of heat in a process that reverses free expansion. This theorem follows from stated assumptions via a collection of thought experiments, theorems and other supporting results, and it excludes application of the reversible mechanical adiabatic power law in this context. The existence of an isothermal adiabatic centrifugal <span class="hlt">compression</span> process makes a three-process cycle possible using a fixed sample of the working gas. The three processes are: adiabatic mechanical expansion and cooling against a piston, isothermal adiabatic centrifugal <span class="hlt">compression</span> back to the original volume, and isochoric temperature rise back to the original temperature due to an influx of heat. This cycle forms the basis for a Thomson perpetuum mobile that induces a loop of energy flow in an isolated system consisting of a heat bath connectable by a thermal path to the working gas, a mechanical extractor of the gas's internal energy, and a device that uses that mechanical energy and dissipates it as heat back into the heat bath. We present a simple experimental procedure to test the assertion that adiabatic centrifugal <span class="hlt">compression</span> is isothermal. An energy budget for the cycle provides a criterion for breakeven in the conversion of heat to mechanical energy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA461522','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA461522"><span>Code <span class="hlt">Compression</span> for DSP</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1998-12-01</p> <p>PAGES 6 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b . ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8...Automation Conference, June 1998. [Liao95] S. Liao, S. Devadas , K. Keutzer, “Code Density Optimization for Embedded DSP Processors Using Data <span class="hlt">Compression</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1413223','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1413223"><span>Temporal <span class="hlt">compressive</span> sensing systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Reed, Bryan W.</p> <p>2017-12-12</p> <p>Methods and systems for temporal <span class="hlt">compressive</span> sensing are disclosed, where within each of one or more sensor array data acquisition periods, one or more sensor array measurement datasets comprising distinct linear combinations of time slice data are acquired, and where mathematical reconstruction allows for calculation of accurate representations of the individual time slice datasets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED405838.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED405838.pdf"><span>The <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> Video Experience.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Weber, John</p> <p></p> <p>In the fall semester 1995, Southern Arkansas University- Magnolia (SAU-M) began a two semester trial delivering college classes via a <span class="hlt">compressed</span> video link between SAU-M and its sister school Southern Arkansas University Tech (SAU-T) in Camden. As soon as the University began broadcasting and receiving classes, it was discovered that using the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhDT.......381S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhDT.......381S"><span><span class="hlt">Compressed</span> Sensing for Chemistry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sanders, Jacob Nathan</p> <p></p> <p>Many chemical applications, from spectroscopy to quantum chemistry, involve measuring or computing a large amount of data, and then <span class="hlt">compressing</span> this data to retain the most chemically-relevant information. In contrast, <span class="hlt">compressed</span> sensing is an emergent technique that makes it possible to measure or compute an amount of data that is roughly proportional to its information content. In particular, <span class="hlt">compressed</span> sensing enables the recovery of a sparse quantity of information from significantly undersampled data by solving an ℓ 1-optimization problem. This thesis represents the application of <span class="hlt">compressed</span> sensing to problems in chemistry. The first half of this thesis is about spectroscopy. <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> sensing is used to accelerate the computation of vibrational and electronic spectra from real-time time-dependent density functional theory simulations. Using <span class="hlt">compressed</span> sensing as a drop-in replacement for the discrete Fourier transform, well-resolved frequency spectra are obtained at one-fifth the typical simulation time and computational cost. The technique is generalized to multiple dimensions and applied to two-dimensional absorption spectroscopy using experimental data collected on atomic rubidium vapor. Finally, a related technique known as super-resolution is applied to open quantum systems to obtain realistic models of a protein environment, in the form of atomistic spectral densities, at lower computational cost. The second half of this thesis deals with matrices in quantum chemistry. It presents a new use of <span class="hlt">compressed</span> sensing for more efficient matrix recovery whenever the calculation of individual matrix elements is the computational bottleneck. The technique is applied to the computation of the second-derivative Hessian matrices in electronic structure calculations to obtain the vibrational modes and frequencies of molecules. When applied to anthracene, this technique results in a threefold speed-up, with greater speed-ups possible for larger molecules. The</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AGUFMMR34B..02D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AGUFMMR34B..02D"><span>Ultrahigh Pressure Dynamic <span class="hlt">Compression</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Duffy, T. S.</p> <p>2017-12-01</p> <p>Laser-based dynamic <span class="hlt">compression</span> provides a new opportunity to study the lattice structure and other properties of geological materials to ultrahigh pressure conditions ranging from 100 - 1000 GPa (1 TPa) and beyond. Such studies have fundamental applications to understanding the Earth's core as well as the interior structure of super-Earths and giant planets. This talk will review recent dynamic <span class="hlt">compression</span> experiments using high-powered lasers on materials including Fe-Si, MgO, and SiC. Experiments were conducted at the Omega laser (University of Rochester) and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS, Stanford). At Omega, laser drives as large as 2 kJ are applied over 10 ns to samples that are 50 microns thick. At peak <span class="hlt">compression</span>, the sample is probed with quasi-monochromatic X-rays from a laser-plasma source and diffraction is recorded on image plates. At LCLS, shock waves are driven into the sample using a 40-J laser with a 10-ns pulse. The sample is probed with X-rays form the LCLS free electron laser providing 1012 photons in a monochromatic pulse near 10 keV energy. Diffraction is recorded using pixel array detectors. By varying the delay between the laser and the x-ray beam, the sample can be probed at various times relative to the shock wave transiting the sample. By controlling the shape and duration of the incident laser pulse, either shock or ramp (shockless) loading can be produced. Ramp <span class="hlt">compression</span> produces less heating than shock <span class="hlt">compression</span>, allowing samples to be probed to ultrahigh pressures without melting. Results for iron alloys, oxides, and carbides provide new constraints on equations of state and phase transitions that are relevant to the interior structure of large, extrasolar terrestrial-type planets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1087.photos.046808p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="https://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1087.photos.046808p/"><span>33. BENCH CORE <span class="hlt">STATION</span>, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>33. BENCH CORE <span class="hlt">STATION</span>, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE CORE MOLDS WERE HAND FILLED AND OFTEN PNEUMATICALLY <span class="hlt">COMPRESSED</span> WITH A HAND-HELD RAMMER BEFORE THEY WERE BAKED. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1254599-tem-video-compressive-sensing','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1254599-tem-video-compressive-sensing"><span>TEM Video <span class="hlt">Compressive</span> Sensing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Stevens, Andrew; Kovarik, Libor; Abellan, Patricia</p> <p></p> <p>One of the main limitations of imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution during in-situ TEM experiments is the frame rate of the camera being used to image the dynamic process. While the recent development of direct detectors has provided the hardware to achieve frame rates approaching 0.1ms, the cameras are expensive and must replace existing detectors. In this paper, we examine the use of coded aperture <span class="hlt">compressive</span> sensing methods [1, 2, 3, 4] to increase the framerate of any camera with simple, low-cost hardware modifications. The coded aperture approach allows multiple sub-frames to be coded and integrated into amore » single camera frame during the acquisition process, and then extracted upon readout using statistical <span class="hlt">compressive</span> sensing inversion. Our simulations show that it should be possible to increase the speed of any camera by at least an order of magnitude. <span class="hlt">Compressive</span> Sensing (CS) combines sensing and <span class="hlt">compression</span> in one operation, and thus provides an approach that could further improve the temporal resolution while correspondingly reducing the electron dose rate. Because the signal is measured in a <span class="hlt">compressive</span> manner, fewer total measurements are required. When applied to TEM video capture, <span class="hlt">compressive</span> imaging couled improve acquisition speed and reduce the electron dose rate. CS is a recent concept, and has come to the forefront due the seminal work of Candès [5]. Since the publication of Candès, there has been enormous growth in the application of CS and development of CS variants. For electron microscopy applications, the concept of CS has also been recently applied to electron tomography [6], and reduction of electron dose in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging [7]. To demonstrate the applicability of coded aperture CS video reconstruction for atomic level imaging, we simulate <span class="hlt">compressive</span> sensing on observations of Pd nanoparticles and Ag nanoparticles during exposure to high temperatures and other environmental</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9646E..0PB','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9646E..0PB"><span>Parallel hyperspectral <span class="hlt">compressive</span> sensing method on GPU</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bernabé, Sergio; Martín, Gabriel; Nascimento, José M. P.</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Remote hyperspectral sensors collect large amounts of data per flight usually with low spatial resolution. It is known that the bandwidth connection between the satellite/airborne platform and the ground <span class="hlt">station</span> is reduced, thus a <span class="hlt">compression</span> onboard method is desirable to reduce the amount of data to be transmitted. This paper presents a parallel implementation of an <span class="hlt">compressive</span> sensing method, called parallel hyperspectral coded aperture (P-HYCA), for graphics processing units (GPU) using the compute unified device architecture (CUDA). This method takes into account two main properties of hyperspectral dataset, namely the high correlation existing among the spectral bands and the generally low number of endmembers needed to explain the data, which largely reduces the number of measurements necessary to correctly reconstruct the original data. Experimental results conducted using synthetic and real hyperspectral datasets on two different GPU architectures by NVIDIA: GeForce GTX 590 and GeForce GTX TITAN, reveal that the use of GPUs can provide real-time <span class="hlt">compressive</span> sensing performance. The achieved speedup is up to 20 times when compared with the processing time of HYCA running on one core of the Intel i7-2600 CPU (3.4GHz), with 16 Gbyte memory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981STIA...8142512B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981STIA...8142512B"><span>Space <span class="hlt">station</span>, 1959 to . .</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Butler, G. V.</p> <p>1981-04-01</p> <p>Early space <span class="hlt">station</span> designs are considered, taking into account Herman Oberth's first space <span class="hlt">station</span>, the London Daily Mail Study, the first major space <span class="hlt">station</span> design developed during the moon mission, and the Manned Orbiting Laboratory Program of DOD. Attention is given to Skylab, new space <span class="hlt">station</span> studies, the Shuttle and Spacelab, communication satellites, solar power satellites, a 30 meter diameter radiometer for geological measurements and agricultural assessments, the mining of the moons, and questions of international cooperation. It is thought to be very probable that there will be very large space <span class="hlt">stations</span> at some time in the future. However, for the more immediate future a step-by-step development that will start with Spacelab <span class="hlt">stations</span> of 3-4 men is envisaged.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880002880','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880002880"><span>Vapor <span class="hlt">compression</span> distiller and membrane technology for water revitalization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Ashida, A.; Mitani, K.; Ebara, K.; Kurokawa, H.; Sawada, I.; Kashiwagi, H.; Tsuji, T.; Hayashi, S.; Otsubo, K.; Nitta, K.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>Water revitalization for a space <span class="hlt">station</span> can consist of membrane filtration processes and a distillation process. Water recycling equipment using membrane filtration processes was manufactured for ground testing. It was assembled using commercially available components. Two systems for the distillation are studied: one is absorption type thermopervaporation cell and the other is a vapor <span class="hlt">compression</span> distiller. Absorption type thermopervaporation, able to easily produce condensed water under zero gravity, was investigated experimentally and through simulated calculation. The vapor <span class="hlt">compression</span> distiller was studied experimentally and it offers significant energy savings for evaporation of water.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984rfeh.rept.....N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984rfeh.rept.....N"><span><span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air production with waste heat utilization in industry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nolting, E.</p> <p>1984-06-01</p> <p>The centralized power-heat coupling (PHC) technique using block heating power <span class="hlt">stations</span>, is presented. <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air production in PHC technique with internal combustion engine drive achieves a high degree of primary energy utilization. Cost savings of 50% are reached compared to conventional production. The simultaneous utilization of <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air and heat is especially interesting. A speed regulated drive via an internal combustion motor gives a further saving of 10% to 20% compared to intermittent operation. The high fuel utilization efficiency ( 80%) leads to a pay off after two years for operation times of 3000 hr.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11537274','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11537274"><span>Vapor <span class="hlt">compression</span> distiller and membrane technology for water revitalization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ashida, A; Mitani, K; Ebara, K; Kurokawa, H; Sawada, I; Kashiwagi, H; Tsuji, T; Hayashi, S; Otsubo, K; Nitta, K</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>Water revitalization for a space <span class="hlt">station</span> can consist of membrane filtration processes and a distillation process. Water recycling equipment using membrane filtration processes was manufactured for ground testing. It was assembled using commercially available components. Two systems for the distillation are studied; one is an absorption type thermopervaporation cell and the other is a vapor <span class="hlt">compression</span> distiller. Absorption type thermopervaporation able to easily produce condensed water under zero gravity was investigated experimentally and through simulated calculation. The vapor <span class="hlt">compression</span> distiller was studied experimentally and it offers significant energy savings for evaporation of water.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930013417','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930013417"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom Utilization Conference</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>The topics addressed in Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom Utilization Conference are: (1) space <span class="hlt">station</span> freedom overview and research capabilities; (2) space <span class="hlt">station</span> freedom research plans and opportunities; (3) life sciences research on space <span class="hlt">station</span> freedom; (4) technology research on space <span class="hlt">station</span> freedom; (5) microgravity research and biotechnology on space <span class="hlt">station</span> freedom; and (6) closing plenary.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003SPIE.5022...40H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003SPIE.5022...40H"><span>Digital cinema video <span class="hlt">compression</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Husak, Walter</p> <p>2003-05-01</p> <p>The Motion Picture Industry began a transition from film based distribution and projection to digital distribution and projection several years ago. Digital delivery and presentation offers the prospect to increase the quality of the theatrical experience for the audience, reduce distribution costs to the distributors, and create new business opportunities for the theater owners and the studios. Digital Cinema also presents an opportunity to provide increased flexibility and security of the movies for the content owners and the theater operators. Distribution of content via electronic means to theaters is unlike any of the traditional applications for video <span class="hlt">compression</span>. The transition from film-based media to electronic media represents a paradigm shift in video <span class="hlt">compression</span> techniques and applications that will be discussed in this paper.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8365E..0IE','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8365E..0IE"><span>Progressive <span class="hlt">compressive</span> imager</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Evladov, Sergei; Levi, Ofer; Stern, Adrian</p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p>We have designed and built a working automatic progressive sampling imaging system based on the vector sensor concept, which utilizes a unique sampling scheme of Radon projections. This sampling scheme makes it possible to progressively add information resulting in tradeoff between <span class="hlt">compression</span> and the quality of reconstruction. The uniqueness of our sampling is that in any moment of the acquisition process the reconstruction can produce a reasonable version of the image. The advantage of the gradual addition of the samples is seen when the sparsity rate of the object is unknown, and thus the number of needed measurements. We have developed the iterative algorithm OSO (Ordered Sets Optimization) which employs our sampling scheme for creation of nearly uniform distributed sets of samples, which allows the reconstruction of Mega-Pixel images. We present the good quality reconstruction from <span class="hlt">compressed</span> data ratios of 1:20.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/520537','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/520537"><span>Isentropic <span class="hlt">compression</span> of argon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Veeser, L.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Oona, H.</p> <p>1997-06-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">compression</span> was done in an MC-1 flux <span class="hlt">compression</span> (explosive) generator, in order to study the transition from an insulator to a conductor. Since conductivity signals were observed in all the experiments (except when the probe is removed), both the Teflon and the argon are becoming conductive. The conductivity could not be determined (Teflon insulation properties unknown), but it could be bounded as being {sigma}=1/{rho}{le}8({Omega}cm){sub -1}, because when the Teflon breaks down, the dielectric constant is reduced. The Teflon insulator problem remains, and other ways to better insulate the probe or to measure the conductivity without a probe is beingmore » sought.« less</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_5 --> <div id="page_6" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="101"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984laus.iafcS....C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984laus.iafcS....C"><span>Technology for space <span class="hlt">station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Colladay, R. S.; Carlisle, R. F.</p> <p>1984-10-01</p> <p>Some of the most significant advances made in the space <span class="hlt">station</span> discipline technology program are examined. Technological tasks and advances in the areas of systems/operations, environmental control and life support systems, data management, power, thermal considerations, attitude control and stabilization, auxiliary propulsion, human capabilities, communications, and structures, materials, and mechanisms are discussed. An overview of NASA technology planning to support the initial space <span class="hlt">station</span> and the evolutionary growth of the space <span class="hlt">station</span> is given.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19163324','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19163324"><span><span class="hlt">Compression</span> of electromyographic signals using image <span class="hlt">compression</span> techniques.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Costa, Marcus Vinícius Chaffim; Berger, Pedro de Azevedo; da Rocha, Adson Ferreira; de Carvalho, João Luiz Azevedo; Nascimento, Francisco Assis de Oliveira</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Despite the growing interest in the transmission and storage of electromyographic signals for long periods of time, few studies have addressed the <span class="hlt">compression</span> of such signals. In this article we present an algorithm for <span class="hlt">compression</span> of electromyographic signals based on the JPEG2000 coding system. Although the JPEG2000 codec was originally designed for <span class="hlt">compression</span> of still images, we show that it can also be used to <span class="hlt">compress</span> EMG signals for both isotonic and isometric contractions. For EMG signals acquired during isometric contractions, the proposed algorithm provided <span class="hlt">compression</span> factors ranging from 75 to 90%, with an average PRD ranging from 3.75% to 13.7%. For isotonic EMG signals, the algorithm provided <span class="hlt">compression</span> factors ranging from 75 to 90%, with an average PRD ranging from 3.4% to 7%. The <span class="hlt">compression</span> results using the JPEG2000 algorithm were compared to those using other algorithms based on the wavelet transform.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA521228','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA521228"><span>Distributed <span class="hlt">Compressive</span> Sensing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>example, smooth signals are sparse in the Fourier basis, and piecewise smooth signals are sparse in a wavelet basis [8]; the commercial coding standards MP3...including wavelets [8], Gabor bases [8], curvelets [35], etc., are widely used for representation and <span class="hlt">compression</span> of natural signals, images, and...spikes and the sine waves of a Fourier basis, or the Fourier basis and wavelets . Signals that are sparsely represented in frames or unions of bases can</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930018608','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930018608"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> fluid resupply</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Winters, AL</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Viewgraphs on space <span class="hlt">station</span> fluid resupply are presented. Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom is resupplied with supercritical O2 and N2 for the ECLSS and USL on a 180 day resupply cycle. Resupply fluids are stored in the subcarriers on <span class="hlt">station</span> between resupply cycles and transferred to the users as required. ECLSS contingency fluids (O2 and N2) are supplied and stored on <span class="hlt">station</span> in a gaseous state. Efficiency and flexibility are major design considerations. Subcarrier approach allows multiple manifest combinations. Growth is achieved by adding modular subcarriers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28419125','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28419125"><span>Mammographic <span class="hlt">compression</span> in Asian women.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lau, Susie; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah; Ng, Kwan Hoong</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>To investigate: (1) the variability of mammographic <span class="hlt">compression</span> parameters amongst Asian women; and (2) the effects of reducing <span class="hlt">compression</span> force on image quality and mean glandular dose (MGD) in Asian women based on phantom study. We retrospectively collected 15818 raw digital mammograms from 3772 Asian women aged 35-80 years who underwent screening or diagnostic mammography between Jan 2012 and Dec 2014 at our center. The mammograms were processed using a volumetric breast density (VBD) measurement software (Volpara) to assess <span class="hlt">compression</span> force, <span class="hlt">compression</span> pressure, <span class="hlt">compressed</span> breast thickness (CBT), breast volume, VBD and MGD against breast contact area. The effects of reducing <span class="hlt">compression</span> force on image quality and MGD were also evaluated based on measurement obtained from 105 Asian women, as well as using the RMI156 Mammographic Accreditation Phantom and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) slabs. <span class="hlt">Compression</span> force, <span class="hlt">compression</span> pressure, CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD correlated significantly with breast contact area (p<0.0001). <span class="hlt">Compression</span> parameters including <span class="hlt">compression</span> force, <span class="hlt">compression</span> pressure, CBT and breast contact area were widely variable between [relative standard deviation (RSD)≥21.0%] and within (p<0.0001) Asian women. The median <span class="hlt">compression</span> force should be about 8.1 daN compared to the current 12.0 daN. Decreasing <span class="hlt">compression</span> force from 12.0 daN to 9.0 daN increased CBT by 3.3±1.4 mm, MGD by 6.2-11.0%, and caused no significant effects on image quality (p>0.05). Force-standardized protocol led to widely variable <span class="hlt">compression</span> parameters in Asian women. Based on phantom study, it is feasible to reduce <span class="hlt">compression</span> force up to 32.5% with minimal effects on image quality and MGD.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0100334.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0100334.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-12-01</p> <p>This image of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> in orbit was taken from the Space Shuttle Endeavour prior to docking. Most of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s components are clearly visible in this photograph. They are the Node 1 or Unity Module docked with the Functional Cargo Block or Zarya (top) that is linked to the Zvezda Service Module. The Soyuz spacecraft is at the bottom.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-NHQ_2018_0118_Space+Station+Spacewalks+Previewed.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-NHQ_2018_0118_Space+Station+Spacewalks+Previewed.html"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Spacewalks Previewed</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2018-01-18</p> <p>On Jan. 18, a briefing was held at NASA’s Johnson Space Center to preview a pair of spacewalks scheduled to take place outside the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>. American and Japanese astronauts aboard the <span class="hlt">station</span> will conduct spacewalks on Tuesday, Jan. 23 and Monday, Jan. 29 to service the station’s robotic arm.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701328.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701328.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-08-13</p> <p>Back dropped by the blue and white Earth is a Materials International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Experiment (MISSE) on the exterior of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>. The photograph was taken during the second bout of STS-118 Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). MISSE collects information on how different materials weather in the environment of space.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19720020262','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19720020262"><span>Space <span class="hlt">station</span> executive summary</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>An executive summary of the modular space <span class="hlt">station</span> study is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) design characteristics, (2) experiment program, (3) operations, (4) program description, and (5) research implications. The modular space <span class="hlt">station</span> is considered a candidate payload for the low cost shuttle transportation system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160006357','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160006357"><span>[STEM on <span class="hlt">Station</span> Education</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lundebjerg, Kristen</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The STEM on <span class="hlt">Station</span> team is part of Education which is part of the External Relations organization (ERO). ERO has traditional goals based around BHAG (Big Hairy Audacious Goal). The BHAG model is simplified to a saying: Everything we do stimulates actions by others to advance human space exploration. The STEM on <span class="hlt">Station</span> education initiate is a project focused on bringing off the earth research and learning into classrooms. Educational resources such as lesson plans, activities to connect with the space <span class="hlt">station</span> and STEM related contests are available and hosted by the STEM on <span class="hlt">Station</span> team along with their partners such as Texas Instruments. These educational activities engage teachers and students in the current happenings aboard the international space <span class="hlt">station</span>, inspiring the next generation of space explorers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/biblio/5562197-international-magnetic-pulse-compression','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/biblio/5562197-international-magnetic-pulse-compression"><span>International magnetic pulse <span class="hlt">compression</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kirbie, H.C.; Newton, M.A.; Siemens, P.D.</p> <p>1991-04-01</p> <p>Although pulsed-power engineering traditionally has been practiced by a fairly small, close community in the areas of defense and energy research, it is becoming more common in high-power, high-energy commercial pursuits such as material processing and lasers. This paper is a synopsis of the Feb. 12--14, 1990 workshop on magnetic switching as it applies primarily to pulse <span class="hlt">compression</span> (power transformation). During the course of the Workshop at Granlibakken, a great deal of information was amassed and a keen insight into both the problems and opportunities as to the use of this switching approach was developed. The segmented workshop format provedmore » ideal for identifying key aspects affecting optimum performance in a variety of applications. Individual groups of experts addressed network and system modeling, magnetic materials, power conditioning, core cooling and dielectrics, and finally circuits and application. At the end, they came together to consolidate their input and formulate the workshop's conclusions, identifying roadblocks or suggesting research projects, particularly as they apply to magnetic switching's trump card -- its high-average-power-handling capability (at least on a burst-mode basis). The workshop was especially productive both in the quality and quantity of information transfer in an environment conducive to a free and open exchange of ideas. We will not delve into the organization proper of this meeting, rather we wish to commend to the interested reader this volume, which provides the definitive and most up-to-date compilation on the subject of magnetic pulse <span class="hlt">compression</span> from underlying principles to current state of the art as well as the prognosis for the future of magnetic pulse <span class="hlt">compression</span> as a consensus of the workshop's organizers and participants.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991mpc..work...12K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991mpc..work...12K"><span>International magnetic pulse <span class="hlt">compression</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kirbie, H. C.; Newton, M. A.; Siemens, P. D.</p> <p>1991-04-01</p> <p>Although pulsed-power engineering traditionally has been practiced by a fairly small, close community in the areas of defense and energy research, it is becoming more common in high-power, high-energy commercial pursuits such as material processing and lasers. This paper is a synopsis of the Feb. 12-14, 1990 workshop on magnetic switching as it applies primarily to pulse <span class="hlt">compression</span> (power transformation). During the course of the Workshop at Granlibakken, a great deal of information was amassed and a keen insight into both the problems and opportunities as to the use of this switching approach was developed. The segmented workshop format proved ideal for identifying key aspects affecting optimum performance in a variety of applications. Individual groups of experts addressed network and system modeling, magnetic materials, power conditioning, core cooling and dielectrics, and finally circuits and application. At the end, they came together to consolidate their input and formulate the workshop's conclusions, identifying roadblocks or suggesting research projects, particularly as they apply to magnetic switching's trump card - its high-average-power-handling capability (at least on a burst-mode basis). The workshop was especially productive both in the quality and quantity of information transfer in an environment conducive to a free and open exchange of ideas. We will not delve into the organization proper of this meeting, rather we wish to commend to the interested reader this volume, which provides the definitive and most up-to-date compilation on the subject of magnetic pulse <span class="hlt">compression</span> from underlying principles to current state of the art as well as the prognosis for the future of magnetic pulse <span class="hlt">compression</span> as a consensus of the workshop's organizers and participants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26352631','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26352631"><span>Fast <span class="hlt">Compressive</span> Tracking.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Kaihua; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Ming-Hsuan</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>It is a challenging task to develop effective and efficient appearance models for robust object tracking due to factors such as pose variation, illumination change, occlusion, and motion blur. Existing online tracking algorithms often update models with samples from observations in recent frames. Despite much success has been demonstrated, numerous issues remain to be addressed. First, while these adaptive appearance models are data-dependent, there does not exist sufficient amount of data for online algorithms to learn at the outset. Second, online tracking algorithms often encounter the drift problems. As a result of self-taught learning, misaligned samples are likely to be added and degrade the appearance models. In this paper, we propose a simple yet effective and efficient tracking algorithm with an appearance model based on features extracted from a multiscale image feature space with data-independent basis. The proposed appearance model employs non-adaptive random projections that preserve the structure of the image feature space of objects. A very sparse measurement matrix is constructed to efficiently extract the features for the appearance model. We <span class="hlt">compress</span> sample images of the foreground target and the background using the same sparse measurement matrix. The tracking task is formulated as a binary classification via a naive Bayes classifier with online update in the <span class="hlt">compressed</span> domain. A coarse-to-fine search strategy is adopted to further reduce the computational complexity in the detection procedure. The proposed <span class="hlt">compressive</span> tracking algorithm runs in real-time and performs favorably against state-of-the-art methods on challenging sequences in terms of efficiency, accuracy and robustness.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MS%26E...53a2081H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MS%26E...53a2081H"><span>Comparative data <span class="hlt">compression</span> techniques and multi-<span class="hlt">compression</span> results</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hasan, M. R.; Ibrahimy, M. I.; Motakabber, S. M. A.; Ferdaus, M. M.; Khan, M. N. H.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Data <span class="hlt">compression</span> is very necessary in business data processing, because of the cost savings that it offers and the large volume of data manipulated in many business applications. It is a method or system for transmitting a digital image (i.e., an array of pixels) from a digital data source to a digital data receiver. More the size of the data be smaller, it provides better transmission speed and saves time. In this communication, we always want to transmit data efficiently and noise freely. This paper will provide some <span class="hlt">compression</span> techniques for lossless text type data <span class="hlt">compression</span> and comparative result of multiple and single <span class="hlt">compression</span>, that will help to find out better <span class="hlt">compression</span> output and to develop <span class="hlt">compression</span> algorithms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25173568','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25173568"><span>Seq<span class="hlt">Compress</span>: an algorithm for biological sequence <span class="hlt">compression</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sardaraz, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad; Ikram, Ataul Aziz; Bajwa, Hassan</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>The growth of Next Generation Sequencing technologies presents significant research challenges, specifically to design bioinformatics tools that handle massive amount of data efficiently. Biological sequence data storage cost has become a noticeable proportion of total cost in the generation and analysis. Particularly increase in DNA sequencing rate is significantly outstripping the rate of increase in disk storage capacity, which may go beyond the limit of storage capacity. It is essential to develop algorithms that handle large data sets via better memory management. This article presents a DNA sequence <span class="hlt">compression</span> algorithm Seq<span class="hlt">Compress</span> that copes with the space complexity of biological sequences. The algorithm is based on lossless data <span class="hlt">compression</span> and uses statistical model as well as arithmetic coding to <span class="hlt">compress</span> DNA sequences. The proposed algorithm is compared with recent specialized <span class="hlt">compression</span> tools for biological sequences. Experimental results show that proposed algorithm has better <span class="hlt">compression</span> gain as compared to other existing algorithms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302490.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302490.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-03-13</p> <p>Astronaut Paul W. Richards, STS-102 mission specialist, works in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Discovery during the second of two scheduled space walks. Richards, along with astronaut Andy Thomas, spent 6.5 hours outside the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), continuing work to outfit the <span class="hlt">station</span> and prepare for delivery of its robotic arm. STS-102 delivered the first Multipurpose Logistics Modules (MPLM) named Leonardo, which was filled with equipment and supplies to outfit the U.S. Destiny Laboratory Module. The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the ISS' moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments, and supplies to and from the <span class="hlt">Station</span> aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo in 16 standard Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached <span class="hlt">station</span> module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. NASA's 103rd overall mission and the 8th Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Assembly Flight, STS-102 mission also served as a crew rotation flight. It delivered the Expedition Two crew to the <span class="hlt">Station</span> and returned the Expedition One crew back to Earth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7690E..0QA','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7690E..0QA"><span><span class="hlt">Compressive</span> light field imaging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ashok, Amit; Neifeld, Mark A.</p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>Light field imagers such as the plenoptic and the integral imagers inherently measure projections of the four dimensional (4D) light field scalar function onto a two dimensional sensor and therefore, suffer from a spatial vs. angular resolution trade-off. Programmable light field imagers, proposed recently, overcome this spatioangular resolution trade-off and allow high-resolution capture of the (4D) light field function with multiple measurements at the cost of a longer exposure time. However, these light field imagers do not exploit the spatio-angular correlations inherent in the light fields of natural scenes and thus result in photon-inefficient measurements. Here, we describe two architectures for <span class="hlt">compressive</span> light field imaging that require relatively few photon-efficient measurements to obtain a high-resolution estimate of the light field while reducing the overall exposure time. Our simulation study shows that, <span class="hlt">compressive</span> light field imagers using the principal component (PC) measurement basis require four times fewer measurements and three times shorter exposure time compared to a conventional light field imager in order to achieve an equivalent light field reconstruction quality.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/wv0538.photos.205219p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="https://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/wv0538.photos.205219p/"><span>4. EASTBOUND VIEW. NORTH TRACK WAITING <span class="hlt">STATION</span> ON LEFT. <span class="hlt">STATION</span> ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>4. EASTBOUND VIEW. NORTH TRACK WAITING <span class="hlt">STATION</span> ON LEFT. <span class="hlt">STATION</span> ON RIGHT. NOTE TUNNEL IN BACKGROUND. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Harpers Ferry <span class="hlt">Station</span>, Potomac Street, Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, WV</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17281047','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17281047"><span>Reversible Watermarking Surviving JPEG <span class="hlt">Compression</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zain, J; Clarke, M</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>This paper will discuss the properties of watermarking medical images. We will also discuss the possibility of such images being <span class="hlt">compressed</span> by JPEG and give an overview of JPEG <span class="hlt">compression</span>. We will then propose a watermarking scheme that is reversible and robust to JPEG <span class="hlt">compression</span>. The purpose is to verify the integrity and authenticity of medical images. We used 800x600x8 bits ultrasound (US) images in our experiment. SHA-256 of the image is then embedded in the Least significant bits (LSB) of an 8x8 block in the Region of Non Interest (RONI). The image is then <span class="hlt">compressed</span> using JPEG and decompressed using Photoshop 6.0. If the image has not been altered, the watermark extracted will match the hash (SHA256) of the original image. The result shown that the embedded watermark is robust to JPEG <span class="hlt">compression</span> up to image quality 60 (~91% <span class="hlt">compressed</span>).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018MNRAS.476L..60A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018MNRAS.476L..60A"><span>Generalized massive optimal data <span class="hlt">compression</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Alsing, Justin; Wandelt, Benjamin</p> <p>2018-05-01</p> <p>In this paper, we provide a general procedure for optimally <span class="hlt">compressing</span> N data down to n summary statistics, where n is equal to the number of parameters of interest. We show that <span class="hlt">compression</span> to the score function - the gradient of the log-likelihood with respect to the parameters - yields n <span class="hlt">compressed</span> statistics that are optimal in the sense that they preserve the Fisher information content of the data. Our method generalizes earlier work on linear Karhunen-Loéve <span class="hlt">compression</span> for Gaussian data whilst recovering both lossless linear <span class="hlt">compression</span> and quadratic estimation as special cases when they are optimal. We give a unified treatment that also includes the general non-Gaussian case as long as mild regularity conditions are satisfied, producing optimal non-linear summary statistics when appropriate. As a worked example, we derive explicitly the n optimal <span class="hlt">compressed</span> statistics for Gaussian data in the general case where both the mean and covariance depend on the parameters.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_6 --> <div id="page_7" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="121"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4669980','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4669980"><span><span class="hlt">Compressive</span> sensing in medical imaging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Graff, Christian G.; Sidky, Emil Y.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The promise of <span class="hlt">compressive</span> sensing, exploitation of <span class="hlt">compressibility</span> to achieve high quality image reconstructions with less data, has attracted a great deal of attention in the medical imaging community. At the <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> Sensing Incubator meeting held in April 2014 at OSA Headquarters in Washington, DC, presentations were given summarizing some of the research efforts ongoing in <span class="hlt">compressive</span> sensing for x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems. This article provides an expanded version of these presentations. Sparsity-exploiting reconstruction algorithms that have gained popularity in the medical imaging community are studied, and examples of clinical applications that could benefit from <span class="hlt">compressive</span> sensing ideas are provided. The current and potential future impact of <span class="hlt">compressive</span> sensing on the medical imaging field is discussed. PMID:25968400</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880047826&hterms=evolution+inclusions&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Devolution%2Binclusions','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880047826&hterms=evolution+inclusions&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Devolution%2Binclusions"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> evolution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Black, David C.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>The Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> that will be launched and made operational in the early 1990s should be viewed as a beginning, a facility that will evolve with the passing of time to better meet the needs and requirements of a diverse set of users. Evolution takes several forms, ranging from simple growth through addition of infrastructure elements to upgrading of system capability through inclusion of advanced technologies. Much of the early considerations of Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> evolution focused on physical growth. However, a series of recent workshops have revealed that the more likely mode of Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> evolution will not be through growth but rather through a process known as 'branching'.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890009018','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890009018"><span>The space <span class="hlt">station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Munoz, Abraham</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Conceived since the beginning of time, living in space is no longer a dream but rather a very near reality. The concept of a Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> is not a new one, but a redefined one. Many investigations on the kinds of experiments and work assignments the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> will need to accommodate have been completed, but NASA specialists are constantly talking with potential users of the <span class="hlt">Station</span> to learn more about the work they, the users, want to do in space. Present configurations are examined along with possible new ones.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890006419','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890006419"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Induced Monitoring</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Spann, James F. (Editor); Torr, Marsha R. (Editor)</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>This report contains the results of a conference convened May 10-11, 1988, to review plans for monitoring the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> induced environment, to recommend primary components of an induced environment monitoring package, and to make recommendations pertaining to suggested modifications of the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> External Contamination Control Requirements Document JSC 30426. The contents of this report are divided as Follows: Monitoring Induced Environment - Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Work Packages Requirements, Neutral Environment, Photon Emission Environment, Particulate Environment, Surface Deposition/Contamination; and Contamination Control Requirements.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760004115','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760004115"><span>Madrid space <span class="hlt">station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Fahnestock, R. J.; Renzetti, N. A.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>The Madrid space <span class="hlt">station</span>, operated under bilateral agreements between the governments of the United States and Spain, is described in both Spanish and English. The space <span class="hlt">station</span> utilizes two tracking and data acquisition networks: the Deep Space Network (DSN) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (STDN) operated under the direction of the Goddard Space Flight Center. The <span class="hlt">station</span>, which is staffed by Spanish employees, comprises four facilities: Robledo 1, Cebreros, and Fresnedillas-Navalagamella, all with 26-meter-diameter antennas, and Robledo 2, with a 64-meter antenna.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890037959&hterms=Operations+Management&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DTitle%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DOperations%2BManagement','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890037959&hterms=Operations+Management&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DTitle%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DOperations%2BManagement"><span>Space <span class="hlt">station</span> operations management</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Cannon, Kathleen V.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom operations management concepts must be responsive to the unique challenges presented by the permanently manned international laboratory. Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom will be assembled over a three year period where the operational environment will change as significant capability plateaus are reached. First Element Launch, Man-Tended Capability, and Permanent Manned Capability, represent milestones in operational capability that is increasing toward mature operations capability. Operations management concepts are being developed to accomodate the varying operational capabilities during assembly, as well as the mature operational environment. This paper describes operations management concepts designed to accomodate the uniqueness of Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedoom, utilizing tools and processes that seek to control operations costs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA217302','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA217302"><span>Fractal-Based Image <span class="hlt">Compression</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>used Ziv - Lempel - experiments and for software development. Addi- Welch <span class="hlt">compression</span> algorithm (ZLW) [51 [4] was used tional thanks to Roger Boss, Bill...vol17no. 6 (June 4) and with the minimum number of maps. [5] J. Ziv and A. Lempel , <span class="hlt">Compression</span> of !ndivid- 5 Summary ual Sequences via Variable-Rate...transient and should be discarded. 2.5 Collage Theorem algorithm2 C3.2 Deterministic Algorithm for IFS Attractor For fast image <span class="hlt">compression</span> the best</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3868316','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3868316"><span>Data <span class="hlt">compression</span> for sequencing data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Post-Sanger sequencing methods produce tons of data, and there is a general agreement that the challenge to store and process them must be addressed with data <span class="hlt">compression</span>. In this review we first answer the question “why compression” in a quantitative manner. Then we also answer the questions “what” and “how”, by sketching the fundamental <span class="hlt">compression</span> ideas, describing the main sequencing data types and formats, and comparing the specialized <span class="hlt">compression</span> algorithms and tools. Finally, we go back to the question “why compression” and give other, perhaps surprising answers, demonstrating the pervasiveness of data <span class="hlt">compression</span> techniques in computational biology. PMID:24252160</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/biblio/6290247','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/biblio/6290247"><span>Magnetic <span class="hlt">compression</span> laser driving circuit</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Ball, D.G.; Birx, D.; Cook, E.G.</p> <p>1993-01-05</p> <p>A magnetic <span class="hlt">compression</span> laser driving circuit is disclosed. The magnetic <span class="hlt">compression</span> laser driving circuit <span class="hlt">compresses</span> voltage pulses in the range of 1.5 microseconds at 20 kilovolts of amplitude to pulses in the range of 40 nanoseconds and 60 kilovolts of amplitude. The magnetic <span class="hlt">compression</span> laser driving circuit includes a multi-stage magnetic switch where the last stage includes a switch having at least two turns which has larger saturated inductance with less core material so that the efficiency of the circuit and hence the laser is increased.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/868628','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/868628"><span>Magnetic <span class="hlt">compression</span> laser driving circuit</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Ball, Don G.; Birx, Dan; Cook, Edward G.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>A magnetic <span class="hlt">compression</span> laser driving circuit is disclosed. The magnetic <span class="hlt">compression</span> laser driving circuit <span class="hlt">compresses</span> voltage pulses in the range of 1.5 microseconds at 20 Kilovolts of amplitude to pulses in the range of 40 nanoseconds and 60 Kilovolts of amplitude. The magnetic <span class="hlt">compression</span> laser driving circuit includes a multi-stage magnetic switch where the last stage includes a switch having at least two turns which has larger saturated inductance with less core material so that the efficiency of the circuit and hence the laser is increased.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850039404&hterms=Find+company+cooperation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DFind%2Bcompany%2Bcooperation','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850039404&hterms=Find+company+cooperation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DFind%2Bcompany%2Bcooperation"><span>Pilot's Desk Flight <span class="hlt">Station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Sexton, G. A.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Aircraft flight <span class="hlt">station</span> designs have generally evolved through the incorporation of improved or modernized controls and displays. In connection with a continuing increase in the amount of information displayed, this process has produced a complex and cluttered conglomeration of knobs, switches, and electromechanical displays. The result was often high crew workload, missed signals, and misinterpreted information. Advances in electronic technology have now, however, led to new concepts in flight <span class="hlt">station</span> design. An American aerospace company in cooperation with NASA has utilized these concepts to develop a candidate conceptual design for a 1995 flight <span class="hlt">station</span>. The obtained Pilot's Desk Flight <span class="hlt">Station</span> is a unique design which resembles more an operator's console than today's cockpit. Attention is given to configuration, primary flight controllers, front panel displays, flight/navigation display, approach charts and weather display, head-up display, and voice command and response systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0000552.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0000552.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-02-01</p> <p>A section of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> truss assembly arrived at the Marshall Space Flight Center on NASA's Super Guppy cargo plane for structural and design testing as well as installation of critical flight hardware.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19720022212','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19720022212"><span>Space <span class="hlt">station</span> data flow</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>The results of the space <span class="hlt">station</span> data flow study are reported. Conceived is a low cost interactive data dissemination system for space <span class="hlt">station</span> experiment data that includes facility and personnel requirements and locations, phasing requirements and implementation costs. Each of the experiments identified by the operating schedule is analyzed and the support characteristics identified in order to determine data characteristics. Qualitative and quantitative comparison of candidate concepts resulted in a proposed data system configuration baseline concept that includes a data center which combines the responsibility of reprocessing, archiving, and user services according to the various agencies and their responsibility assignments. The primary source of data is the space <span class="hlt">station</span> complex which provides through the Tracking Data Relay Satellite System (TDRS) and by space shuttle delivery data from experiments in free flying modules and orbiting shuttles as well as from the experiments in the modular space <span class="hlt">station</span> itself.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9503940.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9503940.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1995-04-17</p> <p>This computer generated scene of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) represents the first addition of hardware following the completion of Phase II. The 8-A Phase shows the addition of the S-9 truss.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940021186','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940021186"><span>Enabler operator <span class="hlt">station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bailey, Andrea; Kietzman, John; King, Shirlyn; Stover, Rae; Wegner, Torsten</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>The objective of this project was to design an onboard operator <span class="hlt">station</span> for the conceptual Lunar Work Vehicle (LWV). The LWV would be used in the colonization of a lunar outpost. The details that follow, however, are for an Earth-bound model. The operator <span class="hlt">station</span> is designed to be dimensionally correct for an astronaut wearing the current space shuttle EVA suit (which include life support). The proposed operator <span class="hlt">station</span> will support and restrain an astronaut as well as to provide protection from the hazards of vehicle rollover. The threat of suit puncture is eliminated by rounding all corners and edges. A step-plate, located at the front of the vehicle, provides excellent ease of entry and exit. The operator <span class="hlt">station</span> weight requirements are met by making efficient use of rigid members, semi-rigid members, and woven fabrics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850012379','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850012379"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Software Issues</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Voigt, S. (Editor); Beskenis, S. (Editor)</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Issues in the development of software for the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> are discussed. Software acquisition and management, software development environment, standards, information system support for software developers, and a future software advisory board are addressed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9410696.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9410696.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1994-09-21</p> <p>Artist's concept of the final configuration of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) Alpha. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide an unprecedented undertaking in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9410635.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9410635.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1994-04-20</p> <p>An artist's concept of a fully deployed International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) Alpha. The ISS-A is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide an unprecedented undertaking in scientific, technological, and international experiments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201903.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201903.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-06-01</p> <p>Pictured here is the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour, STS-111 mission insignia. The International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) recieved a new crew, Expedition Five, replacing Expedition Four after a record-setting 196 days in space, when STS-111 visited in June 2002. Three spacewalks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish additional mission objectives: the delivery and installation of a new platform for the ISS robotic arm, the Mobile Base System (MBS) which is an important part of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s Mobile Servicing System allowing the robotic arm to travel the length of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>; the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s robotic arm; and unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the ISS, was launched on June 5, 2002 and landed June 19, 2002.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201907.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201907.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-06-07</p> <p>Backdropped against the blackness of space is the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), as viewed from the approching Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour, STS-111 mission, in June 2002. Expedition Five replaced Expedition Four crew after remaining a record-setting 196 days in space. Three spacewalks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish the delivery and installation of the Mobile Remote Servicer Base System (MBS), an important part of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s Mobile Servicing System that allows the robotic arm to travel the length of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>, which is necessary for future construction tasks; the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s robotic arm, and the task of unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the ISS, was launched on June 5, 2002 and landed June 19, 2002.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860013843','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860013843"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Software Recommendations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Voigt, S. (Editor)</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Four panels of invited experts and NASA representatives focused on the following topics: software management, software development environment, languages, and software standards. Each panel deliberated in private, held two open sessions with audience participation, and developed recommendations for the NASA Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Program. The major thrusts of the recommendations were as follows: (1) The software management plan should establish policies, responsibilities, and decision points for software acquisition; (2) NASA should furnish a uniform modular software support environment and require its use for all space <span class="hlt">station</span> software acquired (or developed); (3) The language Ada should be selected for space <span class="hlt">station</span> software, and NASA should begin to address issues related to the effective use of Ada; and (4) The space <span class="hlt">station</span> software standards should be selected (based upon existing standards where possible), and an organization should be identified to promulgate and enforce them. These and related recommendations are described in detail in the conference proceedings.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870051446&hterms=food+analysis&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dfood%2Banalysis','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870051446&hterms=food+analysis&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dfood%2Banalysis"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Food System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Thurmond, Beverly A.; Gillan, Douglas J.; Perchonok, Michele G.; Marcus, Beth A.; Bourland, Charles T.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>A team of engineers and food scientists from NASA, the aerospace industry, food companies, and academia are defining the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Food System. The team identified the system requirements based on an analysis of past and current space food systems, food systems from isolated environment communities that resemble Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>, and the projected Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> parameters. The team is resolving conflicts among requirements through the use of trade-off analyses. The requirements will give rise to a set of specifications which, in turn, will be used to produce concepts. Concept verification will include testing of prototypes, both in 1-g and microgravity. The end-item specification provides an overall guide for assembling a functional food system for Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19920014406','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19920014406"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Keyes, Gilbert</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>Information is given in viewgraph form on Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom. Topics covered include future evolution, man-tended capability, permanently manned capability, standard payload rack dimensions, the Crystals by Vapor Transport Experiment (CVTE), commercial space projects interfaces, and pricing policy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1511371H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1511371H"><span>GNSS <span class="hlt">station</span> displacement analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Haritonova, Diana; Balodis, Janis; Janpaule, Inese; Normand, Madara</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>Time series of GNSS <span class="hlt">station</span> results of both the EUPOS®-Riga and LatPos networks have been developed at the Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformation (University of Latvia). The reference <span class="hlt">stations</span> from EUREF Permanent Network (EPN) in surroundings of Latvia have been used and Bernese GPS Software, Version 5.0, in both static and kinematic modes was applied. The standard data sets were taken from IGS data base. The results of time series have been analysed and distinctive behaviour of daily and subdaily movements of EUPOS®-Riga and LatPos <span class="hlt">stations</span> was identified. The reasons of dependence of GNSS <span class="hlt">station</span> coordinate distribution on possible external factors such as seismic activity of some areas of Latvia and periodic processes were given.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860022175','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860022175"><span>Space <span class="hlt">station</span> propulsion technology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Briley, G. L.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>The progress on the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Propulsion Technology Program is described. The objectives are to provide a demonstration of hydrogen/oxygen propulsion technology readiness for the Initial Operating Capability (IOC) space <span class="hlt">station</span> application, specifically gaseous hydrogen/oxygen and warm hydrogen thruster concepts, and to establish a means for evolving from the IOC space <span class="hlt">station</span> propulsion to that required to support and interface with advanced <span class="hlt">station</span> functions. The evaluation of concepts was completed. The accumulator module of the test bed was completed and, with the microprocessor controller, delivered to NASA-MSFC. An oxygen/hydrogen thruster was modified for use with the test bed and successfully tested at mixture ratios from 4:1 to 8:1.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19720013183','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19720013183"><span>Modular space <span class="hlt">station</span> mass properties</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>An update of the space <span class="hlt">station</span> mass properties is presented. Included are the final status update of the Initial Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) modules and logistic module plus incorporation of the Growth Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (GSS) module additions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701321.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701321.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-06-19</p> <p>Eight days of construction resumed on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), as STS-117 astronauts and mission specialists and the Expedition 15 crew completed installation of the second and third starboard truss segments (S3 and S4). Back dropped by our colorful Earth, its newly expanded configuration is revealed as pilot Lee Archambault conducts a fly around upon departure from the <span class="hlt">station</span> on June 19, 2007.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701320.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701320.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-06-19</p> <p>Eight days of construction resumed on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), as STS-117 astronauts and mission specialists and the Expedition 15 crew completed installation of the second and third starboard truss segments (S3 and S4). Back dropped by the blackness of space, its newly expanded configuration is revealed as pilot Lee Archambault conducts a fly around upon departure from the <span class="hlt">station</span> on June 19, 2007.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984EOSTr..65...51.','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984EOSTr..65...51."><span>Space <span class="hlt">station</span> proposed</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>In his State of the Union address on January 25, President Ronald Reagan announced that he was directing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to “develop a permanently manned space <span class="hlt">station</span>, and to do it within a decade.”Included in the NASA budget proposal sent to Congress the following week was $150 million for the <span class="hlt">station</span>. This is the first request of many; expected costs will total roughly $8 billion by the early 1990's.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870051448&hterms=Food+Beverage+Management&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DFood%2BBeverage%2BManagement','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870051448&hterms=Food+Beverage+Management&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DFood%2BBeverage%2BManagement"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> galley design</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Trabanino, Rudy; Murphy, George L.; Yakut, M. M.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>An Advanced Food Hardware System galley for the initial operating capability (IOC) Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> is discussed. Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> will employ food hardware items that have never been flown in space, such as a dishwasher, microwave oven, blender/mixer, bulk food and beverage dispensers, automated food inventory management, a trash compactor, and an advanced technology refrigerator/freezer. These new technologies and designs are described and the trades, design, development, and testing associated with each are summarized.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701319.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701319.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-06-15</p> <p>Construction resumed on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), as STS-117 astronauts and mission specialists Jim Reilly (on robotic arm), and John “Danny” Olivas joined forces with their colleagues inside the Shuttle and <span class="hlt">station</span>, and controllers in Houston, to complete the delicate process of folding an older solar array, Port 6 (P6), so that it can be moved from its temporary location to its permanent home during an upcoming Fall scheduled Shuttle mission. The EVA lasted nearly 8 hours.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IJMPS..3960098K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IJMPS..3960098K"><span><span class="hlt">Compressed</span> baryonic matter at FAIR: JINR participation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kurilkin, P.; Ladygin, V.; Malakhov, A.; Senger, P.</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>The scientific mission of the <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> Baryonic Matter(CBM) experiment is the study of the nuclear matter properties at the high baryon densities in heavy ion collisions at the Facility of Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. We present the results on JINR participation in the CBM experiment. JINR teams are responsible on the design, the coordination of superconducting(SC) magnet manufacture, its testing and installation in CBM cave. Together with Silicon Tracker System it will provide the momentum resolution better 1% for different configuration of CBM setup. The characteristics and technical aspects of the magnet are discussed. JINR plays also a significant role in the manufacture of two straw tracker <span class="hlt">station</span> for the muon detection system. JINR team takes part in the development of new method for simulation, processing and analysis experimental data for different basic detectors of CBM.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880012104','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880012104"><span>Space <span class="hlt">station</span> mobile transporter</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Renshall, James; Marks, Geoff W.; Young, Grant L.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>The first quarter of the next century will see an operational space <span class="hlt">station</span> that will provide a permanently manned base for satellite servicing, multiple strategic scientific and commercial payload deployment, and Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle/Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OMV/OTV) retrieval replenishment and deployment. The space <span class="hlt">station</span>, as conceived, is constructed in orbit and will be maintained in orbit. The construction, servicing, maintenance and deployment tasks, when coupled with the size of the <span class="hlt">station</span>, dictate that some form of transportation and manipulation device be conceived. The Transporter described will work in conjunction with the Orbiter and an Assembly Work Platform (AWP) to construct the Work <span class="hlt">Station</span>. The Transporter will also work in conjunction with the Mobile Remote Servicer to service and install payloads, retrieve, service and deploy satellites, and service and maintain the <span class="hlt">station</span> itself. The Transporter involved in <span class="hlt">station</span> construction when mounted on the AWP and later supporting a maintenance or inspection task with the Mobile Remote Servicer and the Flight Telerobotic Servicer is shown.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20130009180','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20130009180"><span>The Princess Elisabeth <span class="hlt">Station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Berte, Johan</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Aware of the increasing impact of human activities on the Earth system, Belgian Science Policy Office (Belspo) launched in 1997 a research programme in support of a sustainable development policy. This umbrella programme included the Belgian Scientific Programme on Antarctic Research. The International Polar Foundation, an organization led by the civil engineer and explorer Alain Hubert, was commissioned by the Belgian Federal government in 2004 to design, construct and operate a new Belgian Antarctic Research <span class="hlt">Station</span> as an element under this umbrella programme. The <span class="hlt">station</span> was to be designed as a central location for investigating the characteristic sequence of Antarctic geographical regions (polynia, coast, ice shelf, ice sheet, marginal mountain area and dry valleys, inland plateau) within a radius of 200 kilometers (approx.124 miles) of a selected site. The <span class="hlt">station</span> was also to be designed as "state of the art" with respect to sustainable development, energy consumption, and waste disposal, with a minimum lifetime of 25 years. The goal of the project was to build a <span class="hlt">station</span> and enable science. So first we needed some basic requirements, which I have listed here; plus we had to finance the <span class="hlt">station</span> ourselves. Our most important requirement was that we decided to make it a zero emissions <span class="hlt">station</span>. This was both a philosophical choice as we thought it more consistent with Antarctic Treaty obligations and it was also a logistical advantage. If you are using renewable energy sources, you do not have to bring in all the fuel.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302492.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302492.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-03-01</p> <p>Pilot James M. Kelly (left) and Commander James D. Wetherbee for the STS-102 mission, participate in the movement of supplies inside Leonardo, the Italian Space Agency built Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM). In this particular photograph, the two are handling a film magazine for the IMAX cargo bay camera. The primary cargo of the STS-102 mission, the Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s (ISS') moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments, and supplies to and from the <span class="hlt">Station</span> aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo in 16 standard Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached <span class="hlt">station</span> module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. The eighth <span class="hlt">station</span> assembly flight, the STS-102 mission also served as a crew rotation flight. It delivered the Expedition Two crew to the <span class="hlt">Station</span> and returned the Expedition One crew back to Earth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302487.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302487.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-03-11</p> <p>STS-102 mission astronaut Susan J. Helms translates along the longerons of the Space Shuttle Discovery during the first of two space walks. During this walk, the Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 was prepared for repositioning from the Unity Module's Earth-facing berth to its port-side berth to make room for the Leonardo multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM), supplied by the Italian Space Agency. The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s (ISS') moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments, and supplies to and from the <span class="hlt">Station</span> aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo in 16 standard Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached <span class="hlt">station</span> module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. NASA's 103rd overall mission and the 8th Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Assembly Flight, STS-102 mission also served as a crew rotation flight. It delivered the Expedition Two crew to the <span class="hlt">Station</span> and returned the Expedition One crew back to Earth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302485.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302485.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-03-08</p> <p>STS-102 astronaut and mission specialist, Andrew S.W. Thomas, gazes through an aft window of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery as it approaches the docking bay of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Launched March 8, 2001, STS-102's primary cargo was the Leonardo, the Italian Space Agency-built Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM). The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the ISS's moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments, and supplies to and from the <span class="hlt">Station</span> aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo in 16 standard Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached <span class="hlt">station</span> module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. NASA's 103rd overall mission and the 8th Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Assembly Flight, STS-102 mission also served as a crew rotation flight. It delivered the Expedition Two crew to the <span class="hlt">Station</span> and returned the Expedition One crew back to Earth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24841191','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24841191"><span><span class="hlt">Compression</span> parameters of hexagonal boron nitride on direct <span class="hlt">compression</span> mixture of microcrystalline cellulose and modified starch.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Halaçoğlu, Mekin Doğa; Uğurlu, Timuçin</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of conventional lubricants including a new candidate lubricant "hexagonal boron nitride (HBN)" on direct <span class="hlt">compression</span> powders. Lubricants such as magnesium stearate (MGST), glyceryl behenate, stearic acid, talc and polyethylene glycol6000 were studied and tablets were manufactured on a single <span class="hlt">station</span> instrumented tablet press. This study comprised the continuation of our previous one, so mixture of microcrystalline cellulose and modified starch was used as a master formula to evaluate effects of lubricants on pharmaceutical excipients that undergo complete plastic deformation without any fragmentation under <span class="hlt">compression</span> pressure. Bulk and tapped densities, and Carr's index parameters were calculated for powders. Tensile strength, cohesion index, lower punch ejection force and lubricant effectiveness values were investigated for tablets. The deformation mechanisms of tablets were studied during <span class="hlt">compression</span> from the Heckel plots with or without lubricant. MGST was found to be the most effective lubricant and HBN was found very close to it. HBN did not show a significant negative effect on the crushing strength and disintegration time of the tablets when we compared with MGST. Based on the Heckel plots at the level of 1%, formulation prepared with HBN showed the most pronounced plastic character.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1175176','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1175176"><span>Edge <span class="hlt">compression</span> manifold apparatus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Renzi, Ronald F.</p> <p>2004-12-21</p> <p>A manifold for connecting external capillaries to the inlet and/or outlet ports of a microfluidic device for high pressure applications is provided. The fluid connector for coupling at least one fluid conduit to a corresponding port of a substrate that includes: (i) a manifold comprising one or more channels extending therethrough wherein each channel is at least partially threaded, (ii) one or more threaded ferrules each defining a bore extending therethrough with each ferrule supporting a fluid conduit wherein each ferrule is threaded into a channel of the manifold, (iii) a substrate having one or more ports on its upper surface wherein the substrate is positioned below the manifold so that the one or more ports is aligned with the one or more channels of the manifold, and (iv) device to apply an axial <span class="hlt">compressive</span> force to the substrate to couple the one or more ports of the substrate to a corresponding proximal end of a fluid conduit.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/902645','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/902645"><span>Edge <span class="hlt">compression</span> manifold apparatus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Renzi, Ronald F [Tracy, CA</p> <p>2007-02-27</p> <p>A manifold for connecting external capillaries to the inlet and/or outlet ports of a microfluidic device for high pressure applications is provided. The fluid connector for coupling at least one fluid conduit to a corresponding port of a substrate that includes: (i) a manifold comprising one or more channels extending therethrough wherein each channel is at least partially threaded, (ii) one or more threaded ferrules each defining a bore extending therethrough with each ferrule supporting a fluid conduit wherein each ferrule is threaded into a channel of the manifold, (iii) a substrate having one or more ports on its upper surface wherein the substrate is positioned below the manifold so that the one or more ports is aligned with the one or more channels of the manifold, and (iv) device to apply an axial <span class="hlt">compressive</span> force to the substrate to couple the one or more ports of the substrate to a corresponding proximal end of a fluid conduit.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/870157','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/870157"><span>Population attribute <span class="hlt">compression</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>White, James M.; Faber, Vance; Saltzman, Jeffrey S.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>An image population having a large number of attributes is processed to form a display population with a predetermined smaller number of attributes that represent the larger number of attributes. In a particular application, the color values in an image are <span class="hlt">compressed</span> for storage in a discrete look-up table (LUT). Color space containing the LUT color values is successively subdivided into smaller volumes until a plurality of volumes are formed, each having no more than a preselected maximum number of color values. Image pixel color values can then be rapidly placed in a volume with only a relatively few LUT values from which a nearest neighbor is selected. Image color values are assigned 8 bit pointers to their closest LUT value whereby data processing requires only the 8 bit pointer value to provide 24 bit color values from the LUT.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6488638','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6488638"><span>Central cooling: <span class="hlt">compressive</span> chillers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Christian, J.E.</p> <p>1978-03-01</p> <p>Representative cost and performance data are provided in a concise, useable form for three types of <span class="hlt">compressive</span> liquid packaged chillers: reciprocating, centrifugal, and screw. The data are represented in graphical form as well as in empirical equations. Reciprocating chillers are available from 2.5 to 240 tons with full-load COPs ranging from 2.85 to 3.87. Centrifugal chillers are available from 80 to 2,000 tons with full load COPs ranging from 4.1 to 4.9. Field-assemblied centrifugal chillers have been installed with capacities up to 10,000 tons. Screw-type chillers are available from 100 to 750 tons with full load COPs ranging from 3.3more » to 4.5.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4301620','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4301620"><span><span class="hlt">Compressive</span> Network Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jiang, Xiaoye; Yao, Yuan; Liu, Han; Guibas, Leonidas</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Modern data acquisition routinely produces massive amounts of network data. Though many methods and models have been proposed to analyze such data, the research of network data is largely disconnected with the classical theory of statistical learning and signal processing. In this paper, we present a new framework for modeling network data, which connects two seemingly different areas: network data analysis and <span class="hlt">compressed</span> sensing. From a nonparametric perspective, we model an observed network using a large dictionary. In particular, we consider the network clique detection problem and show connections between our formulation with a new algebraic tool, namely Randon basis pursuit in homogeneous spaces. Such a connection allows us to identify rigorous recovery conditions for clique detection problems. Though this paper is mainly conceptual, we also develop practical approximation algorithms for solving empirical problems and demonstrate their usefulness on real-world datasets. PMID:25620806</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ExFl...55.1693D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ExFl...55.1693D"><span>Free <span class="hlt">compressible</span> jet investigation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>De Gregorio, Fabrizio</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>The nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) effect on a supersonic turbulent jet was investigated. A dedicated convergent/divergent nozzle together with a flow feeding system was designed and manufactured. A nozzle Mach exit of M j = 1.5 was selected in order to obtain a convective Mach number of M c = 0.6. The flow was investigated for over-expanded, correctly expanded and under-expanded jet conditions. Mach number, total temperature and flow velocity measurements were carried out in order to characterise the jet behaviour. The inlet conditions of the jet flow were monitored in order to calculate the nozzle exit speed of sound and evaluate the mean Mach number distribution starting from the flow velocity data. A detailed analysis of the Mach results obtained by a static Pitot probe and by a particle image velocimetry measurement system was carried out. The mean flow velocity was investigated, and the axial Mach decay and the spreading rate were associated with the flow structures and with the <span class="hlt">compressibility</span> effects. Aerodynamics of the different jet conditions was evaluated, and the shock cells structures were detected and discussed correlating the jet structure to the flow fluctuation and local turbulence. The longitudinal and radial distribution of the total temperature was investigated, and the temperature profiles were analysed and discussed. The total temperature behaviour was correlated to the turbulent phenomena and to the NPR jet conditions. Self-similarity condition was encountered and discussed for the over-expanded jet. <span class="hlt">Compressibility</span> effects on the local turbulence, on the turbulent kinetic energy and on the Reynolds tensor were discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020014363','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020014363"><span>Survey of Header <span class="hlt">Compression</span> Techniques</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Ishac, Joseph</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>This report provides a summary of several different header <span class="hlt">compression</span> techniques. The different techniques included are: (1) Van Jacobson's header <span class="hlt">compression</span> (RFC 1144); (2) SCPS (Space Communications Protocol Standards) header <span class="hlt">compression</span> (SCPS-TP, SCPS-NP); (3) Robust header <span class="hlt">compression</span> (ROHC); and (4) The header <span class="hlt">compression</span> techniques in RFC2507 and RFC2508. The methodology for <span class="hlt">compression</span> and error correction for these schemes are described in the remainder of this document. All of the header <span class="hlt">compression</span> schemes support <span class="hlt">compression</span> over simplex links, provided that the end receiver has some means of sending data back to the sender. However, if that return path does not exist, then neither Van Jacobson's nor SCPS can be used, since both rely on TCP (Transmission Control Protocol). In addition, under link conditions of low delay and low error, all of the schemes perform as expected. However, based on the methodology of the schemes, each scheme is likely to behave differently as conditions degrade. Van Jacobson's header <span class="hlt">compression</span> relies heavily on the TCP retransmission timer and would suffer an increase in loss propagation should the link possess a high delay and/or bit error rate (BER). The SCPS header <span class="hlt">compression</span> scheme protects against high delay environments by avoiding delta encoding between packets. Thus, loss propagation is avoided. However, SCPS is still affected by an increased BER (bit-error-rate) since the lack of delta encoding results in larger header sizes. Next, the schemes found in RFC2507 and RFC2508 perform well for non-TCP connections in poor conditions. RFC2507 performance with TCP connections is improved by various techniques over Van Jacobson's, but still suffers a performance hit with poor link properties. Also, RFC2507 offers the ability to send TCP data without delta encoding, similar to what SCPS offers. ROHC is similar to the previous two schemes, but adds additional CRCs (cyclic redundancy check) into headers and improves</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7444E..08G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7444E..08G"><span>Error mitigation for CCSD <span class="hlt">compressed</span> imager data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gladkova, Irina; Grossberg, Michael; Gottipati, Srikanth; Shahriar, Fazlul; Bonev, George</p> <p>2009-08-01</p> <p>To efficiently use the limited bandwidth available on the downlink from satellite to ground <span class="hlt">station</span>, imager data is usually <span class="hlt">compressed</span> before transmission. Transmission introduces unavoidable errors, which are only partially removed by forward error correction and packetization. In the case of the commonly used CCSD Rice-based <span class="hlt">compression</span>, it results in a contiguous sequence of dummy values along scan lines in a band of the imager data. We have developed a method capable of using the image statistics to provide a principled estimate of the missing data. Our method outperforms interpolation yet can be performed fast enough to provide uninterrupted data flow. The estimation of the lost data provides significant value to end users who may use only part of the data, may not have statistical tools, or lack the expertise to mitigate the impact of the lost data. Since the locations of the lost data will be clearly marked as meta-data in the HDF or NetCDF header, experts who prefer to handle error mitigation themselves will be free to use or ignore our estimates as they see fit.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Physical+AND+science+AND+textbook&pg=5&id=EJ926930','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Physical+AND+science+AND+textbook&pg=5&id=EJ926930"><span>Pressure Oscillations in Adiabatic <span class="hlt">Compression</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Stout, Roland</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>After finding Moloney and McGarvey's modified adiabatic <span class="hlt">compression</span> apparatus, I decided to insert this experiment into my physical chemistry laboratory at the last minute, replacing a problematic experiment. With insufficient time to build the apparatus, we placed a bottle between two thick textbooks and <span class="hlt">compressed</span> it with a third textbook forced…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3541066','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3541066"><span>Adaptive efficient <span class="hlt">compression</span> of genomes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Modern high-throughput sequencing technologies are able to generate DNA sequences at an ever increasing rate. In parallel to the decreasing experimental time and cost necessary to produce DNA sequences, computational requirements for analysis and storage of the sequences are steeply increasing. <span class="hlt">Compression</span> is a key technology to deal with this challenge. Recently, referential <span class="hlt">compression</span> schemes, storing only the differences between a to-be-<span class="hlt">compressed</span> input and a known reference sequence, gained a lot of interest in this field. However, memory requirements of the current algorithms are high and run times often are slow. In this paper, we propose an adaptive, parallel and highly efficient referential sequence <span class="hlt">compression</span> method which allows fine-tuning of the trade-off between required memory and <span class="hlt">compression</span> speed. When using 12 MB of memory, our method is for human genomes on-par with the best previous algorithms in terms of <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratio (400:1) and <span class="hlt">compression</span> speed. In contrast, it <span class="hlt">compresses</span> a complete human genome in just 11 seconds when provided with 9 GB of main memory, which is almost three times faster than the best competitor while using less main memory. PMID:23146997</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5352490','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5352490"><span><span class="hlt">Compressed</span> Sensing for Body MRI</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Feng, Li; Benkert, Thomas; Block, Kai Tobias; Sodickson, Daniel K; Otazo, Ricardo; Chandarana, Hersh</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The introduction of <span class="hlt">compressed</span> sensing for increasing imaging speed in MRI has raised significant interest among researchers and clinicians, and has initiated a large body of research across multiple clinical applications over the last decade. <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> sensing aims to reconstruct unaliased images from fewer measurements than that are traditionally required in MRI by exploiting image <span class="hlt">compressibility</span> or sparsity. Moreover, appropriate combinations of <span class="hlt">compressed</span> sensing with previously introduced fast imaging approaches, such as parallel imaging, have demonstrated further improved performance. The advent of <span class="hlt">compressed</span> sensing marks the prelude to a new era of rapid MRI, where the focus of data acquisition has changed from sampling based on the nominal number of voxels and/or frames to sampling based on the desired information content. This paper presents a brief overview of the application of <span class="hlt">compressed</span> sensing techniques in body MRI, where imaging speed is crucial due to the presence of respiratory motion along with stringent constraints on spatial and temporal resolution. The first section provides an overview of the basic <span class="hlt">compressed</span> sensing methodology, including the notion of sparsity, incoherence, and non-linear reconstruction. The second section reviews state-of-the-art <span class="hlt">compressed</span> sensing techniques that have been demonstrated for various clinical body MRI applications. In the final section, the paper discusses current challenges and future opportunities. PMID:27981664</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830025695','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830025695"><span><span class="hlt">Compression</span> failure of composite laminates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pipes, R. B.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>This presentation attempts to characterize the <span class="hlt">compressive</span> behavior of Hercules AS-1/3501-6 graphite-epoxy composite. The effect of varying specimen geometry on test results is examined. The transition region is determined between buckling and <span class="hlt">compressive</span> failure. Failure modes are defined and analytical models to describe these modes are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302481.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302481.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>This is the STS-102 mission crew insignia. The central image on the crew patch depicts the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) in the build configuration that it had at the time of the arrival and docking of Discovery during the STS-102 mission, the first crew exchange flight to the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>. The <span class="hlt">station</span> is shown along the direction of the flight as was seen by the shuttle crew during their final approach and docking, the so-called V-bar approach. The names of the shuttle crew members are depicted in gold around the top of the patch, and surnames of the Expedition crew members being exchanged are shown in the lower barner. The three ribbons swirling up to and around the <span class="hlt">station</span> signify the rotation of these ISS crew members. The number 2 is for the Expedition 2 crew who flew up to the <span class="hlt">station</span>, and the number 1 is for the Expedition 1 crew who then returned down to Earth. In conjunction with the face of the Lab module of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>, these Expedition numbers create the shuttle mission number 102. Shown mated below the ISS is the Italian-built Multipurpose Logistics Module, Leonardo, that flew for the first time on this flight. The flags of the countries that were the major contributors to this effort, the United States, Russia, and Italy are also shown in the lower part of the patch. The build-sequence number of this flight in the overall <span class="hlt">station</span> assembly sequence, 5A.1, is captured by the constellations in the background.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19920019630','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19920019630"><span>Digital <span class="hlt">compression</span> algorithms for HDTV transmission</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Adkins, Kenneth C.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO; Bibyk, Steven B.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Digital <span class="hlt">compression</span> of video images is a possible avenue for high definition television (HDTV) transmission. <span class="hlt">Compression</span> needs to be optimized while picture quality remains high. Two techniques for <span class="hlt">compression</span> the digital images are explained and comparisons are drawn between the human vision system and artificial <span class="hlt">compression</span> techniques. Suggestions for improving <span class="hlt">compression</span> algorithms through the use of neural and analog circuitry are given.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ems..confE.572H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ems..confE.572H"><span>UMTS Network <span class="hlt">Stations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hernandez, C.</p> <p>2010-09-01</p> <p>The weakness of small island electrical grids implies a handicap for the electrical generation with renewable energy sources. With the intention of maximizing the installation of photovoltaic generators in the Canary Islands, arises the need to develop a solar forecasting system that allows knowing in advance the amount of PV generated electricity that will be going into the grid, from the installed PV power plants installed in the island. The forecasting tools need to get feedback from real weather data in "real time" from remote weather <span class="hlt">stations</span>. Nevertheless, the transference of this data to the calculation computer servers is very complicated with the old point to point telecommunication systems that, neither allow the transfer of data from several remote weather <span class="hlt">stations</span> simultaneously nor high frequency of sampling of weather parameters due to slowness of the connection. This one project has developed a telecommunications infrastructure that allows sensorizadas remote <span class="hlt">stations</span>, to send data of its sensors, once every minute and simultaneously, to the calculation server running the solar forecasting numerical models. For it, the Canary Islands Institute of Technology has added a sophisticated communications network to its 30 weather <span class="hlt">stations</span> measuring irradiation at strategic sites, areas with high penetration of photovoltaic generation or that have potential to host in the future photovoltaic power plants connected to the grid. In each one of the <span class="hlt">stations</span>, irradiance and temperature measurement instruments have been installed, over inclined silicon cell, global radiation on horizontal surface and room temperature. Mobile telephone devices have been installed and programmed in each one of the weather <span class="hlt">stations</span>, which allow the transfer of their data taking advantage of the UMTS service offered by the local telephone operator. Every minute the computer server running the numerical weather forecasting models receives data inputs from 120 instruments distributed</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29278289','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29278289"><span><span class="hlt">Compressed</span> NMR: Combining <span class="hlt">compressive</span> sampling and pure shift NMR techniques.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aguilar, Juan A; Kenwright, Alan M</p> <p>2017-12-26</p> <p>Historically, the resolution of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been orders of magnitude lower than the intrinsic resolution that NMR spectrometers are capable of producing. The slowness of Nyquist sampling as well as the existence of signals as multiplets instead of singlets have been two of the main reasons for this underperformance. Fortunately, two <span class="hlt">compressive</span> techniques have appeared that can overcome these limitations. <span class="hlt">Compressive</span> sensing, also known as <span class="hlt">compressed</span> sampling (CS), avoids the first limitation by exploiting the <span class="hlt">compressibility</span> of typical NMR spectra, thus allowing sampling at sub-Nyquist rates, and pure shift techniques eliminate the second issue "<span class="hlt">compressing</span>" multiplets into singlets. This paper explores the possibilities and challenges presented by this combination (<span class="hlt">compressed</span> NMR). First, a description of the CS framework is given, followed by a description of the importance of combining it with the right pure shift experiment. Second, examples of <span class="hlt">compressed</span> NMR spectra and how they can be combined with covariance methods will be shown. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140005677','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140005677"><span>ILRS <span class="hlt">Station</span> Reporting</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Noll, Carey E.; Pearlman, Michael Reisman; Torrence, Mark H.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Network <span class="hlt">stations</span> provided system configuration documentation upon joining the ILRS. This information, found in the various site and system log files available on the ILRS website, is essential to the ILRS analysis centers, combination centers, and general user community. Therefore, it is imperative that the <span class="hlt">station</span> personnel inform the ILRS community in a timely fashion when changes to the system occur. This poster provides some information about the various documentation that must be maintained. The ILRS network consists of over fifty global sites actively ranging to over sixty satellites as well as five lunar reflectors. Information about these <span class="hlt">stations</span> are available on the ILRS website (http://ilrs.gsfc.nasa.gov/network/<span class="hlt">stations</span>/index.html). The ILRS Analysis Centers must have current information about the <span class="hlt">stations</span> and their system configuration in order to use their data in generation of derived products. However, not all information available on the ILRS website is as up-to-date as necessary for correct analysis of their data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201904.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201904.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-06-07</p> <p>Pictured here is the forward docking port on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s (ISS) Destiny Laboratory as seen by one of the STS-111 crewmembers from the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour just prior to docking. In June 2002, STS-111 provided the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> with a new crew, Expedition Five, replacing Expedition Four after remaining a record-setting 196 days in space. Three spacewalks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish additional mission objectives: the delivery and installation of a new platform for the ISS robotic arm, the Mobile Base System (MBS) which is an important part of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s Mobile Servicing System allowing the robotic arm to travel the length of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>; the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s robotic arm; and unloading supplies and science experiments form the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the ISS, was launched on June 5, 2002 and landed June 19, 2002.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900019274','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900019274"><span>Space <span class="hlt">station</span> contamination modeling</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Gordon, T. D.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Current plans for the operation of Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom allow the orbit to decay to approximately an altitude of 200 km before reboosting to approximately 450 km. The Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> will encounter dramatically increasing ambient and induced environmental effects as the orbit decays. Unfortunately, Shuttle docking, which has been of concern as a high contamination period, will likely occur during the time when the <span class="hlt">station</span> is in the lowest orbit. The combination of ambient and induced environments along with the presence of the docked Shuttle could cause very severe contamination conditions at the lower orbital altitudes prior to Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> reboost. The purpose here is to determine the effects on the induced external environment of Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom with regard to the proposed changes in altitude. The change in the induced environment will be manifest in several parameters. The ambient density buildup in front of ram facing surfaces will change. The source of such contaminants can be outgassing/offgassing surfaces, leakage from the pressurized modules or experiments, purposeful venting, and thruster firings. The third induced environment parameter with altitude dependence is the glow. In order to determine the altitude dependence of the induced environment parameters, researchers used the integrated Spacecraft Environment Model (ISEM) which was developed for Marshall Space Flight Center. The analysis required numerous ISEM runs. The assumptions and limitations for the ISEM runs are described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0100851.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0100851.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1998-11-08</p> <p>Designed by the STS-88 crew members, this patch commemorates the first assembly flight to carry United States-built hardware for constructing the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). This flight's primary task was to assemble the cornerstone of the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>: the Node with the Functional Cargo Block (FGB). The rising sun symbolizes the dawning of a new era of international cooperation in space and the beginning of a new program: the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>. The Earth scene outlines the countries of the <span class="hlt">Station</span> Partners: the United States, Russia, those of the European Space Agency (ESA), Japan, and Canada. Along with the Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMA) and the Functional Cargo Block, the Node is shown in the final mated configuration while berthed to the Space Shuttle during the STS-88/2A mission. The Big Dipper Constellation points the way to the North Star, a guiding light for pioneers and explorers for generations. In the words of the crew, These stars symbolize the efforts of everyone, including all the countries involved in the design and construction of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>, guiding us into the future.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302483.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302483.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2003-03-08</p> <p>The Space Shuttle Discovery, STS-102 mission, clears launch pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center as the sun peers over the Atlantic Ocean on March 8, 2001. STS-102's primary cargo was the Leonardo, the Italian Space Agency built Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM). The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s (ISS') moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments, and supplies to and from the <span class="hlt">Station</span> aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo in 16 standard Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached <span class="hlt">station</span> module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. NASA's 103rd overall flight and the eighth assembly flight, STS-102 was also the first flight involved with Expedition Crew rotation. The Expedition Two crew was delivered to the <span class="hlt">station</span> while Expedition One was returned home to Earth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102547.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102547.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-03-01</p> <p>A crewmember of Expedition One, cosmonaut Yuri P. Gidzenko, is dwarfed by transient hardware aboard Leonardo, the Italian Space Agency-built Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), a primary cargo of the STS-102 mission. The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s (ISS's) moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies to and from the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo into 16 standard Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached <span class="hlt">station</span> module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. The eighth Shuttle mission to visit the ISS, the STS-102 mission served as a crew rotation flight. It delivered the Expedition Two crew to the <span class="hlt">Station</span> and returned the Expedition One crew back to Earth.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302491.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302491.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-03-10</p> <p>This in-orbit close up shows the Italian Space Agency-built multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM), Leonardo, the primary cargo of the STS-102 mission, resting in the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery. The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s (ISS') moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments, and supplies to and from the <span class="hlt">Station</span> aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo in 16 standard Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached <span class="hlt">station</span> module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. The eighth <span class="hlt">station</span> assembly flight and NASA's 103rd overall flight, STS-102 launched March 8, 2001 for an almost 13 day mission.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985GrAeH..21....8K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985GrAeH..21....8K"><span>The manned space <span class="hlt">station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kovit, B.</p> <p></p> <p>The development and establishment of a manned space <span class="hlt">station</span> represents the next major U.S. space program after the Space Shuttle. If all goes according to plan, the space <span class="hlt">station</span> could be in orbit around the earth by 1992. A 'power tower' <span class="hlt">station</span> configuration has been selected as a 'reference' design. This configuration involves a central truss structure to which various elements are attached. An eight-foot-square truss forms the backbone of a structure about 400 feet long. At its lower end, nearest the earth, are attached pressurized manned modules. These modules include two laboratory modules and two so-called 'habitat/command' modules, which provide living and working space for the projected crew of six persons. Later, the <span class="hlt">station</span>'s pressurized space would be expanded to accommodate up to 18 persons. By comparison, the Soviets will provide habitable space for 12 aboard a 300-ton <span class="hlt">station</span> which they are expected to place in orbit. According to current plans the six U.S. astronauts will work in two teams of three persons each. A ninety-day tour of duty is considered.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900006976','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900006976"><span>Analysis and testing of axial <span class="hlt">compression</span> in imperfect slender truss struts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lake, Mark S.; Georgiadis, Nicholas</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>The axial <span class="hlt">compression</span> of imperfect slender struts for large space structures is addressed. The load-shortening behavior of struts with initially imperfect shapes and eccentric <span class="hlt">compressive</span> end loading is analyzed using linear beam-column theory and results are compared with geometrically nonlinear solutions to determine the applicability of linear analysis. A set of developmental aluminum clad graphite/epoxy struts sized for application to the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom truss are measured to determine their initial imperfection magnitude, load eccentricity, and cross sectional area and moment of inertia. Load-shortening curves are determined from axial <span class="hlt">compression</span> tests of these specimens and are correlated with theoretical curves generated using linear analysis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9906376.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9906376.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2004-04-15</p> <p>Pictured is an artist's concept of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) with solar panels fully deployed. In addition to the use of solar energy, the ISS will employ at least three types of propulsive support systems for its operation. The first type is to reboost the <span class="hlt">Station</span> to correct orbital altitude to offset the effects of atmospheric and other drag forces. The second function is to maneuver the ISS to avoid collision with oribting bodies (space junk). The third is for attitude control to position the <span class="hlt">Station</span> in the proper attitude for various experiments, temperature control, reboost, etc. The ISS, a gateway to permanent human presence in space, is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide an unprecedented undertaking in scientific, technological, and international experimentation by cooperation of sixteen countries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0700857.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0700857.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2006-07-09</p> <p>The STS-117 crew patch symbolizes the continued construction of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) and our ongoing human presence in space. The ISS is shown orbiting high above the Earth. Gold is used to highlight the portion of the ISS that will be installed by the STS-117 crew. It consists of the second starboard truss section, S3 and S4, and a set of solar arrays. The names of the STS-117 crew are located above and below the orbiting outpost. The two gold astronaut office symbols, emanating from the 117 at the bottom of the patch, represent the concerted efforts of the shuttle and <span class="hlt">station</span> programs toward the completion of the <span class="hlt">station</span>. The orbiter and unfurled banner of red, white, and blue represent our Nation and renewed patriotism as we continue to explore the universe.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0002103.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0002103.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-05-01</p> <p>The Joint Airlock Module for the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) awaits shipment to the Kennedy Space Center in the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> manufacturing facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The Airlock includes two sections. The larger equipment lock on the left is where crews will change into and out of their spacesuits for extravehicular activities, and store spacesuits, batteries, power tools, and other supplies. The narrower crewlock from which the astronauts will exit into space for extravehicular activities, is on the right. The airlock is 18 feet long and has a mass of about 13,500 pounds. It was launched to the <span class="hlt">station</span> aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis (STS-104 mission) on July 12, 2001. The MSFC is playing a primary role in NASA's development, manufacturing, and operations of the ISS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0002100.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0002100.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-05-01</p> <p>This photograph depicts the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s (ISS) Joint Airlock Module undergoing exhaustive structural and systems testing in the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> manufacturing facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) prior to shipment to the Kennedy Space Center. The Airlock includes two sections. The larger equipment lock, on the left, will store spacesuits and associated gear and the narrower crewlock is on the right, from which the astronauts will exit into space for extravehicular activity. The airlock is 18 feet long and has a mass of about 13,500 pounds. It was launched to the <span class="hlt">station</span> aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis (STS-104 mission) on July 12, 2001. The MSFC is playing a primary role in NASA's development, manufacturing, and operations of the ISS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9905997.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9905997.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1999-09-01</p> <p>This image shows the Integrated Truss Assembly S-1 (S-One), the Starboard Side Thermal Radiator Truss, for the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) undergoing final construction in the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> manufacturing facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s complex power system. Delivered and installed by the STS-112 mission, the S1 truss, attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss installed by the previous STS-110 mission, flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. Manufactured by the Boeing Company in Huntington Beach, California, the truss primary structure was transferred to the Marshall Space Flight Center in February 1999 for hardware installations and manufacturing acceptance testing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0501006.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0501006.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2005-07-28</p> <p>Launched on July 26 2005 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the <span class="hlt">Station</span>-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) and the External Stowage Platform-2. Back dropped by popcorn-like clouds, the MPLM can be seen in the cargo bay as Discovery undergoes rendezvous and docking operations. Cosmonaut Sergei K. Kriklev, Expedition 11 Commander, and John L. Phillips, NASA Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> officer and flight engineer photographed the spacecraft from the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0501005.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0501005.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2005-07-28</p> <p>Launched on July 26, 2005 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the <span class="hlt">Station</span>-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) and the External Stowage Platform-2. Back dropped by popcorn-like clouds, the MPLM can be seen in the cargo bay as Discovery undergoes rendezvous and docking operations. Cosmonaut Sergei K. Kriklev, Expedition 11 Commander, and John L. Phillips, NASA Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> officer and flight engineer photographed the spacecraft from the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201587.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201587.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-08-20</p> <p>This image of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) was photographed by one of the crewmembers of the STS-105 mission from the Shuttle Orbiter Discovery after separating from the ISS. The STS-105 mission was the 11th ISS assembly flight and its goals were the rotation of the ISS Expedition Two crew with Expedition Three crew, and the delivery of supplies utilizing the Italian-built Multipurpose Logistic Module (MPLM) Leonardo. Aboard Leonardo were six resupply stowage racks, four resupply stowage supply platforms, and two new scientific experiment racks, EXPRESS (Expedite the Processing of Experiments to the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>) Racks 4 and 5, which added science capabilities to the ISS. Another payload was the Materials International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Experiment (MISSE), which included materials and other types of space exposure experiments mounted on the exterior of the ISS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0400014.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0400014.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-04-23</p> <p>The STS-100 mission launched for the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) on April 19, 2001 as the sixth <span class="hlt">station</span> assembly flight. Main objectives included the delivery and installation of the Canadian-built Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), or Canadarm2, the installation of a UHF anterna for space-to-space communications for U.S. based space walks, and the delivery of supplies via the Italian Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) "Raffaello". This is an STS-110 onboard photo of Astronaut James S. Voss, Expedition Two flight engineer, peering into the pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-2) prior hatch opening. The picture was taken by one of the STS-100 crew members inside the PMA.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202483.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202483.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-05-14</p> <p>Astronaut James S. Voss, Expedition Two flight engineer, works with a series of cables on the EXPRESS Rack in the United State's Destiny laboratory on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). The EXPRESS Rack is a standardized payload rack system that transports, stores, and supports experiments aboard the ISS. EXPRESS stands for EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>, reflecting the fact that this system was developed specifically to maximize the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s research capabilities. The EXPRESS Rack system supports science payloads in several disciplines, including biology, chemistry, physics, ecology, and medicine. With the EXPRESS Rack, getting experiments to space has never been easier or more affordable. With its standardized hardware interfaces and streamlined approach, the EXPRESS Rack enables quick, simple integration of multiple payloads aboard the ISS. The system is comprised of elements that remain on the ISS, as well as elements that travel back and forth between the ISS and Earth via the Space Shuttle.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302394.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302394.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-11-23</p> <p>The Space Shuttle Endeavour is pictured on a lighted launch pad at Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) Launch Complex 39 with a gibbous moon shining brightly in the night sky. Liftoff from KSC occurred at 7:49:47 p.m. (EST), November 23, 2002. The launch is the 19th for Endeavour, and the 112th flight in the Shuttle program. Mission STS-113 is the 16th assembly flight to the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), carrying another structure for the <span class="hlt">Station</span>, the P1 integrated truss. STS-113 crew members onboard were astronauts James D. Wetherbee, commander; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot, along with astronauts Michael E. Lopez-Alegria and John B. Herrington, both mission specialists. Also onboard were the Expedition 6 crew members: Astronauts Kenneth D. Bowersox and Donald R. Pettit, along with cosmonaut Nikolai M. Budarin, who went on to replace Expedition 5 aboard the <span class="hlt">Station</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701338.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701338.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-08-13</p> <p>As the construction continued on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), STS-118 astronaut and mission specialist, Dave Williams, representing the Canadian Space Agency, was anchored on the foot restraint of the Canadarm2 as he participated in the second session of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) for the mission. Assisting Williams was Rick Mastracchio (out of frame). During the 6 hour, 28 minute space walk, the two removed a faulty control moment gyroscope (CMG-3) and installed a new CMG into the Z1 truss. The failed CMG will remain in its temporary stowage location on the exterior of the <span class="hlt">station</span> until it is returned to Earth on a later Shuttle mission. The new gyroscope is one of four CMGs that are used to control the orbital attitude of the <span class="hlt">station</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701337.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701337.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-08-13</p> <p>As the construction continued on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), STS-118 astronaut and mission specialist Rick Mastracchio participated in the second session of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) for the mission. Assisting Mastracchio was Canadian Space Agency representative Dave Williams (out of frame). During the 6 hour, 28 minute space walk, the two removed a faulty control moment gyroscope (CMG-3) and installed a new CMG into the Z1 truss. The failed CMG will remain in its temporary stowage location on the exterior of the <span class="hlt">station</span> until it is returned to Earth on a later Shuttle mission. The new gyroscope is one of four CMGs that are used to control the orbital attitude of the <span class="hlt">station</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302486.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302486.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-03-10</p> <p>STS-102 mission astronauts James S. Voss and James D. Weatherbee share a congratulatory handshake as the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery successfully docks with the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Photographed from left to right are: Astronauts Susan J. Helms, mission specialist; James S. Voss, Expedition 2 crew member; James D. Weatherbee, mission commander; Andrew S.W. Thomas, mission specialist; and nearly out of frame is James M. Kelley, Pilot. Launched March 8, 2001, STS-102's primary cargo was the Leonardo, the Italian Space Agency-built Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM). The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as ISS' moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments, and supplies to and from the <span class="hlt">Station</span> aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo in 16 standard Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached <span class="hlt">station</span> module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. NASA's 103rd overall mission and the 8th Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Assembly Flight, STS-102 mission also served as a crew rotation flight. It delivered the Expedition Two crew to the <span class="hlt">Station</span> and returned the Expedition One crew back to Earth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14560542','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14560542"><span><span class="hlt">Compression</span> etiology in tendinopathy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Almekinders, Louis C; Weinhold, Paul S; Maffulli, Nicola</p> <p>2003-10-01</p> <p>Recent studies have emphasized that the etiology of tendinopathy is not as simple as was once thought. The etiology is likely to be multifactorial. Etiologic factors may include some of the traditional factors such as overuse, inflexibility, and equipment problems; however, other factors need to be considered as well, such as age-related tendon degeneration and biomechanical considerations as outlined in this article. More research is needed to determine the significance of stress-shielding and <span class="hlt">compression</span> in tendinopathy. If they are confirmed to play a role, this finding may significantly alter our approach in both prevention and in treatment through exercise therapy. The current biomechanical studies indicate that certain joint positions are more likely to place tensile stress on the area of the tendon commonly affected by tendinopathy. These joint positions seem to be different than the traditional positions for stretching exercises used for prevention and rehabilitation of tendinopathic conditions. Incorporation of different joint positions during stretching exercises may exert more uniform, controlled tensile stress on these affected areas of the tendon and avoid stresshielding. These exercises may be able to better maintain the mechanical strength of that region of the tendon and thereby avoid injury. Alternatively, they could more uniformly stress a healing area of the tendon in a controlled manner, and thereby stimulate healing once an injury has occurred. Additional work will have to prove if a change in rehabilitation exercises is more efficacious that current techniques.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999APS..SHK..B201B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999APS..SHK..B201B"><span>Shock-<span class="hlt">Compressed</span> Hydrogen</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bickham, S. R.; Collins, L. A.; Kress, J. D.; Lenosky, T. J.</p> <p>1999-06-01</p> <p>To investigate recent gas-gun and laser experiments on hydrogen at elevated temperatures and high densities, we have performed quantum molecular dynamics simulations using a variety of sophisticated models, ranging from tight-binding(TB) to density functional(DF)(T.J. Lenosky, J.D. Kress, L.A. Collins, and I. Kwon Phys. Rev. B 55), R11907(1997) and references therein.. The TB models have been especially tailored to reproduce experimental findings, such as Diamond-Anvil Cell data, and ab initio calculations, such as H_2, H_3, and H4 potential energy surfaces. The DF calculations have employed the local-density approximation(LDA) as well as generalized gradient corrections(GGA) with large numbers of plane-waves ( ~10^5) that represent a very broad range of excited and continuum electronic states. Good agreement obtains among all these models. The simulations exhibit a rapidly rising electrical conductivity at low temperatures and high pressures in good agreement with the gas-gun results. This conduction property stems from a mobility of the electrons provided principally by the dissociated monomers. The Hugoniot for the conditions of the laser experiment, generated from the TB Equation-of-State, shows a maximum <span class="hlt">compression</span> of around four instead of the observed six. We also report optical properties of the hydrogen media.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999APS..DFD..JG05E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999APS..DFD..JG05E"><span><span class="hlt">Compressible</span> Vortex Ring</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Elavarasan, Ramasamy; Arakeri, Jayawant; Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu</p> <p>1999-11-01</p> <p>The interaction of a high-speed vortex ring with a shock wave is one of the fundamental issues as it is a source of sound in supersonic jets. The complex flow field induced by the vortex alters the propagation of the shock wave greatly. In order to understand the process, a <span class="hlt">compressible</span> vortex ring is studied in detail using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and shadowgraphic techniques. The high-speed vortex ring is generated from a shock tube and the shock wave, which precedes the vortex, is reflected back by a plate and made to interact with the vortex. The shadowgraph images indicate that the reflected shock front is influenced by the non-uniform flow induced by the vortex and is decelerated while passing through the vortex. It appears that after the interaction the shock is "split" into two. The PIV measurements provided clear picture about the evolution of the vortex at different time interval. The centerline velocity traces show the maximum velocity to be around 350 m/s. The velocity field, unlike in incompressible rings, contains contributions from both the shock and the vortex ring. The velocity distribution across the vortex core, core diameter and circulation are also calculated from the PIV data.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0400015.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0400015.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-04-28</p> <p>A Canadian "handshake" in space occurred on April 28, 2001, as the Canadian-built space <span class="hlt">station</span> robotic arm (Canadarm2) transferred its launch cradle over to Endeavour's robotic arm. Pictured is astronaut James S. Voss, Expedition Two flight engineer, working the controls of the new robotic arm. Marning the controls from the shuttle's aft flight deck, Canadian Mission Specialist Chris A. Hadfield of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) was instrumental in the activity. The Space lab pallet that carried the Canadarm2 robotic arm to the <span class="hlt">station</span> was developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102192.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102192.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-04-24</p> <p>This is a Space Shuttle STS-100 mission onboard photograph. Astronaut Scott Parazynski totes a Direct Current Switching Unit while anchored on the end of the Canadian-built Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robotic arm. The RMS is in the process of moving Parazynski to the exterior of the Destiny laboratory (right foreground), where he will secure the spare unit, a critical part of the <span class="hlt">station</span>'s electrical system, to the stowage platform in case future crews will need it. Also in the photograph are the Italian-built Raffaello multipurpose Logistics Module (center) and the new Canadarm2 (lower right) or Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Remote Manipulator System.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=MSFC-9802669&hterms=life+Norway&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dlife%2BNorway','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=MSFC-9802669&hterms=life+Norway&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dlife%2BNorway"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>This artist's digital concept depicts the completely assembled International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) passing over Florida. As a gateway to permanent human presence in space, the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Program is to expand knowledge benefiting all people and nations. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide unprecedented undertakings in scientific, technological, and international experimentation. Experiments to be conducted in the ISS include: microgravity research, Earth science, space science, life sciences, space product development, and engineering research and technology. The sixteen countries participating the ISS are: United States, Russian Federation, Canada, Japan, United Kingdom, Germany, Italy, France, Norway, Netherlands, Belgium, Spain, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, and Brazil.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=MSFC-9802667&hterms=life+Norway&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dlife%2BNorway','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=MSFC-9802667&hterms=life+Norway&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dlife%2BNorway"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>This artist's concept depicts the completely assembled International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) passing over Florida and the Bahamas. As a gateway to permanent human presence in space, the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Program is to expand knowledge benefiting all people and nations. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide unprecedented undertakings in scientific, technological, and international experimentation. Experiments to be conducted in the ISS include: microgravity research, Earth science, space science, life sciences, space product development, and engineering research and technology. The sixteen countries participating in the ISS are: United States, Russian Federation, Canada, Japan, United Kingdom, Germany, Italy, France, Norway, Netherlands, Belgium, Spain, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, and Brazil.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ivs..conf..139Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ivs..conf..139Y"><span>Activities at Sejong <span class="hlt">Station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yi, Sang-oh; Sung, Yun-mo; Ah, Ki-duk; Oh, Hong-jong; Byon, Do-young; Lim, Hyung-chul; Chung, Moon-hee; Je, Do-heung; Jung, Tae-hyun</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>The Sejong <span class="hlt">station</span> is a part of the SGOC (Space Geodetic Observation Center) which belongs to the NGII (National Geographic Information Institute). This report will briefly describe the Sejong S/X system issues that we need to improve, establishment of a server cluster for S/W correlation, and installation of the ARGO-M (mobile SLR system, 40 cm in diameter) which is developed by KASI (Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute) at the Sejong <span class="hlt">station</span>. Construction of the Korea VLBI Network KVNG (Korea VLBI Network for Geodesy) is currently underway.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701329.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701329.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-08-01</p> <p>As the construction continued on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), STS-118 Astronaut Dave Williams, representing the Canadian Space Agency, participated in the fourth and final session of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). During the 5 hour space walk, Williams and Expedition 15 engineer Clay Anderson (out of frame) installed the External Wireless Instrumentation System Antenna, attached a stand for the shuttle robotic arm extension boom, and retrieved the two Materials International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Experiments (MISSE) for return to Earth. MISSE collects information on how different materials weather in the environment of space.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0700859.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0700859.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2006-09-17</p> <p>This view of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>, back dropped against the blackness of space, was taken shortly after the Space Shuttle Atlantis undocked from the orbital outpost at 7:50 a.m. CDT during the STS-115 mission. The unlinking completed after six days, two hours and two minutes of joint operations of the installation of the P3/P4 truss. The new 17 ton truss included batteries, electronics, a giant rotating joint, and sported a second pair of 240-foot solar wings. The new solar arrays will eventually double the onboard power of the <span class="hlt">Station</span> when their electrical systems are brought online during the next shuttle flight, STS-116.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701890.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701890.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-11-05</p> <p>Back dropped by the blackness of space and Earth's horizon is the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) as seen from Space Shuttle Discovery as the two spacecraft begin their relative separation. The latest configuration of the ISS includes the Italian-built U.S. Node 2, named Harmony, and the P6 truss segment installed over 11 days of cooperative work onboard the shuttle and <span class="hlt">station</span> by the STS-120 and Expedition 16 crews. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 4:32 a.m. (CST) on Nov. 5, 2007.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202489.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202489.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-09-16</p> <p>The setting sun and the thin blue airglow line at Earth's horizon was captured by the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s (ISS) Expedition Three crewmembers with a digital camera. Some of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s components are silhouetted in the foreground. The crew was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery STS-105 mission, on August 10, 2001, replacing the Expedition Two crew. After marning the orbiting ISS for 128 consecutive days, the three returned to Earth on December 17, 2001, aboard the STS-108 mission Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701891.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701891.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-11-05</p> <p>Back dropped by the blueness of Earth is the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) as seen from Space Shuttle Discovery as the two spacecraft begin their relative separation. The latest configuration of the ISS includes the Italian-built U.S. Node 2, named Harmony, and the P6 truss segment installed over 11 days of cooperative work onboard the shuttle and <span class="hlt">station</span> by the STS-120 and Expedition 16 crews. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 4:32 a.m. (CST) on Nov. 5, 2007.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/biblio/6609127-solar-power-station','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/biblio/6609127-solar-power-station"><span>Solar power <span class="hlt">station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wenzel, J.</p> <p>1982-11-30</p> <p>Solar power <span class="hlt">station</span> with semiconductor solar cells for generating electric power is described, wherein the semiconductor solar cells are provided on a member such as a balloon or a kite which carries the solar cells into the air. The function of the balloon or kite can also be fulfilled by a glider or airship. The solar power <span class="hlt">station</span> can be operated by allowing the system to ascend at sunrise and descend at sunset or when the wind is going to be too strong in order to avoid any demage.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19990111585&hterms=habitability&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dhabitability','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19990111585&hterms=habitability&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dhabitability"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Habitability Research</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Clearwater, Yvonne A.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>The purpose and scope of the Habitability Research Group within the Space Human Factors Office at the NASA/Ames Research Center is described. Both near-term and long-term research objectives in the space human factors program pertaining to the U.S. manned Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> are introduced. The concept of habitability and its relevancy to the U.S. space program is defined within a historical context. The relationship of habitability research to the optimization of environmental and operational determinants of productivity is discussed. Ongoing habitability research efforts pertaining to living and working on the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> are described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870028797&hterms=habitability&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dhabitability','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870028797&hterms=habitability&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dhabitability"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> habitability research</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Clearwater, Y. A.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>The purpose and scope of the Habitability Research Group within the Space Human Factors Office at the NASA/Ames Research Cente is described. Both near-term and long-term research objectives in the space human factors program pertaining to the U.S. manned Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> are introduced. The concept of habitability and its relevancy to the U.S. space program is defined within a historical context. The relationship of habitability research to the optimization of environmental and operational determinants of productivity is discussed. Ongoing habitability research efforts pertaining to living and working on the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> are described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11542427','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11542427"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> habitability research.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Clearwater, Y A</p> <p>1988-02-01</p> <p>The purpose and scope of the Habitability Research Group within the Space Human Factors Office at the NASA/Ames Research Center is described. Both near-term and long-term research objectives in the space human factors program pertaining to the U.S. manned Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> are introduced. The concept of habitability and its relevancy to the U.S. space program is defined within a historical context. The relationship of habitability research to the optimization of environmental and operational determinants of productivity is discussed. Ongoing habitability research efforts pertaining to living and working on the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> are described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201584.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201584.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-08-18</p> <p>Astronaut Patrick G. Forrester works with the the Materials International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Experiment (MISSE) during extravehicular activity (EVA). MISSE would expose 750 material samples for about 18 months and collect information on how different materials weather the space environment The objective of MISSE is to develop early, low-cost, non-intrusive opportunities to conduct critical space exposure tests of space materials and components plarned for use on future spacecraft. The experiment was the first externally mounted experiment conducted on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) and was installed on the outside of the ISS Quest Airlock. MISSE was launched on August 10, 2001 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880007408','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880007408"><span>Space <span class="hlt">station</span> structures development</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Teller, V. B.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>A study of three interrelated tasks focusing on deployable Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> truss structures is discussed. Task 1, the development of an alternate deployment system for linear truss, resulted in the preliminary design of an in-space reloadable linear motor deployer. Task 2, advanced composites deployable truss development, resulted in the testing and evaluation of composite materials for struts used in a deployable linear truss. Task 3, assembly of structures in space/erectable structures, resulted in the preliminary design of Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> pressurized module support structures. An independent, redundant support system was developed for the common United States modules.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9802667.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9802667.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>This artist's concept depicts the completely assembled International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) passing over Florida and the Bahamas. As a gateway to permanent human presence in space, the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Program is to expand knowledge benefiting all people and nations. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide unprecedented undertakings in scientific, technological, and international experimentation. Experiments to be conducted in the ISS include: microgravity research, Earth science, space science, life sciences, space product development, and engineering research and technology. The sixteen countries participating in the ISS are: United States, Russian Federation, Canada, Japan, United Kingdom, Germany, Italy, France, Norway, Netherlands, Belgium, Spain, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, and Brazil.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9802669.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9802669.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>This artist's digital concept depicts the completely assembled International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) passing over Florida. As a gateway to permanent human presence in space, the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Program is to expand knowledge benefiting all people and nations. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide unprecedented undertakings in scientific, technological, and international experimentation. Experiments to be conducted in the ISS include: microgravity research, Earth science, space science, life sciences, space product development, and engineering research and technology. The sixteen countries participating the ISS are: United States, Russian Federation, Canada, Japan, United Kingdom, Germany, Italy, France, Norway, Netherlands, Belgium, Spain, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, and Brazil.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202495.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202495.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1997-10-03</p> <p>In this photograph, Russians are working on the aft portion of the United States-funded, Russian-built Functional Cargo Bay (FGB) also known as Zarya (Russian for sunrise). Built at Khrunichev, the FGB began pre-launch testing shortly after this photo was taken. Launched by a Russian Proton rocket from the Baikonu Cosmodrome on November 20, 1998, Zarya was the first element of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) followed by the U.S. Unity Node. The aft docking mechanism, Pirs, on the far right with ventilation ducting rurning through it, will be docked with the third <span class="hlt">Station</span> element, the Russian Service Module, or Zvezda.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000MCM....36..319S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000MCM....36..319S"><span>Transverse <span class="hlt">compression</span> of PPTA fibers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Singletary, James</p> <p>2000-07-01</p> <p>Results of single transverse <span class="hlt">compression</span> testing of PPTA and PIPD fibers, using a novel test device, are presented and discussed. In the tests, short lengths of single fibers are <span class="hlt">compressed</span> between two parallel, stiff platens. The fiber elastic deformation is analyzed as a Hertzian contact problem. The inelastic deformation is analyzed by elastic-plastic FE simulation and by laser-scanning confocal microscopy of the <span class="hlt">compressed</span> fibers ex post facto. The results obtained are compared to those in the literature and to the theoretical predictions of PPTA fiber transverse elasticity based on PPTA crystal elasticity.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996SPIE.2727.1394L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996SPIE.2727.1394L"><span>Perceptually lossless fractal image <span class="hlt">compression</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lin, Huawu; Venetsanopoulos, Anastasios N.</p> <p>1996-02-01</p> <p>According to the collage theorem, the encoding distortion for fractal image <span class="hlt">compression</span> is directly related to the metric used in the encoding process. In this paper, we introduce a perceptually meaningful distortion measure based on the human visual system's nonlinear response to luminance and the visual masking effects. Blackwell's psychophysical raw data on contrast threshold are first interpolated as a function of background luminance and visual angle, and are then used as an error upper bound for perceptually lossless image <span class="hlt">compression</span>. For a variety of images, experimental results show that the algorithm produces a <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratio of 8:1 to 10:1 without introducing visual artifacts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28268721','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28268721"><span>Wearable EEG via lossless <span class="hlt">compression</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dufort, Guillermo; Favaro, Federico; Lecumberry, Federico; Martin, Alvaro; Oliver, Juan P; Oreggioni, Julian; Ramirez, Ignacio; Seroussi, Gadiel; Steinfeld, Leonardo</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>This work presents a wearable multi-channel EEG recording system featuring a lossless <span class="hlt">compression</span> algorithm. The algorithm, based in a previously reported algorithm by the authors, exploits the existing temporal correlation between samples at different sampling times, and the spatial correlation between different electrodes across the scalp. The low-power platform is able to <span class="hlt">compress</span>, by a factor between 2.3 and 3.6, up to 300sps from 64 channels with a power consumption of 176μW/ch. The performance of the algorithm compares favorably with the best <span class="hlt">compression</span> rates reported up to date in the literature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017SPIE10134E..40B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017SPIE10134E..40B"><span><span class="hlt">Compression</span> fractures detection on CT</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bar, Amir; Wolf, Lior; Bergman Amitai, Orna; Toledano, Eyal; Elnekave, Eldad</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>The presence of a vertebral <span class="hlt">compression</span> fracture is highly indicative of osteoporosis and represents the single most robust predictor for development of a second osteoporotic fracture in the spine or elsewhere. Less than one third of vertebral <span class="hlt">compression</span> fractures are diagnosed clinically. We present an automated method for detecting spine <span class="hlt">compression</span> fractures in Computed Tomography (CT) scans. The algorithm is composed of three processes. First, the spinal column is segmented and sagittal patches are extracted. The patches are then binary classified using a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN). Finally a Recurrent Neural Network (RNN) is utilized to predict whether a vertebral fracture is present in the series of patches.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201977.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201977.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-07-10</p> <p>This is a photo of soybeans growing in the Advanced Astroculture (ADVASC) Experiment aboard the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). The ADVASC experiment was one of the several new experiments and science facilities delivered to the ISS by Expedition Five aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-111 mission. An agricultural seed company will grow soybeans in the ADVASC hardware to determine whether soybean plants can produce seeds in a microgravity environment. Secondary objectives include determination of the chemical characteristics of the seed in space and any microgravity impact on the plant growth cycle. <span class="hlt">Station</span> science will also be conducted by the ever-present ground crew, with a new cadre of controllers for Expedition Five in the ISS Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Controllers work in three shifts around the clock, 7 days a week, in the POCC, the world's primary science command post for the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>. The POCC links Earth-bound researchers around the world with their experiments and crew aboard the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201976.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201976.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-07-10</p> <p>Expedition Five crewmember and flight engineer Peggy Whitson displays the progress of soybeans growing in the Advanced Astroculture (ADVASC) Experiment aboard the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). The ADVASC experiment was one of the several new experiments and science facilities delivered to the ISS by Expedition Five aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-111 mission. An agricultural seed company will grow soybeans in the ADVASC hardware to determine whether soybean plants can produce seeds in a microgravity environment. Secondary objectives include determination of the chemical characteristics of the seed in space and any microgravity impact on the plant growth cycle. <span class="hlt">Station</span> science will also be conducted by the ever-present ground crew, with a new cadre of controllers for Expedition Five in the ISS Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Controllers work in three shifts around the clock, 7 days a week, in the POCC, the world's primary science command post for the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>. The POCC links Earth-bound researchers around the world with their experiments and crew aboard the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201908.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201908.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-06-01</p> <p>Huddled together in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) are the Expedition Four crew (dark blue shirts), Expedition Five crew (medium blue shirts) and the STS-111 crew (green shirts). The Expedition Four crewmembers are, from front to back, Cosmonaut Ury I. Onufrienko, mission commander; and Astronauts Daniel W. Bursch and Carl E. Waltz, flight engineers. The ISS crewmembers are, from front to back, Astronauts Kerneth D. Cockrell, mission commander; Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, mission specialist; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot; and Philippe Perrin, mission specialist. Expedition Five crewmembers are, from front to back, Cosmonaut Valery G. Korzun, mission commander; Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, flight engineers. The ISS recieved a new crew, Expedition Five, replacing Expedition Four after a record-setting 196 days in space, when the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour STS-111 mission visited in June 2002. Three spacewalks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish additional mission objectives: the delivery and installation of the Mobile Base System (MBS), which is an important part of the <span class="hlt">station</span>'s Mobile Servicing System allowing the robotic arm to travel the length of the <span class="hlt">station</span>; the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s robotic arm; and unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the ISS, was launched on June 5, 2002 and landed June 19, 2002.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0301407.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0301407.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2003-05-03</p> <p>Expedition Seven photographed the Soyez TMA-1 Capsule through a window of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) as it departed for Earth. Aboard were Expedition Six crew members, astronauts Kerneth D. Bowersox and Donald R. Pettit, and cosmonaut Nikolai M. Budarin. Expedition Six served a 5 and 1/2 month stay aboard the ISS, the longest stay to date.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102498.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102498.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-02-16</p> <p>The International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), with its newly attached U.S. Laboratory, Destiny, was photographed by a crew member aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis during a fly-around inspection after Atlantis separated from the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>. The Laboratory is shown in the foreground of this photograph. The American-made Destiny module is the cornerstone for space-based research aboard the orbiting platform and the centerpiece of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), where unprecedented science experiments will be performed in the near-zero gravity of space. Destiny will also serve as the command and control center for the ISS. The aluminum module is 8.5-meters (28-feet) long and 4.3-meters (14-feet) in diameter. The laboratory consists of three cylindrical sections and two endcones with hatches that will be mated to other <span class="hlt">station</span> components. A 50.9-centimeter (20-inch-) diameter window is located on one side of the center module segment. This pressurized module is designed to accommodate pressurized payloads. It has a capacity of 24 rack locations. Payload racks will occupy 15 locations especially designed to support experiments. The Destiny module was built by the Boeing Company under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102501.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102501.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-02-16</p> <p>With its new U.S. Laboratory, Destiny, contrasted over a blue and white Earth, the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) was photographed by one of the STS-98 crew members aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis following separation of the Shuttle and <span class="hlt">Station</span>. The Laboratory is shown at the lower right of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>. The American-made Destiny module is the cornerstone for space-based research aboard the orbiting platform and the centerpiece of the ISS, where unprecedented science experiments will be performed in the near-zero gravity of space. Destiny will also serve as the command and control center for the ISS. The aluminum module is 8.5- meters (28-feet) long and 4.3-meters (14-feet) in diameter. The laboratory consists of three cylindrical sections and two endcones with hatches that will be mated to other <span class="hlt">station</span> components. A 50.9-centimeter (20-inch-) diameter window is located on one side of the center module segment. This pressurized module is designed to accommodate pressurized payloads. It has a capacity of 24 rack locations. Payload racks will occupy 15 locations especially designed to support experiments. The Destiny module was built by the Boeing Company under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=MSFC-0201666&hterms=five+people&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dfive%2Bpeople','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=MSFC-0201666&hterms=five+people&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dfive%2Bpeople"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Assembly</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>The International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) is an unparalleled international scientific and technological cooperative venture that will usher in a new era of human space exploration and research and provide benefits to people on Earth. On-Orbit assembly began on November 20, 1998, with the launch of the first ISS component, Zarya, on a Russian Proton rocket. The Space Shuttle followed on December 4, 1998, carrying the U.S.-built Unity cornecting Module. Sixteen nations are participating in the ISS program: the United States, Canada, Japan, Russia, Brazil, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. The ISS will include six laboratories and be four times larger and more capable than any previous space <span class="hlt">station</span>. The United States provides two laboratories (United States Laboratory and Centrifuge Accommodation Module) and a habitation module. There will be two Russian research modules, one Japanese laboratory, referred to as the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), and one European Space Agency (ESA) laboratory called the Columbus Orbital Facility (COF). The <span class="hlt">station</span>'s internal volume will be roughly equivalent to the passenger cabin volume of two 747 jets. Over five years, a total of more than 40 space flights by at least three different vehicles - the Space Shuttle, the Russian Proton Rocket, and the Russian Soyuz rocket - will bring together more than 100 different <span class="hlt">station</span> components and the ISS crew. Astronauts will perform many spacewalks and use new robotics and other technologies to assemble ISS components in space.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19910074195','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19910074195"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Water Quality</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Willis, Charles E. (Editor)</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>The manned Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> will exist as an isolated system for periods of up to 90 days. During this period, safe drinking water and breathable air must be provided for an eight member crew. Because of the large mass involved, it is not practical to consider supplying the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> with water from Earth. Therefore, it is necessary to depend upon recycled water to meet both the human and nonhuman water needs on the <span class="hlt">station</span>. Sources of water that will be recycled include hygiene water, urine, and cabin humidity condensate. A certain amount of fresh water can be produced by CO2 reduction process. Additional fresh water will be introduced into the total pool by way of food, because of the free water contained in food and the water liberated by metabolic oxidation of the food. A panel of scientists and engineers with extensive experience in the various aspects of wastewater reuse was assembled for a 2 day workshop at NASA-Johnson. The panel included individuals with expertise in toxicology, chemistry, microbiology, and sanitary engineering. A review of Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> water reclamation systems was provided.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9503941.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9503941.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1995-04-17</p> <p>International Cooperation Phase III: A Space Shuttle docked to the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) in this computer generated representation of the ISS in its completed and fully operational state with elements from the U.S., Europe, Canada, Japan, and Russia.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0006654.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0006654.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-09-01</p> <p>This image of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) was taken during the STS-106 mission. The ISS component nearest the camera is the U.S. built Node 1 or Unity module, which cornected with the Russian built Functional Cargo Block (FGB) or Zarya. The FGB was linked with the Service Module or Zvezda. On the far end is the Russian Progress supply ship.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202494.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202494.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-09-17</p> <p>Enroute for docking, the 16-foot-long Russian docking compartment Pirs (the Russian word for pier) approaches the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Pirs will provide a docking port for future Russian Soyuz or Progress craft, as well as an airlock for extravehicular activities. Pirs was launched September 14, 2001 from Baikonur in Russia.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9510830.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9510830.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1995-07-11</p> <p>Artist's concept for Phase III of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) as shown here in its completed and fully operational state with elements from the United States, Europe, Canada, Japan, and Russia. Sixteen countries are cooperating to provide a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide an unprecedented undertaking in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202491.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202491.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-10-23</p> <p>Carrying out a flight program for the French Space Agency (CNES) under a commerial contract with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, a Russian Soyuz spacecraft approaches the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) delivering a crew of three for an eight-day stay. Aboard the craft are Commander Victor Afanasyev, Flight Engineer Konstantin Kozeev, both representing Rosaviakosmos, and French Flight Engineer Claudie Haignere.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0005330.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0005330.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-07-01</p> <p>The 45-foot, port-side (P1) truss segment flight article for the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> is being transported to the Redstone Airfield, Marshall Space Flight Center. The truss will be loaded aboard NASA's Super Guppy cargo plane for shipment to the Kennedy Space Center.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102549.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102549.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-03-01</p> <p>Backdropped against water and clouds, the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> was separated from the Space Shuttle Discovery after several days of joint activities and an important crew exchange. This photograph was taken by one of the crew of this mission from the aft flight deck of Discovery.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=wind&pg=6&id=EJ983325','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=wind&pg=6&id=EJ983325"><span>Designing a Weather <span class="hlt">Station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Roman, Harry T.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The collection and analysis of weather data is crucial to the location of alternate energy systems like solar and wind. This article presents a design challenge that gives students a chance to design a weather <span class="hlt">station</span> to collect data in advance of a large wind turbine installation. Data analysis is a crucial part of any science or engineering…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0100625.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0100625.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-02-01</p> <p>The International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) Payload Operations Center (POC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, is the world's primary science command post for the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), the most ambitious space research facility in human history. The Payload Operations team is responsible for managing all science research experiments aboard the <span class="hlt">Station</span>. The center is also home for coordination of the mission-plarning work of variety of international sources, all science payload deliveries and retrieval, and payload training and safety programs for the <span class="hlt">Station</span> crew and all ground personnel. Within the POC, critical payload information from the ISS is displayed on a dedicated workstation, reading both S-band (low data rate) and Ku-band (high data rate) signals from a variety of experiments and procedures operated by the ISS crew and their colleagues on Earth. The POC is the focal point for incorporating research and experiment requirements from all international partners into an integrated ISS payload mission plan. This photograph is an overall view of the MSFC Payload Operations Center displaying the flags of the countries participating the ISS. The flags at the left portray The United States, Canada, France, Switzerland, Netherlands, Japan, Brazil, and Sweden. The flags at the right portray The Russian Federation, Italy, Germany, Belgium, Spain, United Kingdom, Denmark, and Norway.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=good+AND+poster&pg=4&id=ED114716','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=good+AND+poster&pg=4&id=ED114716"><span>The Service <span class="hlt">Station</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.</p> <p></p> <p>The purpose of the teacher's guide is to encourage the primary student to expand his or her awareness of jobs within the community. The role of the service <span class="hlt">station</span> worker is examined, with emphasis on the goods and services provided. Subject areas for which the materials in this guide have potential are social studies, art, and language. Each set…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840024572&hterms=base+station&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dbase%2Bstation','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840024572&hterms=base+station&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dbase%2Bstation"><span>Mojave Base <span class="hlt">Station</span> Implementation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Koscielski, C. G.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>A 12.2 meter diameter X-Y mount antenna was reconditioned for use by the crustal dynamic project as a fixed base <span class="hlt">station</span>. System capabilities and characteristics and key performance parameters for subsystems are presented. The implementation is completed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9414430.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9414430.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1994-12-16</p> <p>Artist's concept of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) Alpha deployed and operational. This figure also includes the docking procedures for the Space Shuttle (shown with cargo bay open). The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide an unprecedented undertaking in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201666.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201666.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>The International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) is an unparalleled international scientific and technological cooperative venture that will usher in a new era of human space exploration and research and provide benefits to people on Earth. On-Orbit assembly began on November 20, 1998, with the launch of the first ISS component, Zarya, on a Russian Proton rocket. The Space Shuttle followed on December 4, 1998, carrying the U.S.-built Unity cornecting Module. Sixteen nations are participating in the ISS program: the United States, Canada, Japan, Russia, Brazil, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. The ISS will include six laboratories and be four times larger and more capable than any previous space <span class="hlt">station</span>. The United States provides two laboratories (United States Laboratory and Centrifuge Accommodation Module) and a habitation module. There will be two Russian research modules, one Japanese laboratory, referred to as the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), and one European Space Agency (ESA) laboratory called the Columbus Orbital Facility (COF). The <span class="hlt">station</span>'s internal volume will be roughly equivalent to the passenger cabin volume of two 747 jets. Over five years, a total of more than 40 space flights by at least three different vehicles - the Space Shuttle, the Russian Proton Rocket, and the Russian Soyuz rocket - will bring together more than 100 different <span class="hlt">station</span> components and the ISS crew. Astronauts will perform many spacewalks and use new robotics and other technologies to assemble ISS components in space.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9407763.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9407763.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1994-07-20</p> <p>An artist's conception of what the final configuration of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) will look like when it is fully built and deployed. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide an unprecedented undertaking in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102548.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102548.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-03-01</p> <p>One of the astronauts aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery took this photograph, from the aft flight deck of the Discovery, of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) in orbit. The photo was taken after separation of the orbiter Discovery from the ISS after several days of joint activities and an important crew exchange.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0301770.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0301770.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2003-05-01</p> <p>Aboard the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), the Russian Lada greenhouse provides home to an experiment that investigates plant development and genetics. Space grown peas have dried and "gone to seed." The crew of the ISS will soon harvest the seeds. Eventually some will be replanted onboard the ISS, and some will be returned to Earth for further study.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302391.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302391.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-06-09</p> <p>The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), was launched on June 5, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour. On board were the STS-111 and Expedition Five crew members. Astronauts Kerneth D. Cockrell, commander; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot, and mission specialists Franklin R. Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin were the STS-111 crew members. Expedition Five crew members included Cosmonaut Valeri G. Korzun, commander, Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, flight engineers. Three space walks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish the delivery and installation of the Mobile Remote Servicer Base System (MBS), an important part of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s Mobile Servicing System that allows the robotic arm to travel the length of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>, which is necessary for future construction tasks; the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s robotic arm; and the task of unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo multipurpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. In this photograph, the Space Shuttle Endeavour, back dropped by the blackness of space, is docked to the pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-2) at the forward end of the Destiny Laboratory on the ISS. A portion of the Canadarm2 is visible on the right and Endeavour's robotic arm is in full view as it is stretched out with the S0 (S-zero) Truss at its end.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201909.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201909.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-06-01</p> <p>Backdropped against the blackness of space and the Earth's horizon, the Mobile Remote Base System (MBS) is moved by the Canadarm2 for installation on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Delivered by the STS-111 mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in June 2002, the MBS is an important part of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s Mobile Servicing System allowing the robotic arm to travel the length of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>, which is neccessary for future construction tasks. In addition, STS-111 delivered a new crew, Expedition Five, replacing Expedition Four after remaining a record-setting 196 days in space. Three spacewalks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish the delivery and installation of the MBS to the Mobile Transporter on the S0 (S-zero) truss, the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s robotic arm, and the task of unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the ISS, was launched on June 5, 2002 and landed June 19, 2002.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302390.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302390.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-06-09</p> <p>The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), was launched on June 5, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour. On board were the STS-111 and Expedition Five crew members. Astronauts Kerneth D. Cockrell, commander; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot, and mission specialists Franklin R. Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin were the STS-111 crew members. Expedition Five crew members included Cosmonaut Valeri G. Korzun, commander, Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, flight engineers. Three space walks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish mission objectives: The delivery and installation of the Mobile Remote Servicer Base System (MBS), an important part of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s Mobile Servicing System that allows the robotic arm to travel the length of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>, which is necessary for future construction tasks; the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s robotic arm; and the task of unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo multipurpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. In this photograph, the Space Shuttle Endeavour, back dropped by the blackness of space, is docked to the pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-2) at the forward end of the Destiny Laboratory on the ISS. Endeavour's robotic arm is in full view as it is stretched out with the S0 (S-zero) Truss at its end.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=costs+AND+transaction&pg=6&id=EJ258390','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=costs+AND+transaction&pg=6&id=EJ258390"><span>Avoiding Service <span class="hlt">Station</span> Fraud.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Burton, Grace M.; Burton, John R.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>High school students are warned against service <span class="hlt">station</span> fraud. A problem-solving section is designed to help students calculate consumer costs for various fraudulent transactions. Several ways of reducing fraud or of lessening the chances of problems are noted. (MP)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202498.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202498.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-07-15</p> <p>At the control of Expedition Two Flight Engineer Susan B. Helms, the newly-installed Canadian-built Canadarm2, Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) maneuvers the Quest Airlock into the proper position to be mated onto the starboard side of the Unity Node I during the first of three extravehicular activities (EVA) of the STS-104 mission. The Quest Airlock makes it easier to perform space walks, and allows both Russian and American spacesuits to be worn when the Shuttle is not docked with the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). American suits will not fit through Russion airlocks at the <span class="hlt">Station</span>. The Boeing Company, the space <span class="hlt">station</span> prime contractor, built the 6.5-ton (5.8 metric ton) airlock and several other key components at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), in the same building where the Saturn V rocket was built. Installation activities were supported by the development team from the Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) located at the MSFC and the Mission Control Center at NASA's Johnson Space Flight Center in Houston, Texas.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080012637','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080012637"><span>Galileo <span class="hlt">Station</span> Keeping Strategy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Perez-Cambriles, Antonio; Bejar-Romero, Juan Antonio; Aguilar-Taboada, Daniel; Perez-Lopez, Fernando; Navarro, Daniel</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>This paper presents analyses done for the design and implementation of the Maneuver Planning software of the Galileo Flight Dynamics Facility. The <span class="hlt">station</span> keeping requirements of the constellation have been analyzed in order to identify the key parameters to be taken into account in the design and implementation of the software.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302482.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302482.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-02-01</p> <p>These 10 astronauts and cosmonauts represent the base STS-102 space travelers, as well as the crew members for the <span class="hlt">station</span> crews switching out turns aboard the outpost. Those astronauts wearing orange represent the STS-102 crew members. In the top photo, from left to right are: James M. Kelly, pilot; Andrew S.W. Thomas, mission specialist; James D. Wetherbee, commander; and Paul W. Richards, mission specialist. The group pictured in the lower right portion of the portrait are STS-members as well as Expedition Two crew members (from left): mission specialist and flight engineer James S. Voss; cosmonaut Yury V. Usachev, Expedition Two Commander; and mission specialist and flight engineer Susan Helms. The lower left inset are the 3 man crew of Expedition One (pictured from left): Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, flight engineer; astronaut William M. (Bill) Shepherd, commander; and cosmonaut Yuri P. Gidzenko, Soyuz commander. The main objective of the STS-102 mission was the first Expedition Crew rotation and the primary cargo was the Leonardo, the Italian Space Agency-built Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM). The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s (ISS') moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments, and supplies to and from the <span class="hlt">Station</span> aboard the Space Shuttle. NASA's 103rd overall mission and the 8th Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Assembly Flight, STS-102 mission launched on March 8, 2001 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0100629.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0100629.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-09-08</p> <p>This is the insignia for STS-98, which marks a major milestone in assembly of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Atlantis' crew delivered the United States Laboratory, Destiny, to the ISS. Destiny will be the centerpiece of the ISS, a weightless laboratory where expedition crews will perform unprecedented research in the life sciences, materials sciences, Earth sciences, and microgravity sciences. The laboratory is also the nerve center of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>, performing guidance, control, power distribution, and life support functions. With Destiny's arrival, the <span class="hlt">Station</span> will begin to fulfill its promise of returning the benefits of space research to Earth's citizens. The crew patch depicts the Space Shuttle with Destiny held high above the payload bay just before its attachment to the ISS. Red and white stripes, with a deep blue field of white stars, border the Shuttle and Destiny to symbolize the continuing contribution of the United States to the ISS. The constellation Hercules, seen just below Destiny, captures the Shuttle and <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s team efforts in bringing the promise of orbital scientific research to life. The reflection of Earth in Destiny's window emphasizes the connection between space exploration and life on Earth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202490.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202490.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-10-23</p> <p>Carrying out a flight program for the French Space Agency (CNES) under a commercial contract with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, a Russian Soyuz spacecraft approaches the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), delivering a crew of three for an eight-day stay. Aboard the craft are Commander Victor Afanasyev, Flight Engineer Konstantin Kozeev, both representing Rosaviakosmos, and French Flight Engineer Claudie Haignere.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302383.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302383.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-10-12</p> <p>Astronaut David A. Wolf, STS-112 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA), a six hour, four minute space walk, in which an exterior <span class="hlt">station</span> television camera was installed outside of the Destiny Laboratory. Launched October 7, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, the STS-112 mission lasted 11 days and performed three EVA sessions. Its primary mission was to install the Starboard (S1) Integrated Truss Structure and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart to the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s complex power system. The S1 truss, attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss installed by the previous STS-110 mission, flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s railway providing a mobile work platform for future extravehicular activities by astronauts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302381.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302381.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-10-10</p> <p>Anchored to a foot restraint on the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) or Canadarm2, astronaut David A. Wolf, STS-112 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA). Wolf is carrying the Starboard One (S1) outboard nadir external camera which was installed on the end of the S1 Truss on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Launched October 7, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, the STS-112 mission lasted 11 days and performed three EVAs. Its primary mission was to install the S1 Integrated Truss Structure and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart to the ISS. The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s complex power system. The S1 truss, attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss installed by the previous STS-110 mission, flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s railway providing a mobile work platform for future extravehicular activities by astronauts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302385.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302385.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-10-10</p> <p>Launched October 7, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, the STS-112 mission lasted 11 days and performed three sessions of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). Its primary mission was to install the Starboard (S1) Integrated Truss Structure and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart to the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s complex power system. The S1 truss, attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss installed by the previous STS-110 mission, flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s railway providing a mobile work platform for future extravehicular activities by astronauts. This is a view of the newly installed S1 Truss as photographed during the mission's first scheduled EVA. The <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s Canadarm2 is in the foreground. Visible are astronauts Piers J. Sellers (lower left) and David A. Wolf (upper right), both STS-112 mission specialists.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302488.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302488.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-03-11</p> <p>STS-102 mission astronaut Susan J. Helms works outside the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) while holding onto a rigid umbilical and her feet anchored to the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robotic arm on the Space Shuttle Discovery during the first of two space walks. During this space walk, the longest to date in space shuttle history, Helms in tandem with James S. Voss (out of frame), prepared the Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 for repositioning from the Unity Module's Earth-facing berth to its port-side berth to make room for the Leonardo Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) supplied by the Italian Space Agency. The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the ISS's moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments, and supplies to and from the <span class="hlt">Station</span> aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo in 16 standard Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached <span class="hlt">station</span> module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. Launched on May 8, 2001 for nearly 13 days in space, STS-102 mission was the 8th spacecraft assembly flight to the ISS and NASA's 103rd overall mission. The mission also served as a crew rotation flight. It delivered the Expedition Two crew to the <span class="hlt">Station</span> and returned the Expedition One crew back to Earth.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302489.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302489.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-03-11</p> <p>STS-102 astronaut and mission specialist James S. Voss works outside Destiny, the U.S. Laboratory (shown in lower frame) on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), while anchored to the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robotic arm on the Space Shuttle Discovery during the first of two space walks. During this space walk, the longest to date in space shuttle history, Voss in tandem with Susan Helms (out of frame), prepared the Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 for repositioning from the Unity Module's Earth-facing berth to its port-side berth to make room for the Leonardo Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) supplied by the Italian Space Agency. The The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the ISS' moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments, and supplies to and from the <span class="hlt">Station</span> aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo in 16 standard Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached <span class="hlt">station</span> module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. Launched on May 8, 2001 for nearly 13 days in space, the STS-102 mission was the 8th spacecraft assembly flight to the ISS and NASA's 103rd overall mission. The mission also served as a crew rotation flight. It delivered the Expedition Two crew to the <span class="hlt">Station</span> and returned the Expedition One crew back to Earth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/873833','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/873833"><span><span class="hlt">Compressed</span> gas fuel storage system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Wozniak, John J.; Tiller, Dale B.; Wienhold, Paul D.; Hildebrand, Richard J.</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">compressed</span> gas vehicle fuel storage system comprised of a plurality of <span class="hlt">compressed</span> gas pressure cells supported by shock-absorbing foam positioned within a shape-conforming container. The container is dimensioned relative to the <span class="hlt">compressed</span> gas pressure cells whereby a radial air gap surrounds each <span class="hlt">compressed</span> gas pressure cell. The radial air gap allows pressure-induced expansion of the pressure cells without resulting in the application of pressure to adjacent pressure cells or physical pressure to the container. The pressure cells are interconnected by a gas control assembly including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and means for connecting the fuel storage system to a vehicle power source and a refueling adapter. The gas control assembly is enclosed by a protective cover attached to the container. The system is attached to the vehicle with straps to enable the chassis to deform as intended in a high-speed collision.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040152151','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040152151"><span>Comparison of Artificial <span class="hlt">Compressibility</span> Methods</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kiris, Cetin; Housman, Jeffrey; Kwak, Dochan</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Various artificial <span class="hlt">compressibility</span> methods for calculating the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are compared. Each method is described and numerical solutions to test problems are conducted. A comparison based on convergence behavior, accuracy, and robustness is given.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Coding+AND+decoding&pg=5&id=EJ496575','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Coding+AND+decoding&pg=5&id=EJ496575"><span>Efficient Decoding of <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> Data.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bassiouni, Mostafa A.; Mukherjee, Amar</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Discusses the problem of enhancing the speed of Huffman decoding of <span class="hlt">compressed</span> data. Topics addressed include the Huffman decoding tree; multibit decoding; binary string mapping problems; and algorithms for solving mapping problems. (22 references) (LRW)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2014-title47-vol4-sec74-783.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2014-title47-vol4-sec74-783.pdf"><span>47 CFR 74.783 - <span class="hlt">Station</span> identification.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... Booster <span class="hlt">Stations</span> § 74.783 <span class="hlt">Station</span> identification. (a) Each low power TV and TV translator <span class="hlt">station</span> not... suffix “-LP.” (f) TV broadcast booster <span class="hlt">station</span> shall be identified by their primary <span class="hlt">stations</span> by...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title47-vol4-sec74-783.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title47-vol4-sec74-783.pdf"><span>47 CFR 74.783 - <span class="hlt">Station</span> identification.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... Booster <span class="hlt">Stations</span> § 74.783 <span class="hlt">Station</span> identification. (a) Each low power TV and TV translator <span class="hlt">station</span> not... suffix “-LP.” (f) TV broadcast booster <span class="hlt">station</span> shall be identified by their primary <span class="hlt">stations</span> by...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2013-title47-vol4-sec74-783.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2013-title47-vol4-sec74-783.pdf"><span>47 CFR 74.783 - <span class="hlt">Station</span> identification.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... Booster <span class="hlt">Stations</span> § 74.783 <span class="hlt">Station</span> identification. (a) Each low power TV and TV translator <span class="hlt">station</span> not... suffix “-LP.” (f) TV broadcast booster <span class="hlt">station</span> shall be identified by their primary <span class="hlt">stations</span> by...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/tm/tm3A19/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/tm/tm3A19/"><span>Levels at gaging <span class="hlt">stations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Kenney, Terry A.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Operational procedures at U.S. Geological Survey gaging <span class="hlt">stations</span> include periodic leveling checks to ensure that gages are accurately set to the established gage datum. Differential leveling techniques are used to determine elevations for reference marks, reference points, all gages, and the water surface. The techniques presented in this manual provide guidance on instruments and methods that ensure gaging-<span class="hlt">station</span> levels are run to both a high precision and accuracy. Levels are run at gaging <span class="hlt">stations</span> whenever differences in gage readings are unresolved, <span class="hlt">stations</span> may have been damaged, or according to a pre-determined frequency. Engineer's levels, both optical levels and electronic digital levels, are commonly used for gaging-<span class="hlt">station</span> levels. Collimation tests should be run at least once a week for any week that levels are run, and the absolute value of the collimation error cannot exceed 0.003 foot/100 feet (ft). An acceptable set of gaging-<span class="hlt">station</span> levels consists of a minimum of two foresights, each from a different instrument height, taken on at least two independent reference marks, all reference points, all gages, and the water surface. The initial instrument height is determined from another independent reference mark, known as the origin, or base reference mark. The absolute value of the closure error of a leveling circuit must be less than or equal to ft, where n is the total number of instrument setups, and may not exceed |0.015| ft regardless of the number of instrument setups. Closure error for a leveling circuit is distributed by instrument setup and adjusted elevations are determined. Side shots in a level circuit are assessed by examining the differences between the adjusted first and second elevations for each objective point in the circuit. The absolute value of these differences must be less than or equal to 0.005 ft. Final elevations for objective points are determined by averaging the valid adjusted first and second elevations. If final elevations</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19990087488','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19990087488"><span>Hitchhiker On Space <span class="hlt">Station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Daelemans, Gerard; Goldsmith, Theodore</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>The NASA/GSFC Shuttle Small Payloads Projects Office (SSPPO) has been studying the feasibility of migrating Hitchhiker customers past present and future to the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> via a "Hitchhiker like" carrier system. SSPPO has been tasked to make the most use of existing hardware and software systems and infrastructure in its study of an ISS based carrier system. This paper summarizes the results of the SSPPO Hitchhiker on International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) study. Included are a number of "Hitchhiker like" carrier system concepts that take advantage of the various ISS attached payload accommodation sites. Emphasis will be given to a HH concept that attaches to the Japanese Experiment Module - Exposed Facility (JEM-EF).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=MSFC-9802668&hterms=life+Norway&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dlife%2BNorway','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=MSFC-9802668&hterms=life+Norway&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dlife%2BNorway"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>This artist's concept depicts the completely assembled International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) passing over the Straits of Gibraltar and the Mediterranean Sea. As a gateway to permanent human presence in space, the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Program is to expand knowledge benefiting all people and nations. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide unprecedented undertakings in scientific, technological, and international experimentation. Experiments to be conducted in the ISS include: microgravity research, Earth science, space science, life sciences, space product development, and engineering research and technology. The sixteen countries participating the ISS are: United States, Russian Federation, Canada, Japan, United Kingdom, Germany, Italy, France, Norway, Netherlands, Belgium, Spain, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, and Brazil.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9705846.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9705846.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>This photograph, taken by the Boeing Company,shows Boeing technicians preparing to install one of six hatches or doors to the Node 1 (also called Unity), the first U.S. Module for the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). The Node 1, or Unity, serves as a cornecting passageway to Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> modules and was manufactured by the Boeing Company at the Marshall Space Flight Center from 1994 to 1997. The U.S. built Unity module was launched aboard the orbiter Endeavour (STS-88 mission) on December 4, 1998 and connected to the Zarya, the Russian-built Functional Energy Block (FGB). The Zarya was launched on a Russian proton rocket prior to the launch of the Unity. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide unprecedented undertakings in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9705847.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9705847.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>This photograph, taken by the Boeing Company, shows Boeing technicians preparing to install one of six hatches or doors to the Node 1 (also called Unity), the first U.S. Module for the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). The Node 1, or Unity, serves as a cornecting passageway to Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> modules and was manufactured by the Boeing Company at the Marshall Space Flight Center from 1994 to 1997. The U.S. built Unity module was launched aboard the orbiter Endeavour (STS-88 mission) on December 4, 1998 and connected to the Zarya, the Russian-built Functional Energy Block (FGB). The Zarya was launched on a Russian proton rocket prior to the launch of the Unity. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide unprecedented undertakings in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840010209','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840010209"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Technology, 1983</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Wright, R. L. (Editor); Mays, C. R. (Editor)</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>This publication is a compilation of the panel summaries presented in the following areas: systems/operations technology; crew and life support; EVA; crew and life support: ECLSS; attitude, control, and stabilization; human capabilities; auxillary propulsion; fluid management; communications; structures and mechanisms; data management; power; and thermal control. The objective of the workshop was to aid the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Technology Steering Committee in defining and implementing a technology development program to support the establishment of a permanent human presence in space. This compilation will provide the participants and their organizations with the information presented at this workshop in a referenceable format. This information will establish a stepping stone for users of space <span class="hlt">station</span> technology to develop new technology and plan future tasks.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0101380.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0101380.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-02-01</p> <p>The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is responsible for designing and building the life support systems that will provide the crew of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) a comfortable environment in which to live and work. Scientists and engineers at the MSFC are working together to provide the ISS with systems that are safe, efficient, and cost-effective. These compact and powerful systems are collectively called the Environmental Control and Life Support Systems, or simply, ECLSS. This photograph shows the development Water Processor located in two racks in the ECLSS test area at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Actual waste water, simulating Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> waste, is generated and processed through the hardware to evaluate the performance of technologies in the flight Water Processor design.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302376.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302376.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-10-09</p> <p>Back dropped against a blue and white Earth, the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis was photographed by an Expedition 5 crew member onboard the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) during rendezvous and docking operations. Docking occurred at 10:17 am on October 9, 2002. The Starboard 1 (S1) Integrated Truss Structure, the primary payload of the STS-112 mission, can be seen in Atlantis' cargo bay. Installed and outfitted within 3 sessions of Extravehicular Activity (EVA) during the 11 day mission, the S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s complex power system. The S1 truss, attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss installed by the previous STS-110 mission, flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat rejection radiators.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880068103&hterms=information+dissemination&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dinformation%2Bdissemination','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880068103&hterms=information+dissemination&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dinformation%2Bdissemination"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Information Systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pittman, Clarence W.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>The utility of the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> is improved, the ability to manage and integrate its development and operation enhanced, and the cost and risk of developing the software for it is minimized by three major information systems. The Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Information System (SSIS) provides for the transparent collection and dissemination of operational information to all users and operators. The Technical and Management Information System (TMIS) provides all the developers with timely and consistent program information and a project management 'window' to assess the project status. The Software Support Environment (SSE) provides automated tools and standards to be used by all software developers. Together, these three systems are vital to the successful execution of the program.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0700860.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0700860.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2006-09-17</p> <p>This view of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>, back dropped against the blackness of space and Earth, was taken shortly after the Space Shuttle Atlantis undocked from the orbital outpost at 7:50 a.m. CDT during the STS-115 mission. The unlinking completed after six days, two hours and two minutes of joint operations of the installation of the P3/P4 truss. The new 17 ton truss included batteries, electronics, a giant rotating joint, and sported a second pair of 240-foot solar wings. The new solar arrays will eventually double the onboard power of the <span class="hlt">Station</span> when their electrical systems are brought online during the next shuttle flight, STS-116.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12889432','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12889432"><span>Is your <span class="hlt">station</span> secure?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Patrick, Richard W</p> <p>2003-07-01</p> <p>All department personnel must practice and assure safety and security of <span class="hlt">stations</span>, vehicles, equipment and related items. Keep vehicle bay doors closed unless the bays are physically occupied by a department member. When responding or leaving the <span class="hlt">station</span>, ensure, after exiting the bay, that the door is closed. If confronted with questions pertaining to department operations, including SOPs and SOGs, box alarms, response patterns, training times, member rosters/addresses, etc., do not provide the information. Document the incident and immediately report it. Should the inquiry appear extremely unusual in nature, do not hesitate to contact law enforcement. Emergency service personnel should be educated on a periodic basis and remain vigilant at all times.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900020842','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900020842"><span>A lunar space <span class="hlt">station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Trinh, LU; Merrow, Mark; Coons, Russ; Iezzi, Gabrielle; Palarz, Howard M.; Nguyen, Marc H.; Spitzer, Mike; Cubbage, Sam</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>A concept for a space <span class="hlt">station</span> to be placed in low lunar orbit in support of the eventual establishment of a permanent moon base is proposed. This space <span class="hlt">station</span> would have several functions: (1) a complete support facility for the maintenance of the permanent moon base and its population; (2) an orbital docking area to facilitate the ferrying of materials and personnel to and from Earth; (3) a zero gravity factory using lunar raw materials to grow superior GaAs crystals for use in semiconductors and mass produce inexpensive fiber glass; and (4) a space garden for the benefit of the air food cycles. The mission scenario, design requirements, and technology needs and developments are included as part of the proposal.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0400389.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0400389.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-12-07</p> <p>In this image, STS-97 astronaut and mission specialist Carlos I. Noriega waves at a crew member inside Endeavor's cabin during the mission's final session of Extravehicular Activity (EVA). Launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor on November 30, 2000, the STS-97 mission's primary objective was the delivery, assembly, and activation of the U.S. electrical power system onboard the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). The electrical power system, which is built into a 73-meter (240-foot) long solar array structure consists of solar arrays, radiators, batteries, and electronics. The entire 15.4-metric ton (17-ton) package is called the P6 Integrated Truss Segment, and is the heaviest and largest element yet delivered to the <span class="hlt">station</span> aboard a space shuttle. The electrical system will eventually provide the power necessary for the first ISS crews to live and work in the U.S. segment.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0100067.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0100067.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-02-01</p> <p>The Payload Operations Center (POC) is the science command post for the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, it is the focal point for American and international science activities aboard the ISS. The POC's unique capabilities allow science experts and researchers around the world to perform cutting-edge science in the unique microgravity environment of space. The POC is staffed around the clock by shifts of payload flight controllers. At any given time, 8 to 10 flight controllers are on consoles operating, plarning for, and controlling various systems and payloads. This photograph shows the Timeline Change Officer (TCO) at a work <span class="hlt">station</span>. The TCO maintains the daily schedule of science activities and work assignments, and works with planners at Mission Control at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, to ensure payload activities are accommodated in overall ISS plans and schedules.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0100071.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0100071.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-02-01</p> <p>The Payload Operations Center (POC) is the science command post for the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, it is the focal point for American and international science activities aboard the ISS. The POC's unique capabilities allow science experts and researchers around the world to perform cutting-edge science in the unique microgravity environment of space. The POC is staffed around the clock by shifts of payload flight controllers. At any given time, 8 to 10 flight controllers are on consoles operating, plarning for, and controlling various systems and payloads. This photograph shows a Payload Rack Officer (PRO) at a work <span class="hlt">station</span>. The PRO is linked by a computer to all payload racks aboard the ISS. The PRO monitors and configures the resources and environment for science experiments including EXPRESS Racks, multiple-payload racks designed for commercial payloads.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0400385.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0400385.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-12-04</p> <p>This video still depicts the recently deployed starboard and port solar arrays towering over the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). The video was recorded on STS-97's 65th orbit. Delivery, assembly, and activation of the solar arrays was the main mission objective of STS-97. The electrical power system, which is built into a 73-meter (240-foot) long solar array structure consists of solar arrays, radiators, batteries, and electronics, and will provide the power necessary for the first ISS crews to live and work in the U.S. segment. The entire 15.4-metric ton (17-ton) package is called the P6 Integrated Truss Segment, and is the heaviest and largest element yet delivered to the <span class="hlt">station</span> aboard a space shuttle. The STS-97 crew of five launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor on November 30, 2000 for an 11 day mission.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19720013165','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19720013165"><span>Modular space <span class="hlt">station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>The modular space <span class="hlt">station</span> comprising small, shuttle-launched modules, and characterized by low initial cost and incremental manning, is described. The initial space <span class="hlt">station</span> is designed to be delivered into orbit by three space shuttles and assembled in space. The three sections are the power/subsystems module, the crew/operations module, and the general purpose laboratory module. It provides for a crew of six. Subsequently duplicate/crew/operations and power/subsystems modules will be mated to the original modules, and provide for an additional six crewmen. A total of 17 research and applications modules is planned, three of which will be free-flying modules. Details are given on the program plan, modular characteristics, logistics, experiment support capability and requirements, operations analysis, design support analyses, and shuttle interfaces.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/551985','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/551985"><span>Battery charging <span class="hlt">stations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bergey, M.</p> <p>1997-12-01</p> <p>This paper discusses the concept of battery charging <span class="hlt">stations</span> (BCSs), designed to service rural owners of battery power sources. Many such power sources now are transported to urban areas for recharging. A BCS provides the opportunity to locate these facilities closer to the user, is often powered by renewable sources, or hybrid systems, takes advantage of economies of scale, and has the potential to provide lower cost of service, better service, and better cost recovery than other rural electrification programs. Typical systems discussed can service 200 to 1200 people, and consist of <span class="hlt">stations</span> powered by photovoltaics, wind/PV, wind/diesel, or dieselmore » only. Examples of installed systems are presented, followed by cost figures, economic analysis, and typical system design and performance numbers.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201585.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201585.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-08-17</p> <p>Backdropped by a sunrise, the newly installed Materials International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Experiment (MISSE) is visible on this image. MISSE would expose 750 material samples for about 18 months and collect information on how different materials weather the space environment. The objective of MISSE is to develop early, low-cost, non-intrusive opportunities to conduct critical space exposure tests of space materials and components plarned for use on future spacecraft. The experiment was the first externally mounted experiment conducted on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) and was installed on the outside of the ISS Quest Airlock during extravehicular activity (EVA) of the STS-105 mission. MISSE was launched on August 10, 2001 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0601078.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0601078.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2006-07-08</p> <p>Astronaut Michael E. Fossum, STS-121 mission specialist, used a digital still camera to expose a photo of his helmet visor during a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) while Space Shuttle Discovery was docked with the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Also visible in the visor reflections are fellow space walker Piers J. Sellers, mission specialist, Earth's horizon, and a <span class="hlt">station</span> solar array. During its 12-day mission, this utilization and logistics flight delivered a multipurpose logistics module (MPLM) to the ISS with several thousand pounds of new supplies and experiments. In addition, some new orbital replacement units (ORUs) were delivered and stowed externally on the ISS on a special pallet. These ORUs are spares for critical machinery located on the outside of the ISS. During this mission the crew also carried out testing of Shuttle inspection and repair hardware, as well as evaluated operational techniques and concepts for conducting on-orbit inspection and repair.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9802668.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9802668.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>This artist's concept depicts the completely assembled International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) passing over the Straits of Gibraltar and the Mediterranean Sea. As a gateway to permanent human presence in space, the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Program is to expand knowledge benefiting all people and nations. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide unprecedented undertakings in scientific, technological, and international experimentation. Experiments to be conducted in the ISS include: microgravity research, Earth science, space science, life sciences, space product development, and engineering research and technology. The sixteen countries participating the ISS are: United States, Russian Federation, Canada, Japan, United Kingdom, Germany, Italy, France, Norway, Netherlands, Belgium, Spain, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, and Brazil.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880002364','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880002364"><span>Space <span class="hlt">station</span> propulsion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Jones, Robert E.; Morren, W. Earl; Sovey, James S.; Tacina, Robert R.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>Two propulsion systems have been selected for the space <span class="hlt">station</span>: gaseous H/O rockets for high thrust applications and the multipropellant resistojets for low thrust needs. These two thruster systems integrate very well with the fluid systems on the space <span class="hlt">station</span>, utilizing waste fluids as their source of propellant. The H/O rocket will be fueled by electrolyzed water and the resistojets will use waste gases collected from the environmental control system and the various laboratories. The results are presented of experimental efforts with H/O and resistojet thrusters to determine their performance and life capability, as well as results of studies to determine the availability of water and waste gases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0100072.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0100072.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-02-01</p> <p>The Payload Operations Center (POC) is the science command post for the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, it is the focal point for American and international science activities aboard the ISS. The POC's unique capabilities allow science experts and researchers around the world to perform cutting-edge science in the unique microgravity environment of space. The POC is staffed around the clock by shifts of payload flight controllers. At any given time, 8 to 10 flight controllers are on consoles operating, plarning for, and controlling various systems and payloads. This photograph shows the Operations Controllers (OC) at their work <span class="hlt">stations</span>. The OC coordinates the configuration of resources to enable science operations, such as power, cooling, commanding, and the availability of items like tools and laboratory equipment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202499.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202499.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-06-08</p> <p>Astronaut Susan J. Helms, Expedition Two flight engineer, mounts a video camera onto a bracket in the Russian Zarya or Functional Cargo Block (FGB) of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Launched by a Russian Proton rocket from the Baikonu Cosmodrome on November 20, 1998, the Unites States-funded and Russian-built Zarya was the first element of the ISS, followed by the U.S. Unity Node.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940028392','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940028392"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> evolution study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Evans, David B.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>This is the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom (SSF) Evolution Study 1993 Final Report, performed under NASA Contract NAS8-38783, Task Order 5.1. This task examined: (1) the feasibility of launching current National Space Transportation System (NSTS) compatible logistics elements on expendable launch vehicles (ELV's) and the associated modifications, and (2) new, non-NSTS logistics elements for launch on ELV's to augment current SSF logistics capability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0006655.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0006655.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-09-01</p> <p>This image of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) was taken when Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-106 mission) approached the ISS for docking. At the top is the Russian Progress supply ship that is linked with the Russian built Service Module or Zvezda. The Zvezda is cornected with the Russian built Functional Cargo Block (FGB) or Zarya. The U.S. built Node 1 or Unity module is seen at the bottom.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20060026214','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20060026214"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> MMOD Shielding</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Christiansen, Eric</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>This paper describes International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) shielding for micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) protection, requirements for protection, and the technical approach to meeting requirements. Current activities in MMOD protection for ISS will be described, including efforts to augment MMOD protection by adding shields on-orbit. Observed MMOD impacts on ISS elements such as radiators, modules and returned hardware will be described. Comparisons of the observed damage with predicted damage using risk assessment software will be made.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/3516','TREESEARCH'); return false;" href="https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/3516"><span>Photographic bait <span class="hlt">stations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/">Treesearch</a></p> <p>T.E. Kucera; A.M. Soukkala; Bill Zielinski</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>There are a variety of systems in use that employ a camera at a bait <span class="hlt">station</span> to detect wildlife. We will describe three that are widely used and with which we are most familiar. They can be divided into two major categories according to the type of camera used. The first employs automatic, 35-mm cameras and can be further divided into two types that differ by...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=00-042-154&hterms=Football+history&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DFootball%2Bhistory','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=00-042-154&hterms=Football+history&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DFootball%2Bhistory"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> exhibit</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>The International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) exhibit in StenniSphere at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., gives visitors an up-close look at the largest international peacetime project in history. Step inside a module of the ISS and glimpse how astronauts will live and work in space. Currently, 16 countries contribute resources and hardware to the ISS. When complete, the orbiting research facility will be larger than a football field.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA576170','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA576170"><span>Summit <span class="hlt">Station</span> Skiway Review</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>behind a low ground pressure tractor, b) leveling with snow planes, and c) repeating the process in 0.3 m lifts. Cold sink times between each...Antarctica started in 1957 with Opera- tion Deep Freeze at Byrd and South Pole <span class="hlt">Stations</span> and ran until 1962. (During this time McMurdo had a runway...independent turning tires with the ability to compact uniformly across a surface. This type of equipment was best suited for deep compaction because of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202485.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202485.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-07-22</p> <p>An Expedition Two crewmember aboard the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) captured this overhead look at the smoke and ash regurgitated from the erupting volcano Mt. Etna on the island of Sicily, Italy. At an elevation of 10,990 feet (3,350 m), the summit of the Mt. Etna volcano, one of the most active and most studied volcanoes in the world, has been active for a half-million years and has erupted hundreds of times in recorded history.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202487.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202487.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-12-15</p> <p>As seen through a window on the Space Shuttle Endeavor's aft flight deck, the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), with its newly-staffed crew of three, Expedition Four, is contrasted against a patch of the blue and white Earth. The Destiny laboratory is partially covered with shadows in the foreground. The photo was taken during the departure of the Earth-bound Endeavor, bringing to a close the STS-108 mission, the 12th Shuttle mission to visit the ISS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302332.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302332.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2003-10-25</p> <p>Aboard the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), European Space Agency astronaut Pedro Duque of Spain watches a water bubble float between a camera and himself. The bubble shows his reflection (reversed). Duque was launched aboard a Russian Soyuz TMA-3 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan on October 18th, along with expedition-8 crew members Michael C. Foale, Mission Commander and NASA ISS Science Officer, and Cosmonaut Alexander Y. Kaleri, Soyuz Commander and flight engineer.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701333.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701333.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-05-21</p> <p>STS-118 astronaut and mission specialist Dafydd R. “Dave” Williams, representing the Canadian Space Agency, uses Virtual Reality Hardware in the Space Vehicle Mock Up Facility at the Johnson Space Center to rehearse some of his duties for the upcoming mission. This type of virtual reality training allows the astronauts to wear special gloves and other gear while looking at a computer that displays simulating actual movements around the various locations on the <span class="hlt">station</span> hardware which with they will be working.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA204331','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA204331"><span><span class="hlt">Station</span> Climatic Summaries, Europe</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>ICAO ID: BIHN LOCATION: 64118’N, 15󈧑’W ELEVATION (FEET): 30 LST = GMT: +1 PREPARED BY: USAFETAC/ECR, OCT 1986 PERIOD: 8007-8512 SOURCE NO. JAN FEB...SUMMARY SrATION: HOFN, ICELAND <span class="hlt">STATION</span> #: 040820 ICAO ID: BIHN LOCATION: 64018’N, 15013’W ELEVATION (FEET): 30 LST = GT: +1 PREPARED BY: USAFETAC/ECR</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0400379.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0400379.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2003-10-20</p> <p>In the Destiny laboratory aboard the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Pedro Duque of Spain is seen working at the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG). He is working with the PROMISS experiment, which will investigate the growth processes of proteins during weightless conditions. The PROMISS is one of the Cervantes program of tests (consisting of 20 commercial experiments). The MSG is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701336.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701336.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-08-11</p> <p>As the construction continued on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), STS-118 Astronaut Rick Mastracchio and Canada Space Agency's Dave Williams (out of frame), participated in the first session of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) for the mission. During the 6 hour, 17 minute space walk, the two attached the Starboard 5 (S5) segment of truss, retracted the forward heat rejecting radiator from the Port 6 (P6) truss, and performed several get ahead tasks.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701318.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701318.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-06-13</p> <p>STS-117 astronauts and mission specialists Patrick Forrester and Steven Swanson (out of frame), participated in the second Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) as construction resumed on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Among other tasks, the two removed all of the launch locks holding the 10 foot wide solar alpha rotary joint in place and began the solar array retraction. The primary mission objective was the installment of the second and third starboard truss segments (S3 and S4).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701334.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701334.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-08-11</p> <p>As the construction continued on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), STS-118 Astronaut Rick Mastracchio and Canada Space Agency representative Dave Williams (out of frame), participated in the first session of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) for the mission. During the 6 hour, 17 minute space walk, the two attached the Starboard 5 (S5) segment of truss, retracted the forward heat rejecting radiator from the Port 6 (P6) truss, and performed several get ahead tasks.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201906.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201906.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-06-18</p> <p>This is a photo of the Hayman Fire burning in the foothills southwest of Denver, Colorado, as viewed by an Expedition Five crewmember aboard the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Astronauts use a variety of lenses and look angles as their orbits pass over the wildfires to document the long-distance movements of smoke from the fires as well as details of the burning areas. In this view, Littleton, Chatfield Lake, and the Arkansas River are all visible.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202492.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202492.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-10-23</p> <p>A Russian Soyuz spacecraft undocks from the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) with its crew of three ending an eight-day stay. Aboard the craft are Commander Victor Afanasyev, Flight Engineer Konstantin Kozeev, both representing Rosaviakosmos, and French Flight Engineer Claudie Haignere. Their mission was to carry out a flight program for the French Space Agency (CNES) under a commercial contract with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202493.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202493.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-10-23</p> <p>A Russian Soyuz spacecraft departs from the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) with its crew of three ending an eight-day stay. Aboard the craft are Commander Victor Afanasyev, Flight Engineer Konstantin Kozeev, both representing Rosaviakosmos, and French Flight Engineer Claudie Haignere. Their mission was to carry out a flight program for the French Space Agency (CNES) under a commercial contract with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701894.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701894.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-10-30</p> <p>Astronaut Doug Wheelock, STS-120 mission specialist, participated in the third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction continued on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). During a 7-hour and 8-minute space walk, Wheelock and mission specialist Scott Parazynski (out of frame), installed the P6 truss segment with its set of solar arrays to its permanent home, installed a spare main bus switching unit on a stowage platform, and performed a few get-ahead tasks.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title29-vol7/pdf/CFR-2013-title29-vol7-sec1917-154.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title29-vol7/pdf/CFR-2013-title29-vol7-sec1917-154.pdf"><span>29 CFR 1917.154 - <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air. 1917.154 Section 1917.154 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.154 <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air. Employees shall be... this part during cleaning with <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air. <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air used for cleaning shall not exceed a...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title29-vol7/pdf/CFR-2012-title29-vol7-sec1917-154.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title29-vol7/pdf/CFR-2012-title29-vol7-sec1917-154.pdf"><span>29 CFR 1917.154 - <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air. 1917.154 Section 1917.154 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.154 <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air. Employees shall be... this part during cleaning with <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air. <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air used for cleaning shall not exceed a...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title29-vol7/pdf/CFR-2014-title29-vol7-sec1917-154.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title29-vol7/pdf/CFR-2014-title29-vol7-sec1917-154.pdf"><span>29 CFR 1917.154 - <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air. 1917.154 Section 1917.154 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.154 <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air. Employees shall be... this part during cleaning with <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air. <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air used for cleaning shall not exceed a...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0203320.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0203320.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-11-28</p> <p>The 16th American assembly flight and 112th overall American flight to the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), launched on November 23, 2002 from Kennedy's launch pad 39A aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-113. Mission objectives included the delivery of the Expedition Six Crew to the ISS, the return of Expedition Five crew back to Earth, and the installation and activation of the Port 1 Integrated Truss Assembly (P1). The first major component installed on the left side of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>, the P1 truss provides an additional three External Thermal Control System radiators. Weighing in at 27,506 pounds, the P1 truss is 45 feet (13.7 meters) long, 15 feet (4.6 meters) wide, and 13 feet (4 meters) high. Three space walks, aided by the use of the Robotic Manipulator Systems of both the Shuttle and the <span class="hlt">Station</span>, were performed in the installation of P1. In this photograph, astronaut and mission specialist Michael E. Lopez-Alegria works on the newly installed P1 truss during the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202503.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202503.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-02-10</p> <p>Cosmonaut Yuri P. Gidzenko, Expedition One Soyuz commander, stands near the hatch leading from the Unity node into the newly-attached Destiny laboratory aboard the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). The Node 1, or Unity, serves as a cornecting passageway to Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> modules. The U.S.-built Unity module was launched aboard the Orbiter Endeavour (STS-88 mission) on December 4, 1998, and connected to Zarya, the Russian-built Functional Cargo Block (FGB). The U.S. Laboratory (Destiny) module is the centerpiece of the ISS, where science experiments will be performed in the near-zero gravity in space. The Destiny Module was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis (STS-98 mission) on February 7, 2001. The aluminum module is 8.5 meters (28 feet) long and 4.3 meters (14 feet) in diameter. The laboratory consists of three cylindrical sections and two endcones with hatches that will be mated to other <span class="hlt">station</span> components. A 50.9-centimeter- (20-inch-) diameter window is located on one side of the center module segment. This pressurized module is designed to accommodate pressurized payloads. It has a capacity of 24 rack locations, and payload racks will occupy 13 locations especially designed to support experiments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202502.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202502.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1997-10-01</p> <p>The Zvezda Service Module, the first Russian contribution and third element to the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), is shown under construction in the Krunichev State Research and Production Facility (KhSC) in Moscow. Russian technicians work on the module shortly after it completed a pressurization test. In the foreground is the forward portion of the module, including the spherical transfer compartment and its three docking ports. The forward port docked with the cornected Functional Cargo Block, followed by Node 1. Launched via a three-stage Proton rocket on July 12, 2000, the Zvezda Service Module serves as the cornerstone for early human habitation of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>, providing living quarters, life support system, electrical power distribution, data processing system, flight control system, and propulsion system. It also provides a communications system that includes remote command capabilities from ground flight controllers. The 42,000-pound module measures 43 feet in length and has a wing span of 98 feet. Similar in layout to the core module of Russia's Mir space <span class="hlt">station</span>, it contains 3 pressurized compartments and 13 windows that allow ultimate viewing of Earth and space.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0203032.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0203032.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-10-16</p> <p>This image of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) was photographed by one of the crewmembers of the STS-112 mission following separation from the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis as the orbiter pulled away from the ISS. The primary payloads of this mission, International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Assembly Mission 9A, were the Integrated Truss Assembly S1 (S-One), the Starboard Side Thermal Radiator Truss, and the Crew Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart to the ISS. The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s complex power system. The S1 truss was attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss, which was launched on April 8, 2002 aboard the STS-110, and flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat-rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. The CETA cart was attached to the Mobil Transporter and will be used by assembly crews on later missions. Manufactured by the Boeing Company in Huntington Beach, California, the truss primary structure was transferred to the Marshall Space Flight Center in February 1999 for hardware installations and manufacturing acceptance testing. The launch of the STS-112 mission occurred on October 7, 2002, and its 11-day mission ended on October 18, 2002.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0100624.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0100624.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-02-01</p> <p>The International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) Payload Operations Center (POC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, is the world's primary science command post for the (ISS), the most ambitious space research facility in human history. The Payload Operations team is responsible for managing all science research experiments aboard the <span class="hlt">Station</span>. The center is also home for coordination of the mission-plarning work of variety of international sources, all science payload deliveries and retrieval, and payload training and safety programs for the <span class="hlt">Station</span> crew and all ground personnel. Within the POC, critical payload information from the ISS is displayed on a dedicated workstation, reading both S-band (low data rate) and Ku-band (high data rate) signals from a variety of experiments and procedures operated by the ISS crew and their colleagues on Earth. The POC is the focal point for incorporating research and experiment requirements from all international partners into an integrated ISS payload mission plan. This photograph is an overall view of the MSFC Payload Operations Center displaying the flags of the countries participating in the ISS. The flags at the left portray The United States, Canada, France, Switzerland, Netherlands, Japan, Brazil, and Sweden. The flags at the right portray The Russian Federation, Italy, Germany, Belgium, Spain, United Kingdom, Denmark, and Norway.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890004880','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890004880"><span>Space <span class="hlt">station</span> commonality analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>This study was conducted on the basis of a modification to Contract NAS8-36413, Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Commonality Analysis, which was initiated in December, 1987 and completed in July, 1988. The objective was to investigate the commonality aspects of subsystems and mission support hardware while technology experiments are accommodated on board the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> in the mid-to-late 1990s. Two types of mission are considered: (1) Advanced solar arrays and their storage; and (2) Satellite servicing. The point of departure for definition of the technology development missions was a set of missions described in the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Mission Requirements Data Base. (MRDB): TDMX 2151 Solar Array/Energy Storage Technology; TDMX 2561 Satellite Servicing and Refurbishment; TDMX 2562 Satellite Maintenance and Repair; TDMX 2563 Materials Resupply (to a free-flyer materials processing platform); TDMX 2564 Coatings Maintenance Technology; and TDMX 2565 Thermal Interface Technology. Issues to be addressed according to the Statement of Work included modularity of programs, data base analysis interactions, user interfaces, and commonality. The study was to consider State-of-the-art advances through the 1990s and to select an appropriate scale for the technology experiments, considering hardware commonality, user interfaces, and mission support requirements. The study was to develop evolutionary plans for the technology advancement missions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302386.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302386.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-06-05</p> <p>Aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour, the STS-111 mission was launched on June 5, 2002 at 5:22 pm EDT from Kennedy's launch pad. On board were the STS-111 and Expedition Five crew members. Astronauts Kenneth D. Cockrell, commander; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot, and mission specialists Franklin R. Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin were the STS-111 crew members. Expedition Five crew members included Cosmonaut Valeri G. Korzun, commander, Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, flight engineers. Three space walks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish mission objectives: the delivery and installation of a new platform for the ISS robotic arm, the Mobile Base System (MBS) which is an important part of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s Mobile Servicing System allowing the robotic arm to travel the length of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>; the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s robotic arm; and unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. Landing on June 19, 2002, the 14-day STS-111 mission was the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the ISS.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202484.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202484.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-09-16</p> <p>Aboard the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), Cosmonaut and Expedition Three flight engineer Vladimir N. Dezhurov, representing Rosaviakosmos, talks with flight controllers from the Zvezda Service Module. Russian-built Zvezda is linked to the Functional Cargo Block (FGB), or Zarya, the first component of the ISS. Zarya was launched on a Russian Proton rocket prior to the launch of Unity. The third component of the ISS, Zvezda (Russian word for star), the primary Russian contribution to the ISS, was launched by a three-stage Proton rocket on July 12, 2000. Zvezda serves as the cornerstone for early human habitation of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>, providing living quarters, a life support system, electrical power distribution, a data processing system, flight control system, and propulsion system. It also provides a communications system that includes remote command capabilities from ground flight controllers. The 42,000-pound module measures 43 feet in length and has a wing span of 98 feet. Similar in layout to the core module of Russia's Mir space <span class="hlt">station</span>, it contains 3 pressurized compartments and 13 windows that allow ultimate viewing of Earth and space.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202486.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202486.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-12-12</p> <p>Astronauts Frank L. Culbertson, Jr. (left), Expedition Three mission commander, and Daniel W. Bursch, Expedition Four flight engineer, work in the Russian Zvezda Service Module on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Zvezda is linked to the Russian built Functional Cargo Block (FGB), or Zarya, the first component of the ISS. Zarya was launched on a Russian Proton rocket prior to the launch of Unity. The third component of the ISS, Zvezda (Russian word for star), the primary Russian contribution to the ISS, was launched by a three-stage Proton rocket on July 12, 2000. Zvezda serves as the cornerstone for early human habitation of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>, providing living quarters, a life support system, electrical power distribution, a data processing system, a flight control system, and a propulsion system. It also provides a communications system that includes remote command capabilities from ground flight controllers. The 42,000 pound module measures 43 feet in length and has a wing span of 98 feet. Similar in layout to the core module of Russia's Mir space <span class="hlt">station</span>, it contains 3 pressurized compartments and 13 windows that allow ultimate viewing of Earth and space.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202480.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202480.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-03-30</p> <p>Astronaut James S. Voss, Expedition Two flight engineer, performs an electronics task in the Russian Zvezda Service Module on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Zvezda is linked to the Russian-built Functional Cargo Block (FGB), or Zarya, the first component of the ISS. Zarya was launched on a Russian Proton rocket prior to the launch of Unity, the first U.S.-built component to the ISS. Zvezda (Russian word for star), the third component of the ISS and the primary Russian contribution to the ISS, was launched by a three-stage Proton rocket on July 12, 2000. Zvezda serves as the cornerstone for early human habitation of the <span class="hlt">station</span>, providing living quarters, a life support system, electrical power distribution, a data processing system, a flight control system, and a propulsion system. It also provides a communications system that includes remote command capabilities from ground flight controllers. The 42,000-pound module measures 43 feet in length and has a wing span of 98 feet. Similar in layout to the core module of Russia's Mir space <span class="hlt">station</span>, it contains 3 pressurized compartments and 13 windows that allow ultimate viewing of Earth and space.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202482.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202482.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-03-25</p> <p>Cosmonaut Yury I. Onufrienko, Expedition Four mission commander, uses a communication system in the Russian Zvezda Service Module on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). The Zvezda is linked to the Russian-built Functional Cargo Block (FGB) or Zarya, the first component of the ISS. Zarya was launched on a Russian Proton rocket prior to the launch of Unity. The third component of the ISS, Zvezda (Russian word for star), the primary Russian contribution to the ISS, was launched by a three-stage Proton rocket on July 12, 2000. Zvezda serves as the cornerstone for early human habitation of the <span class="hlt">station</span>, providing living quarters, a life support system, electrical power distribution, a data processing system, flight control system, and propulsion system. It also provides a communications system that includes remote command capabilities from ground flight controllers. The 42,000-pound module measures 43 feet in length and has a wing span of 98 feet. Similar in layout to the core module of Russia's Mir space <span class="hlt">station</span>, it contains 3 pressurized compartments and 13 windows that allow ultimate viewing of Earth and space.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9808607.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9808607.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1998-11-01</p> <p>This photograph shows the U.S. Laboratory Module (also called Destiny) for the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), in the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> manufacturing facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center, being readied for shipment to the Kennedy Space Center. The U.S. Laboratory module is the centerpiece of the ISS, where science experiments will be performed in the near-zero gravity of space. The Destiny Module was launched aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis (STS-67 mission) on February 7, 2001. The aluminum module is 8.5 meters (28 feet) long and 4.3 meters (14 feet) in diameter. The laboratory consists of three cylindrical sections and two endcones with hatches that will be mated to other <span class="hlt">station</span> components. A 50.9-centimeter- (20-inch-) diameter window is located on one side of the center module segment. This pressurized module is designed to accommodate pressurized payloads. It has a capacity of 24 rack locations, and payload racks will occupy 13 locations especially designed to support experiments. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide unprecedented undertakings in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9706216.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9706216.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>In this photograph, the U.S. Laboratory Module (also called Destiny) for the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) is shown under construction in the West High Bay of the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> manufacturing facility (building 4708) at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The U.S. Laboratory module is the centerpiece of the ISS, where science experiments will be performed in the near-zero gravity of space. The Destiny Module was launched aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis (STS-98 mission) on February 7, 2001. The aluminum module is 8.5 meters (28 feet) long and 4.3 meters (14 feet) in diameter. The laboratory consists of three cylindrical sections and two endcones with hatches that will be mated to other <span class="hlt">station</span> components. A 50.9-centimeter- (20-inch-) diameter window is located on one side of the center module segment. This pressurized module is designed to accommodate pressurized payloads. It has a capacity of 24 rack locations, and payload racks will occupy 13 locations especially designed to support experiments. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide unprecedented undertakings in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9711678.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9711678.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1997-11-01</p> <p>In this photograph, the U.S. Laboratory Module (also called Destiny) for the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) is shown under construction in the West High Bay of the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> manufacturing facility (building 4708) at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The U.S. Laboratory module is the centerpiece of the ISS, where science experiments will be performed in the near-zero gravity of space. The Destiny Module was launched aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis (STS-98 mission) on February 7, 2001. The aluminum module is 8.5 meters (28 feet) long and 4.3 meters (14 feet) in diameter. The laboratory consists of three cylindrical sections and two endcones with hatches that will be mated to other <span class="hlt">station</span> components. A 50.9-centimeter- (20-inch-) diameter window is located on one side of the center module segment. This pressurized module is designed to accommodate pressurized payloads. It has a capacity of 24 rack locations, and payload racks will occupy 13 locations especially designed to support experiments. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide unprecedented undertakings in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9711679.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9711679.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1997-11-26</p> <p>This photograph shows the U.S. Laboratory Module (also called Destiny) for the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), under construction in the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> manufacturing facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The U.S. Laboratory module is the centerpiece of the ISS, where science experiments will be performed in the near-zero gravity of space. The Destiny Module was launched aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis (STS-67 mission) on February 7, 2001. The aluminum module is 8.5 meters (28 feet) long and 4.3 meters (14 feet) in diameter. The laboratory consists of three cylindrical sections and two end cones with hatches that will be mated to other <span class="hlt">station</span> components. A 50.9-centimeter- (20-inch-) diameter window is located on one side of the center module segment. This pressurized module is designed to accommodate pressurized payloads. It has a capacity of 24 rack locations, and payload racks will occupy 13 locations especially designed to support experiments. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide unprecedented undertakings in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0601080.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0601080.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2003-02-09</p> <p>This is the STS-115 insignia. This mission continued the assembly of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) with the installation of the truss segments P3 and P4. Following the installation of the segments utilizing both the shuttle and the <span class="hlt">station</span> robotic arms, a series of three space walks completed the final connections and prepared for the deployment of the <span class="hlt">station</span>'s second set of solar arrays. To reflect the primary mission of the flight, the patch depicts a solar panel as the main element. As the Space Shuttle Atlantis launches towards the ISS, its trail depicts the symbol of the Astronaut Office. The star burst, representing the power of the sun, rises over the Earth and shines on the solar panel. The shuttle flight number 115 is shown at the bottom of the patch, along with the ISS assembly designation 12A (the 12th American assembly mission). The blue Earth in the background reminds us of the importance of space exploration and research to all of Earth's inhabitants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0501000.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0501000.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2005-07-28</p> <p>Launched on July 26, 2005 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the <span class="hlt">Station</span>-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module and the External Stowage Platform-2. A major focus of the mission was the testing and evaluation of new Space Shuttle flight safety, which included new inspection and repair techniques. Upon its approach to the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), the Space Shuttle Discovery underwent a photography session in order to assess any damages that may have occurred during its launch and/or journey through Space. Discovery was over Switzerland, about 600 feet from the ISS, when Cosmonaut Sergei K. Kriklev, Expedition 11 Commander, and John L. Phillips, NASA Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> officer and flight engineer photographed the spacecraft as it performed a back flip to allow photography of its heat shield. Astronaut Eileen M. Collins, STS-114 Commander, guided the shuttle through the flip. The photographs were analyzed by engineers on the ground to evaluate the condition of Discovery’s heat shield. The crew safely returned to Earth on August 9, 2005. The mission historically marked the Return to Flight after nearly a two and one half year delay in flight after the Space Shuttle Columbia tragedy in February 2003.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0501001.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0501001.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2005-07-28</p> <p>Launched on July 26, 2005, from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the <span class="hlt">Station</span>-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module and the External Stowage Platform-2. A major focus of the mission was the testing and evaluation of new Space Shuttle flight safety, which included new inspection and repair techniques. Upon its approach to the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), the Space Shuttle Discovery underwent a photography session in order to assess any damages that may have occurred during its launch and/or journey through Space. Discovery was over Switzerland, about 600 feet from the ISS, when Cosmonaut Sergei K. Kriklev, Expedition 11 Commander, and John L. Phillips, NASA Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> officer and flight engineer photographed the under side of the spacecraft as it performed a back flip to allow photography of its heat shield. Astronaut Eileen M. Collins, STS-114 Commander, guided the shuttle through the flip. The photographs were analyzed by engineers on the ground to evaluate the condition of Discovery’s heat shield. The crew safely returned to Earth on August 9, 2005. The mission historically marked the Return to Flight after nearly a two and one half year delay in flight after the Space Shuttle Columbia tragedy in February 2003.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0501003.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0501003.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2005-07-28</p> <p>Launched on July 26, 2005 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the <span class="hlt">Station</span>-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module and the External Stowage Platform-2. A major focus of the mission was the testing and evaluation of new Space Shuttle flight safety, which included new inspection and repair techniques. Upon its approach to the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), the Space Shuttle Discovery underwent a photography session in order to assess any damages that may have occurred during its launch and/or journey through Space. Discovery was over Switzerland, about 600 feet from the ISS, when Cosmonaut Sergei K. Kriklev, Expedition 11 Commander, and John L. Phillips, NASA Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> officer and flight engineer photographed the under side of the spacecraft as it performed a back flip to allow photography of its heat shield. Astronaut Eileen M. Collins, STS-114 Commander, guided the shuttle through the flip. The photographs were analyzed by engineers on the ground to evaluate the condition of Discovery’s heat shield. The crew safely returned to Earth on August 9, 2005. The mission historically marked the Return to Flight after nearly a two and one half year delay in flight after the Space Shuttle Columbia tragedy in February 2003.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0501028.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0501028.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-06-08</p> <p>Five NASA astronauts and two cosmonauts representing the Russian Aviation and Space Agency take a break in training from their scheduled September 2000 visit to the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Astronauts Terrence W. Wilcutt (right front), and Scott D. Altman (left front) are mission commander and pilot, respectively. On the back row (from the left) are mission specialists Boris V. Morukov, cosmonaut, along with astronauts Richard A. Mastracchio, Edward T. Lu, and Daniel C. Burbank, and cosmonaut Yuri I. Malenchenko. Morukov and Malenchenko represent the Russian Aviation and Space Agency. Launched aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis on September 8, 2000 at 7:46 a.m. (CDT), the STS-106 crew successfully prepared the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) for occupancy. Acting as plumbers, movers, installers and electricians, they installed batteries, power converters, a toilet and a treadmill on the outpost. They also delivered more than 2,993 kilograms (6,600 pounds) of supplies. Lu and Malenchenko performed a space walk to connect power, and data and communications cables to the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module and the <span class="hlt">Station</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19720014229','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19720014229"><span>Space <span class="hlt">station</span> ventilation study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Colombo, G. V.; Allen, G. E.</p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>A ventilation system design and selection method which is applicable to any manned vehicle were developed. The method was used to generate design options for the NASA 33-foot diameter space <span class="hlt">station</span>, all of which meet the ventilation system design requirements. System characteristics such as weight, volume, and power were normalized to dollar costs for each option. Total system costs for the various options ranged from a worst case $8 million to a group of four which were all approximately $2 million. A system design was then chosen from the $2 million group and is presented in detail. A ventilation system layout was designed for the MSFC space <span class="hlt">station</span> mockup which provided comfortable, efficient ventilation of the mockup. A conditioned air distribution system design for the 14-foot diameter modular space <span class="hlt">station</span>, using the same techniques, is also presented. The tradeoff study resulted in the selection of a system which costs $1.9 million, as compared to the alternate configuration which would have cost $2.6 million.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9705912.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-9705912.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1997-06-01</p> <p>This Boeing photograph shows the Node 1, Unity module, Flight Article (at right) and the U.S. Laboratory module, Destiny, Flight Article for the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) being manufactured in the High Bay Clean Room of the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Manufacturing Facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The Node 1, or Unity, serves as a cornecting passageway to Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> modules. The U.S. built Unity module was launched aboard the orbiter Endeavour (STS-88 mission) on December 4, 1998 and connected to the Zarya, the Russian-built Functional Energy Block (FGB). The U.S. Laboratory (Destiny) module is the centerpiece of the ISS, where science experiments will be performed in the near-zero gravity of space. The U.S. Laboratory/Destiny was launched aboard the orbiter Atlantis (STS-98 mission) on February 7, 2001. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide unprecedented undertakings in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900017984','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900017984"><span>Space <span class="hlt">station</span> advanced automation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Woods, Donald</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>In the development of a safe, productive and maintainable space <span class="hlt">station</span>, Automation and Robotics (A and R) has been identified as an enabling technology which will allow efficient operation at a reasonable cost. The Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom's (SSF) systems are very complex, and interdependent. The usage of Advanced Automation (AA) will help restructure, and integrate system status so that <span class="hlt">station</span> and ground personnel can operate more efficiently. To use AA technology for the augmentation of system management functions requires a development model which consists of well defined phases of: evaluation, development, integration, and maintenance. The evaluation phase will consider system management functions against traditional solutions, implementation techniques and requirements; the end result of this phase should be a well developed concept along with a feasibility analysis. In the development phase the AA system will be developed in accordance with a traditional Life Cycle Model (LCM) modified for Knowledge Based System (KBS) applications. A way by which both knowledge bases and reasoning techniques can be reused to control costs is explained. During the integration phase the KBS software must be integrated with conventional software, and verified and validated. The Verification and Validation (V and V) techniques applicable to these KBS are based on the ideas of consistency, minimal competency, and graph theory. The maintenance phase will be aided by having well designed and documented KBS software.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302389.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302389.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-06-11</p> <p>The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), was launched on June 5, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour. On board were the STS-111 and Expedition Five crew members. Astronauts Kerneth D. Cockrell, commander; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot; and mission specialists Franklin R. Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin were the STS-111 crew members. Expedition Five crew members included Cosmonaut Valeri G. Korzun, commander; Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, flight engineers. Three space walks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish the delivery and installation of the Mobile Remote Servicer Base System (MBS), an important part of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s Mobile Servicing System that allows the robotic arm to travel the length of the <span class="hlt">Station</span>, which is necessary for future construction tasks. In this photograph, Astronaut Philippe Perrin, representing CNES, the French Space Agency, participates in the second scheduled EVA. During the space walk, Perrin and Chang-Diaz attached power, data, and video cables from the ISS to the MBS, and used a power wrench to complete the attachment of the MBS onto the Mobile Transporter (MT).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016Freq...70..289W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016Freq...70..289W"><span>Cognitive Radios Exploiting Gray Spaces via <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> Sensing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wieruch, Dennis; Jung, Peter; Wirth, Thomas; Dekorsy, Armin; Haustein, Thomas</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>We suggest an interweave cognitive radio system with a gray space detector, which is properly identifying a small fraction of unused resources within an active band of a primary user system like 3GPP LTE. Therefore, the gray space detector can cope with frequency fading holes and distinguish them from inactive resources. Different approaches of the gray space detector are investigated, the conventional reduced-rank least squares method as well as the <span class="hlt">compressed</span> sensing-based orthogonal matching pursuit and basis pursuit denoising algorithm. In addition, the gray space detector is compared with the classical energy detector. Simulation results present the receiver operating characteristic at several SNRs and the detection performance over further aspects like base <span class="hlt">station</span> system load for practical false alarm rates. The results show, that especially for practical false alarm rates the <span class="hlt">compressed</span> sensing algorithm are more suitable than the classical energy detector and reduced-rank least squares approach.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020040846&hterms=Telemedicine&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DTelemedicine','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020040846&hterms=Telemedicine&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DTelemedicine"><span>Perceptual Image <span class="hlt">Compression</span> in Telemedicine</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Watson, Andrew B.; Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Eckstein, Miguel; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>The next era of space exploration, especially the "Mission to Planet Earth" will generate immense quantities of image data. For example, the Earth Observing System (EOS) is expected to generate in excess of one terabyte/day. NASA confronts a major technical challenge in managing this great flow of imagery: in collection, pre-processing, transmission to earth, archiving, and distribution to scientists at remote locations. Expected requirements in most of these areas clearly exceed current technology. Part of the solution to this problem lies in efficient image <span class="hlt">compression</span> techniques. For much of this imagery, the ultimate consumer is the human eye. In this case image <span class="hlt">compression</span> should be designed to match the visual capacities of the human observer. We have developed three techniques for optimizing image <span class="hlt">compression</span> for the human viewer. The first consists of a formula, developed jointly with IBM and based on psychophysical measurements, that computes a DCT quantization matrix for any specified combination of viewing distance, display resolution, and display brightness. This DCT quantization matrix is used in most recent standards for digital image <span class="hlt">compression</span> (JPEG, MPEG, CCITT H.261). The second technique optimizes the DCT quantization matrix for each individual image, based on the contents of the image. This is accomplished by means of a model of visual sensitivity to <span class="hlt">compression</span> artifacts. The third technique extends the first two techniques to the realm of wavelet <span class="hlt">compression</span>. Together these two techniques will allow systematic perceptual optimization of image <span class="hlt">compression</span> in NASA imaging systems. Many of the image management challenges faced by NASA are mirrored in the field of telemedicine. Here too there are severe demands for transmission and archiving of large image databases, and the imagery is ultimately used primarily by human observers, such as radiologists. In this presentation I will describe some of our preliminary explorations of the applications</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930018610','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930018610"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> fluid management logistics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Dominick, Sam M.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Viewgraphs and discussion on space <span class="hlt">station</span> fluid management logistics are presented. Topics covered include: fluid management logistics - issues for Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom evolution; current fluid logistics approach; evolution of Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom fluid resupply; launch vehicle evolution; ELV logistics system approach; logistics carrier configuration; expendable fluid/propellant carrier description; fluid carrier design concept; logistics carrier orbital operations; carrier operations at space <span class="hlt">station</span>; summary/status of orbital fluid transfer techniques; Soviet progress tanker system; and Soviet propellant resupply system observations.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000SPIE.4127..121C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000SPIE.4127..121C"><span>JPEG 2000 in advanced ground <span class="hlt">station</span> architectures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chien, Alan T.; Brower, Bernard V.; Rajan, Sreekanth D.</p> <p>2000-11-01</p> <p>The integration and management of information from distributed and heterogeneous information producers and providers must be a key foundation of any developing imagery intelligence system. Historically, imagery providers acted as production agencies for imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial information. In the future, these imagery producers will be evolving to act more like e-business information brokers. The management of imagery and geospatial information-visible, spectral, infrared (IR), radar, elevation, or other feature and foundation data-is crucial from a quality and content perspective. By 2005, there will be significantly advanced collection systems and a myriad of storage devices. There will also be a number of automated and man-in-the-loop correlation, fusion, and exploitation capabilities. All of these new imagery collection and storage systems will result in a higher volume and greater variety of imagery being disseminated and archived in the future. This paper illustrates the importance-from a collection, storage, exploitation, and dissemination perspective-of the proper selection and implementation of standards-based <span class="hlt">compression</span> technology for ground <span class="hlt">station</span> and dissemination/archive networks. It specifically discusses the new <span class="hlt">compression</span> capabilities featured in JPEG 2000 and how that commercially based technology can provide significant improvements to the overall imagery and geospatial enterprise both from an architectural perspective as well as from a user's prospective.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900000051&hterms=Lamas&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DLamas','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900000051&hterms=Lamas&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DLamas"><span>Competitive Parallel Processing For <span class="hlt">Compression</span> Of Data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Diner, Daniel B.; Fender, Antony R. H.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Momentarily-best <span class="hlt">compression</span> algorithm selected. Proposed competitive-parallel-processing system <span class="hlt">compresses</span> data for transmission in channel of limited band-width. Likely application for <span class="hlt">compression</span> lies in high-resolution, stereoscopic color-television broadcasting. Data from information-rich source like color-television camera <span class="hlt">compressed</span> by several processors, each operating with different algorithm. Referee processor selects momentarily-best <span class="hlt">compressed</span> output.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/AD1023803','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/AD1023803"><span>Sensitivity Analysis in RIPless <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> Sensing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The <span class="hlt">compressive</span> sensing framework finds a wide range of applications in signal processing and analysis. Within this...Analysis of <span class="hlt">Compressive</span> Sensing Solutions Report Title The <span class="hlt">compressive</span> sensing framework finds a wide range of applications in signal processing and...<span class="hlt">compressed</span> sensing. More specifically, we show that in a noiseless and RIP-less setting [11], the recovery process of a <span class="hlt">compressed</span> sensing framework is</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018AIPC.1960b0033S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018AIPC.1960b0033S"><span>Machine compliance in <span class="hlt">compression</span> tests</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sousa, Pedro; Ivens, Jan; Lomov, Stepan V.</p> <p>2018-05-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">compression</span> behavior of a material cannot be accurately determined if the machine compliance is not accounted prior to the measurements. This work discusses the machine compliance during a <span class="hlt">compressibility</span> test with fiberglass fabrics. The thickness variation was measured during loading and unloading cycles with a relaxation stage of 30 minutes between them. The measurements were performed using an indirect technique based on the comparison between the displacement at a free <span class="hlt">compression</span> cycle and the displacement with a sample. Relating to the free test, it has been noticed the nonexistence of machine relaxation during relaxation stage. Considering relaxation or not, the characteristic curves for a free <span class="hlt">compression</span> cycle can be overlapped precisely in the majority of the points. For the <span class="hlt">compression</span> test with sample, it was noticed a non-physical decrease of about 30 µm during the relaxation stage, what can be explained by the greater fabric relaxation in relation to the machine relaxation. Beyond the technique normally used, another technique was used which allows a constant thickness during relaxation. Within this second method, machine displacement with sample is simply subtracted to the machine displacement without sample being imposed as constant. If imposed as a constant it will remain constant during relaxation stage and it will suddenly decrease after relaxation. If constantly calculated it will decrease gradually during relaxation stage. Independently of the technique used the final result will remain unchanged. The uncertainty introduced by this imprecision is about ±15 µm.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14717876','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14717876"><span>Cardiovascular causes of airway <span class="hlt">compression</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kussman, Barry D; Geva, Tal; McGowan, Francis X</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Compression</span> of the paediatric airway is a relatively common and often unrecognized complication of congenital cardiac and aortic arch anomalies. Airway obstruction may be the result of an anomalous relationship between the tracheobronchial tree and vascular structures (producing a vascular ring) or the result of extrinsic <span class="hlt">compression</span> caused by dilated pulmonary arteries, left atrial enlargement, massive cardiomegaly, or intraluminal bronchial obstruction. A high index of suspicion of mechanical airway <span class="hlt">compression</span> should be maintained in infants and children with recurrent respiratory difficulties, stridor, wheezing, dysphagia, or apnoea unexplained by other causes. Prompt diagnosis is required to avoid death and minimize airway damage. In addition to plain chest radiography and echocardiography, diagnostic investigations may consist of barium oesophagography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography, cardiac catheterization and bronchoscopy. The most important recent advance is MRI, which can produce high quality three-dimensional reconstruction of all anatomic elements allowing for precise anatomic delineation and improved surgical planning. Anaesthetic technique will depend on the type of vascular ring and the presence of any congenital heart disease or intrinsic lesions of the tracheobronchial tree. Vascular rings may be repaired through a conventional posterolateral thoracotomy, or utilizing video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) or robotic endoscopic surgery. Persistent airway obstruction following surgical repair may be due to residual <span class="hlt">compression</span>, secondary airway wall instability (malacia), or intrinsic lesions of the airway. Simultaneous repair of cardiac defects and vascular tracheobronchial <span class="hlt">compression</span> carries a higher risk of morbidity and mortality.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009LNCS.5785..255V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009LNCS.5785..255V"><span><span class="hlt">Compression</span> of Probabilistic XML Documents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Veldman, Irma; de Keijzer, Ander; van Keulen, Maurice</p> <p></p> <p>Database techniques to store, query and manipulate data that contains uncertainty receives increasing research interest. Such UDBMSs can be classified according to their underlying data model: relational, XML, or RDF. We focus on uncertain XML DBMS with as representative example the Probabilistic XML model (PXML) of [10,9]. The size of a PXML document is obviously a factor in performance. There are PXML-specific techniques to reduce the size, such as a push down mechanism, that produces equivalent but more compact PXML documents. It can only be applied, however, where possibilities are dependent. For normal XML documents there also exist several techniques for <span class="hlt">compressing</span> a document. Since Probabilistic XML is (a special form of) normal XML, it might benefit from these methods even more. In this paper, we show that existing <span class="hlt">compression</span> mechanisms can be combined with PXML-specific <span class="hlt">compression</span> techniques. We also show that best <span class="hlt">compression</span> rates are obtained with a combination of PXML-specific technique with a rather simple generic DAG-<span class="hlt">compression</span> technique.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title30-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title30-vol1-sec75-1730.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title30-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title30-vol1-sec75-1730.pdf"><span>30 CFR 75.1730 - <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air; general; <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air systems.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air; general; <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air systems... <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air; general; <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air systems. (a) All pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed... Safety and Health district office. (b) Compressors and <span class="hlt">compressed</span>-air receivers shall be equipped with...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title30-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title30-vol1-sec75-1730.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title30-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title30-vol1-sec75-1730.pdf"><span>30 CFR 75.1730 - <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air; general; <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air systems.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air; general; <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air systems... <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air; general; <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air systems. (a) All pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed... Safety and Health district office. (b) Compressors and <span class="hlt">compressed</span>-air receivers shall be equipped with...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title30-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title30-vol1-sec75-1730.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title30-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title30-vol1-sec75-1730.pdf"><span>30 CFR 75.1730 - <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air; general; <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air systems.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air; general; <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air systems... <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air; general; <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air systems. (a) All pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed... Safety and Health district office. (b) Compressors and <span class="hlt">compressed</span>-air receivers shall be equipped with...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title30-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title30-vol1-sec75-1730.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title30-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title30-vol1-sec75-1730.pdf"><span>30 CFR 75.1730 - <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air; general; <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air systems.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air; general; <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air systems... <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air; general; <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air systems. (a) All pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed... Safety and Health district office. (b) Compressors and <span class="hlt">compressed</span>-air receivers shall be equipped with...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890040860&hterms=operations+planning&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Doperations%2Bplanning','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890040860&hterms=operations+planning&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Doperations%2Bplanning"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom operations planning</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Smith, Kevin J.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>This paper addresses the development of new planning methodologies which will evolve to serve the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom program; these planning processes will focus on the complex task of effectively managing the resources provided by the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom and will be made available to the diverse international community of space <span class="hlt">station</span> users in support of their ongoing investigative activities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160001267','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160001267"><span>Build Your Own Space <span class="hlt">Station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bolinger, Allison</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This presentation will be used to educate elementary students on the purposes and components of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> and then allow them to build their own space <span class="hlt">stations</span> with household objects and then present details on their space <span class="hlt">stations</span> to the rest of the group.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840019688','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840019688"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> commercial user development</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>The commercial utilization of the space <span class="hlt">station</span> is investigated. The interest of nonaerospace firms in the use of the space <span class="hlt">station</span> is determined. The user requirements are compared to the space <span class="hlt">station</span>'s capabilities and a feasibility analysis of a commercial firm acting as an intermediary between NASA and the private sector to reduce costs is presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/30518','TREESEARCH'); return false;" href="https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/30518"><span>The Pacific Northwest Research <span class="hlt">Station</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/">Treesearch</a></p> <p>Forest Service U.S. Department of Agriculture</p> <p>1937-01-01</p> <p>The research organization of the United States Forest Service in the North Pacific Region is the Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment <span class="hlt">Station</span>, one of the 12 regional experiment <span class="hlt">stations</span> maintained by the service. This <span class="hlt">station</span>, which has headquarters in Portland, Oregon, is making studies and surveys in the fields of economics, forest management, forest...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19960016649','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19960016649"><span>Preliminary Design Program: Vapor <span class="hlt">Compression</span> Distillation Flight Experiment Program</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Schubert, F. H.; Boyda, R. B.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>This document provides a description of the results of a program to prepare a preliminary design of a flight experiment to demonstrate the function of a Vapor <span class="hlt">Compression</span> Distillation (VCD) Wastewater Processor (WWP) in microgravity. This report describes the test sequence to be performed and the hardware, control/monitor instrumentation and software designs prepared to perform the defined tests. the purpose of the flight experiment is to significantly reduce the technical and programmatic risks associated with implementing a VCD-based WWP on board the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Alpha.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018GeoJI.213.1731Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018GeoJI.213.1731Z"><span>Application of wavefield <span class="hlt">compressive</span> sensing in surface wave tomography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhan, Zhongwen; Li, Qingyang; Huang, Jianping</p> <p>2018-06-01</p> <p>Dense arrays allow sampling of seismic wavefield without significant aliasing, and surface wave tomography has benefitted from exploiting wavefield coherence among neighbouring <span class="hlt">stations</span>. However, explicit or implicit assumptions about wavefield, irregular <span class="hlt">station</span> spacing and noise still limit the applicability and resolution of current surface wave methods. Here, we propose to apply the theory of <span class="hlt">compressive</span> sensing (CS) to seek a sparse representation of the surface wavefield using a plane-wave basis. Then we reconstruct the continuous surface wavefield on a dense regular grid before applying any tomographic methods. Synthetic tests demonstrate that wavefield CS improves robustness and resolution of Helmholtz tomography and wavefield gradiometry, especially when traditional approaches have difficulties due to sub-Nyquist sampling or complexities in wavefield.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080009460','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080009460"><span>Data <span class="hlt">compression</span> using Chebyshev transform</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Cheng, Andrew F. (Inventor); Hawkins, III, S. Edward (Inventor); Nguyen, Lillian (Inventor); Monaco, Christopher A. (Inventor); Seagrave, Gordon G. (Inventor)</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The present invention is a method, system, and computer program product for implementation of a capable, general purpose <span class="hlt">compression</span> algorithm that can be engaged on the fly. This invention has particular practical application with time-series data, and more particularly, time-series data obtained form a spacecraft, or similar situations where cost, size and/or power limitations are prevalent, although it is not limited to such applications. It is also particularly applicable to the <span class="hlt">compression</span> of serial data streams and works in one, two, or three dimensions. The original input data is approximated by Chebyshev polynomials, achieving very high <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratios on serial data streams with minimal loss of scientific information.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/984089','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/984089"><span><span class="hlt">Compressive</span> behavior of fine sand.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Martin, Bradley E.; Kabir, Md. E.; Song, Bo</p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">compressive</span> mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial <span class="hlt">compressive</span> response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the <span class="hlt">compressive</span> response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trendsmore » were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDM17001K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDM17001K"><span>Premixed autoignition in <span class="hlt">compressible</span> turbulence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Konduri, Aditya; Kolla, Hemanth; Krisman, Alexander; Chen, Jacqueline</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Prediction of chemical ignition delay in an autoignition process is critical in combustion systems like <span class="hlt">compression</span> ignition engines and gas turbines. Often, ignition delay times measured in simple homogeneous experiments or homogeneous calculations are not representative of actual autoignition processes in complex turbulent flows. This is due the presence of turbulent mixing which results in fluctuations in thermodynamic properties as well as chemical composition. In the present study the effect of fluctuations of thermodynamic variables on the ignition delay is quantified with direct numerical simulations of <span class="hlt">compressible</span> isotropic turbulence. A premixed syngas-air mixture is used to remove the effects of inhomogeneity in the chemical composition. Preliminary results show a significant spatial variation in the ignition delay time. We analyze the topology of autoignition kernels and identify the influence of extreme events resulting from <span class="hlt">compressibility</span> and intermittency. The dependence of ignition delay time on Reynolds and turbulent Mach numbers is also quantified. Supported by Basic Energy Sciences, Dept of Energy, United States.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5507793','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5507793"><span>Rectal perforation by <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>As the use of <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air in industrial work has increased, so has the risk of associated pneumatic injury from its improper use. However, damage of large intestine caused by <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air is uncommon. Herein a case of pneumatic rupture of the rectum is described. The patient was admitted to the Emergency Room complaining of abdominal pain and distension. His colleague triggered a <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air nozzle over his buttock. On arrival, vital signs were stable but physical examination revealed peritoneal irritation and marked distension of the abdomen. Computed tomography showed a large volume of air in the peritoneal cavity and subcutaneous emphysema at the perineum. A rectal perforation was found at laparotomy and the Hartmann procedure was performed. PMID:28706893</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28706893','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28706893"><span>Rectal perforation by <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Park, Young Jin</p> <p>2017-07-01</p> <p>As the use of <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air in industrial work has increased, so has the risk of associated pneumatic injury from its improper use. However, damage of large intestine caused by <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air is uncommon. Herein a case of pneumatic rupture of the rectum is described. The patient was admitted to the Emergency Room complaining of abdominal pain and distension. His colleague triggered a <span class="hlt">compressed</span> air nozzle over his buttock. On arrival, vital signs were stable but physical examination revealed peritoneal irritation and marked distension of the abdomen. Computed tomography showed a large volume of air in the peritoneal cavity and subcutaneous emphysema at the perineum. A rectal perforation was found at laparotomy and the Hartmann procedure was performed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0400386.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0400386.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-12-07</p> <p>In this image, the five STS-97 crew members pose with the 3 members of the Expedition One crew onboard the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) for the first ever traditional onboard portrait taken in the Zvezda Service Module. On the front row, left to right, are astronauts Brent W. Jett, Jr., STS-97 commander; William M. Shepherd, Expedition One mission commander; and Joseph R. Tarner, STS-97 mission specialist. On the second row, from the left are Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition One flight engineer; astronaut Carlos I. Noriega, STS-97 mission specialist; cosmonaut Yuri P. Gidzenko, Expedition One Soyuz commander; and Michael J. Bloomfield, STS-97 pilot. Behind them is astronaut Marc Garneau, STS-97 mission specialist representing the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). The primary objective of the STS-97 mission was the delivery, assembly, and activation of the U.S. electrical power system onboard the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). The electrical power system, which is built into a 73-meter (240-foot) long solar array structure consists of solar arrays, radiators, batteries, and electronics. The entire 15.4-metric ton (17-ton) package is called the P6 Integrated Truss Segment, and is the heaviest and largest element yet delivered to the <span class="hlt">station</span> aboard a space shuttle. The electrical system will eventually provide the power necessary for the first ISS crews to live and work in the U.S. segment. The STS-97 crew of five launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor on November 30, 2000 for an 11 day mission.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994STIN...9522518.','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994STIN...9522518."><span>Southeast Regional Experiment <span class="hlt">Station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1994-08-01</p> <p>This is the final report of the Southeast Regional Experiment <span class="hlt">Station</span> project. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), a research institute of the University of Central Florida (UCF), has operated the Southeast Regional Experiment <span class="hlt">Station</span> (SE RES) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) since September 1982. Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA) provides technical program direction for both the SE RES and the Southwest Regional Experiment <span class="hlt">Station</span> (SW RES) located at the Southwest Technology Development Institute at Las Cruces, New Mexico. This cooperative effort serves a critical role in the national photovoltaic program by conducting system evaluations, design assistance and technology transfer to enhance the cost-effective utilization and development of photovoltaic technology. Initially, the research focus of the SE RES program centered on utility-connected PV systems and associated issues. In 1987, the SE RES began evaluating amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film PV modules for application in utility-interactive systems. Stand-alone PV systems began receiving increased emphasis at the SE RES in 1986. Research projects were initiated that involved evaluation of vaccine refrigeration, water pumping and other stand-alone power systems. The results of this work have led to design optimization techniques and procedures for the sizing and modeling of PV water pumping systems. Later recent research at the SE RES included test and evaluation of batteries and charge controllers for stand-alone PV system applications. The SE RES project provided the foundation on which FSEC achieved national recognition for its expertise in PV systems research and related technology transfer programs. These synergistic products of the SE RES illustrate the high visibility and contributions the FSEC PV program offers to the DOE.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910025386&hterms=craft&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dcraft','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910025386&hterms=craft&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dcraft"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> transition through Spacelab</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Craft, Harry G., Jr.; Wicks, Thomas G.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>It is appropriate that NASA's Office of Space Science and Application's science management structures and processes that have proven successful on Spacelab be applied and extrapolated to Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> utilization, wherever practical. Spacelab has many similarities and complementary aspects to Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom. An understanding of the similarities and differences between Spacelab and Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> is necessary in order to understand how to transition from Spacelab to Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>. These relationships are discussed herein as well as issues which must be dealt with and approaches for transition and evolution from Spacelab to Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840019746','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840019746"><span>Space <span class="hlt">station</span>: Cost and benefits</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>Costs for developing, producing, operating, and supporting the initial space <span class="hlt">station</span>, a 4 to 8 man space <span class="hlt">station</span>, and a 4 to 24 man space <span class="hlt">station</span> are estimated and compared. These costs include contractor hardware; space <span class="hlt">station</span> assembly and logistics flight costs; and payload support elements. Transportation system options examined include orbiter modules; standard and extended duration STS fights; reusable spacebased perigee kick motor OTV; and upper stages. Space <span class="hlt">station</span> service charges assessed include crew hours; energy requirements; payload support module storage; pressurized port usage; and OTV service facility. Graphs show costs for science missions, space processing research, small communication satellites; large GEO transportation; OVT launch costs; DOD payload costs, and user costs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202504.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202504.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-03-20</p> <p>Astronaut Daniel W. Bursch, Expedition Four flight engineer, was delighted in capturing this image of Mt. Everest in the Himalayan Range from aboard the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). The mountain is near frame center. Because the photo was taken close to orbital sunrise, the low sun angle gave tremendous relief to the mountains. Named for Sir George Everest, the British surveyor-general of India, Mount Everest is the tallest point on earth. Standing 29,028 feet tall, it is 5 1/2 miles above sea level. Mount Everest is located half in Nepal and half in Tibet.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302514.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302514.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-08-01</p> <p>The STS-110 mission began the third and final phase of construction for the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) by delivering and installing the Starboard side S0 (S-zero) truss segment that was carried into orbit in the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Atlantis. The STS-110 crew patch is patterned after the cross section of the S0 truss, and encases the launch of the Shuttle Atlantis and a silhouette of the ISS as it will look following mission completion. The successfully installed S0 segment is highlighted in gold. The three prominent flames blasting from the shuttle emphasizes the first shuttle flight to use three Block II Main Engines.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110004889','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110004889"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Wahlberg, Jennifer; Gordon, Randy</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This slide presentation reviews the research on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), including the sponsorship of payloads by country and within NASA. Included is a description of the space available for research, the Laboratory "Rack" facilities, the external research facilities and those available from the Japanese Experiment Module (i.e., Kibo), and highlights the investigations that JAXA has maintained. There is also a review of the launch vehicles and spacecraft that are available for payload transportation to the ISS, including cargo capabilities of the spacecraft.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701342.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701342.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-08-19</p> <p>Back dropped by the colorful Earth, the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) boasts its newest configuration upon the departure of Space Shuttle Endeavor and STS-118 mission. Days earlier, construction resumed on the ISS as STS-118 mission specialists and the Expedition 15 crew completed installation of the Starboard 5 (S-5) truss segment, removed a faulty Control Moment Gyroscope (CMG-3), installed a new CMG into the Z1 truss, relocated the S-band Antenna Sub-Assembly from the Port 6 (P6) to Port 1 (P1) truss, installed a new transponder on P1, retrieved the P6 transponder, and delivered roughly 5,000 pounds of supplies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA222708','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA222708"><span><span class="hlt">Station</span> Climatic Summaries, Asia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1989-07-01</p> <p>488640 7108 (CB) ......................................................... 589 CON SON/POULO CONDORE 489180 7105 (CB...<span class="hlt">STATION</span> NAME BAHRAIN/KJS4ARR9AQ LoM4AIN pERlIOD: FEB 49-FES 81 9 STIN LYtS: 0111 MARCH 1982 LOCATION N26 17 EOS0 Z,7 ILEV 6 FT w gMo .; 325031 wwMoO. m A...357 0 WCLIMATBRIEF OABU NOME LUZON I, PHILIPPINEs PERIOO:1949-63 ’WMO * 98223 Pro ed by ETAC ( MAR 1972 N 1811 E120 2 FIELD ELEMTION: 13 ftSTNLTRS: RPML</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0301409.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0301409.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2003-05-11</p> <p>Many odd looking moon photos have been captured over the years by astronauts aboard the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>. Even so, this photograph, taken by the crew over Russia on May 11, 2003, must have come as a surprise. The moon which is really a quarter of a million miles away, appears to be floating inside the Earth's atmosphere. The picture is tricky because of its uneven lighting. With the sun's elevation angle at only 6 degrees, night is falling on the left side of the image while it is still broad daylight on the right side. This gradient of sunlight is the key to the illusion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0700060.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0700060.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2006-10-25</p> <p>Astronauts Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 14 flight engineer, and Robert L. Curbeam (partially obscured), STS-116 mission specialist, are about to be submerged in the waters of the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) near Johnson Space Center. Williams and Curbeam are attired in training versions of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) space suit. SCUBA-equipped divers are in the water to assist the crew members in their rehearsal intended to help prepare them for work on the exterior of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20695869','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20695869"><span>Play<span class="hlt">Station</span> purpura.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Robertson, Susan J; Leonard, Jane; Chamberlain, Alex J</p> <p>2010-08-01</p> <p>A 16-year-old boy presented with a number of asymptomatic pigmented macules on the volar aspect of his index fingers. Dermoscopy of each macule revealed a parallel ridge pattern of homogenous reddish-brown pigment. We propose that these lesions were induced by repetitive trauma from a Sony Play<span class="hlt">Station</span> 3 (Sony Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) vibration feedback controller. The lesions completely resolved following abstinence from gaming over a number of weeks. Although the parallel ridge pattern is typically the hallmark for early acral lentiginous melanoma, it may be observed in a limited number of benign entities, including subcorneal haematoma.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201588.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0201588.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-08-12</p> <p>In this photograph, Astronaut Susan Helms, Expedition Two flight engineer, is positioned near a large amount of water temporarily stored in the Unity Node aboard the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Astronaut Helms accompanied the STS-105 crew back to Earth after having spent five months with two crewmates aboard the ISS. The 11th ISS assembly flight, the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery STS-105 mission was launched on August 10, 2001, and landed on August 22, 2001 at the Kennedy Space Center after the completion of the successful 12-day mission.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ASPC..370..308N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ASPC..370..308N"><span>Astronomical <span class="hlt">Station</span> at Vidojevica</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ninković, S.; Pejović, N.; Mijajlović, Ž.</p> <p>2007-05-01</p> <p>Recently a project was started aimed at building a new astronomical <span class="hlt">station</span> at the mountain of Vidojevica in Serbia (ASV) as an extension of the Astronomical Observatory in Belgrade. The first phase - ASV1 - is planned to be finished during 2006. ASV1 will consist of one observatory dome, a reflector of 60cm aperture, and a dormitory. In this year, the Faculty of Mathematics and its Department of Astronomy applied for the project of reinforcing and upgrading it to ASV2. The project objective is to improve the research capacities in astronomy and applied mathematics in Serbia and Western Balkan.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302206.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302206.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2003-10-16</p> <p>The Soyuz TMA-3 spacecraft and its booster rocket (rear view) is shown on a rail car for transport to the launch pad where it was raised to a vertical launch position at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan on October 16, 2003. Liftoff occurred on October 18th, transporting a three man crew to the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Aboard were Michael Foale, Expedition-8 Commander and NASA science officer; Alexander Kaleri, Soyuz Commander and flight engineer, both members of the Expedition-8 crew; and European Space agency (ESA) Astronaut Pedro Duque of Spain. Photo Credit: "NASA/Bill Ingalls"</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302207.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302207.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2003-10-16</p> <p>The Soyuz TMA-3 spacecraft and its booster rocket (front view) is shown on a rail car for transport to the launch pad where it was raised to a vertical launch position at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan on October 16, 2003. Liftoff occurred on October 18th, transporting a three man crew to the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Aboard were Michael Foale, Expedition-8 Commander and NASA science officer; Alexander Kaleri, Soyuz Commander and flight engineer, both members of the Expedition-8 crew; and European Space agency (ESA) Astronaut Pedro Duque of Spain. Photo Credit: "NASA/Bill Ingalls"</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202505.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202505.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-10-29</p> <p>The Soyuz TM-31 launch vehicle is shown in the vertical position for its launch from Baikonur, carrying the first resident crew to the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>. The Russian Soyuz launch vehicle is an expendable spacecraft that evolved out of the original Class A (Sputnik). From the early 1960s until today, the Soyuz launch vehicle has been the backbone of Russia's marned and unmanned space launch fleet. Today, the Soyuz launch vehicle is marketed internationally by a joint Russian/French consortium called STARSEM. As of August 2001, there have been ten Soyuz missions under the STARSEM banner.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202506.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202506.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-10-29</p> <p>The Soyuz TM-31 launch vehicle, which carried the first resident crew to the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>, moves toward the launch pad at the Baikonur complex in Kazakhstan. The Russian Soyuz launch vehicle is an expendable spacecraft that evolved out of the original Class A (Sputnik). From the early 1960' until today, the Soyuz launch vehicle has been the backbone of Russia's marned and unmanned space launch fleet. Today, the Soyuz launch vehicle is marketed internationally by a joint Russian/French consortium called STARSEM. As of August 2001, there have been ten Soyuz missions under the STARSEM banner.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990SPIE.1232..258M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990SPIE.1232..258M"><span>Multimodality image display <span class="hlt">station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Myers, H. Joseph</p> <p>1990-07-01</p> <p>The Multi-modality Image Display <span class="hlt">Station</span> (MIDS) is designed for the use of physicians outside of the radiology department. Connected to a local area network or a host computer, it provides speedy access to digitized radiology images and written diagnostics needed by attending and consulting physicians near the patient bedside. Emphasis has been placed on low cost, high performance and ease of use. The work is being done as a joint study with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, and as part of a joint development effort with the Mayo Clinic. MIDS is a prototype, and should not be assumed to be an IBM product.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140002351','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140002351"><span>Submerged AUV Charging <span class="hlt">Station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Jones, Jack A.; Chao, Yi; Curtin, Thomas</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) are becoming increasingly important for military surveillance and mine detection. Most AUVs are battery powered and have limited lifetimes of a few days to a few weeks. This greatly limits the distance that AUVs can travel underwater. Using a series of submerged AUV charging <span class="hlt">stations</span>, AUVs could travel a limited distance to the next charging <span class="hlt">station</span>, recharge its batteries, and continue to the next charging <span class="hlt">station</span>, thus traveling great distances in a relatively short time, similar to the Old West “Pony Express.” One solution is to use temperature differences at various depths in the ocean to produce electricity, which is then stored in a submerged battery. It is preferred to have the upper buoy submerged a reasonable distance below the surface, so as not to be seen from above and not to be inadvertently destroyed by storms or ocean going vessels. In a previous invention, a phase change material (PCM) is melted (expanded) at warm temperatures, for example, 15 °C, and frozen (contracted) at cooler temperatures, for example, 8 °C. Tubes containing the PCM, which could be paraffin such as pentadecane, would be inserted into a container filled with hydraulic oil. When the PCM is melted (expanded), it pushes the oil out into a container that is pressurized to about 3,000 psi (approx equals 20.7 MPa). When a valve is opened, the high-pressure oil passes through a hydraulic motor, which turns a generator and charges a battery. The low-pressure oil is finally reabsorbed into the PCM canister when the PCM tubes are frozen (contracted). Some of the electricity produced could be used to control an external bladder or a motor to the tether line, such that depth cycling is continued for a very long period of time. Alternatively, after the electricity is generated by the hydraulic motor, the exiting low-pressure oil from the hydraulic motor could be vented directly to an external bladder on the AUV, such that filling of the bladder</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0500989.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0500989.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-03-08</p> <p>Launched aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor on June 6, 2002, these four astronauts comprised the prime crew for NASA's STS-111 mission. Astronaut Kenneth D. Cockrell (front right) was mission commander, and astronaut Paul S. Lockhart (front left) was pilot. Astronauts Philippe Perrin (rear left), representing the French Space Agency, and Franklin R. Chang-Diaz were mission specialists assigned to extravehicular activity (EVA) work on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). In addition to the delivery and installation of the Mobile Base System (MBS), this crew dropped off the Expedition Five crew members at the orbital outpost, and brought back the Expedition Four trio at mission's end.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830036701&hterms=kaplan+readiness&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dkaplan%2Breadiness','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830036701&hterms=kaplan+readiness&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dkaplan%2Breadiness"><span>Space <span class="hlt">station</span> orbit maintenance</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kaplan, D. I.; Jones, R. M.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>The orbit maintenance problem is examined for two low-earth-orbiting space <span class="hlt">station</span> concepts - the large, manned Space Operations Center (SOC) and the smaller, unmanned Science and Applications Space Platform (SASP). Atmospheric drag forces are calculated, and circular orbit altitudes are selected to assure a 90 day decay period in the event of catastrophic propulsion system failure. Several thrusting strategies for orbit maintenance are discussed. Various chemical and electric propulsion systems for orbit maintenance are compared on the basis of propellant resupply requirements, power requirements, Shuttle launch costs, and technology readiness.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302516.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0302516.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-12-01</p> <p>This is the official STS-110 crew portrait. In front, from the left, are astronauts Stephen N. Frick, pilot; Ellen Ochoa, flight engineer; and Michael J. Bloomfield, mission commander; In the back, from left, are astronauts Steven L. Smith, Rex J. Walheim, Jerry L. Ross and Lee M.E. Morin, all mission specialists. Launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis on April 8, 2002, the STS-110 mission crew prepared the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) for future space walks by installing and outfitting a 43-foot-long Starboard side S0 truss and preparing the Mobile Transporter. The mission served as the 8th ISS assembly flight.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701899.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701899.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-11-03</p> <p>Astronaut Doug Wheelock, STS-120 mission specialist, participated in the mission's fourth session of extravehicular activity (EVA) while Space Shuttle Discovery was docked with the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). During the 7-hour and 19-minute space walk, astronaut Scott Parazynski (out of frame), mission specialist, cut a snagged wire and installed homemade stabilizers designed to strengthen the structure and stability of the damaged P6 4B solar array wing. Wheelock assisted from the truss by keeping an eye on the distance between Parazynski and the array. Once the repair was complete, flight controllers on the ground successfully completed the deployment of the array.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701340.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701340.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-08-15</p> <p>As the construction continued on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), STS-118 astronaut and mission specialist Rick Mastracchio was anchored on the foot restraint of the Canadarm2 as he participated in the third session of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) for the mission. Assisting Mastracchio was Expedition 15 flight engineer Clay Anderson (out of frame). During the 5 hour, 28 minute space walk, the two relocated the S-band Antenna Sub-Assembly from the Port 6 (P6) truss to the Port 1 (P1) truss, installed a new transponder on P1 and retrieved the P6 transponder.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701316.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701316.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-06-11</p> <p>STS-117 astronauts and mission specialists Jim Reilly (center frame), and John “Danny” Olivas (bottom center), participated in the first Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) as construction resumed on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Among other tasks, the two connected power, data, and cooling cables between trusses 1 (S1) and 3 (S3), released the launch restraints from and deployed the four solar array blanket boxes on S4, and released the cinches and winches holding the photovoltaic radiator on S4. The primary mission objective was the installment of the second and third starboard truss segments (S3 and S4).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0400203.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0400203.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-07-01</p> <p>Astronaut Michael L. Gernhardt, STS-104 mission specialist, participates in one of three STS-104 space walks while holding on to the end effector of the Canadarm on the Space Shuttle Atlantis. Gernhardt was joined on the extravehicular activity (EVA) by astronaut James F. Reilly (out of frame). The major objective of the mission was to install and activate the Joint Airlock, which completed the second phase of construction on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). The airlock accommodates both United States and Russian space suits and was designed and built at the Marshall Space Flight Center by the Boeing Company.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1225256-compressing-inert-doublet-model','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1225256-compressing-inert-doublet-model"><span><span class="hlt">Compressing</span> the Inert Doublet Model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Blinov, Nikita; Kozaczuk, Jonathan; Morrissey, David E.; ...</p> <p>2016-02-16</p> <p>The Inert Doublet Model relies on a discrete symmetry to prevent couplings of the new scalars to Standard Model fermions. We found that this stabilizes the lightest inert state, which can then contribute to the observed dark matter density. In the presence of additional approximate symmetries, the resulting spectrum of exotic scalars can be <span class="hlt">compressed</span>. Here, we study the phenomenological and cosmological implications of this scenario. In conclusion, we derive new limits on the <span class="hlt">compressed</span> Inert Doublet Model from LEP, and outline the prospects for exclusion and discovery of this model at dark matter experiments, the LHC, and future colliders.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19770010813','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19770010813"><span>Data <span class="hlt">compression</span> for satellite images</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chen, P. H.; Wintz, P. A.</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>An efficient data <span class="hlt">compression</span> system is presented for satellite pictures and two grey level pictures derived from satellite pictures. The <span class="hlt">compression</span> techniques take advantages of the correlation between adjacent picture elements. Several source coding methods are investigated. Double delta coding is presented and shown to be the most efficient. Both predictive differential quantizing technique and double delta coding can be significantly improved by applying a background skipping technique. An extension code is constructed. This code requires very little storage space and operates efficiently. Simulation results are presented for various coding schemes and source codes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19720055510&hterms=distillation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Ddistillation','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19720055510&hterms=distillation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Ddistillation"><span>Extended testing of <span class="hlt">compression</span> distillation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bambenek, R. A.; Nuccio, P. P.</p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>During the past eight years, the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center has supported the development of an integrated water and waste management system which includes the <span class="hlt">compression</span> distillation process for recovering useable water from urine, urinal flush water, humidity condensate, commode flush water, and concentrated wash water. This paper describes the design of the <span class="hlt">compression</span> distillation unit, developed for this system, and the testing performed to demonstrate its reliability and performance. In addition, this paper summarizes the work performed on pretreatment and post-treatment processes, to assure the recovery of sterile potable water from urine and treated urinal flush water.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860018946','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860018946"><span>Tether applications for space <span class="hlt">station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Nobles, W.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>A wide variety of space <span class="hlt">station</span> applications for tethers were reviewed. Many will affect the operation of the <span class="hlt">station</span> itself while others are in the category of research or scientific platforms. One of the most expensive aspects of operating the space <span class="hlt">station</span> will be the continuing shuttle traffic to transport logistic supplies and payloads to the space <span class="hlt">station</span>. If a means can be found to use tethers to improve the efficiency of that transportation operation, it will increase the operating efficiency of the system and reduce the overall cost of the space <span class="hlt">station</span>. The concept studied consists of using a tether to lower the shuttle from the space <span class="hlt">station</span>. This results in a transfer of angular momentum and energy from the orbiter to the space <span class="hlt">station</span>. The consequences of this transfer is studied and how beneficial use can be made of it.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102500.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102500.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-02-11</p> <p>This STS-98 mission photograph shows astronauts Thomas D. Jones (foreground) and Kerneth D. Cockrell floating inside the newly installed Laboratory aboard the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). The American-made Destiny module is the cornerstone for space-based research aboard the orbiting platform and the centerpiece of the ISS, where unprecedented science experiments will be performed in the near-zero gravity of space. Destiny will also serve as the command and control center for the ISS. The aluminum module is 8.5-meters (28-feet) long and 4.3-meters (14-feet) in diameter. The laboratory consists of three cylindrical sections and two endcones with hatches that will be mated to other <span class="hlt">station</span> components. A 50.9-centimeter (20-inch-) diameter window is located on one side of the center module segment. This pressurized module is designed to accommodate pressurized payloads. It has a capacity of 24 rack locations. Payload racks will occupy 15 locations especially designed to support experiments. The Destiny module was built by the Boeing Company under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102503.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102503.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-02-16</p> <p>The International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), with the newly installed U.S. Laboratory, Destiny, is backdropped over clouds, water and land in South America. South Central Chile shows up at the bottom of the photograph. Just below the Destiny, the Chacao Charnel separates the large island of Chile from the mainland and connects the Gulf of Coronado on the Pacific side with the Gulf of Ancud, southwest of the city of Puerto Montt. The American-made Destiny module is the cornerstone for space-based research aboard the orbiting platform and the centerpiece of the ISS, where unprecedented science experiments will be performed in the near-zero gravity of space. Destiny will also serve as the command and control center for the ISS. The aluminum module is 8.5-meters (28-feet) long and 4.3-meters (14-feet) in diameter. The laboratory consists of three cylindrical sections and two endcones with hatches that will be mated to other <span class="hlt">station</span> components. A 50.9-centimeter (20-inch-) diameter window is located on one side of the center module segment. This pressurized module is designed to accommodate pressurized payloads. It has a capacity of 24 rack locations. Payload racks will occupy 15 locations especially designed to support experiments. The Destiny module was built by the Boeing Company under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102497.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102497.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-02-01</p> <p>In the grasp of the Shuttle's Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robot arm, the U.S. Laboratory, Destiny, is moved from its stowage position in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Atlantis. This photograph was taken by astronaut Thomas D. Jones during his Extravehicular Activity (EVA). The American-made Destiny module is the cornerstone for space-based research aboard the orbiting platform and the centerpiece of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), where unprecedented science experiments will be performed in the near-zero gravity of space. Destiny will also serve as the command and control center for the ISS. The aluminum module is 8.5- meters (28-feet) long and 4.3-meters (14-feet) in diameter. The laboratory consists of three cylindrical sections and two endcones with hatches that will be mated to other <span class="hlt">station</span> components. A 50.9-centimeter (20-inch-) diameter window is located on one side of the center module segment. This pressurized module is designed to accommodate pressurized payloads. It has a capacity of 24 rack locations. Payload racks will occupy 15 locations especially designed to support experiments. The Destiny module was built by the Boeing Company under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102496.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102496.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-02-01</p> <p>In the grasp of the Shuttle's Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robot arm, the U.S. Laboratory, Destiny, is moved from its stowage position in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Atlantis. This photograph was taken by astronaut Thomas D. Jones during his Extravehicular Activity (EVA). The American-made Destiny module is the cornerstone for space-based research aboard the orbiting platform and the centerpiece of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), where unprecedented science experiments will be performed in the near-zero gravity of space. Destiny will also serve as the command and control center for the ISS. The aluminum module is 8.5- meters (28-feet) long and 4.3-meters (14-feet) in diameter. The laboratory consists of three cylindrical sections and two endcones with hatches that will be mated to other <span class="hlt">station</span> components. A 50.9-centimeter- (20-inch-) diameter window is located on one side of the center module segment. This pressurized module is designed to accommodate pressurized payloads. It has a capacity of 24 rack locations. Payload racks will occupy 15 locations especially designed to support experiments. The Destiny module was built by the Boeing Company under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0601389.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0601389.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2006-12-09</p> <p>Against a black night sky, the Space Shuttle Discovery and its seven-member crew head toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled linkup with the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Liftoff from the Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39B occurred at 8:47 p.m. (EST) on Dec. 9, 2006 in what was the first evening shuttle launch since 2002. The primary mission objective was to deliver and install the P5 truss element. The P5 installation was conducted during the first of three space walks, and involved use of both the shuttle and station’s robotic arms. The remainder of the mission included a major reconfiguration and activation of the ISS electrical and thermal control systems, as well as delivery of Zvezda Service Module debris panels, which will increase ISS protection from potential impacts of micro-meteorites and orbital debris. Two major payloads developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) were also delivered to the <span class="hlt">Station</span>. The Lab-On-A Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS) and the Water Delivery System, a vital component of the Station’s Oxygen Generation System.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120000463','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120000463"><span>Draper <span class="hlt">Station</span> Analysis Tool</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bedrossian, Nazareth; Jang, Jiann-Woei; McCants, Edward; Omohundro, Zachary; Ring, Tom; Templeton, Jeremy; Zoss, Jeremy; Wallace, Jonathan; Ziegler, Philip</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Draper <span class="hlt">Station</span> Analysis Tool (DSAT) is a computer program, built on commercially available software, for simulating and analyzing complex dynamic systems. Heretofore used in designing and verifying guidance, navigation, and control systems of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>, DSAT has a modular architecture that lends itself to modification for application to spacecraft or terrestrial systems. DSAT consists of user-interface, data-structures, simulation-generation, analysis, plotting, documentation, and help components. DSAT automates the construction of simulations and the process of analysis. DSAT provides a graphical user interface (GUI), plus a Web-enabled interface, similar to the GUI, that enables a remotely located user to gain access to the full capabilities of DSAT via the Internet and Webbrowser software. Data structures are used to define the GUI, the Web-enabled interface, simulations, and analyses. Three data structures define the type of analysis to be performed: closed-loop simulation, frequency response, and/or stability margins. DSAT can be executed on almost any workstation, desktop, or laptop computer. DSAT provides better than an order of magnitude improvement in cost, schedule, and risk assessment for simulation based design and verification of complex dynamic systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0203029.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0203029.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-10-14</p> <p>Astronauts Piers J. Sellers (left ) and David A. Wolf work on the newly installed Starboard One (S1) truss to the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) during the STS-112 mission. The primary payloads of this mission, ISS Assembly Mission 9A, were the Integrated Truss Assembly S1 (S One), the starboard side thermal radiator truss, and the Crew Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart to the ISS. The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s complex power system. The S1 truss was attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss, which was launched on April 8, 2002 aboard the STS-110, and flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat-rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. The CETA cart was attached to the Mobil Transporter and will be used by assembly crews on later missions. Manufactured by the Boeing Company in Huntington Beach, California, the truss primary structure was transferred to the Marshall Space Flight Center in February 1999 for hardware installations and manufacturing acceptance testing. The launch of the STS-112 mission occurred on October 7, 2002, and its 11-day mission ended on October 18, 2002.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0400388.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0400388.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-12-07</p> <p>In this image, planet Earth, some 235 statute miles away, forms the back drop for this photo of STS-97 astronaut and mission specialist Joseph R. Tanner, taken during the third of three space walks. The mission's goal was to perform the delivery, assembly, and activation of the U.S. electrical power system onboard the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). The electrical power system, which is built into a 73-meter (240-foot) long solar array structure consists of solar arrays, radiators, batteries, and electronics. The entire 15.4-metric ton (17-ton) package is called the P6 Integrated Truss Segment, and is the heaviest and largest element yet delivered to the <span class="hlt">station</span> aboard a space shuttle. The electrical system will eventually provide the power necessary for the first ISS crews to live and work in the U.S. segment. The STS-97 crew of five launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor on November 30, 2000 for an 11 day mission.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0400380.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0400380.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-12-05</p> <p>Astronaut Joseph R. Tanner, STS-97 mission specialist, is seen during a session of Extravehicular Activity (EVA), performing work on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Part of the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm and a section of the newly deployed solar array panel are in the background. The primary objective of the STS-97 mission was the delivery, assembly, and activation of the U.S. electrical power system on board the ISS. The electrical power system, which is built into a 73-meter (240-foot) long solar array structure consists of solar arrays, radiators, batteries, and electronics. The entire 15.4-metric ton (17-ton) package is called the P6 Integrated Truss Segment and is the heaviest and largest element yet delivered to the <span class="hlt">station</span> aboard a space shuttle. The electrical system will eventually provide the power necessary for the first ISS crews to live and work in the U.S. segment. The STS-97 crew of five launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor on November 30, 2000 for an 11 day mission.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102545.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102545.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-03-01</p> <p>In this Space Shuttle STS-102 mission image, the Payload Equipment Restraint System H-Strap is shown at the left side of the U.S. Laboratory hatch and behind Astronaut James D. Weatherbee, mission specialist. PERS is an integrated modular system of components designed to assist the crew of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) in restraining and carrying necessary payload equipment and tools in a microgravity environment. The Operations Development Group, Flight Projects Directorate at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), while providing operation support to the ISS Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF), recognized the need for an on-orbit restraint system to facilitate control of lose objects, payloads, and tools. The PERS is the offspring of that need and it helps the ISS crew manage tools and rack components that would otherwise float away in the near-zero gravity environment aboard the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>. The system combines Kevlar straps, mesh pockets, Velcro and a variety of cornecting devices into a portable, adjustable system. The system includes the Single Strap, the H-Strap, the Belly Pack, the Laptop Restraint Belt, and the Tool Page Case. The Single Strap and the H-Strap were flown on this mission. The PERS concept was developed by industrial design students at Auburn University and the MSFC Flight Projects Directorate.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992STIN...9233933H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992STIN...9233933H"><span>The effects of video <span class="hlt">compression</span> on acceptability of images for monitoring life sciences experiments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Haines, Richard F.; Chuang, Sherry L.</p> <p>1992-07-01</p> <p>Future manned space operations for Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom will call for a variety of carefully planned multimedia digital communications, including full-frame-rate color video, to support remote operations of scientific experiments. This paper presents the results of an investigation to determine if video <span class="hlt">compression</span> is a viable solution to transmission bandwidth constraints. It reports on the impact of different levels of <span class="hlt">compression</span> and associated calculational parameters on image acceptability to investigators in life-sciences research at ARC. Three nonhuman life-sciences disciplines (plant, rodent, and primate biology) were selected for this study. A total of 33 subjects viewed experimental scenes in their own scientific disciplines. Ten plant scientists viewed still images of wheat stalks at various stages of growth. Each image was <span class="hlt">compressed</span> to four different <span class="hlt">compression</span> levels using the Joint Photographic Expert Group (JPEG) standard algorithm, and the images were presented in random order. Twelve and eleven staffmembers viewed 30-sec videotaped segments showing small rodents and a small primate, respectively. Each segment was repeated at four different <span class="hlt">compression</span> levels in random order using an inverse cosine transform (ICT) algorithm. Each viewer made a series of subjective image-quality ratings. There was a significant difference in image ratings according to the type of scene viewed within disciplines; thus, ratings were scene dependent. Image (still and motion) acceptability does, in fact, vary according to <span class="hlt">compression</span> level. The JPEG still-image-<span class="hlt">compression</span> levels, even with the large range of 5:1 to 120:1 in this study, yielded equally high levels of acceptability. In contrast, the ICT algorithm for motion <span class="hlt">compression</span> yielded a sharp decline in acceptability below 768 kb/sec. Therefore, if video <span class="hlt">compression</span> is to be used as a solution for overcoming transmission bandwidth constraints, the effective management of the ratio and <span class="hlt">compression</span> parameters</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19920024689','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19920024689"><span>The effects of video <span class="hlt">compression</span> on acceptability of images for monitoring life sciences experiments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Haines, Richard F.; Chuang, Sherry L.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Future manned space operations for Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom will call for a variety of carefully planned multimedia digital communications, including full-frame-rate color video, to support remote operations of scientific experiments. This paper presents the results of an investigation to determine if video <span class="hlt">compression</span> is a viable solution to transmission bandwidth constraints. It reports on the impact of different levels of <span class="hlt">compression</span> and associated calculational parameters on image acceptability to investigators in life-sciences research at ARC. Three nonhuman life-sciences disciplines (plant, rodent, and primate biology) were selected for this study. A total of 33 subjects viewed experimental scenes in their own scientific disciplines. Ten plant scientists viewed still images of wheat stalks at various stages of growth. Each image was <span class="hlt">compressed</span> to four different <span class="hlt">compression</span> levels using the Joint Photographic Expert Group (JPEG) standard algorithm, and the images were presented in random order. Twelve and eleven staffmembers viewed 30-sec videotaped segments showing small rodents and a small primate, respectively. Each segment was repeated at four different <span class="hlt">compression</span> levels in random order using an inverse cosine transform (ICT) algorithm. Each viewer made a series of subjective image-quality ratings. There was a significant difference in image ratings according to the type of scene viewed within disciplines; thus, ratings were scene dependent. Image (still and motion) acceptability does, in fact, vary according to <span class="hlt">compression</span> level. The JPEG still-image-<span class="hlt">compression</span> levels, even with the large range of 5:1 to 120:1 in this study, yielded equally high levels of acceptability. In contrast, the ICT algorithm for motion <span class="hlt">compression</span> yielded a sharp decline in acceptability below 768 kb/sec. Therefore, if video <span class="hlt">compression</span> is to be used as a solution for overcoming transmission bandwidth constraints, the effective management of the ratio and <span class="hlt">compression</span> parameters</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/10606','TREESEARCH'); return false;" href="https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/10606"><span><span class="hlt">Compression</span> debarking of wood chips.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/">Treesearch</a></p> <p>Rodger A. Arola; John R. Erickson</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>Presents results from 2 years testing of a single-pass <span class="hlt">compression</span> process for debarking wood chips of several species. The most significant variable was season of cut. Depending on species, approximately 70% of the bark was removed from wood cut in the growing season while approximately 45% was removed from wood cut in the dormant season.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950065353&hterms=Cardiopulmonary+Resuscitation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DCardiopulmonary%2BResuscitation','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950065353&hterms=Cardiopulmonary+Resuscitation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DCardiopulmonary%2BResuscitation"><span>Device Assists Cardiac Chest <span class="hlt">Compression</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Eichstadt, Frank T.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Portable device facilitates effective and prolonged cardiac resuscitation by chest <span class="hlt">compression</span>. Developed originally for use in absence of gravitation, also useful in terrestrial environments and situations (confined spaces, water rescue, medical transport) not conducive to standard manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780000548&hterms=flammable+liquid+safety&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dflammable%2Bliquid%2Bsafety','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780000548&hterms=flammable+liquid+safety&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dflammable%2Bliquid%2Bsafety"><span><span class="hlt">Compression</span> testing of flammable liquids</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Briles, O. M.; Hollenbaugh, R. P.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>Small cylindrical test chamber determines catalytic effect of given container material on fuel that might contribute to accidental deflagration or detonation below expected temperature under adiabatic <span class="hlt">compression</span>. Device is useful to producers and users of flammable liquids and to safety specialists.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018SPIE10620E..14Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018SPIE10620E..14Z"><span>Temporal <span class="hlt">compressive</span> imaging for video</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhou, Qun; Zhang, Linxia; Ke, Jun</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>In many situations, imagers are required to have higher imaging speed, such as gunpowder blasting analysis and observing high-speed biology phenomena. However, measuring high-speed video is a challenge to camera design, especially, in infrared spectrum. In this paper, we reconstruct a high-frame-rate video from <span class="hlt">compressive</span> video measurements using temporal <span class="hlt">compressive</span> imaging (TCI) with a temporal <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratio T=8. This means that, 8 unique high-speed temporal frames will be obtained from a single <span class="hlt">compressive</span> frame using a reconstruction algorithm. Equivalently, the video frame rates is increased by 8 times. Two methods, two-step iterative shrinkage/threshold (TwIST) algorithm and the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) method, are used for reconstruction. To reduce reconstruction time and memory usage, each frame of size 256×256 is divided into patches of size 8×8. The influence of different coded mask to reconstruction is discussed. The reconstruction qualities using TwIST and GMM are also compared.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=plague&pg=2&id=EJ924703','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=plague&pg=2&id=EJ924703"><span>Teaching Time-Space <span class="hlt">Compression</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Warf, Barney</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Time-space <span class="hlt">compression</span> shows students that geographies are plastic, mutable and forever changing. This paper justifies the need to teach this topic, which is rarely found in undergraduate course syllabi. It addresses the impacts of transportation and communications technologies to explicate its dynamics. In summarizing various conceptual…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=61988&keyword=dynamical+AND+system&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="https://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=61988&keyword=dynamical+AND+system&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50"><span><span class="hlt">COMPRESSIBLE</span> FLOW, ENTRAINMENT, AND MEGAPLUME</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>It is generally believed that low Mach number, i.e., low-velocity, flow may be assumed to be incompressible flow. Under steady-state conditions, an exact equation of continuity may then be used to show that such flow is non-divergent. However, a rigorous, <span class="hlt">compressible</span> fluid-dynam...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992SPIE.1709..376P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992SPIE.1709..376P"><span>Neural network for image <span class="hlt">compression</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Panchanathan, Sethuraman; Yeap, Tet H.; Pilache, B.</p> <p>1992-09-01</p> <p>In this paper, we propose a new scheme for image <span class="hlt">compression</span> using neural networks. Image data <span class="hlt">compression</span> deals with minimization of the amount of data required to represent an image while maintaining an acceptable quality. Several image <span class="hlt">compression</span> techniques have been developed in recent years. We note that the coding performance of these techniques may be improved by employing adaptivity. Over the last few years neural network has emerged as an effective tool for solving a wide range of problems involving adaptivity and learning. A multilayer feed-forward neural network trained using the backward error propagation algorithm is used in many applications. However, this model is not suitable for image <span class="hlt">compression</span> because of its poor coding performance. Recently, a self-organizing feature map (SOFM) algorithm has been proposed which yields a good coding performance. However, this algorithm requires a long training time because the network starts with random initial weights. In this paper we have used the backward error propagation algorithm (BEP) to quickly obtain the initial weights which are then used to speedup the training time required by the SOFM algorithm. The proposed approach (BEP-SOFM) combines the advantages of the two techniques and, hence, achieves a good coding performance in a shorter training time. Our simulation results demonstrate the potential gains using the proposed technique.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=smith&pg=3&id=EJ1050525','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=smith&pg=3&id=EJ1050525"><span>Culture: Copying, <span class="hlt">Compression</span>, and Conventionality</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Tamariz, Mónica; Kirby, Simon</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Through cultural transmission, repeated learning by new individuals transforms cultural information, which tends to become increasingly <span class="hlt">compressible</span> (Kirby, Cornish, & Smith, 2008; Smith, Tamariz, & Kirby, 2013). Existing diffusion chain studies include in their design two processes that could be responsible for this tendency: learning…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1168680','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1168680"><span><span class="hlt">Compressive</span> passive millimeter wave imager</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Gopalsami, Nachappa; Liao, Shaolin; Elmer, Thomas W; Koehl, Eugene R; Heifetz, Alexander; Raptis, Apostolos C</p> <p>2015-01-27</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">compressive</span> scanning approach for millimeter wave imaging and sensing. A Hadamard mask is positioned to receive millimeter waves from an object to be imaged. A subset of the full set of Hadamard acquisitions is sampled. The subset is used to reconstruct an image representing the object.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.eia.gov/naturalgas/articles/compressor96index.php+','EIAPUBS'); return false;" href="https://www.eia.gov/naturalgas/articles/compressor96index.php+"><span>Natural Gas Compressor <span class="hlt">Stations</span> on the Interstate Pipeline Network: Developments Since 1996</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eia.doe.gov/reports/">EIA Publications</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>This special report looks at the use of natural gas pipeline compressor <span class="hlt">stations</span> on the interstate natural gas pipeline network that serves the lower 48 states. It examines the <span class="hlt">compression</span> facilities added over the past 10 years and how the expansions have supported pipeline capacity growth intended to meet the increasing demand for natural gas.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ISPAr41B4....3A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ISPAr41B4....3A"><span>Comparison of Open Source <span class="hlt">Compression</span> Algorithms on Vhr Remote Sensing Images for Efficient Storage Hierarchy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Akoguz, A.; Bozkurt, S.; Gozutok, A. A.; Alp, G.; Turan, E. G.; Bogaz, M.; Kent, S.</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>High resolution level in satellite imagery came with its fundamental problem as big amount of telemetry data which is to be stored after the downlink operation. Moreover, later the post-processing and image enhancement steps after the image is acquired, the file sizes increase even more and then it gets a lot harder to store and consume much more time to transmit the data from one source to another; hence, it should be taken into account that to save even more space with file <span class="hlt">compression</span> of the raw and various levels of processed data is a necessity for archiving <span class="hlt">stations</span> to save more space. Lossless data <span class="hlt">compression</span> algorithms that will be examined in this study aim to provide <span class="hlt">compression</span> without any loss of data holding spectral information. Within this objective, well-known open source programs supporting related <span class="hlt">compression</span> algorithms have been implemented on processed GeoTIFF images of Airbus Defence & Spaces SPOT 6 & 7 satellites having 1.5 m. of GSD, which were acquired and stored by ITU Center for Satellite Communications and Remote Sensing (ITU CSCRS), with the algorithms Lempel-Ziv-Welch (LZW), Lempel-Ziv-Markov chain Algorithm (LZMA & LZMA2), Lempel-Ziv-Oberhumer (LZO), Deflate & Deflate 64, Prediction by Partial Matching (PPMd or PPM2), Burrows-Wheeler Transform (BWT) in order to observe <span class="hlt">compression</span> performances of these algorithms over sample datasets in terms of how much of the image data can be <span class="hlt">compressed</span> by ensuring lossless <span class="hlt">compression</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/biblio/22579834-force-balancing-mammographic-compression','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/biblio/22579834-force-balancing-mammographic-compression"><span>Force balancing in mammographic <span class="hlt">compression</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Branderhorst, W., E-mail: w.branderhorst@amc.nl; Groot, J. E. de; Lier, M. G. J. T. B. van</p> <p></p> <p>Purpose: In mammography, the height of the image receptor is adjusted to the patient before <span class="hlt">compressing</span> the breast. An inadequate height setting can result in an imbalance between the forces applied by the image receptor and the paddle, causing the clamped breast to be pushed up or down relative to the body during <span class="hlt">compression</span>. This leads to unnecessary stretching of the skin and other tissues around the breast, which can make the imaging procedure more painful for the patient. The goal of this study was to implement a method to measure and minimize the force imbalance, and to assess itsmore » feasibility as an objective and reproducible method of setting the image receptor height. Methods: A trial was conducted consisting of 13 craniocaudal mammographic <span class="hlt">compressions</span> on a silicone breast phantom, each with the image receptor positioned at a different height. The image receptor height was varied over a range of 12 cm. In each <span class="hlt">compression</span>, the force exerted by the <span class="hlt">compression</span> paddle was increased up to 140 N in steps of 10 N. In addition to the paddle force, the authors measured the force exerted by the image receptor and the reaction force exerted on the patient body by the ground. The trial was repeated 8 times, with the phantom remounted at a slightly different orientation and position between the trials. Results: For a given paddle force, the obtained results showed that there is always exactly one image receptor height that leads to a balance of the forces on the breast. For the breast phantom, deviating from this specific height increased the force imbalance by 9.4 ± 1.9 N/cm (6.7%) for 140 N paddle force, and by 7.1 ± 1.6 N/cm (17.8%) for 40 N paddle force. The results also show that in situations where the force exerted by the image receptor is not measured, the craniocaudal force imbalance can still be determined by positioning the patient on a weighing scale and observing the changes in displayed weight during the procedure. Conclusions: In mammographic</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2011-title47-vol4-sec74-1281.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2011-title47-vol4-sec74-1281.pdf"><span>47 CFR 74.1281 - <span class="hlt">Station</span> records.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... FM Broadcast Booster <span class="hlt">Stations</span> § 74.1281 <span class="hlt">Station</span> records. (a) The licensee of a <span class="hlt">station</span> authorized... booster, except that the <span class="hlt">station</span> records of a booster or translator licensed to the licensee of the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title47-vol4-sec74-1281.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title47-vol4-sec74-1281.pdf"><span>47 CFR 74.1281 - <span class="hlt">Station</span> records.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... FM Broadcast Booster <span class="hlt">Stations</span> § 74.1281 <span class="hlt">Station</span> records. (a) The licensee of a <span class="hlt">station</span> authorized... booster, except that the <span class="hlt">station</span> records of a booster or translator licensed to the licensee of the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2014-title47-vol4-sec74-1281.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2014-title47-vol4-sec74-1281.pdf"><span>47 CFR 74.1281 - <span class="hlt">Station</span> records.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... FM Broadcast Booster <span class="hlt">Stations</span> § 74.1281 <span class="hlt">Station</span> records. (a) The licensee of a <span class="hlt">station</span> authorized... booster, except that the <span class="hlt">station</span> records of a booster or translator licensed to the licensee of the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2013-title47-vol4-sec74-1281.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2013-title47-vol4-sec74-1281.pdf"><span>47 CFR 74.1281 - <span class="hlt">Station</span> records.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... FM Broadcast Booster <span class="hlt">Stations</span> § 74.1281 <span class="hlt">Station</span> records. (a) The licensee of a <span class="hlt">station</span> authorized... booster, except that the <span class="hlt">station</span> records of a booster or translator licensed to the licensee of the...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19960017673','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19960017673"><span>The Capabilities of Space <span class="hlt">Stations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Over the past two years the U.S. space <span class="hlt">station</span> program has evolved to a three-phased international program, with the first phase consisting of the use of the U.S. Space Shuttle and the upgrading and use of the Russian Mir Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>, and the second and third phases consisting of the assembly and use of the new International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>. Projected capabilities for research, and plans for utilization, have also evolved and it has been difficult for those not directly involved in the design and engineering of these space <span class="hlt">stations</span> to learn and understand their technical details. The Committee on the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> of the National Research Council, with the concurrence of NASA, undertook to write this short report in order to provide concise and objective information on space <span class="hlt">stations</span> and platforms -- with emphasis on the Mir Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> and International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> -- and to supply a summary of the capabilities of previous, existing, and planned space <span class="hlt">stations</span>. In keeping with the committee charter and with the task statement for this report, the committee has summarized the research capabilities of five major space platforms: the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>, the Mir Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>, the Space Shuttle (with a Spacelab or Spacehab module in its cargo bay), the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom (which was redesigned to become the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> in 1993 and 1994), and Skylab. By providing the summary, together with brief descriptions of the platforms, the committee hopes to assist interested readers, including scientists and engineers, government officials, and the general public, in evaluating the utility of each system to meet perceived user needs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3706374','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3706374"><span>Volatile Emissions from <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> Tissue</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Dini, Francesca; Capuano, Rosamaria; Strand, Tillan; Ek, Anna-Christina; Lindgren, Margareta; Paolesse, Roberto; Di Natale, Corrado; Lundström, Ingemar</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Since almost every fifth patient treated in hospital care develops pressure ulcers, early identification of risk is important. A non-invasive method for the elucidation of endogenous biomarkers related to pressure ulcers could be an excellent tool for this purpose. We therefore found it of interest to determine if there is a difference in the emissions of volatiles from <span class="hlt">compressed</span> and uncompressed tissue. The ultimate goal is to find a non-invasive method to obtain an early warning for the risk of developing pressure ulcers for bed-ridden persons. Chemical analysis of the emissions, collected in <span class="hlt">compresses</span>, was made with gas-chromatography – mass spectrometry and with a chemical sensor array, the so called electronic nose. It was found that the emissions from healthy and hospitalized persons differed significantly irrespective of the site. Within each group there was a clear difference between the <span class="hlt">compressed</span> and uncompressed site. Peaks that could be certainly deemed as markers of the <span class="hlt">compression</span> were, however, not identified. Nonetheless, different compounds connected to the application of local mechanical pressure were found. The results obtained with GC-MS reveal the complexity of VOC composition, thus an array of non-selective chemical sensors seems to be a suitable choice for the analysis of skin emission from <span class="hlt">compressed</span> tissues; it may represent a practical instrument for bed side diagnostics. Results show that the adopted electronic noses are likely sensitive to the total amount of the emission rather than to its composition. The development of a gas sensor-based device requires then the design of sensor receptors adequate to detect the VOCs bouquet typical of pressure. This preliminary experiment evidences the necessity of studies where each given person is followed for a long time in a ward in order to detect the insurgence of specific VOCs pattern changes signalling the occurrence of ulcers. PMID:23874929</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.nrel.gov/hydrogen/infrastructure-cdps-all.html','SCIGOVWS'); return false;" href="https://www.nrel.gov/hydrogen/infrastructure-cdps-all.html"><span>Next Generation Hydrogen <span class="hlt">Station</span> Composite Data Products: All <span class="hlt">Stations</span> |</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.science.gov/aboutsearch.html">Science.gov Websites</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>/11/17 Fuel Temperature at Receptacle 30 s After Start of Fill CDP INFR 77, 10/11/17 <em>Cost</em> Compressor Operation <em>Cost</em> CDP INFR 39, 10/11/17 <span class="hlt">Station</span> <em>Cost</em> by Daily Capacity CDP INFR 40, 10/11/17 Average <span class="hlt">Station</span> <em>Cost</em> by Category CDP INFR 41, 10/11/17 <span class="hlt">Station</span> <em>Cost</em> CDP INFR 42, 10/11/17 <span class="hlt">Station</span> <em>Cost</em> by Type CDP INFR</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.nrel.gov/hydrogen/infrastructure-cdps-retail.html','SCIGOVWS'); return false;" href="https://www.nrel.gov/hydrogen/infrastructure-cdps-retail.html"><span>Next Generation Hydrogen <span class="hlt">Station</span> Composite Data Products: Retail <span class="hlt">Stations</span> |</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.science.gov/aboutsearch.html">Science.gov Websites</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>-Cool of -40°C CDP RETAIL INFR 57, 9/25/17 <em>Cost</em> Compressor Operation <em>Cost</em> CDP RETAIL INFR 39, 9/25/17 <span class="hlt">Station</span> <em>Cost</em> by Daily Capacity CDP RETAIL INFR 40, 9/25/17 Average <span class="hlt">Station</span> <em>Cost</em> by Category CDP RETAIL INFR 41, 9/25/17 <span class="hlt">Station</span> <em>Cost</em> CDP RETAIL INFR 42, 9/25/17 <span class="hlt">Station</span> <em>Cost</em> by Type CDP RETAIL INFR 43, 9/25</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018AcMSn..34...82S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018AcMSn..34...82S"><span>Effect of <span class="hlt">compressibility</span> on the hypervelocity penetration</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Song, W. J.; Chen, X. W.; Chen, P.</p> <p>2018-02-01</p> <p>We further consider the effect of rod strength by employing the <span class="hlt">compressible</span> penetration model to study the effect of <span class="hlt">compressibility</span> on hypervelocity penetration. Meanwhile, we define different instances of penetration efficiency in various modified models and compare these penetration efficiencies to identify the effects of different factors in the <span class="hlt">compressible</span> model. To systematically discuss the effect of <span class="hlt">compressibility</span> in different metallic rod-target combinations, we construct three cases, i.e., the penetrations by the more <span class="hlt">compressible</span> rod into the less <span class="hlt">compressible</span> target, rod into the analogously <span class="hlt">compressible</span> target, and the less <span class="hlt">compressible</span> rod into the more <span class="hlt">compressible</span> target. The effects of volumetric strain, internal energy, and strength on the penetration efficiency are analyzed simultaneously. It indicates that the <span class="hlt">compressibility</span> of the rod and target increases the pressure at the rod/target interface. The more <span class="hlt">compressible</span> rod/target has larger volumetric strain and higher internal energy. Both the larger volumetric strain and higher strength enhance the penetration or anti-penetration ability. On the other hand, the higher internal energy weakens the penetration or anti-penetration ability. The two trends conflict, but the volumetric strain dominates in the variation of the penetration efficiency, which would not approach the hydrodynamic limit if the rod and target are not analogously <span class="hlt">compressible</span>. However, if the <span class="hlt">compressibility</span> of the rod and target is analogous, it has little effect on the penetration efficiency.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890012965','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890012965"><span>Video requirements for materials processing experiments in the space <span class="hlt">station</span> US laboratory</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Baugher, Charles R.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Full utilization of the potential of the materials research on the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> can be achieved only if adequate means are available for interactive experimentation between the science facilities and ground-based investigators. Extensive video interfaces linking these three elements are the only alternative for establishing a viable relation. Because of the limit in the downlink capability, a comprehensive complement of on-board video processing, and video <span class="hlt">compression</span> is needed. The application of video <span class="hlt">compression</span> will be an absolute necessity since it's effectiveness will directly impact the quantity of data which will be available to ground investigator teams, and their ability to review the effects of process changes and the experiment progress. Video data <span class="hlt">compression</span> utilization on the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0501030.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0501030.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-10-08</p> <p>The STS-108 crew members take a break from their training to pose for their preflight portrait. Astronauts Dominic L. Gorie right) and Mark E. Kelly, commander and pilot, respectively, are seated in front. In the rear are astronauts Linda M. Godwin and Daniel L. Tani, both mission specialists. The 12th flight to the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) and final flight of 2001, the STS-108 mission launched aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on December 5, 2001. They were accompanied to the ISS by the Expedition Four crew, which remained on board the orbital outpost for several months. The Expedition Three crew members returned home with the STS-108 astronauts. In addition to the Expedition crew exchange, STS-108 crew deployed the student project STARSHINE, and delivered 2.7 metric tons (3 tons) of equipment and supplies to the ISS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701883.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701883.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-02-09</p> <p>The STS-120 patch reflects the role of the mission in the future of the space program. The shuttle payload bay carries Node 2, Harmony, the doorway to the future international laboratory elements on the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). The star on the left represents the ISS; the red colored points represent the current location of the P6 solar array, furled and awaiting relocation when the crew arrives. During the mission, the crew will move P6 to its final home at the end of the port truss. The gold points represent the P6 solar array in its new location, unfurled and producing power for science and life support. On the right, the moon and Mars can be seen representing the future of NASA. The constellation Orion rises in the background, symbolizing NASA's new exploration vehicle. Through all, the shuttle rises up and away, leading the way to the future.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701325.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701325.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-06-08</p> <p>Headed toward Earth orbit and a link up with the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS), the Space Shuttle Atlantis lifted off from Kennedy Space Center on June 8, 2007. Aboard were STS-117 astronauts James F. Reilly II, Steven R. Swanson, Patrick G. Forrester and John D. “Danny” Olivas, all mission specialists; Frederick W. (Rick) Sturckow, commander; Lee J. Archambault, pilot; and Clayton Anderson, mission specialist who joined the Expedition 15 crew. The crew members along with the Expedition 15 crew spent 8 days resuming construction on the ISS with the installation of the second and third starboard truss segments (S3 and S4) with Photovoltaic Radiator (PVR), and retracted the P6 starboard solar array wing and radiator for later use.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701341.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701341.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-08-19</p> <p>Back dropped by the blue Earth, the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) boasts its newest configuration upon the departure of Space Shuttle Endeavor and STS-118 mission. Days earlier, construction resumed on the ISS as STS-118 mission specialists and the Expedition 15 crew completed installation of the Starboard 5 (S-5) truss segment, removed a faulty Control Moment Gyroscope (CMG-3), installed a new CMG into the Z1 truss, relocated the S-band Antenna Sub-Assembly from the Port 6 (P6) to Port 1 (P1) truss, installed a new transponder on P1, retrieved the P6 transponder, and delivered roughly 5,000 pounds of equipment and supplies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MS%26E..245h2009R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MS%26E..245h2009R"><span>Innovative Railway <span class="hlt">Stations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rzepnicka, Sylwia; Załuski, Daniel</p> <p>2017-10-01</p> <p>In relation to modern demographic trends, evolving technologies and environment-friendly solutions increases the potential of rail considered as sustainable form of public transport. Contemporary tendencies of designing railway <span class="hlt">stations</span> in Europe are focused on lowering energy consumption and reducing carbon emission. The main goal of the designers is to create a friendly and intuitive space for its users and at the same time a building that uses renewable energy sources and minimizes negative impact on the environment by the increase of biologically active areas, reuse of rainwater and greywater, innovative heating and cooling solutions and reduction of energy losses. The optimisation of a life circle in railway architecture introduces new approach to passenger service. Examples mentioned in the content of this article help to synthesize changes in approach to the design within the context of sustainability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701898.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701898.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2006-11-03</p> <p>While anchored to a foot restraint on the end of the Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS), astronaut Scott Parazynski, STS-120 mission specialist, participated in the mission's fourth session of extravehicular activity (EVA) while Space Shuttle Discovery was docked with the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). During the 7-hour and 19-minute space walk, Parazynski cut a snagged wire and installed homemade stabilizers designed to strengthen the structure and stability of the damaged P6 4B solar array wing. Astronaut Doug Wheelock (out of frame), mission specialist, assisted from the truss by keeping an eye on the distance between Parazynski and the array. Once the repair was complete, flight controllers on the ground successfully completed the deployment of the array.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0601071.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0601071.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2005-06-09</p> <p>The STS-121 patch depicts the Space Shuttle docked with the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) in the foreground, overlaying the astronaut symbol with three gold columns and a gold star. The ISS is shown in the configuration that it was during the STS-121 mission. The background shows the nighttime Earth with a dawn breaking over the horizon. STS-121, ISS mission ULF1.1, was the final Shuttle Return to Flight test mission. This utilization and logistics flight delivered a multipurpose logistics module (MPLM) to the ISS with several thousand pounds of new supplies and experiments. In addition, some new orbital replacement units (ORUs) were delivered and stowed externally on the ISS on a special pallet. These ORUs are spares for critical machinery located on the outside of the ISS. During this mission the crew also carried out testing of Shuttle inspection and repair hardware, as well as evaluated operational techniques and concepts for conducting on-orbit inspection and repair.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102167.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102167.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>This diagram shows the flow of recyclable resources in the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). The Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Group of the Flight Projects Directorate at the Marshall Space Flight Center is responsible for the regenerative ECLSS hardware, as well as providing technical support for the rest of the system. The regenerative ECLSS, whose main components are the Water Recovery System (WRS), and the Oxygen Generation System (OGS), reclaims and recycles water and oxygen. The ECLSS maintains a pressurized habitation environment, provides water recovery and storage, maintains and provides fire detection / suppression, and provides breathable air and a comfortable atmosphere in which to live and work within the ISS. The ECLSS hardware will be located in the Node 3 module of the ISS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102168.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0102168.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>This diagram shows the flow of water recovery and management in the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). The Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Group of the Flight Projects Directorate at the Marshall Space Flight Center is responsible for the regenerative ECLSS hardware, as well as providing technical support for the rest of the system. The regenerative ECLSS, whose main components are the Water Recovery System (WRS), and the Oxygen Generation System (OGS), reclaims and recycles water oxygen. The ECLSS maintains a pressurized habitation environment, provides water recovery and storage, maintains and provides fire detection/ suppression, and provides breathable air and a comfortable atmosphere in which to live and work within the ISS. The ECLSS hardware will be located in the Node 3 module of the ISS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-GSFC_20171208_Archive_e001717.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-GSFC_20171208_Archive_e001717.html"><span>Ice <span class="hlt">Station</span> Diagrams</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2017-12-08</p> <p>On July 18, 2011, Melinda Webster of University of Washington, calculated distances between sampling locations during the 2011 ICESCAPE mission's eighth sea ice <span class="hlt">station</span> in the Arctic Ocean. The ICESCAPE mission, or "Impacts of Climate on Ecosystems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment," is a NASA shipborne investigation to study how changing conditions in the Arctic affect the ocean's chemistry and ecosystems. The bulk of the research took place in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas in summer 2010 and 2011. Credit: NASA/Kathryn Hansen NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0101376.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0101376.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-02-01</p> <p>The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is responsible for designing and building the life support systems that will provide the crew of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) a comfortable environment in which to live and work. Scientists and engineers at the MSFC are working together to provide the ISS with systems that are safe, efficient and cost-effective. These compact and powerful systems are collectively called the Environmental Control and Life Support Systems, or simply, ECLSS. This is an exterior view of the U.S. Laboratory Module Simulator containing the ECLSS Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) testing facility at MSFC. At the bottom right is the data acquisition and control computers (in the blue equipment racks) that monitor the testing in the facility. The ITCS simulator facility duplicates the function, operation, and troubleshooting problems of the ITCS. The main function of the ITCS is to control the temperature of equipment and hardware installed in a typical ISS Payload Rack.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0600688.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0600688.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2006-07-04</p> <p>Space Shuttle Discovery and its seven-member crew launched at 2:38 p.m. (EDT) to begin the two-day journey to the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) on the historic Return to Flight STS-121 mission. The shuttle made history as it was the first human-occupying spacecraft to launch on Independence Day. During its 12-day mission, this utilization and logistics flight delivered a multipurpose logistics module (MPLM) to the ISS with several thousand pounds of new supplies and experiments. In addition, some new orbital replacement units (ORUs) were delivered and stowed externally on the ISS on a special pallet. These ORUs are spares for critical machinery located on the outside of the ISS. During this mission the crew also carried out testing of Shuttle inspection and repair hardware, as well as evaluated operational techniques and concepts for conducting on-orbit inspection and repair.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0101372.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0101372.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-02-01</p> <p>The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is responsible for designing and building the life support systems that will provide the crew of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) a comfortable environment in which to live and work. Scientists and engineers at the MSFC are working together to provide the ISS with systems that are safe, efficient, and cost-effective. These compact and powerful systems are collectively called the Environmental Control and Life Support Systems, or simply, ECLSS. This is a view of the ECLSS and the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) Test Facility in building 4755, MSFC. In the foreground is the 3-module ECLSS simulator comprised of the U.S. Laboratory Module Simulator, Node 1 Simulator, and Node 3/Habitation Module Simulator. At center left is the ITCS Simulator. The main function of the ITCS is to control the temperature of equipment and hardware installed in a typical ISS Payload Rack.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0101373.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0101373.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-02-01</p> <p>The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is responsible for designing and building the life support systems that will provide the crew of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) a comfortable environment in which to live and work. Scientists and engineers at the MSFC are working together to provide the ISS with systems that are safe, efficient, and cost-effective. These compact and powerful systems are collectively called the Environmental Control and Life Support Systems, or simply, ECLSS. This is a view of the ECLSS and the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) Test Facility in building 4755, MSFC. In the foreground is the 3-module ECLSS simulator comprised of the U.S. Laboratory Module Simulator, Node 1 Simulator, and Node 3/Habitation Module Simulator. On the left is the ITCS Simulator. The main function of the ITCS is to control the temperature of equipment and hardware installed in a typical ISS Payload Rack.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950011141','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950011141"><span>Advanced ground <span class="hlt">station</span> architecture</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Zillig, David; Benjamin, Ted</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>This paper describes a new <span class="hlt">station</span> architecture for NASA's Ground Network (GN). The architecture makes efficient use of emerging technologies to provide dramatic reductions in size, operational complexity, and operational and maintenance costs. The architecture, which is based on recent receiver work sponsored by the Office of Space Communications Advanced Systems Program, allows integration of both GN and Space Network (SN) modes of operation in the same electronics system. It is highly configurable through software and the use of charged coupled device (CCD) technology to provide a wide range of operating modes. Moreover, it affords modularity of features which are optional depending on the application. The resulting system incorporates advanced RF, digital, and remote control technology capable of introducing significant operational, performance, and cost benefits to a variety of NASA communications and tracking applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701897.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0701897.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-11-03</p> <p>While anchored to a foot restraint on the end of the Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS), astronaut Scott Parazynski, STS-120 mission specialist, participated in the mission's fourth session of extravehicular activity (EVA) while Space Shuttle Discovery was docked with the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). During the 7-hour and 19-minute space walk, Parazynski cut a snagged wire and installed homemade stabilizers designed to strengthen the structure and stability of the damaged P6 4B solar array wing. Astronaut Doug Wheelock (out of frame), mission specialist, assisted from the truss by keeping an eye on the distance between Parazynski and the array. Once the repair was complete, flight controllers on the ground successfully completed the deployment of the array.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-GSFC_20171208_Archive_e001719.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-GSFC_20171208_Archive_e001719.html"><span>Mapping an Ice <span class="hlt">Station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2017-12-08</p> <p>On July 10, 2011, Melinda Webster of University of Washington mapped the locations where measurements were collected during the 2011 ICESCAPE mission's fourth sea ice <span class="hlt">station</span> in the Chukchi Sea. The ICESCAPE mission, or "Impacts of Climate on Ecosystems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment," is a NASA shipborne investigation to study how changing conditions in the Arctic affect the ocean's chemistry and ecosystems. The bulk of the research took place in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas in summer 2010 and 2011. Credit: NASA/Kathryn Hansen NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21133501','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21133501"><span>Integrated microfluidic probe <span class="hlt">station</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Perrault, C M; Qasaimeh, M A; Brastaviceanu, T; Anderson, K; Kabakibo, Y; Juncker, D</p> <p>2010-11-01</p> <p>The microfluidic probe (MFP) consists of a flat, blunt tip with two apertures for the injection and reaspiration of a microjet into a solution--thus hydrodynamically confining the microjet--and is operated atop an inverted microscope that enables live imaging. By scanning across a surface, the microjet can be used for surface processing with the capability of both depositing and removing material; as it operates under immersed conditions, sensitive biological materials and living cells can be processed. During scanning, the MFP is kept immobile and centered over the objective of the inverted microscope, a few micrometers above a substrate that is displaced by moving the microscope stage and that is flushed continuously with the microjet. For consistent and reproducible surface processing, the gap between the MFP and the substrate, the MFP's alignment, the scanning speed, the injection and aspiration flow rates, and the image capture need all to be controlled and synchronized. Here, we present an automated MFP <span class="hlt">station</span> that integrates all of these functionalities and automates the key operational parameters. A custom software program is used to control an independent motorized Z stage for adjusting the gap, a motorized microscope stage for scanning the substrate, up to 16 syringe pumps for injecting and aspirating fluids, and an inverted fluorescence microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device camera. The parallelism between the MFP and the substrate is adjusted using manual goniometer at the beginning of the experiment. The alignment of the injection and aspiration apertures along the scanning axis is performed using a newly designed MFP screw holder. We illustrate the integrated MFP <span class="hlt">station</span> by the programmed, automated patterning of fluorescently labeled biotin on a streptavidin-coated surface.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0501029.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0501029.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-05-08</p> <p>This is the insignia for the STS-108 mission, which marked a major milestone in the assembly of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) as the first designated Utilization Flight, UF-1. The crew of Endeavour delivered the Expedition Four crew to ISS and returned the Expedition Three crew to Earth. Endeavour launched with a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) that was berthed to the ISS and unloaded. The MPLM was returned to Endeavour for the trip home and used again on a later flight. The crew patch depicts Endeavour and the ISS in the configuration at the time of arrival and docking. The <span class="hlt">Station</span> is shown viewed along the direction of flight as seen by the Shuttle crew during their final approach and docking along the X-axis. The three ribbons and stars on the left side of the patch signify the returning Expedition Three crew. The red, white and blue order of the ribbons represents the American commander for that mission. The three ribbons and stars on the right depict the arriving Expedition Four crew. The white, blue, and red order of the Expedition Four ribbon matches the color of the Russian flag and signifies that the commander of Expedition Four is a Russian cosmonaut. Each white star in the center of the patch represents the four Endeavour crew members. The names of the four astronauts who crewed Endeavour are shown along the top border of the patch. The three astronauts and three cosmonauts of the two expedition crews are shown on the chevron at the bottom of the patch.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title47-vol4-sec74-1283.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title47-vol4-sec74-1283.pdf"><span>47 CFR 74.1283 - <span class="hlt">Station</span> identification.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... FM Broadcast Booster <span class="hlt">Stations</span> § 74.1283 <span class="hlt">Station</span> identification. (a) The call sign of an FM broadcast... of an FM booster <span class="hlt">station</span> will consist of the call sign of the primary <span class="hlt">station</span> followed by the letters “FM” and the number of the booster <span class="hlt">station</span> being authorized, e.g., WFCCFM-1. (c) A translator <span class="hlt">station</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2011-title47-vol4-sec74-1283.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2011-title47-vol4-sec74-1283.pdf"><span>47 CFR 74.1283 - <span class="hlt">Station</span> identification.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... FM Broadcast Booster <span class="hlt">Stations</span> § 74.1283 <span class="hlt">Station</span> identification. (a) The call sign of an FM broadcast... of an FM booster <span class="hlt">station</span> will consist of the call sign of the primary <span class="hlt">station</span> followed by the letters “FM” and the number of the booster <span class="hlt">station</span> being authorized, e.g., WFCCFM-1. (c) A translator <span class="hlt">station</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2013-title47-vol4-sec74-1283.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2013-title47-vol4-sec74-1283.pdf"><span>47 CFR 74.1283 - <span class="hlt">Station</span> identification.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... FM Broadcast Booster <span class="hlt">Stations</span> § 74.1283 <span class="hlt">Station</span> identification. (a) The call sign of an FM broadcast... of an FM booster <span class="hlt">station</span> will consist of the call sign of the primary <span class="hlt">station</span> followed by the letters “FM” and the number of the booster <span class="hlt">station</span> being authorized, e.g., WFCCFM-1. (c) A translator <span class="hlt">station</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2014-title47-vol4-sec74-1283.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title47-vol4/pdf/CFR-2014-title47-vol4-sec74-1283.pdf"><span>47 CFR 74.1283 - <span class="hlt">Station</span> identification.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... FM Broadcast Booster <span class="hlt">Stations</span> § 74.1283 <span class="hlt">Station</span> identification. (a) The call sign of an FM broadcast... of an FM booster <span class="hlt">station</span> will consist of the call sign of the primary <span class="hlt">station</span> followed by the letters “FM” and the number of the booster <span class="hlt">station</span> being authorized, e.g., WFCCFM-1. (c) A translator <span class="hlt">station</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018SPIE10696E..0KG','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018SPIE10696E..0KG"><span><span class="hlt">Compressed</span> normalized block difference for object tracking</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gao, Yun; Zhang, Dengzhuo; Cai, Donglan; Zhou, Hao; Lan, Ge</p> <p>2018-04-01</p> <p>Feature extraction is very important for robust and real-time tracking. <span class="hlt">Compressive</span> sensing provided a technical support for real-time feature extraction. However, all existing <span class="hlt">compressive</span> tracking were based on <span class="hlt">compressed</span> Haar-like feature, and how to <span class="hlt">compress</span> many more excellent high-dimensional features is worth researching. In this paper, a novel <span class="hlt">compressed</span> normalized block difference feature (CNBD) was proposed. For resisting noise effectively in a highdimensional normalized pixel difference feature (NPD), a normalized block difference feature extends two pixels in the original formula of NPD to two blocks. A CNBD feature can be obtained by <span class="hlt">compressing</span> a normalized block difference feature based on <span class="hlt">compressive</span> sensing theory, with the sparse random Gaussian matrix as the measurement matrix. The comparative experiments of 7 trackers on 20 challenging sequences showed that the tracker based on CNBD feature can perform better than other trackers, especially than FCT tracker based on <span class="hlt">compressed</span> Haar-like feature, in terms of AUC, SR and Precision.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23026457','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23026457"><span>Physical examination of upper extremity <span class="hlt">compressive</span> neuropathies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Popinchalk, Samuel P; Schaffer, Alyssa A</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>A thorough history and physical examination are vital to the assessment of upper extremity <span class="hlt">compressive</span> neuropathies. This article summarizes relevant anatomy and physical examination findings associated with upper extremity <span class="hlt">compressive</span> neuropathies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780010552','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780010552"><span>Cluster <span class="hlt">compression</span> algorithm: A joint clustering/data <span class="hlt">compression</span> concept</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hilbert, E. E.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>The Cluster <span class="hlt">Compression</span> Algorithm (CCA), which was developed to reduce costs associated with transmitting, storing, distributing, and interpreting LANDSAT multispectral image data is described. The CCA is a preprocessing algorithm that uses feature extraction and data <span class="hlt">compression</span> to more efficiently represent the information in the image data. The format of the preprocessed data enables simply a look-up table decoding and direct use of the extracted features to reduce user computation for either image reconstruction, or computer interpretation of the image data. Basically, the CCA uses spatially local clustering to extract features from the image data to describe spectral characteristics of the data set. In addition, the features may be used to form a sequence of scalar numbers that define each picture element in terms of the cluster features. This sequence, called the feature map, is then efficiently represented by using source encoding concepts. Various forms of the CCA are defined and experimental results are presented to show trade-offs and characteristics of the various implementations. Examples are provided that demonstrate the application of the cluster <span class="hlt">compression</span> concept to multi-spectral images from LANDSAT and other sources.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995AeAm...33.....F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995AeAm...33.....F"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>: The next iteration</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Foley, Theresa M.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>NASA's international space <span class="hlt">station</span> is nearing the completion stage of its troublesome 10-year design phase. With a revised design and new management team, NASA is tasked to deliver the <span class="hlt">station</span> on time at a budget acceptable to both Congress and the White House. For the next three years, NASA is using tried-and-tested Russian hardware as the technical centerpiece of the <span class="hlt">station</span>. The new <span class="hlt">station</span> configuration consists of eight pressurized modules in which the crew can live and work; a long metal truss to connect the pieces; a robot arm for exterior jobs; a solar power system; and propelling the facility in space.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900004176','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900004176"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Engineering Design Issues</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mcruer, Duane T.; Boehm, Barry W.; Debra, Daniel B.; Green, C. Cordell; Henry, Richard C.; Maycock, Paul D.; Mcelroy, John H.; Pierce, Chester M.; Stafford, Thomas P.; Young, Laurence R.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom topics addressed include: general design issues; issues related to utilization and operations; issues related to systems requirements and design; and management issues relevant to design.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA242539','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA242539"><span>Data <span class="hlt">Compression</span> Using the Dictionary Approach Algorithm</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1990-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Compression</span> Technique The LZ77 is an OPM/L data <span class="hlt">compression</span> scheme suggested by Ziv and Lempel . A slightly modified...June 1984. 12. Witten H. I., Neal M. R. and Cleary G. J., Arithmetic Coding For Data <span class="hlt">Compression</span> , Communication ACM June 1987. 13. Ziv I. and Lempel A...AD-A242 539 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California DTIC NOV 181991 0 THESIS DATA <span class="hlt">COMPRESSION</span> USING THE DICTIONARY APPROACH ALGORITHM</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24524158','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24524158"><span>FRESCO: Referential <span class="hlt">compression</span> of highly similar sequences.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wandelt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>In many applications, sets of similar texts or sequences are of high importance. Prominent examples are revision histories of documents or genomic sequences. Modern high-throughput sequencing technologies are able to generate DNA sequences at an ever-increasing rate. In parallel to the decreasing experimental time and cost necessary to produce DNA sequences, computational requirements for analysis and storage of the sequences are steeply increasing. <span class="hlt">Compression</span> is a key technology to deal with this challenge. Recently, referential <span class="hlt">compression</span> schemes, storing only the differences between a to-be-<span class="hlt">compressed</span> input and a known reference sequence, gained a lot of interest in this field. In this paper, we propose a general open-source framework to <span class="hlt">compress</span> large amounts of biological sequence data called Framework for REferential Sequence <span class="hlt">COmpression</span> (FRESCO). Our basic <span class="hlt">compression</span> algorithm is shown to be one to two orders of magnitudes faster than comparable related work, while achieving similar <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratios. We also propose several techniques to further increase <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratios, while still retaining the advantage in speed: 1) selecting a good reference sequence; and 2) rewriting a reference sequence to allow for better <span class="hlt">compression</span>. In addition,we propose a new way of further boosting the <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratios by applying referential <span class="hlt">compression</span> to already referentially <span class="hlt">compressed</span> files (second-order <span class="hlt">compression</span>). This technique allows for <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratios way beyond state of the art, for instance,4,000:1 and higher for human genomes. We evaluate our algorithms on a large data set from three different species (more than 1,000 genomes, more than 3 TB) and on a collection of versions of Wikipedia pages. Our results show that real-time <span class="hlt">compression</span> of highly similar sequences at high <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratios is possible on modern hardware.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9871E..0CZ','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9871E..0CZ"><span>Image quality (IQ) guided multispectral image <span class="hlt">compression</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zheng, Yufeng; Chen, Genshe; Wang, Zhonghai; Blasch, Erik</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>Image <span class="hlt">compression</span> is necessary for data transportation, which saves both transferring time and storage space. In this paper, we focus on our discussion on lossy <span class="hlt">compression</span>. There are many standard image formats and corresponding <span class="hlt">compression</span> algorithms, for examples, JPEG (DCT -- discrete cosine transform), JPEG 2000 (DWT -- discrete wavelet transform), BPG (better portable graphics) and TIFF (LZW -- Lempel-Ziv-Welch). The image quality (IQ) of decompressed image will be measured by numerical metrics such as root mean square error (RMSE), peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), and structural Similarity (SSIM) Index. Given an image and a specified IQ, we will investigate how to select a <span class="hlt">compression</span> method and its parameters to achieve an expected <span class="hlt">compression</span>. Our scenario consists of 3 steps. The first step is to <span class="hlt">compress</span> a set of interested images by varying parameters and compute their IQs for each <span class="hlt">compression</span> method. The second step is to create several regression models per <span class="hlt">compression</span> method after analyzing the IQ-measurement versus <span class="hlt">compression</span>-parameter from a number of <span class="hlt">compressed</span> images. The third step is to <span class="hlt">compress</span> the given image with the specified IQ using the selected <span class="hlt">compression</span> method (JPEG, JPEG2000, BPG, or TIFF) according to the regressed models. The IQ may be specified by a <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratio (e.g., 100), then we will select the <span class="hlt">compression</span> method of the highest IQ (SSIM, or PSNR). Or the IQ may be specified by a IQ metric (e.g., SSIM = 0.8, or PSNR = 50), then we will select the <span class="hlt">compression</span> method of the highest <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratio. Our experiments tested on thermal (long-wave infrared) images (in gray scales) showed very promising results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21431607','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21431607"><span>A biological <span class="hlt">compression</span> model and its applications.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cao, Minh Duc; Dix, Trevor I; Allison, Lloyd</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>A biological <span class="hlt">compression</span> model, expert model, is presented which is superior to existing <span class="hlt">compression</span> algorithms in both <span class="hlt">compression</span> performance and speed. The model is able to <span class="hlt">compress</span> whole eukaryotic genomes. Most importantly, the model provides a framework for knowledge discovery from biological data. It can be used for repeat element discovery, sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis. We demonstrate that the model can handle statistically biased sequences and distantly related sequences where conventional knowledge discovery tools often fail.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=hatch&id=EJ1051706','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=hatch&id=EJ1051706"><span>Agricultural Experiment <span class="hlt">Stations</span> and Branch <span class="hlt">Stations</span> in the United States</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Pearson, Calvin H.; Atucha, Amaya</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>In 1887, Congress passed the Hatch Act, which formally established and provided a funding mechanism for agricultural experiment <span class="hlt">stations</span> in each state and territory in the United States. The main purpose of agricultural experiment <span class="hlt">stations</span> is to conduct agricultural research to meet the needs of the citizens of the United States. The objective of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=positron&pg=5&id=EJ493362','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=positron&pg=5&id=EJ493362"><span>Tomographic Image <span class="hlt">Compression</span> Using Multidimensional Transforms.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Villasenor, John D.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Describes a method for <span class="hlt">compressing</span> tomographic images obtained using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) by applying transform <span class="hlt">compression</span> using all available dimensions. This takes maximum advantage of redundancy of the data, allowing significant increases in <span class="hlt">compression</span> efficiency and performance. (13 references) (KRN)</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JPhCS.803a2141S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JPhCS.803a2141S"><span>H.264/AVC Video <span class="hlt">Compression</span> on Smartphones</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sharabayko, M. P.; Markov, N. G.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>In this paper, we studied the usage of H.264/AVC video <span class="hlt">compression</span> tools by the flagship smartphones. The results show that only a subset of tools is used, meaning that there is still a potential to achieve higher <span class="hlt">compression</span> efficiency within the H.264/AVC standard, but the most advanced smartphones are already reaching the <span class="hlt">compression</span> efficiency limit of H.264/AVC.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992SPIE.1653..241L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992SPIE.1653..241L"><span>Subjective evaluation of <span class="hlt">compressed</span> image quality</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lee, Heesub; Rowberg, Alan H.; Frank, Mark S.; Choi, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Yongmin</p> <p>1992-05-01</p> <p>Lossy data <span class="hlt">compression</span> generates distortion or error on the reconstructed image and the distortion becomes visible as the <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratio increases. Even at the same <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratio, the distortion appears differently depending on the <span class="hlt">compression</span> method used. Because of the nonlinearity of the human visual system and lossy data <span class="hlt">compression</span> methods, we have evaluated subjectively the quality of medical images <span class="hlt">compressed</span> with two different methods, an intraframe and interframe coding algorithms. The evaluated raw data were analyzed statistically to measure interrater reliability and reliability of an individual reader. Also, the analysis of variance was used to identify which <span class="hlt">compression</span> method is better statistically, and from what <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratio the quality of a <span class="hlt">compressed</span> image is evaluated as poorer than that of the original. Nine x-ray CT head images from three patients were used as test cases. Six radiologists participated in reading the 99 images (some were duplicates) <span class="hlt">compressed</span> at four different <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratios, original, 5:1, 10:1, and 15:1. The six readers agree more than by chance alone and their agreement was statistically significant, but there were large variations among readers as well as within a reader. The displacement estimated interframe coding algorithm is significantly better in quality than that of the 2-D block DCT at significance level 0.05. Also, 10:1 <span class="hlt">compressed</span> images with the interframe coding algorithm do not show any significant differences from the original at level 0.05.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol5/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol5-sec147-60.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol5/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol5-sec147-60.pdf"><span>46 CFR 147.60 - <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> gases.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> gases. 147.60 Section 147.60 Shipping COAST... Other Special Requirements for Particular Materials § 147.60 <span class="hlt">Compressed</span> gases. (a) Cylinder requirements. Cylinders used for containing hazardous ships' stores that are <span class="hlt">compressed</span> gases must be— (1) Authorized for...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=signal+AND+amplification&pg=3&id=EJ567389','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=signal+AND+amplification&pg=3&id=EJ567389"><span>Multichannel <span class="hlt">Compression</span>, Temporal Cues, and Audibility.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Souza, Pamela E.; Turner, Christopher W.</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>The effect of the reduction of the temporal envelope produced by multichannel <span class="hlt">compression</span> on recognition was examined in 16 listeners with hearing loss, with particular focus on audibility of the speech signal. Multichannel <span class="hlt">compression</span> improved speech recognition when superior audibility was provided by a two-channel <span class="hlt">compression</span> system over linear…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.P42B..04B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.P42B..04B"><span>Geophysical Monitoring <span class="hlt">Station</span> (GEMS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Banerdt, B.; Dehant, V. M.; Lognonne, P.; Smrekar, S. E.; Spohn, T.; GEMS Mission Team</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>GEMS (GEophysical Monitoring <span class="hlt">Station</span>) is one of three missions undergoing Phase A development for possible selection by NASA's Discovery Program. If selected, GEMS will perform the first comprehensive surface-based geophysical investigation of Mars, filling a longstanding gap in the scientific exploration of the solar system. It will illuminate the fundamental processes of terrestrial planet formation and evolution, providing unique and critical information about the initial accretion of the planet, the formation and differentiation of the core and crust, and the subsequent evolution of the interior. The scientific goals of GEMS are to understand the formation and evolution of terrestrial planets through investigation of the interior structure and processes of Mars and to determine its present level of tectonic activity and impact flux. A straightforward set of scientific objectives address these goals: 1) Determine the size, composition and physical state of the core; 2) Determine the thickness and structure of the crust; 3) Determine the composition and structure of the mantle; 4) Determine the thermal state of the interior; 5) Measure the rate and distribution of internal seismic activity; and 6) Measure the rate of impacts on the surface. To accomplish these objectives, GEMS carries a tightly-focused payload consisting of 3 investigations: 1) SEIS, a 6-component, very-broad-band seismometer, with careful thermal compensation/control and a sensitivity comparable to the best terrestrial instruments across a frequency range of 1 mHz to 50 Hz; 2) HP3 (Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package), an instrumented self-penetrating mole system that trails a string of temperature sensors to measure the thermal gradient and conductivity of the upper several meters, and thus the planetary heat flux; and 3) RISE (Rotation and Interior Structure Experiment), which would use the spacecraft X-band communication system to provide precision tracking for planetary dynamical</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvL.108l8102P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvL.108l8102P"><span>Population Genetics in <span class="hlt">Compressible</span> Flows</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pigolotti, Simone; Benzi, Roberto; Jensen, Mogens H.; Nelson, David R.</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>We study competition between two biological species advected by a <span class="hlt">compressible</span> velocity field. Individuals are treated as discrete Lagrangian particles that reproduce or die in a density-dependent fashion. In the absence of a velocity field and fitness advantage, number fluctuations lead to a coarsening dynamics typical of the stochastic Fisher equation. We investigate three examples of <span class="hlt">compressible</span> advecting fields: a shell model of turbulence, a sinusoidal velocity field and a linear velocity sink. In all cases, advection leads to a striking drop in the fixation time, as well as a large reduction in the global carrying capacity. We find localization on convergence zones, and very rapid extinction compared to well-mixed populations. For a linear velocity sink, one finds a bimodal distribution of fixation times. The long-lived states in this case are demixed configurations with a single interface, whose location depends on the fitness advantage.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25039798','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25039798"><span>Culture: copying, <span class="hlt">compression</span>, and conventionality.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tamariz, Mónica; Kirby, Simon</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Through cultural transmission, repeated learning by new individuals transforms cultural information, which tends to become increasingly <span class="hlt">compressible</span> (Kirby, Cornish, & Smith, ; Smith, Tamariz, & Kirby, ). Existing diffusion chain studies include in their design two processes that could be responsible for this tendency: learning (storing patterns in memory) and reproducing (producing the patterns again). This paper manipulates the presence of learning in a simple iterated drawing design experiment. We find that learning seems to be the causal factor behind the increase in <span class="hlt">compressibility</span> observed in the transmitted information, while reproducing is a source of random heritable innovations. Only a theory invoking these two aspects of cultural learning will be able to explain human culture's fundamental balance between stability and innovation. Copyright © 2014 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23715317','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23715317"><span>[Medical image <span class="hlt">compression</span>: a review].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Noreña, Tatiana; Romero, Eduardo</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Modern medicine is an increasingly complex activity , based on the evidence ; it consists of information from multiple sources : medical record text , sound recordings , images and videos generated by a large number of devices . Medical imaging is one of the most important sources of information since they offer comprehensive support of medical procedures for diagnosis and follow-up . However , the amount of information generated by image capturing gadgets quickly exceeds storage availability in radiology services , generating additional costs in devices with greater storage capacity . Besides , the current trend of developing applications in cloud computing has limitations, even though virtual storage is available from anywhere, connections are made through internet . In these scenarios the optimal use of information necessarily requires powerful <span class="hlt">compression</span> algorithms adapted to medical activity needs . In this paper we present a review of <span class="hlt">compression</span> techniques used for image storage , and a critical analysis of them from the point of view of their use in clinical settings.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADD018279','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADD018279"><span>Metering System for <span class="hlt">Compressible</span> Fluids.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1995-04-10</p> <p>pressure switch and a low pass pressure switch are included in 5 line with the <span class="hlt">compressible</span> fluid cylinder; consequently, the density of the...Once the pressure in first container 30 reaches the preset pressure for pressure switch 58, inlet valves 20 and 24 are closed and outlet valves 36...is allowed to drop to the preset pressure for pressure switch 60, at which time outlet valves 36 and 40 are closed, inlet valves 20 and 24 are</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19770008398','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19770008398"><span>Turbulence modeling for <span class="hlt">compressible</span> flows</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Marvin, J. G.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>Material prepared for a course on Applications and Fundamentals of Turbulence given at the University of Tennessee Space Institute, January 10 and 11, 1977, is presented. A complete concept of turbulence modeling is described, and examples of progess for its use in computational aerodynimics are given. Modeling concepts, experiments, and computations using the concepts are reviewed in a manner that provides an up-to-date statement on the status of this problem for <span class="hlt">compressible</span> flows.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/biblio/5382914','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/biblio/5382914"><span><span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air energy storage system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Ahrens, F.W.; Kartsounes, G.T.</p> <p></p> <p>An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air <span class="hlt">compression</span> and power generation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/863939','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/863939"><span><span class="hlt">Compressed</span> air energy storage system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Ahrens, Frederick W.; Kartsounes, George T.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air <span class="hlt">compression</span> and power generation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22407621','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22407621"><span>[<span class="hlt">Compression</span> treatment for burned skin].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jaafar, Fadhel; Lassoued, Mohamed A; Sahnoun, Mahdi; Sfar, Souad; Cheikhrouhou, Morched</p> <p>2012-02-01</p> <p>The regularity of a <span class="hlt">compressive</span> knit is defined as its ability to perform its function in a burnt skin. This property is essential to avoid the phenomenon of rejection of the material or toxicity problems But: Make knits biocompatible with high burnet of human skin. We fabric knits of elastic material. To ensure good adhesion to the skin, we made elastic material, typically a tight loop knitted. The Length of yarn absorbed by stitch and the raw matter are changed with each sample. The physical properties of each sample are measured and compared. Surface modifications are made to these samples by impregnation of microcapsules based on jojoba oil. Knits are compressif, elastic in all directions, light, thin, comfortable, and washable for hygiene issues. In addition, the washing can find their <span class="hlt">compressive</span> properties. The Jojoba Oil microcapsules hydrated the human burnet skin. This moisturizer is used to the firmness of the wound and it gives flexibility to the skin. <span class="hlt">Compressive</span> Knits are biocompatible with burnet skin. The mixture of natural and synthetic fibers is irreplaceable in terms comfort and regularity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20070026133','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20070026133"><span><span class="hlt">Compressibility</span> Effects in Aeronautical Engineering</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Stack, John</p> <p>1941-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Compressible</span>-flow research, while a relatively new field in aeronautics, is very old, dating back almost to the development of the first firearm. Over the last hundred years, researches have been conducted in the ballistics field, but these results have been of practically no use in aeronautical engineering because the phenomena that have been studied have been the more or less steady supersonic condition of flow. Some work that has been done in connection with steam turbines, particularly nozzle studies, has been of value, In general, however, understanding of <span class="hlt">compressible</span>-flow phenomena has been very incomplete and permitted no real basis for the solution of aeronautical engineering problems in which.the flow is likely to be unsteady because regions of both subsonic and supersonic speeds may occur. In the early phases of the development of the airplane, speeds were so low that the effects of <span class="hlt">compressibility</span> could be justifiably ignored. During the last war and immediately after, however, propellers exhibited losses in efficiency as the tip speeds approached the speed of sound, and the first experiments of an aeronautical nature were therefore conducted with propellers. Results of these experiments indicated serious losses of efficiency, but aeronautical engineers were not seriously concerned at the time became it was generally possible. to design propellers with quite low tip. speeds. With the development of new engines having increased power and rotational speeds, however, the problems became of increasing importance.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDL34001P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDL34001P"><span><span class="hlt">Compressibility</span> effects on turbulent mixing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Panickacheril John, John; Donzis, Diego</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>We investigate the effect of <span class="hlt">compressibility</span> on passive scalar mixing in isotropic turbulence with a focus on the fundamental mechanisms that are responsible for such effects using a large Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) database. The database includes simulations with Taylor Reynolds number (Rλ) up to 100, turbulent Mach number (Mt) between 0.1 and 0.6 and Schmidt number (Sc) from 0.5 to 1.0. We present several measures of mixing efficiency on different canonical flows to robustly identify <span class="hlt">compressibility</span> effects. We found that, like shear layers, mixing is reduced as Mach number increases. However, data also reveal a non-monotonic trend with Mt. To assess directly the effect of dilatational motions we also present results with both dilatational and soleniodal forcing. Analysis suggests that a small fraction of dilatational forcing decreases mixing time at higher Mt. Scalar spectra collapse when normalized by Batchelor variables which suggests that a <span class="hlt">compressive</span> mechanism similar to Batchelor mixing in incompressible flows might be responsible for better mixing at high Mt and with dilatational forcing compared to pure solenoidal mixing. We also present results on scalar budgets, in particular on production and dissipation. Support from NSF is gratefully acknowledged.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18489794','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18489794"><span><span class="hlt">Compressing</span> DNA sequence databases with coil.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>White, W Timothy J; Hendy, Michael D</p> <p>2008-05-20</p> <p>Publicly available DNA sequence databases such as GenBank are large, and are growing at an exponential rate. The sheer volume of data being dealt with presents serious storage and data communications problems. Currently, sequence data is usually kept in large "flat files," which are then <span class="hlt">compressed</span> using standard Lempel-Ziv (gzip) <span class="hlt">compression</span> - an approach which rarely achieves good <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratios. While much research has been done on <span class="hlt">compressing</span> individual DNA sequences, surprisingly little has focused on the <span class="hlt">compression</span> of entire databases of such sequences. In this study we introduce the sequence database <span class="hlt">compression</span> software coil. We have designed and implemented a portable software package, coil, for <span class="hlt">compressing</span> and decompressing DNA sequence databases based on the idea of edit-tree coding. coil is geared towards achieving high <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratios at the expense of execution time and memory usage during <span class="hlt">compression</span> - the <span class="hlt">compression</span> time represents a "one-off investment" whose cost is quickly amortised if the resulting <span class="hlt">compressed</span> file is transmitted many times. Decompression requires little memory and is extremely fast. We demonstrate a 5% improvement in <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratio over state-of-the-art general-purpose <span class="hlt">compression</span> tools for a large GenBank database file containing Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) data. Finally, coil can efficiently encode incremental additions to a sequence database. coil presents a compelling alternative to conventional <span class="hlt">compression</span> of flat files for the storage and distribution of DNA sequence databases having a narrow distribution of sequence lengths, such as EST data. Increasing <span class="hlt">compression</span> levels for databases having a wide distribution of sequence lengths is a direction for future work.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2426707','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2426707"><span><span class="hlt">Compressing</span> DNA sequence databases with coil</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>White, W Timothy J; Hendy, Michael D</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Background Publicly available DNA sequence databases such as GenBank are large, and are growing at an exponential rate. The sheer volume of data being dealt with presents serious storage and data communications problems. Currently, sequence data is usually kept in large "flat files," which are then <span class="hlt">compressed</span> using standard Lempel-Ziv (gzip) <span class="hlt">compression</span> – an approach which rarely achieves good <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratios. While much research has been done on <span class="hlt">compressing</span> individual DNA sequences, surprisingly little has focused on the <span class="hlt">compression</span> of entire databases of such sequences. In this study we introduce the sequence database <span class="hlt">compression</span> software coil. Results We have designed and implemented a portable software package, coil, for <span class="hlt">compressing</span> and decompressing DNA sequence databases based on the idea of edit-tree coding. coil is geared towards achieving high <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratios at the expense of execution time and memory usage during <span class="hlt">compression</span> – the <span class="hlt">compression</span> time represents a "one-off investment" whose cost is quickly amortised if the resulting <span class="hlt">compressed</span> file is transmitted many times. Decompression requires little memory and is extremely fast. We demonstrate a 5% improvement in <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratio over state-of-the-art general-purpose <span class="hlt">compression</span> tools for a large GenBank database file containing Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) data. Finally, coil can efficiently encode incremental additions to a sequence database. Conclusion coil presents a compelling alternative to conventional <span class="hlt">compression</span> of flat files for the storage and distribution of DNA sequence databases having a narrow distribution of sequence lengths, such as EST data. Increasing <span class="hlt">compression</span> levels for databases having a wide distribution of sequence lengths is a direction for future work. PMID:18489794</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860017665','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860017665"><span>Space <span class="hlt">station</span> impact experiments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Schultz, P.; Ahrens, T.; Alexander, W. M.; Cintala, M.; Gault, D.; Greeley, R.; Hawke, B. R.; Housen, K.; Schmidt, R.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Four processes serve to illustrate potential areas of study and their implications for general problems in planetary science. First, accretional processes reflect the success of collisional aggregation over collisional destruction during the early history of the solar system. Second, both catastrophic and less severe effects of impacts on planetary bodies survivng from the time of the early solar system may be expressed by asteroid/planetary spin rates, spin orientations, asteroid size distributions, and perhaps the origin of the Moon. Third, the surfaces of planetary bodies directly record the effects of impacts in the form of craters; these records have wide-ranging implications. Fourth, regoliths evolution of asteroidal surfaces is a consequence of cumulative impacts, but the absence of a significant gravity term may profoundly affect the retention of shocked fractions and agglutinate build-up, thereby biasing the correct interpretations of spectral reflectance data. An impact facility on the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> would provide the controlled conditions necessary to explore such processes either through direct simulation of conditions or indirect simulation of certain parameters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0101374.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0101374.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-02-01</p> <p>The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is responsible for designing and building the life support systems that will provide the crew of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) a comfortable environment in which to live and work. Scientists and engineers at the MSFC are working together to provide the ISS with systems that are safe, efficient, and cost-effective. These compact and powerful systems are collectively called the Environmental Control and Life Support Systems, or simply, ECLSS. In this photograph, the life test area on the left of the MSFC ECLSS test facility is where various subsystems and components are tested to determine how long they can operate without failing and to identify components needing improvement. Equipment tested here includes the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA), the Urine Processing Assembly (UPA), the mass spectrometer filament assemblies and sample pumps for the Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA). The Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) simulator facility (in the module in the right) duplicates the function and operation of the ITCS in the ISS U.S. Laboratory Module, Destiny. This facility provides support for Destiny, including troubleshooting problems related to the ITCS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0300316.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0300316.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2003-01-16</p> <p>In this International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) onboard photo, Expedition Six Science Officer Donald R. Pettit works to set up the Pulmonary Function in Flight (PuFF) experiment hardware in the Destiny Laboratory. Expedition Six is the fourth and final crew to perform the PuFF experiment. The PuFF experiment was developed to better understand what effects long term exposure to microgravity may have on the lungs. The focus is on measuring changes in the everness of gas exchange in the lungs, and on detecting changes in respiratory muscle strength. It allows astronauts to measure blood flow through the lungs, the ability of the lung to take up oxygen, and lung volumes. Each PuFF session includes five lung function tests, which involve breathing only cabin air. For each planned extravehicular (EVA) activity, a crew member performs a PuFF test within one week prior to the EVA. Following the EVA, those crew members perform another test to document the effect of exposure of the lungs to the low-pressure environment of the space suits. This experiment utilizes the Gas Analyzer System for Metabolic Analysis Physiology, or GASMAP, located in the Human Research Facility (HRF), along with a variety of other Puff equipment including a manual breathing valve, flow meter, pressure-flow module, pressure and volume calibration syringes, and disposable mouth pieces.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202664.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0202664.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-07-05</p> <p>Expedition Five flight engineer Peggy Whitson is shown installing the Solidification Using a Baffle in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA) experiment in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) in the Destiny laboratory aboard the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). SUBSA examines the solidification of semiconductor crystals from a melted material. Semiconductor crystals are used for many products that touch our everyday lives. They are found in computer chips, integrated circuits, and a multitude of other electronic devices, such as sensors for medical imaging equipment and detectors of nuclear radiation. Materials scientists want to make better semiconductor crystals to be able to further reduce the size of high-tech devices. In the microgravity environment, convection and sedimentation are reduced, so fluids do not remove and deform. Thus, space laboratories provide an ideal environment of studying solidification from the melt. This investigation is expected to determine the mechanism causing fluid motion during production of semiconductors in space. It will provide insight into the role of the melt motion in production of semiconductor crystals, advancing our knowledge of the crystal growth process. This could lead to a reduction of defects in semiconductor crystals produced in space and on Earth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0100909.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0100909.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-03-01</p> <p>The Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Group of the Flight Projects Directorate at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, is responsible for designing and building the life support systems that will provide the crew of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) a comfortable environment in which to live and work. This photograph shows the mockup of the the ECLSS to be installed in the Node 3 module of the ISS. From left to right, shower rack, waste management rack, Water Recovery System (WRS) Rack #2, WRS Rack #1, and Oxygen Generation System (OGS) rack are shown. The WRS provides clean water through the reclamation of wastewaters and is comprised of a Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) and a Water Processor Assembly (WPA). The UPA accepts and processes pretreated crewmember urine to allow it to be processed along with other wastewaters in the WPA. The WPA removes free gas, organic, and nonorganic constituents before the water goes through a series of multifiltration beds for further purification. The OGS produces oxygen for breathing air for the crew and laboratory animals, as well as for replacing oxygen loss. The OGS is comprised of a cell stack, which electrolyzes (breaks apart the hydrogen and oxygen molecules) some of the clean water provided by the WRS, and the separators that remove the gases from the water after electrolysis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0005602.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-0005602.html"><span>International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-09-01</p> <p>The Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Group of the Flight Projects Directorate at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, is responsible for designing and building the life support systems that will provide the crew of the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS) a comfortable environment in which to live and work. This is a close-up view of ECLSS Oxygen Generation System (OGS) rack. The ECLSS Group at the MSFC oversees the development of the OGS, which produces oxygen for breathing air for the crew and laboratory animals, as well as for replacing oxygen lost due to experiment use, airlock depressurization, module leakage, and carbon dioxide venting. The OGS consists primarily of the Oxygen Generator Assembly (OGA), provided by the prime contractor, the Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems, International (HSSSI) in Windsor Locks, Cornecticut and a Power Supply Module (PSM), supplied by the MSFC. The OGA is comprised of a cell stack that electrolyzes (breaks apart the hydrogen and oxygen molecules) some of the clean water provided by the Water Recovery System and the separators that remove the gases from water after electrolysis. The PSM provides the high power to the OGA needed to electrolyze the water.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850051590&hterms=Dental&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DDental','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850051590&hterms=Dental&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DDental"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> medical sciences concepts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mason, J. A.; Johnson, P. C., Jr.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Current life sciences concepts relating to Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> are presented including the following: research, extravehicular activity, biobehavioral considerations, medical care, maintenance of dental health, maintaining health through physical conditioning and countermeasures, protection from radiation, atmospheric contamination control, atmospheric composition, noise pollution, food supply and service, clothing and furnishings, and educational program possibilities. Information on the current status of Soviet Space <span class="hlt">Stations</span> is contained.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890015045','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890015045"><span>The space <span class="hlt">station</span> power system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>The requirements for electrical power by the proposed Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Freedom are discussed. The options currently under consideration are examined. The three power options are photovoltaic, solar dynamic, and a hybrid system. Advantages and disadvantages of each system are tabulated. Drawings and artist concepts of the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> configuration are provided.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-201304220015HQ.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-201304220015HQ.html"><span>Earth Day at Union <span class="hlt">Station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-04-22</p> <p>NASA's Earth Dome is seen at Union <span class="hlt">Station</span>, Monday, April 22, 2013 in Washington. The Earth Dome housed two of NASA's Science Gallery exhibits as part of a NASA-sponsored Earth Day event at Union <span class="hlt">Station</span>. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=space+AND+station&id=EJ859253','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=space+AND+station&id=EJ859253"><span>Sighting the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Teets, Donald</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>This article shows how to use six parameters describing the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span>'s orbit to predict when and in what part of the sky observers can look for the <span class="hlt">station</span> as it passes over their location. The method requires only a good background in trigonometry and some familiarity with elementary vector and matrix operations. An included…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=chemical+AND+Sensors&pg=4&id=EJ314344','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=chemical+AND+Sensors&pg=4&id=EJ314344"><span>Computer-Assisted Laboratory <span class="hlt">Stations</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Snyder, William J., Hanyak, Michael E.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Describes the advantages and features of computer-assisted laboratory <span class="hlt">stations</span> for use in a chemical engineering program. Also describes a typical experiment at such a <span class="hlt">station</span>: determining the response times of a solid state humidity sensor at various humidity conditions and developing an empirical model for the sensor. (JN)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14650634','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14650634"><span>Lossless <span class="hlt">compression</span> of otoneurological eye movement signals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tossavainen, Timo; Juhola, Martti</p> <p>2002-12-01</p> <p>We studied the performance of several lossless <span class="hlt">compression</span> algorithms on eye movement signals recorded in otoneurological balance and other physiological laboratories. Despite the wide use of these signals their <span class="hlt">compression</span> has not been studied prior to our research. The <span class="hlt">compression</span> methods were based on the common model of using a predictor to decorrelate the input and using an entropy coder to encode the residual. We found that these eye movement signals recorded at 400 Hz and with 13 bit amplitude resolution could losslessly be <span class="hlt">compressed</span> with a <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratio of about 2.7.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20000065622','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20000065622"><span>Magnetic Flux <span class="hlt">Compression</span> Concept for Aerospace Propulsion and Power</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Litchford, Ron J.; Robertson, Tony; Hawk, Clark W.; Turner, Matt; Koelfgen, Syri</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>The objective of this research is to investigate system level performance and design issues associated with magnetic flux <span class="hlt">compression</span> devices for aerospace power generation and propulsion. The proposed concept incorporates the principles of magnetic flux <span class="hlt">compression</span> for direct conversion of nuclear/chemical detonation energy into electrical power. Specifically a magnetic field is <span class="hlt">compressed</span> between an expanding detonation driven diamagnetic plasma and a stator structure formed from a high temperature superconductor (HTSC). The expanding plasma cloud is entirely confined by the <span class="hlt">compressed</span> magnetic field at the expense of internal kinetic energy. Electrical power is inductively extracted, and the detonation products are collimated and expelled through a magnetic nozzle. The long-term development of this highly integrated generator/propulsion system opens up revolutionary NASA Mission scenarios for future interplanetary and interstellar spacecraft. The unique features of this concept with respect to future space travel opportunities are as follows: ability to implement high energy density chemical detonations or ICF microfusion bursts as the impulsive diamagnetic plasma source; high power density system characteristics constrain the size, weight, and cost of the vehicle architecture; provides inductive storage pulse power with a very short pulse rise time; multimegajoule energy bursts/terawatt power bursts; compact pulse power driver for low-impedance dense plasma devices; utilization of low cost HTSC material and casting technology to increase magnetic flux conservation and inductive energy storage; improvement in chemical/nuclear-to-electric energy conversion efficiency and the ability to generate significant levels of thrust with very high specific impulse; potential for developing a small, lightweight, low cost, self-excited integrated propulsion and power system suitable for space <span class="hlt">stations</span>, planetary bases, and interplanetary and interstellar space travel</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7529E..12D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7529E..12D"><span>Visually lossless <span class="hlt">compression</span> of digital hologram sequences</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Darakis, Emmanouil; Kowiel, Marcin; Näsänen, Risto; Naughton, Thomas J.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Digital hologram sequences have great potential for the recording of 3D scenes of moving macroscopic objects as their numerical reconstruction can yield a range of perspective views of the scene. Digital holograms inherently have large information content and lossless coding of holographic data is rather inefficient due to the speckled nature of the interference fringes they contain. Lossy coding of still holograms and hologram sequences has shown promising results. By definition, lossy <span class="hlt">compression</span> introduces errors in the reconstruction. In all of the previous studies, numerical metrics were used to measure the <span class="hlt">compression</span> error and through it, the coding quality. Digital hologram reconstructions are highly speckled and the speckle pattern is very sensitive to data changes. Hence, numerical quality metrics can be misleading. For example, for low <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratios, a numerically significant coding error can have visually negligible effects. Yet, in several cases, it is of high interest to know how much lossy <span class="hlt">compression</span> can be achieved, while maintaining the reconstruction quality at visually lossless levels. Using an experimental threshold estimation method, the staircase algorithm, we determined the highest <span class="hlt">compression</span> ratio that was not perceptible to human observers for objects <span class="hlt">compressed</span> with Dirac and MPEG-4 <span class="hlt">compression</span> methods. This level of <span class="hlt">compression</span> can be regarded as the point below which <span class="hlt">compression</span> is perceptually lossless although physically the <span class="hlt">compression</span> is lossy. It was found that up to 4 to 7.5 fold <span class="hlt">compression</span> can be obtained with the above methods without any perceptible change in the appearance of video sequences.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999SPIE.3658..448E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999SPIE.3658..448E"><span>JPEG and wavelet <span class="hlt">compression</span> of ophthalmic images</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Eikelboom, Robert H.; Yogesan, Kanagasingam; Constable, Ian J.; Barry, Christopher J.</p> <p>1999-05-01</p> <p>This study was designed to determine the degree and methods of digital image <span class="hlt">compression</span> to produce ophthalmic imags of sufficient quality for transmission and diagnosis. The photographs of 15 subjects, which inclined eyes with normal, subtle and distinct pathologies, were digitized to produce 1.54MB images and <span class="hlt">compressed</span> to five different methods: (i) objectively by calculating the RMS error between the uncompressed and <span class="hlt">compressed</span> images, (ii) semi-subjectively by assessing the visibility of blood vessels, and (iii) subjectively by asking a number of experienced observers to assess the images for quality and clinical interpretation. Results showed that as a function of <span class="hlt">compressed</span> image size, wavelet <span class="hlt">compressed</span> images produced less RMS error than JPEG <span class="hlt">compressed</span> images. Blood vessel branching could be observed to a greater extent after Wavelet <span class="hlt">compression</span> compared to JPEG <span class="hlt">compression</span> produced better images then a JPEG <span class="hlt">compression</span> for a given image size. Overall, it was shown that images had to be <span class="hlt">compressed</span> to below 2.5 percent for JPEG and 1.7 percent for Wavelet <span class="hlt">compression</span> before fine detail was lost, or when image quality was too poor to make a reliable diagnosis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860050697&hterms=customers&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dcustomers','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860050697&hterms=customers&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dcustomers"><span>Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> crew workload - <span class="hlt">Station</span> operations and customer accommodations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Shinkle, G. L.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>The features of the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> which permit crew members to utilize work time for payload operations are discussed. The user orientation, modular design, nonstressful flight regime, in space construction, on board control, automation and robotics, and maintenance and servicing of the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> are examined. The proposed crew size, skills, and functions as <span class="hlt">station</span> operator and mission specialists are described. Mission objectives and crew functions, which include performing material processing, life science and astronomy experiments, satellite and payload equipment servicing, systems monitoring and control, maintenance and repair, Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle and Mobile Remote Manipulator System operations, on board planning, housekeeping, and health maintenance and recreation, are studied.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991milc.conf..644D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991milc.conf..644D"><span><span class="hlt">Compression</span> of facsimile graphics for transmission over digital mobile satellite circuits</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dimolitsas, Spiros; Corcoran, Frank L.</p> <p></p> <p>A technique for reducing the transmission requirements of facsimile images while maintaining high intelligibility in mobile communications environments is described. The algorithms developed are capable of achieving a <span class="hlt">compression</span> of approximately 32 to 1. The technique focuses on the implementation of a low-cost interface unit suitable for facsimile communication between low-power mobile <span class="hlt">stations</span> and fixed <span class="hlt">stations</span> for both point-to-point and point-to-multipoint transmissions. This interface may be colocated with the transmitting facsimile terminals. The technique was implemented and tested by intercepting facsimile documents in a store-and-forward mode.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000070376&hterms=study+computers+laptops&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dstudy%2Bcomputers%2Blaptops','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000070376&hterms=study+computers+laptops&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dstudy%2Bcomputers%2Blaptops"><span>Micro Weather <span class="hlt">Station</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hoenk, Michael E.</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>Improved in situ meteorological measurements in the troposphere and stratosphere are needed for studies of weather and climate, both as a primary data source and as validation for remote sensing instruments. Following the initial development and successful flight validation of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) hygrometer, the micro weather <span class="hlt">station</span> program was directed toward the development of an integrated instrument, capable of accurate, in situ profiling of the troposphere, and small enough to fly on a radiosonde balloon for direct comparison with standard radiosondes. On April 23, 1998, working with Frank Schmidlin and Bob Olson of Wallops Island Flight Facility, we flew our instrument in a dual payload experiment, for validation and direct comparison with a Vaisala radiosonde. During that flight, the SAW dewpoint hygrometer measured frostpoint down to -76T at 44,000 feet. Using a laptop computer in radio contact with the balloon, we monitored data in real time, issued the cutdown command, and recovered the payload less than an hour after landing in White Sands Missile Range, 50 miles from the launch site in Hatch, New Mexico. Future flights will extend the intercomparison, and attempt to obtain in situ meteorological profiles from the surface through the tropopause. The SAW hygrometer was successfully deployed on the NASA DC8 as part of NASA's Third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3) during August and September, 1998. This field campaign was devoted to the study of hurricane tracking and intensification using NASA-funded aircraft. In situ humidity data from the SAW hygrometer are currently being analyzed and compared with data from other instruments on the DC8 and ER2 aircraft. Additional information is contained in the original.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AIPC..552..733A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AIPC..552..733A"><span>Milliwatt radioisotope power supply for the PASCAL Mars surface <span class="hlt">stations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Allen, Daniel T.; Murbach, Marcus S.</p> <p>2001-02-01</p> <p>A milliwatt power supply is being developed based on the 1 watt Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit (RHU), which has already been used to provide heating alone on numerous spacecraft. In the past year the power supply has been integrated into the design of the proposed PASCAL Mars Network Mission, which is intended to place 24 surface climate monitoring <span class="hlt">stations</span> on Mars. The PASCAL Mars mission calls for the individual surface <span class="hlt">stations</span> to be transported together in one spacecraft on a trajectory direct from launch to orbit around Mars. From orbit around Mars each surface <span class="hlt">station</span> will be deployed on a SCRAMP (slotted <span class="hlt">compression</span> ramp) probe and, after aerodynamic and parachute deceleration, land at a preselected location on the planet. During descent sounding data and still images will be accumulated, and, once on the surface, the <span class="hlt">station</span> will take measurements of pressure, temperature and overhead atmospheric optical depth for a period of 10 Mars years (18.8 Earth years). Power for periodic data acquisition and transmission to orbital then to Earth relay will come from a bank of ultracapacitors which will be continuously recharged by the radioisotope power supply. This electronic system has been designed and a breadboard built. In the ultimate design the electronics will be arrayed on the exterior surface of the radioisotope power supply in order to take advantage of the reject heat. This assembly in turn is packaged within the SCRAMP, and that assembly comprises the surface <span class="hlt">station</span>. An electrically heated but otherwise prototypical power supply was operated in combination with the surface <span class="hlt">station</span> breadboard system, which included the ultracapacitors. Other issues addressed in this work have been the capability of the generator to withstand the mechanical shock of the landing on Mars and the effectiveness of the generator's multi-foil vacuum thermal insulation. .</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860005869','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860005869"><span>Space <span class="hlt">station</span> propulsion requirements study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Wilkinson, C. L.; Brennan, S. M.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Propulsion system requirements to support Low Earth Orbit (LEO) manned space <span class="hlt">station</span> development and evolution over a wide range of potential capabilities and for a variety of STS servicing and space <span class="hlt">station</span> operating strategies are described. The term space <span class="hlt">station</span> and the overall space <span class="hlt">station</span> configuration refers, for the purpose of this report, to a group of potential LEO spacecraft that support the overall space <span class="hlt">station</span> mission. The group consisted of the central space <span class="hlt">station</span> at 28.5 deg or 90 deg inclinations, unmanned free-flying spacecraft that are both tethered and untethered, a short-range servicing vehicle, and a longer range servicing vehicle capable of GEO payload transfer. The time phasing for preferred propulsion technology approaches is also investigated, as well as the high-leverage, state-of-the-art advancements needed, and the qualitative and quantitative benefits of these advancements on STS/space <span class="hlt">station</span> operations. The time frame of propulsion technologies applicable to this study is the early 1990's to approximately the year 2000.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040085896&hterms=distillation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Ddistillation','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040085896&hterms=distillation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Ddistillation"><span>Results of the Vapor <span class="hlt">Compression</span> Distillation Flight Experiment (VCD-FE)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hutchens, Cindy; Graves, Rex</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Vapor <span class="hlt">Compression</span> Distillation (VCD) is the chosen technology for urine processing aboard the International Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> (ISS). Key aspects of the VCD design have been verified and significant improvements made throughout the ground;based development history. However, an important element lacking from previous subsystem development efforts was flight-testing. Consequently, the demonstration and validation of the VCD technology and the investigation of subsystem performance in micro-gravity were the primary goals of the VCD-FE. The Vapor <span class="hlt">Compression</span> Distillation Flight Experiment (VCD-E) was a flight experiment aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia during the STS-107 mission. The VCD-FE was a full-scale developmental version of the Space <span class="hlt">Station</span> Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) and was designed to test some of the potential micro-gravity issues with the design. This paper summarizes the experiment results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol4/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol4-sec108-633.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol4/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol4-sec108-633.pdf"><span>46 CFR 108.633 - Fire <span class="hlt">stations</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire <span class="hlt">stations</span>. 108.633 Section 108.633 Shipping COAST... Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.633 Fire <span class="hlt">stations</span>. Each fire <span class="hlt">station</span> must be identified by marking: “FIRE <span class="hlt">STATION</span> NO. __;” next to the <span class="hlt">station</span> in letters and numbers at least 5 centimeters (2 inches) high. ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title47-vol5/pdf/CFR-2013-title47-vol5-sec97-209.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title47-vol5/pdf/CFR-2013-title47-vol5-sec97-209.pdf"><span>47 CFR 97.209 - Earth <span class="hlt">station</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Earth <span class="hlt">station</span>. 97.209 Section 97.209... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.209 Earth <span class="hlt">station</span>. (a) Any amateur <span class="hlt">station</span> may be an Earth <span class="hlt">station</span>. A holder of any class operator license may be the control operator of an Earth <span class="hlt">station</span>, subject to the...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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