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Sample records for compressive strength

  1. Compressive strength of carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Prandy, J.M. ); Hahn, H.T. )

    1991-01-01

    Most composites are weaker in compression than in tension, which is due to the poor compressive strength of the load bearing fibers. The present paper discusses the compressive strengths and failure modes of 11 different carbon fibers: PAN-AS1, AS4, IM6, IM7, T700, T300, GY-30, pitch-75, ultra high modulus (UHM), high modulus (HM), and high strength (HS). The compressive strength was determined by embedding a fiber bundle in a transparent epoxy matrix and testing in compression. The resin allows for the containment and observation of failure during and after testing while also providing lateral support to the fibers. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to determine the global failure modes of the fibers.

  2. (Finite) statistical size effects on compressive strength

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jérôme; Girard, Lucas; Gimbert, Florent; Amitrano, David; Vandembroucq, Damien

    2014-01-01

    The larger structures are, the lower their mechanical strength. Already discussed by Leonardo da Vinci and Edmé Mariotte several centuries ago, size effects on strength remain of crucial importance in modern engineering for the elaboration of safety regulations in structural design or the extrapolation of laboratory results to geophysical field scales. Under tensile loading, statistical size effects are traditionally modeled with a weakest-link approach. One of its prominent results is a prediction of vanishing strength at large scales that can be quantified in the framework of extreme value statistics. Despite a frequent use outside its range of validity, this approach remains the dominant tool in the field of statistical size effects. Here we focus on compressive failure, which concerns a wide range of geophysical and geotechnical situations. We show on historical and recent experimental data that weakest-link predictions are not obeyed. In particular, the mechanical strength saturates at a nonzero value toward large scales. Accounting explicitly for the elastic interactions between defects during the damage process, we build a formal analogy of compressive failure with the depinning transition of an elastic manifold. This critical transition interpretation naturally entails finite-size scaling laws for the mean strength and its associated variability. Theoretical predictions are in remarkable agreement with measurements reported for various materials such as rocks, ice, coal, or concrete. This formalism, which can also be extended to the flowing instability of granular media under multiaxial compression, has important practical consequences for future design rules. PMID:24733930

  3. Compressive strength of delaminated aerospace composites.

    PubMed

    Butler, Richard; Rhead, Andrew T; Liu, Wenli; Kontis, Nikolaos

    2012-04-28

    An efficient analytical model is described which predicts the value of compressive strain below which buckle-driven propagation of delaminations in aerospace composites will not occur. An extension of this efficient strip model which accounts for propagation transverse to the direction of applied compression is derived. In order to provide validation for the strip model a number of laminates were artificially delaminated producing a range of thin anisotropic sub-laminates made up of 0°, ±45° and 90° plies that displayed varied buckling and delamination propagation phenomena. These laminates were subsequently subject to experimental compression testing and nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) using cohesive elements. Comparison of strip model results with those from experiments indicates that the model can conservatively predict the strain at which propagation occurs to within 10 per cent of experimental values provided (i) the thin-film assumption made in the modelling methodology holds and (ii) full elastic coupling effects do not play a significant role in the post-buckling of the sub-laminate. With such provision, the model was more accurate and produced fewer non-conservative results than FEA. The accuracy and efficiency of the model make it well suited to application in optimum ply-stacking algorithms to maximize laminate strength.

  4. Compressive strength of fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. G., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Results of an experimental and analytical investigation of the compressive strength of unidirectional boron-epoxy composite material are presented. Observation of fiber coordinates in a boron-epoxy composite indicates that the fibers contain initial curvature. Combined axial compression and torsion tests were conducted on boron-epoxy tubes and it was shown that the shear modulus is a function of axial compressive stress. An analytical model which includes initial curvature in the fibers and permits an estimate of the effect of curvature on compressive strength is proposed. Two modes of failure which may result from the application of axial compressive stress are analyzed - delamination and shear instability. Based on tests and analysis, failure of boron-epoxy under axial compressive load is due to shear instability.

  5. Compressive strength of the mineral reinforced aluminium alloy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Rama; Sharma, Anju; Kumar, Suresh; Singh, Gurmel; Pandey, O. P.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the results of quasi-static compressive strength of aluminium alloy reinforced with different concentration of rutile mineral particles. The reinforced material shows increase in compressive strength with 5wt% rutile concentration as compared to the base alloy. This increase in compressive strength of composite is attributed to direct strengthening due to transfer of load from lower stiffness matrix (LM13 alloy) to higher stiffness reinforcement (rutile particles). Indirect strengthening mechanisms like increase in dislocation density at the matrix-reinforcement interface, grain size refinement of the matrix and dispersion strengthening are also the contributing factors. The decrease in compressive strength of composite with the increased concentration of rutile concentration beyond 5 wt.% can be attributed to the increase in dislocation density due to the void formation at the matrix-reinforcement interface.

  6. Studies of fiber-matrix adhesion on compression strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, Willard D.; Nairn, John A.; Boll, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    A study was initiated on the effect of the matrix polymer and the fiber matrix bond strength of carbon fiber polymer matrix composites. The work includes tests with micro-composites, single ply composites, laminates, and multi-axial loaded cylinders. The results obtained thus far indicate that weak fiber-matrix adhesion dramatically reduces 0 degree compression strength. Evidence is also presented that the flaws in the carbon fiber that govern compression strength differ from those that determine fiber tensile strength. Examination of post-failure damage in the single ply tests indicates kink banding at the crack tip.

  7. Compressive residual strength of graphite/epoxy laminates after impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, Teresa A.; Lagace, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    The issue of damage tolerance after impact, in terms of the compressive residual strength, was experimentally examined in graphite/epoxy laminates using Hercules AS4/3501-6 in a (+ or - 45/0)(sub 2S) configuration. Three different impactor masses were used at various velocities and the resultant damage measured via a number of nondestructive and destructive techniques. Specimens were then tested to failure under uniaxial compression. The results clearly show that a minimum compressive residual strength exists which is below the open hole strength for a hole of the same diameter as the impactor. Increases in velocity beyond the point of minimum strength cause a difference in the damage produced and cause a resultant increase in the compressive residual strength which asymptotes to the open hole strength value. Furthermore, the results show that this minimum compressive residual strength value is independent of the impactor mass used and is only dependent upon the damage present in the impacted specimen which is the same for the three impactor mass cases. A full 3-D representation of the damage is obtained through the various techniques. Only this 3-D representation can properly characterize the damage state that causes the resultant residual strength. Assessment of the state-of-the-art in predictive analysis capabilities shows a need to further develop techniques based on the 3-D damage state that exists. In addition, the need for damage 'metrics' is clearly indicated.

  8. The compressive strengths of ice cubes of different sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, G.A.; Schulson, E.M.; Jones, D.E.; Zhang, J. . Thayer School of Engineering)

    1993-05-01

    Cubes of side length from 10 to 150 mm were prepared from freshwater granular ice of about 1 mm grain size and then compressed uniaxially to failure at [minus]10 C. In addition to size, the variables were strain rate (10[sup [minus]5] s[sup [minus]1] and 10[sup [minus]2] s[sup [minus]1]) and boundary conditions (ground brass plates, ground and polished brass plates, and brass brushes). The results showed that over the range investigated, size is not an important factor when considering the ductile compressive strength of ice. It also appears that size is not a factor when considering the brittle compressive failure strength under more ideal loading conditions. However, under less ideal conditions where perturbations on the loading surface may be significant, the brittle compressive strength decreases as the size of cube increases. In this case, the effect is attributed to nonsimultaneous failure.

  9. Determination of Plate Compressive Strengths at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimerl, George J; Roberts, William M

    1950-01-01

    The results of local-instability tests of h-section plate assemblies and compressive stress-strain tests of extruded 75s-t6 aluminum alloy, obtained to determine flat-plate compressive strength under stabilized elevated temperature conditions, are given for temperatures up to 600 degrees F. The results show that methods available for calculating the critical compressive stress at room temperature can also be used at elevated temperatures if the applicable compressive stress-strain curve for the material is given.

  10. Comparison of Open-Hole Compression Strength and Compression After Impact Strength on Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Laminates for the Ares I Composite Interstage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Andrew J.; Nettles, Alan T.; Jackson, Justin R.

    2011-01-01

    Notched (open hole) composite laminates were tested in compression. The effect on strength of various sizes of through holes was examined. Results were compared to the average stress criterion model. Additionally, laminated sandwich structures were damaged from low-velocity impact with various impact energy levels and different impactor geometries. The compression strength relative to damage size was compared to the notched compression result strength. Open-hole compression strength was found to provide a reasonable bound on compression after impact.

  11. Calcite-forming bacteria for compressive strength improvement in mortar.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Jin; Park, Yu-Mi; Chun, Woo-Young; Kim, Wha-Jung; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2010-04-01

    Microbiological calcium carbonate precipitation (MCP) has been investigated for its ability to improve the compressive strength of concrete mortar. However, very few studies have been conducted on the use of calcite-forming bacteria (CFB) to improve compressive strength. In this study, we discovered new bacterial genera that are capable of improving the compressive strength of concrete mortar. We isolated 4 CFB from 7 environmental concrete structures. Using sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA genes, the CFB could be partially identified as Sporosarcina soli KNUC401, Bacillus massiliensis KNUC402, Arthrobacter crystallopoietes KNUC403, and Lysinibacillus fusiformis KNUC404. Crystal aggregates were apparent in the bacterial colonies grown on an agar medium. Stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction analyses illustrated both the crystal growth and the crystalline structure of the CaCO3 crystals. We used the isolates to improve the compressive strength of concrete mortar cubes and found that KNUC403 offered the best improvement in compressive strength.

  12. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  13. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  14. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-04-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  15. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-12-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  16. Compression Strength of Composite Primary Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1998-01-01

    Research conducted under NASA Grant NAG-1-537 focussed on the response and failure of advanced composite material structures for application to aircraft. Both experimental and analytical methods were utilized to study the fundamental mechanics of the response and failure of selected structural components subjected to quasi-static loads. Most of the structural components studied were thin-walled elements subject to compression, such that they exhibited buckling and postbuckling responses prior to catastrophic failure. Consequently, the analyses were geometrically nonlinear. Structural components studied were dropped-ply laminated plates, stiffener crippling, pressure pillowing of orthogonally stiffened cylindrical shells, axisymmetric response of pressure domes, and the static crush of semi-circular frames. Failure of these components motivated analytical studies on an interlaminar stress postprocessor for plate and shell finite element computer codes, and global/local modeling strategies in finite element modeling. These activities are summarized in the following section. References to literature published under the grant are listed on pages 5 to 10 by a letter followed by a number under the categories of journal publications, conference publications, presentations, and reports. These references are indicated in the text by their letter and number as a superscript.

  17. Relationship among fatigue strength, mean grain size and compressive strength of a rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. K.

    1988-10-01

    Fatigue tests carried on three sets of samples having different mean grain sizes revealed that fatigue strength is a function of mean grain size of the rock. Samples having smaller grain size show higher value of fatigue strength. Graywacke samples from Flagstaff formation having mean grain sizes of 1.79 mm, 1.35 mm and 0.93 mm showed fatigue strengths of 87%, 88.25% and 89.1% respectively. Since the mean uniaxial compressive strength also varied with varying grain size, i. e. higher mean strength value for samples having finer grain size; the fatigue strength of a rock also shows a converse relation with mean uniaxial compressive strength.

  18. Compressive strength and hydration processes of concrete with recycled aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Koenders, Eduardus A.B.; Pepe, Marco; Martinelli, Enzo

    2014-02-15

    This paper deals with the correlation between the time evolution of the degree of hydration and the compressive strength of Recycled Aggregate Concrete (RAC) for different water to cement ratios and initial moisture conditions of the Recycled Concrete Aggregates (RCAs). Particularly, the influence of such moisture conditions is investigated by monitoring the hydration process and determining the compressive strength development of fully dry or fully saturated recycled aggregates in four RAC mixtures. Hydration processes are monitored via temperature measurements in hardening concrete samples and the time evolution of the degree of hydration is determined through a 1D hydration and heat flow model. The effect of the initial moisture condition of RCAs employed in the considered concrete mixtures clearly emerges from this study. In fact, a novel conceptual method is proposed to predict the compressive strength of RAC-systems, from the initial mixture parameters and the hardening conditions. -- Highlights: •The concrete industry is more and more concerned with sustainability issues. •The use of recycled aggregates is a promising solution to enhance sustainability. •Recycled aggregates affect both hydration processes and compressive strength. •A fundamental approach is proposed to unveil the influence of recycled aggregates. •Some experimental comparisons are presented to validate the proposed approach.

  19. Estimating rock compressive strength from Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) grinds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, B. J.; Bridges, N. T.; Cohen, J.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Lennon, A.; Paulsen, G.; Zacny, K.

    2013-06-01

    Each Mars Exploration Rover carries a Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) whose intended use was to abrade the outer surfaces of rocks to expose more pristine material. Motor currents drawn by the RAT motors are related to the strength and hardness of rock surfaces undergoing abrasion, and these data can be used to infer more about a target rock's physical properties. However, no calibration of the RAT exists. Here, we attempt to derive an empirical correlation using an assemblage of terrestrial rocks and apply this correlation to data returned by the rover Spirit. The results demonstrate a positive correlation between rock strength and RAT grind energy for rocks with compressive strengths less than about 150 MPa, a category that includes all but the strongest intact rocks. Applying this correlation to rocks abraded by Spirit's RAT, the results indicate a large divide in strength between more competent basaltic rocks encountered in the plains of Gusev crater (Adirondack-class rocks) and the weaker variety of rock types measured in the Columbia Hills. Adirondack-class rocks have estimated compressive strengths in the range of 70-130 MPa and are significantly less strong than fresh terrestrial basalts; this may be indicative of a degree of weathering-induced weakening. Rock types in the Columbia Hills (Wishstone, Watchtower, Clovis, and Peace class) all have compressive strengths <50 MPa and are consistent with impactites or volcanoclastic materials. In general, when considered alongside chemical, spectral, and rock textural data, these inferred compressive strength results help inform our understanding of rock origins and modification history.

  20. Predicting The Compression Strength Of Impact-Damaged Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James; Jackson, Wade; Schaff, Jeffery

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a technique for predicting the residual compression strength of sandwich panels containing impact damage in one facesheet. The technique was tailored to predict the strength of specimens that exhibit a failure mode involving the formation of kink bands at locations of peak strain in the region of impact damage. Under continued compression loading, the kink bands propagate in a stable manner perpendicular to the applied load. When a critical kink-band length is reached, growth becomes unstable corresponding to panel failure. The analysis follows in two sections. The first section calculates the far-field stress required for stable kink-band growth and the second calculates that required for unstable growth. The residual strength prediction is made when the stress for stable growth becomes equal to that for unstable kink-band growth. Initial comparisons between analysis and experiment show good agreement.

  1. Insulation interlaminar shear strength testing with compression and irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, T.J.; Brasier, J.E.; Snook, P.; Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID; Princeton Univ., NJ )

    1989-01-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) project identified the need for research and development for the insulation to be used in the toroidal field coils. The requirements included tolerance to a combination of high compression and shear and a high radiation dose. Samples of laminate-type sheet material were obtained from commercial vendors. The materials included various combinations of epoxy, polyimide, E-glass, S-glass, and T-glass. The T-glass was in the form of a three-dimensional weave. The first tests were with 50 {times} 25 {times} 1 mm samples. These materials were loaded in compression and then to failure in shear. At 345-MPa compression, the interlaminar shear strength was generally in the range of 110 to 140 MPa for the different materials. A smaller sample configuration was developed for irradiation testing. The data before irradiation were similar to those for the larger samples but approximately 10% lower. Limited fatigue testing was also performed by cycling the shear load. No reduction in shear strength was found after 50,000 cycles at 90% of the failure stress. Because of space limitations, only three materials were chosen for irradiation: two polyimide systems and one epoxy system. All used boron-free glass. The small shear/compression samples and some flexure specimens were irradiated to 4 {times} 10{sup 9} and 2 {times} 10{sup 10} rad in the Advanced Technology Reactor at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. A lead shield was used to ensure that the majority of the dose was from neutrons. The shear strength with compression before and after irradiation at the lower dose was determined. Flexure strength and the results from irradiation at the higher dose level will be available in the near future. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Compressive shear bond strength of core buildup materials.

    PubMed

    Görücü, Jale; Saygili, Gülbin; Ozgünaltay, Gül

    2006-04-01

    New tooth-colored restorative materials have been developed with the goal of replacing amalgam. These restoratives are marketed as packable composite and ormocer. The purpose of the present study was to compare the compressive shear bond strengths of these new materials with that of hybrid composite and amalgam as core materials. Standardized core buildups were made on four groups of extracted molars, with 10 teeth per group. Three tooth-colored restorative materials (Filtek Z 250, Filtek P 60, and Definite) and an amalgam (SDI Permite) were used. Specimens were placed in a special jig at a 45-degree angle. The compressive shear bond strength was obtained using a universal testing machine. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the groups, and pairwise comparisons were made by Mann-Whitney U test (P < .05). Filtek P 60, a packable composite resin, had the greatest compressive shear bond strength values in all instances, and the ormocer (Definite) had the lowest. The strengths of packable composite, hybrid composite, and amalgam as core materials were not significantly different (P > .05).

  3. Compressive Strength of Cometary Surfaces Derived from Radar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElShafie, A.; Heggy, E.

    2014-12-01

    Landing on a comet nucleus and probing it, mechanically using harpoons, penetrometers and drills, and electromagnetically using low frequency radar waves is a complex task that will be tackled by the Rosetta mission for Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The mechanical properties (i.e. density, porosity and compressive strength) and the electrical properties (i.e. the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant) of the comet nucleus, constrain both the mechanical and electromagnetic probing capabilities of Rosetta, as well as the choice of landing site, the safety of the landing, and subsurface data interpretation. During landing, the sounding radar data that will be collected by Rosetta's CONSERT experiment can be used to probe the comet's upper regolith layer by assessing its dielectric properties, which are then inverted to retrieve the surface mechanical properties. These observations can help characterize the mechanical properties of the landing site, which will optimize the operation of the anchor system. In this effort, we correlate the mechanical and electrical properties of cometary analogs to each other, and derive an empirical model that can be used to retrieve density, porosity and compressive strength from the dielectric properties of the upper regolith inverted from CONSERT observations during the landing phase. In our approach we consider snow as a viable cometary material analog due to its low density and its porous nature. Therefore, we used the compressive strength and dielectric constant measurements conducted on snow at a temperature of 250 K and a density range of 0.4-0.9 g/cm3 in order to investigate the relation between compressive strength and dielectric constant under cometary-relevant density range. Our results suggest that compressive strength increases linearly as function of the dielectric constant over the observed density range mentioned above. The minimum and maximum compressive strength of 0.5 and 4.5 MPa corresponded to a

  4. Compressive strength of human openwedges: a selection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follet, H.; Gotteland, M.; Bardonnet, R.; Sfarghiu, A. M.; Peyrot, J.; Rumelhart, C.

    2004-02-01

    A series of 44 samples of bone wedges of human origin, intended for allograft openwedge osteotomy and obtained without particular precautions during hip arthroplasty were re-examined. After viral inactivity chemical treatment, lyophilisation and radio-sterilisation (intended to produce optimal health safety), the compressive strength, independent of age, sex and the height of the sample (or angle of cut), proved to be too widely dispersed [ 10{-}158 MPa] in the first study. We propose a method for selecting samples which takes into account their geometry (width, length, thicknesses, cortical surface area). Statistical methods (Principal Components Analysis PCA, Hierarchical Cluster Analysis, Multilinear regression) allowed final selection of 29 samples having a mean compressive strength σ_{max} =103 MPa ± 26 and with variation [ 61{-}158 MPa] . These results are equivalent or greater than average materials currently used in openwedge osteotomy.

  5. Compression Strength of Sulfur Concrete Subjected to Extreme Cold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    Sulfur concrete cubes were cycled between liquid nitrogen and room temperature to simulate extreme exposure conditions. Subsequent compression testing showed the strength of cycled samples to be roughly five times less than those non-cycled. Fracture surface examination showed de-bonding of the sulfur from the aggregate material in the cycled samples but not in those non-cycled. The large discrepancy found, between the samples is attributed to the relative thermal properties of the materials constituting the concrete.

  6. Compressive strength of damaged and repaired composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, Scott R.; Springer, George S.

    1992-01-01

    Tests were performed assessing the effectiveness of repair in restoring the mechanical properties of damaged, solid composite plates made of Fiberite T300/976 graphite-epoxy. Some (75%) or all (100%) of the damaged zone was cut out, and the plate was repaired by plugging and patching the hole. The effectiveness of the repair was evaluated by measuring the compressive strengths of undamaged plates, damaged plates with no cutout, damaged plates with a cutout, and plates that had been repaired.

  7. Tow collapse model for compression strength of textile composites

    SciTech Connect

    Emehel, T.C.; Shivakumar, K.N.

    1995-12-31

    The unidirectional composite compression strength model based on microbuckling of fibers embedded in a rigid-plastic matrix was extended to multiaxial laminates and textile composites. The resulting expression is a function of matrix yield strength under the fiber constraint, fiber misalignment angle, fiber volume fraction, and the area fractions of various sets of inclined tows. The analysis was verified by experimentation. Compression tests were conducted on laminated, three-dimensional triaxially braided and orthogonally woven composites using the IITRI test specimen. The laminate specimens were made up of AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy composite with (0){sub 24}, (0/30/0/{minus}30){sub 3S}, and ((0/90)6/0){sub S} stacking sequence. Textile composites were made of BASF G30-500 graphite fiber tows (tow size is 6K) and Dow Chemicals Tactix 123 matrix. Fiber preform architecture of braided and woven composites before resin consolidation was 0/{+-}17 and 0/90, respectively and after consolidation it was about (7/{+-}20) and (5/90/90), respectively. The analysis agreed reasonably well with the test data for all cases considered. The axial fiber/tow misalignment angle for laminated, braided, and woven composites were about 4, 7, and 5 degrees, respectively. The compression strength was found to be strongly dependent on the percentage of axial tows and its misalignment angle. A small variation in the off-axis fiber/tow orientation had marginal effect on the compression strength. Hence, the off axis tow misalignment angle can be assumed to be same as the initial laminate or the two orientation angle.

  8. Compressive strength of damaged and repaired composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, Scott R.; He, Yi-Fei; Springer, George S.; Lee, Hung-Joo

    1992-01-01

    Tests were performed assessing the effectiveness of repair in restoring the mechanical properties of damaged, solid composite plates made either of Fiberite T300/976 graphite-epoxy, Fiberite IM7/977-2 graphite-toughened epoxy, or ICI APC-2 graphite-PEEK. The plate length, the layup and the amount of damage were also varied. Damage was introduced in the plates either by impacting them with a solid projectile or by applying a transverse static load. Some (75 percent) or all (100 percent) of the damaged zone was then cut out, and the plate was repaired by plugging and patching the hole. The effectiveness of the repair was evaluated by measuring the compressive strengths of undamaged plates, damaged plates with no cutout, damaged plates with a cutout, and repaired plates. The data at an intermediate stage of repair provide information on the effect of each repair step on the compressive strength. The results indicated that for the solid plates used in these tests, the repair methods used herein did not improve the compressive strength of already damaged plates.

  9. The effects of compressive preloads on the compression-after-impact strength of carbon/epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Lance, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    A preloading device was used to examine the effects of compressive prestress on the compression-after-impact (CAI) strength of 16-ply, quasi-isotropic carbon epoxy test coupons. T300/934 material was evaluated at preloads from 200 to 4000 lb at impact energies from 1 to 9 joules. IM7/8551-7 material was evaluated at preloads from 4000 to 10,000 lb at impact energies from 4 to 16 joules. Advanced design of experiments methodology was used to design and evaluate the test matrices. The results showed that no statistically significant change in CAI strength could be contributed to the amount of compressive preload applied to the specimen.

  10. Compressive strength of cement stabilized fly ash-soil mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kaniraj, S.R.; Havanagi, V.G.

    1999-05-01

    Rajghat fly ash from Delhi, India, and Baumineral fly ash near Bochum, Germany, were mixed with the locally available soils -- silt and Yamuna sand with Rajghat fly ash and Rhine sand with Baumineral fly ash -- in different proportions. Cement, varying from 3--9%, was added to stabilize the fly ash-soil mixtures. Cylindrical samples were prepared at optimum moisture content and maximum dry density and were cured for different duration. Unconfined compression tests were conducted on these samples. Correlations for unconfined compressive strength and secant modulus as functions of curing time, fly ash content, and cement content have been established. The data were analyzed with other correlations recommended in literature and comparisons between the correlations have been made. Correlations for water content as functions of curing time and cement content have also been established.

  11. Approaching the Limits of Strength: Measuring the Uniaxial Compressive Strength of Diamond at Small Scales.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Jeffrey M; Raghavan, Rejin; Wehrs, Juri; Zhang, Yucheng; Erni, Rolf; Michler, Johann

    2016-01-13

    Diamond ⟨100⟩- and ⟨111⟩-oriented nanopillars were fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) milling from synthetic single crystals and compressed using a larger diameter diamond punch. Uniaxial compressive failure was observed via fracture with a plateau in maximum stress of ∼0.25 TPa, the highest uniaxial strength yet measured. This corresponded to maximum shear stresses that converged toward 75 GPa or ∼ G/7 at small sizes, which are very close to the ultimate theoretical yield stress estimate of G/2π.

  12. The Effects of Compressive Preloads on the Compression-After-Impact Strength of Carbon/Epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    1994-01-01

    A fixture to apply compressive loads to composite specimens during an impact event was used to assess the effect of prestresses on the compression-after-impact (CAI) strength of 16 ply quasi-isotropic carbon/epoxy test coupons. Advanced design of experiments techniques were used to evaluate a range of prestresses and impact energies on two material systems, T300/934 and IM7/8551-7. An instrumented drop tower supplied impact energies between 1 and 9 Joules for the T300/934 material and between 4 and 16 Joules for the IM7/8551-7 material. The prestress values varied between a low of 5.7 Wa and a high of 287 NDa. Results showed some change in CAI strength that could be attributed to the prestresses on the specimens.

  13. Space Shuttle filament wound case compressive strength study. I - Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, C. B.; Nuismer, R. J.; Bianca, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    Immediately before liftoff, ignition of the Space Shuttle main engines places a significant bending moment on the filament wound cases of the solid rocket booster motors. This results in substantial compressive loading of the aft end of the composite case which, because of attachment requirements, has a complicated design including inserted broadgoods and helical ply dropoffs. To investigate the performance of the filament wound cases during the prelaunch load environment, a comprehensive study was initiated which included both testing and analysis. The results of the test program, which included testing of several full-scale and over three hundred subscale articles, will be described. The test program began with a short development effort to establish appropriate subscale test specimens for determining the material compressive strengths. Once these were established, a more comprehensive test program was initiated to determine the effects on strength of both processing and design changes. Full-scale cases were tested in a simulated prelaunch bending environment in order to validate the analysis predictions. In all tests, special attention was given to observation of the failure sequence which involved a complex process of load transfer from the region of helical ply dropoffs to the broadgood termination region.

  14. An investigation of the compressive strength of PRD-49-3/Epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, S. V.; Rice, J. S.; Rosen, B. W.

    1973-01-01

    The development of unidirectional fiber composite materials is discussed. The mechanical and physical properties of the materials are described. Emphasis is placed in analyzing the compressive behavior of composite materials and developing methods for increasing compressive strength. The test program for evaluating the various procedures for improving compressive strength are reported.

  15. Compressive strength after blast of sandwich composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Arora, H.; Kelly, M.; Worley, A.; Del Linz, P.; Fergusson, A.; Hooper, P. A.; Dear, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Composite sandwich materials have yet to be widely adopted in the construction of naval vessels despite their excellent strength-to-weight ratio and low radar return. One barrier to their wider use is our limited understanding of their performance when subjected to air blast. This paper focuses on this problem and specifically the strength remaining after damage caused during an explosion. Carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite skins on a styrene–acrylonitrile (SAN) polymer closed-cell foam core are the primary composite system evaluated. Glass-fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite skins were also included for comparison in a comparable sandwich configuration. Full-scale blast experiments were conducted, where 1.6×1.3 m sized panels were subjected to blast of a Hopkinson–Cranz scaled distance of 3.02 m kg−1/3, 100 kg TNT equivalent at a stand-off distance of 14 m. This explosive blast represents a surface blast threat, where the shockwave propagates in air towards the naval vessel. Hopkinson was the first to investigate the characteristics of this explosive air-blast pulse (Hopkinson 1948 Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 89, 411–413 (doi:10.1098/rspa.1914.0008)). Further analysis is provided on the performance of the CFRP sandwich panel relative to the GFRP sandwich panel when subjected to blast loading through use of high-speed speckle strain mapping. After the blast events, the residual compressive load-bearing capacity is investigated experimentally, using appropriate loading conditions that an in-service vessel may have to sustain. Residual strength testing is well established for post-impact ballistic assessment, but there has been less research performed on the residual strength of sandwich composites after blast. PMID:24711494

  16. Compressive strength after blast of sandwich composite materials.

    PubMed

    Arora, H; Kelly, M; Worley, A; Del Linz, P; Fergusson, A; Hooper, P A; Dear, J P

    2014-05-13

    Composite sandwich materials have yet to be widely adopted in the construction of naval vessels despite their excellent strength-to-weight ratio and low radar return. One barrier to their wider use is our limited understanding of their performance when subjected to air blast. This paper focuses on this problem and specifically the strength remaining after damage caused during an explosion. Carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite skins on a styrene-acrylonitrile (SAN) polymer closed-cell foam core are the primary composite system evaluated. Glass-fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite skins were also included for comparison in a comparable sandwich configuration. Full-scale blast experiments were conducted, where 1.6×1.3 m sized panels were subjected to blast of a Hopkinson-Cranz scaled distance of 3.02 m kg(-1/3), 100 kg TNT equivalent at a stand-off distance of 14 m. This explosive blast represents a surface blast threat, where the shockwave propagates in air towards the naval vessel. Hopkinson was the first to investigate the characteristics of this explosive air-blast pulse (Hopkinson 1948 Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 89, 411-413 (doi:10.1098/rspa.1914.0008)). Further analysis is provided on the performance of the CFRP sandwich panel relative to the GFRP sandwich panel when subjected to blast loading through use of high-speed speckle strain mapping. After the blast events, the residual compressive load-bearing capacity is investigated experimentally, using appropriate loading conditions that an in-service vessel may have to sustain. Residual strength testing is well established for post-impact ballistic assessment, but there has been less research performed on the residual strength of sandwich composites after blast.

  17. Influence of pore structure on compressive strength of cement mortar.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haitao; Xiao, Qi; Huang, Donghui; Zhang, Shiping

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation into the pore structure of cement mortar using mercury porosimeter. Ordinary Portland cement, manufactured sand, and natural sand were used. The porosity of the manufactured sand mortar is higher than that of natural sand at the same mix proportion; on the contrary, the probable pore size and threshold radius of manufactured sand mortar are finer. Besides, the probable pore size and threshold radius increased with increasing water to cement ratio and sand to cement ratio. In addition, the existing models of pore size distribution of cement-based materials have been reviewed and compared with test results in this paper. Finally, the extended Bhattacharjee model was built to examine the relationship between compressive strength and pore structure.

  18. Influence of Pore Structure on Compressive Strength of Cement Mortar

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haitao; Xiao, Qi; Huang, Donghui

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation into the pore structure of cement mortar using mercury porosimeter. Ordinary Portland cement, manufactured sand, and natural sand were used. The porosity of the manufactured sand mortar is higher than that of natural sand at the same mix proportion; on the contrary, the probable pore size and threshold radius of manufactured sand mortar are finer. Besides, the probable pore size and threshold radius increased with increasing water to cement ratio and sand to cement ratio. In addition, the existing models of pore size distribution of cement-based materials have been reviewed and compared with test results in this paper. Finally, the extended Bhattacharjee model was built to examine the relationship between compressive strength and pore structure. PMID:24757414

  19. Effect of size, shape, and end condition of test specimen on compressive strength of high-strength concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipatti, A.

    Compressive testing of high-strength concrete is a critical issue on which no consensus has yet been reached. Among the many factors that are under discussion are the size, shape, and end condition of test specimens for high-strength concrete. The experimental program described herein was designed primarily to investigate the effects and the possible interactions of the above-mentioned factors on compressive strength of high-strength concrete. Three levels of specimen sizes, three methods of specimen capping (mould surface, sulphur capping, grinding), and four grades of concrete strengths were selected. A 3 x 3 x 4 factorial experimental design was adopted with two replicates (each an average of three specimens), giving a total of 72 test values (216 specimens). The strictest possible precautions were taken to ensure that all other factors which would conceivably effect the compressive strength were held constant. The statistical methods utilized included analyses of variance, linear regressions, and pairwise comparisons of factor main effects.

  20. Development of K-Basin High-Strength Homogeneous Sludge Simulants and Correlations Between Unconfined Compressive Strength and Shear Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Yasuo; Baer, Ellen BK; Chun, Jaehun; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sande, Susan; Buchmiller, William C.

    2011-02-20

    K-Basin sludge will be stored in the Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSCs) at an interim storage location on Central Plateau before being treated and packaged for disposal. During the storage period, sludge in the STSCs may consolidate/agglomerate, potentially resulting in high-shear-strength material. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) plans to use water jets to retrieve K-Basin sludge after the interim storage. STP has identified shear strength to be a key parameter that should be bounded to verify the operability and performance of sludge retrieval systems. Determining the range of sludge shear strength is important to gain high confidence that a water-jet retrieval system can mobilize stored K-Basin sludge from the STSCs. The shear strength measurements will provide a basis for bounding sludge properties for mobilization and erosion. Thus, it is also important to develop potential simulants to investigate these phenomena. Long-term sludge storage tests conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) show that high-uranium-content K-Basin sludge can self-cement and form a strong sludge with a bulk shear strength of up to 65 kPa. Some of this sludge has 'paste' and 'chunks' with shear strengths of approximately 3-5 kPa and 380-770 kPa, respectively. High-uranium-content sludge samples subjected to hydrothermal testing (e.g., 185 C, 10 hours) have been observed to form agglomerates with a shear strength up to 170 kPa. These high values were estimated by measured unconfined compressive strength (UCS) obtained with a pocket penetrometer. Due to its ease of use, it is anticipated that a pocket penetrometer will be used to acquire additional shear strength data from archived K-Basin sludge samples stored at the PNNL Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) hot cells. It is uncertain whether the pocket penetrometer provides accurate shear strength measurements of the material. To assess the bounding material strength and potential for erosion, it

  1. Compressive Strength of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate with Propylene Glycol

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Negin; Rahimi, Saeed; Shahi, Shahriar; Salem Milani, Amin; Rezaei, Yashar; Nobakht, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding propylene glycol (PG) to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) liquid with volume ratio of 20% on the compressive strength (CS) of MTA in two time periods (4 and 21 days) after mixing. Methods and Materials: Four groups of steel cylinders (n=15) with an internal diameter of 3 and a height of 6 mm were prepared and MTA (groups 1 and 2) and MTA+PG (80% MTA liquid+20% PG) (groups 3 and 4) were placed in to the cylinders. In groups 1 and 3 the CS was evaluated after 4 days and in groups 2 and 4 after 21 days. Data were calculated using the two-ways ANOVA. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: The highest (52.22±18.92 MPa) and lowest (4.5±0.67 MPa) of CS was obtained in 21-day MTA samples and 4-day MTA+PG specimen, respectively. The effect of time and PG were significant on the CS (P<0.05). Mixing MTA with PG significantly reduced the CS; but passing the time from 4 to 21 days significantly increased the CS. Conclusion: Considering the limitations of this study, PG had a negative effect on CS of MTA. PMID:27790264

  2. Dataset of long-term compressive strength of concrete with manufactured sand

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xinxin; Li, Changyong; Xu, Yangyang; Li, Fenglan; Zhao, Shunbo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents 186 groups compressive strength tests data of concrete with manufactured sand (MSC) in different curing age and 262 groups compressive strength tests data of MSC at 28 days collected from authors’ experiments and other researches in China. Further interpretation and discussion were described in this issues. PMID:26949726

  3. Strength of Kevlar narrow fabrics as influenced by folding and compression in the presence of moisture

    SciTech Connect

    Ericksen, R.H.

    1986-08-01

    The tensile strength of dry Kevlar narrow fabrics was investigated as a function of moisture present during folding and compression. Fabric samples were exposed to 96% relative humidity, or soaked in water prior to compression; or moisture was introduced while the samples were compressed. The fabrics exhibited a 10 to 30% tensile strength loss after wet compression relative to data for samples compressed dry. Similar tests on nylon did not show this effect. Warp yarns removed from fabrics compressed with moisture present exhibited nominally the same strength as those obtained from fabrics compressed dry or from uncompressed fabrics. These results are consistent with test data from a parachute that had been exposed to moisture and with packing difficulties encountered under high humidity environments.

  4. The effects of embedded internal delaminations on composite laminate compression strength; an experimental review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    1994-01-01

    Delaminations in laminated composite materials can degrade the compressive strength of these materials. Delaminations can form as a result of impact damage or processing flaws. In order to better understand the effects of these delaminations on the compressive behavior of laminated composite plates, programs have been conducted to assess the criticality of prescribed delaminations of known size, shape, and location on the compression strength of laminated composites. A review of these programs is presented along with highlights of pertinent findings from each.

  5. Neuromuscular Compression Garments: Effects on Neuromuscular Strength and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Bottaro, Martim; Martorelli, Saulo; Vilaça, José

    2011-01-01

    Graduated compression stockings have been used as a mechanical method of deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis for several years. Several studies have demonstrated an increase in mean deep venous velocity, reduced venous pooling, improved venous return, and increase blood lactate clearance in subjects who wore graduated compression stockings during exercise. A possible improvement in venous return during and after exercise may facilitate the clearance of metabolites produced during exercise. Also, studies have suggested that compressive clothing can promote tissue regeneration and consequently positively benefit the muscle function following strenuous exercise. However, the results from the previous studies are controversial. Also, the majority of the studies investigated the effects of compression stockings and there is a lack of studies using different compression garments such as compression shorts, shirts and sleeves. Thus, the purpose of this text is to briefly review the possible effects of compression garments on exercise performance and muscle recovery. PMID:23486558

  6. Sublaminate buckling and compression strength of stitched uniweave graphite/epoxy laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.K.; Sankar, B.V.

    1995-12-31

    Effects of through-the-thickness stitching on the sublaminate buckling and residual compression strength (often referred as compression-after-impact or CAI strength) of graphite/epoxy uniweave laminates are experimentally investigated. Primarily, three stitching variables: type of stitch yarn, linear density of stitch yam and stitch density were studied. Delaminations were created by implanting teflon inserts during processing. The improvement in the CAI strength of the stitched laminates was up to 400% compared to the unstitched laminates. Stitching was observed to effectively restrict sublaminate buckling failure of the laminates. The CAI strength increases rapidly with increase in stitch density. It reaches a peak CAI strength that is very close to the compression strength of the undamaged material. All the stitch yams in this study demonstrated very close performance in improving the CAI strength. It appears that any stitch yarn with adequate breaking strength and stiffness successfully restricts the sublaminate buckling.

  7. Filler effect of fine particle sand on the compressive strength of mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Tangpagasit, Jatuphon; Songmue, Sawang; Kiattikomol, Kraiwood

    2011-04-01

    The river sand, which is a non-pozzolanic material, was ground into 3 different particle sizes. Portland cement type I was replaced by the ground river sands at 10wt%-40wt% of binder to cast mortar. Compressive strengths of mortar were investigated and the filler effect of different fine particles of sand on the compressive strength of mortar was evaluated. The results show that the compressive strength of mortar contributed from the filler effect of smaller particles is higher than that of the coarser ones. The difference in compressive strength of mortar tends to be greater as the difference in ground river sand fineness increases. The results also suggest that ASTM C618 specification is not practically suitable for specifying pozzolan in concrete since the strength activity index of mortar containing ground river sand (high crystalline phase) with 33.8wt% of particles retained on a 45-μm sieve can pass the strength requirement.

  8. [Production of denture by preform compression molding method. Part 3. Retentive strength of artificial teeth].

    PubMed

    Kimura, H; Teraoka, F; Saitoh, Y; Tamura, M

    1989-05-01

    A preform compression molding method to make a polysulfone denture has been reported. Retentive strength of artificial teeth to the denture base was examined to select artificial teeth for the compression molding method. Ceramic teeth with metal pins and polysulfone teeth heated at above 140 degrees C were retained to the denture base by useful retentive strength. Acrylic teeth on which the adhesive was used were also retained by useful strength. Each of the teeth, acrylic teeth, ceramic teeth and polysulfone teeth, could be used in the compression molding method.

  9. Compressive Strength of Stainless-Steel Sandwiches at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathauser, Eldon E.; Pride, Richard A.

    1959-01-01

    Experimental results are presented from crippling tests of stainless-steel sandwich specimens in the temperature range from 80 F to 1,200 F. The specimens included resistance-welded 17-7 PH stainless-steel sandwiches with single-corrugated cores, type 301 stainless-steel sandwiches with double-corrugated cores, and brazed 17-7 PH stainless-steel sandwiches with honeycomb cores. The experimental strengths are compared with predicted buckling and crippling strengths. The crippling strengths were predicted from the calculated maximum strength of the individual plate elements of the sandwiches and from a correlation procedure which gives the elevated-temperature crippling strength when the experimental room-temperature crippling strengths are known. Photographs of some of the tested specimens are included to show the modes of failure.

  10. Compressive strength of fiber reinforced composite materials. [composed of boron and epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. G., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Results of an experimental and analytical investigation of the compressive strength of unidirectional boron-epoxy composite material are presented. Observation of fiber coordinates in a boron-epoxy composite indicates that the fibers contain initial curvature. Combined axial compression and torsion tests were conducted on boron-epoxy tubes, and it was shown that the shear modulus is a function of axial compressive stress. An analytical model which includes initial curvature in the fibers and permits an estimate of the effect of curvature on compressive strength is proposed. Two modes of failure which may result from the application of axial compressive stress are analyzed, delamination and shear instability. Based on tests and analysis, failure of boron-epoxy under axial compressive load is due to shear instability.

  11. Determine the Compressive Strength of Calcium Silicate Bricks by Combined Nondestructive Method

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the application of combined nondestructive method for assessment of compressive strength of calcium silicate bricks. In this case, it is a combination of the rebound hammer method and ultrasonic pulse method. Calibration relationships for determining compressive strength of calcium silicate bricks obtained from nondestructive parameter testing for the combined method as well as for the L-type Schmidt rebound hammer and ultrasonic pulse method are quoted here. Calibration relationships are known for their close correlation and are applicable in practice. The highest correlation between parameters from nondestructive measurement and predicted compressive strength is obtained using the SonReb combined nondestructive method. Combined nondestructive SonReb method was proved applicable for determination of compressive strength of calcium silicate bricks at checking tests in a production plant and for evaluation of bricks built in existing masonry structures. PMID:25276864

  12. Compressive Strength, Chloride Permeability, and Freeze-Thaw Resistance of MWNT Concretes under Different Chemical Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingang; Wang, Yao; Xi, Yunping

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated compressive strength, chloride penetration, and freeze-thaw resistance of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) concrete. More than 100 cylindrical specimens were used to assess test variables during sensitivity observations, including water-cement ratios (0.75, 0.5, and 0.4) and exposure to chemical agents (including gum arabic, propanol, ethanol, sodium polyacrylate, methylcellulose, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and silane). To determine the adequate sonication time for MWNT dispersal in water, the compressive strengths of MWNT concrete cylinders were measured after sonication times ranging from 2 to 24 minutes. The results demonstrated that the addition of MWNT can increase the compressive strength of concrete by up to 108%. However, without chemical treatment, MWNT concretes tend to have poor freeze-thaw resistance. Among the different chemical treatments, MWNT concrete treated with sodium polyacrylate has the best compressive strength, chloride resistance, and freeze-thaw durability. PMID:25140336

  13. Compressive strength, chloride permeability, and freeze-thaw resistance of MWNT concretes under different chemical treatments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingang; Rhee, Inkyu; Wang, Yao; Xi, Yunping

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated compressive strength, chloride penetration, and freeze-thaw resistance of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) concrete. More than 100 cylindrical specimens were used to assess test variables during sensitivity observations, including water-cement ratios (0.75, 0.5, and 0.4) and exposure to chemical agents (including gum arabic, propanol, ethanol, sodium polyacrylate, methylcellulose, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and silane). To determine the adequate sonication time for MWNT dispersal in water, the compressive strengths of MWNT concrete cylinders were measured after sonication times ranging from 2 to 24 minutes. The results demonstrated that the addition of MWNT can increase the compressive strength of concrete by up to 108%. However, without chemical treatment, MWNT concretes tend to have poor freeze-thaw resistance. Among the different chemical treatments, MWNT concrete treated with sodium polyacrylate has the best compressive strength, chloride resistance, and freeze-thaw durability.

  14. Determine the compressive strength of calcium silicate bricks by combined nondestructive method.

    PubMed

    Brozovsky, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the application of combined nondestructive method for assessment of compressive strength of calcium silicate bricks. In this case, it is a combination of the rebound hammer method and ultrasonic pulse method. Calibration relationships for determining compressive strength of calcium silicate bricks obtained from nondestructive parameter testing for the combined method as well as for the L-type Schmidt rebound hammer and ultrasonic pulse method are quoted here. Calibration relationships are known for their close correlation and are applicable in practice. The highest correlation between parameters from nondestructive measurement and predicted compressive strength is obtained using the SonReb combined nondestructive method. Combined nondestructive SonReb method was proved applicable for determination of compressive strength of calcium silicate bricks at checking tests in a production plant and for evaluation of bricks built in existing masonry structures.

  15. The influence of tensile fatigue damage on residual compressive strength of woven composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrovic, M.; Carman, G.P.

    1995-12-31

    The long term mechanical fatigue of a Celion G30-500/PMR-15 woven composite system is investigated to study the interrelationship between thermo-mechanical properties, namely the thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) and the compressive strength. Residual compressive strength measurements (IITRI fixture) conducted on specimens subjected to tension-tension fatigue cycling indicate that this material property is sensitive to cracks and delaminations which form during mechanical cycling. Measured compressive strength degradation are as large as 49% for this material undergoing mechanical fatigue cycling with TEC degradation as large as 61%. Experimental results show that a correlation exists between TEC measurements and compressive strength. This correlation suggests that TEC measurements may be used as a damage evaluation technique.

  16. Compressive epitactic layers on single-crystal components for improved mechanical durability and strength

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, J.E.; Gualtieri, D.M.; Morris, R.C.

    1987-09-01

    Compressive epitactic layers grown on single-crystal substrates are shown to substantially improve mechanical durability. In this study, neodymium-substituted gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) layers are grown on undoped GGG substrates. The layers are found to dramatically improve the abrasion resistance of the substrates, but to have only a slight effect on strength. Abrasion treatments, which cause up to 20 times decrease in the strength of substrates without epitactic layers, do not cause a significant decrease in the strength of substrates with these compressive surface layers. This permits the high strength of specially prepared strong substrates to be retained after abrasion.

  17. Estimating the Concrete Compressive Strength Using Hard Clustering and Fuzzy Clustering Based Regression Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Nagwani, Naresh Kumar; Deo, Shirish V.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of the compressive strength of concrete is important for activities like construction arrangement, prestressing operations, and proportioning new mixtures and for the quality assurance. Regression techniques are most widely used for prediction tasks where relationship between the independent variables and dependent (prediction) variable is identified. The accuracy of the regression techniques for prediction can be improved if clustering can be used along with regression. Clustering along with regression will ensure the more accurate curve fitting between the dependent and independent variables. In this work cluster regression technique is applied for estimating the compressive strength of the concrete and a novel state of the art is proposed for predicting the concrete compressive strength. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that clustering along with regression ensures less prediction errors for estimating the concrete compressive strength. The proposed technique consists of two major stages: in the first stage, clustering is used to group the similar characteristics concrete data and then in the second stage regression techniques are applied over these clusters (groups) to predict the compressive strength from individual clusters. It is found from experiments that clustering along with regression techniques gives minimum errors for predicting compressive strength of concrete; also fuzzy clustering algorithm C-means performs better than K-means algorithm. PMID:25374939

  18. Evaluation of the ratio between uniaxial compressive strength and Schmidt hammer rebound number and its effectiveness in predicting rock strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selçuk, Levent; Yabalak, Esma

    2015-01-01

    Schmidt rebound hammer (SRH) test has been used worldwide as an index test for estimating the compressive strength and deformation characteristics of intact rocks. Although there is a high correlation between the surface hardness and the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) of intact rocks, the SRH provides only a crude estimate for the UCS of rocks. SRH numbers reflect the outer surface of rocks and a depth of 30-50 mm. It is not sensitive to the intrinsic properties of the rocks such as texture, saturation, porosity and micro-fractures controlling the mechanical behaviour of rocks. In order for an empirical equation relating the surface hardness to the UCS to be widely used, the index parameter should characterise the mechanical properties of intact rocks. The ratio of UCS/SRH defined as a function of the UCS is a much better indicator for assessing the mechanical characteristics of rocks because the UCS of rocks defines the strength of the material and the ratio UCS/SRH is strongly affected by the level of the UCS. The ratio of UCS/SRH increases with increasing compressive strength at an increasing rate. A large-scale regression analysis was carried out using experimental data to evaluate the ratio of UCS/SRH for the rocks. The accuracy and reliability of the relationship was assessed by means of the root mean square error. The standard error associated with the empirical relationship is very small and the reliability and accuracy of the relationship to assess the compressive strength indirectly seem to be higher than those of traditional relationships between the UCS and the SRH. The ratio of UCS/SRH was also verified by a large database collected from previous studies. This strong linear relationship is proposed for engineering projects requiring the estimation of the compressive strength for intact rocks.

  19. Influence of Compression and Shear on the Strength of Composite Laminates With Z-Pinned Reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Krueger, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    The influence of compression and shear loads on the strength of composite laminates with z-pins is evaluated parametrically using a 2D Finite Element Code (FLASH) based on Cosserat couple stress theory. Meshes were generated for three unique combinations of z-pin diameter and density. A laminated plate theory analysis was performed on several layups to determine the bi-axial stresses in the zero degree plies. These stresses, in turn, were used to determine the magnitude of the relative load steps prescribed in the FLASH analyses. Results indicated that increasing pin density was more detrimental to in-plane compression strength than increasing pin diameter. Compression strengths of lamina without z-pins agreed well with a closed form expression derived by Budiansky and Fleck. FLASH results for lamina with z-pins were consistent with the closed form results, and FLASH results without z-pins, if the initial fiber waviness due to z-pin insertion was added to the fiber waviness in the material to yield a total misalignment. Addition of 10% shear to the compression loading significantly reduced the lamina strength compared to pure compression loading. Addition of 50% shear to the compression indicated shear yielding rather than kink band formation as the likely failure mode. Two different stiffener reinforced skin configurations with z-pins, one quasi-isotropic and one orthotropic, were also analyzed. Six unique loading cases ranging from pure compression to compression plus 50% shear were analyzed assuming material fiber waviness misalignment angles of 0, 1, and 2 degrees. Compression strength decreased with increased shear loading for both configurations, with the quasi-isotropic configuration yielding lower strengths than the orthotropic configuration.

  20. Influence of Compression and Shear on the Strength of Composite Laminates with Z-Pinned Reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Krueger, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    The influence of compression and shear loads on the strength of composite laminates with z-pins is evaluated parametrically using a 2D Finite Element Code (FLASH) based on Cosserat couple stress theory. Meshes were generated for three unique combinations of z-pin diameter and density. A laminated plate theory analysis was performed on several layups to determine the bi-axial stresses in the zero degree plies. These stresses, in turn, were used to determine the magnitude of the relative load steps prescribed in the FLASH analyses. Results indicated that increasing pin density was more detrimental to in-plane compression strength than increasing pin diameter. Compression strengths of lamina without z-pins agreed well with a closed form expression derived by Budiansky and Fleck. FLASH results for lamina with z-pins were consistent with the closed form results, and FLASH results without z-pins, if the initial fiber waviness due to z-pin insertion was added to the fiber waviness in the material to yield a total misalignment. Addition of 10% shear to the compression loading significantly reduced the lamina strength compared to pure compression loading. Addition of 50% shear to the compression indicated shear yielding rather than kink band formation as the likely failure mode. Two different stiffener reinforced skin configurations with z-pins, one quaiisotropic and one orthotropic, were also analyzed. Six unique loading cases ranging from pure compression to compression plus 50% shear were analyzed assuming material fiber waviness misalignment angles of 0, 1, and 2 degrees. Compression strength decreased with increased shear loading for both configurations, with the quasi-isotropic configuration yielding lower strengths than the orthotropic configuration.

  1. Effect of raw material ratios on the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ai-juan; Yuan, Zhi-long; Zhang, Jiao; Liu, Lin-tao; Li, Jun-ming; Liu, Zheng

    2013-12-01

    The compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics is important in biomedical field. In this work, the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics was investigated with different liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratios. X-ray diffractometer was applied to characterize its phase composition. The microstructure was imaged using a scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the compressive strength of the chemically bonded ceramics increased with the decrease of liquid-to-solid ratio due to the change of the packing density and the crystallinity of hydrated product. However, with the increase of MgO-to-KH2PO4 weight ratio, its compressive strength increased firstly and then decreased. The low compressive strength in lower MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratio might be explained by the existence of the weak phase KH2PO4. However, the low value of compressive strength with the higher MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratio might be caused by lack of the joined phase in the hydrated product. Besides, it has been found that the microstructures were different in these two cases by the scanning electron microscope. Colloidal structure appeared for the samples with lower liquid-to-solid and higher MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratios possibly because of the existence of amorphous hydrated products. The optimization of both liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratios was important to improve the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics.

  2. Influence of Compression and Shear on the Strength of Composite Laminates with Z-Pinned Reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Krueger, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    The influence of compression and shear loads on the strength of composite laminates with z-pins is evaluated parametrically using a 2D Finite Element Code (FLASH). Meshes were generated for three unique combinations of z-pin diameter and density. A laminated plate theory analysis was performed on several layups to determine the bi-axial stresses in the zero degree plies. These stresses, in turn, were used to determine the magnitude of the relative load steps prescribed in the FLASH analyses. Results indicated that increasing pin density was more detrimental to in-plane compression strength than increasing pin diameter. FLASH results for lamina with z-pins were consistent with the closed form results, and FLASH results without z-pins, if the initial fiber waviness due to z-pin insertion was added to the fiber waviness in the material to yield a total misalignment. Addition of 10% shear to the compression loading significantly reduced the lamina strength compared to pure compression loading. Addition of 50% shear to the compression indicated shear yielding rather than kink band formation as the likely failure mode. Two different stiffener reinforced skin configurations with z-pins, one quasi-isotropic and one orthotropic, were also analyzed. Six unique loading cases ranging from pure compression to compression plus 50% shear were analyzed assuming material fiber waviness misalignment angles of 0, 1, and 2 degrees. Compression strength decreased with increased shear loading for both configurations, with the quasi-isotropic configuration yielding lower strengths than the orthotropic configuration.

  3. Effect of angle-ply orientation on compression strength of composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S J; Hoppel, C P

    1999-03-01

    An experimental program was initiated to investigate the effect of angle-ply orientations on the compressive strength (X{sub 1C}) of 0{degree} plies in fiber reinforced composite laminates. Graphite fiber-reinforced epoxy test coupons with the generic architecture [0{sub 2}/{+-}{theta}] (where {theta} varied between 0{degree} and 90{degree}) and for the quasi-isotropic architecture were evaluated. The effective compressive strength of the 0{degree} plies varied considerably. The results were related to the Poisson's ratios of the laminates with high Poisson's ratios leading to high transverse tensile strains in the test coupons and lower than expected strengths. Specimens with the [O{sub 2}/{+-}30] architecture had both the highest Poisson's ratio and the lowest calculated ply-level compression strength for the 0{degree} plies. This work has implications in the selection of composite failure criterion for compression performance, design of test coupons for acceptance testing, and the selection of laminate architectures for optimum combinations of compressive and shear behavior. Two commonly used composite failure criteria, the maximum stress and the Tsai-Wu, predict significantly different laminate strengths depending on the Poisson's ratio of the laminate. This implies that the biaxial stress state in the laminate needs to be carefully considered before backing out unidirectional properties.

  4. Compressive strength evaluation of structural lightweight concrete by non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity method.

    PubMed

    Bogas, J Alexandre; Gomes, M Glória; Gomes, Augusto

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the compressive strength of a wide range of structural lightweight aggregate concrete mixes is evaluated by the non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity method. This study involves about 84 different compositions tested between 3 and 180 days for compressive strengths ranging from about 30 to 80 MPa. The influence of several factors on the relation between the ultrasonic pulse velocity and compressive strength is examined. These factors include the cement type and content, amount of water, type of admixture, initial wetting conditions, type and volume of aggregate and the partial replacement of normal weight coarse and fine aggregates by lightweight aggregates. It is found that lightweight and normal weight concretes are affected differently by mix design parameters. In addition, the prediction of the concrete's compressive strength by means of the non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity test is studied. Based on the dependence of the ultrasonic pulse velocity on the density and elasticity of concrete, a simplified expression is proposed to estimate the compressive strength, regardless the type of concrete and its composition. More than 200 results for different types of aggregates and concrete compositions were analyzed and high correlation coefficients were obtained. PMID:23351273

  5. Dynamic compressive and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.

    2014-06-28

    Fully dense submicron grain size alumina samples were manufactured from alumina nano-powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two kinds of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the first kind, samples were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors, accelerated to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed at studying the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)-processed alumina and the decay, with propagation distance, of the elastic precursor wave. In the tests of the second kind, alumina samples of 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated to 100–1000 m/s. These tests were aimed at studying the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina specimens. The tensile fracture of the un-alloyed alumina shows a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. Analysis of the decay of the elastic precursor wave allowed determining the rate of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced inelastic deformation and to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the deformation. The 1-% addition of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} decreases the HEL of the SPS-processed alumina by 5-% and its spall strength by 50% but barely affects its static properties.

  6. An investigation of the compressive strength of Kevlar 49/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, S. V.; Rosen, B. W.; Rice, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    Tests were performed to evaluate the effect of a wide range of variables including matrix properties, interface properties, fiber prestressing, secondary reinforcement, and others on the ultimate compressive strength of Kevlar 49/epoxy composites. Scanning electron microscopy is used to assess the resulting failure surfaces. In addition, a theoretical study is conducted to determine the influence of fiber anisotropy and lack of perfect bond between fiber and matrix on the shear mode microbuckling. The experimental evaluation of the effect of various constituent and process characteristics on the behavior of these unidirectional composites in compression did not reveal any substantial increase in strength. However, theoretical evaluations indicate that the high degree of fiber anisotropy results in a significant drop in the predicted stress level for internal instability. Scanning electron microscope data analysis suggests that internal fiber failure and smooth surface debonding could be responsible for the measured low compressive strengths.

  7. Characterization of compressive and short beam shear strength of bamboo opened cell foam core sandwich composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyawan, Paryanto Dwi; Sugiman, Saputra, Yudhi

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents the compressive and the short beam shear strength of a sandwich composite with opened cell foam made of bamboo fiber as the core and plywood as the skins. The core thickness was varied from 10 mm to 40 mm keeping the volume fraction of fiber constant. Several test s were carried out including the core density, flatwise compressive and the short beam shear testing in three point bending. The results show that the density of bamboo opened cell foam is comparable with commercial plastic foam, such as polyurethane foam. The compressive strength tends to increase linearly with increasing the core thickness. The short beam shear failure load of the sandwich composite increases with the increase of core thickness, however on the contrary, the short beam shear strength which tends to sharply decrease from the thickness of 10 mm to 30 mm and then becomes flat.

  8. Unified compaction curve model for tensile strength of tablets made by roller compaction and direct compression.

    PubMed

    Farber, Leon; Hapgood, Karen P; Michaels, James N; Fu, Xi-Young; Meyer, Robert; Johnson, Mary-Ann; Li, Feng

    2008-01-01

    A model that describes the relationship between roller-compaction conditions and tablet strength is proposed. The model assumes that compaction is cumulative during roller compaction and subsequent granule compaction, and compact strength (ribbon and tablet) is generated irreversibly as if strength is controlled by plastic deformation of primary particles only. Roller-compaction is treated as a compaction step where the macroscopic ribbon strength is subsequently destroyed in milling. This loss in strength is irreversible and tablets compressed from the resulting granulation are weaker than those compressed by direct compression at the same compression force. Roller-compacted ribbons were produced at a range of roll forces for three formulations and subsequently milled and compacted into tablets. Once the total compaction history is taken in account, the compaction behavior of the uncompacted blends and the roller-compacted granules ultimately follow a single master compaction curve--a unified compaction curve (UCC). The model successfully described the compaction behavior of DC grade starch and formulations of lactose monohydrate with 50% or more microcrystalline cellulose, and may be more generally applicable to systems containing significant proportions of any plastically deforming material, including MCC and starch. PMID:17689211

  9. A statistical, micromechanical theory of the compressive strength of brittle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M.; Sines, G.

    1978-01-01

    A general theory of the compressive strength of brittle materials is presented. This theory proposes that failure is brought about by structural weakening from accumulated crack damage which increases with the stress level. The statistics of the flaw distribution and the mechanism of crack initiation and extension are important. A sample calculation using the theory is given to demonstrate its application

  10. Effect of different dispersants in compressive strength of carbon fiber cementitious composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestari, Yulinda; Bahri, Saiful; Sugiarti, Eni; Ramadhan, Gilang; Akbar, Ari Yustisia; Martides, Erie; Khaerudini, Deni S.

    2013-09-01

    Carbon Fiber Cementitious Composites (CFCC) is one of the most important materials in smart concrete applications. CFCC should be able to have the piezoresistivity properties where its resistivity changes when there is applied a stress/strain. It must also have the compressive strength qualification. One of the important additives in carbon fiber cementitious composites is dispersant. Dispersion of carbon fiber is one of the key problems in fabricating piezoresistive carbon fiber cementitious composites. In this research, the uses of dispersants are methylcellulose, mixture of defoamer and methylcellulose and superplasticizer based polycarboxylate. The preparation of composite samples is similar as in the mortar technique according to the ASTM C 109/109M standard. The additives material are PAN type carbon fibers, methylcellulose, defoamer and superplasticizer (as water reducer and dispersant). The experimental testing conducts the compressive strength and resistivity at various curing time, i.e. 3, 7 and 28 days. The results obtained that the highest compressive strength value in is for the mortar using superplasticizer based polycarboxylate dispersant. This also shown that the distribution of carbon fiber with superplasticizer is more effective, since not reacting with the cementitious material which was different from the methylcellulose that creates the cement hydration reaction. The research also found that the CFCC require the proper water cement ratio otherwise the compressive strength becomes lower.

  11. Prediction of Corrosion Resistance of Concrete Containing Natural Pozzolan from Compressive Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    al-Swaidani, A. M.; Ismat, R.; Diyab, M. E.; Aliyan, S. D.

    2015-11-01

    A lot of Reinforced Concrete (RC) structures in Syria have suffered from reinforcement corrosion which shortened significantly their service lives. Probably, one of the most effective approaches to make concrete structures more durable and concrete industry on the whole - more sustainable is to substitute pozzolan for a portion of Portland cement (PC). Syria is relatively rich in natural pozzolan. In the study, in order to predict the corrosion resistance from compressive strength, concrete specimens were produced with seven cement types: one plain Portland cement (control) and six natural pozzolan-based cements with replacement levels ranging from 10 to 35%. The development of the compressive strengths of concrete cube specimens with curing time has been investigated. Chloride penetrability has also been evaluated for all concrete mixes after three curing times of 7, 28 and 90 days. The effect on resistance of concrete against damage caused by corrosion of the embedded reinforcing steel has been investigated using an accelerated corrosion test by impressing a constant anodic potential for 7, 28 and 90 days curing. Test results have been statistically analysed and correlation equations relating compressive strength and corrosion performance have been developed. Significant correlations have been noted between the compressive strength and both rapid chloride penetrability and corrosion initiation times. So, this prediction could be reliable in concrete mix design when using natural pozzolan as cement replacement.

  12. Compressive strength and heavy metal leaching behaviour of mortars containing spent catalyst.

    PubMed

    Rattanasak, U; Jaturapitakkul, C; Sudaprasert, T

    2001-10-01

    This investigation was set and aimed to study the possibility of using spent catalyst as a concrete constituent which the spent catalyst was used as sand. Besides the spent catalyst was used as sand, it was also ground to very small particle size as small as that of cement and used as 20% replacement of cement by weight. Compressive strengths and leaching characteristics of lead, chromium, cadmium, and nickel in mortars containing spent catalyst and ground spent catalyst were tested. The results presented revealed that the compressive strength of mortar containing spent catalyst increased with ages. The results also indicated that the compressive strength of mortar containing spent catalyst at the proportion of 1.25 times of cement by weight was strong enough to make a concrete brick. In case of the ground spent catalyst being used to replace cement, it made the compressive strength lower than that of the standard mortar approximately 20%. The leachate results of lead and chromium from spent catalyst were lower than the allowance, but cadmium and nickel exceeded the limits. After the spent catalyst was fixed with cement, the leaching of the heavy metals did not exceed the industrial effluent standard. Therefore, the heavy metals mentioned earlier were not a problem in using spent catalyst as a concrete constituent.

  13. Effect of Impact Damage and Open Hole on Compressive Strength of Hybrid Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, Clement; Brinson, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    Impact damage tolerance is a frequently listed design requirement for composites hardware. The effect of impact damage and open hole size on laminate compressive strength was studied on sandwich beam specimens which combine CFRP-GFRP hybrid skins and a syntactic foam core. Three test specimen configurations have been investigated for this study. The first two were sandwich beams which were loaded in pure bending (by four point flexure). One series had a skin damaged by impact, and the second series had a circular hole machined through one of the skins. The reduction of compressive strength with increasing damage (hole) size was compared. Additionally a third series of uniaxially loaded open hole compression coupons were tested to generate baseline data for comparison with both series of sandwich beams.

  14. Effect of Impact Damage and Open Hole on Compressive Strength of Hybrid Composite Laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Hiel, C.; Brinson, H.F.

    1993-05-01

    Impact damage tolerance is a frequently listed design requirement for composites hardware. The effect of impact damage and open hole size on laminate compressive strength was studied on sandwich beam specimens which combine CFRP-GFRP hybrid skins and a syntactic foam core. Three test specimen configurations have been investigated for this study. The first two were sandwich beams which were loaded in pure bending (by four point flexure). One series had a skin damaged by impact, and the second series had a circular hole machined through one of the skins. The reduction of compressive strength with increasing damage (hole) size was compared. Additionally a third series of uniaxially loaded open hole compression coupons were tested to generate baseline data for comparison with both series of sandwich beams.

  15. Haversian microstructure in bovine femoral cortices: An adaptation for improved compressive strength.

    PubMed

    Mayya, Ashwij; Banerjee, Anuradha; Rajesh, R

    2016-02-01

    Microstructural variations in bovine femoral cortices and its possible implications for the bone's mechanical behavior are characterized for a mature and a young bovine femur. Histological examination at several locations shows the presence of Haversian systems to be largely confined to the posterior region of any cross-section. Haversian bone is shown to have higher compressive strength than the non-Haversian primary bone present in the corresponding anterior regions. The anatomical variation in the compressive strength along diaphysis is found to correlate strongly with the Haversian density. Based on the differences in the failure surfaces observed from compressive failure, it is argued that the presence of Haversian systems plays a role in deflection of crack path, leading to non-prismatic failure surfaces. As biomaterials, such as bone cement and implants, closely interact with bone material, the structure-property relation established here can provide a basis for better design of future biomaterials. PMID:26652396

  16. Statistical analysis of compositional factors affecting the compressive strength of alumina-loaded epoxy (ALOX).

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Stephen Tedford; Ahn, Sung K. (Washington State University, Pullman, WA); Lee, Moo Yul

    2006-02-01

    Detailed statistical analysis of the experimental data from testing of alumina-loaded epoxy (ALOX) composites was conducted to better understand influences of the selected compositional properties on the compressive strength of these ALOX composites. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) for different models with different sets of parameters identified the optimal statistical model as, y{sub l} = -150.71 + 29.72T{sub l} + 204.71D{sub l} + 160.93S{sub 1l} + 90.41S{sub 2l}-20.366T{sub l}S{sub 2l}-137.85D{sub l}S{sub 1l}-90.08D{sub l}S{sub 2l} where y{sub l} is the predicted compressive strength, T{sub l} is the powder type, D{sub l} is the density as the covariate for powder volume concentration, and S{sub il}(i=1,2) is the strain rate. Based on the optimal statistical model, we conclude that the compressive strength of the ALOX composite is significantly influenced by the three main factors examined: powder type, density, and strain rate. We also found that the compressive strength of the ALOX composite is significantly influenced by interactions between the powder type and the strain rate and between the powder volume concentration and the strain rate. However, the interaction between the powder type and the powder volume concentration may not significantly influence the compressive strength of the ALOX composite.

  17. Compressive strength of dental composites photo-activated with different light tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvão, M. R.; Caldas, S. G. F. R.; Calabrez-Filho, S.; Campos, E. A.; Bagnato, V. S.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Andrade, M. F.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the compressive strength of microhybrid (Filtek™ Z250) and nanofilled (Filtek™ Supreme XT) composite resins photo-activated with two different light guide tips, fiber optic and polymer, coupled with one LED. The power density was 653 mW cm-2 when using the fiber optic light tip and 596 mW cm-2 with the polymer. After storage in distilled water at 37 ± 2 °C for seven days, the samples were subjected to mechanical testing of compressive strength in an EMIC universal mechanical testing machine with a load cell of 5 kN and speed of 0.5 mm min-1. The statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA with a confidence interval of 95% and Tamhane’s test. The results showed that the mean values of compressive strength were not influenced by the different light tips (p > 0.05). However, a statistical difference was observed (p < 0.001) between the microhybrid composite resin photo-activated with the fiber optic light tip and the nanofilled composite resin. Based on these results, it can be concluded that microhybrid composite resin photo-activated with the fiber optic light tip showed better results than nanofilled, regardless of the tip used, and the type of the light tip did not influence the compressive strength of either composite. Thus, the presented results suggest that both the fiber optic and polymer light guide tips provide adequate compressive strength to be used to make restorations. However, the fiber optic light tip associated with microhybrid composite resin may be an interesting option for restorations mainly in posterior teeth.

  18. Effect of dilute tungsten alloying on the dynamic strength of tantalum under ramp compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. S.; Brown, J. L.; Millett, J. C. F.; Whiteman, G.; Asay, J. R.; Bourne, N. K.

    2015-06-01

    The strength of tantalum and tantalum alloys are of considerable interest due to their widespread use in both military and industrial applications. Previous work has shown that strength in these materials is tied to dislocation density and mobility within the microstructure. Accordingly, strength has been observed to increase with dilute alloying which serves to increase the dislocation density. In this study, we examine the effect of alloying on the strength of a dilute tantalum-tungsten alloy (2.5 weight percent W) under ramp compression. The strength of the alloy is measured using the ``self-consistent'' technique which examines the response under longitudinal unloading from peak compression. The results are compared to previous studies of pure tantalum and dilute tantalum-tungsten alloys under both shock and ramp compression and indicate strengthening of the alloy when compared to pure tantalum. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Effect of quartz sand on compressive strength of the solid waste composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masturi, Marwoto, Putut; Sunarno, Rustad, Supriadi

    2016-02-01

    A solid waste composite was successfully made. Preliminary, the composite was synthesized using polyurethane (PU) as binder mixed with the solid waste using simple mixing method and then hot-pressed at at pressure of 4 metric-tons and temperature of 80°C for 20 minutes. To enhance its strength, quartz sand partilces with varied content then were added into the PU-solid waste mixture. From the compressive strength test, it was obtained that PU/solid waste composite with PU fraction (w/w) of 0.43 has optimum compressive strength of 38.91 MPa. Having been added quartz sand having average particles size of 0.94 μm, its compressive strength attains maximum at 40.47 MPa for quartz sand fraction (w/w) of 4.27 × 10-3. The strength is comparable to that of clay brick, slate stone, sandstone, limestone, alder wood, aspen wood, black cherry and pine woods. Therefore, this composite is very adequate to compete the building materials such as the bricks, stones and woods.

  20. The confined compressive strengths and Young's moduli of three American coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantino, Marc; Trettenero, Stan

    1983-01-01

    We report the confined compression strengths and Young's moduli of coal and roof rock from the Upper Freeport seam, Lucerne No. 6 Mine, Homer City, Pennsylvania, the Lower Kittanning seam, Kitt No. 1 Mine, Phillipi, West Virginia, and the Soldier Canyon seam, Soldier Canyon Mine, Price, Utah. A total of 210 tests to failure in biaxial compression were performed at confining pressures of 0.1, 3.0, and 10.0 MPa. The strengths increase by a factor of 2-3 over the confining pressure range, while the Young's moduli are about constant. Standard deviations are 10-30% of the mean, emphasizing the need to do many tests. Failure in all three coals is brittle, progressing from dilational to multiplane shear to single-plane shear on increasing confining pressure. Strengths and moduli could not be correlated with such macroscopic inhomogeneities as large cracks, voids, and compositional changes.

  1. The effects of specimen scale on the compression strength of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camponeschi, Eugene Thomas, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a number of observations on the effect of specimen scale on the compression response of composite materials. Work on this topic was motivated by observations that thick-walled, unstiffened carbon reinforced cylinders subjected to hydrostatic pressure were not reaching inplane laminate stress levels at failure expected from coupon level properties, while similar cylinders reinforced with fiberglass were. Results from a study on coupon strength of (0/0/90) laminates, reinforced with AS4 carbon fiber and S2 glass fiber, are presented and show that compression strength is not a function of material or specimen thickness for materials that have the same laminate quality (autoclave cured quality). Actual laminate compression strength was observed to decrease with increasing thickness, but this is attributed to fixture restraint effects on coupon response. The hypothesis drawn from the coupon level results is further supported by results from a compression test on a thick carbon reinforced coupon in a fixture with reduced influence on specimen response and from a hydrostatic test on an unstiffened carbon reinforced cylinder subjected to hydrostatic pressure with end closures designed to minimize their effect on cylinder response.

  2. Effect of shear strength on the Hugoniot-compression curve and EOS of some metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashimo, Tsutomu; Gomoto, Yuya; Liu, Xun; Zaretsky, Eugene; Katayama, Masahide; Nagayama, Kunihito

    2015-06-01

    To derive true equations of state (EOS) of matter, we need the precise Hugoniot data, and must access the strength under shock compression to draw the isothermal hydrostatic compression curve. For this, we have established the high-speed streak camera measurement system consisting of rotating-mirror type streak camera and pulsed dye laser combined with the one-stage powder gun and two-stage light gas gun. We performed the plate-mirror Hugoniot measurement experiments on tungsten (W), copper (Cu), etc. in the pressure range up to >200 GPa by symmetric impact method, and measured the Hugoniot data where the effects of tilt and bowing of the impact plate were carefully considered. It was found that the zero-intercept value (C0) of Us-Up relation (Us =C0 +SUp) of W were larger than the bulk sound velocity by 3.1%, which may show the effect of shear strength in plastic region. The hydrostatic-compression curves were drawn by using the shear strength values reported by Sandia National Laboratories group, and the EOS's were discussed. The hypothesized Us-Up Hugoniot curve of the hydrostatic compression curve converged to the bulk sound velocity.

  3. Compressive strength and behavior of 8H C3000/PMR15 woven composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, F.

    1988-01-01

    Center-notched and unnotched specimens cut from Celion 3000/PMR15 woven composite panels with 60% fiber volume fraction were tested under quasi-static compressive load to failure at room temperature. Micrographic evidence clearly identifies the mode of compressive failure as fiber kinking. Each fiber in the kink fractures because of a combination of compressive and shear stresses. A post-failure mechanism follows the local fiber-bundle failures, which completely deforms the material by large cracks. In center-notched specimens, fiber kinks start from the notch and propagate to some distance from the notch before the post failure takes place. The effect of bundle interactions on stresses and strains was clearly distinguished by comparing the results of the finite-element analysis of a bundle surrounded by other plies to the results of the Moire interferometry on the edge of a laminate. A model introduced incorporated the micromechanical geometry as well as the constituent properties to predict the notched and unnotched compressive strengths of the woven material. For notched-strength predictions, the Average Stress Criterion was used, and the characteristics distance was found to be a function of laminate thickness. Predicted notched and unnotched strengths correlate very well with the experimental results.

  4. A low cost method of testing compression-after-impact strength of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    1991-01-01

    A method was devised to test the compression strength of composite laminate specimens that are much thinner and wider than other tests require. The specimen can be up to 7.62 cm (3 in) wide and as thin as 1.02 mm (.04 in). The best features of the Illinois Institute of Technology Research Institute (IITRI) fixture are combined with an antibuckling jig developed and used at the University of Dayton Research Institute to obtain a method of compression testing thin, wide test coupons on any 20 kip (or larger) loading frame. Up to 83 pct. less composite material is needed for the test coupons compared to the most commonly used compression-after-impact (CAI) tests, which calls for 48 ply thick (approx. 6.12 mm) test coupons. Another advantage of the new method is that composite coupons of the exact lay-up and thickness of production parts can be tested for CAI strength, thus yielding more meaningful results. This new method was used to compression test 8 and 16 ply laminates of T300/934 carbon/epoxy. These results were compared to those obtained using ASTM standard D 3410-87 (Celanese compression test). CAI testing was performed on IM6/3501-6, IM7/SP500 and IM7/F3900. The new test method and associated fixture work well and is a valuable asset to MSFC's damage tolerance program.

  5. Correlation between aggregate quality and compressive strength of andesite from Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czinder, Balázs; Török, Ákos

    2015-04-01

    Andesite is one of the most common lithology that is used as aggregate. Testing of aggregate quality traditionally includes Los Angeles, micro-Deval tests and the quality of the stone is assessed according to these values. In the present paper both aggregate properties and strength properties of andesites are compared in order to find correlation between aggregate strength, durability and compressive and tensile strength as well as frost resistance. Tests were made from andesite types obtained from two operating quarries of Nógrádkövesd and Gyöngyössolymos. Uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) values were compared with aggregate test results obtained from the same block. Air dry, water saturated and freeze-thaw subjected specimens were tested. According to lithological description and fabric analyses samples were grouped into 4 main lithotypes: one from Nógrádkövesd and three from Gyöngyössolymos. Fine porphyric andesite from Gyöngyössolymos provided the best micro-Deval values. In terms of uniaxial compressive strength the same trend was found, fine porphyric andesite from Gyöngyössolymos had the highest UCS under laboratory conditions, while coarser porphyritic andesite from the same quarry had lower strength. Water saturation decreased UCS as it was expected. Tensile strength values show a gradual deceases from air dry to water saturated and finally subjected to freeze-thaw cycles. Mean micro-Deval value of fine porphyric Gyöngyössolymos andesite was about 7, while that of the coarser porphyritic andesite was app. 16. These values are still higher than the mean micro-Deval test result of Nógrádkövesd andesite; which was 20. A good correlation was found in between Los Angeles and micro-Deval values, but there was no indication that micro-Deval values correlate well with UCS.

  6. Strength and texture of Pt compressed to 63 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, Susannah M.; Shieh, Sean R.; Duffy, Thomas S.

    2015-02-14

    Angle- and energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction experiments in a radial geometry were performed in the diamond anvil cell on polycrystalline platinum samples at pressures up to 63 GPa. Observed yield strength and texture depend on grain size. For samples with 70–300-nm particle size, the yield strength is 5–6 GPa at ∼60 GPa. Coarse-grained (∼2-μm particles) Pt has a much lower yield strength of 1–1.5 GPa at ∼60 GPa. Face-centered cubic metals Pt and Au have lower strength to shear modulus ratio than body-centered cubic or hexagonal close-packed metals. While a 300-nm particle sample exhibits the 〈110〉 texture expected of face-centered-cubic metals under compression, smaller and larger particles show a weak mixed 〈110〉 and 〈100〉 texture under compression. Differences in texture development may also occur due to deviations from uniaxial stress under compression in the diamond anvil cell.

  7. The influence of nickel slag aggregate concentration to compressive and flexural strength on fly ash-based geopolymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujiono, E. H.; Setiawan, A.; Husain, H.; Irhamsyah, A.; Samnur, S.; Subaer, S.

    2016-04-01

    Fly ash-based geopolymer with nickel slag aggregate has been successfully produced. Fly ash and nickel slag were obtained from Bosowa Jeneponto Power Plant and PT. Vale Indonesia, respectively. This research aims to investigate the influence of nickel slag concentration to compressive strength, flexural strength, and microstructure of geopolymer composite. The increment of nickel slag aggregate on fly ash was relative to the weight of samples. Geopolymer composite were synthesized by using alkali activated method, cured at temperature of 70 °C for 1 hour. The resulting composites were left at room temperature for 14 days, before compressive and flexural strength were performed. The results showed that the addition of nickel slag aggregate was found to increase the compressive strength of the material. The optimum compressive strength was 14.81 MPa with the addition of 10% aggregate. The optimum flexural strength was 2.63 MPa with the addition of 15% aggregate.

  8. The effect of strain rate on the compressive strength of dry and saturated tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, W.A.

    1989-09-01

    The uniaxial compressive strength of air-dry and water-saturated ashfall tuff from the Nevada Test Site was measured as a function of strain rate from 10{sup {minus}6} to 10{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1}. Two different testing devices were used to achieve this wide range in rate, an electro-hydraulic, servo-controlled load frame, and a Kolsky bar. Critical strain rates of 82 s{sup {minus}1} and 22{sup {minus}1} were found for dry and saturated tuffs, respectively. Below the critical rate the strength is a weak function of strain rate and above the critical rate strength varies as the cube root of strain rate. The strengths of the dry and saturated tuff are the same above the critical rate. At slower rates, the saturated tuff is weaker at all rates and shows a slightly stronger strain-rate sensitivity. 26 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Development of optimization models for the set behavior and compressive strength of sodium activated geopolymer pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillenwarth, Brian Albert

    As large countries such as China begin to industrialize and concerns about global warming continue to grow, there is an increasing need for more environmentally friendly building materials. One promising material known as a geopolymer can be used as a portland cement replacement and in this capacity emits around 67% less carbon dioxide. In addition to potentially reducing carbon emissions, geopolymers can be synthesized with many industrial waste products such as fly ash. Although the benefits of geopolymers are substantial, there are a few difficulties with designing geopolymer mixes which have hindered widespread commercialization of the material. One such difficulty is the high variability of the materials used for their synthesis. In addition to this, interrelationships between mix design variables and how these interrelationships impact the set behavior and compressive strength are not well understood. A third complicating factor with designing geopolymer mixes is that the role of calcium in these systems is not well understood. In order to overcome these barriers, this study developed predictive optimization models through the use of genetic programming with experimentally collected set times and compressive strengths of several geopolymer paste mixes. The developed set behavior models were shown to predict the correct set behavior from the mix design over 85% of the time. The strength optimization model was shown to be capable of predicting compressive strengths of geopolymer pastes from their mix design to within about 1 ksi of their actual strength. In addition to this the optimization models give valuable insight into the key factors influencing strength development as well as the key factors responsible for flash set and long set behaviors in geopolymer pastes. A method for designing geopolymer paste mixes was developed from the generated optimization models. This design method provides an invaluable tool for use in future geopolymer research as well as

  10. A Finite Element Analysis for Predicting the Residual Compression Strength of Impact-Damaged Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; Jackson, Wade C.

    2008-01-01

    A simple analysis method has been developed for predicting the residual compression strength of impact-damaged sandwich panels. The method is tailored for honeycomb core-based sandwich specimens that exhibit an indentation growth failure mode under axial compression loading, which is driven largely by the crushing behavior of the core material. The analysis method is in the form of a finite element model, where the impact-damaged facesheet is represented using shell elements and the core material is represented using spring elements, aligned in the thickness direction of the core. The nonlinear crush response of the core material used in the analysis is based on data from flatwise compression tests. A comparison with a previous analysis method and some experimental data shows good agreement with results from this new approach.

  11. A Finite Element Analysis for Predicting the Residual Compressive Strength of Impact-Damaged Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; Jackson, Wade C.

    2008-01-01

    A simple analysis method has been developed for predicting the residual compressive strength of impact-damaged sandwich panels. The method is tailored for honeycomb core-based sandwich specimens that exhibit an indentation growth failure mode under axial compressive loading, which is driven largely by the crushing behavior of the core material. The analysis method is in the form of a finite element model, where the impact-damaged facesheet is represented using shell elements and the core material is represented using spring elements, aligned in the thickness direction of the core. The nonlinear crush response of the core material used in the analysis is based on data from flatwise compression tests. A comparison with a previous analysis method and some experimental data shows good agreement with results from this new approach.

  12. A Graphical Method Predicting the Compressive Strength of Toughened Unidirectional Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumahat, Aidah; Soutis, Constantinos; Hodzic, Alma

    2011-02-01

    The in-plane shear and compressive properties of unidirectional (UD) HTS40/977-2 carbon fibre-toughened resin (CF/TR) laminates are investigated. Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy are used to reveal the failure mechanisms developed during compression. It is found that damage initiates by fibre microbuckling (a fibre instability failure mode) which then is followed by yielding of the matrix to form a fibre kink band zone that leads to final fracture. Analytical models are briefly reviewed and a graphical method, based on the shear response of the composite system, is described in order to estimate the UD compressive strength. Predictions for the HTS40/977-2 system are compared to experimental measurements and to data of five other unidirectional carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites that are currently used in aerospace and other structural applications. It is shown that the estimated values are in a good agreement with the measured results.

  13. A mechanism responsible for reducing compression strength of through-the-thickness reinforced composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify one of the mechanisms that contributes to the reduced compression strength of composite materials with through-the-thickness (TTT) reinforcements. In this study a series of thick (0/90) laminates with stitched and integrally woven TTT reinforcements were fabricated and statically tested. In both the stitching and weaving process a surface loop of TTT reinforcement yarn is created between successive TTT penetrations. It was shown that the surface loop of the TTT reinforcement 'kinked' the in-plane fibers in such a manner that they were made ineffective in carrying compressive load. The improvement in strength by removal of the surface loop and 'kinked' in-plane fibers was between 7 and 35 percent.

  14. COMPARISON OF QUANTITATIVE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY-BASED MEASURES IN PREDICTING VERTEBRAL COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Jenni M.; Loo, Kenneth; Motherway, Julie

    2007-01-01

    Patient-specific measures derived from quantitative computed tomography (QCT) scans are currently being developed as a clinical tool for vertebral strength prediction. QCT-based measurement techniques vary greatly in structural complexity and generally fall into one of three categories: 1) bone mineral density (BMD), 2) “mechanics of solids” (MOS) models, such as minimum axial rigidity (the product of axial stiffness and vertebral height), or 3) three dimensional finite element (FE) models. There is no clear consensus as to the relative performance of these measures due to differences in experimental protocols, sample sizes and demographics, and outcome metrics. The goal of this study was to directly compare the performance of QCT-based assessment techniques of varying degrees of structural sophistication in predicting experimental vertebral compressive strength. Eighty-one human thoracic vertebrae (T6 – T10) from 44 donors cadavers (F = 32, M = 12; 85 + 8 y.o., max = 97 y.o., min = 54 y.o.) were QCT scanned and destructively tested in uniaxial compression. The QCT scans were processed to generate FE models and various BMD and MOS measures, including trabecular bone mineral density (tBMD), integral bone mineral density (iBMD), and axial rigidity. Bone mineral density was weakly to moderately predictive of compressive strength (R2 = 0.16 and 0.62 for tBMD and iBMD, respectively). Ex vivo vertebral strength was strongly correlated with both axial rigidity (R2 = 0.81) and FE strength measurements (R2 = 0.80), and the predictive capabilities of these two metrics were statistically equivalent (p > 0.05 for differences between FE and axial rigidity). The results of this study indicate that non-invasive predictive measures of vertebral strength should include some level of structural sophistication, specifically, gross geometric and material property distribution information. However, for uniaxial compression of isolated vertebrae, which is the current biomechanical

  15. Column and Plate Compressive Strengths of Aircraft Structural Martials Extruded 0-1HTA Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimerl, George J; Niles, Donald E

    1947-01-01

    Column and plate compressive strengths of extruded 0-1HTA magnesium alloy were determined both within and beyond the elastic range from tests of flat end H-section columns and from local instability tests of H-, Z-, and channel section columns. These tests are part of an extensive research investigation to provide data on the structural strength of various aircraft materials. The results are presented in the form of curves and charts that are suitable for use in the design and analysis of aircraft structures.

  16. Column and Plate Compressive Strengths of Aircraft Structural Materials: Extruded 24S-T Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimerl, George J.; Roy, J Albert

    1945-01-01

    Column and plate compressive strengths of extruded 24S-T aluminum alloy were determined both within and beyond the elastic range from tests of thin-strip columns and local-instability tests of H-, Z-,and channel-section columns. These tests are part of an extensive research investigation to provide data on the' structural strength of various aircraft materials. The results are presented in the form of curves and charts that are suitable for use in the design and analysis of aircraft structures.

  17. The pore characteristics of geopolymer foam concrete and their impact on the compressive strength and modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zuhua; Wang, Hao

    2016-08-01

    The pore characteristics of GFCs manufactured in the laboratory with 0-16% foam additions were examined using image analysis (IA) and vacuum water saturation techniques. The pore size distribution, pore shape and porosity were obtained. The IA method provides a suitable approach to obtain the information of large pores, which are more important in affecting the compressive strength of GFC. By examining the applicability of the existing models of predicting compressive strength of foam concrete, a modified Ryshkevitch’s model is proposed for GFC, in which only the porosity that is contributed by the pores over a critical diameter (>100 μm) is considered. This “critical void model” is shown to have very satisfying prediction capability in the studied range of porosity. A compression-modulus model for Portland cement concrete is recommended for predicting the compression modulus elasticity of GFC. This study confirms that GFC have similar pore structures and mechanical behavior as those Portland cement foam concrete and can be used alternatively in the industry for the construction and insulation purposes.

  18. Effects of fiber, matrix, and interphase on carbon fiber composite compression strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nairn, John A.; Harper, Sheila I.; Bascom, Willard D.

    1994-01-01

    The major goal of this project was to obtain basic information on compression failure properties of carbon fiber composites. To do this, we investigated fiber effects, matrix effects, and fiber/matrix interface effects. Using each of nine fiber types, we prepared embedded single-fiber specimens, single-ply specimens, and full laminates. From the single-fiber specimens, in addition to the standard fragmentation test analysis, we were able to use the low crack density data to provide information about the distribution of fiber flaws. The single-ply specimens provided evidence of a correlation between the size of kink band zones and the quality of the interface. Results of the laminate compression experiments mostly agreed with the results from single-ply experiments, although the ultimate compression strengths of laminates were higher. Generally, these experiments showed a strong effect of interfacial properties. Matrix effects were examined using laminates subjected to precracking under mixed-mode loading conditions. A large effect of precracking conditions on the mode 1 toughness of the laminates was found. In order to control the properties of the fiber/matrix interface, we prepared composites of carbon fiber and polycarbonate and subjected these to annealing. The changes in interfacial properties directly correlated with changes in compression strength.

  19. Determination of dynamic shear strength of 2024 aluminum alloy under shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. S.; Yan, M.; Wang, H. Y.; Shen, L. T.; Dai, L. H.

    2016-04-01

    A series of plate impact shock-reshock and shock-release experiments were conducted by using an one-stage light gas gun to determine the critical shear strength of the 2024 aluminum alloy under shock compression levels ranging from 0.66 to 3.05 GPa in the present study. In the experiments, a dual flyer plate assembly, i.e., the 2024 aluminum alloy flyer backed either by a brass plate or a PMMA plate, was utilized to produce reshock or release wave. The stress profiles of uniaxial plane strain wave propagation in the 2024 aluminum alloy sample under different pre-compressed states were measured by the embedded stress gauges. The stress-strain data at corresponding states were then calculated by a Lagrangian analysis method named as path line method. The critical shear strengths at different stress levels were finally obtained by self-consistent method. The results show that, at the low shock compression level (0.66 to 3.05 GPa), the critical shear strength of the 2024 aluminum alloy cannot be ignored and increases with the increasing longitudinal stress, which may be attributed to rate-dependence and/or pressure dependent yield behavior of the 2024 aluminum alloy.

  20. Effect of Pore Fluid Salinity on Compressibility and Shear Strength Development of Clayey Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Paassen, Leon A.; Gareau, Laurent F.

    Investigations of shear strength, compressibility and moisture content of a recent marine clay in the Caspian Sea showed soil profiles with a lower shear strength and higher moisture content, than expected for a normally consolidated soil. Further, measured preconsolidation pressures were lower than the calculated in-situ effective stress, suggesting that the deposit was underconsolidated. The pore fluid salinity was also measured and showed an increase with depth up to saturation concentration. A research project was carried out to study the effect of pore fluid salinity on shear strength and compressibility of remoulded clays. Results of this study showed that increasing pore fluid salinity caused a decrease of the moisture content for a normally consolidated clayey soil of high plasticity. The remoulded shear strength corresponded with the measured moisture contents. The observed compressive behaviour of these clays is explained using the modified effective stress concept, which considers not only (excess) pore pressure and effective pressure, but also the electrochemical repulsive and attractive forces between the clay particles. The laboratory tests on remoulded clays show opposite results to the measurements on the natural soils. The effects of soil structure are used to explain the differences for the measurements of moisture content, undrained shear strength and preconsolidation pressure. The oedometer test procedure was reviewed and additional tests were performed on natural clay samples from this site. Results showed that the measured pre-consolidation pressure depends largely on the salinity of the permeating fluid used in the oedometer apparatus and suggest that when testing marine clays with very high pore fluid salinity, using a brine solution that closely resembles the pore fluid chemistry yields a measured preconsolidation pressure closer to the known geological stress history.

  1. The Effect on the Flexural Strength, Flexural Modulus and Compressive Strength of Fibre Reinforced Acrylic with That of Plain Unfilled Acrylic Resin – An in Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Tony C; K, Aswini Kumar; Krishnan, Vinod; Mathew, Anil; V, Manju

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the flexural strength, the flexural modulus and compressive strength of the acrylic polymer reinforced with glass, carbon, polyethylene and Kevlar fibres with that of plain unfilled resin. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 specimens were prepared and divided into 10 specimens each under 5 groups namely group 1- control group without any fibres, group 2 – carbon fibres, group 3- glass fibres, group 4 – polyethylene, group 5- Kevlar. Universal testing machine (Tinius olsen, USA) was used for the testing of these specimens. Out of each group, 5 specimens were randomly selected and testing was done for flexural strength using a three point deflection test and three point bending test for compressive strength and the modulus was plotted using a graphical method. Statistical analysis was done using statistical software. Results: The respective mean values for samples in regard to their flexural strength for PMMA plain, PMMA+ glass fibre, PMMA+ carbon, PMMA+ polyethylene and PMMA+ Kevlar were 90.64, 100.79, 102.58, 94.13 and 96.43 respectively. Scheffes post hoc test clearly indicated that only mean flexural strength values of PMMA + Carbon, has the highest mean value. One-way ANOVA revealed a non-significant difference among the groups in regard to their compressive strength. Conclusion: The study concludes that carbon fibre reinforced samples has the greatest flexural strength and greatest flexural modulus, however the compressive strength remains unchanged. PMID:25954696

  2. Flow strength of tantalum under ramp compression to 250 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J. L.; Alexander, C. S.; Asay, J. R.; Dolan, D. H.; Vogler, T. J.; Belof, J. L.

    2014-01-28

    A magnetic loading technique was used to study the strength of polycrystalline tantalum ramp compressed to peak stresses between 60 and 250 GPa. Velocimetry was used to monitor the planar ramp compression and release of various tantalum samples. A wave profile analysis was then employed to determine the pressure-dependence of the average shear stress upon unloading at strain rates on the order of 10{sup 5} s{sup −1}. Experimental uncertainties were quantified using a Monte Carlo approach, where values of 5% in the estimated pressure and 9–17% in the shear stress were calculated. The measured deviatoric response was found to be in good agreement with existing lower pressure strength data as well as several strength models. Significant deviations between the experiments and models, however, were observed at higher pressures where shear stresses of up to 5 GPa were measured. Additionally, these data suggest a significant effect of the initial material processing on the high pressure strength. Heavily worked or sputtered samples were found to support up to a 30% higher shear stress upon release than an annealed material.

  3. Comparison of the compressive strengths for stitched and toughened composite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    1994-01-01

    The compression strength of a stitched and a toughened matrix graphite/epoxy composite was determined and compared to a baseline unstitched untoughened composite. Two different layups with a variety of test lengths were tested under both ambient and hot/wet conditions. No significant difference in strength was seen for the different materials when the gage lengths of the specimens were long enough to lead to a buckling failure. For shorter specimens, a 30 percent reduction in strength from the baseline was seen due to stitching for both a 48-ply quasi-isotropic and a (0/45/0/-45/90/-45/0/45/0)s laminate. Analysis of the results suggested that the decrease in strength was due to increased fiber misalignment due to the stitches. An observed increasing strength with decreasing gage length, which was seen for all materials, was explained with a size effect model. The model assumed a random distribution of flaws (misaligned fibers). The toughened materials showed a small increase in strength over the baseline material for both laminates presumably due to the compensating effects of a more compliant matrix and straighter fibers in the toughened material. The hot/wet strength of the stitched and baseline material fell 30 percent below their ambient strengths for shorter, nonbuckling specimen, while the strength of the toughened matrix material only fell 20 percent. Video images of the failing specimen were recorded and showed local failures prior to global collapse of the specimen. These images support the theory of a random distribution of flaws controlling composite failure. Failed specimen appearance, however, seems to be a misleading indication of the cause of failure.

  4. The uniaxial compressive strength of coal: Should it be used to design pillars?

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, C.; Barton, T.

    1996-12-01

    The Bureau of Mines has recently completed a comprehensive study of coal strength. More than 4000 individual test results from over 60 scams were extracted from the literature and combined in the most complete data base of the uniaxial compressive strength of coal ever assembled. In addition, more than 100 case studies of in-mine pillar performance were available in the Analysis of Retreat Mining Pillar Stability (ARMPS) data base. Statistical analysis of this wealth of data has yielded valuable results. The data shows clearly that the {open_quotes}size effect{close_quotes} is related to coal structure. The widely-used Gaddy formula, which predicts a significant strength reduction as the specimen size is increased, was found to apply only to {open_quotes}blocky{close_quotes} coals. For friable coals, the size effect was much less pronounced or even non-existent. Case histories of failed pillars are the best available data on in situ coal strength. This study found no correlation between the ARMPS stability factor of failed pillars and coal specimen strength. Pillar design was much more reliable when a uniform coal strength was used in all case histories.

  5. General and mechanistic optimal relationships for tensile strength of doubly convex tablets under diametrical compression.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Sonia M; Gonzalez, Marcial; Cuitiño, Alberto M

    2015-04-30

    We propose a general framework for determining optimal relationships for tensile strength of doubly convex tablets under diametrical compression. This approach is based on the observation that tensile strength is directly proportional to the breaking force and inversely proportional to a non-linear function of geometric parameters and materials properties. This generalization reduces to the analytical expression commonly used for flat faced tablets, i.e., Hertz solution, and to the empirical relationship currently used in the pharmaceutical industry for convex-faced tablets, i.e., Pitt's equation. Under proper parametrization, optimal tensile strength relationship can be determined from experimental results by minimizing a figure of merit of choice. This optimization is performed under the first-order approximation that a flat faced tablet and a doubly curved tablet have the same tensile strength if they have the same relative density and are made of the same powder, under equivalent manufacturing conditions. Furthermore, we provide a set of recommendations and best practices for assessing the performance of optimal tensile strength relationships in general. Based on these guidelines, we identify two new models, namely the general and mechanistic models, which are effective and predictive alternatives to the tensile strength relationship currently used in the pharmaceutical industry.

  6. The Value Compressive Strength and Split Tensile Strength on Concrete Mixture With Expanded Polystyrene Coated by Surfactant Span 80 as a Partial Substitution of Fine Aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Irpan; Siauwantara, Alice

    2014-03-01

    The value of the density normal concrete which ranges between 2200-2400 kg/m3. Therefore the use of Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) as a subitute to fine aggregate can reduce the density of concrete. The purpose this research is to reduce the density of normal concrete but increase compressive strength of EPS concrete, with use surfactant as coating for the EPS. Variables of substitution percentage of EPS and EPS coated by surfactant are 5%,10%,15%,20%,25%. Method of concrete mix design based on SNI 03-2834-2000 "Tata Cara Pembuatan Rencana Campuran Beton Normal (Provisions for Proportioning Normal Concrete Mixture)". The result of testing, every increase percentage of EPS substitution will decrease the compressive strength around 1,74 MPa and decrease density 34,03 kg/m3. Using Surfactant as coating of EPS , compressive strength increase from the EPS's compressive strength. Average of increasing compressive strength 0,19 MPa and increase the density 20,03 kg/m3,average decrease of the tensile split strength EPS coated surfaktan is 0,84 MPa.

  7. Analysis and Assessment of Strength Development in Compressed FaL-G Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagendra Prasad, K.; Vijaya Bhaskar, S.; Narasimhulu, M. L.; Manohara Reddy, R.

    2014-09-01

    Of the several options explored in large scale utilization of fly ash, such as production of blended cements, high volume fly ash cement concretes, fly ash, lime and gypsum (FaL-G) combinations, alkali activated fly ash mortars and concretes are of recent innovations. The last two are non-traditional cementing materials, since no cement is used in processing of these materials. This investigation deals with analysis and assessment of strength development in compressed FaL-G blocks. FaL-G chemistry provides a strong scientific base for understanding the mechanisms of interaction. But an equally strong technological base in the production of FaL-G blocks is the need of the hour. In this investigation, analysis has been made to advance a phenomenological model to arrive at the combinations of the ingredients to produce compressed blocks to meet the strength development desired at specified age, based on carefully planned experimental data generated. The analysis of test results has been done within the framework of Abrams' law, which is extensively used in concrete technology. The validity has been examined with an independent set of experimental data. With incorporation of more data covering still wider spectrum of materials the phenomenological model can further be reinforced as a viable tool in the production of compressed FaL-G blocks.

  8. Influence of variables on the consolidation and unconfined compressive strength of crushed salt: Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifle, T.W.; Senseny, P.E.; Mellegard, K.D.

    1987-01-01

    Eight hydrostatic compression creep tests were performed on crushed salt specimens fabricated from Avery Island dome salt. Following the creep test, each specimen was tested in unconfined compression. The experiments were performed to assess the influence of the following four variables on the consolidation and unconfined strength of crushed salt: grain size distribution, temperature, time, and moisture content. The experiment design comprised a half-fraction factorial matrix at two levels. The levels of each variable investigated were grain size distribution, uniform-graded and well-graded (coefficient of uniformity of 1 and 8); temperature 25/sup 0/C and 100/sup 0/C; time, 3.5 x 10/sup 3/s and 950 x 10/sup 3/s (approximately 60 minutes and 11 days, respectively); and moisture content, dry and wet (85% relative humidity for 24 hours). The hydrostatic creep stress was 10 MPa. The unconfined compression tests were performed at an axial strain rate of 1 x 10/sup -5/s/sup -1/. Results show that the variables time and moisture content have the greatest influence on creep consolidation, while grain size distribution and, to a somewhat lesser degree, temperature have the greatest influence on total consolidation. Time and moisture content and the confounded two-factor interactions between either grain size distribution and time or temperature and moisture content have the greatest influence on unconfined strength. 7 refs., 7 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. The Effect of Temperature on Compressive and Tensile Strengths of Commonly Used Luting Cements: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Suneel G; Sajjan, MC Suresh; Patil, Rekha

    2015-01-01

    Background: The luting cements must withstand masticatory and parafunctional stresses in the warm and wet oral environment. Mouth temperature and the temperature of the ingested foods may induce thermal variation and plastic deformation within the cements and might affect the strength properties. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of temperature on the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of two polycarboxylate, a conventional glass ionomer and a resin modified glass ionomer luting cements and, to compare the compressive strength and the diametral tensile strength of the selected luting cements at varying temperatures. Materials and Methods: In this study, standardized specimens were prepared. The temperature of the specimens was regulated prior to testing them using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Six specimens each were tested at 23°C, 37°C and 50°C for both the compressive and diametral tensile strengths, for all the luting cements. Results: All the luting cements showed a marginal reduction in their compressive and diametral tensile strengths at raised temperatures. Fuji Plus was strongest in compression, followed by Fuji I > Poly F > Liv Carbo. Fuji Plus had the highest diametral tensile strength values, followed by Poly F = Fuji I = Liv Carbo, at all temperatures. Conclusion: An increase in the temperature caused no significant reduction in the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of the cements evaluated. The compressive strength of the luting cements differed significantly from one another at all temperatures. The diametral tensile strength of resin modified glass ionomers differed considerably from the other cements, whereas there was no significant difference between the other cements, at all the temperatures. PMID:25859100

  10. The influence of dicarboxylic acids: Oxalic acid and tartaric acid on the compressive strength of glass ionomer cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Ahmadi Jaya; Setyawati, Harsasi; Hamami, Murwani, Irmina Kris

    2016-03-01

    Glass ionomer cement (GIC) has limitation on the mechanical properties especially compressive strength. The change of compressive strength of GIC by adding oxalic acid and tartaric acid has been investigated. Oxalic acid and tartaric acid was added to the liquid components at concentrations of 0 - 15% (w/w). Powder component of GIC was made from optimum experimental powder glass SiO2-Al2O3-CaF2. GIC was characterized by compressive strength test, SEM-EDX and FTIR. The addition of tartaric acid to GIC has greater improvement than addition of oxalic acid. The addition of tartaric acid at 10 % (w/w) to GIC has greatest value of compressive strength.

  11. Improving the compressive strength of bioceramic robocast scaffolds by polymer infiltration.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Vázquez, Francisco J; Perera, Fidel H; Miranda, Pedro; Pajares, Antonia; Guiberteau, Fernando

    2010-11-01

    The effect of polymer infiltration on the compressive strength of β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds fabricated by robocasting (direct write assembly) is analyzed in this work. Porous structures consisting of a tetragonal three-dimensional mesh of interpenetrating rods were fabricated from concentrated TCP inks with suitable viscoelastic properties. Biodegradable polymers (polylactic acid (PLA) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)) were infiltrated into selected scaffolds by immersion of the structure in a polymer melt. Infiltration increased the uniaxial compressive strength of these model scaffolds by a factor of three (PCL) or six (PLA). It also considerably improved the mechanical integrity of the structures after initial cracking, with the infiltrated structure retaining a significant load-bearing capacity after fracture of the ceramic rods. The strength improvement in the infiltrated scaffolds was attributed to two different contributions: the sealing of precursor flaws in the ceramic rod surfaces and the partial transfer of stress to the polymer, as confirmed by finite element analysis. The implications of these results for the mechanical optimization of scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications are discussed.

  12. Damage assessment and residual compression strength of thick composite plates with through-the-thickness reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Barry T.

    1990-01-01

    Damage in composite materials was studied with through-the-thickness reinforcements. As a first step it was necessary to develop new ultrasonic imaging technology to better assess internal damage of the composite. A useful ultrasonic imaging technique was successfully developed to assess the internal damage of composite panels. The ultrasonic technique accurately determines the size of the internal damage. It was found that the ultrasonic imaging technique was better able to assess the damage in a composite panel with through-the-thickness reinforcements than by destructively sectioning the specimen and visual inspection under a microscope. Five composite compression-after-impact panels were tested. The compression-after-impact strength of the panels with the through-the-thickness reinforcements was almost twice that of the comparable panel without through-the-thickness reinforcement.

  13. Damage assessment and residual compression strength of thick composite plates with through-the-thickness reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Barry T.; Farley, Gary L.; Maiden, Janice; Coogan, Dreux; Moore, Judith G.

    1991-01-01

    Damage in composite materials was studied with through-the-thickness reinforcements. As a first step it was necessary to develop new ultrasonic imaging technology to better assess internal damage of the composite. A useful ultrasonic imaging technique was successfully developed to assess the internal damage of composite panels. The ultrasonic technique accurately determines the size of the internal damage. It was found that the ultrasonic imaging technique was better able to assess the damage in composite panel with through-the-thickness reinforcements than by destructively sectioning the specimen and visual inspection under a microscope. Five composite compression-after-impact panels were tested. The compression-after-impact strength of the panels with the through-the-thickness reinforcements was almost twice that of the comparable panel without through-the-thickness reinforcement.

  14. Investigation of out of plane compressive strength of 3D printed sandwich composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikshit, V.; Yap, Y. L.; Goh, G. D.; Yang, H.; Lim, J. C.; Qi, X.; Yeong, W. Y.; Wei, J.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the 3D printing technique was utilized to manufacture the sandwich composites. Composite filament fabrication based 3D printer was used to print the face-sheet, and inkjet 3D printer was used to print the sandwich core structure. This work aims to study the compressive failure of the sandwich structure manufactured by using these two manufacturing techniques. Two different types of core structures were investigated with the same type of face-sheet configuration. The core structures were printed using photopolymer, while the face-sheet was made using nylon/glass. The out-of-plane compressive strength of the 3D printed sandwich composite structure has been examined in accordance with ASTM standards C365/C365-M and presented in this paper.

  15. Comparative evaluation of compressive strength, diametral tensile strength and shear bond strength of GIC type IX, chlorhexidine-incorporated GIC and triclosan-incorporated GIC: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Jaidka, Shipra; Somani, Rani; Singh, Deepti J.; Shafat, Shazia

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To comparatively evaluate the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement type IX, chlorhexidine-incorporated glass ionomer cement, and triclosan-incorporated glass ionomer cement. Materials and Methods: In this study, glass ionomer cement type IX was used as a control. Chlorhexidine diacetate, and triclosan were added to glass ionomer cement type IX powder, respectively, in order to obtain 0.5, 1.25, and 2.5% concentrations of the respective experimental groups. Compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength were evaluated after 24 h using Instron Universal Testing Machine. The results obtained were statistically analyzed using the independent t-test, Dunnett test, and Tukey test. Results: There was no statistical difference in the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement type IX (control), 0.5% triclosan-glass ionomer cement, and 0.5% chlorhexidine-glass ionomer cement. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength of 0.5% triclosan-glass ionomer cement and 0.5% chlorhexidine-glass ionomer cement were similar to those of the glass ionomer cement type IX, discernibly signifying that these can be considered as viable options for use in pediatric dentistry with the additional value of antimicrobial property along with physical properties within the higher acceptable range. PMID:27195231

  16. Microstructure characteristics of concrete incorporating metakaolin and PVA fibers and influence on the compressive strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sadaqat Ullah; Shafiq, Nasir; Ayub, Tehmina

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, microstructure of concrete is investigated using metakaolin (MK) as cement replacing material and Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) fibers. Total ten (10) mixes of concrete are examined by varying PVA fiber aspect ratio. It was found that MK refines the pore structure, improves interfacial transition zone (ITZ) due to its pozzolanic effects, reduces portlandite (Ca(OH)2) content and bridges the gap between matrix and aggregates due to finer particle size. Due to improvement in ITZ, the compressive strength was improved. There was no indication of Ca(OH)2 around the PVA fibers in the presence of MK and the interface between the fiber and matrix was observed very narrow.

  17. Steelmaking slag as aggregate for mortars: effects of particle dimension on compression strength.

    PubMed

    Faraone, Nicola; Tonello, Gabriele; Furlani, Erika; Maschio, Stefano

    2009-11-01

    The present paper reports on the results of some experiments obtained from the production, hydration and subsequent measurement of the mechanical properties of several mortars prepared using a commercial CII/B-LL Portland cement, steelmaking slag, superplasticizer and water. Relevant parameters for the mortar preparation are the weight ratios of cement/water, the weight ratio superplasticizer/cement and between fine and granulated coarse particles. It has been demonstrated that optimisation of such parameters leads to the production of materials with mechanical properties suitable for civil engineering applications. Moreover, materials with improved compressive strength can be prepared by the use of slag containing extensive amounts of large particles.

  18. A comparison of pressure compaction and diametral compression tests for determining granule strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, S. J.; Newton, C.

    Lightning strikes can cause structural damage, ignite flammable materials, and produce circuit malfunctions in missiles, aircraft, and ground systems. Lightning arrestor connectors (LAC's) are used to divert harmful lightning energy away from these systems by providing less destructive breakdown paths. Ceramic granules in the size range of 150-200 micrometers are used in LAC's to provide physical and electrical separation of contacts (pins) from the surrounding metal web, and to control the voltage breakdown level. Pressure compaction (P-C) tests were used to characterize the strength of ceramic granules. When compaction data are plotted as relative density of the compact versus the compaction pressure two linear regions are generally observed. The intersection of these regions, which is known as the 'breakpoint,' has been used as a semi-quantitative measure of granule strength. Comparisons were made between the P-C breakpoint and strengths of 150-200 micrometers diameter ZnO, TiO2 (rutile), and lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) granules, where the strengths were determined by diametral compression (D-C) tests. At high compaction pressures the compliance of the die itself is significant and was accounted for in the analyses. Tests were conducted at different compaction rates, and with different aspect ratio compacts. High aspect ratios and loading rates decrease the slope of the second linear portion of the compaction curve and produce higher apparent P-C breakpoints. Comparison of the P-C breakpoint to the average D-C strength indicates that the D-C strength is approximately fifty percent higher for PMN-PT granules. To eliminate the uncertainty in results due to irregular granules sizes and shapes, comparisons were made for uniform size (210 micrometers) glass spheres. In this case the average D-C strength coincided with a second breakpoint in the P-C data, which occurred after compaction by a mechanism of bridge formation and collapse had ceased.

  19. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-10-28

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points. 2 figs.

  20. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points.

  1. Optimum mass-strength analysis for orthotropic ring-stiffened cylinders under axial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shideler, J. L.; Anderson, M. S.; Jackson, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis was developed to calculate the minimum mass-strength curve for an orthotropic cylinder subjected to axial compressive loading. The analysis, which includes the effects of ring and stringer eccentricities, is in a general form so that various cylinder wall and stiffener geometries can be considered. Several different ring-stiffened orthotropic configurations were studied. The minimum mass-strength curves and the dimensions associated with these curves are presented for (in order of decreasing efficiency) a tubular double bead, a nonsymmetric double bead, a Z-stiffened skin, and a trapezoidal corrugation. A comparison of efficiencies of the configurations shows a tubular element cylinder to be more efficient than a 3-percent core-density honeycomb-sandwich cylinder. It was found that for an optimized Z-stiffened skin, the location of the Z-stiffeners (internal or external) made a negligible difference in efficiency.

  2. Shear strength of irradiated insulation under combined shear/compression loading

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.; Fabian, P.; Hazelton, C.

    1997-06-01

    The shear strengths of irradiated insulation systems were measured at 4 K under combined shear and compression loads. Sandwich-type (316LN/bonded insulation/316LN) specimens were irradiated at 4 K and tested at 4 K after storage at room temperature. Some specimens were stored at room temperature; others, at 77 K. Insulation systems included diglycidylether of bisphenol-A and tetraglycidyl diaminodiphenyl methane epoxies and polyimide resins reinforced with S-2 glass. Some contained polyimide film or mica electrical barriers. All specimens were irradiated to a fast neutron fluence of 1.8 X 10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2}. Insulation systems are compared on the basis of their irradiated and unirradiated shear strengths.

  3. Long-Term Isothermal Aging Effects on Carbon Fabric-Reinforced PMR-15 Composites: Compression Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Roberts, Gary D.; Kamvouris, John E.

    1996-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of long-term isothermal thermo-oxidative aging on the compressive properties of T-650-35 fabric reinforced PMR-15 composites. The temperatures that were studied were 204, 260, 288, 316, and 343 C. Specimens of different geometries were evaluated. Cut edge-to-surface ratios of 0.03 to 0.89 were fabricated and aged. Aging times extended to a period in excess of 15,000 hours for the lower temperature runs. The unaged and aged specimens were tested in compression in accordance with ASTM D-695. Both thin and thick (plasma) specimens were tested. Three specimens were tested at each time/temperature/geometry condition. The failure modes appeared to be initiated by fiber kinking with longitudinal, interlaminar splitting. In general, it appears that the thermo-oxidative degradation of the compression strength of the composite material may occur by both thermal (time-dependent) and oxidative (weight-loss) mechanisms. Both mechanisms appear to be specimen-thickness dependent.

  4. Material strength and inelastic deformation of silicon carbide under shock wave compression

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, R.; Raiser, G.F.; Gupta, Y.M.

    1998-01-01

    In-material, lateral, manganin foil gauge measurements were obtained in dense polycrystalline silicon carbide (SiC) shocked to peak longitudinal stresses ranging from 10{endash}24 GPa. The lateral gauge data were analyzed to determine the lateral stresses in the shocked SiC and the results were checked for self-consistency through dynamic two-dimensional computations. Over the stress range examined, the shocked SiC has an extremely high strength: the maximum shear stress supported by the material in the shocked state increases from 4.5 GPa at the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of the material (11.5 GPa) to 7.0 GPa at stresses approximately twice the HEL. The latter value is 3.7{percent} of the shear modulus of the material. The elastic{endash}inelastic transition in the shocked SiC is nearly indistinctive. At stresses beyond twice the HEL, the data suggest a gradual softening with increasing shock compression. The post-HEL material strength evolution resembles neither catastrophic failure due to massive cracking nor classical plasticity response. Stress confinement, inherent in plane shock wave compression, contributes significantly to the observed material response. The results obtained are interpreted qualitatively in terms of an inhomogeneous deformation mechanism involving both in-grain microplasticity and highly confined microfissures. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Application of alkaliphilic biofilm-forming bacteria to improve compressive strength of cement-sand mortar.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Jin; Chun, Woo-Young; Kim, Wha-Jung; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2012-03-01

    The application of microorganisms in the field of construction material is rapidly increasing worldwide; however, almost all studies that were investigated were bacterial sources with mineral-producing activity and not with organic substances. The difference in the efficiency of using bacteria as an organic agent is that it could improve the durability of cement material. This study aimed to assess the use of biofilm-forming microorganisms as binding agents to increase the compressive strength of cement-sand material. We isolated 13 alkaliphilic biofilmforming bacteria (ABB) from a cement tetrapod block in the West Sea, Korea. Using 16S RNA sequence analysis, the ABB were partially identified as Bacillus algicola KNUC501 and Exiguobacterium marinum KNUC513. KNUC513 was selected for further study following analysis of pH and biofilm formation. Cement-sand mortar cubes containing KNUC513 exhibited greater compressive strength than mineral-forming bacteria (Sporosarcina pasteurii and Arthrobacter crystallopoietes KNUC403). To determine the biofilm effect, Dnase I was used to suppress the biofilm formation of KNUC513. Field emission scanning electron microscopy image revealed the direct involvement of organic-inorganic substance in cement-sand mortar.

  6. Parametric Study of Three-Stringer-Panel Compression-After-Impact Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseau, Carl Q.; Hethcock, J. Donn; Baker, Donald J.

    1999-01-01

    Damage tolerance requirements for integrally-stiffened composite wing skins are typically met using design allowables generated by testing impact-damaged subcomponents, such as three-stringer stiffened panels. To improve these structures, it is necessary to evaluate the critical design parameters associated with three-stringer stiffened-panel compressive behavior. During recent research and development programs, four structural parameters were identified as sources for strength variation: (a) material system, (b) stringer configuration, (c) skin layup, and (d) form of axial reinforcement (tape versus pultruded carbon rods). Relative effects of these parameters on damage resistance and damage tolerance were evaluated numerically and experimentally. Material system and geometric configuration had the largest influence on damage resistance; location and extent of the damage zone influenced the sublaminate buckling behavior, failure initiation site, and compressive ultimate strength. A practical global-local modeling technique captured observed experimental behavior and has the potential to identify critical damage sites and estimate failure loads prior to testing. More careful consideration should be given to accurate simulation of boundary conditions in numerical and experimental studies.

  7. Investigation of the Compressive Strength and Creep Lifetime of 2024-T3 Aluminum-Alloy Plates at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathauser, Eldon E; Deveikis, William D

    1957-01-01

    The results of elevated-temperature compressive strength and creep tests of 2024-t3 (formerly 24s-t3) aluminum alloy plates supported in v-grooves are presented. The strength-test results indicate that a relation previously developed for predicting plate compressive strength for plates of all materials at room temperature is also satisfactory for determining elevated-temperature strength. Creep-lifetime results are presented for plates in the form of master creep-lifetime curves by using a time-temperature parameter that is convenient for summarizing tensile creep-rupture data. A comparison is made between tensile and compressive creep lifetime for the plates and a method that made use of isochronous stress-strain curves for predicting plate-creep failure stresses is investigated.

  8. Fixation of waste materials in grouts. Part II. An empirical equation for estimating compressive strength for grouts from different wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Tallent, O.K.; McDaniel, E.W.; Godsey, T.T.

    1986-04-01

    Compressive strength data for grouts prepared from three different nuclear waste materials have been correlated. The wastes include ORNL low-level waste (LLW) solution, Hanford Facility Waste (HFW) solution, and Hanford cladding removal waste (CRW) slurry. Data for the three wastes can be represented with a 0.96 coefficient of correlation by the following equation: S = -9.56 + 9.27 D/I + 18.11/C + 0.010 R, where S denotess 28-d compressive strength, in mPa; D designates Waste concentration, fraction of the original; I is ionic strength; C denotes Attapulgite-150 clay content of dry blend, in wt %; and R is the mix ratio, kg/m/sup 3/. The equation may be used to estimate 28-d compressive strengths of grouts prepared within the compositional range of this investigation.

  9. Determination of Uniaxial Compressive Strength of Ankara Agglomerate Considering Fractal Geometry of Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coskun, Aycan; Sonmez, Harun; Ercin Kasapoglu, K.; Ozge Dinc, S.; Celal Tunusluoglu, M.

    2010-05-01

    The uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) of rock material is a crucial parameter to be used for design stages of slopes, tunnels and foundations to be constructed in/on geological medium. However, preparation of high quality cores from geological mixtures or fragmented rocks such as melanges, fault rocks, coarse pyroclastic rocks, breccias and sheared serpentinites is often extremely difficult. According to the studies performed in literature, this type of geological materials may be grouped as welded and unwelded birmocks. Success of preparation of core samples from welded bimrocks is slightly better than unwelded ones. Therefore, some studies performed on the welded bimrocks to understand the mechanical behavior of geological mixture materials composed of stronger and weaker components (Gokceoglu, 2002; Sonmez et al., 2004; Sonmez et al., 2006; Kahraman, et al., 2008). The overall strength of bimrocks are generally depends on strength contrast between blocks and matrix; types and strength of matrix; type, size, strength, shape and orientation of blocks and volumetric block proportion. In previously proposed prediction models, while UCS of unwelded bimrocks may be determined by decreasing the UCS of matrix considering the volumetric block proportion, the welded ones can be predicted by considering both UCS of matrix and blocks together (Lindquist, 1994; Lindquist and Goodman, 1994; Sonmez et al., 2006 and Sonmez et al., 2009). However, there is a few attempts were performed about the effect of blocks shape and orientation on the strength of bimrock (Linqduist, 1994 and Kahraman, et al., 2008). In this study, Ankara agglomerate, which is composed of andesite blocks and surrounded weak tuff matrix, was selected as study material. Image analyses were performed on bottom, top and side faces of cores to identify volumetric block portions. In addition to the image analyses, andesite blocks on bottom, top and side faces were digitized for determination of fractal

  10. Compressive Strength Evaluation in Brazed ZrO2/Ti6Al4V Joints Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Kee, Se Ho; Jung, Flora; Heo, Yongku; Jung, Jae Pil

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to synthesize and evaluate the compressive strength of the ZrO2/Ti-6Al-4V joint brazed using an active metal filler Ag-Cu-Sn-Ti, and its application to dental implants assuring its reliability to resist the compressive failure in the actual oral environment. The brazing was performed at a temperature of 750 °C for 30 min in a vacuum furnace under 5 × 10-6 Torr atmosphere. The microstructure of the brazed joint showed the presence of an Ag-rich matrix and a Cu-rich phase, and Cu-Ti intermetallic compounds were observed along the Ti-6Al-4V bonded interface. The compressive strength of the brazed ZrO2/Ti-6Al-4V joint was measured by EN ISO 14801 standard test method. The measured compressive strength of the joint was ~1477 MPa—a value almost five times that of existing dental cements. Finite element analysis also confirmed the high von Mises stress values. The compressive strains in the samples were found concentrated near the Ti-6Al-4V position, matching with the position of the real fractured sample. These results suggest extremely significant compressive strength in ZrO2/Ti-6Al-4V joints using the Ag-Cu-Sn-Ti filler. It is believed that a highly reliable dental implant can be processed and designed using the results of this study.

  11. Repeatability and Reproducibility of Compression Strength Measurements Conducted According to ASTM E9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luecke, William E.; Ma, Li; Graham, Stephen M.; Adler, Matthew A.

    2010-01-01

    Ten commercial laboratories participated in an interlaboratory study to establish the repeatability and reproducibility of compression strength tests conducted according to ASTM International Standard Test Method E9. The test employed a cylindrical aluminum AA2024-T351 test specimen. Participants measured elastic modulus and 0.2 % offset yield strength, YS(0.2 % offset), using an extensometer attached to the specimen. The repeatability and reproducibility of the yield strength measurement, expressed as coefficient of variations were cv(sub r)= 0.011 and cv(sub R)= 0.020 The reproducibility of the test across the laboratories was among the best that has been reported for uniaxial tests. The reported data indicated that using diametrically opposed extensometers, instead of a single extensometer doubled the precision of the test method. Laboratories that did not lubricate the ends of the specimen measured yield stresses and elastic moduli that were smaller than those measured in laboratories that lubricated the specimen ends. A finite element analysis of the test specimen deformation for frictionless and perfect friction could not explain the discrepancy, however. The modulus measured from stress-strain data were reanalyzed using a technique that finds the optimal fit range, and applies several quality checks to the data. The error in modulus measurements from stress-strain curves generally increased as the fit range decreased to less than 40 % of the stress range.

  12. The influences of calcia silica contents to the compressive strength of the Al-7000 aluminium foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutarno; Soepriyanto, S.; Korda, A. A.; Dirgantara, T.

    2016-08-01

    This experiment evaluated the effect of calcia alumina and alumina silica that formed as side products involved in metal mixture of aluminium foam. These compounds are formed from additional calcium carbonate and silica in the mixture. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) roles as a blowing agent source of carbon dioxide (CO2). The formation of calcia alumina (CaO.Al2O3) is desired to improve the viscosity and to strengthen of cell wall of aluminium foam. However, Al-7000 aluminium foam showed a decrease tendency of compressive strength probably due to existence of alumina silica (3Al2O3.SiO2) in the metal mixture. In this case, the silica that thermally combines with alumina compound may degrade the metal mixture of aluminium foam structure.

  13. Effect of synthesis parameters on the compressive strength of low-calcium ferronickel slag inorganic polymers.

    PubMed

    Komnitsas, Kostas; Zaharaki, Dimitra; Perdikatsis, Vasillios

    2009-01-30

    The wide range of physical and chemical properties of inorganic polymers, also known as geopolymers, commonly formed by alkali activation of aluminosilicates, makes these materials useful for a variety of applications. In the present experimental study inorganic polymers are synthesised from low-Ca electric arc ferronickel slag. The effect of experimental conditions on the compressive strength of the final products is assessed. A number of techniques, namely XRD, FTIR and TG-DTG were used to identify new phases and subsequently elucidate to some degree the mechanisms involved. Finally, the paper discusses briefly the potential of inorganic polymer technology as a feasible option for the utilisation of certain potentially hazardous mining and metallurgical wastes towards an increased sustainability of the wider minerals sector.

  14. Hot/Wet Open Hole Compression Strength of Carbon/Epoxy Laminates for Launch Vehicle Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2009-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum examines the effects of heat and absorbed moisture on the open hole compression strength of carbon/epoxy laminates with the material and layup intended for the Ares I composite interstage. The knockdown due to temperature, amount of moisture absorbed, and the interaction between these two are examined. Results show that temperature is much more critical than the amount of moisture absorbed. The environmental knockdown factor was found to be low for this material and layup and thus obtaining a statistically significant number for this value needs to be weighed against a program s cost and schedule since basis values, damage tolerance, and safety factors all contribute much more to the overall knockdown factor.

  15. Compressive strength of titanium alloy skin-stringer panels selectively reinforced with boron-aluminum composite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, H. W.; Carri, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a method of selectively reinforcing conventional titanium airframe structure with unidirectional boron-aluminum composite attached by brazing which has been successfully demonstrated based on compression tests of short skin-stringer panels. Improvements in structural performance exceeded 25% on an equivalent weight basis over the range from room temperature to 800 F, both in terms of initial buckling and maximum strengths. Room-temperature performance was not affected by prior exposure at 600 F for 1000 hours in air, or by 400 cycles between -65 and 600 F. The experimental results were generally predictable on the basis of existing analytical procedures. No evidence of failure was observed in the braze bond between the boron-aluminum composite and the titanium alloy.

  16. Effects of material properties and speed of compression on microbial survival and tensile strength in diclofenac tablet formulations.

    PubMed

    Ayorinde, J O; Itiola, O A; Odeniyi, M A

    2013-03-01

    A work has been done to study the effects of material properties and compression speed on microbial survival and tensile strength in diclofenac tablet formulations. Tablets were produced from three formulations containing diclofenac and different excipients (DC, DL and DDCP). Two types of machines (Hydraulic hand press and single punch press), which compress the tablets at different speeds, were used. The compression properties of the tablets were analyzed using Heckel and Kawakita equations. A 3-dimensional plot was produced to determine the relationship between the tensile strength, compression speed and percentage survival of Bacillus subtilis in the diclofenac tablets. The mode of consolidation of diclofenac was found to depends on the excipient used in the formulation. DC deformed mainly by plastic flow with the lowest Py and Pk values. DL deformed plastically at the initial stage, followed by fragmentation at the later stage of compression, whereas DDCP deformed mainly by fragmentation with the highest Py and Pk values. The ranking of the percentage survival of B. subtilis in the formulations was DDCP > DL > DC, whereas the ranking of the tensile strength of the tablets was DDCP > DL > DC. Tablets produced on a hydraulic hand press with a lower compression speed had a lower percentage survival of microbial contaminants than those produced on a single punch press, which compressed the tablets at a much higher speed. The mode of consolidation of the materials and the speed at which tablet compression is carried out have effects on both the tensile strength of the tablets and the extent of destruction of microbial contaminants in diclofenac tablet formulations.

  17. Enhanced densification, strength and molecular mechanisms in shock compressed porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, J. Matthew D.; Vogler, Tracy J.

    2015-06-01

    In most porous materials, void collapse during shock compression couples mechanical energy to thermal energy. Increased temperature drives up pressures and lowers densities in the final Hugoniot states as compared to full-density samples. Some materials, however, exhibit an anomalous enhanced densification in their Hugoniot states when porosity is introduced. We have recently shown that silicon is such a material, and demonstrated a molecular mechanism for the effect using molecular simulation. We will review results from large-scale non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) and Hugoniotstat simulations of shock compressed porous silicon, highlighting the mechanism by which porosity produces local shear which nucleate partial phase transition and localized melting at shock pressures below typical thresholds in these materials. Further, we will characterize the stress states and strength of the material as a function of porosity from 5 to 50 percent and with various porosity microstructures. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Prediction of zeolite-cement-sand unconfined compressive strength using polynomial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MolaAbasi, H.; Shooshpasha, I.

    2016-04-01

    The improvement of local soils with cement and zeolite can provide great benefits, including strengthening slopes in slope stability problems, stabilizing problematic soils and preventing soil liquefaction. Recently, dosage methodologies are being developed for improved soils based on a rational criterion as it exists in concrete technology. There are numerous earlier studies showing the possibility of relating Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS) and Cemented sand (CS) parameters (voids/cement ratio) as a power function fits. Taking into account the fact that the existing equations are incapable of estimating UCS for zeolite cemented sand mixture (ZCS) well, artificial intelligence methods are used for forecasting them. Polynomial-type neural network is applied to estimate the UCS from more simply determined index properties such as zeolite and cement content, porosity as well as curing time. In order to assess the merits of the proposed approach, a total number of 216 unconfined compressive tests have been done. A comparison is carried out between the experimentally measured UCS with the predictions in order to evaluate the performance of the current method. The results demonstrate that generalized polynomial-type neural network has a great ability for prediction of the UCS. At the end sensitivity analysis of the polynomial model is applied to study the influence of input parameters on model output. The sensitivity analysis reveals that cement and zeolite content have significant influence on predicting UCS.

  19. The Effect of Different Parameters on the Development of Compressive Strength of Oil Palm Shell Geopolymer Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Kupaei, Ramin Hosseini; Alengaram, U. Johnson; Jumaat, Mohd Zamin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental results of an on-going research project on geopolymer lightweight concrete using two locally available waste materials—low calcium fly ash (FA) and oil palm shell (OPS)—as the binder and lightweight coarse aggregate, respectively. OPS was pretreated with three different alkaline solutions of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide, and sodium silicate as well as polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) for 30 days; afterwards, oil palm shell geopolymer lightweight concrete (OPSGPC) was cast by using both pretreated and untreated OPSs. The effect of these solutions on the water absorption of OPS, and the development of compressive strength in different curing conditions of OPSGPC produced by pretreated OPS were investigated; subsequently the influence of NaOH concentration, alkaline solution to FA ratio (A/FA), and different curing regimes on the compressive strength and density of OPSGPC produced by untreated OPS was inspected. The 24-hour water absorption value for OPS pretreated with 20% and 50% PVA solution was about 4% compared to 23% for untreated OPS. OPSGPC produced from OPS treated with 50% PVA solution produced the highest compressive strength of about 30 MPa in ambient cured condition. The pretreatment with alkaline solution did not have a significant positive effect on the water absorption of OPS aggregate and the compressive strength of OPSGPC. The result revealed that a maximum compressive strength of 32 MPa could be obtained at a temperature of 65°C and curing period of 4 days. This investigation also found that an A/FA ratio of 0.45 has the optimum amount of alkaline liquid and it resulted in the highest level of compressive strength. PMID:25531006

  20. The effect of different parameters on the development of compressive strength of oil palm shell geopolymer concrete.

    PubMed

    Kupaei, Ramin Hosseini; Alengaram, U Johnson; Jumaat, Mohd Zamin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental results of an on-going research project on geopolymer lightweight concrete using two locally available waste materials--low calcium fly ash (FA) and oil palm shell (OPS)--as the binder and lightweight coarse aggregate, respectively. OPS was pretreated with three different alkaline solutions of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide, and sodium silicate as well as polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) for 30 days; afterwards, oil palm shell geopolymer lightweight concrete (OPSGPC) was cast by using both pretreated and untreated OPSs. The effect of these solutions on the water absorption of OPS, and the development of compressive strength in different curing conditions of OPSGPC produced by pretreated OPS were investigated; subsequently the influence of NaOH concentration, alkaline solution to FA ratio (A/FA), and different curing regimes on the compressive strength and density of OPSGPC produced by untreated OPS was inspected. The 24-hour water absorption value for OPS pretreated with 20% and 50% PVA solution was about 4% compared to 23% for untreated OPS. OPSGPC produced from OPS treated with 50% PVA solution produced the highest compressive strength of about 30 MPa in ambient cured condition. The pretreatment with alkaline solution did not have a significant positive effect on the water absorption of OPS aggregate and the compressive strength of OPSGPC. The result revealed that a maximum compressive strength of 32 MPa could be obtained at a temperature of 65°C and curing period of 4 days. This investigation also found that an A/FA ratio of 0.45 has the optimum amount of alkaline liquid and it resulted in the highest level of compressive strength.

  1. The effect of different parameters on the development of compressive strength of oil palm shell geopolymer concrete.

    PubMed

    Kupaei, Ramin Hosseini; Alengaram, U Johnson; Jumaat, Mohd Zamin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental results of an on-going research project on geopolymer lightweight concrete using two locally available waste materials--low calcium fly ash (FA) and oil palm shell (OPS)--as the binder and lightweight coarse aggregate, respectively. OPS was pretreated with three different alkaline solutions of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide, and sodium silicate as well as polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) for 30 days; afterwards, oil palm shell geopolymer lightweight concrete (OPSGPC) was cast by using both pretreated and untreated OPSs. The effect of these solutions on the water absorption of OPS, and the development of compressive strength in different curing conditions of OPSGPC produced by pretreated OPS were investigated; subsequently the influence of NaOH concentration, alkaline solution to FA ratio (A/FA), and different curing regimes on the compressive strength and density of OPSGPC produced by untreated OPS was inspected. The 24-hour water absorption value for OPS pretreated with 20% and 50% PVA solution was about 4% compared to 23% for untreated OPS. OPSGPC produced from OPS treated with 50% PVA solution produced the highest compressive strength of about 30 MPa in ambient cured condition. The pretreatment with alkaline solution did not have a significant positive effect on the water absorption of OPS aggregate and the compressive strength of OPSGPC. The result revealed that a maximum compressive strength of 32 MPa could be obtained at a temperature of 65°C and curing period of 4 days. This investigation also found that an A/FA ratio of 0.45 has the optimum amount of alkaline liquid and it resulted in the highest level of compressive strength. PMID:25531006

  2. Effects of method of loading and specimen configuration on compressive strength of graphite/epoxy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. K.; Lisagor, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    Three test schemes were examined for testing graphite/epoxy (Narmco T300/5208) composite material specimens to failure in compression, including an adaptation of the IITRI "wedge grip" compression fixture, a face-supported-compression fixture, and an end-loaded-coupon fixture. The effects of specimen size, specimen support arrangement and method of load transfer on compressive behavior of graphite/epoxy were investigated. Compressive stress strain, strength, and modulus data obtained with the three fixtures are presented with evaluations showing the effects of all test parameters, including fiber orientation. The IITRI fixture has the potential to provide good stress/strain data to failure for unidirectional and quasi-isotropic laminates. The face supported fixture was found to be the most desirable for testing + or - 45 s laminates.

  3. Experiments on the enhancement of compressible mixing via streamwise vorticity. II - Vortex strength assessment and seed particle dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naughton, J. W.; Cattafesta, L. N.; Settles, G. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of streamwise vorticity on compressible axisymmetric mixing layers is examined using vortex strength assessment and seed particle dynamics analysis. Experimental results indicate that the particles faithfully represent the dynamics of the turbulent swirling flow. A comparison of the previously determined mixing layer growth rates with the present vortex strength data reveals that the increase of turbulent mixing up to 60 percent scales with the degree of swirl. The mixing enhancement appears to be independent of the compressibility level of the mixing layer.

  4. Structural strength of cancellous specimens from bovine femur under cyclic compression

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Kaori; Yamada, Satoshi; Todoh, Masahiro; Takahata, Masahiko; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of osteoporotic fractures was estimated as nine million worldwide in 2000, with particular occurrence at the proximity of joints rich in cancellous bone. Although most of these fractures spontaneously heal, some fractures progressively collapse during the early post-fracture period. Prediction of bone fragility during progressive collapse following initial fracture is clinically important. However, the mechanism of collapse, especially the gradual loss of the height in the cancellous bone region, is not clearly proved. The strength of cancellous bone after yield stress is difficult to predict since structural and mechanical strength cannot be determined a priori. The purpose of this study was to identify whether the baseline structure and volume of cancellous bone contributed to the change in cancellous bone strength under cyclic loading. A total of fifteen cubic cancellous bone specimens were obtained from two 2-year-old bovines and divided into three groups by collection regions: femoral head, neck, and proximal metaphysis. Structural indices of each 5-mm cubic specimen were determined using micro-computed tomography. Specimens were then subjected to five cycles of uniaxial compressive loading at 0.05 mm/min with initial 20 N loading, 0.3 mm displacement, and then unloading to 0.2 mm with 0.1 mm displacement for five successive cycles. Elastic modulus and yield stress of cancellous bone decreased exponentially during five loading cycles. The decrease ratio of yield stress from baseline to fifth cycle was strongly correlated with bone volume fraction (BV/TV, r = 0.96, p < 0.01) and structural model index (SMI, r = − 0.81, p < 0.01). The decrease ratio of elastic modulus from baseline to fifth cycle was also correlated with BV/TV (r = 0.80, p < 0.01) and SMI (r = − 0.78, p < 0.01). These data indicate that structural deterioration of cancellous bone is associated with bone strength after yield stress. This study suggests that baseline cancellous

  5. Effects of fabrication and joining processes on compressive strength of boron/aluminum and borsic/aluminum structural panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royster, D. M.; Wiant, H. R.; Mcwithey, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    Processes for forming and joining boron/aluminum and borsic/aluminum to themselves and to titanium alloys were studied. Composite skin and titanium skin panels were joined to composite stringers by high strength bolts, by spotwelding, by diffusion bonding, by adhesive bonding, or by brazing. The effects of the fabrication and joining processes on panel compressive strengths were discussed. Predicted buckling loads were compared with experimental data.

  6. Developing a Material Strength Design Value Based on Compression after Impact Damage for the Ares I Composite Interstage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Jackson, J. R.

    2009-01-01

    The derivation of design values for compression after impact strength for two types of honeycomb sandwich structures are presented. The sandwich structures in this study had an aluminum core and composite laminate facesheets of either 16-ply quasi or 18-ply directional lay-ups. The results show that a simple power law curve fit to the data can be used to create A- and B-basis residual strength curves.

  7. True uniaxial compressive strengths of rock or coal specimens are independent of diameter-to-length ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Babcock, C.O.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that part of the compressive strength of a test specimen of rock or coal in the laboratory or a pillar in a mine comes from physical property strength and, in part, from the constraint provided by the loading stresses. Much confusion in pillar design comes from assigning the total strength change to geometry, as evidenced by the many pillar design equations with width to height as the primary variable. In tests by the U.S. Bureau of Mines, compressive strengths for cylindrical specimens of limestone, marble, sandstone, and coal were independent of the specimen test geometry when the end friction was removed. A conventional uniaxial compressive strength test between two steel platens is actually a uniaxial force and not a uniaxial stress test. The biaxial or triaxial state of stress for much of the test volume changes with the geometry of the test specimen. By removing the end friction supplied by the steel platens to the specimen, a more nearly uniaxial stress state independent of the specimen geometry is produced in the specimen. Pillar design is a constraint and physical property problem rather than a geometry problem. Roof and floor constraint are major factors in pillar design and strength.

  8. A comparative study for the concrete compressive strength estimation using neural network and neuro-fuzzy modelling approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgehan, Mahmut

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and artificial neural network (ANN) model have been successfully used for the evaluation of relationships between concrete compressive strength and ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) values using the experimental data obtained from many cores taken from different reinforced concrete structures having different ages and unknown ratios of concrete mixtures. A comparative study is made using the neural nets and neuro-fuzzy (NF) techniques. Statistic measures were used to evaluate the performance of the models. Comparing of the results, it is found that the proposed ANFIS architecture with Gaussian membership function is found to perform better than the multilayer feed-forward ANN learning by backpropagation algorithm. The final results show that especially the ANFIS modelling may constitute an efficient tool for prediction of the concrete compressive strength. Architectures of the ANFIS and neural network established in the current study perform sufficiently in the estimation of concrete compressive strength, and particularly ANFIS model estimates closely follow the desired values. Both ANFIS and ANN techniques can be used in conditions where too many structures are to be examined in a restricted time. The presented approaches enable to practically find concrete strengths in the existing reinforced concrete structures, whose records of concrete mixture ratios are not available or present. Thus, researchers can easily evaluate the compressive strength of concrete specimens using UPV and density values. These methods also contribute to a remarkable reduction in the computational time without any significant loss of accuracy. A comparison of the results clearly shows that particularly the NF approach can be used effectively to predict the compressive strength of concrete using UPV and density values. In addition, these model architectures can be used as a nondestructive procedure for health monitoring of

  9. Age- and sex-related regional compressive strength characteristics of human lumbar vertebrae in osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Kurutz, Márta; Donáth, Judit; Gálos, Miklós; Varga, Péter; Fornet, Béla

    2008-01-01

    Objective To obtain the compressive load bearing and energy absorption capacity of lumbar vertebrae of osteoporotic elderly for the everyday medical praxis in terms of the simple diagnostic data, like computed tomography (CT), densitometry, age, and sex. Methods Compressive test of 54 osteoporotic cadaver vertebrae L1 and L2, 16 males and 38 females (age range 43–93, mean age 71.6 ± 13.3 years, mean bone mineral density (BMD) 0.377 ± 0.089 g/cm2, mean T-score −5.57 ± 0.79, Z-score −4.05 ± 0.77) was investigated. Based on the load-displacement diagrams and the measured geometrical parameters of vertebral bodies, proportional, ultimate and yield stresses and strains, Young’s modulus, ductility and energy absorption capacity were determined. Three vertebral regions were distinguished: superior, central and inferior regions, but certain parameters were calculated for the upper/ lower intermediate layers, as well. Cross-sectional areas, and certain bone tissue parameters were determined by image analysis of CT pictures of vertebrae. Sex- and age-related decline functions and trends of strength characteristics were determined. Results Size-corrected failure load was 15%–25% smaller in women, proportional and ultimate stresses were about 30%–35% smaller for women in any region, and 20%–25% higher in central regions for both sexes. Young’s moduli were about 30% smaller in women in any region, and 20%–25% smaller in the central region for both sexes. Small strains were higher in males, large strains were higher in females, namely, proportional strains were about 25% larger in men, yield and ultimate strains were quasi equal for sexes, break strains were 10% higher in women. Ultimate energy absorption capacity was 10%–20% higher in men; the final ductile energy absorption capacity was quasi equal for sexes in all levels. Age-dependence was stronger for men, mainly in central regions (ultimate load, male: r = −0.66, p < 0.01, female: r = −0.52, p

  10. Strength of Tantalum at High Pressures through Richtmyer-Meshkov Laser Compression Experiments and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Kristen Kathleen

    Strength at extreme pressures (>1 Mbar or 100 GPa) and high strain rates (106-108 s-1) of materials is not well characterized. The goal of the research outlined in this thesis is to study the strength of tantalum (Ta) at these conditions. The Omega Laser in the Laboratory for Laser Energetics in Rochester, New York is used to create such extreme conditions. Targets are designed with ripples or waves on the surface, and these samples are subjected to high pressures using Omega's high energy laser beams. In these experiments, the observational parameter is the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability in the form of ripple growth on single-mode ripples. The experimental platform used for these experiments is the "ride-along" laser compression recovery experiments, which provide a way to recover the specimens having been subjected to high pressures. Six different experiments are performed on the Omega laser using single-mode tantalum targets at different laser energies. The energy indicates the amount of laser energy that impinges the target. For each target, values for growth factor are obtained by comparing the profile of ripples before and after the experiment. With increasing energy, the growth factor increased. Engineering simulations are used to interpret and correlate the measurements of growth factor to a measure of strength. In order to validate the engineering constitutive model for tantalum, a series of simulations are performed using the code Eureka, based on the Optimal Transportation Meshfree (OTM) method. Two different configurations are studied in the simulations: RM instabilities in single and multimode ripples. Six different simulations are performed for the single ripple configuration of the RM instability experiment, with drives corresponding to laser energies used in the experiments. Each successive simulation is performed at higher drive energy, and it is observed that with increasing energy, the growth factor increases. Overall, there is favorable

  11. Compressive strength of resin-modified glass ionomer restorative material: effect of P/L ratio and storage time.

    PubMed

    Aratani, Mônica; Pereira, Antônio Carlos; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Consani, Simonides

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the compressive strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement Fuji II LC and Vitremer, in powder/liquid ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3, at three periods (24 hours, 7 and 28 days) of storage in distilled water at 37ºC. For each material, P/L ratio and storage time, 5 cylindrical specimens were prepared, with 4mm diameter and 6mm height, in silicon moulds. Specimens were light-cured for 40 seconds at each extremity, removed from the moulds and laterally light-cured (perpendicular to long axis) for 40 seconds, protected as recommended by the manufacturers and immersed for the time tested. The specimens were submitted to compressive strength testing in an Instron machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0mm/min until failure. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%), and showed that the compressive strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement was reduced when P/L ratio was reduced and that the storage in water had little influence on compressive strength.

  12. Investigation of test methods for measuring compressive strength and modulus of two-dimensional carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Sawyer, James Wayne; Yamaki, Y. Robert

    1989-01-01

    An experimental evaluation has been conducted to ascertain the the usefulness of two techniques for measuring in-plane compressive failure strength and modulus in coated and uncoated carbon-carbon composites. The techniques involved testing specimens with potted ends as well as testing them in a novel clamping fixture; specimen shape, length, gage width, and thickness were the test parameters investigated for both coated and uncoated 0/90 deg and +/-45 deg laminates. It is found that specimen shape does not have a significant effect on the measured compressive properties. The potting of specimen ends results in slightly higher measured compressive strengths than those obtained with the new clamping fixture. Comparable modulus values are obtained by both techniques.

  13. Predicting the uniaxial compressive strength of cemented paste backfill from ultrasonic pulse velocity test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Tekin; Ercikdi, Bayram

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the predictability of the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) of cemented paste backfill (CPB) prepared from three different tailings (Tailings T1, Tailings T2 and Tailings T3) using ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) test. For this purpose, 180 CPB samples with diameter × height of 5 × 10 cm (similar to NX size) prepared at different binder dosages and consistencies were subjected to the UPV and UCS tests at 7-56 days of curing periods. The effects of binder dosage and consistency on the UPV and UCS properties of CPB samples were investigated and UCS values were correlated with the corresponding UPV data. Microstructural analyses were also performed on CPB samples in order to understand the effect of microstructure (i.e. total porosity) on the UPV data. The UPV and UCSs of CPB samples increased with increasing binder dosage and reducing the consistency irrespective of the tailings type and curing periods. Changes in the mixture properties observed to have a lesser extent on the UPV properties of CPB, while, their effect on the UCS of CPB was significant. Empirical equations were produced for each mixture in order to predict the UCSs of CPB through UPV. The validity of the equations was also checked by t- and F-test. The results showed that a linear relation appeared to exist between the UPV and UCS with high correlation coefficients (r ≥ 0.79) and all models were valid by statistical analysis. Mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses have revealed that the UPV properties of CPB samples were highly associated with their respective microstructural properties (i.e. total porosity). The major output of this study is that UPV test can be effectively used for a preliminary prediction of the strength of CPB.

  14. Data on Material Properties and Panel Compressive Strength of a Plastic-bonded Material of Glass Cloth and Canvas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zender, George W; Schuette, Evan H; Weinberger, Robert A

    1944-01-01

    Results are presented of tests for determining the tensile, compressive, and bending properties of a material of plastic-bonding glass cloth and canvas layers. In addition, 10 panel specimens were tested in compression. Although the material is not satisfactory for primary structural use in aircraft when compared on a strength-weight basis with other materials in common use, there appears to be potential strength in the material that will require research for development. These points are considered in some detail in the concluding discussion of the report. An appendix shows that a higher tensile strength can be obtained by changes in the type of weave used in the glass-cloth reinforcement.

  15. Experiment to Measure the Strength of Lead to ~ 1.5 Mbar by Compression and Release using the Z Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, Stephen; Brown, Justin; Davis, Jean-Paul

    2015-06-01

    We are planning an experiment to infer the strength of lead at ~ 1.5 Mbar by ramp compression and release using the Z machine. Longitudinal and bulk sound speeds may be calculated from the measurement of the velocity of the interface between thin lead samples and a LiF window by an iterative process using either a transfer-function or characteristics-based method to map in-situ velocity onto measured window velocity. The hydrostatic response comes from analysis of the compression; the strength at each iteration step from the difference between the longitudinal and (extrapolated) bulk sound speeds. As lead is expected to be soft, the effect of its strength on the expansion on release is thought to be small, and may be treated as an error on the results, contrary to similar results for, e.g., Ta. (c) British Crown Owned Copyright 2015/AWE.

  16. Laboratory-produced high-volume fly ash blended cements: Physical properties and compressive strength of mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Bouzoubaa, N.; Zhang, M.H.; Bilodeau, A.; Malhotra, V.M.

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes the production of laboratory-produced high-volume fly ash blended cements. The effect of grinding of the Portland cement clinker, fly ash, and gypsum with or without a superplasticizer on the physical properties of the cements, and the compressive strength of the mortars made with the resulting blended cements, is discussed. The use of ground fly ash compared with unground fly ash resulted in a substantial increase in the compressive strength of the mortars; the improvement in the strength seems to increase with an increase in the fineness of the fly ash. This was particularly significant for the coarser fly ash. The superplasticizer interground with the clinker seems to act as a grinding aid in the production of Portland cement.

  17. Comparative experimental study of dynamic compressive strength of mortar with glass and basalt fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruszka, Leopold; Moćko, Wojciech; Fenu, Luigi; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    Specimen reinforced with glass and basalt fibers were prepared using Standard Portland cement (CEM I, 52.5 R as prescribed by EN 197-1) and standard sand, in accordance with EN 196-1. From this cementitious mixture, a reference cement mortar without fibers was first prepared. Compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and mod of fracture were determined for all specimens. Static and dynamic properties were investigated using Instron testing machine and split Hopkinson pressure bar, respectively. Content of the glass fibers in the mortar does not influence the fracture stress at static loading conditions in a clearly observed way. Moreover at dynamic range 5% content of the fiber results in a significant drop of fracture stress. Analysis of the basalt fibers influence on the fracture stress shows that optimal content of this reinforcement is equal to 3% for both static and dynamic loading conditions. Further increase of the fiber share gives the opposite effect, i.e. drop of the fracture stress.

  18. An engineering procedure for calculating compressive strength of isogrid cylindrical shells with buckled skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, W. L., Jr.; Anderson, M. S.; Slysh, P.

    1976-01-01

    An engineering procedure is presented for calculating the compressive buckling strength of isogrid cylinders using shell of revolution techniques and accounting for loading beyond the material proportional limit and/or local buckling of the skin prior to general buckling. A general nondimensional chart is presented which can be used in conjunction with formulas based on simple deformation plasticity theory to calculate postbuckling stiffnesses of the skin. The stiffening grid system is treated as an equivalent isotropic grid layer. Stiffnesses are determined for this grid layer, when loaded beyond the proportional limit, by the same plasticity theory used for the skin and a nonlinear stress-strain curve constructed from simple isogrid-handbook formulas and standard-reference-manual stress-strain curves for the material involved. Comparison of prebuckling strains and buckling results obtained by this procedure with data from a large isogrid-cylinder test is excellent with the calculated buckling load no more than 4 percent greater than the test value.

  19. Shell hardness and compressive strength of the Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and the Asian oyster, Crassostrea ariakensis.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Sara A; Chon, Grace D; Lee, James Jin-Wu; Lane, Hillary A; Paynter, Kennedy T

    2013-12-01

    The valves of oysters act as a physical barrier between tissues and the external environment, thereby protecting the oyster from environmental stress and predation. To better understand differences in shell properties and predation susceptibilities of two physiologically and morphologically similar oysters, Crassostrea virginica and Crassostrea ariakensis, we quantified and compared two mechanical properties of shells: hardness (resistance to irreversible deformation; GPa) and compressive strength (force necessary to produce a crack; N). We found no differences in the hardness values between foliated layers (innermost and outermost foliated layers), age class (C. virginica: 1, 4, 6, 9 years; C. ariakensis: 4, 6 years), or species. This suggests that the foliated layers have similar properties and are likely composed of the same material. The compressive force required to break wet and dry shells was also not different. However, the shells of both six- and nine-year-old C. virginica withstood higher compressive force than C. virginica shells aged either one or four, and the shells of C. ariakensis at both ages studied (4- and 6-years-old). Differences in ability to withstand compressive force are likely explained by differences in thickness and density between age classes and species. Further, we compared the compressive strength of differing ages of these two species to the crushing force of common oyster predators in the Chesapeake Bay. By studying the physical properties of shells, this work may contribute to a better understanding of the mechanical defenses of oysters as well as of their predation vulnerabilities. PMID:24445443

  20. Effect of Different pH Values on the Compressive Strength of Calcium-Enriched Mixture Cement

    PubMed Central

    Sobhnamayan, Fereshte; Sahebi, Safoora; Alborzi, Ali; Ghorbani, Saeed; Shojaee, Nooshin Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the compressive strength of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement in contact with acidic, neutral and alkaline pH values. Methods and Materials: The cement was mixed according to the manufacturer’s instructions, it was then condensed into fourteen split molds with five 4×6 mm holes. The specimens were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=10) and were then exposed to environments with pH values of 4.4, 5.4, 6.4, 7.4, 8.4, 9.4 and 10.4 in an incubator at 37° C for 4 days. After removing the samples from the molds, cement pellets were compressed in a universal testing machine. The exact forces required for breaking of the samples were recorded. The data were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests for individual and pairwise comparisons, respectively. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: The greatest (48.59±10.36) and the lowest (9.67±3.16) mean compressive strength values were observed after exposure to pH value of 9.4 and 7.4, respectively. Alkaline environment significantly increased the compressive strength of CEM cement compared to the control group. There was no significant difference between the pH values of 9.4 and 10.4 but significant differences were found between pH values of 9.4, 8.4 and 7.4. The acidic environment showed better results than the neutral environment, although the difference was not significant for the pH value of 6.4. Alkaline pH also showed significantly better results than acidic and neutral pH. Conclusion: The compressive strength of CEM cement improved in the presence of acidic and alkaline environments but alkaline environment showed the best results. PMID:25598805

  1. In-Situ Welding Carbon Nanotubes into a Porous Solid with Super-High Compressive Strength and Fatigue Resistance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhiqiang; Gui, Xuchun; Gan, Qiming; Chen, Wenjun; Cheng, Xiaoping; Liu, Ming; Zhu, Yuan; Yang, Yanbing; Cao, Anyuan; Tang, Zikang

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene-based sponges and aerogels have an isotropic porous structure and their mechanical strength and stability are relatively lower. Here, we present a junction-welding approach to fabricate porous CNT solids in which all CNTs are coated and welded in situ by an amorphous carbon layer, forming an integral three-dimensional scaffold with fixed joints. The resulting CNT solids are robust, yet still highly porous and compressible, with compressive strengths up to 72 MPa, flexural strengths up to 33 MPa, and fatigue resistance (recovery after 100,000 large-strain compression cycles at high frequency). Significant enhancement of mechanical properties is attributed to the welding-induced interconnection and reinforcement of structural units, and synergistic effects stemming from the core-shell microstructures consisting of a flexible CNT framework and a rigid amorphous carbon shell. Our results provide a simple and effective method to manufacture high-strength porous materials by nanoscale welding.

  2. In-Situ Welding Carbon Nanotubes into a Porous Solid with Super-High Compressive Strength and Fatigue Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhiqiang; Gui, Xuchun; Gan, Qiming; Chen, Wenjun; Cheng, Xiaoping; Liu, Ming; Zhu, Yuan; Yang, Yanbing; Cao, Anyuan; Tang, Zikang

    2015-06-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene-based sponges and aerogels have an isotropic porous structure and their mechanical strength and stability are relatively lower. Here, we present a junction-welding approach to fabricate porous CNT solids in which all CNTs are coated and welded in situ by an amorphous carbon layer, forming an integral three-dimensional scaffold with fixed joints. The resulting CNT solids are robust, yet still highly porous and compressible, with compressive strengths up to 72 MPa, flexural strengths up to 33 MPa, and fatigue resistance (recovery after 100,000 large-strain compression cycles at high frequency). Significant enhancement of mechanical properties is attributed to the welding-induced interconnection and reinforcement of structural units, and synergistic effects stemming from the core-shell microstructures consisting of a flexible CNT framework and a rigid amorphous carbon shell. Our results provide a simple and effective method to manufacture high-strength porous materials by nanoscale welding.

  3. In-Situ Welding Carbon Nanotubes into a Porous Solid with Super-High Compressive Strength and Fatigue Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhiqiang; Gui, Xuchun; Gan, Qiming; Chen, Wenjun; Cheng, Xiaoping; Liu, Ming; Zhu, Yuan; Yang, Yanbing; Cao, Anyuan; Tang, Zikang

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene-based sponges and aerogels have an isotropic porous structure and their mechanical strength and stability are relatively lower. Here, we present a junction-welding approach to fabricate porous CNT solids in which all CNTs are coated and welded in situ by an amorphous carbon layer, forming an integral three-dimensional scaffold with fixed joints. The resulting CNT solids are robust, yet still highly porous and compressible, with compressive strengths up to 72 MPa, flexural strengths up to 33 MPa, and fatigue resistance (recovery after 100,000 large-strain compression cycles at high frequency). Significant enhancement of mechanical properties is attributed to the welding-induced interconnection and reinforcement of structural units, and synergistic effects stemming from the core-shell microstructures consisting of a flexible CNT framework and a rigid amorphous carbon shell. Our results provide a simple and effective method to manufacture high-strength porous materials by nanoscale welding. PMID:26067176

  4. Compressive Strength and Water Absorption of Pervious Concrete that Using the Fragments of Ceramics and Roof Tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahara, E.; Meilani

    2014-03-01

    Pervious concrete was introduced in America in 2003, popularized by Dan Brown and used as a rigid pavement in the open parking lot. Rigid pavement using pervious concrete can absorb water in the surface to go straight through the concrete to the ground below.This water flow is one of the benefit of using the pervious concrete. Using of wastes such as broken roof and ceramics tiles are not commonly used in Indonesia. Utilization these kind of wastes is predicted lower the compressive strength of pervious concrete as they are used as a substitute for coarse aggregate.In this research, pervious concrete is made using a mixture of the fragment of ceramics and roof tiles.This research using broken ceramics and roof tiles with a grain size that loose from 38 mm sieve, retained on 19 mm sieve and the coarse aggregate from crushed stone that loose 12.5 mm sieve, retained on 9.5 mm sieve. The water cement ratio is 0.3 and to assist the mixing process, the addition of addictive in pervious concrete is used.The size of coarse aggregate used in the mixture affects the strength of pervious concrete. The larger the size of aggregate, the obtained compressive strength becomes smaller. It also affects the density of pervious concrete. The using of mixture of ceramics and roof tiles only reduce 2 MPa of pervious concrete compressive strength so this mixture can be used as a substitute for coarse aggregate with a maximum portion of 30 %. The high porosity of the specimens causes the reduction of pervious concrete density that affect the compressive strength. This high level of porosity can be seen from the high level of water absorption that exceed the required limit of water infiltration.

  5. Embedded NMR Sensor to Monitor Compressive Strength Development and Pore Size Distribution in Hydrating Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Díaz, Floriberto; de J. Cano-Barrita, Prisciliano F.; Balcom, Bruce J.; Solís-Nájera, Sergio E.; Rodríguez, Alfredo O.

    2013-01-01

    In cement-based materials porosity plays an important role in determining their mechanical and transport properties. This paper describes an improved low–cost embeddable miniature NMR sensor capable of non-destructively measuring evaporable water loss and porosity refinement in low and high water-to-cement ratio cement-based materials. The sensor consists of two NdFeB magnets having their North and South poles facing each other, separated by 7 mm to allow space for a Faraday cage containing a Teflon tube and an ellipsoidal RF coil. To account for magnetic field changes due to temperature variations, and/or the presence of steel rebars, or frequency variation due to sample impedance, an external tuning circuit was employed. The sensor performance was evaluated by analyzing the transverse magnetization decay obtained with a CPMG measurement from different materials, such as a polymer phantom, fresh white and grey cement pastes with different w/c ratios and concrete with low (0.30) and high (0.6) w/c ratios. The results indicated that the sensor is capable of detecting changes in water content in fresh cement pastes and porosity refinement caused by cement hydration in hardened materials, even if they are prepared with a low w/c ratio (w/c = 0.30). The short lifetime component of the transverse relaxation rate is directly proportional to the compressive strength of concrete determined by destructive testing. The r2 (0.97) from the linear relationship observed is similar to that obtained using T2 data from a commercial Oxford Instruments 12.9 MHz spectrometer.

  6. A Unified Model for Predicting the Open Hole Tensile and Compressive Strengths of Composite Laminates for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Paul; Pineda, Evan J.; Heinrich, Christian; Waas, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    The open hole tensile and compressive strengths are important design parameters in qualifying fiber reinforced laminates for a wide variety of structural applications in the aerospace industry. In this paper, we present a unified model that can be used for predicting both these strengths (tensile and compressive) using the same set of coupon level, material property data. As a prelude to the unified computational model that follows, simplified approaches, referred to as "zeroth order", "first order", etc. with increasing levels of fidelity are first presented. The results and methods presented are practical and validated against experimental data. They serve as an introductory step in establishing a virtual building block, bottom-up approach to designing future airframe structures with composite materials. The results are useful for aerospace design engineers, particularly those that deal with airframe design.

  7. Effects of carbonation on the leachability and compressive strength of cement-solidified and geopolymer-solidified synthetic metal wastes.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Bhishan; Kinrade, Stephen D; Catalan, Lionel J J

    2012-06-30

    The effects of accelerated carbonation on the compressive strength and leachability of fly ash-based geopolymer and ordinary portland cement (OPC) doped with Cd(II), Cr(III), Cr(VI), Cu(II), Pb(II) or Zn(II) salts were investigated. Cement was effective at immobilizing Cd, Cr(III), Cu, Pb and Zn under both the Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure (SPLP) and the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), but ineffective for retaining Cr(VI). Carbonated cement maintained its ability to immobilize Cd, Cr(III), Pb and Zn, but, under acidic TCLP conditions, was much worse at retaining Cu. Geopolymer was effective at immobilizing Cr(III) and Cu, and, to a lesser degree, Cd, Pb and Zn in SPLP leaching tests. Only Cr(III) was immobilized under comparatively acidic TCLP testing conditions. Carbonation did not change the metal retention capacity of the geopolymer matrix. Metal doping caused compressive strengths of both geopolymer and cement to decrease. Carbonation increased the compressive strength of cement, but decreased that of the geopolymer. Geochemical equilibrium modeling provided insight on the mechanisms of metal immobilization.

  8. Investigation of Noise Level and Penetration Rate of Pneumatic Drill vis-à-vis Rock Compressive Strength and Abrasivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivade, S. B.; Murthy, Ch. S. N.; Vardhan, H.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, detailed studies were carried out to determine the influence of rock properties on the sound level produced during pneumatic drilling. Further, investigation was also carried out on the effect of thrust, air pressure and compressive strength on penetration rate and the sound level produced. For this purpose, a fabricated pneumatic drill set up available in the institute was used. Rock properties, like compressive strength and abrasivity, of various samples collected from the field were determined in the laboratory. Drilling experiments were carried out on ten different rock samples for varying thrust and air pressure values and the corresponding A-weighted equivalent continuous sound levels were measured. It was observed that, very low thrust results in low penetration rate. Even very high thrust does not produce high penetration rate at higher operating air pressures. With increase in thrust beyond the optimum level, the penetration rate starts decreasing and causes the drill bit to `stall'. Results of the study show that penetration rate and sound level increases with increase in the thrust level. After reaching the maximum, they start decreasing despite the increase of thrust. The main purpose of the study is to develop a general prediction model and to investigate the relationships between sound level produced during drilling and physical properties such as uniaxial compressive strength and abrasivity of sedimentary rocks. The results were evaluated using the multiple regression analysis taking into account the interaction effects of predictor variables.

  9. Real time synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements to determine material strength of shocked single crystals following compression and release

    SciTech Connect

    Turneaure, Stefan J.; Gupta, Y.M.

    2009-09-15

    We present a method to use real time, synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements to determine the strength of shocked single crystals following compression and release during uniaxial strain loading. Aluminum and copper single crystals shocked along [111] were examined to peak stresses ranging from 2 to 6 GPa. Synchrotron x rays were used to probe the longitudinal lattice strains near the rear free surface (16 and 5 {micro}m depths for Al and Cu, respectively) of the metal crystals following shock compression and release. The 111 diffraction peaks showed broadening indicating a heterogeneous microstructure in the released state. The diffraction peaks also shifted to lower Bragg angles relative to the ambient Bragg angle; the magnitude of the shift increased with increasing impact stress. The Bragg angle shifts and appropriate averaging procedures were used to determine the macroscopic or continuum strength following compression and release. For both crystals, the strengths upon release increased with increasing impact stress and provide a quantitative measure of the strain hardening that occurs in Al(111) and Cu(111) during the shock and release process. Our results for Al(111) are in reasonable agreement with a previous determination based solely on continuum measurements. Two points are noteworthy about the developments presented here: Synchrotron x rays are needed because they provide the resolution required for analyzing the data in the released state; the method presented here can be extended to the shocked state but will require additional measurements.

  10. Injectable porous nano-hydroxyapatite/chitosan/tripolyphosphate scaffolds with improved compressive strength for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Uswatta, Suren P; Okeke, Israel U; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C

    2016-12-01

    In this study we have fabricated porous injectable spherical scaffolds using chitosan biopolymer, sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) and nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA). TPP was primarily used as an ionic crosslinker to crosslink nHA/chitosan droplets. We hypothesized that incorporating nHA into chitosan could support osteoconduction by emulating the mineralized cortical bone structure, and improve the Ultimate Compressive Strength (UCS) of the scaffolds. We prepared chitosan solutions with 0.5%, 1% and 2% (w/v) nHA concentration and used simple coacervation and lyophilization techniques to obtain spherical scaffolds. Lyophilized spherical scaffolds had a mean diameter of 1.33mm (n=25). Further, portion from each group lyophilized scaffolds were soaked and dried to obtain Lyophilized Soaked and Dried (LSD) scaffolds. LSD scaffolds had a mean diameter of 0.93mm (n=25) which is promising property for the injectability. Scanning Electron Microscopy images showed porous surface morphology and interconnected pore structures inside the scaffolds. Lyophilized and LSD scaffolds had surface pores <10 and 2μm, respectively. 2% nHA/chitosan LSD scaffolds exhibited UCS of 8.59MPa compared to UCS of 2% nHA/chitosan lyophilized scaffolds at 3.93MPa. Standardize UCS values were 79.98MPa and 357MPa for 2% nHA/chitosan lyophilized and LSD particles respectively. One-way ANOVA results showed a significant increase (p<0.001) in UCS of 1% and 2% nHA/chitosan lyophilized scaffolds compared to 0% and 0.5% nHA/chitosan lyophilized scaffolds. Moreover, 2% nHA LSD scaffolds had significantly increased (p<0.005) their mean UCS by 120% compared to 2% nHA lyophilized scaffolds. In a drawback, all scaffolds have lost their mechanical properties by 95% on the 2nd day when fully immersed in phosphate buffered saline. Additionally live and dead cell assay showed no cytotoxicity and excellent osteoblast attachment to both lyophilized and LSD scaffolds at the end of 14th day of in vitro studies. 2% n

  11. Effect of shear strength on Hugoniot-compression curve and the equation of state of tungsten (W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashimo, Tsutomu; Liu, Xun; Kodama, Masao; Zaretsky, Eugene; Katayama, Masahide; Nagayama, Kunihiko

    2016-01-01

    The Hugoniot data for highly dense polycrystalline tungsten were obtained for pressures above 200 GPa, and the equation of state (EOS) was determined taking into account shear strength effects. For this study, we have made some improvements in measurement system and analyses of the shock wave data. Symmetric-impact Hugoniot measurements were performed using the high-time resolution streak camera system equipped on a one-stage powder gun and two-stage light gas gun, where the effects of tilting and bowing of flyer plate on the Hugoniot data were carefully considered. The shock velocity-particle velocity (US-UP) Hugoniot relation in the plastic regime was determined to be US = 4.137 + 1.242UP km/s (UP < 2 km/s). Ultrasonic and Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector measurements were also performed in this study. The zero-intercept value of the US-UP Hugoniot relation was found to be slightly larger than the ultrasonic bulk sound velocity (4.023 km/s). The hypothetical hydrostatic isothermal Us-Up Hugoniot curve, which corresponds to the hydrostatic isothermal compression curve derived from the Hugoniot data using the strength data, converged to the bulk sound velocity, clearly showing shear strength dependence in the Hugoniot data. The EOS for tungsten is derived from the hydrostatic isothermal compression curve using the strength data.

  12. Static compressive strength prediction of open-hole structure based on non-linear shear behavior and micro-mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wangnan; Cai, Hongneng; Li, Chao

    2014-11-01

    This paper deals with the characterization of the strength of the constituents of carbon fiber reinforced plastic laminate (CFRP), and a prediction of the static compressive strength of open-hole structure of polymer composites. The approach combined with non-linear analysis in macro-level and a linear elastic micromechanical failure analysis in microlevel (non-linear MMF) is proposed to improve the prediction accuracy. A face-centered cubic micromechanics model is constructed to analyze the stresses in fiber and matrix in microlevel. Non-interactive failure criteria are proposed to characterize the strength of fiber and matrix. The non-linear shear behavior of the laminate is studied experimentally, and a novel approach of cubic spline interpolation is used to capture significant non-linear shear behavior of laminate. The user-defined material subroutine UMAT for the non-linear share behavior is developed and combined in the mechanics analysis in the macro-level using the Abaqus Python codes. The failure mechanism and static strength of open-hole compressive (OHC) structure of polymer composites is studied based on non-linear MMF. The UTS50/E51 CFRP is used to demonstrate the application of theory of non-linear MMF.

  13. Effect of restorative technique and thermal/mechanical treatment on marginal adaptation and compressive strength of esthetic restorations.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Andréia Bolzan; Duque, Cristiane; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Puppin-Rontani, Regina M

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the compressive strength and marginal adaptation of composite onlays using indirect and direct techniques after thermal and mechanical cycling. Onlay standardized cavities were prepared in 50 permanent molars and restored with Z-250 resin composite using indirect (IRT) or direct (DRT) restorative techniques. The restorations were either submitted or not submitted to thermal (500 cycles, 5 degrees to 55 degrees C) and mechanical cycling (50,000 cycles, 50N). The teeth were distributed to five groups (n=10): G1-IRT/cycling; G2-IRT/no cycling; G3-DRT/cycling; G4-DRT/no cycling and G5 (control group)-sound teeth. All prepared teeth were stored in 100% relative humidity at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, followed by finishing with Sof-Lex discs. A caries detector solution was applied on the tooth-restoration interface of all teeth for five seconds, followed by washing and drying. Four digital photographs were taken of each tooth surface. The extent of gaps was measured using standard software (Image Tool 3.0). All groups were submitted to compression testing in a universal testing machine (INSTRON) at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute until failure. The compressive strength (CS) and marginal adaptation data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05). For both evaluation criteria (compressive strength and marginal adaptation), there were no statistically significant differences among the restorative techniques. Deterioration over time was observed for both types of restorations. However, the prevalence of catastrophic fractures increased among direct restorations. The application of thermal/mechanical cycling only influenced marginal adaptation.

  14. Introducing Mg-4Zn-3Gd-1Ca/ZnO nanocomposite with compressive strengths matching/exceeding that of mild steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Tekumalla, S.; Guo, Y. B.; Gupta, M.

    2016-08-01

    This work introduces Mg-4Zn-3Gd-1Ca/2ZnO (wt.%) nanocomposite fabricated using the technique of disintegrated melt deposition and extrusion. Addition of ZnO nanoparticles enhanced the compressive strengths of alloy by ~100 MPa. Nanocomposite samples display high strength and good ductility: 0.2% compressive yield stress of 355 MPa, ultimate compressive stress of 703 MPa, and compressive failure strain of 10.6%. The significant enhancement of compressive yield stress is mainly attributed to the grain refinement by adding nanoparticles. The strength levels exceed that of commercial magnesium alloys (i.e. WE43, WE54, ZK60, and ME21) and mild steels (i.e. S275 and S355), making Mg-4Zn-3Gd-1Ca/2ZnO a very promising material for multiple engineering and biomedical applications.

  15. Introducing Mg-4Zn-3Gd-1Ca/ZnO nanocomposite with compressive strengths matching/exceeding that of mild steel

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.; Tekumalla, S.; Guo, Y. B.; Gupta, M.

    2016-01-01

    This work introduces Mg-4Zn-3Gd-1Ca/2ZnO (wt.%) nanocomposite fabricated using the technique of disintegrated melt deposition and extrusion. Addition of ZnO nanoparticles enhanced the compressive strengths of alloy by ~100 MPa. Nanocomposite samples display high strength and good ductility: 0.2% compressive yield stress of 355 MPa, ultimate compressive stress of 703 MPa, and compressive failure strain of 10.6%. The significant enhancement of compressive yield stress is mainly attributed to the grain refinement by adding nanoparticles. The strength levels exceed that of commercial magnesium alloys (i.e. WE43, WE54, ZK60, and ME21) and mild steels (i.e. S275 and S355), making Mg-4Zn-3Gd-1Ca/2ZnO a very promising material for multiple engineering and biomedical applications. PMID:27572903

  16. Introducing Mg-4Zn-3Gd-1Ca/ZnO nanocomposite with compressive strengths matching/exceeding that of mild steel.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Tekumalla, S; Guo, Y B; Gupta, M

    2016-01-01

    This work introduces Mg-4Zn-3Gd-1Ca/2ZnO (wt.%) nanocomposite fabricated using the technique of disintegrated melt deposition and extrusion. Addition of ZnO nanoparticles enhanced the compressive strengths of alloy by ~100 MPa. Nanocomposite samples display high strength and good ductility: 0.2% compressive yield stress of 355 MPa, ultimate compressive stress of 703 MPa, and compressive failure strain of 10.6%. The significant enhancement of compressive yield stress is mainly attributed to the grain refinement by adding nanoparticles. The strength levels exceed that of commercial magnesium alloys (i.e. WE43, WE54, ZK60, and ME21) and mild steels (i.e. S275 and S355), making Mg-4Zn-3Gd-1Ca/2ZnO a very promising material for multiple engineering and biomedical applications. PMID:27572903

  17. A prediction model for uniaxial compressive strength of deteriorated pyroclastic rocks due to freeze-thaw cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    İnce, İsmail; Fener, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    Either directly or indirectly, building stone is exposed to diverse atmospheric interactions depending on the seasonal conditions. Due to those interactions, objects of historic and cultural heritage, as well as modern buildings, partially or completely deteriorate. Among processes involved in rock deterioration, the freeze-thaw (F-T) cycle is one of the most important. Even though pyroclastic rocks have been used as building stone worldwide due to their easy workability, they are the building stone most affected by the F-T cycle. A historical region in Central Anatolia, Turkey, Cappadoia encompasses exceptional natural wonders characterized by fairy chimneys and unique historical and cultural heritage. Human-created caves, places of worship and houses have been dug into the pyroclastic rocks, which have in turn been used in architectural construction as building stone. Using 10 pyroclastic rock samples collected from Cappadocia, we determined the rock's index-mechanical properties to develop a statistical model for estimating percentage loss of uniaxial compressive strength a critical parameter of F-T cycle's important value. We used dry density (ρd), ultrasonic velocity (Vp), point load strengths (IS(50)), and slake-durability test indexes (Id4) values of unweathered rocks in our model, which is highly reliable (R2 = 0.84) for predetermination of percentage loss of uniaxial compressive strengths of pyroclastic rocks without requiring any F-T tests.

  18. A prediction model for uniaxial compressive strength of deteriorated pyroclastic rocks due to freeze-thaw cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    İnce, İsmail; Fener, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    Either directly or indirectly, building stone is exposed to diverse atmospheric interactions depending on the seasonal conditions. Due to those interactions, objects of historic and cultural heritage, as well as modern buildings, partially or completely deteriorate. Among processes involved in rock deterioration, the freeze-thaw (F-T) cycle is one of the most important. Even though pyroclastic rocks have been used as building stone worldwide due to their easy workability, they are the building stone most affected by the F-T cycle. A historical region in Central Anatolia, Turkey, Cappadoia encompasses exceptional natural wonders characterized by fairy chimneys and unique historical and cultural heritage. Human-created caves, places of worship and houses have been dug into the pyroclastic rocks, which have in turn been used in architectural construction as building stone. Using 10 pyroclastic rock samples collected from Cappadocia, we determined the rock's index-mechanical properties to develop a statistical model for estimating percentage loss of uniaxial compressive strength a critical parameter of F-T cycle's important value. We used dry density (ρd), ultrasonic velocity (Vp), point load strengths (IS(50)), and slake-durability test indexes (Id4) values of unweathered rocks in our model, which is highly reliable (R2 = 0.84) for predetermination of percentage loss of uniaxial compressive strengths of pyroclastic rocks without requiring any F-T tests.

  19. Evaluation of Compressive Strength and Stiffness of Grouted Soils by Using Elastic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In-Mo; Kim, Jong-Sun; Yoon, Hyung-Koo; Lee, Jong-Sub

    2014-01-01

    Cement grouted soils, which consist of particulate soil media and cementation agents, have been widely used for the improvement of the strength and stiffness of weak ground and for the prevention of the leakage of ground water. The strength, elastic modulus, and Poisson's ratio of grouted soils have been determined by classical destructive methods. However, the performance of grouted soils depends on several parameters such as the distribution of particle size of the particulate soil media, grouting pressure, curing time, curing method, and ground water flow. In this study, elastic wave velocities are used to estimate the strength and elastic modulus, which are generally obtained by classical strength tests. Nondestructive tests by using elastic waves at small strain are conducted before and during classical strength tests at large strain. The test results are compared to identify correlations between the elastic wave velocity measured at small strain and strength and stiffness measured at large strain. The test results show that the strength and stiffness have exponential relationship with elastic wave velocities. This study demonstrates that nondestructive methods by using elastic waves may significantly improve the strength and stiffness evaluation processes of grouted soils. PMID:25025082

  20. Measurement of In-Plane Shear Strength of Carbon/Carbon Composites by Compression of Double-Notched Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, K. F.; Zhang, C. Y.; Qiao, S. R.; Song, C. Z.; Han, D.; Li, M.

    2012-01-01

    The compression of a double-notched specimen was used to determine the in-plane shear strength (IPSS) of a carbon/carbon composite in the paper. The effects of the notch distance ( L), thickness ( T), and notch width ( W) and supporting jig on the IPSS of the double-notched specimens were investigated numerically and experimentally. The fracture surfaces were examined by a scanning electron microscope. It was found that the IPSS varied with L. Thin specimen yielded low strength. W has little effect on IPSS. The main failure modes include the matrix shear cracking, delamination, fracture and pullout of fibers or fiber bundles. Meanwhile, a supporting jig can provide lateral support and prevent buckling, therefore lead to the failure in a shear mode.

  1. The Strength of Single Crystal Copper under Uniaxial Shock Compression at Mbar pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, W; Higginbotham, A; Kimminau, G; Barbrel, B; Bringa, E; Hawreliak, J; Koenig, M; McBarron, W; Meyers, M; Nagler, B; Ozaki, N; Park, N; Remington, B; Rothman, S; Vinko, S M; Whitcher, T; Wark, J

    2009-05-21

    In situ x-ray diffraction has been used to measure the shear strain (and thus strength) of single crystal copper shocked to Mbar pressures along the [001] and [111] axes. These direct shear strain measurements indicate shear strengths at these ultra-high strain rates (of order 10{sup 9} s{sup -1}) of a few GPa, which are both broadly in agreement with the extrapolation of lower strain-rate data and with non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

  2. An extrapolation method for compressive strength prediction of hydraulic cement products

    SciTech Connect

    Siqueira Tango, C.E. de

    1998-07-01

    The basis for the AMEBA Method is presented. A strength-time function is used to extrapolate the predicted cementitious material strength for a late (ALTA) age, based on two earlier age strengths--medium (MEDIA) and low (BAIXA) ages. The experimental basis for the method is data from the IPT-Brazil laboratory and the field, including a long-term study on concrete, research on limestone, slag, and fly-ash additions, and quality control data from a cement factory, a shotcrete tunnel lining, and a grout for structural repair. The method applicability was also verified for high-performance concrete with silica fume. The formula for predicting late age (e.g., 28 days) strength, for a given set of involved ages (e.g., 28,7, and 2 days) is normally a function only of the two earlier ages` (e.g., 7 and 2 days) strengths. This equation has been shown to be independent on materials variations, including cement brand, and is easy to use also graphically. Using the AMEBA method, and only needing to know the type of cement used, it has been possible to predict strengths satisfactorily, even without the preliminary tests which are required in other methods.

  3. The immediate effect of repeated loading on the compressive strength of young porcine lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Thoreson, Olof; Baranto, Adad; Ekström, Lars; Holm, Sten; Hellström, Mikael; Swärd, Leif

    2010-05-01

    The human spine is exposed to repeated loading during daily activities and more extremely during sports. Despite this, there remains a lack of knowledge regarding the immediate effects on the spine due to this mode of loading. Age-specific spinal injury patterns has been demonstrated and this implies differences in reaction to load mode and load history The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of cyclic pre-loading on the biomechanical properties and fracture patterns of the adolescent spine in an experimental model. Eight functional spinal units from four young porcine spines were harvested. The functional spinal units were cyclic loaded with 20,000 cycles and then axially compressed to failure. The compression load at failure, ultimate stress and viscoelastic parameters were calculated. The functional spinal units were examined with plain radiography, computer tomography and MRI before and after the loading, and finally macroscopically and histologically. The median compression load at failure in this study was 8.3 kN (range 5.6-8.7 kN). The median deformation for all cases was 2.24 mm (range 2.30-2.7 mm) and stiffness was 3.45 N/mm (range 3.5-4.5 N/mm). A fracture was seen on radiograph in one case, on CT and macroscopically in seven, and on MRI and histologically in all eight cases. The cyclic loaded functional spinal units in the present study were not more sensitive to axial compression than non-cyclic loaded functional spinal units from young porcine. The endplate and the growth zone were the weakest part in the cyclic loaded functional spinal units. Disc signal reduction and disc height reduction was found on MRI. The E-modulus value found in this study was of the same order of magnitude as found by others using a porcine animal model.

  4. Strength Anisotropy of Berea Sandstone: Results of X-Ray Computed Tomography, Compression Tests, and Discrete Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwang Yeom; Zhuang, Li; Yang, Hwayoung; Kim, Hanna; Min, Ki-Bok

    2016-04-01

    Berea sandstone in northern Ohio is a transversely isotropic rock. X-ray CT investigations showed that its internal structure is composed of cross-bedded loose layers and relatively thin tightly packed layers called bedding. Uniaxial compression tests were performed on different Berea sandstone specimens. The uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) decreases with increasing porosity, and also decreases with increasing inclination of the bedding plane relative to horizontal line. Two-dimensional discrete modeling was applied to investigate the micromechanical behavior of Berea sandstone. Different microparameters were assigned to loose and tight layers. The UCS simulation results agree well with the experimental results. At the peak stress, cracks almost always develop in loose layers regardless of the bedding plane orientation. In addition, both normal and shear cracks occur earlier for specimens with a higher inclination angle. No correlations were found between the inclination angle of failure planes and the orientation of bedding planes. The bedding planes of Berea sandstone are not weak planes. The strength anisotropy of Berea sandstone is not significant compared with other rocks such as shale, gneiss, and schist.

  5. Influence of artificially-induced porosity on the compressive strength of calcium phosphate bone cements.

    PubMed

    Mouzakis, Dionysios; Zaoutsos, Stefanos Polymeros; Bouropoulos, Nikolaos; Rokidi, Stamatia; Papanicolaou, George

    2016-07-01

    The biological and mechanical nature of calcium phosphate cements (CPC's) matches well with that of bone tissues, thus they can be considered as an appropriate environment for bone repair as bone defect fillers. The current study focuses on the experimental characterization of the mechanical properties of CPCs that are favorably used in clinical applications. Aiming on evaluation of their mechanical performance, tests in compression loading were conducted in order to determine the mechanical properties of the material under study. In this context, experimental results occurring from the above mechanical tests on porous specimens that were fabricated from three different porous additives, namely albumin, gelatin and sodium alginate, are provided, while assessment of their mechanical properties in respect to the used porous media is performed. Additionally, samples reinforced with hydroxyapatite crystals were also tested in compression and the results are compared with those of the above tested porous CPCs. The knowledge obtained allows the improvement of their biomechanical properties by controlling their structure in a micro level, and finds a way to compromise between mechanical and biological response. PMID:26945808

  6. Elevated Temperature, Residual Compressive Strength of Impact-Damaged Sandwich Structure Manufactured Out-of-Autoclave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Sutter, James K.; Burke, Eric R.; Dixon, Genevieve D.; Gyekenyesi, Thomas G.; Smeltzer, Stanley S.

    2012-01-01

    Several 1/16th-scale curved sandwich composite panel sections of a 10 m diameter barrel were fabricated to demonstrate the manufacturability of large-scale curved sections using minimum gauge, [+60/-60/0]s, toughened epoxy composite facesheets co-cured with low density (50 kilograms per cubic meters) aluminum honeycomb core. One of these panels was fabricated out of autoclave (OoA) by the vacuum bag oven (VBO) process using Cycom(Registered Trademark) T40-800b/5320-1 prepreg system while another panel with the same lay-up and dimensions was fabricated using the autoclave-cure, toughened epoxy prepreg system Cycom(Registered Trademark) IM7/977-3. The resulting 2.44 m x 2 m curved panels were investigated by non-destructive evaluation (NDE) at NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) to determine initial fabrication quality and then cut into smaller coupons for elevated temperature wet (ETW) mechanical property characterization. Mechanical property characterization of the sandwich coupons was conducted including edge-wise compression (EWC), and compression-after-impact (CAI) at conditions ranging from 25 C/dry to 150 C/wet. The details and results of this characterization effort are presented in this paper.

  7. Lattice-level measurement of material strength with LCLS during ultrafast dynamic compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milathianaki, Despina; Boutet, Sebastien; Ratner, Daniel; White, William; Williams, Garth; Gleason, Arianna; Swift, Damian; Higginbotham, Andrew; Wark, Justin

    2013-10-01

    An in-depth understanding of the stress-strain behavior of materials during ultrafast dynamic compression requires experiments that offer in-situ observation of the lattice at the pertinent temporal and spatial scales. To date, the lattice response under extreme strain-rate conditions (>108 s-1) has been inferred predominantly from continuum-level measurements and multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations. Several time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiments have captured important information on plasticity kinetics, while limited to nanosecond timescales due to the lack of high brilliance ultrafast x-ray sources. Here we present experiments at LCLS combining ultrafast laser-shocks and serial femtosecond x-ray diffraction. The high spectral brightness (~1012 photons per pulse, ΔE/E = 0.2%) and subpicosecond temporal resolution (<100 fs pulsewidth) of the LCLS x-ray free electron laser allow investigations that link simulations and experiments at the fundamental temporal and spatial scales for the first time. We present movies of the lattice undergoing rapid shock-compression, composed by a series of single femtosecond x-ray snapshots, demonstrating the transient behavior while successfully decoupling the elastic and plastic response in polycrystalline Cu.

  8. Spall strength and ejecta production of gold under explosively driven shock wave compression

    SciTech Connect

    La Lone, B. M.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.; Holtkamp, D. B.

    2013-12-16

    Explosively driven shock wave experiments were conducted to characterize the spall strength and ejecta production of high-purity cast gold samples. The samples were from 0.75 to 1.84 mm thick and 30 mm in diameter. Peak stresses up to 44 GPa in gold were generated using PBX-9501 high explosive. Sample free surface and ejecta velocities were recorded using photonic Doppler velocimetry techniques. Lithium niobate pins were used to quantify the time dependence of the ejecta density and the total ejected mass. An optical framing camera for time-resolved imaging and a single-image x-ray radiograph were used for additional characterization. Free surface velocities exhibited a range of spall strengths from 1.7 to 2.4 GPa (mean: 2.0 ±0.3 GPa). The pullback signals were faint, minimal ringing was observed in the velocity records, and the spall layer continued to decelerate after first pull back. These results suggest finite tensile strength was present for some time after the initial void formation. Ejecta were observed for every sample with a roughened free surface, and the ejecta density increased with increased surface roughness, which was different in every experiment. The total ejected mass is consistent with the missing mass model.

  9. Optimizing the Compressive Strength of Strain-Hardenable Stretch-Formed Microtruss Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bosco; Abu Samk, Khaled; Hibbard, Glenn D.

    2015-05-01

    The mechanical performance of stretch-formed microtrusses is determined by both the internal strut architecture and the accumulated plastic strain during fabrication. The current study addresses the question of optimization, by taking into consideration the interdependency between fabrication path, material properties and architecture. Low carbon steel (AISI1006) and aluminum (AA3003) material systems were investigated experimentally, with good agreement between measured values and the analytical model. The compressive performance of the microtrusses was then optimized on a minimum weight basis under design constraints such as fixed starting sheet thickness and final microtruss height by satisfying the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker condition. The optimization results were summarized as carpet plots in order to meaningfully visualize the interdependency between architecture, microstructural state, and mechanical performance, enabling material and processing path selection.

  10. Strength and Mechanical Response of NaCl Using In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Compression and Nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai-Peng; Fang, Te-Hua; Kang, Sho-Hui

    2016-03-01

    Strength and mechanical properties of single crystal sodium chloride (NaCl) are characterized. Critical deformation variations of NaCl pillared structures and films are estimated using in-situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) compression tests and nanoindentation experiments. Young's modulus and contact stiffness of NaCl pillars with diameters of 300 to 500 nm were 10.4-23.9 GPa, and 159-230 N/m, respectively. The nanohardness and Vickers hardness of the NaCl (001) film were 282-596 and 196-260 MPa, respectively. The results could provide useful information for understanding the mechanical properties, contact and local deformation of NaCl pillars and films. PMID:27455676

  11. Changes in Mineralogy, Microstructure, Compressive Strength and Intrinsic Permeability of Two Sedimentary Rocks Subjected to High-Temperature Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianfeng; Yuan, Shengyang; Sieffert, Yannick; Fityus, Stephen; Buzzi, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    This study falls in the context of underground coal fires where burning coal can elevate the temperature of a rock mass in excess of 1000°. The objective of the research is to experimentally characterize the change in mechanical behaviour, mineralogy and microstructural texture of two sedimentary rocks when subjected to temperatures up to 1200 °C for 24 h. Specimens of local sandstone and mudstone were comprehensively characterized by X-ray diffraction and thermal-gravimetric analysis. These analyses were complemented by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy on polished thin sections. In addition, pore size distributions of these heated rocks were inferred by means of mercury intrusion porosimetry. These results were extended to an estimation of the intrinsic permeability using the Katz-Thompson model. Investigations at micro scale were followed by mechanical testing (both unconfined and confined compression tests) on cylindrical specimens of heated rocks. Results show that the unconfined compressive strength (UCS) of both rock types tends to increase when the temperatures increases up to 900 °C, beyond which the UCS tends to slightly decrease. As for the permeability, a clear increase in intrinsic permeability was observed for both rocks. The macroscopic behaviour was found to be fully consistent with the changes observed at micro scale.

  12. The strength of ruby from X-ray diffraction under non-hydrostatic compression to 68 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Haini; Dorfman, Susannah M.; Wang, Jianghua; He, Duanwei; Duffy, Thomas S.

    2014-07-01

    Polycrystalline ruby (α-Al2O3:Cr3+), a widely used pressure calibrant in high-pressure experiments, was compressed to 68.1 GPa at room temperature under non-hydrostatic conditions in a diamond anvil cell. Angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction experiments in a radial geometry were conducted at beamline X17C of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The stress state of ruby at high pressure and room temperature was analyzed based on the measured lattice strain. The differential stress of ruby increases with pressure from ~3.4 % of the shear modulus at 18.5 GPa to ~6.5 % at 68.1 GPa. The polycrystalline ruby sample can support a maximum differential stress of ~16 GPa at 68.1 GPa under non-hydrostatic compression. The results of this study provide a better understanding of the mechanical properties of this important material for high-pressure science. From a synthesis of existing data for strong ceramic materials, we find that the high-pressure yield strength correlates well with the ambient pressure Vickers hardness.

  13. Strength and stability analysis of a single-walled black phosphorus tube under axial compression.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kun; Wan, Jing; Wei, Ning; Qin, Qing H

    2016-07-01

    Few-layered black phosphorus materials currently attract much attention due to their special electronic properties. As a consequence, a single-layer black phosphorus (SLBP) nanotube has been theoretically built. The corresponding electronic properties of such a black phosphorus nanotube (BPNT) were also evaluated numerically. However, unlike graphene formed with 2sp(2) covalent carbon atoms, SLBP is formed with 3sp(3) bonded atoms. It means that the structure from SLBP will possess lower Young's modulus and mechanical strength than those of carbon nanotubes. In this study, molecular dynamics simulation is performed to investigate the strength and stability of BPNTs affected by the factors of diameter, length, loading speed and temperature. Results are fundamental for investigating the other physical properties of a BPNT acting as a component in a nanodevice. For example, buckling of the BPNT happens earlier than fracture, before which the nanostructure has very small axial strain. For the same BPNT, a higher load speed results in lower critical axial strain and a nanotube with lower axial strain can still be stable at a higher temperature. PMID:27211804

  14. Strength and stability analysis of a single-walled black phosphorus tube under axial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Kun; Wan, Jing; Wei, Ning; Qin, Qing H.

    2016-07-01

    Few-layered black phosphorus materials currently attract much attention due to their special electronic properties. As a consequence, a single-layer black phosphorus (SLBP) nanotube has been theoretically built. The corresponding electronic properties of such a black phosphorus nanotube (BPNT) were also evaluated numerically. However, unlike graphene formed with 2sp2 covalent carbon atoms, SLBP is formed with 3sp3 bonded atoms. It means that the structure from SLBP will possess lower Young’s modulus and mechanical strength than those of carbon nanotubes. In this study, molecular dynamics simulation is performed to investigate the strength and stability of BPNTs affected by the factors of diameter, length, loading speed and temperature. Results are fundamental for investigating the other physical properties of a BPNT acting as a component in a nanodevice. For example, buckling of the BPNT happens earlier than fracture, before which the nanostructure has very small axial strain. For the same BPNT, a higher load speed results in lower critical axial strain and a nanotube with lower axial strain can still be stable at a higher temperature.

  15. Strength and stability analysis of a single-walled black phosphorus tube under axial compression.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kun; Wan, Jing; Wei, Ning; Qin, Qing H

    2016-07-01

    Few-layered black phosphorus materials currently attract much attention due to their special electronic properties. As a consequence, a single-layer black phosphorus (SLBP) nanotube has been theoretically built. The corresponding electronic properties of such a black phosphorus nanotube (BPNT) were also evaluated numerically. However, unlike graphene formed with 2sp(2) covalent carbon atoms, SLBP is formed with 3sp(3) bonded atoms. It means that the structure from SLBP will possess lower Young's modulus and mechanical strength than those of carbon nanotubes. In this study, molecular dynamics simulation is performed to investigate the strength and stability of BPNTs affected by the factors of diameter, length, loading speed and temperature. Results are fundamental for investigating the other physical properties of a BPNT acting as a component in a nanodevice. For example, buckling of the BPNT happens earlier than fracture, before which the nanostructure has very small axial strain. For the same BPNT, a higher load speed results in lower critical axial strain and a nanotube with lower axial strain can still be stable at a higher temperature.

  16. Isothermal Volume Expansion of a TATB-Based Composite and the Effect on Compressive Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Darla; Schwarz, Ricardo; Deluca, Racci

    2015-06-01

    It has long been known that compacted composites containing TATB crystals undergo ``ratchet growth,'' an irreversible volume expansion upon thermal cycling. A mechanism has not been established but is believed to arise from the highly-anisotropic CTE of TATB crystals and the interactions caused by compaction. Because explosive performance depends fundamentally on bulk density, the details of this phenomenon are important to understand. PBX 9502 is a plastic bonded explosive containing 95 wt% TATB crystals. We have used a TA Instruments thermal mechanical analyzer (TMA) to monitor uniaxial length changes of PBX 9502 specimens as a function of temperature and thermal cycling. Previous ``ratchet growth'' work has focused on irreversible expansion as a function of temperature range and number of thermal cycles (1). In the work reported here, we demonstrate that irreversible growth also occurs during extended isothermal conditions and especially at elevated temperatures. We explore PBX 9502 irreversible expansion as a function of time and temperature, in the form of thermal ramps and holds. Post-test specimens are then subjected to quasi-static compression testing to determine whether the mechanical properties correlate with the final bulk density, or depend in a more complex way on the detailed thermal history of the specimen.

  17. Phase transition and strength of vanadium under shock compression up to 88 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yuying Tan, Ye; Dai, Chengda; Li, Xuemei; Li, Yinghua; Wu, Qiang; Tan, Hua

    2014-11-17

    A series of reverse-impact experiments were performed on vanadium at shock pressure ranging from 32 GPa to 88 GPa. Particle velocity profiles measured at sample/LiF window interface were used to estimate the sound velocities, shear modulus, and yield stress in shocked vanadium. A phase transition at ∼60.5 GPa that may be the body-centered cubic (BCC) to rhombohedral structure was identified by the discontinuity of the sound velocity against shock pressure. This transition pressure is consistent with the results from diamond anvil cell (DAC) experiments and first-principle calculations. However, present results show that the rhombohedral phase has higher strength and shear modulus than the BCC phase, which is contrast to the findings from DAC experiments and theoretical work.

  18. Strain anisotropy and shear strength of shock compressed tantalum from in-situ Laue diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrenberg, C.; Comley, A. J.; Rudd, R. E.; Terry, M.; Hawreliak, J.; Maddox, B. R.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.

    2014-05-01

    Laser driven shock experiments were performed at the Omega facility to study the dynamic yield strength of ~5 μm thick single crystal tantalum using in-situ Laue diffraction. Tantalum samples were shocked along the [001] direction to peak stresses up to 50 GPa and probed using a 150 ps pulse of bremsstrahlung radiation from an imploding CH capsule x-ray source timed for when the shock was halfway through the sample. The capsule implosion was monitored by a combination of pinhole cameras and DANTE x-ray diode scopes. Diffraction spots for both the undriven and driven regions of the sample were recorded simultaneously on image plate detectors. The strain state of the material was found by combining the strain anisotropy found from the driven diffraction pattern and with simultaneous VISAR measurements.

  19. Method of increasing the phase stability and the compressive yield strength of uranium-1 to 3 wt. % zirconium alloy

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    A uranium-1 to 3 wt. % zirconium alloy characterized by high strength, high ductility and stable microstructure is fabricated by an improved thermal mechanical process. A homogenous ingot of the alloy which has been reduced in thickness of at least 50% in the two-step forging operation, rolled into a plate with a 75% reduction and then heated in vacuum at a temperature of about 750.degree. to 850.degree. C. and then quenched in water is subjected to further thermal-mechanical operation steps to increase the compressive yield strength approximately 30%, stabilize the microstructure, and decrease the variations in mechanical properties throughout the plate is provided. These thermal-mechanical steps are achieved by cold rolling the quenched plate to reduce the thickness thereof about 8 to 12%, aging the cold rolled plate at a first temperature of about 325.degree. to 375.degree. C. for five to six hours and then aging the plate at a higher temperature ranging from 480.degree. to 500.degree. C. for five to six hours prior to cooling the billet to ambient conditions and sizing the billet or plate into articles provides the desired increase in mechanical properties and phase stability throughout the plate.

  20. True uniaxial compressive strengths of rock or coal specimens are independent of diameter-to-length ratios. Report of Investigations/1990

    SciTech Connect

    Babcock, C.O.

    1990-01-01

    Part of the compressive strength of a test specimen of rock or coal in the laboratory or a pillar in a mine comes from physical property strength and, in part, from the constraint provided by the loading stresses. Much confusion in pillar design comes from assigning the total strength change to geometry, as evidenced by the many pillar design equations with width to height as the primary variable. In tests by the U.S. Bureau of Mines, compressive strengths for cylindrical specimens of limestone, marble, sandstone, and coal were independent of the specimen test geometry when the end friction was removed. A conventional uniaxial compressive strength test between two steel platens is actually a uniaxial force and not a uniaxial stress test. The biaxial or triaxial state of stress for much of the test volume changes with the geometry of the test specimen. By removing the end friction supplied by the steel platens to the specimen, a more nearly uniaxial stress state independent of the specimen geometry is produced in the specimen. Pillar design is a constraint and physical property problem rather than a geometry problem. Roof and floor constraint are major factors in pillar design and strength.

  1. Hierarchical Order of Influence of Mix Variables Affecting Compressive Strength of Sustainable Concrete Containing Fly Ash, Copper Slag, Silica Fume, and Fibres

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Sakthieswaran; Karuppiah, Ganesan

    2014-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to study the effect of addition of fly ash, copper slag, and steel and polypropylene fibres on compressive strength of concrete and to determine the hierarchical order of influence of the mix variables in affecting the strength using cluster analysis experimentally. While fly ash and copper slag are used for partial replacement of cement and fine aggregate, respectively, defined quantities of steel and polypropylene fibres were added to the mixes. It is found from the experimental study that, in general, irrespective of the presence or absence of fibres, (i) for a given copper slag-fine aggregate ratio, increase in fly ash-cement ratio the concrete strength decreases and with the increase in copper slag-sand ratio also the rate of strength decrease and (ii) for a given fly ash-cement ratio, increase in copper slag-fine aggregate ratio increases the strength of the concrete. From the cluster analysis, it is found that the quantities of coarse and fine aggregate present have high influence in affecting the strength. It is also observed that the quantities of fly ash and copper slag used as substitutes have equal “influence” in affecting the strength. Marginal effect of addition of fibres in the compression strength of concrete is also revealed by the cluster analysis. PMID:24707213

  2. Hierarchical order of influence of mix variables affecting compressive strength of sustainable concrete containing fly ash, copper slag, silica fume, and fibres.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Sakthieswaran; Karuppiah, Ganesan

    2014-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to study the effect of addition of fly ash, copper slag, and steel and polypropylene fibres on compressive strength of concrete and to determine the hierarchical order of influence of the mix variables in affecting the strength using cluster analysis experimentally. While fly ash and copper slag are used for partial replacement of cement and fine aggregate, respectively, defined quantities of steel and polypropylene fibres were added to the mixes. It is found from the experimental study that, in general, irrespective of the presence or absence of fibres, (i) for a given copper slag-fine aggregate ratio, increase in fly ash-cement ratio the concrete strength decreases and with the increase in copper slag-sand ratio also the rate of strength decrease and (ii) for a given fly ash-cement ratio, increase in copper slag-fine aggregate ratio increases the strength of the concrete. From the cluster analysis, it is found that the quantities of coarse and fine aggregate present have high influence in affecting the strength. It is also observed that the quantities of fly ash and copper slag used as substitutes have equal "influence" in affecting the strength. Marginal effect of addition of fibres in the compression strength of concrete is also revealed by the cluster analysis.

  3. Compressive strength of masonry (f{sub m}{prime}) for the Oak Ridge Y- 12 Plant, Hollow Clay Tile Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Fricke, K.E.; Flanagan, R.D.

    1995-04-17

    Prism tests have been performed on the HCT walls. The three groups of data were treated as separate data points and averaged. The recommended effective compressive strengths for HCT walls are 735 psi for single wythe 6- and 8-in. walls, and 495 psi for the double wythe 13-in. walls.

  4. Description of Primary Education 1st Grade Students' Forms of Holding a Pencil as well as Their Grip and Compression Strengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temur, Turan

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to examine how first grade students in primary education held and gripped a pencil and their compressive strength using a descriptive research method. The participants of the research comprises first grade students attending a private school in the city center of Ankara (n=79). All of the four different sections in this private…

  5. Compressive strength and interfacial transition zone of sugar cane bagasse ash concrete: A comparison to the established pozzolans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Asma Abd Elhameed; Shafiq, Nasir; Nuruddin, Muhd Fadhil

    2015-05-01

    Agricultural and industrial by-products are commonly used in concrete production as cement replacement materials (CRMs) or as admixtures to enhance both fresh and hardened properties of concrete as well as to save the environment from the negative effects caused by their disposal. Sugar Cane Bagasse Ash (SCBA) is one of the promising CRMs, it is used as a partial replacement of cement for producing concrete; properties of such concrete depend on the chemical composition, fineness, and burning temperature of SCBA. Approximately 1500 Million tons of sugarcane are annually produced over all the world which leave about 40-45% bagasse after juice crushing for sugar industry giving an average annual production of about 600 Million tons of bagasse as a waste material. This paper presents some findings on the effect of SCBA on workability, compressive strength and microstructure of interfacial zone of concrete and its performance is compared to some of the established CRMs namely Densified Silica Fume, Fly Ash and Microwave Incinerated Rice Husk Ash.

  6. In Vitro Comparison of Compressive and Tensile Strengths ofAcrylic Resins Reinforced by Silver Nanoparticles at 2% and0.2% Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Tahereh; Hamedirad, Fahimeh; Ezzati, Baharak

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Polymethyl methacrylate, PMMA, is widely used in prosthodontics for fabrication of removable prostheses. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of adding silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) to PMMA at 2% and 0.2% concentrations on compressive and tensile strengths of PMMA. Materials and methods. The silver nanoparticles were mixed with heat-cured acrylic resin in an amalgamator in two groups at 0.2 and 2 wt% of AgNPs. Eighteen 2×20×200-mm samples were prepared for tensile strength test, 12 samples containing silver nanoparticle and 6 samples for the control group. Another 18 cylindrical 25×38-mm samples were prepared for compressive strength test. Scanning electron microscopy was used to verify homogeneous distribution of particles. The powder was manually mixed with a resin monomer and then the mixture was properly blended. Before curing, the paste was packed into steel molds. After curing, the specimens were removed from the molds. One-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis, followed by multiple comparison test (Scheffé’s test). Results. This study showed that the mean compressive strength of PMMA reinforced with AgNPs was significantly higher than that of the unmodified PMMA (P<0.05). It was not statistically different between the two groups reinforced with AgNPs. The tensile strength was not significantly different between the 0.2% group and unmodified PMMA and it de-creased significantly after incorporation of 2% AgNPs (P<0.05). Conclusion. Based on the results and the desirable effect of nanoparticles of silver on improvement of compressive strength of PMMA, use of this material with proper concentration in the palatal area of maxillary acrylic resin dentures is recommended. PMID:25587381

  7. Poly-L-lactide/sodium alginate/chitosan microsphere hybrid scaffolds made with braiding manufacture and adhesion technique: Solution to the incongruence between porosity and compressive strength.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Horng; Chen, Chih-Kuang; Wen, Shih-Peng; Lou, Ching-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Bone scaffolds require a three-dimensional structure, high porosity, interconnected pores, adequate mechanical strengths, and non-toxicity. A high porosity is incongruent with mechanical strengths. Therefore, this study combines a braiding method and microsphere solution to create bone scaffolds with a high porosity and sufficient mechanical strengths. First, poly-L-lactide (PLLA) plied yarns are braided into 5-, 10-, 15-, 20-, and 25-layer hollow braids, and then thermally treated at 165 °C for various durations. Next, sodium alginate (SA) microspheres, cross-linked with CaCl2 solution with various concentrations, are combined with PLLA porous braided bone scaffolds to form PLLA/SA/CS microsphere hybrid scaffolds, which are then observed for surface observation, and tested for porosity, water contact angle, compressive strength, MTT assay, bioactivity, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay, cell attachment, and statistical analyses. The test results show that the layer amount of the bone scaffold is proportional to the compressive strength. With the same number of layers, the compressive strength is inversely proportional to the concentration of the CaCl2 solution. The results of surface observation, porosity, and water contact angle tests show that PLLA/SA/CS microsphere hybrid scaffolds possess a high porosity and good hydrophilicity; as a result, the braiding manufacture and the bonding technique effectively solve the confliction between porosity and mechanical strength. The concentration of CaCl2 does not pertain to cell activity and ALP results, exemplified by good cell attachment on bone scaffolds for each specification. PMID:25953547

  8. Association analyses of vitamin D-binding protein gene with compression strength index variation in Caucasian nuclear families

    PubMed Central

    Xu, X.-H.; Xiong, D.-H.; Liu, X.-G.; Guo, Y.; Chen, Y.; Zhao, J.; Recker, R. R.; Deng, H.-W.

    2010-01-01

    Summary This study was conducted to test whether there exists an association between vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) gene and compression strength index (CSI) phenotype. Candidate gene association analyses were conducted in total sample, male subgroup, and female subgroup, respectively. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with significant association results were found in males, suggesting the importance of DBP gene polymorphisms on the variation in CSI especially in Caucasian males. Introduction CSI of the femoral neck (FN) is a newly developed phenotype integrating information about bone size, body size, and bone mineral density. It is considered to have the potential to improve the performance of risk assessment for hip fractures because it is based on a combination of phenotypic traits influencing hip fractures rather than a single trait. CSI is under moderate genetic determination (with a heritability of ~44% found in this study), but the relevant genetic study is still rather scarce. Methods Based on the known physiological role of DBP in bone biology and the relatively high heritability of CSI, we tested 12 SNPs of the DBP gene for association with CSI variation in 405 Caucasian nuclear families comprising 1,873 subjects from the Midwestern US. Association analyses were performed in the total sample, male and female subgroups, respectively. Results Significant associations with CSI were found with two SNPs (rs222029, P=0.0019; rs222020, P=0.0042) for the male subgroup. Haplotype-based association tests corroborated the single-SNP results. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the DBP gene might be one of the genetic factors influencing CSI phenotype in Caucasians, especially in males. PMID:19543766

  9. Application of support vector machines and relevance vector machines in predicting uniaxial compressive strength of volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceryan, Nurcihan

    2014-12-01

    The uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) of intact rocks is an important and pertinent property for characterizing a rock mass. It is known that standard UCS tests are destructive, expensive and time-consuming task, which is particularly true for thinly bedded, highly fractured, foliated, highly porous and weak rocks. Consequently, prediction models have become an attractive alternative for engineering geologists. In the last several years, a new, alternative kernel-based technique, support vector machines (SVMs), has been popular in modeling studies. Despite superior SVM performance, this technique has certain significant, practical drawbacks. Hence, the relevance vector machines (RVMs) approach has been proposed to recast the main ideas underlying SVMs in a Bayesian context. The primary purpose of this study is to examine the applicability and capability of RVM and SVM models for predicting the UCS of volcanic rocks from NE Turkey and comparing its performance with ANN models. In these models, the porosity and P-durability index representing microstructural variables are the input parameters. The study results indicate that these methods can successfully predict the UCS for the volcanic rocks. The SVM and RVM performed better than the ANN model. When these kernel based models are considered, RVM model found successful in terms of statistical performance criterions (e.g., performance index, PI values for training and testing data are computed as 1.579 and 1.449). These values for SVM are 1.509 and 1.307. Although SVM and RVM models are powerful techniques, the RVM run time was considerably faster, and it yielded the highest accuracy.

  10. Effects of humeral head compression taping on the isokinetic strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moon-Hwan; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of humeral head compression taping (HHCT) on the strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty patients with rotator cuff tendinitis were recruited. The shoulder external rotator strength was measured using a Biodex isokinetic dynamometer system. A paired t-test was performed to evaluate within-group differences in the strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle. [Results] Significantly higher shoulder external rotator peak torque and peak torque per body weight were found in the HHCT condition than in the no-taping condition. [Conclusion] HHCT may effectively increase the shoulder external rotator muscle strength in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis. PMID:25642053

  11. Fly and bottom ashes from biomass combustion as cement replacing components in mortars production: rheological behaviour of the pastes and materials compression strength.

    PubMed

    Maschio, Stefano; Tonello, Gabriele; Piani, Luciano; Furlani, Erika

    2011-10-01

    In the present research mortar pastes obtained by replacing a commercial cement with the equivalent mass of 5, 10, 20 and 30 wt.% of fly ash or bottom ash from fir chips combustion, were prepared and rheologically characterized. It was observed that the presence of ash modifies their rheological behaviour with respect to the reference blend due to the presence, in the ashes, of KCl and K2SO4 which cause precipitation of gypsum and portlandite during the first hydration stages of the pastes. Hydrated materials containing 5 wt.% of ash display compression strength and absorption at 28 d of same magnitude as the reference composition; conversely, progressive increase of ash cause a continuous decline of materials performances. Conversely, samples tested after 180 d display a marked decline of compression strength, as a consequence of potassium elution and consequent alkali-silica reaction against materials under curing. PMID:21762950

  12. Fly and bottom ashes from biomass combustion as cement replacing components in mortars production: rheological behaviour of the pastes and materials compression strength.

    PubMed

    Maschio, Stefano; Tonello, Gabriele; Piani, Luciano; Furlani, Erika

    2011-10-01

    In the present research mortar pastes obtained by replacing a commercial cement with the equivalent mass of 5, 10, 20 and 30 wt.% of fly ash or bottom ash from fir chips combustion, were prepared and rheologically characterized. It was observed that the presence of ash modifies their rheological behaviour with respect to the reference blend due to the presence, in the ashes, of KCl and K2SO4 which cause precipitation of gypsum and portlandite during the first hydration stages of the pastes. Hydrated materials containing 5 wt.% of ash display compression strength and absorption at 28 d of same magnitude as the reference composition; conversely, progressive increase of ash cause a continuous decline of materials performances. Conversely, samples tested after 180 d display a marked decline of compression strength, as a consequence of potassium elution and consequent alkali-silica reaction against materials under curing.

  13. Ideal compressive strength of fcc Co, Ni, and Ni-rich alloys along the <001 > direction: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breidi, A.; Fries, S. G.; Ruban, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    We perform density functional theory based first-principles calculations to identify promising alloying elements (X ) capable of enhancing the compressive uniaxial theoretical (ideal) strength of the fcc Ni-matrix along the <001 > direction. The alloying element belongs to a wide range of 3 d ,4 d , and 5 d series with nominal composition of 6.25 at. %. Additionally, a full elastic study is carried to investigate the ideal strength of fcc Ni and fcc Co. Our results indicate that the most desirable alloying elements are those with half d -band filling, namely, Os, Ir, Re, and Ru.

  14. Exploring the optimal pre-sintering temperature on compressive strength and anti-fatigue property of graded zirconia-based glass/zirconia structure.

    PubMed

    Qian, Haixin; Cui, Chang; Su, Tingshu; Zhang, Fuqiang; Sun, Jian

    2016-01-01

    To explore the optimal pre-sintering temperature for graded glass/zirconia material, glass/zirconia specimens were prepared and pre-sintered at 900, 1,000 and 1,100°C respectively, glass infiltration and densification at 1,450°C. Monolith Y-TZP specimens were sintered at 1,450°C. Nanoindentation was used to test Young's modulus and Hardness. Compressive strength test and cycling fatigue test were conducted. Nanoindentation test showed graded change of Young's modulus in glass/zirconia structure. The compressive strength and the number of cycles to failure of specimens pre-sintered at 1,000°C were significantly higher than those of Y-TZP and the specimens pre-sintered at 900 and 1,000°C (p<0.05). It is concluded that when the pre-sintering temperature is set at 1,000°C, the graded glass/zirconia structure exhibits the most optimal compressive strength and anti-fatigue property. PMID:27251987

  15. Smart cement modified with iron oxide nanoparticles to enhance the piezoresistive behavior and compressive strength for oil well applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vipulanandan, C.; Mohammed, A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, smart cement with a 0.38 water-to-cement ratio was modified with iron oxide nanoparticles (NanoFe2O3) to have better sensing properties, so that the behavior can be monitored at various stages of construction and during the service life of wells. A series of experiments evaluated the piezoresistive smart cement behavior with and without NanoFe2O3 in order to identify the most reliable sensing properties that can also be relatively easily monitored. Tests were performed on the smart cement from the time of mixing to a hardened state behavior. When oil well cement (Class H) was modified with 0.1% of conductive filler, the piezoresistive behavior of the hardened smart cement was substantially improved without affecting the setting properties of the cement. During the initial setting the electrical resistivity changed with time based on the amount of NanoFe2O3 used to modify the smart oil well cement. A new quantification concept has been developed to characterize the smart cement curing based on electrical resistivity changes in the first 24 h of curing. Addition of 1% NanoFe2O3 increased the compressive strength of the smart cement by 26% and 40% after 1 day and 28 days of curing respectively. The modulus of elasticity of the smart cement increased with the addition of 1% NanoFe2O3 by 29% and 28% after 1 day and 28 days of curing respectively. A nonlinear curing model was used to predict the changes in electrical resistivity with curing time. The piezoresistivity of smart cement with NanoFe2O3 was over 750 times higher than the unmodified cement depending on the curing time and nanoparticle content. Also the nonlinear stress-strain and stress-change in resistivity relationships predicated the experimental results very well. Effects of curing time and NanoFe2O3 content on the model parameters have been quantified using a nonlinear model.

  16. Interfacial strength of compression-molded specimens between PMMA powder and PMMA/MMA monomer solution-treated ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) powder.

    PubMed

    Park, K D; Park, J B

    2000-01-01

    The interface between bone cement and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been considered a weak link of cemented UHMWPE acetabular cup in total hip replacement (THR). For the improvement of this weak interface, adhesion between the UHMWPE acetabular cup and bone cement made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) has been investigated in our laboratory. Virgin UHMWPE powders were treated with methyl methacrylate (MMA) monomer and PMMA/MMA solution. The treated UHMWPE powders were then compression-molded with virgin UHMWPE powders or PMMA powders, creating two different interfaces, i. e., treated/virgin UHMWPE powder and treated UHMWPE/PMMA powder. For the present study, the interfacial strengths between PMMA powder and the treated UHMWPE power were investigated following the same protocol previously set. The maximum interfacial strength was 17.0 +/- 0.25MPa with the same molding condition of 166.5 degrees C, 38.7 MPa and l h. In addition to the molding condition, we tested the strengths for the treated UHMWPE powders, which have different ratios between PMMA/MMA solution and MMA-treated UHMWPE powders. Significant differences on the interfacial strengths resulted due to the ratio change; more PMMA in the PMMA/MMA solution-treated UHMWPE powder exhibited higher interfacial strength. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) pictures showed that the interface is composed of three major portions: PMMA powder, UHMWPE, and coated PMMA, indicating strong mechanical interlocking of UHMWPE and PMMA powder matrix and chemical bonding between PMMA powder and the precoated PMMA onto the UHMWPE. In addition, another interfacial strength between PMMA powder, which is equivalent to the outermost part of the cup, and bone cement was investigated. The average strength reached up to 42.4 +/- 3.6 MPa, close to the tensile strength of bone cement itself.

  17. Strength and equation of state of boron suboxide from radial x-ray diffraction in a diamond cell under nonhydrostatic compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Duanwei; Shieh, Sean R.; Duffy, Thomas S.

    2004-11-01

    Using radial x-ray diffraction techniques together with lattice strain theory, the behavior of boron suboxide (B6O) was investigated under nonhydrostatic compression to 65.3GPa in a diamond-anvil cell. The apparent bulk modulus derived from nonhydrostatic compression data varies from 363GPato124GPa depending on the orientation of the diffraction planes with respect to the loading axis. Measurement of the variation of lattice spacing with angle, ψ , from the loading axis allows the d spacings corresponding to hydrostatic compression to be obtained. The hydrostatic d spacing obtained from a linear fitting to data at 0° and 90° is consistent with direct measurements at the appropriate angle (ψ=54.7°) to within 0.5%, which suggests that even two measurements ( ψ=0° and 90°) are sufficient for accurate hydrostatic equation of state determination. The hydrostatic compression data yield a bulk modulus K0=270±12GPa and its pressure derivative K0'=1.8±0.3 . The ratio of differential stress to shear modulus ranges from 0.021 to 0.095 at pressures of 9.3-65.3GPa . Together with estimates of the high-pressure shear modulus, a lower bound to the yield strength is 26-30GPa at the highest pressure. The yield strength of B6O is about a factor of 2 larger than for other strong solids such as Al2O3 . The ratio of yield stress to shear modulus derived from lattice strain theory is also consistent with the result obtained by the analysis of x-ray peak width. This ratio might be a good qualitative indicator of hardness as it reflects the contributions of both plastic and elastic deformation.

  18. Molecular-Level Study of the Effect of Prior Axial Compression/Torsion on the Axial-Tensile Strength of PPTA Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Yavari, R.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2013-11-01

    A comprehensive all-atom molecular-level computational investigation is carried out in order to identify and quantify: (i) the effect of prior longitudinal-compressive or axial-torsional loading on the longitudinal-tensile behavior of p-phenylene terephthalamide (PPTA) fibrils/fibers; and (ii) the role various microstructural/topological defects play in affecting this behavior. Experimental and computational results available in the relevant open literature were utilized to construct various defects within the molecular-level model and to assign the concentration to these defects consistent with the values generally encountered under "prototypical" PPTA-polymer synthesis and fiber fabrication conditions. When quantifying the effect of the prior longitudinal-compressive/axial-torsional loading on the longitudinal-tensile behavior of PPTA fibrils, the stochastic nature of the size/potency of these defects was taken into account. The results obtained revealed that: (a) due to the stochastic nature of the defect type, concentration/number density and size/potency, the PPTA fibril/fiber longitudinal-tensile strength is a statistical quantity possessing a characteristic probability density function; (b) application of the prior axial compression or axial torsion to the PPTA imperfect single-crystalline fibrils degrades their longitudinal-tensile strength and only slightly modifies the associated probability density function; and (c) introduction of the fibril/fiber interfaces into the computational analyses showed that prior axial torsion can induce major changes in the material microstructure, causing significant reductions in the PPTA-fiber longitudinal-tensile strength and appreciable changes in the associated probability density function.

  19. An experimental method of measuring the confined compression strength of high-performance concretes to analyse their ballistic behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forquin, P.; Árias, A.; Zaera, R.

    2006-08-01

    The test known as “quasi-oedometric compression” consists of the compression of a cylindrical specimen confined in a thick vessel. In this work, an original methodology is proposed to deduce the radial stress and strain within the specimen using hoop strains measured on the external surface of the vessel, taking into account its elasto-plastic deformation. On one hand the spherical and deviatoric behaviours of two concretes are deduced. On the other hand, their ballistic behaviour is analysed using impact tests. These experiments are simulated numerically by the plasticity model of Krieg, Swenson and Taylor, and the features of the model are identified by the previous confined compression tests. The capacity of the model to describe the ballistic behaviour of such materials is shown in a comparison of the numerical simulations with the ballistic tests.

  20. Loading simulation of lumbar spine vertebrae during a compression test using the finite elements method and trabecular bone strength properties, determined by means of nanoindentations.

    PubMed

    Bouzakis, K D; Mitsi, S; Michailidis, N; Mirisidis, I; Mesomeris, G; Maliaris, G; Korlos, A; Kapetanos, G; Antonarakos, P; Anagnostidis, K

    2004-06-01

    The mechanical strength properties of lumbar spine vertebrae are of great importance in a wide range of applications. Herein, through nanoindentations and appropriate evaluation of the corresponding results, trabecular bone struts stress-strain characteristics can be determined. In the frame of the present paper, an L2 fresh cadaveric vertebra, from which posterior elements were removed, was subjected to compression. With the aid of developed finite elements method based algorithms, the cortical shell and the cancellous core bulk elasticity moduli and stresses were determined, whereas the tested vertebra geometrical model used in these algorithms was considered as having a compound structure, consisting of the cancellous bone surrounded by the cortical shell. Moreover nanoindentations were conducted and an appropriate evaluation method of the obtained results was applied to extract stress-strain curves of individual lumbar spine vertebra trabecular bone struts. These data were used in the mathematical description of the vertebrae compression test. The vertebral cancellous bone structure was simulated by a beam elements network, possessing an equivalent porosity and different stiffnesses in vertical and horizontal direction. Thus, the measured course of the compression load versus the occurring specimen deformation was verified.

  1. Evaluation of critical resolved shear strength and deformation mode in proton-irradiated austenitic stainless steel using micro-compression tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyung-Ha; Ko, Eunsol; Kwon, Junhyun; Hwang, Seong Sik; Shin, Chansun

    2016-03-01

    Micro-compression tests were applied to evaluate the changes in the strength and deformation mode of proton-irradiated commercial austenitic stainless steel. Proton irradiation generated small dots at low dose levels and Frank loops at high dose levels. The increase in critical resolved shear stresses (CRSS) was measured from micro-compression of pillars and the Schmid factor calculated from the measured loading direction. The magnitudes of the CRSS increase were in good agreement with the values calculated from the barrier hardening model using the measured size and density of radiation defects. The deformation mode changed upon increasing the irradiation dose level. At a low radiation dose level, work hardening and smooth flow behavior were observed. Increasing the dose level resulted in the flow behavior changing to a distinct heterogeneous flow, yielding a few large strain bursts in the stress-strain curves. The change in the deformation mode was related to the formation and propagation of defect-free slip bands. The effect of the orientation of the pillar or loading direction on the strengths is discussed.

  2. Strength Restoration of Cracked Sandstone and Coal under a Uniaxial Compression Test and Correlated Damage Source Location Based on Acoustic Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaowei; Zhang, Nong; Zheng, Xigui; Pan, Dongjiang

    2015-01-01

    Underground rock masses have shown a general trend of natural balance over billions of years of ground movement. Nonetheless, man-made underground constructions disturb this balance and cause rock stability failure. Fractured rock masses are frequently encountered in underground constructions, and this study aims to restore the strength of rock masses that have experienced considerable fracturing under uniaxial compression. Coal and sandstone from a deep-buried coal mine were chosen as experimental subjects; they were crushed by uniaxial compression and then carefully restored by a chemical adhesive called MEYCO 364 with an innovative self-made device. Finally, the restored specimens were crushed once again by uniaxial compression. Axial stress, axial strain, circumferential strain, and volumetric strain data for the entire process were fully captured and are discussed here. An acoustic emission (AE) testing system was adopted to cooperate with the uniaxial compression system to provide better definitions for crack closure thresholds, crack initiation thresholds, crack damage thresholds, and three-dimensional damage source locations in intact and restored specimens. Several remarkable findings were obtained. The restoration effects of coal are considerably better than those of sandstone because the strength recovery coefficient of the former is 1.20, whereas that of the latter is 0.33, which indicates that MEYCO 364 is particularly valid for fractured rocks whose initial intact peak stress is less than that of MEYCO 364. Secondary cracked traces of restored sandstone almost follow the cracked traces of the initial intact sandstone, and the final failure is mainly caused by decoupling between the adhesive and the rock mass. However, cracked traces of restored coal only partially follow the traces of intact coal, with the final failure of the restored coal being caused by both bonding interface decoupling and self-breakage in coal. Three-dimensional damage source

  3. Strength Restoration of Cracked Sandstone and Coal under a Uniaxial Compression Test and Correlated Damage Source Location Based on Acoustic Emissions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaowei; Zhang, Nong; Zheng, Xigui; Pan, Dongjiang

    2015-01-01

    Underground rock masses have shown a general trend of natural balance over billions of years of ground movement. Nonetheless, man-made underground constructions disturb this balance and cause rock stability failure. Fractured rock masses are frequently encountered in underground constructions, and this study aims to restore the strength of rock masses that have experienced considerable fracturing under uniaxial compression. Coal and sandstone from a deep-buried coal mine were chosen as experimental subjects; they were crushed by uniaxial compression and then carefully restored by a chemical adhesive called MEYCO 364 with an innovative self-made device. Finally, the restored specimens were crushed once again by uniaxial compression. Axial stress, axial strain, circumferential strain, and volumetric strain data for the entire process were fully captured and are discussed here. An acoustic emission (AE) testing system was adopted to cooperate with the uniaxial compression system to provide better definitions for crack closure thresholds, crack initiation thresholds, crack damage thresholds, and three-dimensional damage source locations in intact and restored specimens. Several remarkable findings were obtained. The restoration effects of coal are considerably better than those of sandstone because the strength recovery coefficient of the former is 1.20, whereas that of the latter is 0.33, which indicates that MEYCO 364 is particularly valid for fractured rocks whose initial intact peak stress is less than that of MEYCO 364. Secondary cracked traces of restored sandstone almost follow the cracked traces of the initial intact sandstone, and the final failure is mainly caused by decoupling between the adhesive and the rock mass. However, cracked traces of restored coal only partially follow the traces of intact coal, with the final failure of the restored coal being caused by both bonding interface decoupling and self-breakage in coal. Three-dimensional damage source

  4. Strength Restoration of Cracked Sandstone and Coal under a Uniaxial Compression Test and Correlated Damage Source Location Based on Acoustic Emissions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaowei; Zhang, Nong; Zheng, Xigui; Pan, Dongjiang

    2015-01-01

    Underground rock masses have shown a general trend of natural balance over billions of years of ground movement. Nonetheless, man-made underground constructions disturb this balance and cause rock stability failure. Fractured rock masses are frequently encountered in underground constructions, and this study aims to restore the strength of rock masses that have experienced considerable fracturing under uniaxial compression. Coal and sandstone from a deep-buried coal mine were chosen as experimental subjects; they were crushed by uniaxial compression and then carefully restored by a chemical adhesive called MEYCO 364 with an innovative self-made device. Finally, the restored specimens were crushed once again by uniaxial compression. Axial stress, axial strain, circumferential strain, and volumetric strain data for the entire process were fully captured and are discussed here. An acoustic emission (AE) testing system was adopted to cooperate with the uniaxial compression system to provide better definitions for crack closure thresholds, crack initiation thresholds, crack damage thresholds, and three-dimensional damage source locations in intact and restored specimens. Several remarkable findings were obtained. The restoration effects of coal are considerably better than those of sandstone because the strength recovery coefficient of the former is 1.20, whereas that of the latter is 0.33, which indicates that MEYCO 364 is particularly valid for fractured rocks whose initial intact peak stress is less than that of MEYCO 364. Secondary cracked traces of restored sandstone almost follow the cracked traces of the initial intact sandstone, and the final failure is mainly caused by decoupling between the adhesive and the rock mass. However, cracked traces of restored coal only partially follow the traces of intact coal, with the final failure of the restored coal being caused by both bonding interface decoupling and self-breakage in coal. Three-dimensional damage source

  5. Compressive strength and resistance to chloride ion penetration and carbonation of recycled aggregate concrete with varying amount of fly ash and fine recycled aggregate.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jongsung; Park, Cheolwoo

    2011-11-01

    Construction and demolition waste has been dramatically increased in the last decade, and social and environmental concerns on the recycling have consequently been increased. Recent technology has greatly improved the recycling process for waste concrete. This study investigates the fundamental characteristics of concrete using recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) for its application to structural concrete members. The specimens used 100% coarse RCA, various replacement levels of natural aggregate with fine RCA, and several levels of fly ash addition. Compressive strength of mortar and concrete which used RCA gradually decreased as the amount of the recycled materials increased. Regardless of curing conditions and fly ash addition, the 28 days strength of the recycled aggregate concrete was greater than the design strength, 40 MPa, with a complete replacement of coarse aggregate and a replacement level of natural fine aggregate by fine RCA up to 60%. The recycled aggregate concrete achieved sufficient resistance to the chloride ion penetration. The measured carbonation depth did not indicate a clear relationship to the fine RCA replacement ratio but the recycled aggregate concrete could also attain adequate carbonation resistance. Based on the results from the experimental investigations, it is believed that the recycled aggregate concrete can be successfully applied to structural concrete members. PMID:21784626

  6. Compressive strength and resistance to chloride ion penetration and carbonation of recycled aggregate concrete with varying amount of fly ash and fine recycled aggregate.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jongsung; Park, Cheolwoo

    2011-11-01

    Construction and demolition waste has been dramatically increased in the last decade, and social and environmental concerns on the recycling have consequently been increased. Recent technology has greatly improved the recycling process for waste concrete. This study investigates the fundamental characteristics of concrete using recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) for its application to structural concrete members. The specimens used 100% coarse RCA, various replacement levels of natural aggregate with fine RCA, and several levels of fly ash addition. Compressive strength of mortar and concrete which used RCA gradually decreased as the amount of the recycled materials increased. Regardless of curing conditions and fly ash addition, the 28 days strength of the recycled aggregate concrete was greater than the design strength, 40 MPa, with a complete replacement of coarse aggregate and a replacement level of natural fine aggregate by fine RCA up to 60%. The recycled aggregate concrete achieved sufficient resistance to the chloride ion penetration. The measured carbonation depth did not indicate a clear relationship to the fine RCA replacement ratio but the recycled aggregate concrete could also attain adequate carbonation resistance. Based on the results from the experimental investigations, it is believed that the recycled aggregate concrete can be successfully applied to structural concrete members.

  7. Compressive Strength of 24S-T Aluminum-alloy Flat Panels with Longitudinal Formed Hat-section Stiffeners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuette, Evan H; Barab, Sual; Mccracken, Howard L

    1946-01-01

    Results are presented for a part of a test program on 24S-T aluminum alloy flat compression panels with longitudinal formed hat-section stiffeners. This part of the program is concerned with panels in which the thickness of the stiffener materials is 0.625 times the skin thickness. The results, presented in tabular and graphical form, show the effect of the relative dimensions of the panel on the buckling stress and the average stress at maximum load. Comparative envelope curves are presented for hat-stiffened and Z-stiffened panels having the same ratio of stiffener thickness to sheet thickness. These curves provide some indication of the relative structural efficiencies of the two types of panel.

  8. Effects of TiO2, ZrO2 and Al2O3 dopants on the compressive strength of tricalcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Zawahreh, Y I; Popova, N; Smith, R W; Hendry, J; Smith, T J N; Ziolo, T L

    2005-12-01

    Tricalcium phosphate (TCP) powders synthesised using the Ca(NO3)2 and Ca(OH)2 routes were doped with TiO2, ZrO2 and Al2O3 in order to increase their compressive strength. An ultimate compressive strength (UCS) of 255 +/- 6 MPa was achieved for approximately 10 vol% TiO2 doping compared to 30 +/- 3 MPa for an un-doped control processed and tested in the same manner. Higher levels of TiO2 doping resulted in smaller increases in UCS with 30 and 50 vol% achieving 213 +/- 9 and 178 +/- 15 MPa, respectively. Very small amounts of Al2O3 doping (< 0.5 vol%) also resulted in a stronger materials. However, under the processing conditions employed, higher levels of Al2O3 and ZrO2 doping resulted in no beneficial effect on the UCS. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) was used as binding agent to facilitate processing. As expected, higher levels of PVA were associated with smaller increases in UCS. Powders synthesised using the Ca(OH)2 route had smaller particle size and resulted in larger increases in UCS compared to the Ca(NO3)2-synthesised powders. Although some powders contained alpha and beta-TCP phases, no other calcium phosphate, CaO, CaTiO3 or CaZrO3 phases were detected. In conclusion, a significant increase in the UCS of TCP was achieved by doping with approximately 10 vol% TiO2 which is expected to have little or no effect on the bioactivity or bioresorbability of the material.

  9. The Effect of Different Mixing Methods on the Flow Rate and Compressive Strength of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Calcium-Enriched Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Shahriar; Ghasemi, Negin; Rahimi, Saeed; Yavari, Hamid Reza; Samiei, Mohammad; Janani, Maryam; Bahari, Mahmood; Moheb, Sanaz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Flow rate (FR) and compressive strength (CS) are important properties of endodontic biomaterials that may be affected by various mixing methods. The aim of this experimental study was to evaluate the effect of different mixing methods on these properties of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Materials and methods: Hand, amalgamator and ultrasonic techniques were used to mix both biomaterials. Then 0.5 mL of each mixture was placed on a glass slab to measure FR. The second glass slab (100 g) was placed on the samples and 180 sec after the initiation of mixing a 100-g force was applied on it for 10 min. After 10 min, the load was removed, and the minimum and maximum diameters of the sample disks were measured. To measure the CS, 6 sample of each group were placed in steel molds and were then stored in distilled water for 21 h and 21 days. Afterwards, the CS test was performed. Data were analyzed with multi-variant ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: There were significant differences in FR of MTA and CEM cement with different mixing techniques (P<0.05). In the MTA group, none of the mixing techniques exhibited a significant effect on CS (P>0.05); however, in CEM group the CS at 21-h and 21-day intervals was higher with the hand technique (P<0.05). Conclusion: Mixing methods affected the flowability of both biomaterials and compressive strength of CEM cement. PMID:25598811

  10. Raman spectroscopic determination of the length, strength, compressibility, Debye temperature, elasticity, and force constant of the C-C bond in graphene.

    PubMed

    Yang, X X; Li, J W; Zhou, Z F; Wang, Y; Yang, L W; Zheng, W T; Sun, Chang Q

    2012-01-21

    From the perspective of bond relaxation and bond vibration, we have formulated the Raman phonon relaxation of graphene, under the stimuli of the number-of-layers, the uni-axial strain, the pressure, and the temperature, in terms of the response of the length and strength of the representative bond of the entire specimen to the applied stimuli. Theoretical unification of the measurements clarifies that: (i) the opposite trends of the Raman shifts, which are due to the number-of-layers reduction, of the G-peak shift and arises from the vibration of a pair of atoms, while the D- and the 2D-peak shifts involve the z-neighbor of a specific atom; (ii) the tensile strain-induced phonon softening and phonon-band splitting arise from the asymmetric response of the C(3v) bond geometry to the C(2v) uni-axial bond elongation; (iii) the thermal softening of the phonons originates from bond expansion and weakening; and (iv) the pressure stiffening of the phonons results from bond compression and work hardening. Reproduction of the measurements has led to quantitative information about the referential frequencies from which the Raman frequencies shift as well as the length, energy, force constant, Debye temperature, compressibility and elastic modulus of the C-C bond in graphene, which is of instrumental importance in the understanding of the unusual behavior of graphene. PMID:22105904

  11. Raman spectroscopic determination of the length, strength, compressibility, Debye temperature, elasticity, and force constant of the C-C bond in graphene.

    PubMed

    Yang, X X; Li, J W; Zhou, Z F; Wang, Y; Yang, L W; Zheng, W T; Sun, Chang Q

    2012-01-21

    From the perspective of bond relaxation and bond vibration, we have formulated the Raman phonon relaxation of graphene, under the stimuli of the number-of-layers, the uni-axial strain, the pressure, and the temperature, in terms of the response of the length and strength of the representative bond of the entire specimen to the applied stimuli. Theoretical unification of the measurements clarifies that: (i) the opposite trends of the Raman shifts, which are due to the number-of-layers reduction, of the G-peak shift and arises from the vibration of a pair of atoms, while the D- and the 2D-peak shifts involve the z-neighbor of a specific atom; (ii) the tensile strain-induced phonon softening and phonon-band splitting arise from the asymmetric response of the C(3v) bond geometry to the C(2v) uni-axial bond elongation; (iii) the thermal softening of the phonons originates from bond expansion and weakening; and (iv) the pressure stiffening of the phonons results from bond compression and work hardening. Reproduction of the measurements has led to quantitative information about the referential frequencies from which the Raman frequencies shift as well as the length, energy, force constant, Debye temperature, compressibility and elastic modulus of the C-C bond in graphene, which is of instrumental importance in the understanding of the unusual behavior of graphene.

  12. Effect of solution heat treatment on the internal architecture and compressive strength of an AlMg4.7Si8 alloy☆

    PubMed Central

    Tolnai, D.; Requena, G.; Cloetens, P.; Lendvai, J.; Degischer, H.P.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of the microstructure of an AlMg4.7Si8 alloy is investigated by scanning electron microscopy and ex situ synchrotron tomography in as-cast condition and subsequent solution treatments for 1 h and 25 h at 540 °C, respectively. The eutectic Mg2Si phase, which presents a highly interconnected structure in the as-cast condition, undergoes significant morphological changes during the solution heat treatment. Statistical analyses of the particle distribution, the sphericity, the mean curvatures and Gaussian curvatures describe the disintegration of the interconnected seaweed-like structure followed by the rounding of the disintegrated fractions of the eutectic branches quantitatively. The ternary eutectic Si resulting from the Si-surplus to the stoichiometric Mg2Si ratio of the alloy undergoes similar changes. The morphological evolution during solution heat treatment is correlated with results of elevated temperature compression tests at 300 °C. The elevated temperature compressive strength is more sensitive to the degree of interconnectivity of the three dimensional Mg2Si network than to the shape of the individual particles. PMID:24244073

  13. Scaling laws of nanoporous gold under uniaxial compression: Effects of structural disorder on the solid fraction, elastic Poisson's ratio, Young's modulus and yield strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roschning, B.; Huber, N.

    2016-07-01

    In this work the relationship between the structural disorder and the macroscopic mechanical behavior of nanoporous gold under uniaxial compression was investigated, using the finite element method. A recently proposed model based on a microstructure consisting of four-coordinated spherical nodes interconnected by cylindrical struts, whose node positions are randomly displaced from the lattice points of a diamond cubic lattice, was extended. This was done by including the increased density as result of the introduced structural disorder. Scaling equations for the elastic Poisson's ratio, the Young's modulus and the yield strength were determined as functions of the structural disorder and the solid fraction. The extended model was applied to identify the elastic-plastic behavior of the solid phase of nanoporous gold. It was found, that the elastic Poisson's ratio provides a robust basis for the calibration of the structural disorder. Based on this approach, a systematic study of the size effect on the yield strength was performed and the results were compared to experimental data provided in literature. An excellent agreement with recently published results for polymer infiltrated samples of nanoporous gold with varying ligament size was found.

  14. Elevated Temperature Compressive Strength Properties of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened NiAl After Cryo-milling and Roasting in Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Grahle, Peter; Arzt, Eduard; Hebsur, Mohan

    1998-01-01

    In an effort to superimpose two different elevated temperature strengthening mechanisms in NiAl, several lots of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) NiAl powder have been cryo-milled in liquid nitrogen to introduce AlN particles at the grain boundaries. As an alternative to cryo-milling, one lot of ODS NiAl was roasted in nitrogen to produce AlN. Both techniques resulted in hot extruded AlN-strengthened, ODS NiAl alloys which were stronger than the base ODS NiAl between 1200 and 1400 K. However, neither the cryo-milled nor the N2-roasted ODS NiAl alloys were as strong as cryo-milled binary NiAl containing like amounts of AlN. The reason(s) for the relative weakness of cryo-milled ODS NiAl is not certain; however the lack of superior strength in N2-roasted ODS NiAl is probably due to its relatively large AlN particles.

  15. The use of the percentile method for searching empirical relationships between compression strength (UCS), Point Load (Is50) and Schmidt Hammer (RL) Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Giovanni; Bobbo, Luigi; Vessia, Giovanna

    2014-05-01

    Is50 and RL indices are commonly used to indirectly estimate the compression strength of a rocky deposit by in situ and in laboratory devices. The widespread use of Point load and Schmidt hammer tests is due to the simplicity and the speediness of the execution of these tests. Their indices can be related to the UCS by means of the ordinary least square regression analyses. Several researchers suggest to take into account the lithology to build high correlated empirical expressions (R2 >0.8) to draw UCS from Is50 or RL values. Nevertheless, the lower and upper bounds of the UCS ranges of values that can be estimated by means of the two indirect indices are not clearly defined yet. Aydin (2009) stated that the Schmidt hammer test shall be used to assess the compression resistance of rocks characterized by UCS>12-20 MPa. On the other hand, the Point load measures can be performed on weak rocks but upper bound values for UCS are not suggested. In this paper, the empirical relationships between UCS, RL and Is50 are searched by means of the percentile method (Bruno et al. 2013). This method is based on looking for the best regression function, between measured data of UCS and one of the indirect indices, drawn from a subset sample of the couples of measures that are the percentile values. These values are taken from the original dataset of both measures by calculating the cumulative function. No hypothesis on the probability distribution of the sample is needed and the procedure shows to be robust with respect to odd values or outliers. In this study, the carbonate sedimentary rocks are investigated. According to the rock mass classification of Dobereiner and De Freitas (1986), the UCS values for the studied rocks range between 'extremely weak' to 'strong'. For the analyzed data, UCS varies between 1,18-270,70 MPa. Thus, through the percentile method the best empirical relationships UCS-Is50 and UCS-RL are plotted. Relationships between Is50 and RL are drawn, too

  16. Comparative evaluation of shear compressive bond strength between cross-linked acrylic resin denture base and cross-linked acrylic resin teeth with different modifcations of their ridge lap surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sadar, Leena; Dhume, Swaroop; Maniar, Neena; Prakash Patil, Jeevan; Rane, Prasad; Gandhewar, Mahesh

    2013-09-01

    A major problem commonly observed in denture wearer is the detachment of artifcial tooth/teeth from acrylic denture base. The problem was grave when porcelain teeth used along with the then available denture base materials. The bond formed was purely mechanical and hence debonding of teeth from denture base was a frequent occurrence. Inspite of chemical union between acrylic resin teeth and acrylic denture base material, detachment of teeth particularly anterior teeth is a frequent observation. The objective of the study is to study the effect of change in the surface treatment and surface confguration of ridge lap surface of the teeth on retention of cross-linked acrylic teeth on cross-linked acrylic resin denture base. Sixty specimens were tested for the shear compressive bond strength using instron universal testing machine in KN. Statistical analysis is used. The fndings were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and 't' test. Slight modifcation in the ridge lap surface of artifcial teeth alters the strength of the shear compressive bond. Sand papering of ridge lap surfaces improves the shear compressive bond then the one without any modifcation. Maximum shear compressive bond strength can be increased by application of monomer.

  17. Strength and elastic moduli of TiN from radial x-ray diffraction under nonhydrostatic compression up to 45 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Haihua; Peng, Fang; Mao, Ho-kwang; Shen, Guoyin; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Li, Zuo; Shu, Jinfu

    2010-07-23

    The high pressure behavior of titanium nitride (TiN) was investigated using synchrotron radial x-ray diffraction (RXRD) under nonhydrostatic compression up to 45.4 GPa in a diamond-anvil cell. We obtained the hydrostatic compression equation of state of TiN. Fitting to the third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state, the bulk modulus derived from nonhydrostatic compression data varies from 232 to 353 GPa, depending on angle {Psi}, the orientation of the diffraction planes with respect to the loading axis. The RXRD data obtained at {Psi} = 54.7{sup o} yield a bulk modulus K{sub 0} = 282 {+-} 9 GPa with pressure derivative K{prime}{sub 0} fixed at 4. We have analyzed the deformation mechanisms by analyzing the (111), (200), (220), (311), and (222) peaks in the x-ray diffraction under pressures. The ratio of uniaxial stress component to shear modulus t/G ranges from 0.007-0.027 at the pressure of 6.4-45.4 GPa. It was found that the TiN sample could support a maximum uniaxial stress component t of 8.6 GPa, when it started to yield at 45.4 GPa under uniaxial compression. And the aggregate elastic moduli of TiN at high pressure were determined from the synchrotron RXRD measurements.

  18. Improvement of magnetic hysteresis loss, corrosion resistance and compressive strength through spark plasma sintering magnetocaloric LaFe11.65Si1.35/Cu core-shell powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Caiyin; Wang, Shaopeng; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Nannan; Tian, Na

    2016-05-01

    LaFe11.65Si1.35/Cu core-shell powders were achieved by self-designed magnetron sputtering system, which presents a better solidification during spark plasma sintering in comparison to the naked LaFe11.65Si1.35 powders. Much higher compressive strength, lower corrosion current density and magnetic hysteresis losses are achieved for the sintered sample of LaFe11.65Si1.35/Cu core-shell powders without significant decrease of the magnetic entropy change. The compressive strength, corrosion current density and maximum magnetic hysteresis losses are 105.6 MPa/16.8 MPa, 1.08 × 10-3A/cm2/3.03 × 10-3 A/cm2 and 1.33 J/kg/2.71 J/kg, respectively for the sintered samples of core-shell structured/naked powders. The technique of fabricating the core-shell structured powders demonstrated here is also applicable for other types of functional powders.

  19. The Density and Compressibility of BaCO3-SrCO3-CaCO3-K2CO3-Na2CO3-Li2CO3 Liquids: New Measurements and a Systematic Trend with Cation Field Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurt, S. M.; Lange, R. A.; Ai, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The volumetric properties of multi-component carbonate liquids are required to extend thermodynamic models that describe partial melting of the deep mantle (e.g. pMELTS; Ghiorso et al., 2003) to carbonate-bearing lithologies. Carbonate in the mantle is an important reservoir of carbon, which is released to the atmosphere as CO2 through volcanism, and thus contributes to the carbon cycle. Although MgCO3 is the most important carbonate component in the mantle, it is not possible to directly measure the 1-bar density and compressibility of MgCO3 liquid because, like other alkaline-earth carbonates, it decomposes at a temperature lower than its melting temperature. Despite this challenge, Liu and Lange (2003) and O'Leary et al. (2015) showed that the one bar molar volume, thermal expansion and compressibility of the CaCO3 liquid component could be obtained by measuring the density and sound speeds of stable liquids in the CaCO3-Li2CO3-Na2CO3-K2CO3 quaternary system at one bar. In this study, this same strategy is employed on SrCO3- and BaCO3-bearing alkali carbonate liquids. The density and sound speed of seven liquids in the SrCO3-Li2CO3-Na2CO3-K2CO3 quaternary and three liquids in the BaCO3-Li2CO3-Na2CO3-K2CO3 quaternary were measured from 739-1367K, with SrCO3 and BaCO3 concentrations ranging from 10-50 mol%. The density measurements were made using the double-bob Archimedean method and sound speeds were obtained with a frequency-sweep acoustic interferometer. The molar volume and sound speed measurements were used to calculate the isothermal compressibility of each liquid, and the results show the volumetric properties mix ideally with composition. The partial molar volume and compressibility of the SrCO3 and BaCO3 components are compared to those obtained for the CaCO3 component as a function of cation field strength. The results reveal a systematic trend that allows the partial molar volume and compressibility of the MgCO3 liquid component to be estimated.

  20. Compressive and tensile failure at high fluid pressure where preexisting fractures have cohesive strength, with application to the San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.

    1996-01-01

    In thrusting and strike-slip situations, when the maximum principal horizontal stress S1 acts nearly normal to a fault (a misoriented fault, such as the San Andreas), pore-fluid pressure > the lithostatic load, Pf > Sv, is required to reactivate movement on that fault. Pf > Sv may be achieved without causing hydraulic tensile fracturing if (1) previously existing cracks have regained cohesive strength by chemical processes, (2) subcritical crack growth has been blunted, and (3) the least principal horizontal stress S3 nearly equals Sv. Where Pf > Sv has been attained within a misaligned fault, increasing the stress difference (S1 - S3) at constant Pf > Sv will not lead to shear failure, while a decrease in (S1 - S3) can lead to shear failure of that fault. However, where the cohesive strength of material in a broad misaligned fault zone is less than that of the surrounding intact rock, increasing (S1 - S3) while Pf > Sv can result in shear failure of fractures at near optimum angles to S1, but confined within this weak fault zone. If this faulting results in the local short-lived attainment of Pf > Sv (cataclastic deformation and frictional heating overcoming dilation) and a simultaneous decrease in (S1 - S3), this combination of effects can trigger movement along the main trace of the misaligned fault. When increasing Pf results in hydraulic failure, anisotropy in tensile strength or fracture toughness resulting from foliation within faults allows fractures to propagate along the planes of weakness rather than across the foliation perpendicular to S3.

  1. DNABIT Compress - Genome compression algorithm.

    PubMed

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-01

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, "DNABIT Compress" for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that "DNABIT Compress" algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases.

  2. Space-time compressive imaging.

    PubMed

    Treeaporn, Vicha; Ashok, Amit; Neifeld, Mark A

    2012-02-01

    Compressive imaging systems typically exploit the spatial correlation of the scene to facilitate a lower dimensional measurement relative to a conventional imaging system. In natural time-varying scenes there is a high degree of temporal correlation that may also be exploited to further reduce the number of measurements. In this work we analyze space-time compressive imaging using Karhunen-Loève (KL) projections for the read-noise-limited measurement case. Based on a comprehensive simulation study, we show that a KL-based space-time compressive imager offers higher compression relative to space-only compressive imaging. For a relative noise strength of 10% and reconstruction error of 10%, we find that space-time compressive imaging with 8×8×16 spatiotemporal blocks yields about 292× compression compared to a conventional imager, while space-only compressive imaging provides only 32× compression. Additionally, under high read-noise conditions, a space-time compressive imaging system yields lower reconstruction error than a conventional imaging system due to the multiplexing advantage. We also discuss three electro-optic space-time compressive imaging architecture classes, including charge-domain processing by a smart focal plane array (FPA). Space-time compressive imaging using a smart FPA provides an alternative method to capture the nonredundant portions of time-varying scenes.

  3. Tensile strength of restorative resins.

    PubMed

    Zidan, O; Asmussen, E; Jørgensen, K D

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of the present work was to measure the tensile strength of restorative resins and to study the effect of the method of measurement on the recorded results. A direct pull method using dumb-bell shaped specimens was used. The tensile strength of the resins was also tested using the diametral compression method suggested by the A.D.A. It was found that the method of testing affects the results. Although the diametral compression method is a simple method, it cannot be considered reliable for all types of material. The tensile strength of the conventional composites was significantly higher than the tensile strength of the microfilled composites.

  4. Orbiting dynamic compression laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Vreeland, T., Jr.; Kasiraj, P.; Frisch, B.

    1984-01-01

    In order to examine the feasibility of carrying out dynamic compression experiments on a space station, the possibility of using explosive gun launchers is studied. The question of whether powders of a refractory metal (molybdenum) and a metallic glass could be well considered by dynamic compression is examined. In both cases extremely good bonds are obtained between grains of metal and metallic glass at 180 and 80 kb, respectively. When the oxide surface is reduced and the dynamic consolidation is carried out in vacuum, in the case of molybdenum, tensile tests of the recovered samples demonstrated beneficial ultimate tensile strengths.

  5. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%.

  6. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  7. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-03-10

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique is disclosed. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method. 11 figs.

  8. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method.

  9. Compression strength of composite primary structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    Two projects are summarized. The first project is entitled 'Stiffener Crippling Inititated by Delaminations' and its objective is to develop a computational model of the stiffener specimens that includes the capability to predict the interlaminar stress response at the flange free edge in postbuckling. The second is entitled 'Pressure Pillowing of an Orthogonally Stiffened Cylindrical Shell'. A paper written on this project is included.

  10. Compression strength of composite primary structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1993-10-01

    Two projects are summarized in this report. The first project is entitled 'Stiffener Crippling Initiated by Delamination', and the second is entitled 'Pressure Pillowing of an Orthogonally Stiffened Cylindrical Shell.' The objective of the first project is to develop a computational model of the stiffener specimens that includes the capability to predict the interlaminar stress response at the flange free edge in postbuckling. The objectives of the second project are to analyze the concentration of interacting loads at the stiffener intersection and to study the pillowing of the skin.

  11. Compression strength of composite primary structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1993-10-01

    Two projects are summarized. The first project is entitled 'Stiffener Crippling Inititated by Delaminations' and its objective is to develop a computational model of the stiffener specimens that includes the capability to predict the interlaminar stress response at the flange free edge in postbuckling. The second is entitled 'Pressure Pillowing of an Orthogonally Stiffened Cylindrical Shell'. A paper written on this project is included.

  12. Compression strength of composite primary structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    Two projects are summarized in this report. The first project is entitled 'Stiffener Crippling Initiated by Delamination', and the second is entitled 'Pressure Pillowing of an Orthogonally Stiffened Cylindrical Shell.' The objective of the first project is to develop a computational model of the stiffener specimens that includes the capability to predict the interlaminar stress response at the flange free edge in postbuckling. The objectives of the second project are to analyze the concentration of interacting loads at the stiffener intersection and to study the pillowing of the skin.

  13. Compression strength of composite primary structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    The linear elastic response is determined for an internally pressurized, long circular cylindrical shell stiffened on the inside by a regular arrangement of identical stringers and identical rings. Periodicity of this configuration permits the analysis of a portion of the shell wall centered over a generic stringer-ring joint; i.e., a unit cell model. The stiffeners are modeled as discrete beams, and the stringer is assumed to have a symmetrical cross section and the ring an asymmetrical section. Asymmetery causes out-of-plane bending and torsion of the ring. Displacements are assumed as truncated double Fourier series plus simple terms in the axial coordinate to account for the closed and pressure vessel effect (a non-periodic effect). The interacting line loads between the stiffeners and the inside shell wall are Lagrange multipliers in the formulation, and they are also assumed as truncated Fourier series. Displacement continuity constraints between the stiffeners and shell along the contact lines are satisfied point-wise. Equilibrium is imposed by the principle of virtual work. A composite material crown panel from the fuselage of a large transport aircraft is the numerical example. The distributions of the interacting line loads, and the out-of-plane bending moment and torque in the ring, are strongly dependent on modeling the deformations due to transverse shear and cross-sectional warping of the ring in torsion. This paper contains the results from the semiannual report on research on 'Pressure Pillowing of an Orthogonally Stiffened Cylindrical Shell'. The results of the new work are illustrated in the included appendix.

  14. Dynamic strength of reaction-sintered boron carbide ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savinykh, A. S.; Garkushin, G. V.; Razorenov, S. V.; Rumyantsev, V. I.

    2015-06-01

    The shock compression wave profiles in three modifications of boron carbide ceramic are studied in the compressive stress range 3-19 GPa. The Hugoniot elastic limit and the spall strength of the materials are determined. It is confirmed that the spall strength of high-hardness ceramic changes nonmonotonically with the compressive stress in a shock wave.

  15. Video Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Optivision developed two PC-compatible boards and associated software under a Goddard Space Flight Center Small Business Innovation Research grant for NASA applications in areas such as telerobotics, telesciences and spaceborne experimentation. From this technology, the company used its own funds to develop commercial products, the OPTIVideo MPEG Encoder and Decoder, which are used for realtime video compression and decompression. They are used in commercial applications including interactive video databases and video transmission. The encoder converts video source material to a compressed digital form that can be stored or transmitted, and the decoder decompresses bit streams to provide high quality playback.

  16. Compressed Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Erlich, Yaniv; Gordon, Assaf; Brand, Michael; Hannon, Gregory J.; Mitra, Partha P.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past three decades we have steadily increased our knowledge on the genetic basis of many severe disorders. Nevertheless, there are still great challenges in applying this knowledge routinely in the clinic, mainly due to the relatively tedious and expensive process of genotyping. Since the genetic variations that underlie the disorders are relatively rare in the population, they can be thought of as a sparse signal. Using methods and ideas from compressed sensing and group testing, we have developed a cost-effective genotyping protocol to detect carriers for severe genetic disorders. In particular, we have adapted our scheme to a recently developed class of high throughput DNA sequencing technologies. The mathematical framework presented here has some important distinctions from the ’traditional’ compressed sensing and group testing frameworks in order to address biological and technical constraints of our setting. PMID:21451737

  17. Dynamic Strength of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabildas, Lalit

    2011-06-01

    Historically when shock loading techniques became accessible in the early fifties it was assumed that materials behave like fluids implying that materials cannot support any shear stresses. Early and careful investigation in the sixties by G. R. Fowles in aluminum indicated otherwise. When he compared his Hugoniot compression measurements to hydrostatic pressure compression measurements in the pressure volume plane he noticed that the shock data lay above the hydrostatic compression curve - which laid the ground work for what is the basis for elastic-plastic theories that exist today. In this talk, a brief historical perspective on strength measurements in materials will be discussed including how time-resolved techniques have played a role in allowing estimates of the strength of materials at over Mbar stress. This is crucial especially at high stresses since we are determining values that are small compared to the loading stress. Even though we have made considerable progress in our understanding of materials, there are still many anomalies and unanswered questions. Some of these anomalies are fertile grounds for further and future research and will be mentioned.

  18. IMPACT STRENGTH OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bless, S.; Tolman, J.

    2009-12-28

    Strength of glass and glass ceramic was measured with a bar impact technique. High-speed movies show regions of tensile and compressive failure. The borosilicate glass had a compressive strength of at least 2.2 GPa, and the glass ceramic at least 4 GPa. However, the BSG was much stronger in tension than GC. In ballistic tests, the BSG was the superior armor.

  19. Impact Strength of Glass and Glass Ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bless, S.; Tolman, J.

    2009-12-01

    Strength of glass and glass ceramic was measured with a bar impact technique. High-speed movies show regions of tensile and compressive failure. The borosilicate glass had a compressive strength of at least 2.2 GPa, and the glass ceramic at least 4 GPa. However, the BSG was much stronger in tension than GC. In ballistic tests, the BSG was the superior armor.

  20. A study of compressibility and compactibility of directly compressible tableting materials containing tramadol hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Mužíková, Jitka; Kubíčková, Alena

    2016-09-01

    The paper evaluates and compares the compressibility and compactibility of directly compressible tableting materials for the preparation of hydrophilic gel matrix tablets containing tramadol hydrochloride and the coprocessed dry binders Prosolv® SMCC 90 and Disintequik™ MCC 25. The selected types of hypromellose are Methocel™ Premium K4M and Methocel™ Premium K100M in 30 and 50 % concentrations, the lubricant being magnesium stearate in a 1 % concentration. Compressibility is evaluated by means of the energy profile of compression process and compactibility by the tensile strength of tablets. The values of total energy of compression and plasticity were higher in the tableting materials containing Prosolv® SMCC 90 than in those containing Disintequik™ MCC 25. Tramadol slightly decreased the values of total energy of compression and plasticity. Tableting materials containing Prosolv® SMCC 90 yielded stronger tablets. Tramadol decreased the strength of tablets from both coprocessed dry binders.

  1. Compressive strain rate sensitivity of ballistic gelatin.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jiwoon; Subhash, Ghatu

    2010-02-10

    Gelatin is a popular tissue simulant used in biomedical applications. The uniaxial compressive stress-strain response of gelatin was determined at a range of strain rates. In the quasistatic regime, gelatin strength remained relatively constant. With increase in loading rate, the compressive strength increased from 3kPa at a strain rate of around 0.0013/s to 6MPa at a strain rate of around 3200/s. This dramatic increase in strength of gelatin at high rates is attributed to its shear-thickening behavior and is argued on the basis of hydrocluster formation mechanism and differences in internal energy dissipation mechanism under static and dynamic loading. PMID:19863960

  2. Shock-compression properties of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution, time-resolved shock compression measurements have been performed on high-strength monolithic ceramics to assess equation-of-state, phase transformation and flow properties. A substantial base of data has been obtained on a range of ceramics including aluminium nitride, aluminum oxide, boron carbide, silicon carbide, titanium diboride and zirconium dioxide. These data provide material response properties for nonlinear elastic compliance, pressure-induced phase transformation, shear strength and tensile fracture strength. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Strength Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.

    1981-01-01

    Postural deviations resulting from strength and flexibility imbalances include swayback, scoliosis, and rounded shoulders. Screening tests are one method for identifying strength problems. Tests for the evaluation of postural problems are described, and exercises are presented for the strengthening of muscles. (JN)

  4. Compression behavior of unidirectional fibrous composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, J. H.; Chamis, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    The longitudinal compression behavior of unidirectional fiber composites is investigated using a modified Celanese test method with thick and thin test specimens. The test data obtained are interpreted using the stress/strain curves from back-to-back strain gages, examination of fracture surfaces by scanning electron microscope, and predictive equations for distinct failure modes including fiber compression failure, Euler buckling, delamination, and flexure. The results show that the longitudinal compression fracture is induced by a combination of delamination, flexure, and fiber tier breaks. No distinct fracture surface characteristics can be associated with unique failure modes. An equation is described which can be used to extract the longitudinal compression strength knowing the longitudinal tensile and flexural strengths of the same composite system.

  5. Impact Strength of Glass and Glass Ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bless, Stephan; Tolman, John

    2009-06-01

    Bar impact tests, using the techniques described elsewhere in this symposium, were used to measure compressive and tensile strengths of borosilicate glass, soda lime glass, and glass ceramic. The glass ceramic was 25% crystalline spinel, furnished by Corning, Inc. There are two measures of compressive strength: the peak stress that can be transmitted in unconfined compression and the steady-state strength. For both glasses, these values were similar, being about 1.8 and 1.5 GPa, respectively. The glass ceramic was almost 50% stronger. Tensile failure in the glass and glass ceramic takes places via surface flaws, and thus tensile strength is an extrinsic---as opposed to intrinsic---property.

  6. Extracellular bone matrix exhibits hardening elastoplasticity and more than double cortical strength: Evidence from homogeneous compression of non-tapered single micron-sized pillars welded to a rigid substrate.

    PubMed

    Luczynski, Krzysztof W; Steiger-Thirsfeld, Andreas; Bernardi, Johannes; Eberhardsteiner, Josef; Hellmich, Christian

    2015-12-01

    We here report an improved experimental technique for the determination of Young׳s modulus and uniaxial strength of extracellular bone matrix at the single micrometer scale, giving direct access to the (homogeneous) deformation (or strain) states of the tested samples and to the corresponding mechanically recoverable energy, called potential or elastic energy. Therefore, a new protocol for Focused Ion Beam milling of prismatic non-tapered micropillars, and attaching them to a rigid substrate, was developed. Uniaxial strength turns out as at least twice that measured macroscopically, and respective ultimate stresses are preceded by hardening elastoplastic states, already at very low load levels. The unloading portion of quasi-static load-displacement curves revealed Young׳s modulus of 29GPa in bovine extracellular bone matrix. This value is impressively confirmed by the corresponding prediction of a multiscale mechanics model for bone, which has been comprehensively validated at various other observation scales, across tissues from the entire vertebrate animal kingdom.

  7. Strength nutrition.

    PubMed

    Volek, Jeff S

    2003-08-01

    Muscle strength is determined by muscle size and factors related to neural recruitment. Resistance training is a potent stimulus for increasing muscle size and strength. These increases are, to a large extent, influenced and mediated by changes in hormones that regulate important events during the recovery process following exercise. Provision of nutrients in the appropriate amounts and at the appropriate times is necessary to optimize the recovery process. This review discusses the results of research that has examined the potential for nutrition and dietary supplements to impact the acute response to resistance exercise and chronic adaptations to resistance training. To date, the most promising strategies to augment gains in muscle size and strength appear to be consumption of protein-carbohydrate calories before and after resistance exercise, and creatine supplementation.

  8. Compressive response of Kevlar/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, J.R.; Teply, J.L.

    1988-03-01

    A mathematical model is developed from the principle of minimum potential energy to determine the longitudinal compressive response of unidirectional fiber composites. A theoretical study based on this model is conducted to assess the influence of local fiber misalignment and the nonlinear shear deformation of the matrix. Numerical results are compared with experiments to verify this study; it appears that the predicted compressive response coincides well with experimental results. It is also shown that the compressive strength of Kevlar/epoxy is dominated by local shear failure. 12 references.

  9. Extracellular bone matrix exhibits hardening elastoplasticity and more than double cortical strength: Evidence from homogeneous compression of non-tapered single micron-sized pillars welded to a rigid substrate.

    PubMed

    Luczynski, Krzysztof W; Steiger-Thirsfeld, Andreas; Bernardi, Johannes; Eberhardsteiner, Josef; Hellmich, Christian

    2015-12-01

    We here report an improved experimental technique for the determination of Young׳s modulus and uniaxial strength of extracellular bone matrix at the single micrometer scale, giving direct access to the (homogeneous) deformation (or strain) states of the tested samples and to the corresponding mechanically recoverable energy, called potential or elastic energy. Therefore, a new protocol for Focused Ion Beam milling of prismatic non-tapered micropillars, and attaching them to a rigid substrate, was developed. Uniaxial strength turns out as at least twice that measured macroscopically, and respective ultimate stresses are preceded by hardening elastoplastic states, already at very low load levels. The unloading portion of quasi-static load-displacement curves revealed Young׳s modulus of 29GPa in bovine extracellular bone matrix. This value is impressively confirmed by the corresponding prediction of a multiscale mechanics model for bone, which has been comprehensively validated at various other observation scales, across tissues from the entire vertebrate animal kingdom. PMID:25842157

  10. Turbulence in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lecture notes for the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) Special Course on 'Turbulence in Compressible Flows' have been assembled in this report. The following topics were covered: Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers, Compressible Turbulent Free Shear Layers, Turbulent Combustion, DNS/LES and RANS Simulations of Compressible Turbulent Flows, and Case Studies of Applications of Turbulence Models in Aerospace.

  11. In-situ rock strength determination for blasting purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, D.K.; Jain, A.

    1994-12-31

    Compressive strength of rocks is often required by mining engineers and quarrying authorities for blasting operations. Uniaxial compressive strength of rocks can be predicted with reasonable accuracy with the help of point load strength tests which can be easily conducted at site by the field staff, simultaneously as the cores are recovered from drilling operations. A number of diametral point load tests and uniaxial compressive strength tests have been conducted on the specimens of different rock types under air dried, and saturated condition as well to study the effect of ground water saturation on strength. It has been observed that due to saturation uniaxial compressive strength and point load strength get reduced to a maximum of 32 and 29 percent respectively. It has also been observed that uniaxial strength is sixteen times the point load strength in air dried as well as saturated condition. However, this factor used for calculating uniaxial compressive strength may be reduced to a lower value for the safety of miners in field blasting operations.

  12. Environmental effects on the compressive properties - Thermosetting vs. thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haque, A.; Jeelani, S.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of moisture and temperature on the compressive properties of graphite/epoxy and APC-2 materials systems was investigated to assess the viability of using APC-2 instead of graphite/epoxy. Data obtained indicate that the moisture absorption rate of T-300/epoxy is higher than that of APC-2. Thick plate with smaller surface area absorbs less moisture than thin plate with larger surface area. The compressive strength and modulus of APC-2 are higher than those of T-300/epoxy composite, and APC-2 sustains higher compressive strength in the presence of moisture. The compressive strength and modulus decrease with the increase of temperature in the range of 23-100 C. The compression failure was in the form of delamination, interlaminar shear, and end brooming.

  13. Static compression of porous dust aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Akimasa; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Wada, Koji

    2013-07-01

    To understand the structure evolution of dust aggregates is a key in the planetesimal formation. Dust grains become fluffy by coagulation in protoplanetary disks. However, once they become fluffy, they are not sufficiently compressed by collisional compression to form compact planetesimals (Okuzumi et al. 2012, ApJ, 752, 106). Thus, some other compression mechanisms are required to form planetesimals. We investigate the static compression of highly porous aggregates. First, we derive the compressive strength by numerical N-body simulations (Kataoka et al. 2013, A&A, 554, 4). Then, we apply the strength to protoplanetary disks, supposing that the highly porous aggregates can be quiasi-statically compressed by ram pressure of the disk gas and the self gravity. As a result, we find the pathway of the dust structure evolution from dust grains via fluffy aggregates to compact planetesimals. Moreover, we find that the fluffy aggregates overcome the barriers in planetesimal formation, which are radial drift, fragmentation, and bouncing barriers. (The paper is now available on arXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/1307.7984 )

  14. Mechanical strength and stability of lithium aluminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimhall, J. L.

    1992-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) investigated the strength and resistance to thermal shock of lithium aluminate annular pellets. The room temperature, axial compressive fracture strength of pellets made at Westinghouse Advanced Energy Systems (WAES) varied from 80 to 133 ksi. The strength at 430 C (806 F) was to 30 to 40 percent lower. The strength at 900 C (1652 F) showed a wide variation with one measurement near 90 ksi. These strength values are consistent with other data and predictions made in the literature when the grain size and porosity of the microstructure are taken into account. In diametral compression tests, the fracture strengths were much lower due to the existence of tensile stresses in some pellet regions from this type of loading. However, the fracture stresses were still generally higher than those reported in the literature; this fracture resistance probably reflects the better quality of the pellets tested in this study. Measurements on pellets made at PNL indicated lower strengths compared to the WAES material. This strength difference could be accounted for by different processing technologies: material made at PNL was cold-pressed and sintered with high porosity whereas the WAES material was isostatically hot-pressed with high density. Thermal shocking of the material by ramping to 900 C in two minutes did not have an observable effect on the microstructure or the strength of any of the pellets.

  15. Interactive calculation procedures for mixed compression inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reshotko, Eli

    1983-01-01

    The proper design of engine nacelle installations for supersonic aircraft depends on a sophisticated understanding of the interactions between the boundary layers and the bounding external flows. The successful operation of mixed external-internal compression inlets depends significantly on the ability to closely control the operation of the internal compression portion of the inlet. This portion of the inlet is one where compression is achieved by multiple reflection of oblique shock waves and weak compression waves in a converging internal flow passage. However weak these shocks and waves may seem gas-dynamically, they are of sufficient strength to separate a laminar boundary layer and generally even strong enough for separation or incipient separation of the turbulent boundary layers. An understanding was developed of the viscous-inviscid interactions and of the shock wave boundary layer interactions and reflections.

  16. Microbunching and RF Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-05-23

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  17. Compressed gas manifold

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, Richard J.; Wozniak, John J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas storage cell interconnecting manifold including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and a port for connecting the compressed gas storage cells to a motor vehicle power source and to a refueling adapter. The manifold is mechanically and pneumatically connected to a compressed gas storage cell by a bolt including a gas passage therein.

  18. Compressible turbulent mixing: Effects of compressibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qionglin

    2016-04-01

    We studied by numerical simulations the effects of compressibility on passive scalar transport in stationary compressible turbulence. The turbulent Mach number varied from zero to unity. The difference in driven forcing was the magnitude ratio of compressive to solenoidal modes. In the inertial range, the scalar spectrum followed the k-5 /3 scaling and suffered negligible influence from the compressibility. The growth of the Mach number showed (1) a first reduction and second enhancement in the transfer of scalar flux; (2) an increase in the skewness and flatness of the scalar derivative and a decrease in the mixed skewness and flatness of the velocity-scalar derivatives; (3) a first stronger and second weaker intermittency of scalar relative to that of velocity; and (4) an increase in the intermittency parameter which measures the intermittency of scalar in the dissipative range. Furthermore, the growth of the compressive mode of forcing indicated (1) a decrease in the intermittency parameter and (2) less efficiency in enhancing scalar mixing. The visualization of scalar dissipation showed that, in the solenoidal-forced flow, the field was filled with the small-scale, highly convoluted structures, while in the compressive-forced flow, the field was exhibited as the regions dominated by the large-scale motions of rarefaction and compression.

  19. Micromechanics of compression failures in open hole composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, E. Gail; Bradley, Walter L.

    1987-01-01

    The high strength-to-weight ratio of composite materials is ideally suited for aerospace applications where they already are used in commercial and military aircraft secondary structures and will soon be used for heavily loaded primary structures. One area impeding the widespread application of composites is their inherent weakness in compressive strength when compared to the tensile properties of the same material. Furthermore, these airframe designs typically contain many bolted or riveted joints, as well as electrical and hydraulic control lines. These applications produce areas of stress concentration, and thus, further complicate the compression failure problem. Open hole compression failures which represent a typical failure mode for composite materials are addressed.

  20. Estimating Rock Strength Parameters from Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) Grinds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, B. J.; Bridges, N. T.; Cohen, J.; Hurowitz, J.; Lennon, A.

    2011-03-01

    We have developed an empirical correlation between rock abrasion tool (RAT) grind energy and compressive strength. This correlation can be used to infer the physical properties of rocks ground by the MER rovers on Mars.

  1. Strength prediction of fly ash concretes by accelerated testing

    SciTech Connect

    Tokyay, M.

    1999-11-01

    Relationships between standard compressive strength at 7, 28, and 90 days and early strength attained by (1) autogeneous curing, (2) warm water curing, and (3) boiling water curing were obtained and a regression expression to predict the strength of concretes containing high-lime and low-lime fly ashes as partial cement replacement are proposed. The control concretes were designed for 28-day characteristic compressive strengths, f{sub ck28} = 40, 60, 65, and 70 MPa. All concretes were proportioned to keep the slump at 80--100 mm. The curing methods used were in accordance with the relevant ASTM and Turkish standards.

  2. Compression failure of angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peel, Larry D.; Hyer, Michael W.; Shuart, Mark J.

    1991-01-01

    The present work deals with modes and mechanisms of failure in compression of angle-ply laminates. Experimental results were obtained from 42 angle-ply IM7/8551-7a specimens with a lay-up of ((plus or minus theta)/(plus or minus theta)) sub 6s where theta, the off-axis angle, ranged from 0 degrees to 90 degrees. The results showed four failure modes, these modes being a function of off-axis angle. Failure modes include fiber compression, inplane transverse tension, inplane shear, and inplane transverse compression. Excessive interlaminar shear strain was also considered as an important mode of failure. At low off-axis angles, experimentally observed values were considerably lower than published strengths. It was determined that laminate imperfections in the form of layer waviness could be a major factor in reducing compression strength. Previously developed linear buckling and geometrically nonlinear theories were used, with modifications and enhancements, to examine the influence of layer waviness on compression response. The wavy layer is described by a wave amplitude and a wave length. Linear elastic stress-strain response is assumed. The geometrically nonlinear theory, in conjunction with the maximum stress failure criterion, was used to predict compression failure and failure modes for the angle-ply laminates. A range of wave length and amplitudes were used. It was found that for 0 less than or equal to theta less than or equal to 15 degrees failure was most likely due to fiber compression. For 15 degrees less than theta less than or equal to 35 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane transverse tension. For 35 degrees less than theta less than or equal to 70 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane shear. For theta less than 70 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane transverse compression. The fiber compression and transverse tension failure modes depended more heavily on wave length than on wave amplitude. Thus using a single

  3. Compressive failure of fiber composites under multi-axial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Shiladitya; Waas, Anthony M.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    2006-03-01

    This paper examines the compressive strength of a fiber reinforced lamina under multi-axial stress states. An equilibrium analysis is carried out in which a kinked band of rotated fibers, described by two angles, is sandwiched between two regions in which the fibers are nominally straight. Proportional multi-axial stress states are examined. The analysis includes the possibility of bifurcation from the current equilibrium state. The compressive strength of the lamina is contingent upon either attaining a load maximum in the equilibrium response or satisfaction of a bifurcation condition, whichever occurs first. The results show that for uniaxial loading a non-zero kink band angle β produces the minimum limit load. For multi-axial loading, different proportional loading paths show regimes of bifurcation dominated and limit load dominated behavior. The present results are able to capture the beneficial effect of transverse compression in raising the composite compressive strength as observed in experiments.

  4. Compression failure mechanisms of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.; Sohi, M.; Moon, S.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study was conducted to delineate the compression failure mechanisms of composite structures. The present report summarizes further results on kink band formation in unidirectional composites. In order to assess the compressive strengths and failure modes of fibers them selves, a fiber bundle was embedded in epoxy casting and tested in compression. A total of six different fibers were used together with two resins of different stiffnesses. The failure of highly anisotropic fibers such as Kevlar 49 and P-75 graphite was due to kinking of fibrils. However, the remaining fibers--T300 and T700 graphite, E-glass, and alumina--failed by localized microbuckling. Compressive strengths of the latter group of fibers were not fully utilized in their respective composite. In addition, acoustic emission monitoring revealed that fiber-matrix debonding did not occur gradually but suddenly at final failure. The kink band formation in unidirectional composites under compression was studied analytically and through microscopy. The material combinations selected include seven graphite/epoxy composites, two graphite/thermoplastic resin composites, one Kevlar 49/epoxy composite and one S-glass/epoxy composite.

  5. Rate dependent of strength in metallic glasses at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y W; Bian, X L; Wu, S W; Hussain, I; Jia, Y D; Yi, J; Wang, G

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between the strength at the macroscale and the elastic deformation as well as shear cracking behavior at the microscale of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is investigated. The temperatures of 298 K and 77 K as well as the strain rate ranging from 10(-6) s(-1) to 10(-2) s(-1) are applied to the BMGs, in which the mechanical responses of the BMGs are profiled through the compression tests. The yield strength is associated with the activation of the elementary deformation unit, which is insensitive to the strain rate. The maximum compressive strength is linked to the crack propagation during shear fracture process, which is influenced by the strain rate. The cryogenic temperature of 77 K significantly improves the yield strength and the maximum compressive strength of the BMGs. PMID:27270688

  6. Rate dependent of strength in metallic glasses at different temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y. W.; Bian, X. L.; Wu, S. W.; Hussain, I.; Jia, Y. D.; Yi, J.; Wang, G.

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between the strength at the macroscale and the elastic deformation as well as shear cracking behavior at the microscale of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is investigated. The temperatures of 298 K and 77 K as well as the strain rate ranging from 10−6 s−1 to 10−2 s−1 are applied to the BMGs, in which the mechanical responses of the BMGs are profiled through the compression tests. The yield strength is associated with the activation of the elementary deformation unit, which is insensitive to the strain rate. The maximum compressive strength is linked to the crack propagation during shear fracture process, which is influenced by the strain rate. The cryogenic temperature of 77 K significantly improves the yield strength and the maximum compressive strength of the BMGs. PMID:27270688

  7. Uniaxial compression test series on Bullfrog Tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R H; Jones, A K; Nimick, K G

    1982-04-01

    Nineteen uniaxial compressive experiments were performed on samples of the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff, obtained from drillhole USW-G1 at Yucca Mountain on the Nevada Test Site. The water saturated samples were deformed at a nominal strain rate of 10{sup -5} sec{sup -1}, atmospheric pressure and room temperature. Resultant unconfined compressive strengths, axial strains to failure, Young`s moduli and Poisson`s ratios ranged from 4.63 to 153. MPa, .0028 to .0058, 2.03 to 28.9 GPa and .08 to .16, respectively.

  8. Parallel image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reif, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A parallel compression algorithm for the 16,384 processor MPP machine was developed. The serial version of the algorithm can be viewed as a combination of on-line dynamic lossless test compression techniques (which employ simple learning strategies) and vector quantization. These concepts are described. How these concepts are combined to form a new strategy for performing dynamic on-line lossy compression is discussed. Finally, the implementation of this algorithm in a massively parallel fashion on the MPP is discussed.

  9. Sequential neural text compression.

    PubMed

    Schmidhuber, J; Heil, S

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show that neural networks may be promising tools for data compression without loss of information. We combine predictive neural nets and statistical coding techniques to compress text files. We apply our methods to certain short newspaper articles and obtain compression ratios exceeding those of the widely used Lempel-Ziv algorithms (which build the basis of the UNIX functions "compress" and "gzip"). The main disadvantage of our methods is that they are about three orders of magnitude slower than standard methods.

  10. Effects of Nesting on Compression-Loaded 2-D Woven Textile Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Daniel OHare; Breiling, Kurtis B.; Verhulst, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Layer nesting was investigated in five harness satin weave textile composite laminates under static compression loading. Two carbon/epoxy material systems, AS4/3501-6 and IM7/8551-7A were considered. Laminates were fabricated with three idealized nesting cases: stacked, split-span and diagonal. Similar compression strength reductions due to the effects of idealized nesting were identified for each material. The diagonal nesting geometry produced the largest reduction in static strength when compared to the compression strength of a conventional textile composite. All three nesting cases produced reductions in strength and ultimate strain due to the effects of idealized nesting. Finite element results showed consistent strength reduction trends for the idealized nesting cases, however the magnitudes of compressive strengths were overpredicted.

  11. 49 CFR 238.405 - Longitudinal static compressive strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... crash refuge for crewmembers occupying the cab of a power car, the underframe of the cab of a power car... volumes of a power car or a trailer car designed to crush as part of the crash energy management...

  12. 49 CFR 238.405 - Longitudinal static compressive strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... crash refuge for crewmembers occupying the cab of a power car, the underframe of the cab of a power car... volumes of a power car or a trailer car designed to crush as part of the crash energy management...

  13. 49 CFR 238.405 - Longitudinal static compressive strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... crash refuge for crewmembers occupying the cab of a power car, the underframe of the cab of a power car... volumes of a power car or a trailer car designed to crush as part of the crash energy management...

  14. 49 CFR 238.405 - Longitudinal static compressive strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... crash refuge for crewmembers occupying the cab of a power car, the underframe of the cab of a power car... volumes of a power car or a trailer car designed to crush as part of the crash energy management...

  15. 49 CFR 238.405 - Longitudinal static compressive strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... crash refuge for crewmembers occupying the cab of a power car, the underframe of the cab of a power car... volumes of a power car or a trailer car designed to crush as part of the crash energy management design...) The underframe of the occupied volume of each trailer car shall resist a minimum longitudinal...

  16. The compressive strength of wheat endosperm: Analysis of endosperm 'bricks'.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The material properties of wheat grain endosperm are central to its processing and end-use quality. The preparation of geometrically-defined endosperm specimens free of bran, germ, and pigment strand can facilitate the objective study of endosperm material properties. This study was conducted to c...

  17. Chemically induced strength changes in sandstone. Report of Investigations/1993

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, W.P.; Dolinar, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical alteration of the compressive strength of sandstone has been investigated by the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM). Successful development of this technology would offer an attractive alternative to the methods now used for stress control in mines. Sandstone cores were stressed to failure under uniaxial compression at two different strain rates. Specimens saturated with either distilled or tap water showed an average 14% reduction in stress at failure compared with those dried in vacuum. Samples saturated with dilute solutions of aluminum chloride, hydrochloric acid, and polyethylene oxide showed no statistically significant difference in failure stress compared with those saturated with water. By contrast, compressive strength of the cores was increased some 7% by saturation with the nonpolar solvent carbon tetrachloride. No correlation was found between zeta potential and compressive strength.

  18. Onset of plasticity in gold nanopillar compression.

    PubMed

    Rabkin, Eugen; Srolovitz, David J

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of a series of molecular dynamics simulations of the compressive deformation of <111>-oriented gold nanopillars, we demonstrate that slip nucleates at surface features for which the amplitude of thermal vibrations is a maximum. This leads to a yield stress which can be either a linear or parabolic function of temperature, depending on the strength with which atoms are bound to the surface. Changing the surface structure by removing weakly bound atoms produces a striking rise in yield strength and a change in its temperature dependence. PMID:17212447

  19. Compression Ratio Adjuster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akkerman, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    New mechanism alters compression ratio of internal-combustion engine according to load so that engine operates at top fuel efficiency. Ordinary gasoline, diesel and gas engines with their fixed compression ratios are inefficient at partial load and at low-speed full load. Mechanism ensures engines operate as efficiently under these conditions as they do at highload and high speed.

  20. Notched Strength Allowables and Inplane Shear Strength of AS4/VRM-34 Textile Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenoble, Ray W.; Johnston, William M.

    2013-01-01

    Notched and unnotched strength allowables were developed for a textile composite to provide input data to analytical structural models based on the Pultruded Rod Stiffened Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept. Filled-hole tensile strength, filled-hole compressive strength, and inplane shear strength along stitch lines have been measured. The material system evaluated in this study is based on warp-knitted preforms of AS4 carbon fibers and VRM-34 epoxy resin, which have been processed via resin infusion and oven curing. All specimens were tested in as-fabricated (dry) condition. Filled-hole strengths were evaluated with and without through-thickness stitching. The effects of scaling on filled-hole tensile strength were evaluated by testing specimens in two widths, but with identical width / hole-diameter ratios. Inplane shear specimens were stitched in two configurations, and two specimen thicknesses were tested for each stitch configuration.

  1. Fractal image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnsley, Michael F.; Sloan, Alan D.

    1989-01-01

    Fractals are geometric or data structures which do not simplify under magnification. Fractal Image Compression is a technique which associates a fractal to an image. On the one hand, the fractal can be described in terms of a few succinct rules, while on the other, the fractal contains much or all of the image information. Since the rules are described with less bits of data than the image, compression results. Data compression with fractals is an approach to reach high compression ratios for large data streams related to images. The high compression ratios are attained at a cost of large amounts of computation. Both lossless and lossy modes are supported by the technique. The technique is stable in that small errors in codes lead to small errors in image data. Applications to the NASA mission are discussed.

  2. Strength of Shocked Aluminum Oxynitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Feng, R.; Dandekar, D. P.

    2009-06-01

    Aluminum oxynitride (AlON) is a polycrystalline and transparent ceramic. An accurate characterization of its shock response is critically important for its applications as transparent armor. Shock wave profiles measured in a series of plate impact experiments on AlON [Thornhill, et al., SCCM-2005, 143-146 (2006)] have been reanalyzed using finite element wave propagation simulations and considering an effective strength behavior that is pressure- and time-dependent. The results show a stiffer shock response than that calculated previously using the jump conditions. The material has a Hugoniot elastic limit of 10.37 GPa and sustains a maximum shear stress of 4.38 GPa for shock compressions up to a shock stress of 96 GPa. The mean stress response determined from the simulations displays no sign of phase transformation and corresponds to a linear shock speed-particle velocity relation with a slope of 0.857. These results have been successfully summarized into an AlON material model consisting of compression-dependent nonlinear elasticity, pressure-dependent equilibrium strength, and over-stress relaxation. The wave profiles simulated with the model show very good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  3. Application of Strength Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Robert U.; Dugan, Eric

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the various strength qualities (maximum strength, high- and low-load speed strength, reactive strength, rate of force development, and skill performance), noting why a training program design based on strength diagnosis can lead to greater efficacy and better performance gains for the athlete. Examples of tests used to assess strength…

  4. Analysis of compressive fracture in rock using statistical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, S.C.

    1994-12-01

    Fracture of rock in compression is analyzed using a field-theory model, and the processes of crack coalescence and fracture formation and the effect of grain-scale heterogeneities on macroscopic behavior of rock are studied. The model is based on observations of fracture in laboratory compression tests, and incorporates assumptions developed using fracture mechanics analysis of rock fracture. The model represents grains as discrete sites, and uses superposition of continuum and crack-interaction stresses to create cracks at these sites. The sites are also used to introduce local heterogeneity. Clusters of cracked sites can be analyzed using percolation theory. Stress-strain curves for simulated uniaxial tests were analyzed by studying the location of cracked sites, and partitioning of strain energy for selected intervals. Results show that the model implicitly predicts both development of shear-type fracture surfaces and a strength-vs-size relation that are similar to those observed for real rocks. Results of a parameter-sensitivity analysis indicate that heterogeneity in the local stresses, attributed to the shape and loading of individual grains, has a first-order effect on strength, and that increasing local stress heterogeneity lowers compressive strength following an inverse power law. Peak strength decreased with increasing lattice size and decreasing mean site strength, and was independent of site-strength distribution. A model for rock fracture based on a nearest-neighbor algorithm for stress redistribution is also presented and used to simulate laboratory compression tests, with promising results.

  5. High-strength mineralized collagen artificial bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Tao, Chun-Sheng; Cui, Helen; Wang, Chang-Ming; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2014-03-01

    Mineralized collagen (MC) is a biomimetic material that mimics natural bone matrix in terms of both chemical composition and microstructure. The biomimetic MC possesses good biocompatibility and osteogenic activity, and is capable of guiding bone regeneration as being used for bone defect repair. However, mechanical strength of existing MC artificial bone is too low to provide effective support at human load-bearing sites, so it can only be used for the repair at non-load-bearing sites, such as bone defect filling, bone graft augmentation, and so on. In the present study, a high strength MC artificial bone material was developed by using collagen as the template for the biomimetic mineralization of the calcium phosphate, and then followed by a cold compression molding process with a certain pressure. The appearance and density of the dense MC were similar to those of natural cortical bone, and the phase composition was in conformity with that of animal's cortical bone demonstrated by XRD. Mechanical properties were tested and results showed that the compressive strength was comparable to human cortical bone, while the compressive modulus was as low as human cancellous bone. Such high strength was able to provide effective mechanical support for bone defect repair at human load-bearing sites, and the low compressive modulus can help avoid stress shielding in the application of bone regeneration. Both in vitro cell experiments and in vivo implantation assay demonstrated good biocompatibility of the material, and in vivo stability evaluation indicated that this high-strength MC artificial bone could provide long-term effective mechanical support at human load-bearing sites.

  6. Modeling Compressed Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Israel, Daniel M.

    2012-07-13

    From ICE to ICF, the effect of mean compression or expansion is important for predicting the state of the turbulence. When developing combustion models, we would like to know the mix state of the reacting species. This involves density and concentration fluctuations. To date, research has focused on the effect of compression on the turbulent kinetic energy. The current work provides constraints to help development and calibration for models of species mixing effects in compressed turbulence. The Cambon, et al., re-scaling has been extended to buoyancy driven turbulence, including the fluctuating density, concentration, and temperature equations. The new scalings give us helpful constraints for developing and validating RANS turbulence models.

  7. Local compressibilities in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín Pendás, A.; Costales, Aurora; Blanco, M. A.; Recio, J. M.; Luaña, Víctor

    2000-12-01

    An application of the atoms in molecules theory to the partitioning of static thermodynamic properties in condensed systems is presented. Attention is focused on the definition and the behavior of atomic compressibilities. Inverses of bulk moduli are found to be simple weighted averages of atomic compressibilities. Two kinds of systems are investigated as examples: four related oxide spinels and the alkali halide family. Our analyses show that the puzzling constancy of the bulk moduli of these spinels is a consequence of the value of the compressibility of an oxide ion. A functional dependence between ionic bulk moduli and ionic volume is also proposed.

  8. Frictional work in double-sided tablet compression.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Ruiz, A; Wihervaara, M; Hakkinen, M; Juslin, M; Paronen, P

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the friction during double-sided tablet compression. Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and lactose were tabletted with a compaction simulator with symmetrical and asymmetrical double-sided sawtooth punch displacement profiles. The estimation of force transmission in a powder column was based on an exponential equation, including the material parameter consisting of both the friction coefficient and Poisson's ratio. This parameter was predetermined from a single-sided compression. A novel equation was derived from a previously presented equation for friction work in single-sided tablet compression. The basic assumption was drawn from the linearly decreasing movement of infinitely thin particle layers, which are produced as the compressing punch surface approaches the other punch. This calculation was also based on the assumption that the equilibrium point, where the particles do not move, is halfway between the punches in the symmetrical profile and at a distance proportional to the amplitudes of the asymmetrical upper and lower sawtooth profiles. The tensile strength of tablets compressed with single-double-sided profiles was identical, and thus the behavior of the materials studied under compression was independent of the compression profiles. The friction work values that were calculated with the proposed expression for double-sided profiles were close to the theoretical values, as estimated by calculations based on compressions with single-sided profiles. In conclusion, the novel mathematical expression opens new possibilities for the evaluation of friction in double-sided compression; for example, in rotary press tabletting. PMID:9109053

  9. Compressive Optical Image Encryption

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Sheng Li, Jiao; Yang Pan, Yang; Li, Rong

    2015-01-01

    An optical image encryption technique based on compressive sensing using fully optical means has been proposed. An object image is first encrypted to a white-sense stationary noise pattern using a double random phase encoding (DRPE) method in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Then, the encrypted image is highly compressed to a signal using single-pixel compressive holographic imaging in the optical domain. At the receiving terminal, the encrypted image is reconstructed well via compressive sensing theory, and the original image can be decrypted with three reconstructed holograms and the correct keys. The numerical simulations show that the method is effective and suitable for optical image security transmission in future all-optical networks because of the ability of completely optical implementation and substantially smaller hologram data volume. PMID:25992946

  10. Focus on Compression Stockings

    MedlinePlus

    ... sion apparel is used to prevent or control edema The post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) is a complication ( ... complication. abdomen. This swelling is referred to as edema. If you have edema, compression therapy may be ...

  11. Muon cooling: longitudinal compression.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yu; Antognini, Aldo; Bertl, Wilhelm; Hildebrandt, Malte; Khaw, Kim Siang; Kirch, Klaus; Papa, Angela; Petitjean, Claude; Piegsa, Florian M; Ritt, Stefan; Sedlak, Kamil; Stoykov, Alexey; Taqqu, David

    2014-06-01

    A 10  MeV/c positive muon beam was stopped in helium gas of a few mbar in a magnetic field of 5 T. The muon "swarm" has been efficiently compressed from a length of 16 cm down to a few mm along the magnetic field axis (longitudinal compression) using electrostatic fields. The simulation reproduces the low energy interactions of slow muons in helium gas. Phase space compression occurs on the order of microseconds, compatible with the muon lifetime of 2  μs. This paves the way for the preparation of a high-quality low-energy muon beam, with an increase in phase space density relative to a standard surface muon beam of 10^{7}. The achievable phase space compression by using only the longitudinal stage presented here is of the order of 10^{4}.

  12. Compressive Optical Image Encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Sheng Li, Jiao; Yang Pan, Yang; Li, Rong

    2015-05-01

    An optical image encryption technique based on compressive sensing using fully optical means has been proposed. An object image is first encrypted to a white-sense stationary noise pattern using a double random phase encoding (DRPE) method in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Then, the encrypted image is highly compressed to a signal using single-pixel compressive holographic imaging in the optical domain. At the receiving terminal, the encrypted image is reconstructed well via compressive sensing theory, and the original image can be decrypted with three reconstructed holograms and the correct keys. The numerical simulations show that the method is effective and suitable for optical image security transmission in future all-optical networks because of the ability of completely optical implementation and substantially smaller hologram data volume.

  13. Muon Cooling: Longitudinal Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yu; Antognini, Aldo; Bertl, Wilhelm; Hildebrandt, Malte; Khaw, Kim Siang; Kirch, Klaus; Papa, Angela; Petitjean, Claude; Piegsa, Florian M.; Ritt, Stefan; Sedlak, Kamil; Stoykov, Alexey; Taqqu, David

    2014-06-01

    A 10 MeV/c positive muon beam was stopped in helium gas of a few mbar in a magnetic field of 5 T. The muon "swarm" has been efficiently compressed from a length of 16 cm down to a few mm along the magnetic field axis (longitudinal compression) using electrostatic fields. The simulation reproduces the low energy interactions of slow muons in helium gas. Phase space compression occurs on the order of microseconds, compatible with the muon lifetime of 2 μs. This paves the way for the preparation of a high-quality low-energy muon beam, with an increase in phase space density relative to a standard surface muon beam of 107. The achievable phase space compression by using only the longitudinal stage presented here is of the order of 104.

  14. Compressible Astrophysics Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, L.; Singer, M.

    2007-07-18

    This is an astrophysics simulation code involving a radiation diffusion module developed at LLNL coupled to compressible hydrodynamics and adaptive mesh infrastructure developed at LBNL. One intended application is to neutrino diffusion in core collapse supernovae.

  15. High-strain-rate compression and fracture of B sub 4 C-aluminum cermets

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The compressive behavior of liquid-metal infiltrated boron carbide-aluminum cermets were studied as a function of strain rate, composition, and microstructure. Hopkinson split pressure bar (HSPB) and quasi-static compression tests were conducted using dumb-bell-shaped specimens. Results showed cermet compressive strength to be independent of loading rate. Strength was also found to be independent of the aluminum alloy used to infiltrate pre-sintered 65 vol % B{sub 4}C pre-forms. compositions with the smallest phase size displayed the best strength and ductility. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Fixture For Compression-After-Impact Tests Of Thin Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Hodge, Andrew J.; Lance, David G.

    1994-01-01

    Special fixture holds specimen of laminated composite material in 20-klb (89-kN) or larger load frame for compression-after-impact test. In preparation for test, specimen damaged by dropping weight on it at known kinetic energy. During test, specimen loaded in compression, and load measured, until specimen fails. Measurement data used to characterize compressive strength of specimen after impact important indicator of ability of structural components made of composite material to tolerate damage. Tests give more-realistic measures of tolerance to damage.

  17. Shock compression profiles in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Moody, R.L.

    1996-03-01

    An investigation of the shock compression properties of high-strength ceramics has been performed using controlled planar impact techniques. In a typical experimental configuration, a ceramic target disc is held stationary, and it is struck by plates of either a similar ceramic or by plates of a well-characterized metal. All tests were performed using either a single-stage propellant gun or a two-stage light-gas gun. Particle velocity histories were measured with laser velocity interferometry (VISAR) at the interface between the back of the target ceramic and a calibrated VISAR window material. Peak impact stresses achieved in these experiments range from about 3 to 70 GPa. Ceramics tested under shock impact loading include: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, AlN, B{sub 4}C, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, TiB{sub 2}, WC and ZrO{sub 2}. This report compiles the VISAR wave profiles and experimental impact parameters within a database-useful for response model development, computational model validation studies, and independent assessment of the physics of dynamic deformation on high-strength, brittle solids.

  18. Image compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1997-03-25

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace`s equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image. 16 figs.

  19. Image compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Chi-Yung; Petrich, Loren I.

    1997-01-01

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace's equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image.

  20. Alternative Compression Garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Lee, S. M. C.; Ribeiro, L. C.; Brown, A. K.; Westby, C. M.; Platts, S. H.

    2011-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance after spaceflight is still an issue for astronauts as no in-flight countermeasure has been 100% effective. Future anti-gravity suits (AGS) may be similar to the Shuttle era inflatable AGS or may be a mechanical compression device like the Russian Kentavr. We have evaluated the above garments as well as elastic, gradient compression garments of varying magnitude and determined that breast-high elastic compression garments may be a suitable replacement to the current AGS. This new garment should be more comfortable than the AGS, easy to don and doff, and as effective a countermeasure to orthostatic intolerance. Furthermore, these new compression garments could be worn for several days after space flight as necessary if symptoms persisted. We conducted two studies to evaluate elastic, gradient compression garments. The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the comfort and efficacy of an alternative compression garment (ACG) immediately after actual space flight and 6 degree head-down tilt bed rest as a model of space flight, and to determine if they would impact recovery if worn for up to three days after bed rest.

  1. Strength of composite laminates under biaxial loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinton, M. J.; Soden, P. D.; Kaddour, A. S.

    1996-05-01

    Five well known failure criteria and one simple progressive model have been used in conjunction with laminate theory, which allows for nonlinear lamina shear behaviour, to predict the initial and final failure strengths of filament wound composite tubes. The predictions have been compared with experimental leakage and fracture stresses for ±75°, ±55° and ±45° filament wound GRP tubes subjected to a wide range of biaxial stress systems including biaxial compression. In some cases the fracture strengths were a factor of 10 higher than the initial failure predictions. The simple progressive failure theory predictions gave the best agreement with the experimental results.

  2. Locking strength of Morse tapers used for modular segmental bone defect replacement prostheses.

    PubMed

    Duda, G N; Elias, J J; Valdevit, A; Chao, E Y

    1997-01-01

    Mechanical testing has been performed to characterize the locking strength of Morse taper locks used for reconstruction of large bone defects. Taper joint pairs were locked with a series of compressive loads increasing from 500 to 3500 N. Following each load application the taper locks were distracted with either an axial load or a torsional load. Additional tapers were loaded with 2 million cycles of axial compression or 2 million cycles of cantilever bending combined with axial compression, followed by axial distraction. The torsional and axial distraction loads increased linearly with the compressive load. Compared to a single compressive load application, cyclic axial loading had little influence on the joint strength, while a combination of axial loading and bending increased the joint strength. Based on these results, in vivo loading should increase the locking strength of Morse taper locks used for bone defect reconstruction.

  3. Strength development in concrete with wood ash blended cement and use of soft computing models to predict strength parameters

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, S.; Maniar, A.; Suganya, O.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Wood Ash (WA) prepared from the uncontrolled burning of the saw dust is evaluated for its suitability as partial cement replacement in conventional concrete. The saw dust has been acquired from a wood polishing unit. The physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of WA is presented and analyzed. The strength parameters (compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength) of concrete with blended WA cement are evaluated and studied. Two different water-to-binder ratio (0.4 and 0.45) and five different replacement percentages of WA (5%, 10%, 15%, 18% and 20%) including control specimens for both water-to-cement ratio is considered. Results of compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength showed that the strength properties of concrete mixture decreased marginally with increase in wood ash contents, but strength increased with later age. The XRD test results and chemical analysis of WA showed that it contains amorphous silica and thus can be used as cement replacing material. Through the analysis of results obtained in this study, it was concluded that WA could be blended with cement without adversely affecting the strength properties of concrete. Also using a new statistical theory of the Support Vector Machine (SVM), strength parameters were predicted by developing a suitable model and as a result, the application of soft computing in structural engineering has been successfully presented in this research paper. PMID:26644928

  4. Strength development in concrete with wood ash blended cement and use of soft computing models to predict strength parameters.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, S; Maniar, A; Suganya, O M

    2015-11-01

    In this study, Wood Ash (WA) prepared from the uncontrolled burning of the saw dust is evaluated for its suitability as partial cement replacement in conventional concrete. The saw dust has been acquired from a wood polishing unit. The physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of WA is presented and analyzed. The strength parameters (compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength) of concrete with blended WA cement are evaluated and studied. Two different water-to-binder ratio (0.4 and 0.45) and five different replacement percentages of WA (5%, 10%, 15%, 18% and 20%) including control specimens for both water-to-cement ratio is considered. Results of compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength showed that the strength properties of concrete mixture decreased marginally with increase in wood ash contents, but strength increased with later age. The XRD test results and chemical analysis of WA showed that it contains amorphous silica and thus can be used as cement replacing material. Through the analysis of results obtained in this study, it was concluded that WA could be blended with cement without adversely affecting the strength properties of concrete. Also using a new statistical theory of the Support Vector Machine (SVM), strength parameters were predicted by developing a suitable model and as a result, the application of soft computing in structural engineering has been successfully presented in this research paper.

  5. Strength development in concrete with wood ash blended cement and use of soft computing models to predict strength parameters.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, S; Maniar, A; Suganya, O M

    2015-11-01

    In this study, Wood Ash (WA) prepared from the uncontrolled burning of the saw dust is evaluated for its suitability as partial cement replacement in conventional concrete. The saw dust has been acquired from a wood polishing unit. The physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of WA is presented and analyzed. The strength parameters (compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength) of concrete with blended WA cement are evaluated and studied. Two different water-to-binder ratio (0.4 and 0.45) and five different replacement percentages of WA (5%, 10%, 15%, 18% and 20%) including control specimens for both water-to-cement ratio is considered. Results of compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength showed that the strength properties of concrete mixture decreased marginally with increase in wood ash contents, but strength increased with later age. The XRD test results and chemical analysis of WA showed that it contains amorphous silica and thus can be used as cement replacing material. Through the analysis of results obtained in this study, it was concluded that WA could be blended with cement without adversely affecting the strength properties of concrete. Also using a new statistical theory of the Support Vector Machine (SVM), strength parameters were predicted by developing a suitable model and as a result, the application of soft computing in structural engineering has been successfully presented in this research paper. PMID:26644928

  6. Tensile strength of dried gelcast green bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Nunn, S.D.; Omatete, O.O.; Walls, C.A.; Barker, D.L.

    1994-04-01

    Ceramic green bodies were prepared by three different techniques, dry pressing, slip casting, and gelcasting. The tensile strength of the green bodies was measured using a diametral compression test. It was found that the gelcast samples were from 2 to 20 times stronger than the conventionally formed green bodies. SEM examination of the gelcast samples revealed a homogeneous, brittle fracture surface indicating a very uniform distribution of the binder and excellent dispersion of the ceramic powder.

  7. A review of floc strength and breakage.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, P; Jefferson, B; Gregory, J; Parsons, S A

    2005-09-01

    The main focus of the paper is to review current understanding of floc structure and strength. This has been done by reviewing current theoretical understanding of floc growth and breakage and an analysis of different techniques used for measuring floc strength. An overview has also been made of the general trends seen in floc strength analysis. The rate of floc formation is a balance between breakage and aggregation with flocs eventually reaching a steady-state size for a given shear rate. The steady-state floc size for a particular shear rate can, therefore, be a good indicator of floc strength. This has resulted in the development of a range of techniques to measure floc size at different applied shear levels using a combination of one or more of the following tools: light scattering and transmission; microscopy; photography; video and image analysis software. Floc strength may be simply quantified using the initial floc size for a given shear rate and the floc strength factor. More complex techniques have used theoretical modelling to determine whether flocs break by large-scale fragmentation or smaller-scale surface erosion effects, although this interpretation is open to debate. Impeller-based mixing, ultrasound and vibrating columns have all been used to provide a uniform, accurate and controllable dissipation of energy onto a floc suspension to determine floc strength. Other more recent techniques have used sensitive micromanipulators to measure the force required to break or compress individual flocs, although these techniques have been limited to the measurement of only a few hundred flocs. General trends emerge showing that smaller flocs tend to have greater strength than larger flocs, whilst the use of polymer seems to give increased strength to only some types of floc. Finally, a comparison of the strength of different types of floc (activated sludge flocs, organic matter flocs, sweep flocs and charge neutralised flocs) has been made highlighting

  8. Measurements of the compressive behavior of AS4/3501-6 and IM7/8551-7 carbon/epoxy

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, S.R.; Colvin, G.E. Jr.; Haslam, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    The compressive strength of carbon/epoxy materials is of importance in design, and is typically somewhat lower than the strength in tension. The measurement of compressive strength has been subject to some uncertainty, as different experimental techniques can give somewhat different results. A new specimen for the determination of compressive strength has been developed, based on compression of a 38 mm (1.5 in) diameter tube. The tube has been designed to prevent overall structural buckling and also to minimize end effects. This and a larger tubular specimen have been utilized to determine the compressive strength of AS4/3501-6 and IM7/8551-7 carbon/epoxy prepregs. The results are compared with previous tests, indicating that the results are relatively independent of the test specimen. The comparison also supports a criterion for laminate failure prediction reported previously. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Strain-rate dependence of the compressive properties of normal and carbon-fiber-reinforced bone cement.

    PubMed

    Saha, S; Pal, S

    1983-11-01

    Normal and carbon-fiber-reinforced (1 wt. %) bone cement samples were tested in compression at various strain rates. Both the compressive strength and proportional limit increased in general with increasing strain rate. Similar strain-rate sensitivity was also shown by the carbon-fiber-reinforced bone cement. The mechanical properties, namely the modulus of elasticity, the proportional limit, and the compressive strength of the carbon-fiber-reinforced bone cement showed highly significant positive correlations with the strain rate. PMID:6654926

  10. Compressive Properties of Metal Matrix Syntactic Foams in Free and Constrained Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orbulov, Imre Norbert; Májlinger, Kornél

    2014-06-01

    Metal matrix syntactic foam (MMSF) blocks were produced by an inert gas-assisted pressure infiltration technique. MMSFs are advanced hollow sphere reinforced-composite materials having promising application in the fields of aviation, transport, and automotive engineering, as well as in civil engineering. The produced blocks were investigated in free and constrained compression modes, and besides the characteristic mechanical properties, their deformation mechanisms and failure modes were studied. In the tests, the chemical composition of the matrix material, the size of the reinforcing ceramic hollow spheres, the applied heat treatment, and the compression mode were considered as investigation parameters. The monitored mechanical properties were the compressive strength, the fracture strain, the structural stiffness, the fracture energy, and the overall absorbed energy. These characteristics were strongly influenced by the test parameters. By the proper selection of the matrix and the reinforcement and by proper design, the mechanical properties of the MMSFs can be effectively tailored for specific and given applications.

  11. The out-of-plane compressive response of Dyneema® composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attwood, J. P.; Khaderi, S. N.; Karthikeyan, K.; Fleck, N. A.; O'Masta, M. R.; Wadley, H. N. G.; Deshpande, V. S.

    2014-10-01

    Out-of-plane compression tests were conducted on six grades of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene fibre composites (Dyneema®) with varying grades of fibre and matrix, ply thickness, and ply stacking sequence. The composites with a [0°/90°] lay-up had an out-of-plane compressive strength that was dictated by in-plane tensile fibre fracture. By contrast, the out-of-plane compressive strength of the uni-directional composites was significantly lower and was not associated with fibre fracture. The peak strength of the [0°/90°] composites increased with increasing in-plane specimen dimensions and was dependent on the matrix and fibre strength as well as on the ply thickness. A combination of micro X-ray tomography and local pressure measurements revealed the existence of a shear-lag zone at the periphery of the specimens. Finite element (FE) and analytical micromechanical models predict the compressive composite response and reveal that the out-of-plane compression generates tensile stresses along the fibres due to shear-lag loading between the alternating 0° and 90° plies. Moreover, the compressive strength data suggests that the shear strength of Dyneema® is pressure sensitive, and this pressure sensitivity is quantified by comparing predictions with experimental measurements of the out-of-plane compressive strength. Both the FE and analytical models accurately predict the sensitivity of the compressive response of Dyneema® to material and geometric parameters: matrix strength, fibre strength and ply thickness.

  12. Increasing the Strength of Aluminum-alloy Columns by Prestressing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, M; Hartman, E C

    1937-01-01

    A series of tests was made in which the column strength of 17ST tubing was increased as much as 50 percent by prestressing the tubing to 40,000 pounds per square inch in compression under conditions of support that prevented column failure at this stress. This prestressing achieves it's beneficial effects entirely by improving the compressive properties of the material, principally the proportional limit.

  13. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, S T Samuel; Buckley, C Paul; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon. PMID:26833218

  14. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, S T Samuel; Buckley, C Paul; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon.

  15. Compression Testing of Textile Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, John E.

    1996-01-01

    The applicability of existing test methods, which were developed primarily for laminates made of unidirectional prepreg tape, to textile composites is an area of concern. The issue is whether the values measured for the 2-D and 3-D braided, woven, stitched, and knit materials are accurate representations of the true material response. This report provides a review of efforts to establish a compression test method for textile reinforced composite materials. Experimental data have been gathered from several sources and evaluated to assess the effectiveness of a variety of test methods. The effectiveness of the individual test methods to measure the material's modulus and strength is determined. Data are presented for 2-D triaxial braided, 3-D woven, and stitched graphite/epoxy material. However, the determination of a recommended test method and specimen dimensions is based, primarily, on experimental results obtained by the Boeing Defense and Space Group for 2-D triaxially braided materials. They evaluated seven test methods: NASA Short Block, Modified IITRI, Boeing Open Hole Compression, Zabora Compression, Boeing Compression after Impact, NASA ST-4, and a Sandwich Column Test.

  16. The Strength of Shell and Tubular Spar Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebner, H

    1940-01-01

    The report is a survey of the strength problems arising on shell and tubular spar wings. The treatment of the shell wing strength is primarily confined to those questions which concern the shell wing only; those pertaining to both shell wing and shell body together have already been treated in TM 838. The discussion of stress condition and compressive strength of shell wings and tubular spar wings is prefaced by several considerations concerning the spar and shell design of metal wings from the point of view of strength.

  17. The compressible mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandromme, Dany; Haminh, Hieu

    1991-01-01

    The capability of turbulence modeling correctly to handle natural unsteadiness appearing in compressible turbulent flows is investigated. Physical aspects linked to the unsteadiness problem and the role of various flow parameters are analyzed. It is found that unsteady turbulent flows can be simulated by dividing these motions into an 'organized' part for which equations of motion are solved and a remaining 'incoherent' part represented by a turbulence model. Two-equation turbulence models and second-order turbulence models can yield reasonable results. For specific compressible unsteady turbulent flow, graphic presentations of different quantities may reveal complementary physical features. Strong compression zones are observed in rapid flow parts but shocklets do not yet occur.

  18. Isentropic Compression of Argon

    SciTech Connect

    H. Oona; J.C. Solem; L.R. Veeser, C.A. Ekdahl; P.J. Rodriquez; S.M. Younger; W. Lewis; W.D. Turley

    1997-08-01

    We are studying the transition of argon from an insulator to a conductor by compressing the frozen gas isentropically to pressures at which neighboring atomic orbitals overlap sufficiently to allow some electron motion between atoms. Argon and the other rare gases have closed electron shells and therefore remain montomic, even when they solidify. Their simple structure makes it likely that any measured change in conductivity is due to changes in the atomic structure, not in molecular configuration. As the crystal is compressed the band gap closes, allowing increased conductivity. We have begun research to determine the conductivity at high pressures, and it is our intention to determine the compression at which the crystal becomes a metal.

  19. Tension/compression asymmetry in creep behavior of a Ni-based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Kakehi, K.

    1999-08-06

    Orientation and temperature dependence of yield stress or CRSS (Critical Resolved Shear Stress) and tension/compression anisotropy of the yield stress of CRSS have been shown by Shah and Duhl, Heredia and Pope, and Miner et al. Tension/compression asymmetry in the yield strength of Ni-based superalloys has been explained in terms of the core width effect. Shah and Duhl observed the tension/compression asymmetry in creep deformation, which is similar to that observed in the yield strength, and indicated that it can be attributed to cross slip and dislocation core-constriction mechanisms associated with octahedral slip. However, little is known about the mechanism of tension/compression asymmetry in creep. In the present study, single crystals of a Ni-base superalloy were subjected to tensile and compressive creep tests. Tension/compression asymmetry in creep behavior was examined in detail for each orientation.

  20. Compressive Shift Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlsson, Henrik; Eldar, Yonina C.; Yang, Allen Y.; Sastry, S. Shankar

    2014-08-01

    The classical shift retrieval problem considers two signals in vector form that are related by a shift. The problem is of great importance in many applications and is typically solved by maximizing the cross-correlation between the two signals. Inspired by compressive sensing, in this paper, we seek to estimate the shift directly from compressed signals. We show that under certain conditions, the shift can be recovered using fewer samples and less computation compared to the classical setup. Of particular interest is shift estimation from Fourier coefficients. We show that under rather mild conditions only one Fourier coefficient suffices to recover the true shift.

  1. Isentropic compression of argon

    SciTech Connect

    Veeser, L.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Oona, H.

    1997-06-01

    The compression was done in an MC-1 flux compression (explosive) generator, in order to study the transition from an insulator to a conductor. Since conductivity signals were observed in all the experiments (except when the probe is removed), both the Teflon and the argon are becoming conductive. The conductivity could not be determined (Teflon insulation properties unknown), but it could be bounded as being {sigma}=1/{rho}{le}8({Omega}cm){sub -1}, because when the Teflon breaks down, the dielectric constant is reduced. The Teflon insulator problem remains, and other ways to better insulate the probe or to measure the conductivity without a probe is being sought.

  2. Flexibility and Muscular Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell

    1988-01-01

    This definition of flexibility and muscular strength also explores their roles in overall physical fitness and focuses on how increased flexibility and muscular strength can help decrease or eliminate lower back pain. (CB)

  3. PROPOSED PREDICTIVE EQUATION FOR DIAGONAL COMPRESSIVE CAPACITY OF REINFORCED CONCRETE BEAMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantipidok, Patarapol; Kobayashi, Chikaharu; Matsumoto, Koji; Watanabe, Ken; Niwa, Junichiro

    The current standard specifications of JSCE fo r the diagonal compressive capacity of RC beams only consider the effect of the compressive strength of conc rete and are not applicable to high strength concrete. This research aims to investigate the effect of vari ous parameters on the diagonal compressive capacity and propose a predictive equation. Twenty five I-beams were tested by three-point bending. The verification of the effects of concrete strength, stirrup ratio and spacing, shear span to effective depth ratio, flange width to web width ratio and effective depth was performed. The diagonal compressive capacity had a linear relationship to stirrup spacing regardless of its diameter. The effect of spacing became more significant with higher concrete strength. Thus, the effect of concrete strength and stirrup spacing was interrelated. On the other hand, there were slight effects of the other parameters on the diagonal compressive capacity. Finally, a simple empirical equation for predicting the diagonal compressive capacity of RC beams was proposed. The proposed equation had an adequate simplicity and can provide an accurate estimation of the diagonal compressive capacity than the existing equations.

  4. Failure analysis of composite laminates including biaxial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Elliott, W. G.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes a continued effort on the development and application of the tensor polynomial failure criterion for composite laminate analysis. In particular, emphasis is given to the design, construction and testing of a cross-beam laminate configuration to obtain "pure' biaxial compression failure. The purpose of this test case was to provide to permit "closure' of the cubic form of the failure surface in the 1-2 compression-compression quadrant. This resulted in a revised set of interaction strength parameters and the construction of a failure surface which can be used with confidence for strength predictions, assuming a plane stress state exists. Furthermore, the problem of complex conjugate roots which can occur in some failure regions is addressed and an "engineering' interpretation is provided. Results are presented illustrating this behavior and the methodology for overcoming this problem is discussed.

  5. What Is a Strength?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolin, Sybil

    2003-01-01

    As the strength-based perspective gains recognition, it is important to describe what constitutes strengths and to develop a specific vocabulary to name them. This article draws on resilience research to help identify specific competencies and areas of strengths in youth. (Contains 1 table.)

  6. Strength Training for Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connaughton, Daniel; Connaughton, Angela; Poor, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Strength training can be fun, safe, and appropriate for young girls and women and is an important component of any fitness program when combined with appropriate cardiovascular and flexibility activities. Concerns and misconceptions regarding girls' strength training are discussed, presenting general principles of strength training for children…

  7. Nonlinear Frequency Compression

    PubMed Central

    Scollie, Susan; Glista, Danielle; Seelisch, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Frequency lowering technologies offer an alternative amplification solution for severe to profound high frequency hearing losses. While frequency lowering technologies may improve audibility of high frequency sounds, the very nature of this processing can affect the perceived sound quality. This article reports the results from two studies that investigated the impact of a nonlinear frequency compression (NFC) algorithm on perceived sound quality. In the first study, the cutoff frequency and compression ratio parameters of the NFC algorithm were varied, and their effect on the speech quality was measured subjectively with 12 normal hearing adults, 12 normal hearing children, 13 hearing impaired adults, and 9 hearing impaired children. In the second study, 12 normal hearing and 8 hearing impaired adult listeners rated the quality of speech in quiet, speech in noise, and music after processing with a different set of NFC parameters. Results showed that the cutoff frequency parameter had more impact on sound quality ratings than the compression ratio, and that the hearing impaired adults were more tolerant to increased frequency compression than normal hearing adults. No statistically significant differences were found in the sound quality ratings of speech-in-noise and music stimuli processed through various NFC settings by hearing impaired listeners. These findings suggest that there may be an acceptable range of NFC settings for hearing impaired individuals where sound quality is not adversely affected. These results may assist an Audiologist in clinical NFC hearing aid fittings for achieving a balance between high frequency audibility and sound quality. PMID:23539261

  8. Compress Your Files

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branzburg, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    File compression enables data to be squeezed together, greatly reducing file size. Why would someone want to do this? Reducing file size enables the sending and receiving of files over the Internet more quickly, the ability to store more files on the hard drive, and the ability pack many related files into one archive (for example, all files…

  9. Compression: Rent or own

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, C.

    1997-07-01

    Historically, the decision to purchase or rent compression has been set as a corporate philosophy. As companies decentralize, there seems to be a shift away from corporate philosophy toward individual profit centers. This has led the decision to rent versus purchase to be looked at on a regional or project-by-project basis.

  10. The Compressed Video Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, John

    In the fall semester 1995, Southern Arkansas University- Magnolia (SAU-M) began a two semester trial delivering college classes via a compressed video link between SAU-M and its sister school Southern Arkansas University Tech (SAU-T) in Camden. As soon as the University began broadcasting and receiving classes, it was discovered that using the…

  11. Coal strength and Young's modulus related to coal rank, compressional velocity and maceral composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jienan; Meng, Zhaoping; Hou, Quanlin; Ju, Yiwen; Cao, Yunxing

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of coal rank and maceral composition influences on the coal mechanical behaviors. The complete stress-strain behavior, uniaxial compressive strength, Young's modulus, and acoustic compressional velocity were measured and correlated to coal ranks and microstructures. The test results show that coal is an elasto-brittle geo-material and its uniaxial compressive strength and Young's modulus increase as coal rank increases. This occurs because as vitrinite reflectance or coal rank increases, coal has less microporous structure and thus higher uniaxial compressive strength. Therefore, using vitrinite reflectance value instead of vitrinite content is advantageous for correlating coal strength. The experimental results also demonstrate that compressive strength and Young's modulus have positive exponential correlation, even for different types of coal. Therefore, the compressive strength of coal is highly related to its Young's modulus. The uniaxial compressive strength and acoustic compressional velocity of coal are also correlated, but a single correlation does not exist for different coal ranks; instead, different relationships occur for different types of coal.

  12. Making High-Tensile-Strength Amalgam Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Structural components made of amalgams can be made to have tensile strengths much greater than previously known to be possible. Amalgams, perhaps best known for their use in dental fillings, have several useful attributes, including room-temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and high compressive strength. However, the range of applications of amalgams has been limited by their very small tensile strengths. Now, it has been discovered that the tensile strength of an amalgam depends critically on the sizes and shapes of the particles from which it is made and, consequently, the tensile strength can be greatly increased through suitable choice of the particles. Heretofore, the powder particles used to make amalgams have been, variously, in the form of micron-sized spheroids or flakes. The tensile reinforcement contributed by the spheroids and flakes is minimal because fracture paths simply go around these particles. However, if spheroids or flakes are replaced by strands having greater lengths, then tensile reinforcement can be increased significantly. The feasibility of this concept was shown in an experiment in which electrical copper wires, serving as demonstration substitutes for copper powder particles, were triturated with gallium by use of a mortar and pestle and the resulting amalgam was compressed into a mold. The tensile strength of the amalgam specimen was then measured and found to be greater than 10(exp 4) psi (greater than about 69 MPa). Much remains to be done to optimize the properties of amalgams for various applications through suitable choice of starting constituents and modification of the trituration and molding processes. The choice of wire size and composition are expected to be especially important. Perusal of phase diagrams of metal mixtures could give insight that would enable choices of solid and liquid metal constituents. Finally, whereas heretofore, only binary alloys have been considered for amalgams

  13. Strength Modeling Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.; Lee, P.; Wong, S.

    1985-01-01

    Strength modeling is a complex and multi-dimensional issue. There are numerous parameters to the problem of characterizing human strength, most notably: (1) position and orientation of body joints; (2) isometric versus dynamic strength; (3) effector force versus joint torque; (4) instantaneous versus steady force; (5) active force versus reactive force; (6) presence or absence of gravity; (7) body somatotype and composition; (8) body (segment) masses; (9) muscle group envolvement; (10) muscle size; (11) fatigue; and (12) practice (training) or familiarity. In surveying the available literature on strength measurement and modeling an attempt was made to examine as many of these parameters as possible. The conclusions reached at this point toward the feasibility of implementing computationally reasonable human strength models. The assessment of accuracy of any model against a specific individual, however, will probably not be possible on any realistic scale. Taken statistically, strength modeling may be an effective tool for general questions of task feasibility and strength requirements.

  14. Dynamic tensile strength of glass fiber reinforced pultruded composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.K.; Kumar, M.M.; Hui, D.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the stress-strain behavior, fracture strength, influence of low temperature, and energy absorption in the diametral tensile splitting fracturing of a Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite. Experiments were conducted at low-temperature in a thermal chamber installed on a servo-hydraulic universal testing machine. The tensile strength was determined by diametral compression of disc samples at 24, {minus}5 and {minus}40 C.

  15. TEM Video Compressive Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Kovarik, Libor; Abellan, Patricia; Yuan, Xin; Carin, Lawrence; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-08-02

    One of the main limitations of imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution during in-situ TEM experiments is the frame rate of the camera being used to image the dynamic process. While the recent development of direct detectors has provided the hardware to achieve frame rates approaching 0.1ms, the cameras are expensive and must replace existing detectors. In this paper, we examine the use of coded aperture compressive sensing methods [1, 2, 3, 4] to increase the framerate of any camera with simple, low-cost hardware modifications. The coded aperture approach allows multiple sub-frames to be coded and integrated into a single camera frame during the acquisition process, and then extracted upon readout using statistical compressive sensing inversion. Our simulations show that it should be possible to increase the speed of any camera by at least an order of magnitude. Compressive Sensing (CS) combines sensing and compression in one operation, and thus provides an approach that could further improve the temporal resolution while correspondingly reducing the electron dose rate. Because the signal is measured in a compressive manner, fewer total measurements are required. When applied to TEM video capture, compressive imaging couled improve acquisition speed and reduce the electron dose rate. CS is a recent concept, and has come to the forefront due the seminal work of Candès [5]. Since the publication of Candès, there has been enormous growth in the application of CS and development of CS variants. For electron microscopy applications, the concept of CS has also been recently applied to electron tomography [6], and reduction of electron dose in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging [7]. To demonstrate the applicability of coded aperture CS video reconstruction for atomic level imaging, we simulate compressive sensing on observations of Pd nanoparticles and Ag nanoparticles during exposure to high temperatures and other environmental

  16. Coded aperture compressive temporal imaging.

    PubMed

    Llull, Patrick; Liao, Xuejun; Yuan, Xin; Yang, Jianbo; Kittle, David; Carin, Lawrence; Sapiro, Guillermo; Brady, David J

    2013-05-01

    We use mechanical translation of a coded aperture for code division multiple access compression of video. We discuss the compressed video's temporal resolution and present experimental results for reconstructions of > 10 frames of temporal data per coded snapshot.

  17. Acute compressive myelopathy due to vertebral haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Macki, Mohamed; Bydon, Mohamad; Kaloostian, Paul; Bydon, Ali

    2014-04-28

    A 47-year-old woman with a history of anaemia presented to the emergency room with an acute onset of leg weakness. Physical examination of the bilateral lower extremities was significant for 0/5 muscle strength in all muscle groups with decreased pinprick and temperature sensation. A sensory level at the umbilicus was appreciated. Fine touch and proprioception were preserved. Bowel and bladder function were intact. CT revealed several thoracic, vertebral haemangiomatas. An MRI was suggestive of an epidural clot at the T8-T10-weighted posterior epidural space. At the level of the lesion, the cerebrospinal fluid space was completely effaced, and the flattened spinal cord exhibited signs of oedema and compressive myelopathy. The patient immediately underwent surgical decompression of the spinal cord. An epidural clot and vessel conglomeration were identified. A postoperative spinal angiogram confirmed the diagnosis of vertebral haemangioma. At 1-month follow-up, the patient regained strength and sensation.

  18. Continuum damage interactions between tension and compression in osteonal bone.

    PubMed

    Mirzaali, Mohammad J; Bürki, Alexander; Schwiedrzik, Jakob; Zysset, Philippe K; Wolfram, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Skeletal diseases such as osteoporosis impose a severe socio-economic burden to ageing societies. Decreasing mechanical competence causes a rise in bone fracture incidence and mortality especially after the age of 65 y. The mechanisms of how bone damage is accumulated under different loading modes and its impact on bone strength are unclear. We hypothesise that damage accumulated in one loading mode increases the fracture risk in another. This study aimed at identifying continuum damage interactions between tensile and compressive loading modes. We propose and identify the material constants of a novel piecewise 1D constitutive model capable of describing the mechanical response of bone in combined tensile and compressive loading histories. We performed several sets of loading-reloading experiments to compute stiffness, plastic strains, and stress-strain curves. For tensile overloading, a stiffness reduction (damage) of 60% at 0.65% accumulated plastic strain was detectable as stiffness reduction of 20% under compression. For compressive overloading, 60% damage at 0.75% plastic strain was detectable as a stiffness reduction of 50% in tension. Plastic strain at ultimate stress was the same in tension and compression. Compression showed softening and tension exponential hardening in the post-yield regime. The hardening behaviour in compression is unaffected by a previous overload in tension but the hardening behaviour in tension is affected by a previous overload in compression as tensile reloading strength is significantly reduced. This paper demonstrates how damage accumulated under one loading mode affects the mechanical behaviour in another loading mode. To explain this and to illustrate a possible implementation we proposed a theoretical model. Including such loading mode dependent damage and plasticity behaviour in finite element models will help to improve fracture risk analysis of whole bones and bone implant structures. PMID:26093346

  19. Influence of curing temperature on cement hydration and mechanical strength development of fly ash mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Maltais, Y.; Marchand, J.

    1997-07-01

    The influence of fly ash and curing temperature on cement hydration and compressive strength development of mortars was investigated. Test parameters included type of fly ash (two different Class F fly ashes were tested), the level of cement replacement (10, 20 and 30% by mass), and curing temperature (20 C and 40 C). The mortar physical and microstructural properties were determined by means of thermal analyses, compressive strength measurements and SEM observations. Test results confirm that fly ash tends to increase significantly the rate of cement hydration at early age. Data also demonstrate that an elevation of the curing temperature reduces the long-term compressive strength of the reference mortar mixture. In contrast, an increase of the curing temperature seems to have no detrimental effect on the long-term compressive strength of the fly ash mixtures.

  20. Strength of inserts in titanium alloy machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V.; Huang, Z.; Zhang, J.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a stressed state of a non-worn cutting wedge in a machined titanium alloy (Ti6Al2Mo2Cr) is analyzed. The distribution of contact loads on the face of a cutting tool was obtained experimentally with the use of a ‘split cutting tool’. Calculation of internal stresses in the indexable insert made from cemented carbide (WC8Co) was carried out with the help of ANSYS 14.0 software. Investigations showed that a small thickness of the cutting insert leads to extremely high compressive stresses near the cutting edge, stresses that exceed the ultimate compressive strength of cemented carbide. The face and the base of the insert experience high tensile stresses, which approach the ultimate tensile strength of cemented carbide and increase a probability of cutting insert destruction. If the thickness of the cutting insert is bigger than 5 mm, compressive stresses near the cutting edge decrease, and tensile stresses on the face and base decrease to zero. The dependences of the greatest normal and tangential stresses on thickness of the cutting insert were found. Abbreviation and symbols: m/s - meter per second (cutting speed v); mm/r - millimeter per revolution (feed rate f); MPa - mega Pascal (dimension of specific contact loads and stresses); γ - rake angle of the cutting tool [°] α - clearance angle of the sharp cutting tool [°].

  1. Progressive compressive imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evladov, Sergei; Levi, Ofer; Stern, Adrian

    2012-06-01

    We have designed and built a working automatic progressive sampling imaging system based on the vector sensor concept, which utilizes a unique sampling scheme of Radon projections. This sampling scheme makes it possible to progressively add information resulting in tradeoff between compression and the quality of reconstruction. The uniqueness of our sampling is that in any moment of the acquisition process the reconstruction can produce a reasonable version of the image. The advantage of the gradual addition of the samples is seen when the sparsity rate of the object is unknown, and thus the number of needed measurements. We have developed the iterative algorithm OSO (Ordered Sets Optimization) which employs our sampling scheme for creation of nearly uniform distributed sets of samples, which allows the reconstruction of Mega-Pixel images. We present the good quality reconstruction from compressed data ratios of 1:20.

  2. Digital cinema video compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husak, Walter

    2003-05-01

    The Motion Picture Industry began a transition from film based distribution and projection to digital distribution and projection several years ago. Digital delivery and presentation offers the prospect to increase the quality of the theatrical experience for the audience, reduce distribution costs to the distributors, and create new business opportunities for the theater owners and the studios. Digital Cinema also presents an opportunity to provide increased flexibility and security of the movies for the content owners and the theater operators. Distribution of content via electronic means to theaters is unlike any of the traditional applications for video compression. The transition from film-based media to electronic media represents a paradigm shift in video compression techniques and applications that will be discussed in this paper.

  3. Compressibility of solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinet, P.; Ferrante, J.; Rose, J. H.; Smith, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    A universal form is proposed for the equation of state (EOS) of solids. Good agreement is found for a variety of test data. The form of the EOS is used to suggest a method of data analysis, which is applied to materials of geophysical interest. The isothermal bulk modulus is discussed as a function of the volume and of the pressure. The isothermal compression curves for materials of geophysical interest are examined.

  4. Basic cluster compression algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, E. E.; Lee, J.

    1980-01-01

    Feature extraction and data compression of LANDSAT data is accomplished by BCCA program which reduces costs associated with transmitting, storing, distributing, and interpreting multispectral image data. Algorithm uses spatially local clustering to extract features from image data to describe spectral characteristics of data set. Approach requires only simple repetitive computations, and parallel processing can be used for very high data rates. Program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on SEL 32/55.

  5. Compression of Cake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nason, Sarah; Houghton, Brittany; Renfro, Timothy

    2012-03-01

    The fall university physics class, at McMurry University, created a compression modulus experiment that even high school students could do. The class came up with this idea after a Young's modulus experiment which involved stretching wire. A question was raised of what would happen if we compressed something else? We created our own Young's modulus experiment, but in a more entertaining way. The experiment involves measuring the height of a cake both before and after a weight has been applied to the cake. We worked to derive the compression modulus by applying weight to a cake. In the end, we had our experimental cake and, ate it too! To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2012.TSS.B1.1

  6. Scale adaptive compressive tracking.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pengpeng; Cui, Shaohui; Gao, Min; Fang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the compressive tracking (CT) method (Zhang et al. in Proceedings of European conference on computer vision, pp 864-877, 2012) has attracted much attention due to its high efficiency, but it cannot well deal with the scale changing objects due to its constant tracking box. To address this issue, in this paper we propose a scale adaptive CT approach, which adaptively adjusts the scale of tracking box with the size variation of the objects. Our method significantly improves CT in three aspects: Firstly, the scale of tracking box is adaptively adjusted according to the size of the objects. Secondly, in the CT method, all the compressive features are supposed independent and equal contribution to the classifier. Actually, different compressive features have different confidence coefficients. In our proposed method, the confidence coefficients of features are computed and used to achieve different contribution to the classifier. Finally, in the CT method, the learning parameter λ is constant, which will result in large tracking drift on the occasion of object occlusion or large scale appearance variation. In our proposed method, a variable learning parameter λ is adopted, which can be adjusted according to the object appearance variation rate. Extensive experiments on the CVPR2013 tracking benchmark demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method compared to state-of-the-art tracking algorithms. PMID:27386298

  7. Compression of multiwall microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedeva, Natalia; Moore, Sam; Dobrynin, Andrey; Rubinstein, Michael; Sheiko, Sergei

    2012-02-01

    Optical monitoring of structural transformations and transport processes is prohibited if the objects to be studied are bulky and/or non-transparent. This paper is focused on the development of a microbbuble platform for acoustic imaging of heterogeneous media under harsh environmental conditions including high pressure (<500 atm), temperature (<100 C), and salinity (<10 wt%). We have studied the compression behavior of gas-filled microbubbles composed of multiple layers of surfactants and stabilizers. Upon hydrostatic compression, these bubbles undergo significant (up to 100x) changes in volume, which are completely reversible. Under repeated compression/expansion cycles, the pressure-volume P(V) characteristic of these microbubbles deviate from ideal-gas-law predictions. A theoretical model was developed to explain the observed deviations through contributions of shell elasticity and gas effusion. In addition, some of the microbubbles undergo peculiar buckling/smoothing transitions exhibiting intermittent formation of facetted structures, which suggest a solid-like nature of the pressurized shell. Preliminary studies illustrate that these pressure-resistant microbubbles maintain their mechanical stability and acoustic response at pressures greater than 1000 psi.

  8. Alumina fiber strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, R. T.; Nelson, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effective fiber strength of alumina fibers in an aluminum composite was increased to 173,000 psi. A high temperature heat treatment, combined with a glassy carbon surface coating, was used to prevent degradation and improve fiber tensile strength. Attempts to achieve chemical strengthening of the alumina fiber by chromium oxide and boron oxide coatings proved unsuccessful. A major problem encountered on the program was the low and inconsistent strength of the Dupont Fiber FP used for the investigation.

  9. Piston reciprocating compressed air engine

    SciTech Connect

    Cestero, L.G.

    1987-03-24

    A compressed air engine is described comprising: (a). a reservoir of compressed air, (b). two power cylinders each containing a reciprocating piston connected to a crankshaft and flywheel, (c). a transfer cylinder which communicates with each power cylinder and the reservoir, and contains a reciprocating piston connected to the crankshaft, (d). valve means controlled by rotation of the crankshaft for supplying compressed air from the reservoir to each power cylinder and for exhausting compressed air from each power cylinder to the transfer cylinder, (e). valve means controlled by rotation of the crankshaft for supplying from the transfer cylinder to the reservoir compressed air supplied to the transfer cylinder on the exhaust strokes of the pistons of the power cylinders, and (f). an externally powered fan for assisting the exhaust of compressed air from each power cylinder to the transfer cylinder and from there to the compressed air reservoir.

  10. Survivability characteristics of composite compression structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, John G.; Allen, M. R.; Sawdy, D.; Avery, S.

    1990-01-01

    Test and evaluation was performed to determine the compression residual capability of graphite reinforced composite panels following perforation by high-velocity fragments representative of combat threats. Assessments were made of the size of the ballistic damage, the effect of applied compression load at impact, damage growth during cyclic loading and residual static strength. Several fiber/matrix systems were investigated including high-strain fibers, tough epoxies, and APC-2 thermoplastic. Additionally, several laminate configurations were evaluated including hard and soft laminates and the incorporation of buffer strips and stitching for improved damage resistance of tolerance. Both panels (12 x 20-inches) and full scale box-beam components were tested to assure scalability of results. The evaluation generally showed small differences in the responses of the material systems tested. The soft laminate configurations with concentrated reinforcement exhibited the highest residual strength. Ballistic damage did not grow or increase in severity as a result of cyclic loading, and the effects of applied load at impact were not significant under the conditions tested.

  11. Fluffy dust forms icy planetesimals by static compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Akimasa; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Wada, Koji

    2013-09-01

    Context. Several barriers have been proposed in planetesimal formation theory: bouncing, fragmentation, and radial drift problems. Understanding the structure evolution of dust aggregates is a key in planetesimal formation. Dust grains become fluffy by coagulation in protoplanetary disks. However, once they are fluffy, they are not sufficiently compressed by collisional compression to form compact planetesimals. Aims: We aim to reveal the pathway of dust structure evolution from dust grains to compact planetesimals. Methods: Using the compressive strength formula, we analytically investigate how fluffy dust aggregates are compressed by static compression due to ram pressure of the disk gas and self-gravity of the aggregates in protoplanetary disks. Results: We reveal the pathway of the porosity evolution from dust grains via fluffy aggregates to form planetesimals, circumventing the barriers in planetesimal formation. The aggregates are compressed by the disk gas to a density of 10-3 g/cm3 in coagulation, which is more compact than is the case with collisional compression. Then, they are compressed more by self-gravity to 10-1 g/cm3 when the radius is 10 km. Although the gas compression decelerates the growth, the aggregates grow rapidly enough to avoid the radial drift barrier when the orbital radius is ≲6 AU in a typical disk. Conclusions: We propose a fluffy dust growth scenario from grains to planetesimals. It enables icy planetesimal formation in a wide range beyond the snowline in protoplanetary disks. This result proposes a concrete initial condition of planetesimals for the later stages of the planet formation.

  12. Strength Training and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Strength Training and Your Child KidsHealth > For Parents > Strength Training ... help prevent injuries and speed up recovery. About Strength Training Strength training is the practice of using free ...

  13. Test procedure for prism compression testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-26

    This procedure describes the setup and procedure for testing hollow clay tile (HCT) masonry prisms. The prism test is the standard engineering test used to determine values for f'{sub m} (specified compressive strength at 28 days) which are then used to obtain Code design allowable values. The prism compression test described herein produces load vs. deflection data which can be used to determine various properties such as the compressive strength, Modulus of Elasticity, and Poisson's ratio. The test prisms are obtained either by extraction from an existing wall or by fabrication using new materials. Prisms obtained from existing walls are fragile and tedious to extract and handle, but are very important because they provide data on the properties of existing walls. Laboratory-built prisms, used to supplement the in-situ prism test data, are easier to obtain, and allow for better control of the prism. Tests are to be made on prism specimens in two directions with respect to the cores: normal and parallel to the cores. Typically, in the Y-12 Plant buildings that have the HCT infill walls, the walls are constructed such that the cores in the HCT units run horizontally. Loading normal to the cores simulates vertical loading (gravity and vertical earthquake motions) on the walls, and loading parallel to the cores simulates the earthquake forces applied to a building wall in the horizontal direction. Prisms of single wythe 8-in. walls and the composite wythe 13-in. walls will be tested. A special Test Fixture (frame) has been designed and built to perform the in-house testing of prisms. Special handling fixtures have been designed to protect the prisms during removal from the wall site and transportation to the Test Fixture. The Test Fixture was designed for approximately a 400 kip allowable load limit.

  14. Test procedure for prism compression testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-26

    This procedure describes the setup and procedure for testing hollow clay tile (HCT) masonry prisms. The prism test is the standard engineering test used to determine values for f`{sub m} (specified compressive strength at 28 days) which are then used to obtain Code design allowable values. The prism compression test described herein produces load vs. deflection data which can be used to determine various properties such as the compressive strength, Modulus of Elasticity, and Poisson`s ratio. The test prisms are obtained either by extraction from an existing wall or by fabrication using new materials. Prisms obtained from existing walls are fragile and tedious to extract and handle, but are very important because they provide data on the properties of existing walls. Laboratory-built prisms, used to supplement the in-situ prism test data, are easier to obtain, and allow for better control of the prism. Tests are to be made on prism specimens in two directions with respect to the cores: normal and parallel to the cores. Typically, in the Y-12 Plant buildings that have the HCT infill walls, the walls are constructed such that the cores in the HCT units run horizontally. Loading normal to the cores simulates vertical loading (gravity and vertical earthquake motions) on the walls, and loading parallel to the cores simulates the earthquake forces applied to a building wall in the horizontal direction. Prisms of single wythe 8-in. walls and the composite wythe 13-in. walls will be tested. A special Test Fixture (frame) has been designed and built to perform the in-house testing of prisms. Special handling fixtures have been designed to protect the prisms during removal from the wall site and transportation to the Test Fixture. The Test Fixture was designed for approximately a 400 kip allowable load limit.

  15. Strength and deformation characteristics of Alaskan offshore silts

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, L.N.

    1985-01-01

    A comprehensive series of undrained shear tests were performed on representative samples of Alaskan silts in both the normally consolidated and overconsolidated state. The type of tests performed were triaxial compression and extension, torvane and miniature laboratory vane tests. It was found that the Alaskan silt exhibited dilative behavior during undrained shear. Also, the silt is highly anisotropic with respect to the stress-strain characteristics and the undrained shear strength. Sample disturbance reduced the measured strength in the unconsolidated undrained tests. The normalized strength parameter was shown to vary from one silt to another. The importance of evaluating the properties of each new silt deposit are described.

  16. Method for testing the strength and structural integrity of nuclear fuel particles

    DOEpatents

    Lessing, P.A.

    1995-10-17

    An accurate method for testing the strength of nuclear fuel particles is disclosed. Each particle includes an upper and lower portion, and is placed within a testing apparatus having upper and lower compression members. The upper compression member includes a depression therein which is circular and sized to receive only part of the upper portion of the particle. The lower compression member also includes a similar depression. The compression members are parallel to each other with the depressions therein being axially aligned. The fuel particle is then placed between the compression members and engaged within the depressions. The particle is then compressed between the compression members until it fractures. The amount of force needed to fracture the particle is thereafter recorded. This technique allows a broader distribution of forces and provides more accurate results compared with systems which distribute forces at singular points on the particle. 13 figs.

  17. Method for testing the strength and structural integrity of nuclear fuel particles

    DOEpatents

    Lessing, Paul A.

    1995-01-01

    An accurate method for testing the strength of nuclear fuel particles. Each particle includes an upper and lower portion, and is placed within a testing apparatus having upper and lower compression members. The upper compression member includes a depression therein which is circular and sized to receive only part of the upper portion of the particle. The lower compression member also includes a similar depression. The compression members are parallel to each other with the depressions therein being axially aligned. The fuel particle is then placed between the compression members and engaged within the depressions. The particle is then compressed between the compression members until it fractures. The amount of force needed to fracture the particle is thereafter recorded. This technique allows a broader distribution of forces and provides more accurate results compared with systems which distribute forces at singular points on the particle.

  18. Influence of Tension-Compression Asymmetry on the Mechanical Behavior of AZ31B Magnesium Alloy Sheets in Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping; Beeh, Elmar; Friedrich, Horst E.

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium alloys are promising materials for lightweight design in the automotive industry due to their high strength-to-mass ratio. This study aims to study the influence of tension-compression asymmetry on the radius of curvature and energy absorption capacity of AZ31B-O magnesium alloy sheets in bending. The mechanical properties were characterized using tension, compression, and three-point bending tests. The material exhibits significant tension-compression asymmetry in terms of strength and strain hardening rate due to extension twinning in compression. The compressive yield strength is much lower than the tensile yield strength, while the strain hardening rate is much higher in compression. Furthermore, the tension-compression asymmetry in terms of r value (Lankford value) was also observed. The r value in tension is much higher than that in compression. The bending results indicate that the AZ31B-O sheet can outperform steel and aluminum sheets in terms of specific energy absorption in bending mainly due to its low density. In addition, the AZ31B-O sheet was deformed with a larger radius of curvature than the steel and aluminum sheets, which brings a benefit to energy absorption capacity. Finally, finite element simulation for three-point bending was performed using LS-DYNA and the results confirmed that the larger radius of curvature of a magnesium specimen is mainly attributed to the high strain hardening rate in compression.

  19. Building on Our Strengths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Robert

    1978-01-01

    Comments on the feeling that the American family is disintegrating, and that many criticisms traditionally made about Black families are now made about White families. Suggests that people need to stress family strengths. As an example, five major strengths of Black families are described: flexibility, work and achievement ethics, religiosity, and…

  20. Strengths of Remarried Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knaub, Patricia Kain; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on remarried families' (N=80) perceptions of family strengths, marital satisfaction, and adjustment to the remarried situation. Results indicated that although most would like to make some changes, scores on the measurements used were high. A supportive environment was the most important predictor of family strength and success. (JAC)

  1. Calibration of DEM simulation: Unconfined Compressive Test and Brazilian Tensile Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yucang; Alonso-Marroquín, Fernando

    2009-06-01

    We simulate rock fracture using ESyS_Particle, which is a 3-D Discrete Element Model developed for modeling geological materials. Two types of simulations are carried out: Unconfined Compressive Test (UCT) and Brazilian Tensile Test (BTT). The results are compared to laboratory tests. Model parameters are determined on the basis of theoretical studies on the elastic properties of regular lattices and dimensionless analysis. The fracture patterns and realistic macroscopic strength are well reproduced. Also the ratio of the macroscopic strength of compression to the tensile strength is obtained numerically.

  2. Comparative data compression techniques and multi-compression results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, M. R.; Ibrahimy, M. I.; Motakabber, S. M. A.; Ferdaus, M. M.; Khan, M. N. H.

    2013-12-01

    Data compression is very necessary in business data processing, because of the cost savings that it offers and the large volume of data manipulated in many business applications. It is a method or system for transmitting a digital image (i.e., an array of pixels) from a digital data source to a digital data receiver. More the size of the data be smaller, it provides better transmission speed and saves time. In this communication, we always want to transmit data efficiently and noise freely. This paper will provide some compression techniques for lossless text type data compression and comparative result of multiple and single compression, that will help to find out better compression output and to develop compression algorithms.

  3. Compression retaining piston

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglino, A.V. Jr.

    1987-06-16

    A piston apparatus is described for maintaining compression between the piston wall and the cylinder wall, that comprises the following: a generally cylindrical piston body, including: a head portion defining the forward end of the body; and a continuous side wall portion extending rearward from the head portion; a means for lubricating and preventing compression loss between the side wall portion and the cylinder wall, including an annular recessed area in the continuous side wall portion for receiving a quantity of fluid lubricant in fluid engagement between the wall of the recessed and the wall of the cylinder; a first and second resilient, elastomeric, heat resistant rings positioned in grooves along the wall of the continuous side wall portion, above and below the annular recessed area. Each ring engages the cylinder wall to reduce loss of lubricant within the recessed area during operation of the piston; a first pump means for providing fluid lubricant to engine components other than the pistons; and a second pump means provides fluid lubricant to the recessed area in the continuous side wall portion of the piston. The first and second pump means obtains lubricant from a common source, and the second pump means including a flow line supplies oil from a predetermined level above the level of oil provided to the first pump means. This is so that should the oil level to the second pump means fall below the predetermined level, the loss of oil to the recessed area in the continuous side wall portion of the piston would result in loss of compression and shut down of the engine.

  4. International magnetic pulse compression

    SciTech Connect

    Kirbie, H.C.; Newton, M.A.; Siemens, P.D.

    1991-04-01

    Although pulsed-power engineering traditionally has been practiced by a fairly small, close community in the areas of defense and energy research, it is becoming more common in high-power, high-energy commercial pursuits such as material processing and lasers. This paper is a synopsis of the Feb. 12--14, 1990 workshop on magnetic switching as it applies primarily to pulse compression (power transformation). During the course of the Workshop at Granlibakken, a great deal of information was amassed and a keen insight into both the problems and opportunities as to the use of this switching approach was developed. The segmented workshop format proved ideal for identifying key aspects affecting optimum performance in a variety of applications. Individual groups of experts addressed network and system modeling, magnetic materials, power conditioning, core cooling and dielectrics, and finally circuits and application. At the end, they came together to consolidate their input and formulate the workshop's conclusions, identifying roadblocks or suggesting research projects, particularly as they apply to magnetic switching's trump card -- its high-average-power-handling capability (at least on a burst-mode basis). The workshop was especially productive both in the quality and quantity of information transfer in an environment conducive to a free and open exchange of ideas. We will not delve into the organization proper of this meeting, rather we wish to commend to the interested reader this volume, which provides the definitive and most up-to-date compilation on the subject of magnetic pulse compression from underlying principles to current state of the art as well as the prognosis for the future of magnetic pulse compression as a consensus of the workshop's organizers and participants.

  5. International magnetic pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirbie, H. C.; Newton, M. A.; Siemens, P. D.

    1991-04-01

    Although pulsed-power engineering traditionally has been practiced by a fairly small, close community in the areas of defense and energy research, it is becoming more common in high-power, high-energy commercial pursuits such as material processing and lasers. This paper is a synopsis of the Feb. 12-14, 1990 workshop on magnetic switching as it applies primarily to pulse compression (power transformation). During the course of the Workshop at Granlibakken, a great deal of information was amassed and a keen insight into both the problems and opportunities as to the use of this switching approach was developed. The segmented workshop format proved ideal for identifying key aspects affecting optimum performance in a variety of applications. Individual groups of experts addressed network and system modeling, magnetic materials, power conditioning, core cooling and dielectrics, and finally circuits and application. At the end, they came together to consolidate their input and formulate the workshop's conclusions, identifying roadblocks or suggesting research projects, particularly as they apply to magnetic switching's trump card - its high-average-power-handling capability (at least on a burst-mode basis). The workshop was especially productive both in the quality and quantity of information transfer in an environment conducive to a free and open exchange of ideas. We will not delve into the organization proper of this meeting, rather we wish to commend to the interested reader this volume, which provides the definitive and most up-to-date compilation on the subject of magnetic pulse compression from underlying principles to current state of the art as well as the prognosis for the future of magnetic pulse compression as a consensus of the workshop's organizers and participants.

  6. Avalanches in Wood Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkinen, T.; Miksic, A.; Ovaska, M.; Alava, Mikko J.

    2015-07-01

    Wood is a multiscale material exhibiting a complex viscoplastic response. We study avalanches in small wood samples in compression. "Woodquakes" measured by acoustic emission are surprisingly similar to earthquakes and crackling noise in rocks and laboratory tests on brittle materials. Both the distributions of event energies and of waiting (silent) times follow power laws. The stress-strain response exhibits clear signatures of localization of deformation to "weak spots" or softwood layers, as identified using digital image correlation. Even though material structure-dependent localization takes place, the avalanche behavior remains scale-free.

  7. Avalanches in Wood Compression.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, T; Miksic, A; Ovaska, M; Alava, Mikko J

    2015-07-31

    Wood is a multiscale material exhibiting a complex viscoplastic response. We study avalanches in small wood samples in compression. "Woodquakes" measured by acoustic emission are surprisingly similar to earthquakes and crackling noise in rocks and laboratory tests on brittle materials. Both the distributions of event energies and of waiting (silent) times follow power laws. The stress-strain response exhibits clear signatures of localization of deformation to "weak spots" or softwood layers, as identified using digital image correlation. Even though material structure-dependent localization takes place, the avalanche behavior remains scale-free.

  8. Sampling video compression system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Lum, H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A system for transmitting video signal of compressed bandwidth is described. The transmitting station is provided with circuitry for dividing a picture to be transmitted into a plurality of blocks containing a checkerboard pattern of picture elements. Video signals along corresponding diagonal rows of picture elements in the respective blocks are regularly sampled. A transmitter responsive to the output of the sampling circuitry is included for transmitting the sampled video signals of one frame at a reduced bandwidth over a communication channel. The receiving station is provided with a frame memory for temporarily storing transmitted video signals of one frame at the original high bandwidth frequency.

  9. Avalanches in Wood Compression.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, T; Miksic, A; Ovaska, M; Alava, Mikko J

    2015-07-31

    Wood is a multiscale material exhibiting a complex viscoplastic response. We study avalanches in small wood samples in compression. "Woodquakes" measured by acoustic emission are surprisingly similar to earthquakes and crackling noise in rocks and laboratory tests on brittle materials. Both the distributions of event energies and of waiting (silent) times follow power laws. The stress-strain response exhibits clear signatures of localization of deformation to "weak spots" or softwood layers, as identified using digital image correlation. Even though material structure-dependent localization takes place, the avalanche behavior remains scale-free. PMID:26274428

  10. Spinodal strength of liquids, solids and glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imre, A. R.; Drozd-Rzoska, A.; Kraska, T.; Rzoska, S. J.; Wojciechowski, K. W.

    2008-06-01

    With isotropic tri-axial stretching (negative pressure) and/or with heating, the thermodynamic stability limit (spinodal) of condensed matter—like solids, liquids and glasses—can be reached. In this paper, we analyse and compare the spinodal strength (i.e. the negative pressure necessary to reach the spinodal) of liquids, solids and glasses. Some examples with uni-axial stretches are also presented. Moreover, we discuss the possibility to step over the spinodal and to reach the region where the system can exhibit negative compressibility for a finite, nonzero time.

  11. Dynamic Strength of Metals in Shock Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, A; Reisman, D B; Wolfer, W G

    2005-11-09

    It is shown that the Hugoniot and the critical shear stress required to deform a metal plastically in shock compression can be obtained directly from molecular dynamics simulations without recourse to surface velocity profiles, or to details of the dislocation evolution. Specific calculations are shown for aluminum shocked along the [100] direction, and containing an initial distribution of microscopic defects. The presence of such defects has a minor effect on the Hugoniot and on the dynamic strength at high pressures. Computed results agree with experimental data.

  12. HIGH STRENGTH CONTROL RODS FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Lustman, B.; Losco, E.F.; Cohen, I.

    1961-07-11

    Nuclear reactor control rods comprised of highly compressed and sintered finely divided metal alloy panticles and fine metal oxide panticles substantially uniformly distributed theretbrough are described. The metal alloy consists essentially of silver, indium, cadmium, tin, and aluminum, the amount of each being present in centain percentages by weight. The oxide particles are metal oxides of the metal alloy composition, the amount of oxygen being present in certain percentages by weight and all the oxygen present being substantially in the form of metal oxide. This control rod is characterized by its high strength and resistance to creep at elevated temperatures.

  13. Effect of slag on shear strength of calcium bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Khera, R.P.; So, L.T.

    1997-12-31

    To prevent lateral migration of liquid pollutants in groundwater, relatively impervious vertical barriers are built around waste disposal sites. The slurry trench technique is the most commonly used construction method. The two common types of slurry walls are soil bentonite (SB) and cement bentonite (CB) walls. This study was undertaken to determine the strength of calcium bentonite as affected by cement and slag. Test specimens were prepared with 15% calcium bentonite, 5% to 15% cement, and 7.5% to 10% slag. Undrained triaxial compression tests and unconfined compression tests were performed on different mixes. These test results show that regardless of the proportion of cement and slag, the peak strength occurred at strain equal to or less than 1%. The strength essentially reached its ultimate value at about 2% strain and there was little change in strength beyond this point. The strength of specimens increased as the proportion of slag to cement increased. Pore water pressure at peak strength was positive. With increasing strain and increasing proportion of slag the pore water pressure reduced in magnitude. Specimens which were not subjected to vacuum during preparation showed extremely high negative pore pressures and higher strength.

  14. SIZE DEPENDENCE OF FLEXURAL STRENGTH AND FATIGUE STRENGTH OF PAVEMENT CONCRETE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Toru; Sato, Ryoichi

    The size effect on flexural fatigue strength of concrete was experime ntally investigated. For this purpose, specimens of two sizes were prepared: 150mm x 150mm x 530mm (span=450mm) and 200mm x 450mm x 1800mm (span=1350mm). The stress levels were set at 70%, 80% and 90% of the compressive strength. Experimental results showed that the number of loading cycles at failure increased with the enlargement of specimens. Based on a fracture mechanics approach, with a stress level of 70%, this dependence of flexural fatigue strength on size was explained by the difference in the stress distributions in the sections of small and large sized specimens. A te nsion softening stress region was formed in the section of the small specimen, whereas elastic stress was produced over the full section in the large specimen.

  15. Free compression tube. Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Ioan

    2012-11-01

    During the flight of vehicles, their propulsion energy must overcome gravity, to ensure the displacement of air masses on vehicle trajectory, to cover both energy losses from the friction between a solid surface and the air and also the kinetic energy of reflected air masses due to the impact with the flying vehicle. The flight optimization by increasing speed and reducing fuel consumption has directed research in the aerodynamics field. The flying vehicles shapes obtained through studies in the wind tunnel provide the optimization of the impact with the air masses and the airflow along the vehicle. By energy balance studies for vehicles in flight, the author Ioan Rusu directed his research in reducing the energy lost at vehicle impact with air masses. In this respect as compared to classical solutions for building flight vehicles aerodynamic surfaces which reduce the impact and friction with air masses, Ioan Rusu has invented a device which he named free compression tube for rockets, registered with the State Office for Inventions and Trademarks of Romania, OSIM, deposit f 2011 0352. Mounted in front of flight vehicles it eliminates significantly the impact and friction of air masses with the vehicle solid. The air masses come into contact with the air inside the free compression tube and the air-solid friction is eliminated and replaced by air to air friction.

  16. Perceptually Lossless Wavelet Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Yang, Gloria Y.; Solomon, Joshua A.; Villasenor, John

    1996-01-01

    The Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) decomposes an image into bands that vary in spatial frequency and orientation. It is widely used for image compression. Measures of the visibility of DWT quantization errors are required to achieve optimal compression. Uniform quantization of a single band of coefficients results in an artifact that is the sum of a lattice of random amplitude basis functions of the corresponding DWT synthesis filter, which we call DWT uniform quantization noise. We measured visual detection thresholds for samples of DWT uniform quantization noise in Y, Cb, and Cr color channels. The spatial frequency of a wavelet is r 2(exp -1), where r is display visual resolution in pixels/degree, and L is the wavelet level. Amplitude thresholds increase rapidly with spatial frequency. Thresholds also increase from Y to Cr to Cb, and with orientation from low-pass to horizontal/vertical to diagonal. We propose a mathematical model for DWT noise detection thresholds that is a function of level, orientation, and display visual resolution. This allows calculation of a 'perceptually lossless' quantization matrix for which all errors are in theory below the visual threshold. The model may also be used as the basis for adaptive quantization schemes.

  17. Hugoniot equation of state and dynamic strength of boron carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, Dennis E.

    2015-04-01

    Boron carbide ceramics have been particularly problematic in attempts to develop adequate constitutive model descriptions for purposes of analysis of dynamic response in the shock and impact environment. Dynamic strength properties of boron carbide ceramic differ uniquely from comparable ceramics. Furthermore, boron carbide is suspected, but not definitely shown, to undergoing polymorphic phase transformation under shock compression. In the present paper, shock-wave compression measurements conducted over the past 40 years are assessed for the purpose of achieving improved understanding of the dynamic equation of state and strength of boron carbide. In particular, attention is focused on the often ignored Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hugoniot measurements performed on porous sintered boron carbide ceramic. The LANL data are shown to exhibit two compression anomalies on the shock Hugoniot within the range of 20-60 GPa that may relate to crystallographic structure transitions. More recent molecular dynamics simulations on the compressibility of the boron carbide crystal lattice reveal compression transitions that bear similarities to the LANL Hugoniot results. The same Hugoniot data are complemented with dynamic isentropic compression data for boron carbide extracted from Hugoniot measurements on boron carbide and copper granular mixtures. Other Hugoniot measurements, however, performed on near-full-density boron carbide ceramic differ markedly from the LANL Hugoniot data. These later data exhibit markedly less compressibility and tend not to show comparable anomalies in compressibility. Alternative Hugoniot anomalies, however, are exhibited by the near-full-density data. Experimental uncertainty, Hugoniot strength, and phase transformation physics are all possible explanations for the observed discrepancies. It is reasoned that experimental uncertainty and Hugoniot strength are not likely explanations for the observed differences. The notable mechanistic

  18. Hugoniot equation of state and dynamic strength of boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, Dennis E.

    2015-04-28

    Boron carbide ceramics have been particularly problematic in attempts to develop adequate constitutive model descriptions for purposes of analysis of dynamic response in the shock and impact environment. Dynamic strength properties of boron carbide ceramic differ uniquely from comparable ceramics. Furthermore, boron carbide is suspected, but not definitely shown, to undergoing polymorphic phase transformation under shock compression. In the present paper, shock-wave compression measurements conducted over the past 40 years are assessed for the purpose of achieving improved understanding of the dynamic equation of state and strength of boron carbide. In particular, attention is focused on the often ignored Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hugoniot measurements performed on porous sintered boron carbide ceramic. The LANL data are shown to exhibit two compression anomalies on the shock Hugoniot within the range of 20–60 GPa that may relate to crystallographic structure transitions. More recent molecular dynamics simulations on the compressibility of the boron carbide crystal lattice reveal compression transitions that bear similarities to the LANL Hugoniot results. The same Hugoniot data are complemented with dynamic isentropic compression data for boron carbide extracted from Hugoniot measurements on boron carbide and copper granular mixtures. Other Hugoniot measurements, however, performed on near-full-density boron carbide ceramic differ markedly from the LANL Hugoniot data. These later data exhibit markedly less compressibility and tend not to show comparable anomalies in compressibility. Alternative Hugoniot anomalies, however, are exhibited by the near-full-density data. Experimental uncertainty, Hugoniot strength, and phase transformation physics are all possible explanations for the observed discrepancies. It is reasoned that experimental uncertainty and Hugoniot strength are not likely explanations for the observed differences. The notable

  19. Mechanical strength of trabecular bone at the knee.

    PubMed

    Hvid, I

    1988-08-01

    Interest in the biomechanical properties of trabecular bone has expanded in response to the problems related to total and partial joint replacement with the knee joint constituting a main focus of attention. This relatively recent development has left a number of fundamental problems unanswered, especially related to the machining, storage and testing of trabecular bone specimens. Nevertheless, these studies have contributed to the understanding of the mechanical function of trabecular bone. Regarding the role of trabecular bone at the knee joint, the following conclusions may be emphasized (conclusions drawn from the author's previous studies (I-X) are shown in italics): (1) Trabecular bone is almost exclusively responsible for the transmission of load at the proximal tibial epiphysis from the knee joint to the metaphysis. The peripheral shell surrounding the epiphysis is not composed of cortical bone and plays a negligible role in load transmission. (2) The compressive strength and stiffness of trabecular bone is primarily dependent upon the apparent density, trabecular architecture and the strength of the bone material. Direct and indirect sources suggest that the true material strength of trabecular bone is less than that of cortical bone. The epiphyseal trabecular architecture, featuring a marked polarity with alignment of primary trabeculae at right angles to the joint surface, is responsible for functional anisotropy which points to the axial compressive properties as the more important mechanical parameters. (3) Tensile and shear properties are of special relevance to mechanical loosening of implants. These properties may be derived from the apparent density, and a close empirical relation to the axial compressive strength and stiffness is suggested. (4) The foam-like structure of trabecular bone is the basis for the large energy absorptive capacity. (5) The pattern of axial compressive stiffness and strength at the normal proximal tibia differs little

  20. Compressive sensing in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Graff, Christian G; Sidky, Emil Y

    2015-03-10

    The promise of compressive sensing, exploitation of compressibility to achieve high quality image reconstructions with less data, has attracted a great deal of attention in the medical imaging community. At the Compressed Sensing Incubator meeting held in April 2014 at OSA Headquarters in Washington, DC, presentations were given summarizing some of the research efforts ongoing in compressive sensing for x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems. This article provides an expanded version of these presentations. Sparsity-exploiting reconstruction algorithms that have gained popularity in the medical imaging community are studied, and examples of clinical applications that could benefit from compressive sensing ideas are provided. The current and potential future impact of compressive sensing on the medical imaging field is discussed.

  1. Energy transfer in compressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bataille, Francoise; Zhou, YE; Bertoglio, Jean-Pierre

    1995-01-01

    This letter investigates the compressible energy transfer process. We extend a methodology developed originally for incompressible turbulence and use databases from numerical simulations of a weak compressible turbulence based on Eddy-Damped-Quasi-Normal-Markovian (EDQNM) closure. In order to analyze the compressible mode directly, the well known Helmholtz decomposition is used. While the compressible component has very little influence on the solenoidal part, we found that almost all of the compressible turbulence energy is received from its solenoidal counterpart. We focus on the most fundamental building block of the energy transfer process, the triadic interactions. This analysis leads us to conclude that, at low turbulent Mach number, the compressible energy transfer process is dominated by a local radiative transfer (absorption) in both inertial and energy containing ranges.

  2. Recent progress in compressible turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shiyi; Xia, Zhenhua; Wang, Jianchun; Yang, Yantao

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we review some recent studies on compressible turbulence conducted by the authors' group, which include fundamental studies on compressible isotropic turbulence (CIT) and applied studies on developing a constrained large eddy simulation (CLES) for wall-bounded turbulence. In the first part, we begin with a newly proposed hybrid compact-weighted essentially nonoscillatory (WENO) scheme for a CIT simulation that has been used to construct a systematic database of CIT. Using this database various fundamental properties of compressible turbulence have been examined, including the statistics and scaling of compressible modes, the shocklet-turbulence interaction, the effect of local compressibility on small scales, the kinetic energy cascade, and some preliminary results from a Lagrangian point of view. In the second part, the idea and formulas of the CLES are reviewed, followed by the validations of CLES and some applications in compressible engineering problems.

  3. libpolycomp: Compression/decompression library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasi, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Libpolycomp compresses and decompresses one-dimensional streams of numbers by means of several algorithms. It is well-suited for time-ordered data acquired by astronomical instruments or simulations. One of the algorithms, called "polynomial compression", combines two widely-used ideas (namely, polynomial approximation and filtering of Fourier series) to achieve substantial compression ratios for datasets characterized by smoothness and lack of noise. Notable examples are the ephemerides of astronomical objects and the pointing information of astronomical telescopes. Other algorithms implemented in this C library are well known and already widely used, e.g., RLE, quantization, deflate (via libz) and Burrows-Wheeler transform (via libbzip2). Libpolycomp can compress the timelines acquired by the Planck/LFI instrument with an overall compression ratio of ~9, while other widely known programs (gzip, bzip2) reach compression ratios less than 1.5.

  4. Compressive sensing in medical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Christian G.; Sidky, Emil Y.

    2015-01-01

    The promise of compressive sensing, exploitation of compressibility to achieve high quality image reconstructions with less data, has attracted a great deal of attention in the medical imaging community. At the Compressed Sensing Incubator meeting held in April 2014 at OSA Headquarters in Washington, DC, presentations were given summarizing some of the research efforts ongoing in compressive sensing for x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems. This article provides an expanded version of these presentations. Sparsity-exploiting reconstruction algorithms that have gained popularity in the medical imaging community are studied, and examples of clinical applications that could benefit from compressive sensing ideas are provided. The current and potential future impact of compressive sensing on the medical imaging field is discussed. PMID:25968400

  5. Dynamic Strength of Tantalum under impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glam, Benny; Werdiger, Meir; Pistinner, Shlomi

    2013-06-01

    Plane impact experiments of double shock and shock-rarefaction in Tantalum were carried out in a gas gun. VISAR diagnostics has been implemented to measure the particle velocity and the free surface velocity. The VISAR information was utilized to study the dynamic strength of Tantalum under compression and tension. The pressure in the experiments was below 35 GPa. In this pressure range the dominant mechanism is expected to be dislocation motion. A 1-d hydrodynamic code was used in order to match various strength models. As expected, both the Johnson-Cook and the Guinan-Steinberg models do not reproduce the experimental results. Therefore in this paper we compare the Zerilli-Armstrong model which has been recently calibrated at strain rate of 6 x 103 s-1 using the split Kowalsky-Hopkinson bar to our experimental results at strain rate of 106 s-1.

  6. ECG data compression by modeling.

    PubMed Central

    Madhukar, B.; Murthy, I. S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for data compression of single lead Electrocardiogram (ECG) data. The method is based on Parametric modeling of the Discrete Cosine Transformed ECG signal. Improved high frequency reconstruction is achieved by separately modeling the low and the high frequency regions of the transformed signal. Differential Pulse Code Modulation is applied on the model parameters to obtain a further increase in the compression. Compression ratios up to 1:40 were achieved without significant distortion. PMID:1482940

  7. Shock compression of precompressed deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, M R; Crowhurst, J C; Zaug, J M; Bastea, S; Goncharov, A F; Militzer, B

    2011-07-31

    Here we report quasi-isentropic dynamic compression and thermodynamic characterization of solid, precompressed deuterium over an ultrafast time scale (< 100 ps) and a microscopic length scale (< 1 {micro}m). We further report a fast transition in shock wave compressed solid deuterium that is consistent with the ramp to shock transition, with a time scale of less than 10 ps. These results suggest that high-density dynamic compression of hydrogen may be possible on microscopic length scales.

  8. Magnetic compression laser driving circuit

    DOEpatents

    Ball, Don G.; Birx, Dan; Cook, Edward G.

    1993-01-01

    A magnetic compression laser driving circuit is disclosed. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit compresses voltage pulses in the range of 1.5 microseconds at 20 Kilovolts of amplitude to pulses in the range of 40 nanoseconds and 60 Kilovolts of amplitude. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit includes a multi-stage magnetic switch where the last stage includes a switch having at least two turns which has larger saturated inductance with less core material so that the efficiency of the circuit and hence the laser is increased.

  9. Magnetic compression laser driving circuit

    DOEpatents

    Ball, D.G.; Birx, D.; Cook, E.G.

    1993-01-05

    A magnetic compression laser driving circuit is disclosed. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit compresses voltage pulses in the range of 1.5 microseconds at 20 kilovolts of amplitude to pulses in the range of 40 nanoseconds and 60 kilovolts of amplitude. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit includes a multi-stage magnetic switch where the last stage includes a switch having at least two turns which has larger saturated inductance with less core material so that the efficiency of the circuit and hence the laser is increased.

  10. Data compression for sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Post-Sanger sequencing methods produce tons of data, and there is a general agreement that the challenge to store and process them must be addressed with data compression. In this review we first answer the question “why compression” in a quantitative manner. Then we also answer the questions “what” and “how”, by sketching the fundamental compression ideas, describing the main sequencing data types and formats, and comparing the specialized compression algorithms and tools. Finally, we go back to the question “why compression” and give other, perhaps surprising answers, demonstrating the pervasiveness of data compression techniques in computational biology. PMID:24252160

  11. Compressive sensing of sparse tensors.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Shmuel; Li, Qun; Schonfeld, Dan

    2014-10-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) has triggered an enormous research activity since its first appearance. CS exploits the signal's sparsity or compressibility in a particular domain and integrates data compression and acquisition, thus allowing exact reconstruction through relatively few nonadaptive linear measurements. While conventional CS theory relies on data representation in the form of vectors, many data types in various applications, such as color imaging, video sequences, and multisensor networks, are intrinsically represented by higher order tensors. Application of CS to higher order data representation is typically performed by conversion of the data to very long vectors that must be measured using very large sampling matrices, thus imposing a huge computational and memory burden. In this paper, we propose generalized tensor compressive sensing (GTCS)-a unified framework for CS of higher order tensors, which preserves the intrinsic structure of tensor data with reduced computational complexity at reconstruction. GTCS offers an efficient means for representation of multidimensional data by providing simultaneous acquisition and compression from all tensor modes. In addition, we propound two reconstruction procedures, a serial method and a parallelizable method. We then compare the performance of the proposed method with Kronecker compressive sensing (KCS) and multiway compressive sensing (MWCS). We demonstrate experimentally that GTCS outperforms KCS and MWCS in terms of both reconstruction accuracy (within a range of compression ratios) and processing speed. The major disadvantage of our methods (and of MWCS as well) is that the compression ratios may be worse than that offered by KCS.

  12. Experimental and Numerical Investigations on Strength and Deformation Behavior of Cataclastic Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Shao, J. F.; Xu, W. Y.; Zhao, H. B.; Wang, W.

    2015-05-01

    This work is devoted to characterization of the deformation and strength properties of cataclastic sandstones. Before conducting mechanical tests, the physical properties were first examined. These sandstones are characterized by a loose damaged microstructure and poorly cemented contacts. Then, a series of mechanical tests including hydrostatic, uniaxial, and triaxial compression tests were performed to study the mechanical strength and deformation of the sandstones. The results obtained show nonlinear stress-strain responses. The initial microcracks are closed at hydrostatic stress of 2.6 MPa, and the uniaxial compressive strength is about 0.98 MPa. Under triaxial compression, there is a clear transition from volumetric compressibility to dilatancy and a strong dependency on confining pressure. Based on the experimental evidence, an elastoplastic model is proposed using a linear yield function and a nonassociated plastic potential. There is good agreement between numerical results and experimental data.

  13. Internal roll compression system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Graydon E.

    1985-01-01

    This invention is a machine for squeezing water out of peat or other material of low tensile strength; the machine including an inner roll eccentrically positioned inside a tubular outer roll, so as to form a gradually increasing pinch area at one point therebetween, so that, as the rolls rotate, the material is placed between the rolls, and gets wrung out when passing through the pinch area.

  14. Crew Strength Training

    NASA Video Gallery

    Train to develop your upper and lower body strength in your muscles and bones by performing body-weight squats and push-ups.The Train Like an Astronaut project uses the excitement of exploration to...

  15. Developing Strengths in Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Ted

    1976-01-01

    There are few descriptions of growth experiences for total families. This paper describes one such model. It expresses the conviction that families need opportunities to come together with other families to identify strengths, sharpen communication skills, and establish goals. (Author)

  16. Compressibility of Nanocrystalline Forsterite

    SciTech Connect

    Couvy, H.; Chen, J; Drozd, V

    2010-01-01

    We established an equation of state for nanocrystalline forsterite using multi-anvil press and diamond anvil cell. Comparative high-pressure and high-temperature experiments have been performed up to 9.6 GPa and 1,300 C. We found that nanocrystalline forsterite is more compressible than macro-powder forsterite. The bulk modulus of nanocrystalline forsterite is equal to 123.3 ({+-}3.4) GPa whereas the bulk modulus of macro-powder forsterite is equal to 129.6 ({+-}3.2) GPa. This difference is attributed to a weakening of the elastic properties of grain boundary and triple junction and their significant contribution in nanocrystalline sample compare to the bulk counterpart. The bulk modulus at zero pressure of forsterite grain boundary was determined to be 83.5 GPa.

  17. Compressively sensed complex networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Ray, Jaideep; Pinar, Ali

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this project is to develop low dimension parametric (deterministic) models of complex networks, to use compressive sensing (CS) and multiscale analysis to do so and to exploit the structure of complex networks (some are self-similar under coarsening). CS provides a new way of sampling and reconstructing networks. The approach is based on multiresolution decomposition of the adjacency matrix and its efficient sampling. It requires preprocessing of the adjacency matrix to make it 'blocky' which is the biggest (combinatorial) algorithm challenge. Current CS reconstruction algorithm makes no use of the structure of a graph, its very general (and so not very efficient/customized). Other model-based CS techniques exist, but not yet adapted to networks. Obvious starting point for future work is to increase the efficiency of reconstruction.

  18. Vapor compression distillation module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuccio, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    A Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) module was developed and evaluated as part of a Space Station Prototype (SSP) environmental control and life support system. The VCD module includes the waste tankage, pumps, post-treatment cells, automatic controls and fault detection instrumentation. Development problems were encountered with two components: the liquid pumps, and the waste tank and quantity gauge. Peristaltic pumps were selected instead of gear pumps, and a sub-program of materials and design optimization was undertaken leading to a projected life greater than 10,000 hours of continuous operation. A bladder tank was designed and built to contain the waste liquids and deliver it to the processor. A detrimental pressure pattern imposed upon the bladder by a force-operated quantity gauge was corrected by rearranging the force application, and design goals were achieved. System testing has demonstrated that all performance goals have been fulfilled.

  19. Compressed quantum simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, B.

    2014-12-04

    Here, I summarize the results presented in B. Kraus, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 250503 (2011). Recently, it has been shown that certain circuits, the so-called match gate circuits, can be compressed to an exponentially smaller universal quantum computation. We use this result to demonstrate that the simulation of a 1-D Ising chain consisting of n qubits can be performed on a universal quantum computer running on only log(n) qubits. We show how the adiabatic evolution can be simulated on this exponentially smaller system and how the magnetization can be measured. Since the Ising model displays a quantum phase transition, this result implies that a quantum phase transition of a very large system can be observed with current technology.

  20. Population attribute compression

    DOEpatents

    White, James M.; Faber, Vance; Saltzman, Jeffrey S.

    1995-01-01

    An image population having a large number of attributes is processed to form a display population with a predetermined smaller number of attributes that represent the larger number of attributes. In a particular application, the color values in an image are compressed for storage in a discrete look-up table (LUT). Color space containing the LUT color values is successively subdivided into smaller volumes until a plurality of volumes are formed, each having no more than a preselected maximum number of color values. Image pixel color values can then be rapidly placed in a volume with only a relatively few LUT values from which a nearest neighbor is selected. Image color values are assigned 8 bit pointers to their closest LUT value whereby data processing requires only the 8 bit pointer value to provide 24 bit color values from the LUT.

  1. Compressed Wavefront Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Polans, James; McNabb, Ryan P.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Farsiu, Sina

    2014-01-01

    We report on an algorithm for fast wavefront sensing that incorporates sparse representation for the first time in practice. The partial derivatives of optical wavefronts were sampled sparsely with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) by randomly subsampling the original SHWFS data to as little as 5%. Reconstruction was performed by a sparse representation algorithm that utilized the Zernike basis. We name this method SPARZER. Experiments on real and simulated data attest to the accuracy of the proposed techniques as compared to traditional sampling and reconstruction methods. We have made the corresponding data set and software freely available online. Compressed wavefront sensing offers the potential to increase the speed of wavefront acquisition and to defray the cost of SHWFS devices. PMID:24690703

  2. Compressive Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoye; Yao, Yuan; Liu, Han; Guibas, Leonidas

    2014-01-01

    Modern data acquisition routinely produces massive amounts of network data. Though many methods and models have been proposed to analyze such data, the research of network data is largely disconnected with the classical theory of statistical learning and signal processing. In this paper, we present a new framework for modeling network data, which connects two seemingly different areas: network data analysis and compressed sensing. From a nonparametric perspective, we model an observed network using a large dictionary. In particular, we consider the network clique detection problem and show connections between our formulation with a new algebraic tool, namely Randon basis pursuit in homogeneous spaces. Such a connection allows us to identify rigorous recovery conditions for clique detection problems. Though this paper is mainly conceptual, we also develop practical approximation algorithms for solving empirical problems and demonstrate their usefulness on real-world datasets. PMID:25620806

  3. Survey of Header Compression Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishac, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    This report provides a summary of several different header compression techniques. The different techniques included are: (1) Van Jacobson's header compression (RFC 1144); (2) SCPS (Space Communications Protocol Standards) header compression (SCPS-TP, SCPS-NP); (3) Robust header compression (ROHC); and (4) The header compression techniques in RFC2507 and RFC2508. The methodology for compression and error correction for these schemes are described in the remainder of this document. All of the header compression schemes support compression over simplex links, provided that the end receiver has some means of sending data back to the sender. However, if that return path does not exist, then neither Van Jacobson's nor SCPS can be used, since both rely on TCP (Transmission Control Protocol). In addition, under link conditions of low delay and low error, all of the schemes perform as expected. However, based on the methodology of the schemes, each scheme is likely to behave differently as conditions degrade. Van Jacobson's header compression relies heavily on the TCP retransmission timer and would suffer an increase in loss propagation should the link possess a high delay and/or bit error rate (BER). The SCPS header compression scheme protects against high delay environments by avoiding delta encoding between packets. Thus, loss propagation is avoided. However, SCPS is still affected by an increased BER (bit-error-rate) since the lack of delta encoding results in larger header sizes. Next, the schemes found in RFC2507 and RFC2508 perform well for non-TCP connections in poor conditions. RFC2507 performance with TCP connections is improved by various techniques over Van Jacobson's, but still suffers a performance hit with poor link properties. Also, RFC2507 offers the ability to send TCP data without delta encoding, similar to what SCPS offers. ROHC is similar to the previous two schemes, but adds additional CRCs (cyclic redundancy check) into headers and improves

  4. Mechanisms of compressive failure in woven composites and stitched laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, B. N.; Dadkhah, M. S.; Inman, R. V.; Morris, W. L.; Schroeder, S.

    1992-01-01

    Stitched laminates and angle interlock woven composites have been studied in uniaxial, in-plane, monotonic compression. Failure mechanisms have been found to depend strongly on both the reinforcement architecture and the degree of constraint imposed by the loading grips. Stitched laminates show higher compressive strength, but are brittle, possessing no load bearing capacity beyond the strain for peak load. Post-mortem inspection shows a localized shear band of buckled and broken fibers, which is evidently the product of an unstably propagating kink band. Similar shear bands are found in the woven composites if the constraint of lateral displacements is weak; but, under strong constraint, damage is not localized but distributed throughout the gauge section. While the woven composites tested are weaker than the stitched laminates, they continue to bear significant loads to compressive strains of approx. 15 percent, even when most damage is confined to a shear band.

  5. Adaptive compressive sensing camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Charles; Hsu, Ming K.; Cha, Jae; Iwamura, Tomo; Landa, Joseph; Nguyen, Charles; Szu, Harold

    2013-05-01

    We have embedded Adaptive Compressive Sensing (ACS) algorithm on Charge-Coupled-Device (CCD) camera based on the simplest concept that each pixel is a charge bucket, and the charges comes from Einstein photoelectric conversion effect. Applying the manufactory design principle, we only allow altering each working component at a minimum one step. We then simulated what would be such a camera can do for real world persistent surveillance taking into account of diurnal, all weather, and seasonal variations. The data storage has saved immensely, and the order of magnitude of saving is inversely proportional to target angular speed. We did design two new components of CCD camera. Due to the matured CMOS (Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) technology, the on-chip Sample and Hold (SAH) circuitry can be designed for a dual Photon Detector (PD) analog circuitry for changedetection that predicts skipping or going forward at a sufficient sampling frame rate. For an admitted frame, there is a purely random sparse matrix [Φ] which is implemented at each bucket pixel level the charge transport bias voltage toward its neighborhood buckets or not, and if not, it goes to the ground drainage. Since the snapshot image is not a video, we could not apply the usual MPEG video compression and Hoffman entropy codec as well as powerful WaveNet Wrapper on sensor level. We shall compare (i) Pre-Processing FFT and a threshold of significant Fourier mode components and inverse FFT to check PSNR; (ii) Post-Processing image recovery will be selectively done by CDT&D adaptive version of linear programming at L1 minimization and L2 similarity. For (ii) we need to determine in new frames selection by SAH circuitry (i) the degree of information (d.o.i) K(t) dictates the purely random linear sparse combination of measurement data a la [Φ]M,N M(t) = K(t) Log N(t).

  6. Buckling behavior of composite cylinders subjected to compressive loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carri, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Room temperature compressive buckling strengths of eight cylinders, four boron-epoxy and four boron-epoxy reinforced-titanium, with diameter to thickness ratios ranging between 40 and 67 are determined experimentally and compared with analytical predictions. Numerical buckling strengths are presented for Donnell's, Flugge's and Sanders' shell theories for anisotropic and orthotropic material cases. Comparison of analytical predictions with experimental results indicates good agreement and the recommended correlation factor suggested in the literature is applicable for design. For the cylinders tested, the correlation between experiment and theory ranged from 0.73 to 0.97.

  7. Apple Strength Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C

    2009-12-22

    Strength of the apple parts has been noticed to decrease, especially those installed by the new induction heating system since the LEP campaign started. Fig. 1 shows the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS), and elongation of the installed or installation-simulated apples on various systems. One can clearly see the mean values of UTS and YS of the post-LEP parts decreased by about 8 ksi and 6 ksi respectively from those of the pre-LEP parts. The slight increase in elongation seen in Fig.1 can be understood from the weak inverse relationship between the strength and elongation in metals. Fig.2 shows the weak correlation between the YS and elongation of the parts listed in Fig. 1. Strength data listed in Figure 1 were re-plotted as histograms in Figs. 3 and 4. Figs. 3a and 4a show histograms of all UTS and YS data. Figs. 3b and 4b shows histograms of pre-LEP data and Figs. 3c and 4c of post-LEP data. Data on statistical scatter of tensile strengths have been rarely published by material suppliers. Instead, only the minimum 'guaranteed' strength data are typically presented. An example of strength distribution of aluminum 7075-T6 sheet material, listed in Fig. 5, show that its scatter width of both UTS and YS for a single sheet can be about 6 ksi and for multi-lot scatter can be as large as 11 ksi even though the sheets have been produced through well-controlled manufacturing process. By approximating the histograms shown in Figs. 3 and 4 by a Gaussian or similar type of distribution curves, one can plausibly see the strength reductions in the later or more recent apples. The pre-LEP data in Figs. 3b and 4b show wider scatter than the post-LEP data in Figs. 3c and 4c and seem to follow the binomial distribution of strength indicating that the apples might have been made from two different lots of material, either from two different vendors or from two different melts of perhaps slightly different chemical composition by a single vendor. The post

  8. Dynamics of polymer response to nanosecond shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banishev, Alexandr A.; Shaw, William L.; Curtis, Alexander D.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2014-03-01

    The high strain rate mechanical dynamics of a polymer under shock compression, poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA, MW = 996 000), were probed in experiments that combined two measurement techniques. The km s-1 impacts with laser-launched flyer plates were characterized by a fast interferometer, and the polymer dynamics were characterized by the nanosecond emission redshifting of Rhodamine 6G dye in PMMA. The thicknesses and velocities of the flyer plates were varied to create shock durations in the 5-22 ns range and pressures in the 2.6-9.2 GPa range. The strain rates were on the order of 107 s-1. With shock durations greater than 10 ns, a two-part rise of the redshift transients was observed, which was interpreted with reference to the well-known viscoelastic shock compression paradigm. However, the initial compression stage, lasting ˜10 ns, was found to be only partially elastic. With an elastic compression, after a shock the density should promptly return to its initial value. But even with the shortest-duration 5 ns shocks, the density relaxation after the shock ended was quite small. The critical shear stress where PMMA loses strength and the viscous compression process begins, appeared to be considerably larger with nanosecond shocks than with microsecond shocks. The loss of strength always took ˜10 ns, and could not be accelerated by increasing the shock pressure, suggesting the rate of strength loss was limited by the need for collective motions of the 30-40 nm polymer chains. The rates and amplitudes of the viscous density relaxation process increased with shock duration and shock pressure.

  9. Effect of Moisture and Temperature on the Compressive Failure of CCF300/QY8911 Unidirectional Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongbo, Zhang; Huimin, Fu; Zhihua, Wang

    2013-10-01

    CCF300/BMI composites are relevant materials for supersonic aircraft due to their high specific properties. However in aeronautical applications, the composites are exposed to severe environmental conditions, and it is known that hot and humid environments can degrade some aspects of the material performance especially the compressive strength. In this paper, the effect of moisture and temperature on the compressive failure of unidirectional CCF300 carbon fiber reinforced bismaleimide(BMI) matrix composites were studied. Also scanning electron microscope (SEM) was employed for fractographic investigations. It is observed that the plastic deformations at the fiber/matrix and interlaminar interface as well as residual stresses lower the compressive strength of the material. The failure of specimens tested in hot and wet conditions always occurs as a result of out-of-plane microbuckling that is attributed to the reduction of matrix strength. In addition, the fiber microbuckling model, fiber kinking model and combined model were employed for the compressive strength prediction of the UD CCF300/QY8911 composites subjected to different environment conditions. The comparison was done between these models. Results show that the combined model is more suitable for the compressive strength prediction of CCF300/QY8911 composite systems when suffering severe environment conditions.

  10. Compression failure of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pipes, R. B.

    1983-01-01

    This presentation attempts to characterize the compressive behavior of Hercules AS-1/3501-6 graphite-epoxy composite. The effect of varying specimen geometry on test results is examined. The transition region is determined between buckling and compressive failure. Failure modes are defined and analytical models to describe these modes are presented.

  11. Application specific compression : final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Melgaard, David Kennett; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Myers, Daniel S.; Harrison, Carol D.; Lee, David S.; Lewis, Phillip J.; Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2008-12-01

    With the continuing development of more capable data gathering sensors, comes an increased demand on the bandwidth for transmitting larger quantities of data. To help counteract that trend, a study was undertaken to determine appropriate lossy data compression strategies for minimizing their impact on target detection and characterization. The survey of current compression techniques led us to the conclusion that wavelet compression was well suited for this purpose. Wavelet analysis essentially applies a low-pass and high-pass filter to the data, converting the data into the related coefficients that maintain spatial information as well as frequency information. Wavelet compression is achieved by zeroing the coefficients that pertain to the noise in the signal, i.e. the high frequency, low amplitude portion. This approach is well suited for our goal because it reduces the noise in the signal with only minimal impact on the larger, lower frequency target signatures. The resulting coefficients can then be encoded using lossless techniques with higher compression levels because of the lower entropy and significant number of zeros. No significant signal degradation or difficulties in target characterization or detection were observed or measured when wavelet compression was applied to simulated and real data, even when over 80% of the coefficients were zeroed. While the exact level of compression will be data set dependent, for the data sets we studied, compression factors over 10 were found to be satisfactory where conventional lossless techniques achieved levels of less than 3.

  12. Streaming Compression of Hexahedral Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Isenburg, M; Courbet, C

    2010-02-03

    We describe a method for streaming compression of hexahedral meshes. Given an interleaved stream of vertices and hexahedral our coder incrementally compresses the mesh in the presented order. Our coder is extremely memory efficient when the input stream documents when vertices are referenced for the last time (i.e. when it contains topological finalization tags). Our coder then continuously releases and reuses data structures that no longer contribute to compressing the remainder of the stream. This means in practice that our coder has only a small fraction of the whole mesh in memory at any time. We can therefore compress very large meshes - even meshes that do not file in memory. Compared to traditional, non-streaming approaches that load the entire mesh and globally reorder it during compression, our algorithm trades a less compact compressed representation for significant gains in speed, memory, and I/O efficiency. For example, on the 456k hexahedra 'blade' mesh, our coder is twice as fast and uses 88 times less memory (only 3.1 MB) with the compressed file increasing about 3% in size. We also present the first scheme for predictive compression of properties associated with hexahedral cells.

  13. Pressure Oscillations in Adiabatic Compression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Roland

    2011-01-01

    After finding Moloney and McGarvey's modified adiabatic compression apparatus, I decided to insert this experiment into my physical chemistry laboratory at the last minute, replacing a problematic experiment. With insufficient time to build the apparatus, we placed a bottle between two thick textbooks and compressed it with a third textbook forced…

  14. Effective stress-strain-strength behavior of silicate-grouted sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benltayf, M. A.

    The effective stress concept was used to interpret the results of drained and undrained triaxial compression tests on grouted sand specimens which were grouted under at-rest conditions or under a confining stress. The behavior of grouted and ungrouted sand in drained and undrained shear was documented in terms of stress-strain, volume change, pore pressure, shearing resistance, and shear strength characteristics. The behavior of grouted sand in unconfined compression was analyzed. Specimens tested in triaxial compression after curing for six or more days exhibit no appreciable differences in stress-strain, volume change, pore pressure, and shear strength behavior. Grouting improves the stiffness and strength of ungrouted sand. The shearing resistance of silicate grouted sand is generated by cohesion and friction components which vary as a function of axial strain. The strength of grouted sand is greatly affected by drainage conditions and pore pressures.

  15. Derived Interaction Parameters for the Tsai-Wu Tensor Polynomial Theory of Strength for Composite Materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S J; Larsen, G J

    2001-08-03

    It is shown that the two interactive strength parameters in the Tsai-Wu tensor polynomial strength criterion for fiber composites can be derived in terms of the uniaxial or non-interacting strength parameters if the composite does not fail under practical levels of hydrostatic pressure or equal transverse compression. Thus the required number of parameters is reduced from seven to five and all five of the remaining strength terms are easily determined using standard test methods. The derived interactive parameters fall within the stability limits of the theory, yet they lead to open failure surfaces in the compressive stress quadrant. The assumptions used to derive the interactive parameters were supported by measurements for the effect of hydrostatic pressure and unequal transverse compression on the behavior of a typical carbon fiber composite.

  16. A generalized three-dimensional Hoek-Brown strength criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.

    2008-12-01

    Although the Hoek-Brown strength criterion has been widely used in rock mechanics and rock engineering, it does not take account of the influence of the intermediate principal stress. Much evidence, however, has been accumulating to indicate that the intermediate principal stress does influence the rock strength in many instances. Therefore, researchers have developed three-dimensional (3D) versions of the Hoek-Brown strength criterion. In this paper, three existing 3D versions of the Hoek-Brown strength criterion are reviewed and evaluated. The evaluation shows that all of the three 3D versions of the Hoek-Brown strength criterion have limitations. To address the limitations, a generalized 3D Hoek-Brown criterion is proposed by modifying the generalized Hoek-Brown strength criterion. The proposed 3D criterion not only inherits the advantages of the Hoek-Brown strength criterion but can take account of the influence of the intermediate principal stress. At a 2D stress state (triaxial or biaxial), the proposed 3D criterion will simply reduce to the form of the generalized Hoek-Brown strength criterion. To validate the proposed 3D strength criterion, polyaxial or true triaxial compression test data of intact rocks and jointed rock masses has been collected from the published literature. Predictions of the proposed generalized 3D Hoek-Brown strength criterion are in good agreement with the test data for a range of different rock types. The difference of the proposed generalized 3D Hoek-Brown strength criterion from and its advantages over the existing 3D versions of the Hoek-Brown strength criterion are also discussed. It should be noted that the proposed 3D criterion is empirical in nature because it is an extension of the 2D Hoek-Brown strength criterion, which is empirical. Because of the non-convexity of the yield surface for a biaxial stress state, the proposed 3D criterion may have problems with some stress paths.

  17. General theory of peak compression in liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice

    2016-02-12

    A new and general expression of the peak compression factor in liquid chromatography is derived. It applies to any type of gradients induced by non-uniform columns (stationary) or by temporal variations (dynamic) of the elution strength related to changes in solvent composition, temperature, or in any external field. The new equation is validated in two ideal cases for which the exact solutions are already known. From a practical viewpoint, it is used to predict the achievable degree of peak compression for curved retention models, retained solvent gradients, and for temperature-programmed liquid chromatography. The results reveal that: (1) curved retention models affect little the compression factor with respect to the best linear strength retention models, (2) gradient peaks can be indefinitely compressed with respect to isocratic peaks if the propagation speed of the gradient (solvent or temperature) becomes smaller than the chromatographic velocity, (3) limitations are inherent to the maximum intensity of the experimental intrinsic gradient steepness, and (4) dynamic temperature gradients can be advantageously combined to solvent gradients in order to improve peak capacities of microfluidic separation devices.

  18. Direct compression of chitosan: process and formulation factors to improve powder flow and tablet performance.

    PubMed

    Buys, Gerhard M; du Plessis, Lissinda H; Marais, Andries F; Kotze, Awie F; Hamman, Josias H

    2013-06-01

    Chitosan is a polymer derived from chitin that is widely available at relatively low cost, but due to compression challenges it has limited application for the production of direct compression tablets. The aim of this study was to use certain process and formulation variables to improve manufacturing of tablets containing chitosan as bulking agent. Chitosan particle size and flow properties were determined, which included bulk density, tapped density, compressibility and moisture uptake. The effect of process variables (i.e. compression force, punch depth, percentage compaction in a novel double fill compression process) and formulation variables (i.e. type of glidant, citric acid, pectin, coating with Eudragit S®) on chitosan tablet performance (i.e. mass variation, tensile strength, dissolution) was investigated. Moisture content of the chitosan powder, particle size and the inclusion of glidants had a pronounced effect on its flow ability. Varying the percentage compaction during the first cycle of a double fill compression process produced chitosan tablets with more acceptable tensile strength and dissolution rate properties. The inclusion of citric acid and pectin into the formulation significantly decreased the dissolution rate of isoniazid from the tablets due to gel formation. Direct compression of chitosan powder into tablets can be significantly improved by the investigated process and formulation variables as well as applying a double fill compression process.

  19. Digital compression algorithms for HDTV transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adkins, Kenneth C.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO; Bibyk, Steven B.

    1990-01-01

    Digital compression of video images is a possible avenue for high definition television (HDTV) transmission. Compression needs to be optimized while picture quality remains high. Two techniques for compression the digital images are explained and comparisons are drawn between the human vision system and artificial compression techniques. Suggestions for improving compression algorithms through the use of neural and analog circuitry are given.

  20. Analytical model for ramp compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Quanxi; Jiang, Shaoen; Wang, Zhebin; Wang, Feng; Hu, Yun; Ding, Yongkun

    2016-08-01

    An analytical ramp compression model for condensed matter, which can provide explicit solutions for isentropic compression flow fields, is reported. A ramp compression experiment can be easily designed according to the capability of the loading source using this model. Specifically, important parameters, such as the maximum isentropic region width, material properties, profile of the pressure pulse, and the pressure pulse duration can be reasonably allocated or chosen. To demonstrate and study this model, laser-direct-driven ramp compression experiments and code simulation are performed successively, and the factors influencing the accuracy of the model are studied. The application and simulation show that this model can be used as guidance in the design of a ramp compression experiment. However, it is verified that further optimization work is required for a precise experimental design.

  1. Compressive sensing exploiting wavelet-domain dependencies for ECG compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polania, Luisa F.; Carrillo, Rafael E.; Blanco-Velasco, Manuel; Barner, Kenneth E.

    2012-06-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) is an emerging signal processing paradigm that enables sub-Nyquist sampling of sparse signals. Extensive previous work has exploited the sparse representation of ECG signals in compression applications. In this paper, we propose the use of wavelet domain dependencies to further reduce the number of samples in compressive sensing-based ECG compression while decreasing the computational complexity. R wave events manifest themselves as chains of large coefficients propagating across scales to form a connected subtree of the wavelet coefficient tree. We show that the incorporation of this connectedness as additional prior information into a modified version of the CoSaMP algorithm can significantly reduce the required number of samples to achieve good quality in the reconstruction. This approach also allows more control over the ECG signal reconstruction, in particular, the QRS complex, which is typically distorted when prior information is not included in the recovery. The compression algorithm was tested upon records selected from the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm leads to high compression ratios associated with low distortion levels relative to state-of-the-art compression algorithms.

  2. Experimental study on behavior of GFRP stiffened panels under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankeri, Pradeep; Ganesh Mahidhar, P. K.; Prakash, S. Suriya; Ramji, M.

    2015-03-01

    Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) materials are extensively used in the aerospace and marine industries because of their high strength and stiffness to weight ratio and excellent corrosion resistance. Stiffened panels are commonly used in aircraft wing and fuselage parts. The present study focuses on the behavior of composite stiffened panels under compressive loading. With the introduction of stiffeners to unstiffened composite plates, the structural stiffness of the panel increases resulting in higher strength and stiffness. Studies in the past have shown that the critical structural failure mode under compressive loading of a stiffened composite panel is by local buckling. The present study attempts to evaluate the mechanical behavior of composite stiffened panels under compression using blade stiffener configuration and in particular on the behavior of the skin- stiffener interface through experimental testing. A novel test fixture is developed for experimental testing of GFRP stiffened panels. A non-contact whole field strain analysis technique called digital image correlation (DIC) is used for capturing the strain and damage mechanisms. Blade stiffeners increased the strength, stiffness and reduced the out-of plane displacement at failure. The failure of both the unstiffened and stiffened panels was through local buckling rather than through material failure. DIC was able to capture the strain localization and buckling failure modes.

  3. Effects of some lubricants and evaluation of compression parameters on directly compressible powders.

    PubMed

    Uğurlu, Timuçin; Halaçoğlu, Mekin Doğa

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of conventional lubricants including a new candidate lubricant "Hexagonal boron nitride (HBN)" on direct compression powders. Lubricants such as magnesium stearate, glyceryl behenate, stearic acid, talc and polyethylene glycol6000 were studied in this article. Tablets were manufactured on an instrumented tablet press with various lubricant concentrations. Bulk and tapped densities, and Carr's index parameters were calculated for powders. Tensile strength, cohesion index, lower punch ejection force and lubricant effectiveness values were investigated for tablets. The deformation mechanisms of tablets were studied during compression from the Heckel plots with or without lubricants. Powders formulated with MGST and HBN showed better flow properties based on Carr's index. MGST was found to be the most effective lubricant based on lubricant effectiveness for tablets. HBN was found very close to MGST with the same concentrations. Other lubricants showed less effectiveness than that of MGST and HBN. It is observed that an increase in the concentration of HBN leads to decreased tensile strength and cohesion index values because of its surface-covering property. Despite covering property, HBN had no significant effect on disintegration time. Based on the Heckel plots at the level of 1%, HBN showed the most pronounced plastic character.

  4. Effects of some lubricants and evaluation of compression parameters on directly compressible powders.

    PubMed

    Uğurlu, Timuçin; Halaçoğlu, Mekin Doğa

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of conventional lubricants including a new candidate lubricant "Hexagonal boron nitride (HBN)" on direct compression powders. Lubricants such as magnesium stearate, glyceryl behenate, stearic acid, talc and polyethylene glycol6000 were studied in this article. Tablets were manufactured on an instrumented tablet press with various lubricant concentrations. Bulk and tapped densities, and Carr's index parameters were calculated for powders. Tensile strength, cohesion index, lower punch ejection force and lubricant effectiveness values were investigated for tablets. The deformation mechanisms of tablets were studied during compression from the Heckel plots with or without lubricants. Powders formulated with MGST and HBN showed better flow properties based on Carr's index. MGST was found to be the most effective lubricant based on lubricant effectiveness for tablets. HBN was found very close to MGST with the same concentrations. Other lubricants showed less effectiveness than that of MGST and HBN. It is observed that an increase in the concentration of HBN leads to decreased tensile strength and cohesion index values because of its surface-covering property. Despite covering property, HBN had no significant effect on disintegration time. Based on the Heckel plots at the level of 1%, HBN showed the most pronounced plastic character. PMID:23590449

  5. Compression failure of angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peel, L. D.; Hyer, M. W.; Shuart, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    Test results from the compression loading of (+ or - Theta/ - or + Theta)(sub 6s) angle-ply IM7-8551-7a specimens, 0 less than or = Theta less than or = 90 degs, are presented. The observed failure strengths and modes are discussed, and typical stress-strain relations shown. Using classical lamination theory and the maximum stress criterion, an attempt is made to predict failure stress as a function of Theta. This attempt results in poor correlation with test results and thus a more advanced model is used. The model, which is based on a geometrically nonlinear theory, and which was taken from previous work, includes the influence of observed layer waviness. The waviness is described by the wave length and the wave amplitude. The theory is briefly described and results from the theory are correlated with test results. It is shown that by using levels of waviness observed in the specimens, the correlation between predictions and observations is good.

  6. Effect of fly ash and silica fume on compression and fracture behaviors of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, L.; Wong, Y.L.; Poon, C.S.

    1998-02-01

    The effects of replacing cement by fly ash and silica fume on strength, compressive stress-strain relationship, and fracture behavior concrete were investigated. The investigation covered concrete mixes at different water-cementitious material ratios, which contained low and high volumes of fly ash, and with or without the addition of small amount of silica fume. It was found that fly ash substantially improved the post-peak compressive behavior of concrete, with a relatively smaller gradient in the descending part of the stress-strain curve. Low volumes of fly ash improved the tensile strength of concrete. High volume fly ash concrete showed slightly lower tensile strength, but higher values of crack tip opening displacement and final mid-span deflection in the fracture tests, with the corresponding K{sub IC} and G{sub F} values similar to or higher than the plain cement concrete. A small amount of silica fume had a large positive effect on the cylinder compressive strength and tensile strength but less on the cube compressive strength, while the fracture behavior of the resulting concrete was brittle. Improving interfacial bond between the paste and the aggregates in concrete had positive effects on K{sub IC}, but did not necessarily produce higher G{sub F} values.

  7. Study on the strength of cold-bonded high-phosphorus oolitic hematite-coal composite briquettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wen; Sun, Ti-chang; Liu, Zhen-zhen; Kou, Jue; Xu, Cheng-yan

    2014-05-01

    Composite briquettes containing high-phosphorus oolitic hematite and coal were produced with a twin-roller briquette machine using sodium carboxymethyl cellulose, molasses, starch, sodium silicate, and bentonite as binders. The effect of these binders on the strength of the composite briquettes, including cold strength and high-temperature strength, was investigated by drop testing and compression testing. It was found the addition of Ca(OH)2 and Na2CO3 not only improved the reduction of iron oxides and promoted dephosphorization during the reduction-separation process but also provided strength to the composite briquettes during the briquetting process; a compressive strength of 152.8 N per briquette was obtained when no binders were used. On this basis, the addition of molasses, sodium silicate, starch, and bentonite improved the cold strength of the composite briquettes, and a maximum compressive strength of 404.6 N per briquette was obtained by using starch. When subjected to a thermal treatment at 1200°C, all of the composite briquettes suffered from a sharp decrease in compressive strength during the initial reduction process. This decrease in strength was related to an increase in porosity of the composite briquettes. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses showed that the decrease in strength of the composite briquettes could be caused by four factors: decomposition of bonding materials, gasification of coal, transportation of byproduct gases in the composite briquettes, and thermal stress.

  8. Compressive Sensing for Quantum Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howland, Gregory A.

    This thesis describes the application of compressive sensing to several challenging problems in quantum imaging with practical and fundamental implications. Compressive sensing is a measurement technique that compresses a signal during measurement such that it can be dramatically undersampled. Compressive sensing has been shown to be an extremely efficient measurement technique for imaging, particularly when detector arrays are not available. The thesis first reviews compressive sensing through the lens of quantum imaging and quantum measurement. Four important applications and their corresponding experiments are then described in detail. The first application is a compressive sensing, photon-counting lidar system. A novel depth mapping technique that uses standard, linear compressive sensing is described. Depth maps up to 256 x 256 pixel transverse resolution are recovered with depth resolution less than 2.54 cm. The first three-dimensional, photon counting video is recorded at 32 x 32 pixel resolution and 14 frames-per-second. The second application is the use of compressive sensing for complementary imaging---simultaneously imaging the transverse-position and transverse-momentum distributions of optical photons. This is accomplished by taking random, partial projections of position followed by imaging the momentum distribution on a cooled CCD camera. The projections are shown to not significantly perturb the photons' momenta while allowing high resolution position images to be reconstructed using compressive sensing. A variety of objects and their diffraction patterns are imaged including the double slit, triple slit, alphanumeric characters, and the University of Rochester logo. The third application is the use of compressive sensing to characterize spatial entanglement of photon pairs produced by spontaneous parametric downconversion. The technique gives a theoretical speedup N2/log N for N-dimensional entanglement over the standard raster scanning technique

  9. Microstructure and Tensile Properties of Multiple Compressed CuZn Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, F. Y.; Cao, Q. D.; Xiao, J. R.; Dong, X. H.; Ma, S. J.; Zhang, X. P.

    2016-10-01

    The effects of zinc content, preannealing temperature and time, and a number of compression passes on the microstructure and tensile properties of multiple compressed (MCed) CuZn alloys were studied by the orthogonal experimental design method. The grain size of the CuZn alloys was refined by multiple compression (MC), which improved the ultimate tensile strength and tensile yield strength of the annealed CuZn alloys. The degree of grain refinement increased with decreasing grain size of the annealed materials. Fragmentation of the α-Cu and secondary phases during the MC process led to the grain refinement. The zinc content, preannealing temperature and time, and a number of compression passes were therefore found to have a very significant effect on the tensile properties of the MCed material.

  10. Microstructure and Tensile Properties of Multiple Compressed CuZn Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, F. Y.; Cao, Q. D.; Xiao, J. R.; Dong, X. H.; Ma, S. J.; Zhang, X. P.

    2016-08-01

    The effects of zinc content, preannealing temperature and time, and a number of compression passes on the microstructure and tensile properties of multiple compressed (MCed) CuZn alloys were studied by the orthogonal experimental design method. The grain size of the CuZn alloys was refined by multiple compression (MC), which improved the ultimate tensile strength and tensile yield strength of the annealed CuZn alloys. The degree of grain refinement increased with decreasing grain size of the annealed materials. Fragmentation of the α-Cu and secondary phases during the MC process led to the grain refinement. The zinc content, preannealing temperature and time, and a number of compression passes were therefore found to have a very significant effect on the tensile properties of the MCed material.

  11. What controls the strength and brittleness of shale rocks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybacki, Erik; Reinicke, Andreas; Meier, Tobias; Makasi, Masline; Dresen, Georg

    2014-05-01

    With respect to the productivity of gas shales, in petroleum science the mechanical behavior of shales is often classified into rock types of high and low 'brittleness', sometimes also referred to as 'fraccability'. The term brittleness is not well defined and different definitions exist, associated with elastic properties (Poisson's ratio, Young's modulus), with strength parameters (compressive and tensile strength), frictional properties (cohesion, friction coefficient), hardness (indentation), or with the strain or energy budget (ratio of reversible to the total strain or energy, respectively). Shales containing a high amount of clay and organic matter are usually considered as less brittle. Similarly, the strength of shales is usually assumed to be low if they contain a high fraction of weak phases. We performed mechanical tests on a series of shales with different mineralogical compositions, varying porosity, and low to high maturity. Using cylindrical samples, we determined the uniaxial and triaxial compressive strength, static Young's modulus, the tensile strength, and Mode I fracture toughness. The results show that in general the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) linearly increases with increasing Young's modulus (E) and both parameters increase with decreasing porosity. However, the strength and elastic modulus is not uniquely correlated with the mineral content. For shales with a relatively low quartz and high carbonate content, UCS and E increase with increasing quartz content, whereas for shales with a relatively low amount for carbonates, but high quartz content, both parameters increase with decreasing fraction of the weak phases (clays, kerogen). In contrast, the average tensile strength of all shale-types appears to increase with increasing quartz fraction. The internal friction coefficient of all investigated shales decreases with increasing pressure and may approach rather high values (up to ≡ 1). Therefore, the mechanical strength and

  12. High Strength and Thermally Stable Nanostructured Magnesium Alloys and Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yuan-Wei

    Magnesium and its alloys are currently in the spotlight of global research because of the need to limit energy consumption and reduce the environmental impact. In particular, their low densities compared to other structural metals make them a very attractive alternative in the automobile and aerospace industries. However, their low strength compared to other structural materials (e.g. Al and steels) has limited their widespread application. This dissertation presents the results of developing and investigation of a high strength nanostructured magnesium-aluminum alloy and composite. The nanostructured magnesium alloy is prepared by cryomilling and consolidated by spark-plasma-sintering. Focused ion beam is used to prepare micropillars with different diameters ranging from 1.5 to 8 mum and micro-compression test is conducted by nanoindenter in order to evaluate the mechanical properties. The yield strength obtained in the present study is around three times higher than conventional magnesium alloys (120 MPa vs. 370 MPa). The yield strength of the nanostructured magnesium alloy is further improved through hot extrusion, resulting in a yield strength of 550 MPa and an ultimate strength of 580 MPa. The nanostructured magnesium alloy exhibits a strong size-dependence, and a significant improvement in strength is observed when the pillar diameter is reduced to below 3.5 mum. The deformation mechanisms of the compressed pillars were characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The size-induced strengthening is attributed to a less number of dislocation sources along with a higher activity of non-basal deformation mechanisms. We have also developed a high strength and thermally stable nanostructured magnesium composite by adding diamantane. A yield strength of 500 MPa is achieved, moreover, excellent thermal stability is demonstrated in the magnesium alloy containing diamantanes. The strength and grain size are thermally stable after annealing at 400°C for 100

  13. Variable compression ratio control

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.A.

    1988-04-19

    In a four cycle engine that includes a crankshaft having a plural number of main shaft sections defining the crankshaft rotational axis and a plural number of crank arms defining orbital shaft sections, a plural number of combustion cylinders, a movable piston within each cylinder, each cylinder and its associated piston defining a combustion chamber, a connecting rod connecting each piston to an orbital shaft section of the crankshaft, and a plural number of stationary support walls spaced along the crankshaft axis for absorbing crankshaft forces: the improvement is described comprising means for adjustably supporting the crankshaft on the stationary walls such that the crankshaft rotational axis is adjustable along the piston-cylinder axis for the purpose of varying a resulting engine compression ratio; the adjustable support means comprising a circular cavity in each stationary wall. A circular disk swivably is seated in each cavity, each circular disk having a circular opening therethrough eccentric to the disk center. The crankshaft is arranged so that respective ones of its main shaft sections are located within respective ones of the circular openings; means for rotating each circular disk around its center so that the main shaft sections of the crankshaft are adjusted toward and away from the combustion chamber; a pinion gear on an output end of the crankshaft in axial alignment with and positioned beyond the respective ones of the main shaft sections, and a rotary output gear located about and engaged with teeth extending from the pinion gear.

  14. Compression relief engine brake

    SciTech Connect

    Meneely, V.A.

    1987-10-06

    A compression relief brake is described for four cycle internal-combustion engines, comprising: a pressurized oil supply; means for selectively pressurizing a hydraulic circuit with oil from the oil supply; a master piston and cylinder communicating with a slave piston and cylinder via the hydraulic circuit; an engine exhaust valve mechanically coupled to the engine and timed to open during the exhaust cycle of the engine the exhaust valve coupled to the slave piston. The exhaust valve is spring-based in a closed state to contact a valve seat; a sleeve frictionally and slidably disposed within a cavity defined by the slave piston which cavity communicates with the hydraulic circuit. When the hydraulic circuit is selectively pressurized and the engine is operating the sleeve entraps an incompressible volume of oil within the cavity to generate a displacement of the slave piston within the slave cylinder, whereby a first gap is maintained between the exhaust valve and its associated seat; and means for reciprocally activating the master piston for increasing the pressure within the previously pressurized hydraulic circuit during at least a portion of the expansion cycle of the engine whereby a second gap is reciprocally maintained between the exhaust valve and its associated seat.

  15. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  16. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  17. Spin resonance strength calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Courant,E.D.

    2008-10-06

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  18. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  19. Best compression: Reciprocating or rotary?

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, C.

    1997-07-01

    A compressor is a device used to increase the pressure of a compressible fluid. The inlet pressure can vary from a deep vacuum to a high positive pressure. The discharge pressure can range from subatmospheric levels to tens of thousands of pounds per square inch. Compressors come in numerous forms, but for oilfield applications there are two primary types, reciprocating and rotary. Both reciprocating and rotary compressors are grouped in the intermittent mode of compression. Intermittent is cyclic in nature, in that a specific quantity of gas is ingested by the compressor, acted upon and discharged before the cycle is repeated. Reciprocating compression is the most common form of compression used for oilfield applications. Rotary screw compressors have a long history but are relative newcomers to oilfield applications. The rotary screw compressor-technically a helical rotor compressor-dates back to 1878. That was when the first rotary screw was manufactured for the purpose of compressing air. Today thousands of rotary screw compression packages are being used throughout the world to compress natural gas.

  20. Uniaxial compressive behavior of micro-pillars of dental enamel characterized in multiple directions.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ezgi D; Jelitto, Hans; Schneider, Gerold A

    2015-04-01

    In this work, the compressive elastic modulus and failure strength values of bovine enamel at the first hierarchical level formed by hydroxyapatite (HA) nanofibers and organic matter are identified in longitudinal, transverse and oblique direction with the uniaxial micro-compression method. The elastic modulus values (∼70 GPa) measured here are within the range of results reported in the literature but these values were found surprisingly uniform in all orientations as opposed to the previous nanoindentation findings revealing anisotropic elastic properties in enamel. Failure strengths were recorded up to ∼1.7 GPa and different failure modes (such as shear, microbuckling, fiber fracture) governed by the orientation of the HA nanofibers were visualized. Structural irregularities leading to mineral contacts between the nanofibers are postulated as the main reason for the high compressive strength and direction-independent elastic behavior on enamels first hierarchical level.

  1. Dynamic response of kovar to shock and ramp-wave compression.

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Dolores M.; Hall, Clint Allen; Wise, Jack LeRoy; Jones, Scott Christopher; Asay, James Russell

    2007-08-01

    Complementary gas-gun and electro-magnetic pulse tests conducted in Sandia's Dynamic Integrated Compression Experimental (DICE) Facility have, respectively, probed the behavior of electronic-grade Kovar samples under controlled impact and intermediate-strain-rate ICE (Isentropic Compression Experiment) loading. In all tests, velocity interferometer (VISAR) diagnostics provided time-resolved measurements of sample response for conditions involving one-dimensional (i:e:, uniaxial strain) compression and release. Wave-profile data from the gas-gun impact experiments have been analyzed to assess the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL), Hugoniot equation of state, spall strength, and high-pressure yield strength of shocked Kovar. The ICE wave-profile data have been interpreted to determine the locus of isentropic stress-strain states generated in Kovar for deformation rates substantially lower than those associated with a shock process. The impact and ICE results have been compared to examine the influence of loading rate on high-pressure strength.

  2. Thermal Effects on the Compressive Behavior of IM7/PET15 Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Sandra Polesky

    2003-01-01

    The effect of changing operating temperature on the compressive response of IM7/PETI5 composite laminates is investigated within this paper. The three temperatures evaluated for this study were 129 C, 21 C, and 177 C, a spectrum from cryogenic to an elevated operating temperature. Laminate compressive strength property testing was conducted using the Wyoming Combined Load Compression fixture to generate strength data at the three operating temperatures of interest for several lay-ups. A three-dimensional finite element analysis model of a [90/0]8s composite laminate subject to compressive loading is developed. The model is used to study the key attributes of the laminate that significantly influence the state of stress in the laminate. Both the resin rich layer located between lamina and the thermal residual stresses present in the laminate due to curing are included in the analysis model. For the laminate modeled, the effect of modeling temperature dependent material properties was determined to be insignificant for the operating temperatures studied. Simply using the material properties measured at the operating temperature of interest was sufficient for predicting stresses accurately in a linear analysis for the current problem. The three-dimensional analysis results revealed that the application of an applied compressive axial load in the 0-degree direction decreased the interlaminar stresses present in the laminate initially due to curing. Therefore, failure was concluded not be attributable to the interlaminar stresses in the composite laminate being studied when a compressive load is applied. The magnitude of the measured laminate compressive strength change with a change in temperature is concluded to be dominated by the change in the lamina compressive axial strength with a change in temperature.

  3. Compression Pylon Reduces Interference Drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James C., Jr.; Carlson, John R.

    1989-01-01

    New design reduces total drag by 4 percent. Pylon reduces fuselage/wing/pylon/nacelle-channel compressibility losses without creating additional drag associated with other areas of pylon. Minimum cross-sectional area of channel occurs at trailing edge of wing. Velocity of flow in channel always nearly subsonic, reducing compressibility losses associated with supersonic flow. Flow goes past trailing edge before returning to ambient conditions, resulting in no additional drag to aircraft. Designed to compress flow beneath wing by reducing velocity in this channel, thereby reducing shockwave losses and providing increase in wing lift.

  4. Context-Aware Image Compression

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jacky C. K.; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Chen, Claire L.; Jalali, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    We describe a physics-based data compression method inspired by the photonic time stretch wherein information-rich portions of the data are dilated in a process that emulates the effect of group velocity dispersion on temporal signals. With this coding operation, the data can be downsampled at a lower rate than without it. In contrast to previous implementation of the warped stretch compression, here the decoding can be performed without the need of phase recovery. We present rate-distortion analysis and show improvement in PSNR compared to compression via uniform downsampling. PMID:27367904

  5. Partial transparency of compressed wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Sugimori, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    We have developed novel wood composite with optical transparency at arbitrary region. Pores in wood cells have a great variation in size. These pores expand the light path in the sample, because the refractive indexes differ between constituents of cell and air in lumen. In this study, wood compressed to close to lumen had optical transparency. Because the condition of the compression of wood needs the plastic deformation, wood was impregnated phenolic resin. The optimal condition for high transmission is compression ratio above 0.7.

  6. Designing experiments through compressed sensing.

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Joseph G.; Ridzal, Denis

    2013-06-01

    In the following paper, we discuss how to design an ensemble of experiments through the use of compressed sensing. Specifically, we show how to conduct a small number of physical experiments and then use compressed sensing to reconstruct a larger set of data. In order to accomplish this, we organize our results into four sections. We begin by extending the theory of compressed sensing to a finite product of Hilbert spaces. Then, we show how these results apply to experiment design. Next, we develop an efficient reconstruction algorithm that allows us to reconstruct experimental data projected onto a finite element basis. Finally, we verify our approach with two computational experiments.

  7. Compressibility effects on dynamic stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Lawrence W.; Chandrasekhara, M. S.

    1996-12-01

    Dynamic stall delay of flow over airfoils rapidly pitching past the static stall angle has been studied by many scientists. However, the effect of compressibility on this dynamic stall behavior has been less comprehensively studied. This review presents a detailed assessment of research performed on this subject, including a historical review of work performed on both aircraft and helicopters, and offers insight into the impact of compressibility on the complex aerodynamic phenomenon known as dynamic stall. It also documents the major effect that compressibility can have on dynamic stall events, and the complete change of physics of the stall process that can occur as free-stream Mach number is increased.

  8. Damage development under compression-compression fatigue loading in a stitched uniwoven graphite/epoxy composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandermey, Nancy E.; Morris, Don H.; Masters, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Damage initiation and growth under compression-compression fatigue loading were investigated for a stitched uniweave material system with an underlying AS4/3501-6 quasi-isotropic layup. Performance of unnotched specimens having stitch rows at either 0 degree or 90 degrees to the loading direction was compared. Special attention was given to the effects of stitching related manufacturing defects. Damage evaluation techniques included edge replication, stiffness monitoring, x-ray radiography, residual compressive strength, and laminate sectioning. It was found that the manufacturing defect of inclined stitches had the greatest adverse effect on material performance. Zero degree and 90 degree specimen performances were generally the same. While the stitches were the source of damage initiation, they also slowed damage propagation both along the length and across the width and affected through-the-thickness damage growth. A pinched layer zone formed by the stitches particularly affected damage initiation and growth. The compressive failure mode was transverse shear for all specimens, both in static compression and fatigue cycling effects.

  9. Notch strength of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    The notch strength of composites is discussed. The point stress and average stress criteria relate the notched strength of a laminate to the average strength of a relatively long tensile coupon. Tests of notched specimens in which microstrain gages have been placed at or near the edges of the holes have measured strains much larger that those measured in an unnotched tensile coupon. Orthotropic stress concentration analyses of failed notched laminates have also indicated that failure occurred at strains much larger than those experienced on tensile coupons with normal gage lengths. This suggests that the high strains at the edge of a hole can be related to the very short length of fiber subjected to these strains. Lockheed has attempted to correlate a series of tests of several laminates with holes ranging from 0.19 to 0.50 in. Although the average stress criterion correlated well with test results for hole sizes equal to or greater than 0.50 in., it over-estimated the laminate strength in the range of hole sizes from 0.19 to 0.38 in. It thus appears that a theory is needed that is based on the mechanics of failure and is more generally applicable to the range of hole sizes and the varieties of laminates found in aircraft construction.

  10. High strength composites evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, S.M.

    1992-02-01

    A high-strength, thick-section, graphite/epoxy composite was identified. The purpose of this development effort was to evaluate candidate materials and provide LANL with engineering properties. Eight candidate materials (Samples 1000, 1100, 1200, 1300, 1400, 1500, 1600, and 1700) were chosen for evaluation. The Sample 1700 thermoplastic material was the strongest overall.

  11. Gender Differences in Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyward, Vivian H.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This investigation examined gender differences of 103 physically active men and women in upper and lower body strength as a function of lean body weight and the distribution of muscle and subcutaneous fat in the upper and lower limbs. Results are discussed. (Author/MT)

  12. Uniaxial and triaxial compression tests of silicon carbide ceramics under quasi-static loading condition.

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, Rebecca Moss; Lee, Moo Yul; Bronowski, David R.

    2005-02-01

    To establish mechanical properties and failure criteria of silicon carbide (SiC-N) ceramics, a series of quasi-static compression tests has been completed using a high-pressure vessel and a unique sample alignment jig. This report summarizes the test methods, set-up, relevant observations, and results from the constitutive experimental efforts. Results from the uniaxial and triaxial compression tests established the failure threshold for the SiC-N ceramics in terms of stress invariants (I{sub 1} and J{sub 2}) over the range 1246 < I{sub 1} < 2405. In this range, results are fitted to the following limit function (Fossum and Brannon, 2004) {radical}J{sub 2}(MPa) = a{sub 1} - a{sub 3}e -a{sub 2}(I{sub 1}/3) + a{sub 4} I{sub 1}/3, where a{sub 1} = 10181 MPa, a{sub 2} = 4.2 x 10{sup -4}, a{sub 3} = 11372 MPa, and a{sub 4} = 1.046. Combining these quasistatic triaxial compression strength measurements with existing data at higher pressures naturally results in different values for the least-squares fit to this function, appropriate over a broader pressure range. These triaxial compression tests are significant because they constitute the first successful measurements of SiC-N compressive strength under quasistatic conditions. Having an unconfined compressive strength of {approx}3800 MPa, SiC-N has been heretofore tested only under dynamic conditions to achieve a sufficiently large load to induce failure. Obtaining reliable quasi-static strength measurements has required design of a special alignment jig and load-spreader assembly, as well as redundant gages to ensure alignment. When considered in combination with existing dynamic strength measurements, these data significantly advance the characterization of pressure-dependence of strength, which is important for penetration simulations where failed regions are often at lower pressures than intact regions.

  13. Elastic properties, strength and damage tolerance of pultruded composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Mrinal Chandra

    Pultruded composites are candidate materials for civil engineering infrastructural applications due their higher corrosion resistance and lower life cycle cost. Efficient use of materials like structural members requires thorough understanding of the mechanism that affects their response. The present investigation addresses the modeling and characterization of E-glass fiber/polyester resin matrix pultruded composites in the form of sheets of various thicknesses. The elastic constants were measured using static, vibration and ultrasonic methods. Two types of piezoelectric crystals were used in ultrasonic measurements. Finally, the feasibility of using a single specimen, in the form of a circular disk, was shown in measuring all the elastic constants using ultrasonic technique. The effects of stress gradient on tensile strength were investigated. A large number of specimens, parallel and transverse to the pultrusion direction, were tested in tension, 3-point flexure, and 4-point flexure. A 2-parameter Weibull model was applied to predict the tensile strength from the flexure tests. The measured and Weibull-predicted ratios did not show consistent agreement. Microstructural observations suggested that the flaw distribution in the material was not uniform, which appears to be a basic requirement for the Weibull distribution. Compressive properties were measured using a short-block compression test specimen of 44.4-mm long and 25.4-mm wide. Specimens were tested at 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 90° orientations. The compression test specimen was modeled using 4-noded isoparametric layered plate and shell elements. The predicted elastic properties for the roving layer and the continuous strand mat layer was used for the finite element study. The damage resistance and damage tolerance were investigated experimentally. Using a quasi-static indentation loading, damage was induced at various incrementally increased force levels to investigate the damage growth process. Damage

  14. Compression of thick laminated composite beams with initial impact-like damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breivik, N. L.; Guerdal, Z.; Griffin, O. H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    While the study of compression after impact of laminated composites has been under consideration for many years, the complexity of the damage initiated by low velocity impact has not lent itself to simple predictive models for compression strength. The damage modes due to non-penetrating, low velocity impact by large diameter objects can be simulated using quasi-static three-point bending. The resulting damage modes are less coupled and more easily characterized than actual impact damage modes. This study includes the compression testing of specimens with well documented initial damage states obtained from three-point bend testing. Compression strengths and failure modes were obtained for quasi-isotropic stacking sequences from 0.24 to 1.1 inches thick with both grouped and interspersed ply stacking. Initial damage prior to compression testing was divided into four classifications based on the type, extent, and location of the damage. These classifications are multiple through-thickness delaminations, isolated delamination, damage near the surface, and matrix cracks. Specimens from each classification were compared to specimens tested without initial damage in order to determine the effects of the initial damage on the final compression strength and failure modes. A finite element analysis was used to aid in the understanding and explanation of the experimental results.

  15. Loading rate sensitivity of open hole composites in compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubowinski, Steve J.; Guynn, E. G.; Elber, Wolf; Whitcomb, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    The results are reported of an experimental study on the compressive, time-dependent behavior of graphite fiber reinforced polymer composite laminates with open holes. The effect of loading rate on compressive strength was determined for six material systems ranging from brittle epoxies to thermoplastics at both 75 F and 220 F. Specimens were loaded to failure using different loading rates. The slope of the strength versus elapsed time-to-failure curve was used to rank the materials' loading rate sensitivity. All of the materials had greater strength at 75 F than at 220 F. All the materials showed loading rate effects in the form of reduced failure strength for longer elapsed-time-to-failure. Loading rate sensitivity was less at 220 F than the same material at 70 F. However, C12000/ULTEM and IM7/8551-7 were more sensitive to loading rate than the other materials at 220 F. AS4/APC2 laminates with 24, 32, and 48 plies and 1/16 and 1/4 inch diameter holes were tested. The sensitivity to loading rate was less for either increasing number of plies or larger hole size. The failure of the specimens made from brittle resins was accompanied by extensive delaminations while the failure of the roughened systems was predominantly by shear crippling. Fewer delamination failures were observed at the higher temperature.

  16. Prediction of granule physical property by a novel compression energy of wet powder.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Yoshito; Watano, Satoru

    2006-09-01

    Wet granulation is a very important process and a reliable evaluation method for formulation study; thus it requires appropriate process control. In this study, a novel and effective method that involves a compression test of wet powder is proposed. Here, the compression energy, which could predict the capability of the wet powder for extrusion granulation as well as the physical properties of the final products, is used as a novel characteristic of wet powder. The compression energy was defined as the energy consumption derived from the compression speed and the transmission loss during the compression test. Lactose monohydrate was mixed with various additives such as hydroxypropylcellulose in the mass ratio of 0-10%. Various amounts of water were fed into the mixtures, which were kneaded in a planetary motion mixer to prepare the kneaded wet powders. The characteristics of these powders were evaluated by the compression energy. The kneaded wet powders were then extruded through an extrusion granulator, the electrical loads of the granulator during the operation were analyzed as the extrusion energy, and the physical properties of extruded granules were investigated. As a result, the granule strength and granule size distribution showed a good correlation with the compression energy. A good correlation was also observed between the compression energy of the kneaded wet powder and the extrusion energy regardless of the different additives and water contents. It was concluded that the compression energy of the wet powder could be used for the formulation study and the process control of wet granulation. PMID:16946528

  17. Strong Compression of a Magnetic Field with a Laser-Accelerated Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Hitoki; Namiki, Tomonori; Nishida, Akinori; Kodama, Ryosuke; Sakawa, Youichi; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Morita, Taichi; Nishio, Kento; Ide, Takao

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate the generation of high magnetic fields for condensed matter research using a high-power laser system. A cavity in which a seed magnetic field is applied is compressed by a kJ ns laser pulse. The time history of the compressed magnetic field is monitored by observing the Faraday effect rotation of polarization of a probe pulse in a glass fiber. To maintain a low-temperature condition in the final high-field region, we put a high-resistance foil around the final compression area. If we assume the length of the compression region is equal to the laser spot size, a magnetic field of more than 800 T is observed by Faraday rotation. Because of the large mass of the compression foil, this high magnetic field is sustained during almost 2 ns. During compression, a rarefaction wave from the backside of the accelerated foil and expanding material from the inner protection foil affect the magnetic field compression history, but the final compressed magnetic field strength agrees with the ratio between the initial sample area and the compressed cavity area.

  18. Efficient lossy compression for compressive sensing acquisition of images in compressive sensing imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangwei; Lan, Xuguang; Yang, Meng; Xue, Jianru; Zheng, Nanning

    2014-12-05

    Compressive Sensing Imaging (CSI) is a new framework for image acquisition, which enables the simultaneous acquisition and compression of a scene. Since the characteristics of Compressive Sensing (CS) acquisition are very different from traditional image acquisition, the general image compression solution may not work well. In this paper, we propose an efficient lossy compression solution for CS acquisition of images by considering the distinctive features of the CSI. First, we design an adaptive compressive sensing acquisition method for images according to the sampling rate, which could achieve better CS reconstruction quality for the acquired image. Second, we develop a universal quantization for the obtained CS measurements from CS acquisition without knowing any a priori information about the captured image. Finally, we apply these two methods in the CSI system for efficient lossy compression of CS acquisition. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed solution improves the rate-distortion performance by 0.4~2 dB comparing with current state-of-the-art, while maintaining a low computational complexity.

  19. Efficient Lossy Compression for Compressive Sensing Acquisition of Images in Compressive Sensing Imaging Systems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangwei; Lan, Xuguang; Yang, Meng; Xue, Jianru; Zheng, Nanning

    2014-01-01

    Compressive Sensing Imaging (CSI) is a new framework for image acquisition, which enables the simultaneous acquisition and compression of a scene. Since the characteristics of Compressive Sensing (CS) acquisition are very different from traditional image acquisition, the general image compression solution may not work well. In this paper, we propose an efficient lossy compression solution for CS acquisition of images by considering the distinctive features of the CSI. First, we design an adaptive compressive sensing acquisition method for images according to the sampling rate, which could achieve better CS reconstruction quality for the acquired image. Second, we develop a universal quantization for the obtained CS measurements from CS acquisition without knowing any a priori information about the captured image. Finally, we apply these two methods in the CSI system for efficient lossy compression of CS acquisition. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed solution improves the rate-distortion performance by 0.4∼2 dB comparing with current state-of-the-art, while maintaining a low computational complexity. PMID:25490597

  20. Strength of masonry blocks made with recycled concrete aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, Pierre; Dalati, Rouba El

    The idea of recycling concrete of demolished buildings aims at preserving the environment. Indeed, the reuse of concrete as aggregate in new concrete mixes helped to reduce the expenses related to construction and demolition (C&D) waste management and, especially, to protect the environment by reducing the development rate of new quarries. This paper presents the results of an experimental study conducted on masonry blocks containing aggregates resulting from concrete recycling. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of recycled aggregates on compressive strength of concrete blocks. Tests were performed on series of concrete blocks: five series each made of different proportions of recycled aggregates, and one series of reference blocks exclusively composed of natural aggregates. Tests showed that using recycled aggregates with addition of cement allows the production of concrete blocks with compressive strengths comparable to those obtained on concrete blocks made exclusively of natural aggregates.

  1. A multifluid mix model with material strength effects

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C. H.; Scannapieco, A. J.

    2012-04-23

    We present a new multifluid mix model. Its features include material strength effects and pressure and temperature nonequilibrium between mixing materials. It is applicable to both interpenetration and demixing of immiscible fluids and diffusion of miscible fluids. The presented model exhibits the appropriate smooth transition in mathematical form as the mixture evolves from multiphase to molecular mixing, extending its applicability to the intermediate stages in which both types of mixing are present. Virtual mass force and momentum exchange have been generalized for heterogeneous multimaterial mixtures. The compression work has been extended so that the resulting species energy equations are consistent with the pressure force and material strength.

  2. Elevated temperature strength of Cr-W alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Omer N.; Schrems, Karol K.

    2004-09-01

    Cr alloys containing 0-30 weight percent W were investigated for their strength and ductility. These experimental alloys are intended for use in elevated temperature applications. Alloys were melted in a water-cooled, copper-hearth arc furnace. Microstructure of the alloys was studied using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and light microscopy. A hot hardness tester was used to study the strength of these materials up to 1200ºC. Compression tests at the same temperature range were also conducted.

  3. [New aspects of compression therapy].

    PubMed

    Partsch, Bernhard; Partsch, Hugo

    2016-06-01

    In this review article the mechanisms of action of compression therapy are summarized and a survey of materials is presented together with some practical advice how and when these different devices should be applied. Some new experimental findings regarding the optimal dosage (= compression pressure) concerning an improvement of venous hemodynamics and a reduction of oedema are discussed. It is shown, that stiff, non-yielding material applied with adequate pressure provides hemodynamically superior effects compared to elastic material and that relatively low pressures reduce oedema. Compression over the calf is more important to increase the calf pump function compared to graduated compression. In patients with mixed, arterial-venous ulcers and an ABPI over 0.6 inelastic bandages not exceeding a sub-bandage pressure of 40 mmHg may increase the arterial flow and improve venous pumping function. PMID:27259340

  4. Efficient Decoding of Compressed Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassiouni, Mostafa A.; Mukherjee, Amar

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the problem of enhancing the speed of Huffman decoding of compressed data. Topics addressed include the Huffman decoding tree; multibit decoding; binary string mapping problems; and algorithms for solving mapping problems. (22 references) (LRW)

  5. Compressed gas fuel storage system

    DOEpatents

    Wozniak, John J.; Tiller, Dale B.; Wienhold, Paul D.; Hildebrand, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas vehicle fuel storage system comprised of a plurality of compressed gas pressure cells supported by shock-absorbing foam positioned within a shape-conforming container. The container is dimensioned relative to the compressed gas pressure cells whereby a radial air gap surrounds each compressed gas pressure cell. The radial air gap allows pressure-induced expansion of the pressure cells without resulting in the application of pressure to adjacent pressure cells or physical pressure to the container. The pressure cells are interconnected by a gas control assembly including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and means for connecting the fuel storage system to a vehicle power source and a refueling adapter. The gas control assembly is enclosed by a protective cover attached to the container. The system is attached to the vehicle with straps to enable the chassis to deform as intended in a high-speed collision.

  6. Comparison of Artificial Compressibility Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Housman, Jeffrey; Kwak, Dochan

    2004-01-01

    Various artificial compressibility methods for calculating the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are compared. Each method is described and numerical solutions to test problems are conducted. A comparison based on convergence behavior, accuracy, and robustness is given.

  7. Effects of multiple delaminations on compressive buckling behaviors of composite panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suemasu, Hiroshi

    1993-01-01

    Compressive buckling stability of composite panels with through-width, equally spaced multiple delaminations are investigated analytically and experimentally. An analytical method is formulated on the basis of Rayleigh-Ritz approximation technique. Timoshenko type shear effects are included. An experiment and a finite element analysis are also conducted on the present model. The analytical results agree very well with the experimental and finite element results. The buckling load, which is the compressive strength of the panel in the case of the present model, reduces significantly due to the existence of multiple delaminations. The mechanism causing the significant loss of the compressive buckling load due to the delaminations is well explained.

  8. Response of notched AS4/PEEK laminates to tension/compression loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonds, Robert A.; Stinchcomb, Wayne W.

    1989-01-01

    Fatigue life, damage-initiation and propagation, and residual strength data are presently examined to ascertain the response of notched AS4/PEEK specimens to fully reversed tension/compression loading. Stiffness measurements made during the low-level fatigue history show that compression stiffness and tension stiffness degrade throughout the fatigue life. Damage to specimens fatigued at higher cyclic stresses developed primarily in the direction perpendicular to the loading. As in the case of specimens fatigued at lower stress levels, residual compressive stress decreased with damage development.

  9. Compressive behaviour of child and adult cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Öhman, Caroline; Baleani, Massimiliano; Pani, Carla; Taddei, Fulvia; Alberghini, Marco; Viceconti, Marco; Manfrini, Marco

    2011-10-01

    In this study, cortical bone tissue from children was investigated. It is extremely difficult to obtain human child tissue. Therefore, the only possibility was to use bone tissue, free from any lesion, collected from young bone cancer patients. The compressive mechanical behaviour of child bone tissue was compared to the behaviour of adult tissue. Moreover, two hypotheses were tested: 1) that the mechanical behaviour of both groups is correlated to ash density; 2) that yield strain is an invariant. Small parts of the diaphysis of femora or tibiae from 12 children (4-15 years) and 12 adults (22-61 years) were collected. Cylindrical specimens were extracted from the cortical wall along the longitudinal axis of the diaphysis. A total of 107 specimens underwent compressive testing (strain rate: 0.1 s(-1)). Only the specimens showing a regular load-displacement curve (94) were considered valid and thereafter reduced to ash. It was found that the child bone tissue had significant lower compressive Young's modulus (-34%), yield stress (-38%), ultimate stress (-33%) and ash density (-17%) than the adult tissue. Conversely, higher compressive ultimate strain was found in the child group (+24%). Despite specimens extracted from both children and adults, ash density largely described the variation in tissue strength and stiffness (R(2)=in the range of 0.86-0.91). Furthermore, yield strain seemed to be roughly an invariant to subject age and tissue density. These results confirm that the mechanical properties of child cortical bone tissue are different from that of adult tissue. However, such differences are correlated to differences in tissue ash density. In fact, ash density was found to be a good predictor of strength and stiffness, also for cortical bone collected from children. Finally, the present findings support the hypothesis that compressive yield strain is an invariant.

  10. Quasi-Static and High Strain Rate Compressive Response of Injection-Molded Cenosphere/HDPE Syntactic Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharath Kumar, B. R.; Singh, Ashish Kumar; Doddamani, Mrityunjay; Luong, Dung D.; Gupta, Nikhil

    2016-07-01

    High strain rate compressive properties of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) matrix syntactic foams containing cenosphere filler are investigated. Thermoplastic matrix syntactic foams have not been studied extensively for high strain rate deformation response despite interest in them for lightweight underwater vehicle structures and consumer products. Quasi-static compression tests are conducted at 10-4 s-1, 10-3 s-1 and 10-2 s-1 strain rates. Further, a split-Hopkinson pressure bar is utilized for characterizing syntactic foams for high strain rate compression. The compressive strength of syntactic foams is higher than that of HDPE resin at the same strain rate. Yield strength shows an increasing trend with strain rate. The average yield strength values at high strain rates are almost twice the values obtained at 10-4 s-1 for HDPE resin and syntactic foams. Theoretical models are used to estimate the effectiveness of cenospheres in reinforcing syntactic foams.

  11. Numerical analysis of mechanical testing for evaluating shear strength of SiC/SiC composite joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serizawa, H.; Fujita, D.; Lewinsohn, C. A.; Singh, M.; Murakawa, H.

    2007-08-01

    As examples of the most typical methods to determine the shear strength of SiC/SiC composite joints, the asymmetrical four point bending test of a butt-joined composite, the tensile test of a lap-joined composite, and the compression test of a double-notched composite joint were analyzed by using a finite element method with the interface element. From the results, it was found that the shear strength in the asymmetrical bending test was controlled by both the surface energy and the shear strength at the interface regardless of their combination while the strength in the tensile test or the compression test was governed by the surface energy when both the surface energy and the shear strength were large. Also, the apparent shear strength of the composite joint obtained experimentally appeared to be affected by the combination of the surface energy and the shear strength at the interface.

  12. Dynamics of Strongly Compressible Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towery, Colin; Poludnenko, Alexei; Hamlington, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Strongly compressible turbulence, wherein the turbulent velocity fluctuations directly generate compression effects, plays a critical role in many important scientific and engineering problems of interest today, for instance in the processes of stellar formation and also hypersonic vehicle design. This turbulence is very unusual in comparison to ``normal,'' weakly compressible and incompressible turbulence, which is relatively well understood. Strongly compressible turbulence is characterized by large variations in the thermodynamic state of the fluid in space and time, including excited acoustic modes, strong, localized shock and rarefaction structures, and rapid heating due to viscous dissipation. The exact nature of these thermo-fluid dynamics has yet to be discerned, which greatly limits the ability of current computational engineering models to successfully treat these problems. New direct numerical simulation (DNS) results of strongly compressible isotropic turbulence will be presented along with a framework for characterizing and evaluating compressible turbulence dynamics and a connection will be made between the present diagnostic analysis and the validation of engineering turbulence models.

  13. Bringing light into the dark: effects of compression clothing on performance and recovery.

    PubMed

    Born, Dennis-Peter; Sperlich, Billy; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2013-01-01

    To assess original research addressing the effect of the application of compression clothing on sport performance and recovery after exercise, a computer-based literature research was performed in July 2011 using the electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, SPORTDiscus, and Web of Science. Studies examining the effect of compression clothing on endurance, strength and power, motor control, and physiological, psychological, and biomechanical parameters during or after exercise were included, and means and measures of variability of the outcome measures were recorded to estimate the effect size (Hedges g) and associated 95% confidence intervals for comparisons of experimental (compression) and control trials (noncompression). The characteristics of the compression clothing, participants, and study design were also extracted. The original research from peer-reviewed journals was examined using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) Scale. Results indicated small effect sizes for the application of compression clothing during exercise for short-duration sprints (10-60 m), vertical-jump height, extending time to exhaustion (such as running at VO2max or during incremental tests), and time-trial performance (3-60 min). When compression clothing was applied for recovery purposes after exercise, small to moderate effect sizes were observed in recovery of maximal strength and power, especially vertical-jump exercise; reductions in muscle swelling and perceived muscle pain; blood lactate removal; and increases in body temperature. These results suggest that the application of compression clothing may assist athletic performance and recovery in given situations with consideration of the effects magnitude and practical relevance.

  14. Lithium: Measurement of Young's Modulus and Yield Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan P Schultz

    2002-11-07

    The Lithium Collection Lens is used for anti-proton collection. In analyzing the structural behavior during operation, various material properties of lithium are often needed. properties such as density, coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal conductivity, specific heat, compressability, etc.; are well known. However, to the authors knowledge there is only one published source for Young's Modulus. This paper reviews the results from the testing of Young's Modulus and the yield strength of lithium at room temperature.

  15. Strength enhancement of concrete containing MSW incinerator ash

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, J.T. Jr.; Lewis, J.T. II

    1995-12-31

    In previous work pretreatment of fresh municipal solid waste incinerator ash with an alkalinity reduction agent was shown to markedly increase the compressive strength of portland cement concrete using the ash as fine aggregate. Recent studies have shown that aged ash does not demonstrate the same enhancement. This presentation will review the previous study, give the results of the current one and discuss the implications.

  16. Compression response of thick layer composite laminates with through-the-thickness reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Smith, Barry T.; Maiden, Janice

    1992-01-01

    Compression and compression-after-impact (CAI) tests were conducted on seven different AS4-3501-6 (0/90) 0.64-cm thick composite laminates. Four of the seven laminates had through-the-thickness (TTT) reinforcement fibers. Two TTT reinforcement methods, stitching and integral weaving, and two reinforcement fibers, Kevlar and carbon, were used. The remaining three laminates were made without TTT reinforcements and were tested to establish a baseline for comparison with the laminates having TTT reinforcement. Six of the seven laminates consisted of nine thick layers whereas the seventh material was composed of 46 thin plies. The use of thick-layer material has the potential for reducing structural part cost because of the reduced part count (layers of material). The compression strengths of the TTT reinforced laminates were approximately one half those of the materials without TTT reinforcements. However, the CAI strengths of the TTT reinforced materials were approximately twice those of materials without TTT reinforcements. The improvement in CAI strength is due to an increase in interlaminar strength produced by the TTT reinforcement. Stitched laminates had slightly higher compression and CAI strengths than the integrally woven laminates.

  17. Strength Tests of Thin-walled Duralumin Cylinders in Pure Bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Eugene E

    1933-01-01

    This report is the third of a series presenting the results of strengths tests on thin-walled cylinders and truncated cones of circular and elliptic section; it includes the results obtained from pure bending tests on 58 thin-walled duralumin cylinders of circular section with ends clamped to rigid bulkheads. The tests show that the stress on the extreme fiber at failure as calculated by the ordinary theory of bending is from 30 to 80 percent greater than the compressive stress at failure for thin-walled cylinders in compression. The tests also show that length/radius ratio has no consistent effect upon the bending strength and that the size of the wrinkles that form on the compression half of a cylinder in bending is approximately equal to the size of the wrinkles that form in the complete circumference of a cylinder of the same dimensions in compression.

  18. High-strength silk protein scaffolds for bone repair

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Biman B.; Grinberg, Ariela; Seok Gil, Eun; Panilaitis, Bruce; Kaplan, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Biomaterials for bone tissue regeneration represent a major focus of orthopedic research. However, only a handful of polymeric biomaterials are utilized today because of their failure to address critical issues like compressive strength for load-bearing bone grafts. In this study development of a high compressive strength (~13 MPa hydrated state) polymeric bone composite materials is reported, based on silk protein-protein interfacial bonding. Micron-sized silk fibers (10–600 µm) obtained utilizing alkali hydrolysis were used as reinforcement in a compact fiber composite with tunable compressive strength, surface roughness, and porosity based on the fiber length included. A combination of surface roughness, porosity, and scaffold stiffness favored human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell differentiation toward bone-like tissue in vitro based on biochemical and gene expression for bone markers. Further, minimal in vivo immunomodulatory responses suggested compatibility of the fabricated silk-fiber-reinforced composite matrices for bone engineering applications. PMID:22552231

  19. In situ nano-compression testing of irradiated copper

    PubMed Central

    Kiener, D.; Hosemann, P.; Maloy, S. A.; Minor, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing demand for energy and reduction of CO2 emissions has revived interest in nuclear energy. Designing materials for radiation environments necessitates fundamental understanding of how radiation-induced defects alter mechanical properties. Ion beams create radiation damage efficiently without material activation, but their limited penetration depth requires small-scale testing. However, strength measurements of nano-scale irradiated specimens have not been previously performed. Here we show that yield strengths approaching macroscopic values are measured from irradiated ~400 nm diameter copper specimens. Quantitative in situ nano-compression testing in a transmission electron microscope reveals that the strength of larger samples is controlled by dislocation-irradiation defect interactions, yielding size-independent strengths. Below ~400 nm, size-dependent strength results from dislocation source limitation. This transition length-scale should be universal, but depend on material and irradiation conditions. We conclude that for irradiated copper, and presumably related materials, nano-scale in situ testing can determine bulk-like yield strengths and simultaneously identify deformation mechanisms. PMID:21706011

  20. Corium crust strength measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Lomperski, S.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-11-01

    Corium strength is of interest in the context of a severe reactor accident in which molten core material melts through the reactor vessel and collects on the containment basemat. Some accident management strategies involve pouring water over the melt to solidify it and halt corium/concrete interactions. The effectiveness of this method could be influenced by the strength of the corium crust at the interface between the melt and coolant. A strong, coherent crust anchored to the containment walls could allow the yet-molten corium to fall away from the crust as it erodes the basemat, thereby thermally decoupling the melt from the coolant and sharply reducing the cooling rate. This paper presents a diverse collection of measurements of the mechanical strength of corium. The data is based on load tests of corium samples in three different contexts: (1) small blocks cut from the debris of the large-scale MACE experiments, (2) 30 cm-diameter, 75 kg ingots produced by SSWICS quench tests, and (3) high temperature crusts loaded during large-scale corium/concrete interaction (CCI) tests. In every case the corium consisted of varying proportions of UO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and the constituents of concrete to represent a LWR melt at different stages of a molten core/concrete interaction. The collection of data was used to assess the strength and stability of an anchored, plant-scale crust. The results indicate that such a crust is likely to be too weak to support itself above the melt. It is therefore improbable that an anchored crust configuration could persist and the melt become thermally decoupled from the water layer to restrict cooling and prolong an attack of the reactor cavity concrete.