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Sample records for compromises neuronal viability

  1. Methamphetamine compromises gap junctional communication in astrocytes and neurons

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Paul; Nwagbo, Chisom; Martinez, Luis R.; Eugenin, Eliseo A.

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (meth) is a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant that results in psychological and physical dependency. The long-term effects of meth within the CNS include neuronal plasticity changes, blood–brain barrier compromise, inflammation, electrical dysfunction, neuronal/glial toxicity, and an increased risk to infectious diseases including HIV. Most of the reported meth effects in the CNS are related to dysregulation of chemical synapses by altering the release and uptake of neurotransmitters, especially dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine. However, little is known about the effects of meth on connexin (Cx) containing channels, such as gap junctions (GJ) and hemichannels (HC). We examined the effects of meth on Cx expression, function, and its role in NeuroAIDS. We found that meth altered Cx expression and localization, decreased GJ communication between neurons and astrocytes, and induced the opening of Cx43/Cx36 HC. Furthermore, we found that these changes in GJ and HC induced by meth treatment were mediated by activation of dopamine receptors, suggesting that dysregulation of dopamine signaling induced by meth is essential for GJ and HC compromise. Meth-induced changes in GJ and HC contributed to amplified CNS toxicity by dysregulating glutamate metabolism and increasing the susceptibility of neurons and astrocytes to bystander apoptosis induced by HIV. Together, our results indicate that connexin containing channels, GJ and HC, are essential in the pathogenesis of meth and increase the sensitivity of the CNS to HIV CNS disease. PMID:26953131

  2. Methamphetamine compromises gap junctional communication in astrocytes and neurons.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Paul; Nwagbo, Chisom; Martinez, Luis R; Eugenin, Eliseo A

    2016-05-01

    Methamphetamine (meth) is a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant that results in psychological and physical dependency. The long-term effects of meth within the CNS include neuronal plasticity changes, blood-brain barrier compromise, inflammation, electrical dysfunction, neuronal/glial toxicity, and an increased risk to infectious diseases including HIV. Most of the reported meth effects in the CNS are related to dysregulation of chemical synapses by altering the release and uptake of neurotransmitters, especially dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine. However, little is known about the effects of meth on connexin (Cx) containing channels, such as gap junctions (GJ) and hemichannels (HC). We examined the effects of meth on Cx expression, function, and its role in NeuroAIDS. We found that meth altered Cx expression and localization, decreased GJ communication between neurons and astrocytes, and induced the opening of Cx43/Cx36 HC. Furthermore, we found that these changes in GJ and HC induced by meth treatment were mediated by activation of dopamine receptors, suggesting that dysregulation of dopamine signaling induced by meth is essential for GJ and HC compromise. Meth-induced changes in GJ and HC contributed to amplified CNS toxicity by dysregulating glutamate metabolism and increasing the susceptibility of neurons and astrocytes to bystander apoptosis induced by HIV. Together, our results indicate that connexin containing channels, GJ and HC, are essential in the pathogenesis of meth and increase the sensitivity of the CNS to HIV CNS disease. Methamphetamine (meth) is an extremely addictive central nervous system stimulant. Meth reduced gap junctional (GJ) communication by inducing internalization of connexin-43 (Cx43) in astrocytes and reducing expression of Cx36 in neurons by a mechanism involving activation of dopamine receptors (see cartoon). Meth-induced changes in Cx containing channels increased extracellular levels of glutamate and resulted in higher

  3. 3-bromopyruvate inhibits glycolysis, depletes cellular glutathione, and compromises the viability of cultured primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ehrke, Eric; Arend, Christian; Dringen, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    The pyruvate analogue 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) is an electrophilic alkylator that is considered a promising anticancer drug because it has been shown to kill cancer cells efficiently while having little toxic effect on nontumor cells. To test for potential adverse effects of 3-BP on brain cells, we exposed cultured primary rat astrocytes to 3-BP and investigated the effects of this compound on cell viability, glucose metabolism, and glutathione (GSH) content. The presence of 3-BP severely compromised cell viability and slowed cellular glucose consumption and lactate production in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, with half-maximal effects observed at about 100 µM 3-BP after 4 hr of incubation. The cellular hexokinase activity was not affected in 3-BP-treated astrocytes, whereas within 30 min after application of 3-BP the activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was inhibited, and cellular GSH content was depleted in a concentration-dependent manner, with half-maximal effects observed at about 30 µM 3-BP. The depletion of cellular GSH after exposure to 100 µM 3-BP was not prevented by the presence of 10 mM of the monocarboxylates lactate or pyruvate, suggesting that 3-BP is not taken up into astrocytes predominantly by monocarboxylate transporters. The data suggest that inhibition of glycolysis by inactivation of GAPDH and GSH depletion contributes to the toxicity that was observed for 3-BP-treated cultured astrocytes.

  4. Assessment of cell viability in primary neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Aras, Mandar A; Hartnett, Karen A; Aizenman, Elias

    2008-07-01

    This unit contains five protocols for assaying cell viability in vitro using primary neuronal cultures, including a novel method for use with transfected neurons. Three of the assays are based on the principle that cell death cascades alter membrane permeability. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay measures the amount of the cytoplasmic enzyme released into the bathing medium, while the trypan blue and propidium iodide assays measure the ability of cells to exclude dye from their cytoplasm. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay measures the mitochondrial activity of viable cells by quantifying the conversion of the tetrazolium salt to its formazan product. Finally, the fifth assay details the measurement of luciferase expression as an indication of neuronal viability within a relatively small population of transfected neurons.

  5. Human Cerebrospinal Fluid Promotes Neuronal Viability and Activity of Hippocampal Neuronal Circuits In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Alcazar, Marta; Culley, Georgia; Lyckenvik, Tim; Mobarrez, Kristoffer; Bjorefeldt, Andreas; Wasling, Pontus; Seth, Henrik; Asztely, Frederik; Harrer, Andrea; Iglseder, Bernhard; Aigner, Ludwig; Hanse, Eric; Illes, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    For decades it has been hypothesized that molecules within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diffuse into the brain parenchyma and influence the function of neurons. However, the functional consequences of CSF on neuronal circuits are largely unexplored and unknown. A major reason for this is the absence of appropriate neuronal in vitro model systems, and it is uncertain if neurons cultured in pure CSF survive and preserve electrophysiological functionality in vitro. In this article, we present an approach to address how human CSF (hCSF) influences neuronal circuits in vitro. We validate our approach by comparing the morphology, viability, and electrophysiological function of single neurons and at the network level in rat organotypic slice and primary neuronal cultures cultivated either in hCSF or in defined standard culture media. Our results demonstrate that rodent hippocampal slices and primary neurons cultured in hCSF maintain neuronal morphology and preserve synaptic transmission. Importantly, we show that hCSF increases neuronal viability and the number of electrophysiologically active neurons in comparison to the culture media. In summary, our data indicate that hCSF represents a physiological environment for neurons in vitro and a superior culture condition compared to the defined standard media. Moreover, this experimental approach paves the way to assess the functional consequences of CSF on neuronal circuits as well as suggesting a novel strategy for central nervous system (CNS) disease modeling. PMID:26973467

  6. Role of protein histidine phosphatase for viability of neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Susanne; Faber, Daniela; Fischer, Daniel; Litterscheid, Sarah; Krieglstein, Josef

    2009-04-06

    We recently found protein histidine phosphatase (PHP) in eukaryotes and identified ATP-citrate lyase (ACL) and the beta-subunit of G-proteins as its substrates. The aim of the present study was to get information on the significance of PHP for cellular function and viability. PHP was overexpressed by a viral vector in SH-SY5Y cells, a human neuroblastoma cell line, and in primary cultures of cortical neurons from embryonic (E19) rats. Furthermore, PHP was downregulated by siRNA in SH-SY5Y cells. We could demonstrate that overexpression of PHP decreased the phosphorylation state of ACL. Accordingly, the activity of ACL seemed to be reduced and subsequently, the viability of the cells was diminished. On the other hand, downregulation of PHP did not clearly influence phosphorylation and activity of ACL as well as viability of the cells. The results suggest that an increased activity of PHP impairs cellular function whereas downregulation of PHP does not.

  7. Dipeptide Piracetam Analogue Noopept Improves Viability of Hippocampal HT-22 Neurons in the Glutamate Toxicity Model.

    PubMed

    Antipova, T A; Nikolaev, S V; Ostrovskaya, P U; Gudasheva, T A; Seredenin, S B

    2016-05-01

    Effect of noopept (N-phenylacetyl-prolylglycine ethyl ester) on viability of neurons exposed to neurotoxic action of glutamic acid (5 mM) was studied in vitro in immortalized mouse hippocampal HT-22 neurons. Noopept added to the medium before or after glutamic acid improved neuronal survival in a concentration range of 10-11-10-5 M. Comparison of the effective noopept concentrations determined in previous studies on cultured cortical and cerebellar neurons showed that hippocampal neurons are more sensitive to the protective effect of noopept.

  8. Assessment of Neuronal Viability Using Fluorescein Diacetate-Propidium Iodide Double Staining in Cerebellar Granule Neuron Culture.

    PubMed

    Jiajia, Lin; Shinghung, Mak; Jiacheng, Zheng; Jialing, Wang; Dilin, Xu; Shengquan, Hu; Zaijun, Zhang; Qinwen, Wang; Yifan, Han; Wei, Cui

    2017-05-10

    Primary cultured Cerebellar Granule Neurons (CGNs) have been widely used as an in vitro model in neuroscience and neuropharmacology research. However, the co-existence of glial cells and neurons in CGN culture might lead to biases in the accurate assessment of neuronal viability. Fluorescein diacetate (FDA) and Propidium Iodide (PI) double staining has been used to measure cell viability by simultaneously evaluating the viable and dead cells. We used FDA-PI double staining to improve the sensitivities of the colorimetric assays and to evaluate neuronal viability in CGNs. Furthermore, we added blue fluorescent DNA stains (e.g., Hoechst) to improve the accuracy. This protocol describes how to improve the accuracy of assessment of neuronal viability by using these methods in CGN culture. Using this protocol, the number of glial cells can be excluded by using fluorescence microscopy. A similar strategy can be applied to distinguish the unwanted glial cells from neurons in various mixed cell cultures, such as primary cortical culture and hippocampal culture.

  9. Hippocampus Glutamate and N-Acetyl Aspartate Markers of Excitotoxic Neuronal Compromise in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Isabelle M; Crowley, David J; Silveri, Marisa M; Rauch, Scott L; Jensen, J Eric

    2017-03-08

    Hippocampus atrophy is implicated in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and may partly reflect stress-induced glutamate excitotoxicity that culminates in neuron injury and manifests as re-experiencing symptoms and other memory abnormalities. This study used high-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to determine whether PTSD is associated with lower hippocampus levels of the neuron marker N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), along with higher levels of glutamate (Glu) and Glu/NAA. We also predicted that metabolite levels would correlate with re-experiencing symptoms and lifetime trauma load. Twenty-four adult PTSD patients and 23 trauma-exposed normal controls (TENC) underwent 4T MRS of the left and right hippocampus. Participants received psychiatric interviews, and completed the Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire to define lifetime trauma load. Relative to TENC participants, PTSD patients exhibited significantly lower NAA in right and left hippocampi, and significantly higher Glu and Glu/NAA in the right hippocampus. Re-experiencing symptoms were negatively correlated with left and right NAA, and positively correlated with right Glu and right Glu/NAA. Trauma load was positively correlated with right Glu/NAA in PTSD patients. When re-experiencing symptoms and trauma load were examined together in relation to right Glu/NAA, only re-experiencing symptoms remained a significant correlate. This represents the first report that PTSD is associated with MRS markers of hippocampus Glu excess, together with indices of compromised neuron integrity. Their robust associations with re-experiencing symptoms affirm that MRS indices of hippocampus neuron integrity and glutamate metabolism may reflect biomarkers of clinically significant disease variation in PTSD.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 8 March 2017; doi:10.1038/npp.2017.32.

  10. Identification of neurotoxic cytokines by profiling Alzheimer's disease tissues and neuron culture viability screening.

    PubMed

    Wood, Levi B; Winslow, Ashley R; Proctor, Elizabeth A; McGuone, Declan; Mordes, Daniel A; Frosch, Matthew P; Hyman, Bradley T; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Haigis, Kevin M

    2015-11-13

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapeutics based on the amyloid hypothesis have shown minimal efficacy in patients, suggesting that the activity of amyloid beta (Aβ) represents only one aspect of AD pathogenesis. Since neuroinflammation is thought to play an important role in AD, we hypothesized that cytokines may play a direct role in promoting neuronal death. Here, we profiled cytokine expression in a small cohort of human AD and control brain tissues. We identified AD-associated cytokines using partial least squares regression to correlate cytokine expression with quantified pathologic disease state and then used neuron cultures to test whether cytokines up-regulated in AD tissues could affect neuronal viability. This analysis identified cytokines that were associated with the pathological severity. Of the top correlates, only TNF-α reduced viability in neuron culture when applied alone. VEGF also reduced viability when applied together with Aβ, which was surprising because VEGF has been viewed as a neuro-protective protein. We found that this synthetic pro-death effect of VEGF in the context of Aβ was commensurate with VEGFR-dependent changes in multiple signaling pathways that govern cell fate. Our findings suggest that profiling of tissues combined with a culture-based screening approach can successfully identify new mechanisms driving neuronal death.

  11. Moringa oleifera's Nutritious Aqueous Leaf Extract Has Anticancerous Effects by Compromising Mitochondrial Viability in an ROS-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Madi, Niveen; Dany, Mohammed; Abdoun, Salah; Usta, Julnar

    2016-01-01

    Moringa oleifera (MO) is an important dietary component for many populations in West Africa and the Indian subcontinent. In addition to its highly nutritious value, almost all parts of this plant have been widely used in folk medicine in curing infectious, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, hepatic, and other diseases. Evidence-based research supported its versatile medicinal properties; however, more rigorous research is required to establish it in cancer therapy. As such, in this study we aim to investigate the in vitro anticancerous effect of Moringa oleifera's aqueous leaf extract. Moringa extract was prepared by soaking pulverized leaves in hot water mimicking the people's mode of the leaf drink preparation. Several assays were used to study the effect of different percentage concentrations of the extract on viability of A549 cells; levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and glutathione (GSH) generated; as well as percentage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released at different time points. In addition to mitochondrial membrane potential, apoptotic events were assessed using western blotting for apoptotic markers and immunoflourescent flourescent labeled inhibitor of caspases (FLICA) assay. MO extract treatment resulted in a significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (1 hour) and ATP levels (3 hours), followed by an increase in (6 hours) ROS, caspase activation, proapoptotic proteins expression (p53, SMAC/Diablo, AIF), and PARP-1 cleavage. This eventually resulted in decreased GSH levels and a decrease in viability. The cytotoxic effect was prevented upon pretreatment with antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine. MO decreased as well the viability of HepG2, CaCo2, Jurkat, and HEK293 cells. Our findings identify a plant extract with an anticancerous effect on cancer cell lines. MO extract exerts its cytotoxic effect in A549 cancer cells by affecting mitochondrial viability and inducing apoptosis in an ROS-dependent manner.

  12. Cellular viability effects of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition on cerebellar neurons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The endocannabinoid anandamide (ANA) participates in the control of cell death inducing the formation of apoptotic bodies and DNA fragmentation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the ANA degrading enzyme, the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), would induce cellular death. Experiments were performed in cerebellar granule neurons cultured with the FAAH inhibitor, URB597 (25, 50 or 100 nM) as well as endogenous lipids such as oleoylethanolamide (OEA) or palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and cellular viability was determined by MTT test. Neurons cultured with URB597 (25, 50 or 100 nM) displayed a decrease in cellular viability. In addition, if cultured with OEA (25 nM) or PEA (100 nM), cellular death was found. These results further suggest that URB597, OEA or PEA promote cellular death. PMID:21854612

  13. Reduced viability of neuronal cells after overexpression of protein histidine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Krieglstein, Josef; Lehmann, Martina; Mäurer, Anette; Gudermann, Thomas; Pinkenburg, Olaf; Wieland, Thomas; Litterscheid, Sarah; Klumpp, Susanne

    2008-11-01

    Protein histidine phosphatase (PHP) has just recently been discovered in eukaryotes and ATP-citrate lyase (ACL) was shown to be one of its substrates. Since ACL is crucial for cellular energy and fat metabolism we made an attempt to study the influence of PHP on cell viability. Using an adenoviral vector PHP was overexpressed in SN56 cholinergic murine neuroblastoma cells and in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons obtained from embryonic rats (E18). Overexpression of PHP in these cells caused a decrease in ACL activity and consequently impaired viability. To be sure that the reduced cellular viability was achieved by overexpression of PHP we also downregulated ACL in SN56 cells using RNAi-technology. Downregulation of ACL was harmful to the cells similar to what was observed upon overexpression of PHP. Taken together, it is concluded that overexpression of PHP results in increased dephosphorylation with concomitant inactivation of ACL, thus finally leading to cell damage.

  14. A Facile Method for Simultaneously Measuring Neuronal Cell Viability and Neurite Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    K. Hancock, Michael; Kopp, Leisha; Kaur, Navjot; Hanson, Bonnie J.

    2015-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth is an important morphological phenotype of neuronal cells that correlates with their function and cell health, yet there are limited methods available for measuring this phenomenon. Current approaches to measuring neurite outgrowth are laborious and time-consuming, relying largely upon immunocytochemical staining of neuronal markers (e.g., beta-III tubulin or MAP2) followed by manual or automated microscopy for image acquisition and analysis. Here we report the development of a quick and simple dual-color fluorescent dye-based staining method that allows for the simultaneous measurement of neuronal cell health and relative neurite outgrowth from the same sample. An orangered fluorescent dye that stains cell membrane surfaces is used as an indirect reporter of changes in relative neurite outgrowth due to alterations in the number or length of membrane projections emanating from neuronal cell bodies. Cell viability is assessed simultaneously via the use of a cell-permeant dye that is converted by intracellular esterase activity from a non-fluorescent substrate to a green-fluorescent product. Using Neuroscreen-1 cells (a PC-12 subclone), primary rat cortex neurons, and human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons, we demonstrate that this multiplex assay allows for rapid visualization and unbiased, quantitative plate reader analysis of neuronal cell health and neurite outgrowth. PMID:25853055

  15. Effects of borate-based bioactive glass on neuron viability and neurite extension.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Laura M; Day, Delbert; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly E; Harkins, Amy B

    2014-08-01

    Bioactive glasses have recently been shown to promote regeneration of soft tissues by positively influencing tissue remodeling during wound healing. We were interested to determine whether bioactive glasses have the potential for use in the treatment of peripheral nerve injury. In these experiments, degradable bioactive borate glass was fabricated into rods and microfibers. To study the compatibility with neurons, embryonic chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were cultured with different forms of bioactive borate glass. Cell viability was measured with no media exchange (static condition) or routine media exchange (transient condition). Neurite extension was measured within fibrin scaffolds with embedded glass microfibers or aligned rod sheets. Mixed cultures of neurons, glia, and fibroblasts growing in static conditions with glass rods and microfibers resulted in decreased cell viability. However, the percentage of neurons compared with all cell types increased by the end of the culture protocol compared with culture without glass. Furthermore, bioactive glass and fibrin composite scaffolds promoted neurite extension similar to that of control fibrin scaffolds, suggesting that glass does not have a significant detrimental effect on neuronal health. Aligned glass scaffolds guided neurite extension in an oriented manner. Together these findings suggest that bioactive glass can provide alignment to support directed axon growth.

  16. Direct effects of ethanol on neuronal differentiation: An in vitro analysis of viability and morphology.

    PubMed

    Guadagnoli, T; Caltana, L; Vacotto, M; Gironacci, M M; Brusco, A

    2016-10-01

    The deleterious effects of ethanol (EtOH) on the brain have been widely described, but its effects on the neuronal cytoskeleton during differentiation have not yet been firmly established. In this context, our aim was to investigate the direct effect of EtOH on cortical neurons during the period of differentiation. Primary cultures of cortical neurons obtained from 1-day-old rats were exposed to EtOH after 7days of culture, and viability and morphology were analyzed at structural and ultrastructural levels after 24-h EtOH exposure. EtOH caused a significant reduction of 73±7% in the viability of cultured cortical neurons, by preferentially inducing apoptotic cellular death. This effect was accompanied by an increase in caspase 3 and 9 expression. Furthermore, EtOH induced a reduction in total dendrite length and in the number of dendrites per cell. Ultrastructural studies showed that EtOH increased the number of lipidic vacuoles, lysosomes and multilamellar vesicles and induced a dilated endoplasmatic reticulum lumen and a disorganized Golgi apparatus with a ring-shape appearance. Microtubules showed a disorganized distribution. Apposition between pre- and postsynaptic membranes without a defined synaptic cleft and a delay in presynaptic vesicle organization were also observed. Synaptophysin and PSD95 expression, proteins pre- and postsynaptically located, were reduced in EtOH-exposed cultures. Overall, our study shows that EtOH induces neuronal apoptosis and changes in the cytoskeleton and membrane proteins related with the establishment of mature synapses. These direct effects of EtOH on neurons may partially explain its effects on brain development.

  17. Morphological remodeling of C. elegans neurons during aging is modified by compromised protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Vayndorf, Elena M; Scerbak, Courtney; Hunter, Skyler; Neuswanger, Jason R; Toth, Marton; Parker, J Alex; Neri, Christian; Driscoll, Monica; Taylor, Barbara E

    Understanding cellular outcomes, such as neuronal remodeling, that are common to both healthy and diseased aging brains is essential to the development of successful brain aging strategies. Here, we used Caenorhabdits elegans to investigate how the expression of proteotoxic triggers, such as polyglutamine (polyQ)-expanded huntingtin and silencing of proteostasis regulators, such as the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and protein clearance components, may impact the morphological remodeling of individual neurons as animals age. We examined the effects of disrupted proteostasis on the integrity of neuronal cytoarchitecture by imaging a transgenic C. elegans strain in which touch receptor neurons express the first 57 amino acids of the human huntingtin (Htt) gene with expanded polyQs (128Q) and by using neuron-targeted RNA interference in adult wild-type neurons to knockdown genes encoding proteins involved in proteostasis. We found that proteostatic challenges conferred by polyQ-expanded Htt and knockdown of specific genes involved in protein homeostasis can lead to morphological changes that are restricted to specific domains of specific neurons. The age-associated branching of PLM neurons is suppressed by N-ter polyQ-expanded Htt expression, whereas ALM neurons with polyQ-expanded Htt accumulate extended outgrowths and other soma abnormalities. Furthermore, knockdown of genes important for ubiquitin-mediated degradation, lysosomal function, and autophagy modulated these age-related morphological changes in otherwise normal neurons. Our results show that the expression of misfolded proteins in neurodegenerative disease such as Huntington's disease modifies the morphological remodeling that is normally associated with neuronal aging. Our results also show that morphological remodeling of healthy neurons during aging can be regulated by the UPS and other proteostasis pathways. Collectively, our data highlight a model in which morphological remodeling during neuronal

  18. Morphological remodeling of C. elegans neurons during aging is modified by compromised protein homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Vayndorf, Elena M; Scerbak, Courtney; Hunter, Skyler; Neuswanger, Jason R; Toth, Marton; Parker, J Alex; Neri, Christian; Driscoll, Monica; Taylor, Barbara E

    2016-01-01

    Understanding cellular outcomes, such as neuronal remodeling, that are common to both healthy and diseased aging brains is essential to the development of successful brain aging strategies. Here, we used Caenorhabdits elegans to investigate how the expression of proteotoxic triggers, such as polyglutamine (polyQ)-expanded huntingtin and silencing of proteostasis regulators, such as the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) and protein clearance components, may impact the morphological remodeling of individual neurons as animals age. We examined the effects of disrupted proteostasis on the integrity of neuronal cytoarchitecture by imaging a transgenic C. elegans strain in which touch receptor neurons express the first 57 amino acids of the human huntingtin (Htt) gene with expanded polyQs (128Q) and by using neuron-targeted RNA interference in adult wild-type neurons to knockdown genes encoding proteins involved in proteostasis. We found that proteostatic challenges conferred by polyQ-expanded Htt and knockdown of specific genes involved in protein homeostasis can lead to morphological changes that are restricted to specific domains of specific neurons. The age-associated branching of PLM neurons is suppressed by N-ter polyQ-expanded Htt expression, whereas ALM neurons with polyQ-expanded Htt accumulate extended outgrowths and other soma abnormalities. Furthermore, knockdown of genes important for ubiquitin-mediated degradation, lysosomal function, and autophagy modulated these age-related morphological changes in otherwise normal neurons. Our results show that the expression of misfolded proteins in neurodegenerative disease such as Huntington’s disease modifies the morphological remodeling that is normally associated with neuronal aging. Our results also show that morphological remodeling of healthy neurons during aging can be regulated by the UPS and other proteostasis pathways. Collectively, our data highlight a model in which morphological remodeling during

  19. Loss of Mecp2 in substantia nigra dopamine neurons compromises the nigrostriatal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gantz, Stephanie C.; Ford, Christopher P.; Neve, Kim A.; Williams, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding-protein 2 (MeCP2) result in Rett Syndrome (RTT), an X-linked disorder that disrupts neurodevelopment. Girls with RTT exhibit motor deficits similar to Parkinson’s disease, suggesting defects in the nigrostriatal pathway. This study examined age-dependent changes in dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra (SN) from wild type, pre-symptomatic, and symptomatic Mecp2+/− mice. Mecp2+ neurons in the SN in Mecp2+/− mice were indistinguishable in morphology, resting conductance, and dopamine current density from neurons in wild type mice. However, the capacitance, total dendritic length, and resting conductance of Mecp2− neurons were less than that of Mecp2+ neurons as early as four weeks after birth, prior to overt symptoms. These differences were maintained throughout life. In symptomatic Mecp2+/− mice, the current induced by activation of D2 dopamine autoreceptors was significantly less in Mecp2− neurons than Mecp2+ neurons, although D2 receptor density was unaltered in Mecp2+/− mice. Electrochemical measurements revealed that significantly less dopamine was released after stimulation of striatum in adult Mecp2+/− mice compared to wild type. The decrease in size and function of Mecp2− neurons observed in adult Mecp2+/− mice was recapitulated in dopamine neurons from symptomatic Mecp2−/y males. These results show that mutation in Mecp2 results in cell-autonomous defects in the SN early in life and throughout adulthood. Ultimately, dysfunction in terminal dopamine release and D2 autoreceptor dependent currents in dopamine neurons from symptomatic females support the idea that decreased dopamine transmission due to heterogeneous Mecp2 expression contributes to the Parkinsonian features of RTT in Mecp2+/− mice. PMID:21880923

  20. Subclinical Atherosclerosis is Related to Lower Neuronal Viability in Middle-aged Adults: A 1H MRS Study

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Andreana P.; Tarumi, Takashi; Gonzales, Mitzi M.; Suwagara, Jun; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2010-01-01

    Background: Increased carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) is a noninvasive marker of systemic arterial disease, associated with atherosclerosis, abnormal arterial mechanics, myocardial infarction, and stroke. In the elderly, clinically elevated IMT is related to diminished attention-executive function. In this context, previous work involving paper-and-pencil measures of cognition has demonstrated that a threshold of pathology (i.e., IMT ≥ 0.9 mm) is needed before IMT consistently relates to poor neuropsychological test performance. Given the critical role of arterial health in the development of cognitive dysfunction, the goal of this study was to investigate early markers of brain vulnerability by examining subclinical levels of IMT in relation to a sensitive marker of neuronal integrity, cerebral N-acetyl-aspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) ratio, in midlife. Methods: A total of 40 participants aged 50±6 years, underwent neuropsychological assessment, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) examination of occipitoparietal grey matter and B-mode ultrasound of the common carotid artery. IMT was defined as the distance between the luminal-endothelial interface and the junction between the media and the adventitia. The relation between IMT and cerebral metabolite ratios was modeled using a single multivariate multiple regression analysis adjusted for age and current systolic blood pressure. Results: Increased IMT was associated with significantly lower NAA/Cr ratios (IMT beta=−0.62, p=0.001), independent of age and systolic blood pressure (F(3,36) = 4.928, p=0.006). Conclusions: Our study extends previous findings by demonstrating a significant relationship between IMT and NAA concentration, suggesting compromised neuronal viability even at IMT levels below thresholds for clinical end-organ damage. PMID:20460114

  1. Extended Wakefulness: Compromised Metabolics in and Degeneration of Locus Ceruleus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Yan; Zhan, Guanxia; Fenik, Polina; Panossian, Lori; Wang, Maxime M.; Reid, Shayla; Lai, David; Davis, James G.; Baur, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Modern society enables a shortening of sleep times, yet long-term consequences of extended wakefulness on the brain are largely unknown. Essential for optimal alertness, locus ceruleus neurons (LCns) are metabolically active neurons that fire at increased rates across sustained wakefulness. We hypothesized that wakefulness is a metabolic stressor to LCns and that, with extended wakefulness, adaptive mitochondrial metabolic responses fail and injury ensues. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent deacetylase sirtuin type 3 (SirT3) coordinates mitochondrial energy production and redox homeostasis. We find that brief wakefulness upregulates SirT3 and antioxidants in LCns, protecting metabolic homeostasis. Strikingly, mice lacking SirT3 lose the adaptive antioxidant response and incur oxidative injury in LCns across brief wakefulness. When wakefulness is extended for longer durations in wild-type mice, SirT3 protein declines in LCns, while oxidative stress and acetylation of mitochondrial proteins, including electron transport chain complex I proteins, increase. In parallel with metabolic dyshomeostasis, apoptosis is activated and LCns are lost. This work identifies mitochondrial stress in LCns upon wakefulness, highlights an essential role for SirT3 activation in maintaining metabolic homeostasis in LCns across wakefulness, and demonstrates that extended wakefulness results in reduced SirT3 activity and, ultimately, degeneration of LCns. PMID:24647961

  2. Combined Changes in Chloride Regulation and Neuronal Excitability Enable Primary Afferent Depolarization to Elicit Spiking without Compromising its Inhibitory Effects

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The central terminals of primary afferent fibers experience depolarization upon activation of GABAA receptors (GABAAR) because their intracellular chloride concentration is maintained above electrochemical equilibrium. Primary afferent depolarization (PAD) normally mediates inhibition via sodium channel inactivation and shunting but can evoke spikes under certain conditions. Antidromic (centrifugal) conduction of these spikes may contribute to neurogenic inflammation while orthodromic (centripetal) conduction could contribute to pain in the case of nociceptive fibers. PAD-induced spiking is assumed to override presynaptic inhibition. Using computer simulations and dynamic clamp experiments, we sought to identify which biophysical changes are required to enable PAD-induced spiking and whether those changes necessarily compromise PAD-mediated inhibition. According to computational modeling, a depolarizing shift in GABA reversal potential (EGABA) and increased intrinsic excitability (manifest as altered spike initiation properties) were necessary for PAD-induced spiking, whereas increased GABAAR conductance density (ḡGABA) had mixed effects. We tested our predictions experimentally by using dynamic clamp to insert virtual GABAAR conductances with different EGABA and kinetics into acutely dissociated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron somata. Comparable experiments in central axon terminals are prohibitively difficult but the biophysical requirements for PAD-induced spiking are arguably similar in soma and axon. Neurons from naïve (i.e. uninjured) rats were compared before and after pharmacological manipulation of intrinsic excitability, and against neurons from nerve-injured rats. Experimental data confirmed that, in most neurons, both predicted changes were necessary to yield PAD-induced spiking. Importantly, such changes did not prevent PAD from inhibiting other spiking or from blocking spike propagation. In fact, since the high value of ḡGABA required for PAD

  3. Role of miR-211 in Neuronal Differentiation and Viability: Implications to Pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Chunying; Wu, Qi; Ye, Xiaoyang; Luo, Hongxue; Yan, Dongdong; Xiong, Yi; Zhu, Haili; Diao, Yarui; Zhang, Wei; Wan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an age-related irreversible neurodegenerative disorder characterized by extracellular β Amyloid(Aβ) deposition, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and neuronal loss. The dysfunction of neurogenesis and increased degeneration of neurons contribute to the pathogenesis of AD. We now report that miR-211-5p, a small non-coding RNA, can impair neurite differentiation by directly targeting NUAK1, decrease neuronal viability and accelerate the progression of Aβ-induced pathologies. In this study, we observed that during embryonic development, the expression levels of miR-211-5p were down-regulated in the normal cerebral cortexes of mice. However, in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 double transgenic adult mice, it was up-regulated from 9 months of age compared to that of the age-matched wild type mice. Studies in primary cortical neuron cultures demonstrated that miR-211-5p can inhibit neurite growth and branching via NUAK1 repression and decrease mature neuron viability. The impairments were more obvious under the action of Aβ. Our data showed that miR-211-5p could inhibit cortical neuron differentiation and survival, which may contribute to the synaptic failure, neuronal loss and cognitive dysfunction in AD. PMID:27458373

  4. Effects of the analgesic acetaminophen (Paracetamol) and its para-aminophenol metabolite on viability of mouse-cultured cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Stephen; DeSilva, Mauris; Gu, Ting Ting; Qiang, Mei; Whang, Kyumin

    2012-02-01

    Acetaminophen has been used as an analgesic for more than a hundred years, but its mechanism of action has remained elusive. Recently, it has been shown that acetaminophen produces analgesia by the activation of the brain endocannabinoid receptor CB1 through its para-aminophenol (p-aminophenol) metabolite. The objective of this study was to determine whether p-aminophenol could be toxic for in vitro developing mouse cortical neurons as a first step in establishing a link between acetaminophen use and neuronal apoptosis. We exposed developing mouse cortical neurons to various concentrations of drugs for 24 hr in vitro. Acetaminophen itself was not toxic to developing mouse cortical neurons at therapeutic concentrations of 10-250 μg/ml. However, concentrations of p-aminophenol from 1 to 100 μg/ml produced significant (p < 0.05) loss of mouse cortical neuron viability at 24 hr compared to the controls. The naturally occurring endocannabinoid anandamide also caused similar 24-hr loss of cell viability in developing mouse cortical neurons at concentrations from 1 to 100 μg/ml, which indicates the mechanism of cell death could be through the cannabinoid receptors. The results of our experiments have shown a detrimental effect of the acetaminophen metabolite p-aminophenol on in vitro developing cortical neuron viability which could act through CB1 receptors of the endocannabinoid system. These results could be especially important in recommending an analgesic for children or individuals with traumatic brain injury who have developing cortical neurons. Published 2011. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Effects of a novel pesticide-particle conjugate on viability and reactive oxygen species generation in neuronal (PC12) cells.

    PubMed

    Sooresh, Aishwarya; Sayes, Christie M; Pine, Michelle

    2015-04-01

    Development of new methods and compounds to eradicate insect vectors are desperately needed. To that end, our team has previously described the synthesis and characterization of a conjugate comprised of a silver nanoparticle core encapsulated by the pyrethroid pesticide, deltamethrin (pesticide encapsulated silver nanoparticle termed "PENS"). For this current work, the PENS conjugate was tested in neuronal cultured cells to compare the cytotoxic responses to the unconjugated pesticide deltamethrin - a known neurotoxic agent and pristine silver nanoparticles. The PC12 (pheochromocytoma of the rat adrenal medulla) cell line was chosen as a model neuronal culture system. Cells were exposed to known concentrations of PENS, deltamethrin or silver nanoparticle suspensions to assess the degree of toxicity in vitro. After 24 hours of incubation, cell viability and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured. Bright field images of high dose exposures to dosing solutions were also acquired to evaluate cell morphology. Exposure to PENS resulted in a 17% decline in viability at the highest concentration of 45 µM while exposure to deltamethrin caused a 47% decrease. These results suggest that cellular viability was less adversely affected by PENS than by the deltamethrin. Also, ROS production following PENS exposure indicated that the newly developed conjugate was responding in a similar manner as that of cells treated with deltamethrin only.

  6. Fluoxetine and citalopram decrease microglial release of glutamate and D-serine to promote cortical neuronal viability following ischemic insult.

    PubMed

    Dhami, K S; Churchward, M A; Baker, G B; Todd, K G

    2013-09-01

    Depression is one of the most common disorders appearing following a stroke, and is also a major factor limiting recovery and rehabilitation in stroke patients. Antidepressants are the most common prescribed treatment for depression and have shown to have anti-inflammatory properties within the central nervous system (CNS). The major source of pro-inflammatory factors within the CNS is from activated microglia, the innate immune cells of the CNS. Antidepressants have been shown to promote midbrain and hippocampal neuronal survival following an ischemic insult and this survival is mediated through the anti-inflammatory effects on microglia, but the effects on cortical neuronal survival after this insult have yet to be investigated. The present study aimed to test and compare antidepressants from three distinct classes (tricyclics, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, and selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs]) on the release of inflammatory factors and amino acids from activated microglia and whether altering this release could affect cortical neuronal viability after an ischemic insult. Primary microglia were treated with 1 μg/ml LPS and/or 10 μM antidepressants, and the various factors released into medium were assayed. Co-cultures consisting of microglia and primary cortical neurons were used to assess the effects of antidepressant-treated activated microglia on the viability of ischemic injured neurons. Of the antidepressants tested, most decreased the release of the proinflammatory factors nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin 1-beta from activated microglia. Fluoxetine and citalopram, the SSRIs, decreased the release of the amino acids glutamate and d-serine from LPS-activated microglia. oxygen-glucose deprived (OGD) cortical neurons cocultured with LPS-activated microglia pre-treated with fluoxetine and citalopram showed greater survival compared to injured neurons co-cultured with untreated activated microglia. Microglial release of

  7. The autophagic defect in Niemann-Pick disease type C neurons differs from somatic cells and reduces neuronal viability.

    PubMed

    Meske, Volker; Erz, Jennifer; Priesnitz, Timm; Ohm, Thomas-Georg

    2014-04-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is a fatal, progressive neurovisceral disorder. Several studies report that the autophagic flux is disturbed in NPC1-deficient (NPC1-/-) cells. Since it has been suggested that the autophagic defect may contribute to the neurodegeneration, we used cell cultures of NPC1-deficient and NPC1-wildtype neurons to investigate whether the disturbance influences neuronal survival. We found a genotype-dependent difference in survival, when autophagy is induced during culturing. NPC1-deficient neurons are more sensitive to rapamycin treatment and starvation than wildtype neurons. The subsequent search for defects in regulatory components of the autophagic pathway and the autophagic flux brought up results which differ from previous reports on somatic cells in one essential aspect: we exclude that an enhanced formation of autophagosomes contributes to the imbalanced autophagic flux in NPC1 deficient neurons. We found that solely the clearance of autophagosomes is delayed in these cells, which leads to an accumulation of autophagic vacuoles within the lysosomal compartment. Lowering the abnormal lipid load of the acidic organelles with cyclodextrin is sufficient to correct the autophagic flux and prevents premature death of NPC1-/- neurons under autophagic stress. From our results, we conclude that a pharmacological intervention in the neuropathology of NPC-disease should focus on the restoration of the lysosomal degradation capacity of cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [In vitro viability and glutathione levels in mesencephalic neurons after seven days hibernation].

    PubMed

    De La Cuétara-Bernal, K; Castillo-Díaz, L; Cruz-Aguado, R; González-Mena, Y; García-Varona, A Y

    In embryonic mesencephalic transplant in patients with Parkinson s disease dopaminergic survival is low (5 10%), and for this reason the use of multiple donors has been considered. The difficulty of obtaining more tissue determines the need for a procedure that enables human nigral tissue to be stored for a time without affecting its physiological state in any significant way. This study was designed to determine whether hibernation of tissue fragments has any influence on viability, how the viability of the mesencephalic cells behaves after 7 days hibernation and the glutathione levels in the hibernated tissue (HT). The viability of the HT in pieces (82.37 2.12) was found to be higher than the value for the whole mesencephalon (70.29 3.43). Viability of the HT, seven days at 4 C, at different post dissociation times, did not differ significantly. Despite the significant differences found between hibernated and fresh tissue at t= 0, this procedure does not seem to affect the mesencephalic tissue in any significant way, as it conserved a 94% viability after hibernation. No evidence was found of increased glutathione content as an antioxidizing response to the damage that might be caused by hibernation. These results suggest that since hibernation does not have any significant effect on the state of the cells it could be considered a useful procedure for conserving tissue to be used in clinical transplants. Moreover, further research is needed on survival and functionality of hibernated cells after being transplanted into animal models in order to evaluate their potential for use in cell therapy.

  9. The 11S Proteasomal Activator REGγ Impacts Polyglutamine-Expanded Androgen Receptor Aggregation and Motor Neuron Viability through Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yersak, Jill M.; Montie, Heather L.; Chevalier-Larsen, Erica S.; Liu, Yuhong; Huang, Lan; Rechsteiner, Martin; Merry, Diane E.

    2017-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is caused by expression of a polyglutamine (polyQ)-expanded androgen receptor (AR). The inefficient nuclear proteasomal degradation of the mutant AR results in the formation of nuclear inclusions containing amino-terminal fragments of the mutant AR. PA28γ (also referred to as REGγ) is a nuclear 11S-proteasomal activator with limited proteasome activation capabilities compared to its cytoplasmic 11S (PA28α, PA28β) counterparts. To clarify the role of REGγ in polyQ-expanded AR metabolism, we carried out genetic and biochemical studies in cell models of SBMA. Overexpression of REGγ in a PC12 cell model of SBMA increased polyQ-expanded AR aggregation and contributed to polyQ-expanded AR toxicity in the presence of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). These effects of REGγ were independent of its association with the proteasome and may be due, in part, to the decreased binding of polyQ-expanded AR by the E3 ubiquitin-ligase MDM2. Unlike its effects in PC12 cells, REGγ overexpression rescued transgenic SBMA motor neurons from DHT-induced toxicity in a proteasome binding-dependent manner, suggesting that the degradation of a specific 11S proteasome substrate or substrates promotes motor neuron viability. One potential substrate that we found to play a role in mutant AR toxicity is the splicing factor SC35. These studies reveal that, depending on the cellular context, two biological roles for REGγ impact cell viability in the face of polyQ-expanded AR; a proteasome binding-independent mechanism directly promotes mutant AR aggregation while a proteasome binding-dependent mechanism promotes cell viability. The balance between these functions likely determines REGγ effects on polyQ-expanded AR-expressing cells. PMID:28596723

  10. Antiretrovirals, Methamphetamine, and HIV-1 Envelope Protein gp120 Compromise Neuronal Energy Homeostasis in Association with Various Degrees of Synaptic and Neuritic Damage.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Ana B; Varano, Giuseppe P; de Rozieres, Cyrus M; Maung, Ricky; Catalan, Irene C; Dowling, Cari C; Sejbuk, Natalia E; Hoefer, Melanie M; Kaul, Marcus

    2015-10-19

    HIV-1 infection frequently causes HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) despite combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Evidence is accumulating that components of cART can themselves be neurotoxic upon long-term exposure. In addition, abuse of psychostimulants, such as methamphetamine, seems to aggravate HAND and compromise antiretroviral therapy. However, the combined effect of virus and recreational and therapeutic drugs on the brain is poorly understood. Therefore, we exposed mixed neuronal-glial cerebrocortical cells to antiretrovirals (ARVs) (zidovudine [AZT], nevirapine [NVP], saquinavir [SQV], and 118-D-24) of four different pharmacological categories and to methamphetamine and, in some experiments, the HIV-1 gp120 protein for 24 h and 7 days. Subsequently, we assessed neuronal injury by fluorescence microscopy, using specific markers for neuronal dendrites and presynaptic terminals. We also analyzed the disturbance of neuronal ATP levels and assessed the involvement of autophagy by using immunofluorescence and Western blotting. ARVs caused alterations of neurites and presynaptic terminals primarily during the 7-day incubation and depending on the specific compounds and their combinations with and without methamphetamine. Similarly, the loss of neuronal ATP was context specific for each of the drugs or combinations thereof, with and without methamphetamine or viral gp120. Loss of ATP was associated with activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and autophagy, which, however, failed to restore normal levels of neuronal ATP. In contrast, boosting autophagy with rapamycin prevented the long-term drop of ATP during exposure to cART in combination with methamphetamine or gp120. Our findings indicate that the overall positive effect of cART on HIV infection is accompanied by detectable neurotoxicity, which in turn may be aggravated by methamphetamine. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Antiretrovirals, Methamphetamine, and HIV-1 Envelope Protein gp120 Compromise Neuronal Energy Homeostasis in Association with Various Degrees of Synaptic and Neuritic Damage

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Ana B.; Varano, Giuseppe P.; de Rozieres, Cyrus M.; Maung, Ricky; Catalan, Irene C.; Dowling, Cari C.; Sejbuk, Natalia E.; Hoefer, Melanie M.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 infection frequently causes HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) despite combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Evidence is accumulating that components of cART can themselves be neurotoxic upon long-term exposure. In addition, abuse of psychostimulants, such as methamphetamine, seems to aggravate HAND and compromise antiretroviral therapy. However, the combined effect of virus and recreational and therapeutic drugs on the brain is poorly understood. Therefore, we exposed mixed neuronal-glial cerebrocortical cells to antiretrovirals (ARVs) (zidovudine [AZT], nevirapine [NVP], saquinavir [SQV], and 118-D-24) of four different pharmacological categories and to methamphetamine and, in some experiments, the HIV-1 gp120 protein for 24 h and 7 days. Subsequently, we assessed neuronal injury by fluorescence microscopy, using specific markers for neuronal dendrites and presynaptic terminals. We also analyzed the disturbance of neuronal ATP levels and assessed the involvement of autophagy by using immunofluorescence and Western blotting. ARVs caused alterations of neurites and presynaptic terminals primarily during the 7-day incubation and depending on the specific compounds and their combinations with and without methamphetamine. Similarly, the loss of neuronal ATP was context specific for each of the drugs or combinations thereof, with and without methamphetamine or viral gp120. Loss of ATP was associated with activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and autophagy, which, however, failed to restore normal levels of neuronal ATP. In contrast, boosting autophagy with rapamycin prevented the long-term drop of ATP during exposure to cART in combination with methamphetamine or gp120. Our findings indicate that the overall positive effect of cART on HIV infection is accompanied by detectable neurotoxicity, which in turn may be aggravated by methamphetamine. PMID:26482305

  12. Oligomeric TTR V30M aggregates compromise cell viability, erythropoietin gene expression and promoter activity in the human hepatoma cell line Hep3B.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Luciana; Beirão, João Melo; Beirão, Idalina; Pinho e Costa, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy, ATTRV30M (p. TTRV50M) amyloidosis, is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by systemic extracellular amyloid deposition of a mutant transthyretin, TTR V30M. Anemia, with low erythropoietin (EPO) levels and spared kidney function, affects about 25% of symptomatic patients, suggesting a blockage of EPO-producing cells. Early non-fibrillar TTR aggregates are highly cytotoxic, inducing oxidative stress, the expression of apoptosis-related molecules and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, factors capable of inhibiting EPO production. Low EPO levels in these patients are not related to renal amyloid deposition or the presence of circulating TTR V30M. However, the role of early non-fibrillar TTR aggregates remains unexplored. We used the EPO producing Hep3B human hepatoma cell line to study the effect of TTR oligomeric aggregates on EPO expression. Hep3B cells were incubated with soluble and oligomeric TTR V30M, and cell proliferation as well as caspase 3/7 activation was evaluated. Relative quantification of EPO mRNA transcripts was performed by real-time PCR. Significant reductions in cell viability (13 ± 7.3%) and activation of caspases 3/7 were seen after 24 h in the presence of oligomeric TTR V30M. Also, EPO expression was significantly reduced (50 ± 2.8%), in normoxic conditions. A reporter assay was constructed with a PCR fragment of the EPO promoter linked to the luciferase gene to evaluate the role of transcription factors targeting the promoter. A significant reduction of EPO promoter activity (53 ± 6.5%) was observed in transfected cells exposed to TTR oligomers. Our results show that oligomeric TTR V30M reduces EPO expression, at least in part through inhibition of promoter activity.

  13. Compatibility of SYTO 13 and Hoechst 33342 for Longitudinal Imaging of Neuron Viability and Cell Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-14

    neuronal differentiation ESNs were generated, plated and cultured as previously described [10,11]. ESNs were maintained in NeurobasalW- A medium ( NBA ...washed and incubated for 6 h in complete NBA medium without (control) or with 1 μM staurosporine. After 6 h, the media was replaced with complete NBA ...supplemented with 5 μg/mL PI for 10 min at 37°C and 5% CO2 followed by complete NBA with 5 μg/mL Hoechst or 500 nM SYTO 13 for 5 min. Cover- slips were

  14. Acetylcholine content and viability of cholinergic neurons are influenced by the activity of protein histidine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Eißing, Anna; Fischer, Daniel; Rauch, Ilka; Baumann, Anne; Schebb, Nils-Helge; Karst, Uwe; Rose, Karsten; Klumpp, Susanne; Krieglstein, Josef

    2012-03-21

    The first mammalian protein histidine phosphatase (PHP) was discovered in the late 90s of the last century. One of the known substrates of PHP is ATP-citrate lyase (ACL), which is responsible--amongst other functions--for providing acetyl-CoA for acetylcholine synthesis in neuronal tissues. It has been shown in previous studies that PHP downregulates the activity of ACL by dephosphorylation. According to this our present work focused on the influence of PHP activity on the acetylcholine level in cholinergic neurons. The amount of PHP in SN56 cholinergic neuroblastoma cells was increased after overexpression of PHP by using pIRES2-AcGFP1-PHP as a vector. We demonstrated that PHP overexpression reduced the acetylcholine level and induced cell death. The acetylcholine content of SN56 cells was measured by fast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Overexpression of the inactive H53A-PHP mutant also induced cell damage, but in a significantly reduced manner. However, this overexpression of the inactive PHP mutant did not change the acetylcholine content of SN56 cells significantly. In contrast, PHP downregulation, performed by RNAi-technique, did not induce cell death, but significantly increased the acetylcholine content in SN56 cells. We could show for the first time that PHP downregulation increased the acetylcholine level in SN56 cells. This might be a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases involving cholinergic deficits like Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Acetylcholine content and viability of cholinergic neurons are influenced by the activity of protein histidine phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The first mammalian protein histidine phosphatase (PHP) was discovered in the late 90s of the last century. One of the known substrates of PHP is ATP-citrate lyase (ACL), which is responsible - amongst other functions - for providing acetyl-CoA for acetylcholine synthesis in neuronal tissues. It has been shown in previous studies that PHP downregulates the activity of ACL by dephosphorylation. According to this our present work focused on the influence of PHP activity on the acetylcholine level in cholinergic neurons. Results The amount of PHP in SN56 cholinergic neuroblastoma cells was increased after overexpression of PHP by using pIRES2-AcGFP1-PHP as a vector. We demonstrated that PHP overexpression reduced the acetylcholine level and induced cell death. The acetylcholine content of SN56 cells was measured by fast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Overexpression of the inactive H53A-PHP mutant also induced cell damage, but in a significantly reduced manner. However, this overexpression of the inactive PHP mutant did not change the acetylcholine content of SN56 cells significantly. In contrast, PHP downregulation, performed by RNAi-technique, did not induce cell death, but significantly increased the acetylcholine content in SN56 cells. Conclusions We could show for the first time that PHP downregulation increased the acetylcholine level in SN56 cells. This might be a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases involving cholinergic deficits like Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22436051

  16. Inhibitory effects of multiwall carbon nanotubes with high iron impurity on viability and neuronal differentiation in cultured PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Li; Jiang, Aihua; Chen, Rui; Li, Chen-zhong; Wang, Liming; Qu, Ying; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Yuliang; Chen, Chunying

    2013-11-08

    The increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in biomedical applications has garnered a great concern on their potential negative effects to human health. CNTs have been reported to potentially disrupt normal neuronal function and they were speculated to accumulate and cause brain damage, although a lot of distinct and exceptional properties and potential wide applications have been associated with this material in neurobiology. Fe impurities strapped inside the CNTs may be partially responsible for neurotoxicity generation. In the present study, we selected rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells to investigate and compare the effects of two kinds of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different concentrations of Fe impurities which usually come from the massive production of CNTs by chemical vapor deposition. Exposure to Fe-high MWCNTs can reduce cell viability and increase cytoskeletal disruption of undifferentiated PC12 cells, diminish the ability to form mature neurites, and then adversely influence the neuronal dopaminergic phenotype in NGF-treated PC-12 cells. The present results highlight the critical role of iron residue in the adverse response to MWCNTs exposure in neural cells. These findings provide useful information for understanding the toxicity and safe application of carbon nanotubes.

  17. Freezing behavior of adherent neuron-like cells and morphological change and viability of post-thaw cells.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Makoto; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    Freezing of nerve cells forming a neuronal network has largely been neglected, despite the fact that the cryopreservation of nerve cells benefits the study of cells in the areas of medicine and poison screening. Freezing of nerve cells is also attractive for studying cell morphology because of the characteristic long, thread-like neurites extending from the cell body. In the present study, freezing of neuron-like cells adhering to the substrate (differentiated PC12 cells), in physiological saline, was investigated in order to understand the fundamental freezing and thawing characteristics of nerve cells with neurites. The microscopic freezing behavior of cells under different cooling rates was observed. Next, the post-thaw morphological changes in the cells, including the cytoskeleton, were investigated and post-thaw cell viability was evaluated by dye exclusion using propidium iodide. Two categories of morphological changes, beading and shortening of the neurites, were found and quantified. Also, the morphological changes of neurites due to osmotic stress from sodium chloride were studied to gain a better understanding of causation. The results showed that morphological changes and cell death were promoted with a decrease in end temperature during freezing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Beclin 1 Is Required for Neuron Viability and Regulates Endosome Pathways via the UVRAG-VPS34 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Wold, Mitchell S.; Gong, Shiaoching; Phillips, Greg R.; Dou, Zhixun; Zhao, Yanxiang; Heintz, Nathaniel; Zong, Wei-Xing; Yue, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    Deficiency of autophagy protein beclin 1 is implicated in tumorigenesis and neurodegenerative diseases, but the molecular mechanism remains elusive. Previous studies showed that Beclin 1 coordinates the assembly of multiple VPS34 complexes whose distinct phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase III (PI3K-III) lipid kinase activities regulate autophagy at different steps. Recent evidence suggests a function of beclin 1 in regulating multiple VPS34-mediated trafficking pathways beyond autophagy; however, the precise role of beclin 1 in autophagy-independent cellular functions remains poorly understood. Herein we report that beclin 1 regulates endocytosis, in addition to autophagy, and is required for neuron viability in vivo. We find that neuronal beclin 1 associates with endosomes and regulates EEA1/early endosome localization and late endosome formation. Beclin 1 maintains proper cellular phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P) distribution and total levels, and loss of beclin 1 causes a disruption of active Rab5 GTPase-associated endosome formation and impairment of endosome maturation, likely due to a failure of Rab5 to recruit VPS34. Furthermore, we find that Beclin 1 deficiency causes complete loss of the UVRAG-VPS34 complex and associated lipid kinase activity. Interestingly, beclin 1 deficiency impairs p40phox-linked endosome formation, which is rescued by overexpressed UVRAG or beclin 1, but not by a coiled-coil domain-truncated beclin 1 (a UVRAG-binding mutant), Atg14L or RUBICON. Thus, our study reveals the essential role for beclin 1 in neuron survival involving multiple membrane trafficking pathways including endocytosis and autophagy, and suggests that the UVRAG-beclin 1 interaction underlies beclin 1's function in endocytosis. PMID:25275521

  19. Beclin 1 is required for neuron viability and regulates endosome pathways via the UVRAG-VPS34 complex.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Nicole C; Zhong, Yun; Wold, Mitchell S; Gong, Shiaoching; Phillips, Greg R; Dou, Zhixun; Zhao, Yanxiang; Heintz, Nathaniel; Zong, Wei-Xing; Yue, Zhenyu

    2014-10-01

    Deficiency of autophagy protein beclin 1 is implicated in tumorigenesis and neurodegenerative diseases, but the molecular mechanism remains elusive. Previous studies showed that Beclin 1 coordinates the assembly of multiple VPS34 complexes whose distinct phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase III (PI3K-III) lipid kinase activities regulate autophagy at different steps. Recent evidence suggests a function of beclin 1 in regulating multiple VPS34-mediated trafficking pathways beyond autophagy; however, the precise role of beclin 1 in autophagy-independent cellular functions remains poorly understood. Herein we report that beclin 1 regulates endocytosis, in addition to autophagy, and is required for neuron viability in vivo. We find that neuronal beclin 1 associates with endosomes and regulates EEA1/early endosome localization and late endosome formation. Beclin 1 maintains proper cellular phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P) distribution and total levels, and loss of beclin 1 causes a disruption of active Rab5 GTPase-associated endosome formation and impairment of endosome maturation, likely due to a failure of Rab5 to recruit VPS34. Furthermore, we find that Beclin 1 deficiency causes complete loss of the UVRAG-VPS34 complex and associated lipid kinase activity. Interestingly, beclin 1 deficiency impairs p40phox-linked endosome formation, which is rescued by overexpressed UVRAG or beclin 1, but not by a coiled-coil domain-truncated beclin 1 (a UVRAG-binding mutant), Atg14L or RUBICON. Thus, our study reveals the essential role for beclin 1 in neuron survival involving multiple membrane trafficking pathways including endocytosis and autophagy, and suggests that the UVRAG-beclin 1 interaction underlies beclin 1's function in endocytosis.

  20. Biased Type 1 Cannabinoid Receptor Signaling Influences Neuronal Viability in a Cell Culture Model of Huntington Disease.

    PubMed

    Laprairie, Robert B; Bagher, Amina M; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M

    2016-03-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, autosomal dominant, neurodegenerative disorder with limited treatment options. Prior to motor symptom onset or neuronal cell loss in HD, levels of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) decrease in the basal ganglia. Decreasing CB1 levels are strongly correlated with chorea and cognitive deficit. CB1 agonists are functionally selective (biased) for divergent signaling pathways. In this study, six cannabinoids were tested for signaling bias in in vitro models of medium spiny projection neurons expressing wild-type (STHdh(Q7/Q7)) or mutant huntingtin protein (STHdh(Q111/Q111)). Signaling bias was assessed using the Black and Leff operational model. Relative activity [ΔlogR (τ/KA)] and system bias (ΔΔlogR) were calculated relative to the reference compound WIN55,212-2 for Gαi/o, Gαs, Gαq, Gβγ, and β-arrestin1 signaling following treatment with 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), anandamide (AEA), CP55,940, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), and THC+CBD (1:1), and compared between wild-type and HD cells. The Emax of Gαi/o-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling was 50% lower in HD cells compared with wild-type cells. 2-AG and AEA displayed Gαi/o/Gβγ bias and normalized CB1 protein levels and improved cell viability, whereas CP55,940 and THC displayed β-arrestin1 bias and reduced CB1 protein levels and cell viability in HD cells. CBD was not a CB1 agonist but inhibited THC-dependent signaling (THC+CBD). Therefore, enhancing Gαi/o-biased endocannabinoid signaling may be therapeutically beneficial in HD. In contrast, cannabinoids that are β-arrestin-biased--such as THC found at high levels in modern varieties of marijuana--may be detrimental to CB1 signaling, particularly in HD where CB1 levels are already reduced.

  1. High-Content High-Throughput Assays for Characterizing the Viability and Morphology of Human iPSC-Derived Neuronal Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Hesley, Jayne; Rusyn, Ivan; Cromwell, Evan F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Development of quantitative high-throughput in vitro assays that enable assessment of viability and morphological changes in neuronal cells is an active area of investigation in drug discovery and environmental chemical safety assessment. High-content imaging is an emerging and efficient tool for generating multidimensional quantitative cellular readouts; in addition, human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons are a promising in vitro model system that emulates both the functionality and behavior of mature neurons, and they are available in quantities sufficient for screening workflows. The goal of this study was to develop high-content imaging and analysis methods to assess multiple phenotypes in human iPSC-derived neuronal cells. Specifically, we optimized cell culture, staining, and imaging protocols in a 384-well assay format and improved laboratory workflow by designing a one-step procedure to reduce assay time and minimize cell disturbance. Phenotypic readouts include quantitative characterization of neurite outgrowth and branching, cell number and viability, as well as measures of adverse effects on mitochondrial integrity and membrane potential. To verify the robustness of the workflow, we tested a series of compounds that are established toxicants. We report concentration–response effects of selected test compounds on human iPSC-derived neuronal cells and illustrate how the proposed methods may be used for high-content high-throughput compound toxicity screening and safety evaluation of drugs and environmental chemicals. PMID:25506803

  2. High-content high-throughput assays for characterizing the viability and morphology of human iPSC-derived neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Sirenko, Oksana; Hesley, Jayne; Rusyn, Ivan; Cromwell, Evan F

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Development of quantitative high-throughput in vitro assays that enable assessment of viability and morphological changes in neuronal cells is an active area of investigation in drug discovery and environmental chemical safety assessment. High-content imaging is an emerging and efficient tool for generating multidimensional quantitative cellular readouts; in addition, human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons are a promising in vitro model system that emulates both the functionality and behavior of mature neurons, and they are available in quantities sufficient for screening workflows. The goal of this study was to develop high-content imaging and analysis methods to assess multiple phenotypes in human iPSC-derived neuronal cells. Specifically, we optimized cell culture, staining, and imaging protocols in a 384-well assay format and improved laboratory workflow by designing a one-step procedure to reduce assay time and minimize cell disturbance. Phenotypic readouts include quantitative characterization of neurite outgrowth and branching, cell number and viability, as well as measures of adverse effects on mitochondrial integrity and membrane potential. To verify the robustness of the workflow, we tested a series of compounds that are established toxicants. We report concentration-response effects of selected test compounds on human iPSC-derived neuronal cells and illustrate how the proposed methods may be used for high-content high-throughput compound toxicity screening and safety evaluation of drugs and environmental chemicals.

  3. Poly(GR) in C9ORF72-Related ALS/FTD Compromises Mitochondrial Function and Increases Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage in iPSC-Derived Motor Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Lu, Yubing; Gendron, Tania F; Karydas, Anna; Tran, Helene; Yang, Dejun; Petrucelli, Leonard; Miller, Bruce L; Almeida, Sandra; Gao, Fen-Biao

    2016-10-19

    GGGGCC repeat expansions in C9ORF72 are the most common genetic cause of both ALS and FTD. To uncover underlying pathogenic mechanisms, we found that DNA damage was greater, in an age-dependent manner, in motor neurons differentiated from iPSCs of multiple C9ORF72 patients than control neurons. Ectopic expression of the dipeptide repeat (DPR) protein (GR)80 in iPSC-derived control neurons increased DNA damage, suggesting poly(GR) contributes to DNA damage in aged C9ORF72 neurons. Oxidative stress was also increased in C9ORF72 neurons in an age-dependent manner. Pharmacological or genetic reduction of oxidative stress partially rescued DNA damage in C9ORF72 neurons and control neurons expressing (GR)80 or (GR)80-induced cellular toxicity in flies. Moreover, interactome analysis revealed that (GR)80 preferentially bound to mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and caused mitochondrial dysfunction. Thus, poly(GR) in C9ORF72 neurons compromises mitochondrial function and causes DNA damage in part by increasing oxidative stress, revealing another pathogenic mechanism in C9ORF72-related ALS and FTD.

  4. Specific combinations of ion channel inhibitors reduce excessive Ca(2+) influx as a consequence of oxidative stress and increase neuronal and glial cell viability in vitro.

    PubMed

    O'Hare Doig, Ryan L; Bartlett, Carole A; Smith, Nicole M; Hodgetts, Stuart I; Dunlop, Sarah A; Hool, Livia; Fitzgerald, Melinda

    2016-12-17

    Combinations of Ca(2+) channel inhibitors have been proposed as an effective means to prevent excess Ca(2+) flux and death of neurons and glia following neurotrauma in vivo. However, it is not yet known if beneficial outcomes such as improved viability have been due to direct effects on intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. Here, the effects of combinations of Lomerizine (Lom), 2,3-dioxo-7-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-quinoxalinyl]acetic acid monohydrate (YM872), 3,5-dimethyl-1-adamantanamine (memantine (Mem)) and/or adenosine 5'-triphosphate periodate oxidized sodium salt (oxATP) to block voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, Ca(2+) permeable α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, NMDA receptors and purinergic P2X7 receptors (P2X7R) respectively, on Ca(2+) concentration and viability of rat primary mixed cortical (MC) cultures exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) insult, were assessed. The contribution of ryanodine-sensitive intracellular stores to intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was also assessed. Live cell calcium imaging revealed that a 30min H2O2 insult induced a slow increase in intracellular Ca(2+), in part from intracellular sources, associated with loss of cell viability by 6h. Most combinations of inhibitors that included oxATP significantly decreased Ca(2+) influx and increased cell viability when administered simultaneously with H2O2. However, reductions in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration were not always linked to improved cell viability. Examination of the density of specific cell subpopulations demonstrated that most combinations of inhibitors that included oxATP preserved NG2+ non-oligodendroglial cells, but preservation of astrocytes and neurons required additional inhibitors. Olig2(+) oligodendroglia and ED-1(+) activated microglia/macrophages were not preserved by any of the inhibitor combinations. These data indicate that following H2O2 insult, limiting intracellular Ca(2+) entry via P2X7R is

  5. Hippocampal GABAergic interneurons coexpressing alpha7-nicotinic receptors and connexin-36 are able to improve neuronal viability under oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Voytenko, L P; Lushnikova, I V; Savotchenko, A V; Isaeva, E V; Skok, M V; Lykhmus, O Yu; Patseva, M A; Skibo, G G

    2015-08-07

    The hippocampal interneurons are very diverse by chemical profiles and rather inconsistent by sensitivity to CI. Some hippocampal GABAergic interneurons survive certain time after ischemia while ischemia-sensitive interneurons and pyramidal neurons are damaged. GABAergic signaling, nicotinic receptors expressing α7-subunit (α7nAChRs(+)) and connexin-36 (Cx36(+), electrotonic gapjunctions protein) contradictory modulate post-ischemic environment. We hypothesized that hippocampal ischemia-resistant GABAergic interneurons coexpressing glutamate decarboxylase-67 isoform (GAD67(+)), α7nAChRs(+), Cx36(+) are able to enhance neuronal viability. To check this hypothesis the histochemical and electrophysiological investigations have been performed using rat hippocampal organotypic culture in the condition of 30-min oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Post-OGD reoxygenation (4h) revealed in CA1 pyramidal layer numerous damaged cells, decreased population spike amplitude and increased pair-pulse depression. In these conditions GAD67(+) interneurons displayed the OGD-resistance and significant increase of GABA synthesis/metabolism (GAD67-immunofluorescence, mitochondrial activity). The α7nAChRs(+) and Cx36(+) co-localizations were revealed in resistant GAD67(+) interneurons. Under OGD: GABAA-receptors (GABAARs) blockade increased cell damage and exacerbated the pair-pulse depression in CA1 pyramidal layer; α7nAChRs and Cx36-channels separate blockades sufficiently decreased cell damage while interneuronal GAD67-immunofluorescence and mitochondrial activity were similar to the control. Thus, hippocampal GABAergic interneurons co-expressing α7nAChRs and Cx36 remained resistant certain time after OGD and were able to modulate CA1 neuron survival through GABAARs, α7nAChRs and Cx36-channels activity. The enhancements of the neuronal viability together with GABA synthesis/metabolism normalization suggest cooperative neuroprotective mechanism that could be used for increase in

  6. The effect of modified polysialic acid based hydrogels on the adhesion and viability of primary neurons and glial cells.

    PubMed

    Haile, Yohannes; Berski, Silke; Dräger, Gerald; Nobre, Andrè; Stummeyer, Katharina; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Grothe, Claudia

    2008-04-01

    In this study we present the enzymatic and biological analysis of polysialic acid (polySia) based hydrogel in terms of its degradation and cytocompatibility. PolySia based hydrogel is completely degradable by endosialidase enzyme which may avoid second surgery after tissue recovery. Viability assay showed that soluble components of polySia hydrogel did not cause any toxic effect on cultured Schwann cells. Moreover, green fluorescence protein transfected neonatal and adult Schwann cells, neural stem cells and dorsal root ganglionic cells (unlabelled) were seeded on polySia hydrogel modified with poly-L-lysine (Pll), poly-L-ornithine-laminin (porn-laminin) or collagen. Water soluble tetrazolium salt assay revealed that modification of the hydrogel significantly improved cell adhesion and viability. These results infer that polySia based scaffolds in combination with cell adhesion molecules and cells genetically modified to express growth factors would potentially be promising alternative in reconstructive therapeutic strategies.

  7. Monitoring apoptosis and neuronal degeneration by real-time detection of phosphatidylserine externalization using a polarity-sensitive indicator of viability and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yujin E; Chen, Jeannie; Langen, Ralf; Chan, Jonah R

    2015-01-01

    Applications for noninvasive real-time imaging of apoptosis and neuronal degeneration are hindered by technical limitations in imaging strategies and by existing probes. Monitoring the progression of a cell through apoptosis could provide valuable insight into the temporal events that initiate cell death as well as the potential for rescue of apoptotic cells. We engineered an annexin-based biosensor to function as a polarity-sensitive indicator for viability and apoptosis (known as psIVa) by binding to externalized phosphatidylserine (ps) exposed on apoptotic cell membranes. constructed from a structure-based design strategy, psIVa fluoresces only when bound to ps and remains effectively undetectable in solution. In this paper, we describe protocols for the design, expression, purification and labeling of psIVa as well as for its application in time-lapse imaging of degenerating neurons in culture; the entire protocol can be completed in 2 weeks. the primary advantage of this method is the flexibility to use psIVa, in combination with other probes and without perturbing experimental conditions, to explore the cellular mechanisms involved in apoptosis and degeneration in real time. PMID:20671723

  8. Monitoring apoptosis and neuronal degeneration by real-time detection of phosphatidylserine externalization using a polarity-sensitive indicator of viability and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yujin E; Chen, Jeannie; Langen, Ralf; Chan, Jonah R

    2010-08-01

    Applications for noninvasive real-time imaging of apoptosis and neuronal degeneration are hindered by technical limitations in imaging strategies and by existing probes. Monitoring the progression of a cell through apoptosis could provide valuable insight into the temporal events that initiate cell death as well as the potential for rescue of apoptotic cells. We engineered an annexin-based biosensor to function as a polarity-sensitive indicator for viability and apoptosis (known as pSIVA) by binding to externalized phosphatidylserine (PS) exposed on apoptotic cell membranes. Constructed from a structure-based design strategy, pSIVA fluoresces only when bound to PS and remains effectively undetectable in solution. In this paper, we describe protocols for the design, expression, purification and labeling of pSIVA as well as for its application in time-lapse imaging of degenerating neurons in culture; the entire protocol can be completed in 2 weeks. The primary advantage of this method is the flexibility to use pSIVA, in combination with other probes and without perturbing experimental conditions, to explore the cellular mechanisms involved in apoptosis and degeneration in real time.

  9. Intact glycosaminoglycans from intervertebral disc-derived notochordal cell-conditioned media inhibit neurite growth while maintaining neuronal cell viability.

    PubMed

    Purmessur, Devina; Cornejo, Marisa C; Cho, Samuel K; Roughley, Peter J; Linhardt, Robert J; Hecht, Andrew C; Iatridis, James C

    2015-05-01

    Painful human intervertebral discs (IVDs) exhibit nerve growth deep into the IVD. Current treatments for discogenic back pain do not address the underlying mechanisms propagating pain and are often highly invasive or only offer temporary symptom relief. The notochord produces factors during development that pattern the spine and inhibit the growth of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) axons into the IVD. We hypothesize that notochordal cell (NC)-conditioned medium (NCCM) includes soluble factors capable of inhibiting neurite growth and may represent a future therapeutic target. To test if NCCM can inhibit neurite growth and determine if NC-derived glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are necessary candidates for this inhibition. Human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells and rat DRG cells were treated with NCCM in two-dimensional culture in vitro, and digestion and mechanistic studies determined if specific GAGs were responsible for inhibitory effects. Notochordal cell-conditioned medium was generated from porcine nucleus pulposus tissue that was cultured in Dulbecco's modified eagle's medium for 4 days. A dose study was performed using SH-SY5Y cells that were seeded in basal medium for 24 hours and neurite outgrowth and cell viability were assessed after treatment with basal media or NCCM (10% and 100%) for 48 hours. Glycosaminoglycans from NCCM were characterized using multiple digestions and liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy (LC-MS). Neurite growth was assessed on both SH-SY5Y and DRG cells after treatment with NCCM with and without GAG digestion. Notochordal cell-conditioned medium significantly inhibited the neurite outgrowth from SH-SY5Y cells compared with basal controls without dose or cytotoxic effects; % of neurite expressing cells were 39.0±2.9%, 27.3±3.6%, and 30.2±2.7% and mean neurite length was 60.3±3.5, 50.8±2.4, 53.2±3.7 μm for basal, 10% NCCM, and 100% NCCM, respectively. Digestions and LC-MS determined that chondroitin-6-sulfate was the major GAG chain in

  10. Compromised NMDA/Glutamate Receptor Expression in Dopaminergic Neurons Impairs Instrumental Learning, But Not Pavlovian Goal Tracking or Sign Tracking(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    James, Alex S; Pennington, Zachary T; Tran, Phu; Jentsch, James David

    2015-01-01

    Two theories regarding the role for dopamine neurons in learning include the concepts that their activity serves as a (1) mechanism that confers incentive salience onto rewards and associated cues and/or (2) contingency teaching signal reflecting reward prediction error. While both theories are provocative, the causal role for dopamine cell activity in either mechanism remains controversial. In this study mice that either fully or partially lacked NMDARs in dopamine neurons exclusively, as well as appropriate controls, were evaluated for reward-related learning; this experimental design allowed for a test of the premise that NMDA/glutamate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated mechanisms in dopamine neurons, including NMDA-dependent regulation of phasic discharge activity of these cells, modulate either the instrumental learning processes or the likelihood of pavlovian cues to become highly motivating incentive stimuli that directly attract behavior. Loss of NMDARs in dopamine neurons did not significantly affect baseline dopamine utilization in the striatum, novelty evoked locomotor behavior, or consumption of a freely available, palatable food solution. On the other hand, animals lacking NMDARs in dopamine cells exhibited a selective reduction in reinforced lever responses that emerged over the course of instrumental learning. Loss of receptor expression did not, however, influence the likelihood of an animal acquiring a pavlovian conditional response associated with attribution of incentive salience to reward-paired cues (sign tracking). These data support the view that reductions in NMDAR signaling in dopamine neurons affect instrumental reward-related learning but do not lend support to hypotheses that suggest that the behavioral significance of this signaling includes incentive salience attribution.

  11. Compromised NMDA/Glutamate Receptor Expression in Dopaminergic Neurons Impairs Instrumental Learning, But Not Pavlovian Goal Tracking or Sign Tracking1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    James, Alex S.; Pennington, Zachary T.; Tran, Phu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Two theories regarding the role for dopamine neurons in learning include the concepts that their activity serves as a (1) mechanism that confers incentive salience onto rewards and associated cues and/or (2) contingency teaching signal reflecting reward prediction error. While both theories are provocative, the causal role for dopamine cell activity in either mechanism remains controversial. In this study mice that either fully or partially lacked NMDARs in dopamine neurons exclusively, as well as appropriate controls, were evaluated for reward-related learning; this experimental design allowed for a test of the premise that NMDA/glutamate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated mechanisms in dopamine neurons, including NMDA-dependent regulation of phasic discharge activity of these cells, modulate either the instrumental learning processes or the likelihood of pavlovian cues to become highly motivating incentive stimuli that directly attract behavior. Loss of NMDARs in dopamine neurons did not significantly affect baseline dopamine utilization in the striatum, novelty evoked locomotor behavior, or consumption of a freely available, palatable food solution. On the other hand, animals lacking NMDARs in dopamine cells exhibited a selective reduction in reinforced lever responses that emerged over the course of instrumental learning. Loss of receptor expression did not, however, influence the likelihood of an animal acquiring a pavlovian conditional response associated with attribution of incentive salience to reward-paired cues (sign tracking). These data support the view that reductions in NMDAR signaling in dopamine neurons affect instrumental reward-related learning but do not lend support to hypotheses that suggest that the behavioral significance of this signaling includes incentive salience attribution. PMID:26464985

  12. In vitro cytotoxicity of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles on neuronal and glial cells. Evaluation of nanoparticle interference with viability tests.

    PubMed

    Costa, Carla; Brandão, Fátima; Bessa, Maria João; Costa, Solange; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Kiliç, Gözde; Fernández-Bertólez, Natalia; Quaresma, Pedro; Pereira, Eulália; Pásaro, Eduardo; Laffon, Blanca; Teixeira, João Paulo

    2016-03-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (ION) have attracted great interest for use in several biomedical fields. In general, they are considered biocompatible, but little is known of their effects on the human nervous system. The main objective of this work was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of two ION (magnetite), coated with silica and oleic acid, previously determining the possible interference of the ION with the methodological procedures to assure the reliability of the results obtained. Human neuroblastoma SHSY5Y and glioblastoma A172 cells were exposed to different concentrations of ION (5-300 µg ml(-1)), prepared in complete and serum-free cell culture medium for three exposure times (3, 6 and 24 h). Cytotoxicity was evaluated by means of the MTT, neutral red uptake and alamar blue assays. Characterization of the main physical-chemical properties of the ION tested was also performed. Results demonstrated that both ION could significantly alter absorbance readings. To reduce these interferences, protocols were modified by introducing additional washing steps and cell-free systems. Significant decreases in cell viability were observed for both cell lines in specific conditions by all assays. In general, oleic acid-coated ION were less cytotoxic than silica-coated ION; besides, a serum-protective effect was observed for both ION studied and cell lines. These results contribute to increase the knowledge of the potential harmful effects of ION on the human nervous system. Understanding these effects is essential to establish satisfactory regulatory policies on the safe use of magnetite nanoparticles in biomedical applications.

  13. NFκB-activated Astroglial Release of Complement C3 Compromises Neuronal Morphology and Function Associated with Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Hong; Yang, Li; Cole, Allysa; Sun, Lu; Chiang, Angie C.-A.; Fowler, Stephanie W.; Shim, David J.; Rodriguez-Rivera, Jennifer; Taglialatela, Giulio; Jankowsky, Joanna L.; Lu, Hui-Chen; Zheng, Hui

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Abnormal NFκB activation has been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the signaling pathways governing NFκB regulation and function in the brain are poorly understood. We identify complement protein C3 as an astroglial target of NFκB, and show that C3 release acts through neuronal C3aR to disrupt dendritic morphology and network function. Exposure to Aβ activates astroglial NFκB and C3 release, consistent with the high levels of C3 expression in brain tissue from AD patients and APP transgenic mice, where C3aR antagonist treatment rescues cognitive impairment. Thus, dysregulation of neuron-glia interaction through NFκB/C3/C3aR signaling may contribute to synaptic dysfunction in AD and C3aR antagonists may be therapeutically beneficial. PMID:25533482

  14. Ablation of CBP in forebrain principal neurons causes modest memory and transcriptional defects and a dramatic reduction of histone acetylation but does not affect cell viability.

    PubMed

    Valor, Luis M; Pulopulos, Matias M; Jimenez-Minchan, Maria; Olivares, Roman; Lutz, Beat; Barco, Angel

    2011-02-02

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is an inheritable disease associated with mutations in the gene encoding the CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein)-binding protein (CBP) and characterized by growth impairment, learning disabilities, and distinctive facial and skeletal features. Studies in mouse models for RSTS first suggested a direct role for CBP and histone acetylation in cognition and memory. Here, we took advantage of the genetic tools for generating mice in which the CBP gene is specifically deleted in postmitotic principal neurons of the forebrain to investigate the consequences of the loss of CBP in the adult brain. In contrast to the conventional CBP knock-out mice, which exhibit very early embryonic lethality, postnatal forebrain-restricted CBP mutants were viable and displayed no overt abnormalities. We identified the dimer of histones H2A and H2B as the preferred substrate of the histone acetyltransferase domain of CBP. Surprisingly, the loss of CBP and subsequent histone hypoacetylation had a very modest impact in the expression of a number of immediate early genes and did not affect neuronal viability. In addition, the behavioral characterization of these mice dissociated embryonic and postnatal deficits caused by impaired CBP function, narrowed down the anatomical substrate of specific behavioral defects, and confirmed the special sensitivity of object recognition memory to CBP deficiency. Overall, our study provides novel insights into RSTS etiology and clarifies some of the standing questions concerning the role of CBP and histone acetylation in activity-driven gene expression, memory formation, and neurodegeneration.

  15. Overexpression of the Astrocyte Glutamate Transporter GLT1 Exacerbates Phrenic Motor Neuron Degeneration, Diaphragm Compromise, and Forelimb Motor Dysfunction following Cervical Contusion Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Nicaise, Charles; Sannie, Daniel; Hala, Tamara J.; Javed, Elham; Parker, Jessica L.; Putatunda, Rajarshi; Regan, Kathleen A.; Suain, Valérie; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Rhoderick, Fred; Wright, Megan C.; Poulsen, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A major portion of spinal cord injury (SCI) cases affect midcervical levels, the location of the phrenic motor neuron (PhMN) pool that innervates the diaphragm. While initial trauma is uncontrollable, a valuable opportunity exists in the hours to days following SCI for preventing PhMN loss and consequent respiratory dysfunction that occurs during secondary degeneration. One of the primary causes of secondary injury is excitotoxic cell death due to dysregulation of extracellular glutamate homeostasis. GLT1, mainly expressed by astrocytes, is responsible for the vast majority of functional uptake of extracellular glutamate in the CNS, particularly in spinal cord. We found that, in bacterial artificial chromosome-GLT1-enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter mice following unilateral midcervical (C4) contusion SCI, numbers of GLT1-expressing astrocytes in ventral horn and total intraspinal GLT1 protein expression were reduced soon after injury and the decrease persisted for ≥6 weeks. We used intraspinal delivery of adeno-associated virus type 8 (AAV8)-Gfa2 vector to rat cervical spinal cord ventral horn for targeting focal astrocyte GLT1 overexpression in areas of PhMN loss. Intraspinal delivery of AAV8-Gfa2-GLT1 resulted in transduction primarily of GFAP+ astrocytes that persisted for ≥6 weeks postinjury, as well as increased intraspinal GLT1 protein expression. Surprisingly, we found that astrocyte-targeted GLT1 overexpression increased lesion size, PhMN loss, phrenic nerve axonal degeneration, and diaphragm neuromuscular junction denervation, and resulted in reduced functional diaphragm innervation as assessed by phrenic nerve-diaphragm compound muscle action potential recordings. These results demonstrate that GLT1 overexpression via intraspinal AAV-Gfa2-GLT1 delivery exacerbates neuronal damage and increases respiratory impairment following cervical SCI. PMID:24872566

  16. Compromised wounds in Canada.

    PubMed

    Denny, Keith; Lawand, Christina; Perry, Sheril D

    2014-01-01

    Wounds are a serious healthcare issue with profound personal, clinical and economic implications. Using a working definition of compromised wounds, this study examines the prevalence of wounds by type and by healthcare setting using data from hospitals, home care, hospital-based continuing care and long-term care facilities within fiscal year 2011-2012 in Canada. It also evaluates several risk factors associated with wounds, such as diabetes, circulatory disease and age. Compromised wounds were reported in almost 4% of in-patient acute hospitalizations and in more than 7% of home care clients, almost 10% of long-term care clients and almost 30% of hospital-based continuing care clients. Patients with diabetes were much more likely to have a compromised wound than were patients without the disease. Copyright © 2014 Longwoods Publishing.

  17. 29 CFR 18.408 - Compromise and offers to compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... BEFORE THE OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Relevancy and Its Limits § 18.408 Compromise and offers to compromise. Evidence of furnishing or offering or promising to furnish, or of... for or invalidity of the claim or its amount. Evidence of conduct or statements made in compromise...

  18. Myocardial viability.

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, Y; Kloner, R A

    1996-01-01

    Left ventricular function is a major predictor of outcome in patients with coronary artery disease. Acute ischemia, postischemic dysfunction (stunning), myocardial hibernation, or a combination of these 3 are among the reversible forms of myocardial dysfunction. In myocardial stunning, dysfunction occurs despite normal myocardial perfusion, and function recovers spontaneously over time. In acute ischemia and hibernation, there is regional hypoperfusion. Function improves only after revascularization. Evidence of myocardial viability usually relies on the demonstration of uptake of various metabolic tracers, such as thallium (thallous chloride TI 201) or fludeoxyglucose F 18, by dysfunctional myocardium or by the demonstration of contractile reserve in a dysfunctional region. This can be shown as an augmentation of function during the infusion of various sympathomimetic agents. The response of ventricular segments to increasing doses of dobutamine may indicate the underlying mechanism of dysfunction. Stunned segments that have normal perfusion show dose-dependent augmentation of function. If perfusion is reduced as in hibernating myocardium, however, a biphasic response usually occurs: function improves at low doses of dobutamine, whereas higher doses may induce ischemia and, hence, dysfunction. But in patients with severely impaired perfusion, even low doses may cause ischemia. Myocardial regions with subendocardial infarction or diffuse scarring may also have augmented contractility during catecholamine infusion due to stimulation of the subepicardial layers. In these cases, augmentation of function after revascularization is not expected. Because the underlying mechanism, prognosis, and therapy may differ among these conditions, it is crucial to differentiate among dysfunctional myocardial segments that are nonviable and have no potential to regain function, hibernating or ischemic segments in which recovery of function occurs only after revascularization, and

  19. Localization of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots in the lysosomal acidic compartment of cultured neurons and its impact on viability: potential role of ion release.

    PubMed

    Corazzari, Ingrid; Gilardino, Alessandra; Dalmazzo, Simona; Fubini, Bice; Lovisolo, Davide

    2013-03-01

    CdSe Quantum Dots (QDs) are increasingly being employed in both industrial applications and biological imaging, thanks to their numerous advantages over conventional organic and proteic fluorescent markers. On the other hand a growing concern has emerged that toxic elements from the QDs core would render the nanoparticles harmful to cell cultures, animals and humans. The interaction between QDs and neuronal cells in particular needs to be carefully evaluated, since nanoparticles could access the nervous system by several pathways, including the olfactory epithelium, even if no data are presently available about QDs. The pH of the environment to which the nanoparticles are exposed may play a crucial role in the stability of QDs coating. For this reason we investigated the release of metal ions from CdSe/ZnS QDs in artificial media reproducing the cytosolic and lysosomal cellular compartments characterized respectively by a neutral and an acidic pH. In the latter significant amounts of both Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) were released. We provide evidence that these QDs are internalized in the GT1-7 neuronal cell line and located in the lysosomal compartment. These findings can be related to a slight but significant reduction in cell survival and proliferation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of Continuous Versus Discontinuous Progesterone on Estradiol Regulation of Neuron Viability and Sprouting After Entorhinal Cortex Lesion in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Anna M.; Brown, Meghan A.; Morgan, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    Because the estrogen-based hormone therapy (HT) in postmenopausal women typically contains a progestogen component, understanding the interactions between estrogens and progestogens is critical for optimizing the potential neural benefits of HT. An important issue in this regard is the use of continuous vs discontinuous hormone treatments. Although sex steroid hormone levels naturally exhibit cyclic fluctuation, many HT formulations include continuous delivery of hormones. Recent findings from our laboratory and others have shown that coadministration of progesterone (P4) can either attenuate or augment beneficial actions of 17β-estradiol (E2) in experimental models depending in part upon the delivery schedule of P4. In this study, we demonstrate that the P4 delivery schedule in combined E2 and P4 treatments alters degenerative and regenerative outcomes of unilateral entorhinal cortex lesion. We assessed how lesion-induced degeneration of layer II neurons in entorhinal cortex layer and deafferentation in dentate gyrus are affected by ovariectomy and treatments with E2 alone or in combination with either continuous or discontinuous P4. Our results demonstrate the combined efficacy of E2 and P4 is dependent on the administration regimen. Importantly, the discontinuous-combined E2+P4 regimen had the greatest neuroprotective efficacy for both end points. These data extend a growing literature that indicates qualitative differences in the neuroprotective effects of E2 as a function of cotreatment with continuous versus discontinuous P4, the understanding of which has important implications for HT in postmenopausal women. PMID:25514084

  1. Morphological Changes of Cortical and Hippocampal Neurons after Treatment with VEGF and Bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Latzer, Pauline; Schlegel, Uwe; Theiss, Carsten

    2016-06-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a hallmark of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and plays an important role in brain development and function. Recently, it has been reported that treatment of GBM patients with bevacizumab, an anti-VEGF antibody, may cause a decline in neurocognitive function and compromise quality of life. Therefore, we investigated the effects of VEGF and bevacizumab on the morphology and on survival of neurons and glial cells. Dissociated cortical and hippocampal cell cultures of juvenile rats were treated with VEGF, bevacizumab, and VEGF + bevacizumab. Neuronal and glial cell viability was analyzed, and the morphology of neurons was objectified by morphometric analysis. In cortical cultures, bevacizumab significantly decreased the number of neurons after 20 days and the number of glial cells subsequent 30 days. Additionally, an increase in the dendritic length of cortical neurons was obvious after 10 days of incubation with bevacizumab, but returned to control level after 30 days. In hippocampal cultures, cell viability was not affected by bevacizumab; however, dendritic length increased at day 10, but decreased after long-term treatment. Therefore, bevacizumab obviously has a cytotoxic effect in cortical cultures and decreases the dendritic length in hippocampal neurons after long-term treatment. © 2016 The Authors. CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Kif5 regulates mitochondrial movement, morphology, function and neuronal survival.

    PubMed

    Iworima, Diepiriye G; Pasqualotto, Bryce A; Rintoul, Gordon L

    2016-04-01

    Due to the unique architecture of neurons, trafficking of mitochondria throughout processes to regions of high energetic demand is critical to sustain neuronal health. It has been suggested that compromised mitochondrial trafficking may play a role in neurodegenerative diseases. We evaluated the consequences of disrupted kif5c-mediated mitochondrial trafficking on mitochondrial form and function in primary rat cortical neurons. Morphological changes in mitochondria appeared to be due to remodelling, a phenomenon distinct from mitochondrial fission, which resulted in punctate-shaped mitochondria. We also demonstrated that neurons displaying punctate mitochondria exhibited relatively decreased ROS and increased cellular ATP levels using ROS-sensitive GFP and ATP FRET probes, respectively. Somewhat unexpectedly, neurons overexpressing the dominant negative form of kif5c exhibited enhanced survival following excitotoxicity, suggesting that the impairment of mitochondrial trafficking conferred some form of neuroprotection. However, when neurons were exposed to H2O2, disruption of kif5c exacerbated cell death indicating that the effect on cell viability was dependent on the mode of toxicity. Our results suggest a novel role of kif5c. In addition to mediating mitochondrial transport, kif5c plays a role in the mechanism of regulating mitochondrial morphology. Our results also suggest that kif5c mediated mitochondrial dynamics may play an important role in regulating mitochondrial function and in turn cellular health. Moreover, our studies demonstrate an interesting interplay between the regulation of mitochondrial motility and morphology.

  3. Label-Free Characterization of Emerging Human Neuronal Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir, Mustafa; Kim, Taewoo; Majumder, Anirban; Xiang, Mike; Wang, Ru; Liu, S. Chris; Gillette, Martha U.; Stice, Steven; Popescu, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    The emergent self-organization of a neuronal network in a developing nervous system is the result of a remarkably orchestrated process involving a multitude of chemical, mechanical and electrical signals. Little is known about the dynamic behavior of a developing network (especially in a human model) primarily due to a lack of practical and non-invasive methods to measure and quantify the process. Here we demonstrate that by using a novel optical interferometric technique, we can non-invasively measure several fundamental properties of neural networks from the sub-cellular to the cell population level. We applied this method to quantify network formation in human stem cell derived neurons and show for the first time, correlations between trends in the growth, transport, and spatial organization of such a system. Quantifying the fundamental behavior of such cell lines without compromising their viability may provide an important new tool in future longitudinal studies.

  4. Label-Free Characterization of Emerging Human Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Mustafa; Kim, Taewoo; Majumder, Anirban; Xiang, Mike; Wang, Ru; Liu, S. Chris; Gillette, Martha U.; Stice, Steven; Popescu, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    The emergent self-organization of a neuronal network in a developing nervous system is the result of a remarkably orchestrated process involving a multitude of chemical, mechanical and electrical signals. Little is known about the dynamic behavior of a developing network (especially in a human model) primarily due to a lack of practical and non-invasive methods to measure and quantify the process. Here we demonstrate that by using a novel optical interferometric technique, we can non-invasively measure several fundamental properties of neural networks from the sub-cellular to the cell population level. We applied this method to quantify network formation in human stem cell derived neurons and show for the first time, correlations between trends in the growth, transport, and spatial organization of such a system. Quantifying the fundamental behavior of such cell lines without compromising their viability may provide an important new tool in future longitudinal studies. PMID:24658536

  5. Surviving cancer without compromising aspirations.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Sandra

    2011-07-01

    This short paper is a reflection of how one person coped, survived and grew following numerous metastatic incidences over a 20 year period. Surviving cancer is a complex process but coping with the threat of regular recurrence has required a coping strategy that embraced the disease, set it aside and refused to compromise hopes, dreams and future life. Central to this personal journey has been the need to redefine normality, live with and set aside the fear of future metastases and death and find an answer and meaning in a changing biology, increased morbidity and possible mortality. This paper contends that not compromising the direction of travel and being able to focus on a career has ensured that survival was valuable and valued. A working environment in which students' problems have been immediate has produced different stressors. These have ultimately forced personal worries to be set aside, while living with cancer has become normal and accepted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A novel hypothesis for Alzheimer disease based on neuronal tetraploidy induced by p75 (NTR).

    PubMed

    Frade, José M; López-Sánchez, Noelia

    2010-05-15

    Cumulative evidence indicates that neuronal cell cycle re-entry represents an early and critical event in AD, recapitulating known hallmarks of the disease including tau hyperphosphorylation and production of Aβ peptide-containing plaques. Neurons that duplicate their DNA are rarely observed to undergo mitosis, and they remain for long time as tetraploid cells, in accordance with the chronic course of the disease. We have recently shown that cell cycle re-entry and somatic tetraploidization occurs during normal development in a subpopulation of RGCs, giving rise to enlarged neurons with extensive dendritic trees. Tetraploization in these neurons occurs in response to the activation of the neurotrophin receptor p75NTR by an endogenous source of NGF. In contrast, BDNF inhibits G2/M transition in tetraploid RGCs, preventing their death by apoptosis. In AD both proNGF and p75NTR are overexpressed, and AD-associated oxidative conditions have been shown to enhance proNGF function. This suggests that p75NTR could be a trigger for neuronal tetraploidization in AD, being the p75NTR-mediated pathway a putative target for therapeutical intervention. Functional changes in affected neurons, derived from tetraploidy-associated hypertrophy, could compromise neuronal viability. The known decline of BDNF/TrkB expression in AD could facilitate G2/M transition and apoptosis in tetraploid neurons.

  7. 22 CFR 34.19 - Compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compromise. 34.19 Section 34.19 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE CLAIMS AND STOLEN PROPERTY DEBT COLLECTION Collection Adjustments § 34.19 Compromise. STATE may attempt to effect compromise in accordance with the standards set forth in the FCCS,...

  8. 22 CFR 309.20 - Compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Compromise. 309.20 Section 309.20 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS DEBT COLLECTION Salary Offset § 309.20 Compromise. Peace Corps may attempt to effect compromise in accordance with the standards set forth in the FCCS (31 CFR part 902). ...

  9. 22 CFR 309.20 - Compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Compromise. 309.20 Section 309.20 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS DEBT COLLECTION Salary Offset § 309.20 Compromise. Peace Corps may attempt to effect compromise in accordance with the standards set forth in the FCCS (31 CFR part 902). ...

  10. 22 CFR 309.20 - Compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Compromise. 309.20 Section 309.20 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS DEBT COLLECTION Salary Offset § 309.20 Compromise. Peace Corps may attempt to effect compromise in accordance with the standards set forth in the FCCS (31 CFR part 902)....

  11. 22 CFR 309.20 - Compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Compromise. 309.20 Section 309.20 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS DEBT COLLECTION Salary Offset § 309.20 Compromise. Peace Corps may attempt to effect compromise in accordance with the standards set forth in the FCCS (31 CFR part 902)....

  12. 22 CFR 309.20 - Compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Compromise. 309.20 Section 309.20 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS DEBT COLLECTION Salary Offset § 309.20 Compromise. Peace Corps may attempt to effect compromise in accordance with the standards set forth in the FCCS (31 CFR part 902)....

  13. Concentration-Dependent Dual Role of Thrombin In Protection of Cultured Rat Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    García, Paul S.; Ciavatta, Vincent T.; Fidler, Jonathan A.; Woodbury, Anna; Levy, Jerrold H.; Tyor, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Thrombin’s role in the nervous system is not well understood. Under conditions of blood-brain barrier compromise (e.g., neurosurgery or stroke), thrombin can result in neuroapoptosis and the formation of glial scars. Despite this, preconditioning with thrombin has been found to be neuroprotective in models of cerebral ischemia and intracerebral hemorrhage. Methods We investigated the effects of physiologically relevant concentrations of thrombin on cortical neurons using two culture-based assays. We examined thrombin’s effect on neurites by quantitative analysis of fluorescently labeled neurons. To characterize thrombin’s effects on neuron survival, we spectrophotometrically measured changes in enzymatic activity. Using receptor agonists and thrombin inhibitors, we separately examined the role of thrombin and its receptor in neuroprotection. Results We found that low concentrations of thrombin (1 nM) enhances neurite growth and branching, neuron viability, and protects against excitotoxic damage. In contrast, higher concentrations of thrombin (100 nM) are potentially detrimental to neuronal health as evidenced by inhibition of neurite growth. Lower concentrations of thrombin resulted in equivalent neuroprotection as the antifibrinolytic, aprotinin, and the direct thrombin inhibitor, argatroban. Interestingly, exogenous application of the species-specific thrombin inhibitor, antithrombin III, was detrimental to neuronal health; suggesting that some endogenous thrombin is necessary for optimal neuron health in our culture system. Activation of the thrombin receptor, protease-activated receptor - 1 (PAR-1), via micromolar concentrations of the thrombin receptor agonist peptide, TRAP, did not adversely affect neuronal viability. Conclusions An optimal concentration of thrombin exists to enhance neuronal health. Neurotoxic effects of thrombin do not involve activation of PAR receptors and thus separate pharmacologic manipulation of thrombin’s receptor

  14. Cell viability assays: introduction.

    PubMed

    Stoddart, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of cell viability plays a fundamental role in all forms of cell culture. Sometimes it is the main purpose of the experiment, such as in toxicity assays. Alternatively, cell viability can be used to -correlate cell behaviour to cell number, providing a more accurate picture of, for example, anabolic -activity. There are wide arrays of cell viability methods which range from the most routine trypan blue dye exclusion assay to highly complex analysis of individual cells, such as using RAMAN microscopy. The cost, speed, and complexity of equipment required will all play a role in determining the assay used. This chapter aims to provide an overview of many of the assays available today.

  15. Forensic Analysis of Compromised Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Directory Tree Analysis File Generator is a Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL) script that simplifies and automates the collection of information for forensic analysis of compromised computer systems. During such an analysis, it is sometimes necessary to collect and analyze information about files on a specific directory tree. Directory Tree Analysis File Generator collects information of this type (except information about directories) and writes it to a text file. In particular, the script asks the user for the root of the directory tree to be processed, the name of the output file, and the number of subtree levels to process. The script then processes the directory tree and puts out the aforementioned text file. The format of the text file is designed to enable the submission of the file as input to a spreadsheet program, wherein the forensic analysis is performed. The analysis usually consists of sorting files and examination of such characteristics of files as ownership, time of creation, and time of most recent access, all of which characteristics are among the data included in the text file.

  16. Accumulation of iron oxide nanoparticles by cultured primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Petters, Charlotte; Dringen, Ralf

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are frequently used for biomedical applications. Although nanoparticles can enter the brain, little is known so far on the uptake of IONPs in neurons and on their neurotoxic potential. Hence, we applied dimercaptosuccinate (DMSA)-coated IONPs to cultured primary rat cerebellar granule neurons. These IONPs had average hydrodynamic diameters of around 80 nm and 120 nm when dispersed in incubation medium in the absence and the presence of 10% fetal calf serum, respectively. Acute exposure of neurons with IONPs for up to 6 h did neither alter the cell morphology nor compromise cell viability, although neurons accumulated large amounts of IONPs in a time- and concentration-dependent manner which caused delayed toxicity. For the first 30 min of incubation of neurons at 37 °C with IONPs the cellular iron content increased proportionally to the concentration of IONPs applied irrespective of the absence and the presence of serum. IONP-exposure in the absence of serum generated maximal cellular iron contents of around 3000 nmol iron/mg protein after 4 h of incubation, while the accumulation in the presence of 10% serum was slower and reached already within 1 h maximal values of around 450 nmol iron/mg protein. For both incubation conditions was the increase in cellular iron contents significantly lowered by reducing the incubation temperature to 4 °C. Application of inhibitors of endocytotic pathways did not affect neuronal IONP accumulation in the absence of serum, while inhibitors of clathrin-mediated endocytosis lowered significantly the IONP accumulation in the presence of serum. These data demonstrate that DMSA-coated IONPs are not acutely toxic to cultured neurons and that a protein corona around the particles strongly affects their interaction with neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pneumocystis Melanins Confer Enhanced Organism Viability

    PubMed Central

    Icenhour, Crystal R.; Kottom, Theodore J.; Limper, Andrew H.

    2006-01-01

    Pneumocystis continues to represent an important opportunistic fungal pathogen of those with compromised immunity. Thus, it is crucial to identify factors that affect its viability and pathogenicity. We previously reported the first identification of melanins in Pneumocystis. In the present study, we sought to further characterize these components and define the function for these melanins. Melanins extracted from Pneumocystis and melanized Pneumocystis cells were analyzed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, revealing spectra consistent with melanins from other fungi. Immunofluorescence assays using anti-melanin monoclonal antibodies showed that melanins are widely present across Pneumocystis host species, including mouse-, ferret-, and human-derived Pneumocystis organisms, as well as Pneumocystis carinii derived from rat. Using immunoelectron microscopy, melanins were found to localize to the cell wall and cytoplasm of P. carinii cysts, as well as to intracystic bodies within mature cysts. Next, the role of melanins on the maintenance of Pneumocystis viability was determined by using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR measurement of the heat shock protein mRNA under adverse environmental conditions. Using a new method to promote the melanization of Pneumocystis, we observed that strongly melanized Pneumocystis retained viability to a greater degree when exposed to UV irradiation or desiccation compared to less-pigmented organisms. These studies support our previous identification of Pneumocystis melanins across the genus, further characterize these Pneumocystis components, and demonstrate that melanins protect Pneumocystis from environmental stressors. PMID:16757739

  18. Pneumocystis melanins confer enhanced organism viability.

    PubMed

    Icenhour, Crystal R; Kottom, Theodore J; Limper, Andrew H

    2006-06-01

    Pneumocystis continues to represent an important opportunistic fungal pathogen of those with compromised immunity. Thus, it is crucial to identify factors that affect its viability and pathogenicity. We previously reported the first identification of melanins in Pneumocystis. In the present study, we sought to further characterize these components and define the function for these melanins. Melanins extracted from Pneumocystis and melanized Pneumocystis cells were analyzed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, revealing spectra consistent with melanins from other fungi. Immunofluorescence assays using anti-melanin monoclonal antibodies showed that melanins are widely present across Pneumocystis host species, including mouse-, ferret-, and human-derived Pneumocystis organisms, as well as Pneumocystis carinii derived from rat. Using immunoelectron microscopy, melanins were found to localize to the cell wall and cytoplasm of P. carinii cysts, as well as to intracystic bodies within mature cysts. Next, the role of melanins on the maintenance of Pneumocystis viability was determined by using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR measurement of the heat shock protein mRNA under adverse environmental conditions. Using a new method to promote the melanization of Pneumocystis, we observed that strongly melanized Pneumocystis retained viability to a greater degree when exposed to UV irradiation or desiccation compared to less-pigmented organisms. These studies support our previous identification of Pneumocystis melanins across the genus, further characterize these Pneumocystis components, and demonstrate that melanins protect Pneumocystis from environmental stressors.

  19. An Efficient Method for Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons Purification with a One-Time Anti-Mitotic Reagent Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Lin, Gou; Xu, Hanpeng

    2013-01-01

    Background The dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neuron is an invaluable tool in axon growth, growth factor regulation, myelin formation and myelin-relevant researches. The purification of DRG neurons is a key step in these studies. Traditionally, purified DRG neurons were obtained in two weeks after exposure to several rounds of anti-mitotic reagent. Methods and Results In this report, a novel, simple and efficient method for DRG purification is presented. DRG cultures were treated once with a high-dose anti-mitotic reagent cocktail for 72 hours. Using this new method, DRG neurons were obtained with 99% purification within 1 week. We confirmed that the neurite growth and the viability of the purified DRG neurons have no difference from the DRG neurons purified by traditional method. Furthermore, P0 and MBP expression was observed in myelin by immunocytochemistry in the DRG/SC co-culture system. The formation of mature node of Ranvier in DRG-Schwann cell co-culture system was observed using anti-Nav 1.6 and anti-caspr antibody. Conclusion and Significance The results indicate that this high dose single treatment did not compromise the capacity of DRG neurons for myelin formation in the DRG/SC co-culture system. In conclusion, a convenient approach for purifying DRG neurons was developed which is time-saving and high-efficiency. PMID:23565257

  20. Cartilage viability after trochleoplasty.

    PubMed

    Schöttle, Philip B; Schell, Hanna; Duda, Georg; Weiler, Andreas

    2007-02-01

    Trochleoplasty is an established and accepted technique for the treatment of patellar instability because of a missing trochlear groove. In this technique, a flap of cartilage over the trochlea is carefully removed and a new trochlear groove is created in the underlying bone before the cartilaginous flap is reattached with sutures. The mid-term clinical and radiological results of this operation are promising but no information about the viability of the reattached cartilage has been reported. To evaluate cartilage viability and quality after trochleoplasty and to verify the healing process, two osteochondral biopsies were harvested from three patients 6, 8, and 9 months after trochleoplasty. One cylinder was evaluated histologically to assess cartilage, calcified cartilage (cc), and subchondral bone quality, while the other one was examined by confocal microscopy to evaluate cell viability. The histological examination showed a normal matrix and cell distribution of the cartilage, while the cc showed lacunae ingrowing from the underlying bone. The subchondral bone showed normal lamellae and histology, and the healing of the flap. Confocal microscopy showed almost exclusively viable chondrocytes. This demonstration of non-injured cartilage at short-term follow-up together with promising clinical and radiological 2- and 5-year follow-up results indicate a potential promising outlook for the long term, as further chondral damage is not expected. So trochleoplasty can be seen as a primary intervention for patellar instability because of trochlear dysplasia as the risk for cartilage damage is low.

  1. Ovarian fragment sizes affect viability and morphology of preantral follicles during storage at 4°C

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The efficient transportation of ovarian tissues is affected b various factors compromising their viability. We tested various ovarian sample sizes (whole ovary, biopsy, and transplantation size) during various transportation times....

  2. 48 CFR 1432.610 - Compromising debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compromising debts. 1432.610 Section 1432.610 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Contract Debts 1432.610 Compromising debts. The CO may...

  3. 48 CFR 1432.610 - Compromising debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compromising debts. 1432.610 Section 1432.610 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Contract Debts 1432.610 Compromising debts. The CO may...

  4. Analysis of Atlanta Compromise School Desegregation Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Atlanta, Inc., GA.

    On February 22, 1973, attorneys for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the Atlanta Board of Education filed a compromise desegregation plan with the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia. If the Court approves, this compromise will constitute the final desegregation plan for the Atlanta Public…

  5. 26 CFR 301.7122-1 - Compromises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... for taxes, interest, or penalties. Unless the terms of the offer and acceptance expressly provide otherwise, acceptance of an offer to compromise a civil liability does not remit a criminal liability, nor does acceptance of an offer to compromise a criminal liability remit a civil liability. (b) Grounds...

  6. Clayton's compromises and the assisted dying debate.

    PubMed

    Parker, Malcolm

    2015-03-01

    Richard Huxtable has recently argued that while assisted dying has been both repeatedly condemned and commended, a compromise resolution is possible. Following critique of other purported solutions, he argues for a new legal offence of "compassionate killing" as a plausible compromise between supporters and opponents of legalised assisted dying, because it offers something of significance to both sides. However, it turns out that "compassionate killing" would leave both sides with insufficient net benefit for the proposal to qualify as a compromise between them. By analogy with another apparently intractable bioethical debate, concerning destructive embryo research, this column rejects Huxtable's solution as another "Clayton's compromise". True compromise is not possible in bioethical debates involving divisions over deeply held values and world views. Resolving such debates inevitably involves the substitution of one dominant world view with another.

  7. Distinct Functions of Syntaxin-1 in Neuronal Maintenance, Synaptic Vesicle Docking, and Fusion in Mouse Neurons.

    PubMed

    Vardar, Gülçin; Chang, Shuwen; Arancillo, Marife; Wu, Yuan-Ju; Trimbuch, Thorsten; Rosenmund, Christian

    2016-07-27

    Neurotransmitter release requires the formation of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes by SNARE proteins syntaxin-1 (Stx1), synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25), and synaptobrevin-2 (Syb2). In mammalian systems, loss of SNAP-25 or Syb2 severely impairs neurotransmitter release; however, complete loss of function studies for Stx1 have been elusive due to the functional redundancy between Stx1 isoforms Stx1A and Stx1B and the embryonic lethality of Stx1A/1B double knock-out (DKO) mice. Here, we studied the roles of Stx1 in neuronal maintenance and neurotransmitter release in mice with constitutive or conditional deletion of Stx1B on an Stx1A-null background. Both constitutive and postnatal loss of Stx1 severely compromised neuronal viability in vivo and in vitro, indicating an obligatory role of Stx1 for maintenance of developing and mature neurons. Loss of Munc18-1, a high-affinity binding partner of Stx1, also showed severely impaired neuronal viability, but with a slower time course compared with Stx1A/1B DKO neurons, and exogenous Stx1A or Stx1B expression significantly delayed Munc18-1-dependent lethality. In addition, loss of Stx1 completely abolished fusion-competent vesicles and severely impaired vesicle docking, demonstrating its essential roles in neurotransmission. Putative partial SNARE complex assembly with the SNARE motif mutant Stx1A(AV) (A240V, V244A) was not sufficient to rescue neurotransmission despite full recovery of vesicle docking and neuronal survival. Together, these data suggest that Stx1 has independent functions in neuronal maintenance and neurotransmitter release and complete SNARE complex formation is required for vesicle fusion and priming, whereas partial SNARE complex formation is sufficient for vesicle docking and neuronal maintenance. Syntaxin-1 (Stx1) is a component of the synaptic vesicle soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE

  8. Establishing lunar resource viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, J.; Fisackerly, R.; Houdou, B.

    2016-11-01

    Recent research has highlighted the potential of lunar resources as an important element of space exploration but their viability has not been demonstrated. Establishing whether or not they can be considered in future plans is a multidisciplinary effort, requiring scientific expertise and delivering scientific results. To this end various space agencies and private entities are looking to lunar resources, extracted and processed in situ, as a potentially game changing element in future space architectures, with the potential to increase scale and reduce cost. However, before any decisions can be made on the inclusion of resources in exploration roadmaps or future scenarios some big questions need to be answered about the viability of different resource deposits and the processes for extraction and utilisation. The missions and measurements that will be required to answer these questions, and which are being prepared by agencies and others, can only be performed through the engagement and support of the science community. In answering questions about resources, data and knowledge will be generated that is of fundamental scientific importance. In supporting resource prospecting missions the science community will de facto generate new scientific knowledge. Science enables exploration and exploration enables science.

  9. Obesity May Not Compromise Knee Surgery Success

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164282.html Obesity May Not Compromise Knee Surgery Success Results similar ... over 35, so it's unclear if more severe obesity might increase the risk of meniscal repair failure, ...

  10. Viability and the moral status of the fetus.

    PubMed

    Campbell, A V

    1985-01-01

    The viability of the fetus has played a significant part in the framing of abortion legislation, but the use of viability as a criterion represents a compromise which is conceptually unclear and which fails to satisfy either side in the abortion debate. Both conservative and liberal views on abortion regard fetal development as morally irrelevant. For the moderate (or gradualist) view some point in the development must be found which indicates a change in the moral status of the fetus. Since viability changes according to available techniques for neonatal care it cannot be the criterion. Alternative criteria are surveyed and it is concluded that the onset of sensation is a significant transition point beyond which abortion and infanticide cannot be morally distinguished. It is suggested that either legislation should be amended to prohibit abortion after 18 to 20 weeks, or abortion to full term should be permitted and the possibility of legislation for infanticide be envisaged.

  11. Improved two-photon imaging of living neurons in brain tissue through temporal gating

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Vini; Drury, Jack; Choy, Julian M. C.; Stricker, Christian; Bachor, Hans-A.; Daria, Vincent R.

    2015-01-01

    We optimize two-photon imaging of living neurons in brain tissue by temporally gating an incident laser to reduce the photon flux while optimizing the maximum fluorescence signal from the acquired images. Temporal gating produces a bunch of ~10 femtosecond pulses and the fluorescence signal is improved by increasing the bunch-pulse energy. Gating is achieved using an acousto-optic modulator with a variable gating frequency determined as integral multiples of the imaging sampling frequency. We hypothesize that reducing the photon flux minimizes the photo-damage to the cells. Our results, however, show that despite producing a high fluorescence signal, cell viability is compromised when the gating and sampling frequencies are equal (or effectively one bunch-pulse per pixel). We found an optimum gating frequency range that maintains the viability of the cells while preserving a pre-set fluorescence signal of the acquired two-photon images. The neurons are imaged while under whole-cell patch, and the cell viability is monitored as a change in the membrane’s input resistance. PMID:26504651

  12. Modulation of PC12 cell viability by forskolin-induced cyclic AMP levels through ERK and JNK pathways: an implication for L-DOPA-induced cytotoxicity in nigrostriatal dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Park, Keun Hong; Park, Hyun Jin; Shin, Keon Sung; Choi, Hyun Sook; Kai, Masaaki; Lee, Myung Koo

    2012-07-01

    The intracellular levels of cyclic AMP (cAMP) increase in response to cytotoxic concentrations of L-DOPA in PC12 cells, and forskolin that induces intracellular cAMP levels either protects PC12 cells from L-DOPA-induced cytotoxicity or enhances cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. This study investigated the effects of cAMP induced by forskolin on cell viability of PC12 cells, relevant to L-DOPA-induced cytotoxicity in Parkinson's disease therapy. The low levels of forskolin (0.01 and 0.1 μM)-induced cAMP increased dopamine biosynthesis and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) phosphorylation, and induced transient phosphorylation of ERK1/2 within 1 h. However, at the high levels of forskolin (1.0 and 10 μM)-induced cAMP, dopamine biosynthesis and TH phosphorylation did not increase, but rapid differentiation in neurite-like formation was observed with a steady state. The high levels of forskolin-induced cAMP also induced sustained increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation within 0.25-6 h and then led to apoptosis, which was apparently mediated by JNK1/2 and caspase-3 activation. Multiple treatment of PC12 cells with nontoxic L-DOPA (20 μM) for 4-6 days induced neurite-like formation and decreased intracellular dopamine levels by reducing TH phosphorylation. These results suggest that the low levels of forskolin-induced cAMP increased dopamine biosynthesis in cell survival via transient ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In contrast, the high levels of forskolin-induced cAMP induced differentiation via sustained ERK1/2 phosphorylation and then led to apoptosis. Taken together, the intracellular levels of cAMP play a dual role in cell survival and death through the ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 pathways in PC12 cells.

  13. Cell viability test after laser guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbalm, Tabitha N.; Owens, Sarah; Bakken, Daniel; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2006-02-01

    To precisely control the position of multiple types of cells in a coculture for the study of cell-cell interactions, we have developed a laser micropatterning technique. The technique employs the optical forces generated by a weakly focused laser beam. In the beam's focal region, the optical force draws microparticles, such as cells, into the center of the beam, propels them along the beam axis, and guides them onto a target surface. Specific patterns are created through computercontrolled micromanipulation of the substrate relative to the laser beam. Preliminary data have demonstrated cell viability after laser guidance. This project was designed to systematically vary the controllable laser parameters, namely, intensity and exposure time of the laser on single cells, and thus determine the laser parameters that allow negligible cell damage with functional cellular position control. To accomplish this goal, embryonic day 7 (E7) chick forebrain neurons were cultured in 35 mm petri dishes. Control and test cells were selected one hour after cell placement to allow cell attachment. Test cells were subjected to the laser at the focal region. The experimental parameters were chosen as: wavelength - 800 nm, intensities - 100 mW, 200 mW, and 300 mW, and exposure times - 10 s and 60 s. Results were analyzed based on neurite outgrowth and the Live/Dead assay (Viability/Cytoxicity kit from Molecular Probes). No statistical difference (p >> 0.1, student t-test) in viability or function was found between the control neurons and those exposed to the laser. This confirms that laser guidance seems to be a promising method for cellular manipulation.

  14. 45 CFR 30.22 - Bases for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bases for compromise. 30.22 Section 30.22 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CLAIMS COLLECTION Debt Compromise § 30.22 Bases for compromise. (a) Compromise. The Secretary may compromise a debt if the full...

  15. 45 CFR 30.22 - Bases for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bases for compromise. 30.22 Section 30.22 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CLAIMS COLLECTION Debt Compromise § 30.22 Bases for compromise. (a) Compromise. The Secretary may compromise a debt if the full...

  16. 45 CFR 30.22 - Bases for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bases for compromise. 30.22 Section 30.22 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CLAIMS COLLECTION Debt Compromise § 30.22 Bases for compromise. (a) Compromise. The Secretary may compromise a debt if the full...

  17. 45 CFR 30.22 - Bases for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bases for compromise. 30.22 Section 30.22 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CLAIMS COLLECTION Debt Compromise § 30.22 Bases for compromise. (a) Compromise. The Secretary may compromise a debt if the full...

  18. Kinetic viability assays using DRAQ7 probe.

    PubMed

    Wlodkowic, Donald; Akagi, Jin; Dobrucki, Jurek; Errington, Rachel; Smith, Paul J; Takeda, Kazuo; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2013-07-01

    Cell death within cell populations is a stochastic process where cell-to-cell variation in temporal progression through the various stages of cell death arises from asynchrony of subtle fluctuations in the signaling pathways. Most cell death assays rely on detection of the specific marker of cell demise at the end-point of cell culturing. Such an approach cannot account for the asynchrony and the stochastic nature of cell response to the death-inducing signal. There is a need therefore for rapid and high-throughput bioassays capable of continuously tracking viability of individual cells from the time of encountering a stress signal up to final stages of their demise. In this context, a new anthracycline derivative, DRAQ7, is gaining increasing interest as an easy-to-use marker capable of long-term monitoring of cell death in real-time. This novel probe neither penetrates the plasma membrane of living cells nor does it affect the cells' susceptibility to the death-inducing agents. However, when the membrane integrity is compromised, DRAQ7 enters cells undergoing demise and binds readily to nuclear DNA to report cell death. Here, we provide three sets of protocols for viability assays using DRAQ7 probe. The first protocol describes the innovative use of single-color DRAQ7 real-time assay to dynamically track cell viability. The second protocol outlines a simplified end-point DRAQ7 staining approach. The final protocol highlights the real-time and multiparametric apoptosis assay utilizing DRAQ7 dye concurrently with tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), the mitochondrial trans-membrane electrochemical potential (ΔΨm) sensing probe.

  19. Vascular Compromise from Soft Tissue Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Shannon; Carruthers, Jean D.A.; Carruthers, Alastair

    2014-01-01

    The popularity of soft tissue fillers is, in part, due to their favorable side-effect profile. However, serious complications can occur. The authors describe their extensive clinical experience with soft-tissue augmentation and the rare complication of vascular compromise, which can lead to necrosis and scarring. Over a 10-year period between January 2003 and January 2013, the authors observed a total of 12 cases of vascular compromise. Eight patients in their clinical practice showed evidence of vascular compromise out of a total of 14,355 filler injections (0.05%). In addition, four patients treated with an experimental particulate filler had vascular complications. All cases were examined for filler type, location of complication, risk factors, treatment, and outcomes. Although treatment plans differed for each patient in their series, all cases of vascular compromise resolved fully. The authors believe that an office-based protocol for both immediate and ongoing care—including a thorough individualized assessment and treatment plan for each patient—is critical to timely and effective resolution of side effects. They propose key recommendations for the prevention and management of vascular compromise to improve patient outcomes and reduce the risk of permanent complications. PMID:25276276

  20. The theory of compromised eating behavior.

    PubMed

    Furman, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this inquiry was to develop substantive theory that describes the social process that influences the eating behavior of hospitalized older adults. Undernutrition contributes to negative health outcomes, such as increased morbidity and mortality in hospitalized older adults. Despite the availability of vast nutritional resources within the hospital environment, hospitalized older adults often have inadequate dietary intake. A grounded theory methodology was used to explore this phenomenon. The Theory of Compromised Eating Behavior describes the process of compromise that older adults experience related to eating behavior while hospitalized. The theory has four stages: self-indication, joint action, negotiation, and action. The meaning of hospital food and mealtimes differs from at-home food and mealtimes for the older adult, resulting in compromise. Intervention, which enhances the meaning of food and mealtimes for the older adult during hospitalization, may improve dietary intake and nutritional outcomes.

  1. Viability of Baylisascaris procyonis Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Sorvillo, Frank J.; Sorvillo, Teresa; Eberhard, Mark L.

    2011-01-01

    Infection with Baylisascaris procyonis roundworms is rare but often fatal and typically affects children. We attempted to determine parameters of viability and methods of inactivating the eggs of these roundworms. Loss of viability resulted when eggs were heated to 62°C or desiccated for 7 months but not when frozen at –15°C for 6 months. PMID:21762591

  2. Viability of Baylisascaris procyonis Eggs.

    PubMed

    Shafir, Shira C; Sorvillo, Frank J; Sorvillo, Teresa; Eberhard, Mark L

    2011-07-01

    Infection with Baylisascaris procyonis roundworms is rare but often fatal and typically affects children. We attempted to determine parameters of viability and methods of inactivating the eggs of these roundworms. Loss of viability resulted when eggs were heated to 62°C or desiccated for 7 months but not when frozen at -15°C for 6 months.

  3. Modeling the Dynamics of Compromised Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Soper, B; Merl, D M

    2011-09-12

    Accurate predictive models of compromised networks would contribute greatly to improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the detection and control of network attacks. Compartmental epidemiological models have been applied to modeling attack vectors such as viruses and worms. We extend the application of these models to capture a wider class of dynamics applicable to cyber security. By making basic assumptions regarding network topology we use multi-group epidemiological models and reaction rate kinetics to model the stochastic evolution of a compromised network. The Gillespie Algorithm is used to run simulations under a worst case scenario in which the intruder follows the basic connection rates of network traffic as a method of obfuscation.

  4. Air Duster abuse causing rapid airway compromise.

    PubMed

    Winston, Amanda; Kanzy, Abed; Bachuwa, Ghassan

    2015-01-07

    Inhalant abuse is potentially life-threatening and has resulted in many complications such as central nervous system depression, cardiac dysrhythmia and hypoxia. Inhalant abuse causing angioedema is rarely reported in the medical literature. In this report we present a case of rapidly progressive airway compromise following recreational huffing. Our patient required intubation and intensive care unit admission with complete recovery after 5 days. The aetiology of airway compromise is postulated to be due to commonly reported frost bite injury and rarely reported angioedema. To the best of our knowledge this the second case reporting angioedema secondary to huffing Air Duster. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  5. Funhaler spacer: improving adherence without compromising delivery

    PubMed Central

    Watt, P; Clements, B; Devadason, S; Chaney, G

    2003-01-01

    A novel asthma spacer device, the "Funhaler", incorporates incentive toys which are isolated from the main inspiratory circuit by a valve. Here we show that its use does not compromise drug delivery. Improved adherence combined with satisfactory delivery characteristics suggest that the Funhaler may be useful for management of young asthmatics. PMID:12818901

  6. Uneasy Compromise: Language and Education in Moldova

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciscel, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    This study reports on the uneasy compromise in language and education policies in the post-Soviet Republic of Moldova since its first moves toward independence in 1989. Taking an approach that posits language policies as needing to be anchored in both international norms and the idiosyncrasies of local conditions, the discussion explores the…

  7. Political Compromise Makes the World Go 'Round

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Diana

    2007-01-01

    Compromise in any context is often hard to accept. It feels like a person is giving up on his or her ideals. This is especially true in dealing with politics. Legislative and congressional bills can be written with the highest of ideals in mind. By the time the bill progresses through committees and the floor debate process, it can look like a…

  8. Assessment of skin flap viability using visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and auto-fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Caigang; Chen, Shuo; Chui, Christopher Hoe-Kong; Liu, Quan

    2012-12-01

    The accurate assessment of skin flap viability is vitally important in reconstructive surgery. Early identification of vascular compromise increases the change of successful flap salvage. The ability to determine tissue viability intraoperatively is also extremely useful when the reconstructive surgeon must decide how to inset the flap and whether any tissue must be discarded. Visible diffuse reflectance and auto-fluorescence spectroscopy, which yield different sets of biochemical information, have not been used in the characterization of skin flap viability simultaneously to our best knowledge. We performed both diffuse reflectance and fluorescence measurements on a reverse MacFarlane rat dorsal skin flap model to identify the additional value of auto-fluorescence spectroscopy to the assessment of flap viability. Our result suggests that auto-fluorescence spectroscopy appears to be more sensitive to early biochemical changes in a failed flap than diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, which could be a valuable complement to diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for the assessment of flap viability.

  9. 19 CFR 172.33 - Acceptance of offers in compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acceptance of offers in compromise. 172.33 Section... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) CLAIMS FOR LIQUIDATED DAMAGES; PENALTIES SECURED BY BONDS Offers in Compromise § 172.33 Acceptance of offers in compromise. An offer in compromise will be considered...

  10. 19 CFR 171.32 - Acceptance of offers in compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acceptance of offers in compromise. 171.32 Section... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) FINES, PENALTIES, AND FORFEITURES Offers in Compromise § 171.32 Acceptance of offers in compromise. An offer in compromise will be considered accepted only when the...

  11. Metabolic analysis of mouse brains that have compromised iron storage.

    PubMed

    Ill, Amanda M; Mitchell, Todd R; Neely, Elizabeth B; Connor, James R

    2006-09-01

    Iron is a critical component of the CNS that must be tightly regulated; too little iron can result in energy insufficiency and too much iron can result in oxidative stress. The intracellular iron storage protein ferritin is central to the regulation of iron. In this study, we determined the neurochemical profile of brains of animals deficient in heavy-chain ferritin (H-ferritin) using high-resolution magic angle spin proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS (1)H MRS). Spectra of 2 mm-thick coronal tissue punches ( approximately 4 mg) were obtained using a CPMG pulse sequence on Bruker Avance 500 and quantified (nmol/mg tissue) using customized LCModel software (16 metabolites). In H-ferritin deficient mice, we found significant increases in striatal glutamate, hippocampal choline, and N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate in both the cortex and the hippocampus (t-test, p < 0.05). Neurochemical profiling with principal component analysis (PCA) revealed increased glutamate in the hippocampus, striatum, and ventral tegmental area (VTA) in H-ferritin deficient animals as compared to wild-type. While lactate was increased in the VTA of deficient animals, it was decreased in the striatum. Also, GABA was increased in both cortical and striatal regions of deficient mice. These changes reveal the importance of proper iron management for maintaining neurochemical balance and provide new evidence for region specific differences in neurochemical profiles as a result of compromised ability of neurons to store iron while overall iron status is normal. Because H-ferritin is predominantly expressed in neurons, the neurochemical profile is suggestive of neuronal iron deficiency and may have relevance to the functional consequences associated with brain iron deficiency.

  12. Radiosurgical planning of meningiomas: compromises with conformity.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Jeremy G; Walton, Lee; Vaughan, Paul; Malik, Irfan; Radatz, Matthias; Kemeny, Andras

    2004-01-01

    The radiosurgical planning of meningiomas frequently necessitates compromises between irradiating tumour and risking damage to adjacent structures. In selected cases, we resolved this by excluding part of the tumour from the prescription isodose volume. Most of these compromises or 'suboptimal' plans achieved growth control. Growth control could not be related to conformity indices or to various measures of the radiation dose received by the meningioma. Examining recurrences, 75% arose from dura outside the original treatment field. These findings are discussed in terms of dose prescription protocols and the use of conformity indices in planning. The importance of the dural origin of meningiomas is well established in surgical practice, as reflected by Simpson's grades, but may be equally significant in radiosurgical practice.

  13. Synthesis of acetylcholine from choline derived from phosphatidylcholine in a human neuronal cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Blusztajn, J.K.; Liscovitch, M.; Richardson, U.I.

    1987-08-01

    Cholinergic neurons are unique among cells since they alone utilize choline not only as a component of major membrane phospholipids, such as phosphatidylcholine (Ptd-Cho), but also as a precursor of their neurotransmitter acetylcholine (AcCho). It has been hypothesized that choline-phospholipids might serve as a storage pool of choline for AcCho synthesis. The selective vulnerability of cholinergic neurons in certain neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer disease, motor neuron disorders) might result from the abnormally accelerated liberation of choline (to be used a precursor of AcCho) from membrane phospholipids, resulting in altered membrane composition and function and compromised neuronal viability. However, the proposed metabolic link between membrane turnover and AcCho synthesis has been difficult to demonstrate because of the heterogeneity of the preparations used. Here the authors used a population of purely cholinergic cells (human neuroblastomas, LA-N-2), incubated in the presence of (methyl-/sup 3/H)methionine to selectively label PtdCho synthesized by methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine, the only pathway of de novo choline synthesis. Three peaks of radioactive material that cochromatographed with authentic AcCho, choline, and phosphocholine were observed when the water-soluble metabolites of the (/sup 3/H)PtdCho were purified by high-performance liquid chromatography. The results demonstrate that AcCho can be synthesized from choline derived from the degradation of endogenous PtdCho formed de novo by methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine.

  14. Lysosomal compromise and brain dysfunction: examining the role of neuroaxonal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Walkley, Steven U; Sikora, Jakub; Micsenyi, Matthew; Davidson, Cristin; Dobrenis, Kostantin

    2010-12-01

    Lysosomal diseases are a family of over 50 disorders caused by defects in proteins critical for normal function of the endosomal/lysosomal system and characterized by complex pathogenic cascades involving progressive dysfunction of many organ systems, most notably the brain. Evidence suggests that compromise in lysosomal function is highly varied and leads to changes in multiple substrate processing and endosomal signalling, in calcium homoeostasis and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and in autophagocytosis and proteasome function. Neurons are highly vulnerable and show abnormalities in perikarya, dendrites and axons, often in ways seemingly unrelated to the primary lysosomal defect. A notable example is NAD (neuroaxonal dystrophy), which is characterized by formation of focal enlargements (spheroids) containing diverse organelles and other components consistent with compromise of retrograde axonal transport. Although neurons may be universally susceptible to NAD, GABAergic neurons, particularly Purkinje cells, appear most vulnerable and ataxia and related features of cerebellar dysfunction are a common outcome. As NAD is found early in disease and thus may be a contributor to Purkinje cell dysfunction and death, understanding its link to lysosomal compromise could lead to therapies designed to prevent its occurrence and thereby ameliorate cerebellar dysfunction.

  15. Lysosomal Compromise and Brain Dysfunction: Examining the Role of Neuroaxonal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Walkley, Steven U.; Sikora, Jakub; Micsenyi, Matthew; Davidson, Cristin; Dobrenis, Kostantin

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal diseases are a family of over 50 disorders caused by defects in proteins critical for normal function of the endosomal/lysosomal system and characterized by complex pathogenic cascades involving progressive dysfunction of many organ systems, most notably brain. Evidence suggests that compromise in lysosomal function is highly varied and leads to changes in multiple substrate processing and endosomal signaling, in calcium homeostasis and ER stress, and in autophagocytosis and proteasome function. Neurons are highly vulnerable and show abnormalities in perikarya, dendrites, and axons, often in ways appearing unrelated to the primary lysosomal defect. A notable example is neuroaxonal dystrophy (NAD) which is characterized by formation of focal enlargements (spheroids) containing diverse organelles and other components consistent with compromise of retrograde axonal transport. While neurons may be universally susceptible to NAD, GABAergic neurons, particularly Purkinje cells, appear most vulnerable and ataxia and related features of cerebellar dysfunction are a common outcome. As NAD is found early in disease and thus may be a contributor to Purkinje cell dysfunction and death, understanding its link to lysosomal compromise could lead to therapies designed to prevent its occurrence and thereby ameliorate cerebellar dysfunction. PMID:21118103

  16. Compromises in career-related decisions: examining the role of compromise severity.

    PubMed

    Wee, Serena

    2014-10-01

    This study tested L. S. Gottfredson's (1996) revised compromise theory by examining whether the relative importance of job sex type, job prestige, and person-job interest congruence for predicting job choice changed as the level of compromise required changed. The fully within-persons design had participants engage in a simulated occupational choice task where job sex type and job prestige were manipulated to be experimentally independent. Participants 1st categorized jobs as unacceptable, acceptable, or preferred. Then, within each category, they made further pairwise choices among jobs in that category. In Study 1, participants were 168 college seniors (124 women, 44 men) from a large Midwestern university. In Study 2, participants were 262 (146 women, 116 men) individuals residing in the United States and recruited via Amazon's Mechanical Turk platform. Across both studies, job sex type predicted choice when large compromises were required. Across both studies, job prestige did not predict choice when moderate compromises were required. In Study 2 but not Study 1, person-job interest congruence predicted choice when minimal compromises were required. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. ESCRT-0 dysfunction compromises autophagic degradation of protein aggregates and facilitates ER stress-mediated neurodegeneration via apoptotic and necroptotic pathways.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Ryuji; Hasegawa, Takafumi; Tamai, Keiichi; Sugeno, Naoto; Yoshida, Shun; Kobayashi, Junpei; Kikuchi, Akio; Baba, Toru; Futatsugi, Akira; Sato, Ikuro; Satoh, Kennichi; Takeda, Atsushi; Aoki, Masashi; Tanaka, Nobuyuki

    2016-04-26

    Endosomal sorting required for transport (ESCRT) complexes orchestrate endo-lysosomal sorting of ubiquitinated proteins, multivesicular body formation and autophagic degradation. Defects in the ESCRT pathway have been implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases, but the underlying molecular mechanisms that link them to neurodegeneration remain unknown. In this study, we showed that forebrain-specific ablation of ESCRT-0/Hrs induced marked hippocampal neuronal cell loss accompanied by the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, including α-synuclein, TDP-43 and huntingtin as well as the autophagic substrate SQSTM1/p62. Consistent with this, silencing of Hrs in cultured cells not only led to α-synuclein and TDP-43 accumulation in addition to impaired autophagic flux but also suppressed cell viability through the induction of ER stress followed by the activation of JNK and RIPK1, a key regulator of necroptosis. Moreover, necrostatin-1, a specific inhibitor of RIPK1, and pan-caspase inhibitors partially reduced the neurotoxicity in the Hrs-silenced cells. Altogether, these findings suggest that the disruption of ESCRT-0/Hrs in the nervous system compromises autophagic/lysosomal degradation of neurodegenerative disease-related proteins, which thereby triggers ER stress-mediated apoptotic and necroptotic cell death.

  18. The dental management of medically compromised patients.

    PubMed

    Goss, A N

    1984-12-01

    There is an increasing population of apparently well, but in fact medically compromised people in the community. Most will require dental treatment at some stage and will usually seek it away from a hospital environment. In a recent survey of a general dental practice in Australia it was found that up to 55 per cent of some age groups had concurrent medical problems. Thus there is a real risk that adverse interactions between medical conditions and dental treatment may occur--on some occasions, even fatal ones. It is not possible for any one individual to know the details of all medical conditions, their treatment and the possible interactions with dental treatment. However, by the application of some sound general principles the risks of any potential interactions can be evaluated. The essential steps are: knowledge of the medical history of all patients; knowledge of the potential interactions; and knowledge of the management of medical emergencies. These principles will be discussed and illustrated by examples of medically compromised patients who may experience common or potentially serious sequelae as a result of dental treatment.

  19. Live imaging of mitochondrial dynamics in CNS dopaminergic neurons in vivo demonstrates early reversal of mitochondrial transport following MPP(+) exposure.

    PubMed

    Dukes, April A; Bai, Qing; Van Laar, Victor S; Zhou, Yangzhong; Ilin, Vladimir; David, Christopher N; Agim, Zeynep S; Bonkowsky, Joshua L; Cannon, Jason R; Watkins, Simon C; Croix, Claudette M St; Burton, Edward A; Berman, Sarah B

    2016-11-01

    Extensive convergent evidence collectively suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction is central to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently, changes in the dynamic properties of mitochondria have been increasingly implicated as a key proximate mechanism underlying neurodegeneration. However, studies have been limited by the lack of a model in which mitochondria can be imaged directly and dynamically in dopaminergic neurons of the intact vertebrate CNS. We generated transgenic zebrafish in which mitochondria of dopaminergic neurons are labeled with a fluorescent reporter, and optimized methods allowing direct intravital imaging of CNS dopaminergic axons and measurement of mitochondrial transport in vivo. The proportion of mitochondria undergoing axonal transport in dopaminergic neurons decreased overall during development between 2days post-fertilization (dpf) and 5dpf, at which point the major period of growth and synaptogenesis of the relevant axonal projections is complete. Exposure to 0.5-1.0mM MPP(+) between 4 and 5dpf did not compromise zebrafish viability or cause detectable changes in the number or morphology of dopaminergic neurons, motor function or monoaminergic neurochemistry. However, 0.5mM MPP(+) caused a 300% increase in retrograde mitochondrial transport and a 30% decrease in anterograde transport. In contrast, exposure to higher concentrations of MPP(+) caused an overall reduction in mitochondrial transport. This is the first time mitochondrial transport has been observed directly in CNS dopaminergic neurons of a living vertebrate and quantified in a PD model in vivo. Our findings are compatible with a model in which damage at presynaptic dopaminergic terminals causes an early compensatory increase in retrograde transport of compromised mitochondria for degradation in the cell body. These data are important because manipulation of early pathogenic mechanisms might be a valid therapeutic approach to PD. The novel transgenic lines and

  20. Tert-butylhydroquinone compromises survival in murine experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiahong; Hu, Heng; Ren, Xuefang; Simpkins, James W

    2016-01-01

    Tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), an Nrf2 signaling pathway inducer that is widely used as a food additive in the U.S., prevents oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity in neurons. This study assesses the effects of tBHQ on ischemic stroke outcomes in mice. We measured infarct size, neurological deficits, and brain volume after tBHQ treatments in murine permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) model in vivo. Further, we evaluated the regulation of tBHQ on mitochondrial function in cerebrovascular endothelial cells in vitro, which is critical to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. Our results demonstrated that tBHQ increased post-stroke mortality and worsened stroke outcomes. Mitochondrial function was suppressed by tBHQ treatment of cerebrovascular endothelial cells, and this suppression was potentiated by co-treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the bacterial mimic. These data indicate that tBHQ-exacerbated stroke damage might due to the compromised BBB permeability in permanent stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Tert-butylhydroquinone Compromises Survival in Murine Experimental Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiahong; Hu, Heng; Ren, Xuefang; Simpkins, James W.

    2016-01-01

    tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), an Nrf2 signaling pathway inducer that is widely used as a food additive in the U.S., prevents oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity in neurons. This study assesses the effects of tBHQ on ischemic stroke outcomes in mice. We measured infarct size, neurological deficits, and brain volume after tBHQ treatments in murine permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) model in vivo. Further, we evaluated the regulation of tBHQ on mitochondrial function in cerebrovascular endothelial cells in vitro, which is critical to the blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability. Our results demonstrated that tBHQ increased post-stroke mortality and worsened stroke outcomes. Mitochondrial function was suppressed by tBHQ treatment of cerebrovascular endothelial cells, and this suppression was potentiated by co-treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the bacterial mimic. These data indicate that tBHQ-exacerbated stroke damage might due to the compromised BBB permeability in permanent stroke. PMID:26827673

  2. 40 CFR 13.26 - Payment of compromised claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... will be required to execute a confess-judgment agreement which accelerates payment of the balance due... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Payment of compromised claims. 13.26... STANDARDS Compromise of Debts § 13.26 Payment of compromised claims. The Administrator normally will...

  3. 40 CFR 13.26 - Payment of compromised claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... will be required to execute a confess-judgment agreement which accelerates payment of the balance due... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Payment of compromised claims. 13.26... STANDARDS Compromise of Debts § 13.26 Payment of compromised claims. The Administrator normally will...

  4. 39 CFR 964.18 - Compromise and informal disposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compromise and informal disposition. 964.18... DISPOSITION OF MAIL WITHHELD FROM DELIVERY PURSUANT TO 39 U.S.C. 3003, 3004 § 964.18 Compromise and informal disposition. Nothing in these rules precludes the compromise, settlement, and informal disposition of...

  5. 39 CFR 964.18 - Compromise and informal disposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compromise and informal disposition. 964.18... DISPOSITION OF MAIL WITHHELD FROM DELIVERY PURSUANT TO 39 U.S.C. 3003, 3004 § 964.18 Compromise and informal disposition. Nothing in these rules precludes the compromise, settlement, and informal disposition of...

  6. 39 CFR 965.13 - Compromise and informal disposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compromise and informal disposition. 965.13... RELATIVE TO MAIL DISPUTES § 965.13 Compromise and informal disposition. Nothing in these rules precludes the compromise, settlement, and informal disposition of proceedings initiated under these rules at any...

  7. 39 CFR 965.13 - Compromise and informal disposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compromise and informal disposition. 965.13... RELATIVE TO MAIL DISPUTES § 965.13 Compromise and informal disposition. Nothing in these rules precludes the compromise, settlement, and informal disposition of proceedings initiated under these rules at any...

  8. 39 CFR 964.18 - Compromise and informal disposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compromise and informal disposition. 964.18... DISPOSITION OF MAIL WITHHELD FROM DELIVERY PURSUANT TO 39 U.S.C. 3003, 3004 § 964.18 Compromise and informal disposition. Nothing in these rules precludes the compromise, settlement, and informal disposition of...

  9. 29 CFR 1450.13 - Exploration of compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exploration of compromise. 1450.13 Section 1450.13 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE COLLECTIONS OF CLAIMS... § 1450.13 Exploration of compromise. FMCS may attempt to effect compromise, preferably during the course...

  10. 47 CFR 1.1915 - Exploration of compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exploration of compromise. 1.1915 Section 1.1915 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Collection of... Collection § 1.1915 Exploration of compromise. The Commission may attempt to effect compromise, preferably...

  11. 29 CFR 1450.13 - Exploration of compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exploration of compromise. 1450.13 Section 1450.13 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE COLLECTIONS OF CLAIMS... § 1450.13 Exploration of compromise. FMCS may attempt to effect compromise, preferably during the course...

  12. 47 CFR 1.1915 - Exploration of compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exploration of compromise. 1.1915 Section 1.1915 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Collection of... Collection § 1.1915 Exploration of compromise. The Commission may attempt to effect compromise, preferably...

  13. Morgellons: contested illness, diagnostic compromise and medicalisation.

    PubMed

    Fair, Brian

    2010-05-01

    The case of Morgellons illustrates how the emergence of a new medically contested illness intersected with and impacted on the diagnostic processes of an existing uncontested psychiatric condition, Delusional Parasitosis (DP). More specifically, the sociopolitical processes at play in the contested illness, Morgellons, dubiously reflect patient empowerment, as well the resilience and power of medical jurisdiction. This research offers insights into the contested illness and medicalisation literatures, and aims to bridge these two approaches towards the relationship between patient empowerment and medical authority, which I do through the notion of doctor-patient compromise. The data for this research come from a comprehensive qualitative analysis of Morgellons discourse through four key sources: the pro-Morgellons website Morgellons.org; the anti-Morgellons website Morgellonswatch.com; the popular media's portrayal of Morgellons; and the DP and Morgellons articles published in peer-reviewed medical journals, as made available on PubMed.

  14. Enhancement of cell viability after treatment with polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Bartl, J; Walitza, S; Grünblatt, E

    2014-01-24

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is highly prevalent in children and adolescents and both environmental and genetic factors play major roles. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are postulated to contribute to the development of the infant brain and an imbalance in these may increase the risk of ADHD. In recent clinical studies, supplementation with PUFAs improved symptoms of ADHD in some cases. Similarly, some beneficial effects were observed with PUFA treatment in neuronal cell cultures. Therefore, in this study, we hypothesized that a specific PUFA combination (available on the market as Equazen™ [Vifor Pharma, Switzerland]) along with iron, zinc, or vitamin B5 (vitB5) would produce an additive beneficial effect on the viability of rat pheochromocytoma-12 dopaminergic cells. The specific PUFA combination alone, as well as added to each of the three nutrients, was tested in a dose-response manner. The specific PUFAs significantly improved cell viability, starting at very low doses (100pM) from 60h up to 90h; while the combined treatment with vitB5 and minerals did not provide additional benefit. Our results confirmed the beneficial effect of the specific PUFAs on neuronal cell viability; although supplementation with minerals and vitB5 did not enhance this effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of political opposition and compromise on conservation outcomes in the Tongass National Forest, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Beier, Colin M

    2008-12-01

    To understand how a highly contentious policy process influenced a major conservation effort, I examined the origins, compromises, and outcomes of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980 (ANILCA) for the Tongass National Forest. Tongass wilderness designation was among the most controversial issues in the ANILCA debate, and it faced strong opposition from influential lawmakers, land managers, and Alaska residents. To investigate the influence of this opposition on Tongass conservation outcomes, I conducted a gap analysis of Tongass reserves and a policy analysis of the ANILCA debate and traced the influence of specific interests through the amendments, negotiations, and resulting compromises needed to enact ANILCA. Overall, I found that Tongass reserves comprise a broadly representative cross-section of ecosystems and species habitats in southeastern Alaska. Redrawn reserve boundaries, industry subsidies, and special access regulations reflected compromises to minimize the impact of wilderness conservation on mining, timber, and local stakeholder interests, respectively. Fragmentation of the Admiralty Island National Monument-the most ecologically valuable and politically controversial reserve-resulted from compromises with Alaskan Native (indigenous peoples of Alaska) corporations and timber interests. Despite language to accommodate "reasonable access" to wilderness reserves, ongoing access limitations highlight the concerns of Alaska residents that opposed ANILCA several decades ago. More broadly, the Tongass case suggests that early and ambitious conservation action may offset strong political opposition; compromises needed to establish key reserves often exacerbate development impacts in unprotected areas; and efforts to minimize social conflicts are needed to safeguard the long-term viability of conservation measures.

  16. Altered Cell Viability and Proliferation Activity of Peripheral Lymphocytes in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Se Chang; Kwon, Young-Ah; Kim, Hyeran; Kim, Seonwoo; Ahn Jo, Sangmee

    2010-01-01

    Objective We evaluated cell viability and proliferation activity of peripheral lymphocytes as potential models of neuronal death in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods We analyzed the cell viability and proliferation activity of phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated lymphocytes from 68 AD patients and 33 normal controls. The cellular measures were made at baseline (0 hr), 24 hrs, 48 hrs, 72 hrs, and 96 hrs after PHA stimulation. Results Cell viability in the AD patients was significantly decreased at 72 hrs and 96 hrs, compared with the normal controls. The declining ramp of the proliferation activity from 48 hrs to 72 hrs after PHA stimulation was significantly related to cell viability at 72 hrs and at 96 hrs in the AD patients. Conclusion Lymphocytes from patients with AD have altered viability and proliferation characteristics in culture following PHA stimulation. These findings suggest that lymphocytes may be used as a peripheral tissue model of cell cycle dysregulation in AD. PMID:20396436

  17. Birth, meaningful viability and abortion.

    PubMed

    Jensen, David

    2015-06-01

    What role does birth play in the debate about elective abortion? Does the wrongness of infanticide imply the wrongness of late-term abortion? In this paper, I argue that the same or similar factors that make birth morally significant with regard to abortion make meaningful viability morally significant due to the relatively arbitrary time of birth. I do this by considering the positions of Mary Anne Warren and José Luis Bermúdez who argue that birth is significant enough that the wrongness of infanticide does not imply the wrongness of late-term abortion. On the basis of the relatively arbitrary timing of birth, I argue that meaningful viability is the point at which elective abortion is prima facie morally wrong. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Bioluminescence assay for cell viability.

    PubMed

    Lomakina, G Yu; Modestova, Yu A; Ugarova, N N

    2015-06-01

    Theoretical aspects of the adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence assay based on the use of the firefly luciferin-luciferase system are considered, as well as its application for assessing cell viability in microbiology, sanitation, medicine, and ecology. Various approaches for the analysis of individual or mixed cultures of microorganisms are presented, and capabilities of the method for investigation of biological processes in live cells including necrosis, apoptosis, as well as for investigation of the dynamics of metabolism are described.

  19. Silicon Neuron.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Many researchers have developed neural architectures based on extremely simplified models of neurons . Recently, researchers have developed an analog...electronic model of a neuron that more accurately reproduces its biological counterpart. This electronic neuron was designed to emulate the ionic...currents present in biological neurons . Based on this neural model, we designed and fabricated an eight input neuron on a 2mm by 2mm 40 pin VLSI (very

  20. Tyrosine Hydroxylase Binding to Phospholipid Membranes Prompts Its Amyloid Aggregation and Compromises Bilayer Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Anne; Jorge-Finnigan, Ana; Jung-KC, Kunwar; Sauter, Alexander; Horvath, Istvan; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A.; Martinez, Aurora

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of catecholamine neurotransmitters and hormones, binds to negatively charged phospholipid membranes. Binding to both large and giant unilamellar vesicles causes membrane permeabilization, as observed by efflux and influx of fluorescence dyes. Whereas the initial protein-membrane interaction involves the N-terminal tail that constitutes an extension of the regulatory ACT-domain, prolonged membrane binding induces misfolding and self-oligomerization of TH over time as shown by circular dichroism and Thioflavin T fluorescence. The gradual amyloid-like aggregation likely occurs through cross-β interactions involving aggregation-prone motives in the catalytic domains, consistent with the formation of chain and ring-like protofilaments observed by atomic force microscopy in monolayer-bound TH. PC12 cells treated with the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine displayed increased TH levels in the mitochondrial fraction, while incubation of isolated mitochondria with TH led to a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, cell-substrate impedance and viability assays showed that supplementing the culture media with TH compromises cell viability over time. Our results revealed that the disruptive effect of TH on cell membranes may be a cytotoxic and pathogenic factor if the regulation and intracellular stability of TH is compromised. PMID:28004763

  1. In Vitro Electrochemical Corrosion and Cell Viability Studies on Nickel-Free Stainless Steel Orthopedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Salahinejad, Erfan; Hadianfard, Mohammad Jafar; Macdonald, Digby Donald; Sharifi-Asl, Samin; Mozafari, Masoud; Walker, Kenneth J.; Rad, Armin Tahmasbi; Madihally, Sundararajan V.; Tayebi, Lobat

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion and cell viability behaviors of nanostructured, nickel-free stainless steel implants were studied and compared with AISI 316L. The electrochemical studies were conducted by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements in a simulated body fluid. Cytocompatibility was also evaluated by the adhesion behavior of adult human stem cells on the surface of the samples. According to the results, the electrochemical behavior is affected by a compromise among the specimen's structural characteristics, comprising composition, density, and grain size. The cell viability is interpreted by considering the results of the electrochemical impedance spectroscopic experiments. PMID:23630603

  2. Mechanical compromise of partially lacerated flexor tendons.

    PubMed

    Kondratko, Jaclyn; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2013-01-01

    Tendons function to transmit loads from muscle to move and stabilize joints and absorb impacts. Functionality of lacerated tendons is diminished, however clinical practice often considers surgical repair only after 50% or more of the tendon is lacerated, the "50% rule." Few studies provide mechanical insight into the 50% rule. In this study cyclic and static stress relaxation tests were performed on porcine flexor tendons before and after a 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, or 2.75 mm deep transverse, midsubstance laceration. Elastic and viscoelastic properties, such as maximum stress, change in stress throughout each test, and stiffness, were measured and compared pre- and post-laceration. Nominal stress and stiffness parameters decreased, albeit disproportionately in magnitude, with increasing percent loss of cross-sectional area. Conversely, mean stress at the residual area (determined using remaining intact area at the laceration cross section) exhibited a marked increase in stress concentration beginning at 47.2% laceration using both specified load and constant strain analyses. The marked increase in stress concentration beginning near 50% laceration provides mechanical insight into the 50% rule. Additionally, a drastic decrease in viscoelastic stress parameters after only an 8.2% laceration suggests that time-dependent mechanisms protecting tissues during impact loadings are highly compromised regardless of laceration size.

  3. Compromised natural killer cells in pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Qiang; Shen, Yuqin; Song, Haoming; Gong, Zhu; Wang, Lemin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The high morbidity, mortality and misdiagnosis rate render pulmonary embolism (PE) as a worldwide health problem. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of this disease have not been well characterized. Increasing studies indicate infection and immunity play a crucial role in PE. Natural killer (NK) cells act as a bridge between the innate immune and acquired immune. This study aimed to investigate the possible function of NK cells in PE. Methods: Human cDNA microarray analysis was employed to detect genes associated with NK cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Random variance model corrected t-test was used for statistical analysis of differential gene expression. Flow cytometry was performed to detect the CD16+CD56+ NK cells. Results: In the present study, based on gene expression microarray analysis, we showed four inhibitory receptors (KLRB1, KLRD1, KLRF1, KLRG1) and four activating receptors (KLRC1, KLRC3, KLRK1 and NCR1) on NK cells were remarkably down-regulated and the cytological experiment demonstrated the proportion of CD16+CD56+ NK cells among PBMCs decreased in the PE group. Conclusions: We confirmed the presence of reduced expression of critical activating as well as inhibitory NK cell receptors and low proportion of CD16+CD56+ NK cells in PE. The consistence between genomic and cytological examination suggests compromised NK cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of PE. PMID:26339393

  4. Morphine induces albuminuria by compromising podocyte integrity.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiqian; Rai, Partab; Chandel, Nirupama; Cheng, Kang; Lederman, Rivka; Saleem, Moin A; Mathieson, Peter W; Husain, Mohammad; Crosson, John T; Gupta, Kalpna; Malhotra, Ashwani; Singhal, Pravin C

    2013-01-01

    Morphine has been reported to accelerate the progression of chronic kidney disease. However, whether morphine affects slit diaphragm (SD), the major constituent of glomerular filtration barrier, is still unclear. In the present study, we examined the effect of morphine on glomerular filtration barrier in general and podocyte integrity in particular. Mice were administered either normal saline or morphine for 72 h, then urine samples were collected and kidneys were subsequently isolated for immunohistochemical studies and Western blot. For in vitro studies, human podocytes were treated with morphine and then probed for the molecular markers of slit diaphragm. Morphine-receiving mice displayed a significant increase in albuminuria and showed effacement of podocyte foot processes. In both in vivo and in vitro studies, the expression of synaptopodin, a molecular marker for podocyte integrity, and the slit diaphragm constituting molecules (SDCM), such as nephrin, podocin, and CD2-associated protein (CD2AP), were decreased in morphine-treated podocytes. In vitro studies indicated that morphine modulated podocyte expression of SDCM through opiate mu (MOR) and kappa (KOR) receptors. Since morphine also enhanced podocyte oxidative stress, the latter seems to contribute to decreased SDCM expression. In addition, AKT, p38, and JNK pathways were involved in morphine-induced down regulation of SDCM in human podocytes. These findings demonstrate that morphine has the potential to alter the glomerular filtration barrier by compromising the integrity of podocytes.

  5. Female genital alteration: a compromise solution.

    PubMed

    Arora, Kavita Shah; Jacobs, Allan J

    2016-03-01

    Despite 30 years of advocacy, the prevalence of non-therapeutic female genital alteration (FGA) in minors is stable in many countries. Educational efforts have minimally changed the prevalence of this procedure in regions where it has been widely practiced. In order to better protect female children from the serious and long-term harms of some types of non-therapeutic FGA, we must adopt a more nuanced position that acknowledges a wide spectrum of procedures that alter female genitalia. We offer a revised categorisation for non-therapeutic FGA that groups procedures by effect and not by process. Acceptance of de minimis procedures that generally do not carry long-term medical risks is culturally sensitive, does not discriminate on the basis of gender, and does not violate human rights. More morbid procedures should not be performed. However, accepting de minimis non-therapeutic f FGA procedures enhances the effort of compassionate practitioners searching for a compromise position that respects cultural differences but protects the health of their patients.

  6. Immunodiagnosis of histoplasmosis in a compromised host.

    PubMed Central

    Land, G A; Foxworth, J H; Smith, K E

    1978-01-01

    Three serological tests for the diagnosis of histoplasmosis were compared for sensitivity and specificity in serum from blood bank donors, patients with histoplasmosis, and infected or noninfected immunosuppressed patients. The histoplasmin latex agglutination test was positive in 9% of the normal patients, 33% of the histoplasmosis patients, and 61% of the noninfected immunosuppressed patients. Since the test is prone to many false-positive results in patients with inflammatory diseases or non-Histoplasma infections, it has limited potential as a screening test among compromised patients. Immunodiffusion and counterimmunoelectrophoresis using a mycelial antigen were found to be more sensitive than either test using a combined yeast and mycelial antigen or a pure yeast phase antigen. Counterimmunoelectrophoresis at pH 7.2 proved to be the test of choice for serodiagnosis of histoplasmosis, resolving 85% of the immunocompetent infected patients and 100% of the infected immunosuppressed patients. Results indicated that counterimmunoelectrophoresis in conjunction with immunodiffusion could be used as a screening protocol to determine infection in incoming patients in a cancer hospital. PMID:103889

  7. Cryopreservation of adherent neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wu; O'Shaughnessy, Thomas; Chang, Eddie

    2006-07-31

    Neuronal networks have been widely used for neurophysiology, drug discovery and toxicity testing. An essential prerequisite for future widespread application of neuronal networks is the development of efficient cryopreservation protocols to facilitate their storage and transportation. Here is the first report on cryopreservation of mammalian adherent neuronal networks. Dissociated spinal cord cells were attached to a poly-d-lysine/laminin surface and allowed to form neuronal networks. Adherent neuronal networks were embedded in a thin film of collagen gel and loaded with trehalose prior to transfer to a freezing medium containing DMSO, FBS and culture medium. This was followed by a slow rate of cooling to -80 degrees C for 24 h and then storage for up to 2 months in liquid nitrogen at -196 degrees C. The three components: DMSO, collagen gel entrapment and trehalose loading combined provided the highest post-thaw viability, relative to individual or two component protocols. The post-thaw cells with this protocol demonstrated similar neuronal and astrocytic markers and morphological structure as those detected in unfrozen cells. Fluorescent dye FM1-43 staining revealed active recycling of synaptic vesicles upon depolarizing stimulation in the post-thaw neuronal networks. These results suggest that a combination of DMSO, collagen gel entrapment and trehalose loading can significantly improve conventional slow-cooling methods in cryopreservation of adherent neuronal networks.

  8. Electrochemical sensing of hepatocyte viability.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hweiyan; Tsai, Shang-heng; Ting, Wei-Jen; Hu, Chao-Chin; Fuh, C Bor

    2014-05-21

    We investigated the use of amperometric and chronoamperometric methods with a double mediator system and screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) for the electrochemical sensing of hepatocyte viability. Cell counts were determined based on measuring cellular respiration via interaction of electroactive redox mediators. The oxidation currents of chronoamperometric measurement were proportional to the concentrations of ferrocyanide which was produced via interaction of cellular respiration, succinate and ferricyanide. The integrated oxidation charges increased linearly with the density of the cultured primary rat hepatocytes over a range of 1 × 10(5) to 5 × 10(5) cells per well (slope = 1.98 (±0.08) μC per 10(5) cells; R(2) = 0.9969), and the detection limit was 7600 (±300) cells per well based on S/N = 3. Each density of cells was cultured in triple replicates and individual cell samples were evaluated. The results of the cytotoxic effect of the chronoamperometric method are comparable to those of the tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay. The chronoamperometric method with ferricyanide and succinate mediators is an efficient, alternative method for assessing the viability of primary hepatocytes which can be completed in 20 min. Succinate did not provide an efficient electron shuttle between cytosolic respiratory redox activity of cancer cells and extracellular ferricyanide, an effect that may be useful for distinguishing hepatocarcinoma cells from healthy hepatocytes.

  9. Hypothyroidism Compromises Hypothalamic Leptin Signaling in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Groba, Claudia; Mayerl, Steffen; van Mullem, Alies A.; Visser, Theo J.; Darras, Veerle M.; Habenicht, Andreas J.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of thyroid hormone (TH) on metabolism and energy expenditure is well established, but the role of TH in regulating nutritional sensing, particularly in the central nervous system, is only poorly defined. Here, we studied the consequences of hypothyroidism on leptin production as well as leptin sensing in congenital hypothyroid TRH receptor 1 knockout (Trhr1 ko) mice and euthyroid control animals. Hypothyroid mice exhibited decreased circulating leptin levels due to a decrease in fat mass and reduced leptin expression in white adipose tissue. In neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, hypothyroid mice showed increased leptin receptor Ob-R expression and decreased suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 transcript levels. In order to monitor putative changes in central leptin sensing, we generated hypothyroid and leptin-deficient animals by crossing hypothyroid Trhr1 ko mice with the leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Hypothyroid Trhr1/ob double knockout mice showed a blunted response to leptin treatment with respect to body weight and food intake and exhibited a decreased activation of phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 as well as a up-regulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 upon leptin treatment, particularly in the arcuate nucleus. These data indicate alterations in the intracellular processing of the leptin signal under hypothyroid conditions and thereby unravel a novel mode of action by which TH affects energy metabolism. PMID:23518925

  10. Hypothyroidism compromises hypothalamic leptin signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Groba, Claudia; Mayerl, Steffen; van Mullem, Alies A; Visser, Theo J; Darras, Veerle M; Habenicht, Andreas J; Heuer, Heike

    2013-04-01

    The impact of thyroid hormone (TH) on metabolism and energy expenditure is well established, but the role of TH in regulating nutritional sensing, particularly in the central nervous system, is only poorly defined. Here, we studied the consequences of hypothyroidism on leptin production as well as leptin sensing in congenital hypothyroid TRH receptor 1 knockout (Trhr1 ko) mice and euthyroid control animals. Hypothyroid mice exhibited decreased circulating leptin levels due to a decrease in fat mass and reduced leptin expression in white adipose tissue. In neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, hypothyroid mice showed increased leptin receptor Ob-R expression and decreased suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 transcript levels. In order to monitor putative changes in central leptin sensing, we generated hypothyroid and leptin-deficient animals by crossing hypothyroid Trhr1 ko mice with the leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Hypothyroid Trhr1/ob double knockout mice showed a blunted response to leptin treatment with respect to body weight and food intake and exhibited a decreased activation of phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 as well as a up-regulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 upon leptin treatment, particularly in the arcuate nucleus. These data indicate alterations in the intracellular processing of the leptin signal under hypothyroid conditions and thereby unravel a novel mode of action by which TH affects energy metabolism.

  11. Sperm competition and offspring viability at hybridization in Australian tree frogs, Litoria peronii and L. tyleri.

    PubMed

    Sherman, C D H; Wapstra, E; Olsson, M

    2010-02-01

    Hybridization between closely related species often leads to reduced viability or fertility of offspring. Complete failure of hybrid offspring (post-zygotic hybrid incompatibilities) may have an important role in maintaining the integrity of reproductive barriers between closely related species. We show elsewhere that in Peron's tree frog, Litoria peronii, males more closely related to a female sire more offspring in sperm competition with a less related rival male. Observations of rare 'phenotypic intermediate' males between L. peronii and the closely related L. tyleri made us suggest that these relatedness effects on siring success may be because of selection arising from risks of costly hybridization between the two species. Here, we test this hypothesis in an extensive sperm competition experiment, which shows that there is no effect of species identity on probability of fertilization in sperm competition trials controlling for sperm concentration and sperm viability. Instead, there was a close agreement between a male's siring success in isolation with a female and his siring success with the same female in competition with a rival male regardless of species identity. Offspring viability and survival, however, were strongly influenced by species identity. Over a 14-day period, hybrid offspring suffered increasing mortality and developed more malformations and an obvious inability to swim and right themselves, leading to compromised probability of survival. Thus, hybridization in these sympatric tree frogs does not compromise fertilization but has a strong impact on offspring viability and opportunity for reinforcement selection on mate choice for conspecific partners.

  12. Implant surgery in healthy compromised patients-review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghiu, IM; Stoian, IM

    2014-01-01

    Systemic diseases are of major importance in terms of prosthetic restorations supported by dental implants in healthy compromised patients. Each treatment stage from conception of the treatment plan to the long-term monitoring is under the necessity of the interdisciplinary approach to the underlying disease. Abbreviations: healthy compromised patients = HCP PMID:25870664

  13. 45 CFR 1177.12 - Compromise, suspension and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION § 1177.12 Compromise, suspension and termination. (a) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities or... available to the public. (b) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities may compromise...

  14. 45 CFR 1177.12 - Compromise, suspension and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION § 1177.12 Compromise, suspension and termination. (a) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities or... available to the public. (b) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities may compromise...

  15. 45 CFR 1177.12 - Compromise, suspension and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION § 1177.12 Compromise, suspension and termination. (a) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities or... available to the public. (b) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities may compromise...

  16. 45 CFR 1177.12 - Compromise, suspension and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION § 1177.12 Compromise, suspension and termination. (a) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities or... available to the public. (b) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities may compromise...

  17. 45 CFR 1177.12 - Compromise, suspension and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION § 1177.12 Compromise, suspension and termination. (a) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities or... available to the public. (b) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities may compromise...

  18. 41 CFR 105-55.020 - Bases for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... risks involved, GSA will consider the probable amount of court costs and attorney fees pursuant to the... for repayment in the manner set forth in § 105-55.015. (g) To assess the merits of a compromise offer... financial information to assess compromise offers. GSA may use their own financial information form or...

  19. 19 CFR 161.5 - Compromise of Government claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Compromise of Government claims. 161.5 Section 161... Government claims. (a) Offer. An offer made pursuant to section 617, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1617), in compromise of a Government claim arising under the Customs laws and the terms upon which...

  20. 32 CFR 757.19 - Waiver and compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS Medical Care Recovery Act (MCRA) Claims and Claims Asserted Pursuant to 10 U.S.C. 1095 § 757.19 Waiver and compromise. (a) General. OJAG Code 15 (Claims and Tort Litigation) may authorize waiver or... with Code 15 approval. (b) Waiver and compromise. The JAG designee may waive the Federal...

  1. 31 CFR 16.46 - Compromise or settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compromise or settlement. 16.46 Section 16.46 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 § 16.46 Compromise or settlement. (a) Parties may make...

  2. 39 CFR 953.6 - Compromise and informal dispositions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compromise and informal dispositions. 953.6... RELATIVE TO MAILABILITY § 953.6 Compromise and informal dispositions. Either party may request the other to consider informal disposition of any question of mailability, and the scheduled hearing date may be...

  3. 39 CFR 953.6 - Compromise and informal dispositions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compromise and informal dispositions. 953.6... RELATIVE TO MAILABILITY § 953.6 Compromise and informal dispositions. Either party may request the other to consider informal disposition of any question of mailability, and the scheduled hearing date may be...

  4. 39 CFR 953.6 - Compromise and informal dispositions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compromise and informal dispositions. 953.6... RELATIVE TO MAILABILITY § 953.6 Compromise and informal dispositions. Either party may request the other to consider informal disposition of any question of mailability, and the scheduled hearing date may be...

  5. 5 CFR 1312.30 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Loss or possible compromise. 1312.30 Section 1312.30 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES CLASSIFICATION... Classified Information § 1312.30 Loss or possible compromise. Any person who has knowledge of the loss or...

  6. 22 CFR 512.13 - Exploration of compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Exploration of compromise. 512.13 Section 512.13 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS COLLECTION OF DEBTS UNDER THE DEBT COLLECTION ACT OF 1982 Administrative Offset and Referral to Collection Agencies § 512.13 Exploration of compromise...

  7. 22 CFR 512.13 - Exploration of compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Exploration of compromise. 512.13 Section 512.13 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS COLLECTION OF DEBTS UNDER THE DEBT COLLECTION ACT OF 1982 Administrative Offset and Referral to Collection Agencies § 512.13 Exploration of compromise...

  8. 5 CFR 1312.30 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Loss or possible compromise. 1312.30 Section 1312.30 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES CLASSIFICATION... Classified Information § 1312.30 Loss or possible compromise. Any person who has knowledge of the loss...

  9. 38 CFR 42.46 - Compromise and settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compromise and settlement. 42.46 Section 42.46 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS IMPLEMENTING THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT § 42.46 Compromise and settlement. (a)...

  10. 38 CFR 42.46 - Compromise and settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compromise and settlement. 42.46 Section 42.46 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS IMPLEMENTING THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT § 42.46 Compromise and settlement. (a)...

  11. 5 CFR 1312.30 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loss or possible compromise. 1312.30 Section 1312.30 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES CLASSIFICATION... the information shall be notified of the loss or compromise so that the necessary damage assessment...

  12. 5 CFR 1312.30 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Loss or possible compromise. 1312.30 Section 1312.30 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES CLASSIFICATION... the information shall be notified of the loss or compromise so that the necessary damage assessment...

  13. 38 CFR 1.970 - Standards for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Committee respecting acceptance or rejection of a compromise offer shall be in conformity with the standards in §§ 1.930 through 1.936. In loan guaranty cases the offer of a veteran or other obligor to effect a... shall be reviewed by the Committee. An offer to effect a compromise may be accepted if it is...

  14. 26 CFR 300.3 - Offer to compromise fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... taxpayer if the offer is accepted, rejected, withdrawn, or returned as nonprocessable after acceptance for... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Offer to compromise fee. 300.3 Section 300.3... ADMINISTRATION USER FEES § 300.3 Offer to compromise fee. (a) Applicability. This section applies to...

  15. Neurofilament dot blot assays: novel means of assessing axon viability in culture.

    PubMed

    Hares, Kelly; Kemp, Kevin; Gray, Elizabeth; Scolding, Neil; Wilkins, Alastair

    2011-06-15

    Axonal structure and integrity are vital to overall neuronal maintenance and action potential propagation. Neurofilaments (NFs) are one of the main cytoskeletal components of axons and phosphorylation of NF subunits regulates speed of NF transport through axons and determines optimal axonal calibre required for signal propagation. Many previous studies of neuroprotective agents have focussed on neuronal viability in models of neurodegenerative disease, without specifically considering axon function as an indicator of neuronal damage. In this study, we have focused on developing novel assays for determining axon viability by measuring levels of neurofilament phosphorylation in cultured cortical neurons. The nitric oxide donor DETANONOate (NO) was used as an inflammatory insult and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were tested as potential axonal protective agents. Using 'dot blot' methodologies, we show a decrease in NF phosphorylation in cortical neurons exposed to NO-mediated cell toxicity and an attenuation of NO-mediated changes in NF phosphorylation associated with GDNF and SOD treatment. These results correlated well with immunocytochemical counts. We propose therefore that the dot blot assay is a novel method for assessing axonal integrity in vitro and may play a useful role in the future for testing the effects of agents on axonal viability, providing a reliable and reproducible screening method for potential therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Compromised axonal functionality after neurodegeneration, concussion and/or traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Maia, Pedro D; Kutz, J Nathan

    2014-10-01

    Axonal swellings are almost universal in neurodegenerative diseases of the central nervous system, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Concussions and traumatic brain injuries can also produce cognitive and behavioral deficits by compromising neuronal morphology. Using a spike metric analysis, we characterize computationally the effects of such axonal varicosities on spike train propagation by comparing Poisson spike train classes before and after propagation through a prototypical axonal enlargement, or focused axonal swelling. Misclassification of spike train classes and low-pass filtering of firing rate activity increases with more pronounced axonal injury. We show that confusion matrices and a calculation of the loss of transmitted information provide a very practical way to characterize how injured neurons compromise the signal processing and faithful conductance of spike trains. The method demonstrates that (i) neural codes encoded with low firing rates are more robust to injury than those encoded with high firing rates, (ii) classification depends upon the length of the spike train used to encode information, and (iii) axonal injuries reduce the variance of spike trains within a given stimulus class. The work introduces a novel theoretical and computational framework to quantify the interplay between electrophysiological dynamics with focused axonal swellings generated by injury or other neurodegenerative processes. It further suggests how pharmacology and plasticity may play a role in recovery of neural computation. Ultimately, the work bridges vast experimental observations of in vitro morphological pathologies with post-traumatic cognitive and behavioral dysfunction.

  17. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Wellinger, A.

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  18. Experiments with the Viability of Chicken Eggs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garigliano, Leonard J.

    1975-01-01

    Presents the results of an experiment designed to test two hypotheses: (1) a delay of two weeks at room temperature will have no effect on the viability of fertile chicken eggs and (2) refrigeration will have no effect on the viability of fertile chicken eggs. Experimenters were the author and two ninth-grade students. (PEB)

  19. Experiments with the Viability of Chicken Eggs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garigliano, Leonard J.

    1975-01-01

    Presents the results of an experiment designed to test two hypotheses: (1) a delay of two weeks at room temperature will have no effect on the viability of fertile chicken eggs and (2) refrigeration will have no effect on the viability of fertile chicken eggs. Experimenters were the author and two ninth-grade students. (PEB)

  20. 15 CFR 904.106 - Compromise of civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... be sent to Agency counsel at the address specified in the NOVA. (c) Neither the existence of the... which a NOVA becomes final. (d) NOAA will not compromise, modify, or remit a civil penalty assessed,...

  1. 15 CFR 904.106 - Compromise of civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... be sent to Agency counsel at the address specified in the NOVA. (c) Neither the existence of the... which a NOVA becomes final. (d) NOAA will not compromise, modify, or remit a civil penalty assessed,...

  2. 15 CFR 904.106 - Compromise of civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... be sent to Agency counsel at the address specified in the NOVA. (c) Neither the existence of the... which a NOVA becomes final. (d) NOAA will not compromise, modify, or remit a civil penalty assessed,...

  3. 15 CFR 904.106 - Compromise of civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... be sent to Agency counsel at the address specified in the NOVA. (c) Neither the existence of the... which a NOVA becomes final. (d) NOAA will not compromise, modify, or remit a civil penalty assessed,...

  4. 15 CFR 904.106 - Compromise of civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... be sent to Agency counsel at the address specified in the NOVA. (c) Neither the existence of the... which a NOVA becomes final. (d) NOAA will not compromise, modify, or remit a civil penalty assessed,...

  5. Arsenic promotes centrosome abnormalities and cell colony formation in p53 compromised human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Weiting; Lin Pinpin; Cheng, T.-S.; Yu, H.-S.; Chang, Louis W.

    2007-12-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicated that residents, especially cigarette smokers, in arseniasis areas had significantly higher lung cancer risk than those living in non-arseniasis areas. Thus, an interaction between arsenic and cigarette smoking in lung carcinogenesis was suspected. p53 dysfunction or mutation in lung epithelial cells was frequently observed in cigarette smokers. Our present study was to explore the differential effects by arsenic on H1355 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma cell line with mutation in p53), BEAS-2B (immortalized lung epithelial cell with functional p53) and pifithrin-{alpha}-treated BEAS-2B cells (p53-inhibited cells). These cells were treated with different doses of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 5 and 10 {mu}M) for 48 h. A greater reduction in cell viability was observed in the BEAS-2B cells vs. p53 compromised cells (H1355 or p53-inhibited BEAS-2B). Similar observation was also made on 7-day cell survival (growth) study. TUNEL analysis confirmed that there was indeed a significantly reduced arsenite-induced apoptosis found in p53-compromised cells. Centrosomal abnormality has been attributed to eventual chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. In our present study, reduced p21 and Gadd45a expressions and increased centrosomal abnormality (atopic and multiple centrosomes) were observed in both arsenite-treated H1355 and p53-inhibited BEAS-2B cells as compared with similarly treated BEAS-2B cells. Increased anchorage-independent growth (colony formation) of BEAS-2B cells co-treated with pifithrin-{alpha} and 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite was also observed in soft agar. Our present investigation demonstrated that arsenic would act specifically on p53 compromised cells (either with p53 dysfunction or inhibited) to induce centrosomal abnormality and colony formation. These findings provided strong evidence on the carcinogenic promotional role of arsenic, especially under the condition of p53 dysfunction.

  6. [Neuronal ageing].

    PubMed

    Piechota, Małgorzata; Sunderland, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Ageing leads to irreversible alterations in the nervous system, which to various extent impair its functions such as capacity to learn and memory. In old neurons and brain, similarly to what may take place in other cells, there is increased oxidative stress, disturbed energetic homeostasis and metabolism, accumulation of damage in proteins and nucleic acids. Characteristic of old neurons are alterations in plasticity, synaptic transmission, sensitivity to neurotrophic factors and cytoskeletal changes. Some markers of senescence, whose one of them is SA-beta-galactosidase were used to show the process of neuronal ageing both in vitro, and in vivo. Some research suggest that, despite the fact that neurons are postmitotic cells, it is cell cycle proteins which play a certain role in their biology, e.g. differentiation. However, their role in neuronal ageing is not known or explained. Ageing is the serious factor of development of neurodegenerative diseases among others Alzheimer disease.

  7. Recovery and viability of Dirofilaria immitis microfilariae.

    PubMed

    Grieve, R B; Mika-Grieve, M; Lok, J B; Marchell, T F; Cupp, E W

    1984-09-01

    The viability of Dirofilaria immitis microfilariae recovered from canine blood by different methods was determined. Microfilaria recovery techniques included saponin lysis, saponin lysis with a trypsin treatment, dextran sedimentation and phytohemagglutinin treatment. Criteria for evaluating viability were microfilarial motility in vitro at 37 degrees C, microfilarial development in mosquitoes and the ability of microfilariae to circulate in mice. Although each method produced motile microfilariae, differences among groups of microfilariae recovered by different techniques were apparent by each of the criteria for viability. Saponin lysis gave superior yields of viable microfilariae.

  8. Neurons on Parafilm: versatile elastic substrates for neuronal cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sang Jin; Nam, Yoonkey

    2012-02-15

    A variety of materials has been applied to neuronal cell culture substrates to improve the efficiency of the culture and to provide pertinent cell growth environment. Here we report the application of Parafilm(®) M ('Parafilm') as a novel substrate for neuronal culture and patterning. Cell culture results show that elastic Parafilm had effects on cell viability, length and number of neurites, and soma spreading. Parafilm was also an effective substrate to obtain patterned neuronal cultures using a conventional micro-contract printing (μCP) technique. Polylysine micropatterns in line or grid forms were readily transferred from PDMS stamp to bare Parafilm surfaces and spatially confined neuronal cultures were successfully maintained for over three weeks. We also demonstrate that batch-processing cell culture substrates can be easily fabricated using a piece of Parafilm. The softness, plasticity, and hydrophobicity were main features that made it attractive for Parafilm to be considered as a practical cell culture platform. The results can be extended to develop an inexpensive and practical neuronal culture substrates in tissue engineering and biochip applications.

  9. Sperm storage and viability in Photinus fireflies.

    PubMed

    Demary, Kristian C

    2005-07-01

    In many species females mate with and store sperm from multiple males, and some female insects have evolved multiple compartments for sperm storage. Sperm storage and sperm viability were investigated in two firefly species, Photinus greeni and P. ignitus, which differ in the morphology of the female reproductive tract. Although the primary spermatheca is similar in both species, P. greeni females have an additional, conspicuous outpocketing within the bursa copulatrix whose potential role in sperm storage was investigated in this study. An assay that distinguishes between live and dead sperm was used to examine sperm viability in male seminal vesicles and sperm storage sites within the female reproductive tract. For both Photinus species, sperm from male seminal vesicles showed significantly higher viability compared to sperm from the primary spermatheca of single mated females. In single mated P. greeni females, sperm taken from the channel outpocketing (secondary spermatheca) showed significantly higher viability compared to sperm from the primary spermatheca. This sperm viability difference was not evident in double mated females. There were no significant differences between P. greeni and P. ignitus females in the viability of sperm from the primary spermatheca. These studies contribute to our understanding of post-mating processes that may influence paternity success, and suggest that sexual conflict over control of fertilizations may occur in multiply mated firefly females.

  10. Alchemy or Science? Compromising Archaeology in the Deep Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Jonathan

    2007-06-01

    In the torrid debate between archaeology and treasure hunting, compromise is often suggested as the pragmatic solution, especially for archaeology carried out either in deep water or beyond the constraints that commonly regulate such activities in territorial seas. Both the wisdom and the need for such compromise have even been advocated by some archaeologists, particularly in forums such as the internet and conferences. This paper argues that such a compromise is impossible, not in order to fuel confrontation but simply because of the nature of any academic discipline. We can define what archaeology is in terms of its aims, theories, methods and ethics, so combining it with an activity founded on opposing principles must transform it into something else. The way forward for archaeology in the deep sea does not lie in a contradictory realignment of archaeology’s goals but in collaborative research designed to mesh with emerging national and regional research and management plans.

  11. The acute abdomen in the immune compromised host

    PubMed Central

    Power, Niall

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Recent advances in transplantation, oncology and AIDS therapy have greatly increased life expectancies of patients diagnosed with malignancy, auto-immune disorders and organ failure. However, as this immune compromised population grows, complications of such therapies have become a major source of morbidity and mortality. Classical clinical and laboratory evidence of intra-abdominal pathology may be absent in the immune compromised host. Consequently, the radiologist is increasingly called upon to diagnose acute intra-abdominal complications associated with immunodeficiency. This review explores the aetiology of the acute abdomen in the immune compromised host. The typical radiological appearances of the commonest conditions are illustrated. The challenges and limitations in the radiological diagnosis of these conditions are discussed. PMID:18442955

  12. Compromising positions: emergent neo-Fordisms and embedded gender contracts.

    PubMed

    Gottfried, H

    2000-06-01

    This paper adopts a regulation framework to chart the emergence of neo-Fordism as a flexible accumulation regime and mode of social regulation. Neo-Fordism relies on old Fordist principles as well as incorporating new models of emergent post-Fordisms; old and new social relationships, in their particular combination, specify the trajectory of national variants. I argue that Fordist bargains institutionalized the terms of a compromise between labour, capital and the state. These bargains embedded a male-breadwinner gender contract compromising women's positions and standardizing employment contracts around the needs, interests and authority of men. A focus on compromises and contracts makes visible the differentiated gender effects of work transformation in each country.

  13. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for the Compromised Graft or Flap

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Ashish; Baynosa, Richard C.

    2017-01-01

    Significance: Tissue grafts and flaps are used to reconstruct wounds from trauma, chronic disease, tumor extirpation, burns, and infection. Despite careful surgical planning and execution, reconstructive failure can occur due to poor wound beds, radiation, random flap necrosis, vascular insufficiency, or ischemia–reperfusion (IR). Traumatic avulsions and amputated composite tissues—compromised tissue—may fail from crush injury and excessively large sizes. While never intended, these complications result in tissue loss, additional surgery, accrued costs, and negative psychosocial patient effects. Recent Advances: Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) has demonstrated utility in the salvage of compromised grafts/flaps. It can increase the likelihood and effective size of composite graft survival, improve skin graft outcomes, and enhance flap survival. Mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects include increased oxygenation, improved fibroblast function, neovascularization, and amelioration of IR injury. Critical Issues: Common strategies for the compromised graft or flap include local wound care, surgical debridement, and repeated reconstruction. These modalities are associated with added costs, time, need for reoperation, morbidity, and psychosocial effects. Preservation of the amputated/avulsed tissues minimizes morbidity and maximizes the reconstructive outcome by salvaging the compromised tissue and obviating additional surgery. HBO is often overlooked as a potential tool that can limit these issues. Future Directions: Animal studies demonstrate a benefit of HBO in the treatment of compromised tissues. Clinical studies support these findings, but are limited to case reports and series. Further research is needed to provide multicenter prospective clinical studies and cost analyses comparing HBO to other adjunctive therapies in the treatment of compromised grafts/flaps. PMID:28116225

  14. Roles of Melatonin in Fetal Programming in Compromised Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chieh; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Tiao, Miao-Meng; Tain, You-Lin; Huang, Li-Tung

    2013-01-01

    Compromised pregnancies such as those associated with gestational diabetes mellitus, intrauterine growth retardation, preeclampsia, maternal undernutrition, and maternal stress may negatively affect fetal development. Such pregnancies may induce oxidative stress to the fetus and alter fetal development through the epigenetic process that may affect development at a later stage. Melatonin is an oxidant scavenger that reverses oxidative stress during the prenatal period. Moreover, the role of melatonin in epigenetic modifications in the field of developmental programming has been studied extensively. Here, we describe the physiological function of melatonin in pregnancy and discuss the roles of melatonin in fetal programming in compromised pregnancies, focusing on its involvement in redox and epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:23466884

  15. Critical appraisal. Reversal of compromised bonding after bleaching.

    PubMed

    Swift, Edward J

    2012-10-01

    Bleaching with peroxide agents compromises the adhesion of resin-based materials to enamel and dentin. The problem is likely caused by delayed release of oxygen from the teeth that inhibits resin polymerization at the interface. The typical method for avoiding problems with bonding to bleached teeth is simply to delay the bonding procedure for a week or two after bleaching. However, there is evidence that bonding can be done immediately if bleaching is followed by the application of an antioxidant. This Critical Appraisal reviews some of the published reports on the reversal of compromised bonding after bleaching via the use of antioxidants such as sodium ascorbate.

  16. Fuzzy compromise: An effective way to solve hierarchical design problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. K.; Krishnamachari, R. S.; Masetta, J.; Pearce, D.; Rigby, D.; Mistree, F.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for modeling design problems using a compromise decision support problem (DSP) incorporating the principles embodied in fuzzy set theory. Specifically, the fuzzy compromise decision support problem is used to study hierarchical design problems. This approach has the advantage that although the system modeled has an element of uncertainty associated with it, the solution obtained is crisp and precise. The efficacy of incorporating fuzzy sets into the solution process is discussed in the context of results obtained for a portal frame.

  17. Psychological stress compromises CD8+ T cell control of latent herpes simplex virus type 1 infections.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael L; Sheridan, Brian S; Bonneau, Robert H; Hendricks, Robert L

    2007-07-01

    Recurrent HSV-1 ocular disease results from reactivation of latent virus in trigeminal ganglia, often following immunosuppression or exposure to a variety of psychological or physical stressors. HSV-specific CD8+ T cells can block HSV-1 reactivation from latency in ex vivo trigeminal ganglia cultures through production of IFN-gamma. In this study, we establish that either CD8+ T cell depletion or exposure to restraint stress permit HSV-1 to transiently escape from latency in vivo. Restraint stress caused a reduction of TG-resident HSV-specific CD8+ T cells and a functional compromise of those cells that survive. Together, these effects of stress resulted in an approximate 65% reduction of cells capable of producing IFN-gamma in response to reactivating virus. Our findings demonstrate persistent in vivo regulation of latent HSV-1 by CD8+ T cells, and strongly support the concept that stress induces HSV-1 reactivation from latency at least in part by compromising CD8+ T cell surveillance of latently infected neurons.

  18. Recent developments in the use of viability dyes and quantitative PCR in the food microbiology field.

    PubMed

    Elizaquível, P; Aznar, R; Sánchez, G

    2014-01-01

    The increase in foodborne outbreaks highlights the need for rapid, sensitive and specific methods for food safety monitoring, enabling specific detection and quantification of viable foodborne pathogens. Real-time PCR (qPCR) combined with the use of viability dyes, recently introduced, fulfils all these requirements. The strategy relies on the use of DNA-binding molecules such as propidium monoazide (PMA) or ethidium monoazide (EMA) as sample pretreatment previous to the qPCR. These molecules permeate only membrane-compromised cells and have successfully been applied for different types of foodborne pathogens, including bacteria and viruses. Moreover, those dyes have been explored to monitor different food manufacturing processes as an alternative to classical cultural methods. In this review, state-of-the-art information regarding viability PCR (v-PCR) is compiled.

  19. Mapping Chondrocyte Viability, Matrix Glycosaminoglycan, and Water Content on the Surface of a Bovine Metatarsophalangeal Joint

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Cheng; Hall, Andrew C.; Smith, Innes D. M.; Salter, Donald M.; Simpson, A. Hamish R. W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine if there were variations in chondrocyte viability, matrix glycosaminoglycan (GAG), and water content between different areas of the articular surface of a bovine metatarsophalangeal joint, a common and reliable source of articular cartilage for experimental study, which may compromise the validity of using multiple samples from different sites within the joint. Methods Nine fresh cadaveric bovine metatarsophalangeal joints were obtained. From each joint, 16 osteochondral explants were taken from 4 facets, yielding a total of 144 cartilage specimens for evaluation of chondrocyte viability, matrix GAG, and water content. A less invasive method for harvesting osteochondral explants and for processing the biopsy for the assessment of chondrocyte viability was developed, which maintained maximal viability within each cartilage explant. Results There was no significant difference between the 16 biopsy sites from the different areas of the joint surface with respect to chondrocyte viability, matrix GAG and water content. Pooled data of all samples from each joint established the baseline values of chondrocyte viability to be 89.4% ± 3.8%, 94.4% ± 2.2%, and 77.9% ± 7.8%, in the superficial quarter, central half, and deep quarter (with regard to depth from the articular surface), respectively. The matrix GAG content of bovine articular cartilage was 6.06 ± 0.41 μg/mg cartilage, and the cartilage water content was 72.4% ± 1.5%. There were also no significant differences of these 3 variables between the different joints. Conclusion It is thus reasonable to compare biopsies obtained from different sites, as a biopsy from one site would be considered representative of the whole joint. PMID:27047642

  20. Molecular and immunocytochemical characterization of primary neuronal cultures from adult rat brain: Differential expression of neuronal and glial protein markers.

    PubMed

    Ray, Balmiki; Bailey, Jason A; Sarkar, Sumit; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2009-11-15

    Neurobiological studies using primary neuronal cultures commonly employ fetal-derived neurons, but much less often adult brain-derived neurons. Our goal is to perform morphological and molecular characterization of primary neuronal cultures from adult rat brain, including the relative expression of neuronal and glial cell markers at different time points. We tested the hypothesis that long-term neuronal viability is compatible with glial proliferation in adult neuron culture. We examined neuron culture from adult rat brain, which was maintained at steady state up to 24 days, and characterized them on the basis of cellular, molecular and biochemical properties at different time points of the culture. We identified neuronal and glial cells by both immunocytochemical and western immunoblotting techniques using NSE and Tau as neuronal markers and GFAP as glial protein marker, which revealed the presence of predominantly neuronal cells in the initial phase of the culture and a rise in glial cells from day 12 onwards. Notably, neuronal cells were preserved in the culture along with the glial cells even at day 24. Transfection of the cultured cells with a GFP expression vector and plasmids containing a luciferase reporter gene under the control of two different gene promoters demonstrated DNA transfectability. Taken together, these results suggest a differential expression of neuronal and glial cells at different time points and long-term neuronal viability in the presence of glial proliferation. Such adult neurons serve as a suitable system for the application of neurodegeneration models and for drug target discovery in various brain disorders including Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Hijacking microglial glutathione by inorganic arsenic impels bystander death of immature neurons through extracellular cystine/glutamate imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vikas; Gera, Ruchi; Kushwaha, Rajesh; Sharma, Anuj Kumar; Patnaik, Satyakam; Ghosh, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic-induced altered microglial activity leads to neuronal death, but the causative mechanism remains unclear. The present study showed, arsenic-exposed (10 μM) microglial (N9) culture supernatant induced bystander death of neuro-2a (N2a), which was further validated with primary microglia and immature neuronal cultures. Results indicated that arsenic-induced GSH synthesis by N9 unfavorably modified the extracellular milieu for N2a by lowering cystine and increasing glutamate concentration. Similar result was observed in N9-N2a co-culture. Co-exposure of arsenic and 250 μM glutamate, less than the level (265 μM) detected in arsenic-exposed N9 culture supernatant, compromised N2a viability which was rescued by cystine supplementation. Therefore, microglia executes bystander N2a death by competitive inhibition of system Xc- (xCT) through extracellular cystine/glutamate imbalance. We confirmed the role of xCT in mediating bystander N2a death by siRNA inhibition studies. Ex-vivo primary microglia culture supernatant from gestationally exposed mice measured to contain lower cystine and higher glutamate compared to control and N-acetyl cysteine co-treated group. Immunofluorescence staining of brain cryosections from treated group showed more dead immature neurons with no such effect on microglia. Collectively, we showed, in presence of arsenic microglia alters cystine/glutamate balance through xCT in extracellular milieu leading to bystander death of immature neurons. PMID:27477106

  2. Codeswitching and Compromise Strategies: Implications for Lexical Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jake, Janice L.; Myers-Scotton, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Deals with two compromise strategies: (1) embedded language islands (EL Islands), and (2) "bare forms" in code switching (CS) within the projection of complementizer. These elements are discussed within the framework of the Matrix Language Frame Model. Shows how this model provides an explanatory account for the occurrence of both EL…

  3. CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATE STUDIES IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RODENTS

    EPA Science Inventory


    CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATE STUDIES IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RODENTS. WP Watkinson1, LB Wichers2, JP Nolan1, DW Winsett1, UP Kodavanti1, MCJ Schladweiler1, LC Walsh1, ER Lappi1, D Terrell1, R Slade1, AD Ledbetter1, and DL Costa1. 1USEPA, ORD/NHEERL/ETD/PTB, RTP, NC, US...

  4. 5 CFR 1215.32 - Compromise, suspension and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compromise, suspension and termination. 1215.32 Section 1215.32 Administrative Personnel MERIT SYSTEMS PROTECTION BOARD ORGANIZATION AND... to the General Accounting Office (GAO) debts arising from GAO audit exceptions. ...

  5. 32 CFR 2400.33 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... TECHNOLOGY POLICY REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12356; OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY INFORMATION... the loss or possible compromise of classified information shall immediately report the circumstances... originated the information as soon as possible so that a damage assessment may be conducted and appropriate...

  6. 32 CFR 2400.33 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... TECHNOLOGY POLICY REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12356; OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY INFORMATION... the loss or possible compromise of classified information shall immediately report the circumstances... originated the information as soon as possible so that a damage assessment may be conducted and appropriate...

  7. Compromise solutions between conservation and road building in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Caro, Tim; Dobson, Andrew; Marshall, Andrew J; Peres, Carlos A

    2014-08-18

    Road construction is now common through wilderness and protected areas in tropical and subtropical countries with adverse consequences for their high native biodiversity. Here, we summarize the scope of the problem and advance specific compromise solutions that reconcile development with conservation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An Item Response Model for Characterizing Test Compromise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segall, Daniel O.

    2002-01-01

    Developed an item response model for characterizing test-compromise that enables the estimation of item preview and score-gain distributions. In the approach, models parameters and posterior distributions are estimated by Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedures. Simulation study results suggest that when at least some test items are known to be…

  9. CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATE STUDIES IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RODENTS

    EPA Science Inventory


    CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATE STUDIES IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RODENTS. WP Watkinson1, LB Wichers2, JP Nolan1, DW Winsett1, UP Kodavanti1, MCJ Schladweiler1, LC Walsh1, ER Lappi1, D Terrell1, R Slade1, AD Ledbetter1, and DL Costa1. 1USEPA, ORD/NHEERL/ETD/PTB, RTP, NC, US...

  10. 17 CFR 143.5 - Collection by compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Collection by compromise. 143.5 Section 143.5 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COLLECTION OF CLAIMS OWED THE UNITED STATES ARISING FROM ACTIVITIES UNDER THE COMMISSION'S JURISDICTION...

  11. 15 CFR 25.46 - Compromise or settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Government is not with the Office of General Counsel, the representative shall forward all settlement offers... as directed by the reviewing official. (c) The authority head has exclusive authority to compromise... recommend settlement terms to the reviewing official, the authority head, or the Attorney General, as...

  12. Whatever It Takes: Health Compromising Behaviors in Female Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Jennifer J.; Krane, Vikki

    2005-01-01

    The power and performance model of sport stresses a sport ethic of doing "whatever it takes" to win (Coakley, 2004). Uncritical acceptance of this model may lead to various health-compromising behaviors. Employing achievement goal theory, we examine why female athletes may adopt the power and performance approach. An ego motivational climate and a…

  13. 32 CFR 2400.33 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Loss or possible compromise. 2400.33 Section 2400.33 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12356; OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY...

  14. 32 CFR 2400.33 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Loss or possible compromise. 2400.33 Section 2400.33 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12356; OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY...

  15. 32 CFR 2400.33 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Loss or possible compromise. 2400.33 Section 2400.33 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12356; OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY...

  16. Tissue response: biomaterials, dental implants, and compromised osseous tissue.

    PubMed

    Babu RS, Arvind; Ogle, Orrett

    2015-04-01

    Tissue response represents an important feature in biocompatibility in implant procedures. This review article highlights the fundamental characteristics of tissue response after the implant procedure. This article also highlights the tissue response in compromised osseous conditions. Understanding the histologic events after dental implants in normal and abnormal bone reinforces the concept of case selection in dental implants.

  17. 41 CFR 105-70.046 - Compromise or settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compromise or settlement. 105-70.046 Section 105-70.046 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION Regional Offices-General...

  18. Whatever It Takes: Health Compromising Behaviors in Female Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Jennifer J.; Krane, Vikki

    2005-01-01

    The power and performance model of sport stresses a sport ethic of doing "whatever it takes" to win (Coakley, 2004). Uncritical acceptance of this model may lead to various health-compromising behaviors. Employing achievement goal theory, we examine why female athletes may adopt the power and performance approach. An ego motivational climate and a…

  19. Time-to-Compromise Model for Cyber Risk Reduction Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Miles A. McQueen; Wayne F. Boyer; Mark A. Flynn; George A. Beitel

    2005-09-01

    We propose a new model for estimating the time to compromise a system component that is visible to an attacker. The model provides an estimate of the expected value of the time-to-compromise as a function of known and visible vulnerabilities, and attacker skill level. The time-to-compromise random process model is a composite of three subprocesses associated with attacker actions aimed at the exploitation of vulnerabilities. In a case study, the model was used to aid in a risk reduction estimate between a baseline Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system and the baseline system enhanced through a specific set of control system security remedial actions. For our case study, the total number of system vulnerabilities was reduced by 86% but the dominant attack path was through a component where the number of vulnerabilities was reduced by only 42% and the time-to-compromise of that component was increased by only 13% to 30% depending on attacker skill level.

  20. Myocardial microvascular permeability, interstitial oedema, and compromised cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Dongaonkar, Ranjeet M.; Stewart, Randolph H.; Geissler, Hans J.; Laine, Glen A.

    2010-01-01

    The heart, perhaps more than any other organ, is exquisitely sensitive to increases in microvascular permeability and the accumulation of myocardial interstitial oedema fluid. Whereas some organs can cope with profound increases in the interstitial fluid volume or oedema formation without a compromise in function, heart function is significantly compromised with only a few percent increase in the interstitial fluid volume. This would be of little consequence if myocardial oedema were an uncommon pathology. On the contrary, myocardial oedema forms in response to many disease states as well as clinical interventions such as cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest common to many cardiothoracic surgical procedures. The heart's inability to function effectively in the presence of myocardial oedema is further confounded by the perplexing fact that the resolution of myocardial oedema does not restore normal cardiac function. We will attempt to provide some insight as to how microvascular permeability and myocardial oedema formation compromise cardiac function and discuss the acute changes that might take place in the myocardium to perpetuate compromised cardiac function following oedema resolution. We will also discuss compensatory changes in the interstitial matrix of the heart in response to chronic myocardial oedema and the role they play to optimize myocardial function during chronic oedemagenic disease. PMID:20472566

  1. 49 CFR 107.327 - Compromise and settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compromise and settlement. 107.327 Section 107.327 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... consent agreement to the Chief Counsel. If the Chief Counsel accepts the agreement, he issues an order...

  2. 49 CFR 107.327 - Compromise and settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compromise and settlement. 107.327 Section 107.327 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... consent agreement to the Chief Counsel. If the Chief Counsel accepts the agreement, he issues an order...

  3. 49 CFR 107.327 - Compromise and settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compromise and settlement. 107.327 Section 107.327 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... consent agreement to the Chief Counsel. If the Chief Counsel accepts the agreement, he issues an order...

  4. 40 CFR 13.25 - Standards for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 13.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION STANDARDS... claim, either because of the legal issues involved or a bona fide dispute as to the facts. The amount accepted in compromise in such cases will fairly reflect the probability of prevailing on the legal issues...

  5. 42 CFR 401.613 - Compromise of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compromise of claims. 401.613 Section 401.613 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... present or prospective ability to pay the full amount of the claim within a reasonable time. (2...

  6. 19 CFR 161.5 - Compromise of Government claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compromise of Government claims. 161.5 Section 161.5 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF... distance from a Federal Reserve bank may perfect his offer by tendering a bank draft for the amount of the...

  7. 5 CFR 185.146 - Compromise or settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Compromise or settlement. 185.146 Section 185.146 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PROGRAM... pendency of any action to collect penalties and assessments under § 185.143. (d) The Attorney General has...

  8. Vehicle influence on permeation through intact and compromised skin.

    PubMed

    Gujjar, Meera; Banga, Ajay K

    2014-09-10

    The purpose of this study was to compare the transdermal permeation of a model compound, diclofenac diethylamine, from a hydrophilic and lipophilic vehicle across in vitro models simulating compromised skin. Mineral oil served as a lipophilic vehicle while 10mM phosphate buffered saline served as a hydrophilic vehicle. Compromised skin was simulated by tape stripping, delipidization, or microneedle application and compared with intact skin as a control. Transepidermal water loss was measured to assess barrier function. Skin compromised with tape stripping and delipidization significantly (p<0.05) increased permeation of diclofenac diethylamine compared to intact and microneedle treated skin with phosphate buffered saline vehicle. A similar trend in permeation was observed with mineral oil as the vehicle. For both vehicles, permeation across skin increased in the same order and correlated with degree of barrier impairment as indicated by transepidermal water loss values: intactcompromised skin.

  9. 45 CFR 30.22 - Bases for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bases for compromise. 30.22 Section 30.22 Public... an amount that bears a reasonable relation to the amount that can be recovered by enforced collection... amount claimed, either because of the legal issues involved or because of a bona fide dispute as to...

  10. Addictive neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kodirov, Sodikdjon A.

    2017-01-01

    Since the reward center is considered to be the area tegmentalis ventralis of the hypothalamus, logically its neurons could mainly be responsible for addiction. However, the literature asserts that almost any neurons of CNS can respond to one or another addictive compound. Obviously not only addictive nicotine, but also alcohol, amphetamine, cannabis, cocaine, heroin and morphine may influence dopaminergic cells alone in VTA. Moreover, paradoxically some of these drugs ameliorate symptoms, counterbalance syndromes, cure diseases and improve health, not only those related to the CNS and in adults, but also almost all other organs and in children, e.g. epilepsy. PMID:28649663

  11. Balloon kyphoplasty for osteoporotic spinal fractures with middle column compromise.

    PubMed

    Gan, Minfeng; Zou, Jun; Zhu, Xuesong; Wang, Genlin; Yang, Huilin

    2014-10-01

    Balloon kyphoplasty (BKP) is an effective method for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. However osteoporotic spinal fractures with middle column compromise are mentioned as a relative contraindication to BKP. Thus we investigated the safety and efficacy of BKP in the treatment of osteoporotic spinal fractures with middle column compromise but without neurological deficit. In this retrospective study, 45 patients who suffered osteoporotic fractures with middle column compromise but without neurological deficits were treated by BKP from May 2007 to December 2010. The final follow-ups were finished during the time of July 2011-September 2011. The mean follow-up period was 20.2 months. The height of the compromised vertebral body, the kyphotic angle and spinal canal compromise were measured before surgery, one day after surgery, and at the final follow-up. A visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry disability index (ODI) were chosen to evaluate pain and functional activity. The mean VAS and ODI scores improved significantly from pre- to post-operation (p<0.05), and this improvement was sustained at the final follow-up. The mean anterior vertebral body height ratio improved from 57.6%± 11.8% preoperatively to 86.2%± 12.2% postoperatively (p<0.05), so did the mean middle vertebral body height ratio. The kyphotic angle improved from 16.3° ± 3.7° preoperatively to 9.3° ± 2.6° postoperatively (p<0.05). At final follow-up, BKP stabilised vertebral height and prevented further kyphotic deformity. While there were no differences in spinal canal compromise between pre-operation and one day after surgery (p>0.05), there was a significant difference from the measurement at the final follow-up (p<0.05). BKP is a safe and effective method for osteoporotic spinal fractures with middle column compromise but without neurological deficit. Spontaneous remodelling of the spinal canal also occurs after BKP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Viability of cartilage grafts in various forms.

    PubMed

    Firat, Cemal; Gurlek, Ali; Aydin, Nasuhi Engin; Aydn, Nasuhi Engin

    2011-09-01

    The viability of cartilage grafts, in many forms, has been researched since the using of cartilage grafts in surgical procedures. Cryopreservation period and viability of cartilage grafts have remained unclear. This study was performed to investigate the durability, viability, and behavior of fresh or cryopreserved cartilage grafts when used as autografts or allografts in various forms.Six cartilage grafts (1 of each preparation type; 3 blocks and 3 diced) were prepared by wrapping with Surgicel or autogenous fascia, or they were left bare. After the graft preparation stage, the cartilage grafts were inserted into pockets prepared on the dorsum of each rabbit. Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 (6 rabbits in each group) received autogenous fresh grafts, allogenous fresh grafts, autogenous cryopreserved grafts, and allogenous cryopreserved grafts, respectively. All cartilage grafts were implanted for 2 months.At the end of the second month, specimens were harvested and analyzed. The bare grafts provided the most viable specimens. There was no significant difference between the frozen or fresh and allograft or autograft groups with respect to viability and resorption ratios. The bare block graft, in all groups, survived significantly more than the other graft types.Allografts (homografts), similar autografts, did not create major problems, and they had excellent host tolerance and low antigenicity, especially when the perichondrium was removed. Viability and durability of the bare grafts (diced and block) were better than fascia or Surgicel-wrapped cartilage graft forms.

  13. Viability analysis in biological evaluations: Concepts of population viability analysis, biological population, and ecological scale

    Treesearch

    Gregory D. Hayward; John R. Squires

    1994-01-01

    Environmental protection strategies often rely on environmental impact assessments. As part of the assessment process biologists are routinely asked to evaluate the effects of management actions on plants and animals. This evaluation often requires that biologists make judgments about the viability of affected populations. However, population viability...

  14. Viability and Resilience of Languages in Competition

    PubMed Central

    Chapel, Laetitia; Castelló, Xavier; Bernard, Claire; Deffuant, Guillaume; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; Martin, Sophie; Miguel, Maxi San

    2010-01-01

    We study the viability and resilience of languages, using a simple dynamical model of two languages in competition. Assuming that public action can modify the prestige of a language in order to avoid language extinction, we analyze two cases: (i) the prestige can only take two values, (ii) it can take any value but its change at each time step is bounded. In both cases, we determine the viability kernel, that is, the set of states for which there exists an action policy maintaining the coexistence of the two languages, and we define such policies. We also study the resilience of the languages and identify configurations from where the system can return to the viability kernel (finite resilience), or where one of the languages is lead to disappear (zero resilience). Within our current framework, the maintenance of a bilingual society is shown to be possible by introducing the prestige of a language as a control variable. PMID:20126655

  15. Myocardial Viability on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Souto, Ana Luiza Mansur; Souto, Rafael Mansur; Teixeira, Isabella Cristina Resende; Nacif, Marcelo Souto

    2017-01-01

    The study of myocardial viability is of great importance in the orientation and management of patients requiring myocardial revascularization or angioplasty. The technique of delayed enhancement (DE) is accurate and has transformed the study of viability into an easy test, not only for the detection of fibrosis but also as a binary test detecting what is viable or not. On DE, fibrosis equal to or greater than 50% of the segmental area is considered as non-viable, whereas that below 50% is considered viable. During the same evaluation, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) may also use other techniques for functional and perfusion studies to obtain a global evaluation of ischemic heart disease. This study aims to highlight the current concepts and broadly emphasize the use of CMR as a method that over the last 20 years has become a reference in the detection of infarction and assessment of myocardial viability. PMID:28591322

  16. Poxvirus viability and signatures in historical relics.

    PubMed

    McCollum, Andrea M; Li, Yu; Wilkins, Kimberly; Karem, Kevin L; Davidson, Whitni B; Paddock, Christopher D; Reynolds, Mary G; Damon, Inger K

    2014-02-01

    Although it has been >30 years since the eradication of smallpox, the unearthing of well-preserved tissue material in which the virus may reside has called into question the viability of variola virus decades or centuries after its original occurrence. Experimental data to address the long-term stability and viability of the virus are limited. There are several instances of well-preserved corpses and tissues that have been examined for poxvirus viability and viral DNA. These historical specimens cause concern for potential exposures, and each situation should be approached cautiously and independently with the available information. Nevertheless, these specimens provide information on the history of a major disease and vaccination against it.

  17. SEMA4D compromises blood-brain barrier, activates microglia, and inhibits remyelination in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ernest S; Jonason, Alan; Reilly, Christine; Veeraraghavan, Janaki; Fisher, Terrence; Doherty, Michael; Klimatcheva, Ekaterina; Mallow, Crystal; Cornelius, Chad; Leonard, John E; Marchi, Nicola; Janigro, Damir; Argaw, Azeb Tadesse; Pham, Trinh; Seils, Jennifer; Bussler, Holm; Torno, Sebold; Kirk, Renee; Howell, Alan; Evans, Elizabeth E; Paris, Mark; Bowers, William J; John, Gareth; Zauderer, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic neuroinflammatory disease characterized by immune cell infiltration of CNS, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, localized myelin destruction, and progressive neuronal degeneration. There exists a significant need to identify novel therapeutic targets and strategies that effectively and safely disrupt and even reverse disease pathophysiology. Signaling cascades initiated by semaphorin 4D (SEMA4D) induce glial activation, neuronal process collapse, inhibit migration and differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), and disrupt endothelial tight junctions forming the BBB. To target SEMA4D, we generated a monoclonal antibody that recognizes mouse, rat, monkey and human SEMA4D with high affinity and blocks interaction between SEMA4D and its cognate receptors. In vitro, anti-SEMA4D reverses the inhibitory effects of recombinant SEMA4D on OPC survival and differentiation. In vivo, anti-SEMA4D significantly attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in multiple rodent models by preserving BBB integrity and axonal myelination and can be shown to promote migration of OPC to the site of lesions and improve myelin status following chemically-induced demyelination. Our study underscores SEMA4D as a key factor in CNS disease and supports the further development of antibody-based inhibition of SEMA4D as a novel therapeutic strategy for MS and other neurologic diseases with evidence of demyelination and/or compromise to the neurovascular unit.

  18. Depletion of adult neurogenesis exacerbates cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease by compromising hippocampal inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Carolyn; Tobin, Matthew Kyle; Hsu, Michael; Musaraca, Kianna; Yu, Tzong-Shiue; Mishra, Rachana; Kernie, Steven G; Lazarov, Orly

    2017-09-08

    The molecular mechanism underlying progressive memory loss in Alzheimer's disease is poorly understood. Neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus is a dynamic process that continuously changes the dentate gyrus and is important for hippocampal plasticity, learning and memory. However, whether impairments in neurogenesis affect the hippocampal circuitry in a way that leads to memory deficits characteristic of Alzheimer's disease is unknown. Controversial results in that regard were reported in transgenic mouse models of amyloidosis. Here, we conditionally ablated adult neurogenesis in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice by crossing these with mice expressing nestin-driven thymidine kinase (δ-HSV-TK). These animals show impairment in performance in contextual conditioning and pattern separation tasks following depletion of neurogenesis. Importantly, these deficits were not observed in age-matched APPswe/PS1ΔE9 or δ-HSV-TK mice alone. Furthermore, we show that cognitive deficits were accompanied by the upregulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in the hippocampus and in immature neurons specifically. Interestingly, we observed upregulation of the immediate early gene Zif268 (Egr-1) in the dentate gyrus, CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus following learning in the neurogenesis-depleted δ-HSV-TK mice. This may suggest overactivation of hippocampal neurons in these areas following depletion of neurogenesis. These results imply that neurogenesis plays an important role in the regulation of inhibitory circuitry of the hippocampus. This study suggests that deficits in adult neurogenesis may contribute to cognitive impairments, tau hyperphosphorylation in new neurons and compromised hippocampal circuitry in Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Labeling of neuronal differentiation and neuron cells with biocompatible fluorescent nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Tzu-Chia; Liu, Kuang-Kai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Hwang, Eric; Chao, Jui-I.

    2014-05-01

    Nanodiamond is a promising carbon nanomaterial developed for biomedical applications. Here, we show fluorescent nanodiamond (FND) with the biocompatible properties that can be used for the labeling and tracking of neuronal differentiation and neuron cells derived from embryonal carcinoma stem (ECS) cells. The fluorescence intensities of FNDs were increased by treatment with FNDs in both the mouse P19 and human NT2/D1 ECS cells. FNDs were taken into ECS cells; however, FNDs did not alter the cellular morphology and growth ability. Moreover, FNDs did not change the protein expression of stem cell marker SSEA-1 of ECS cells. The neuronal differentiation of ECS cells could be induced by retinoic acid (RA). Interestingly, FNDs did not affect on the morphological alteration, cytotoxicity and apoptosis during the neuronal differentiation. Besides, FNDs did not alter the cell viability and the expression of neuron-specific marker β-III-tubulin in these differentiated neuron cells. The existence of FNDs in the neuron cells can be identified by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Together, FND is a biocompatible and readily detectable nanomaterial for the labeling and tracking of neuronal differentiation process and neuron cells from stem cells.

  20. Labeling of neuronal differentiation and neuron cells with biocompatible fluorescent nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tzu-Chia; Liu, Kuang-Kai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Hwang, Eric; Chao, Jui-I

    2014-05-16

    Nanodiamond is a promising carbon nanomaterial developed for biomedical applications. Here, we show fluorescent nanodiamond (FND) with the biocompatible properties that can be used for the labeling and tracking of neuronal differentiation and neuron cells derived from embryonal carcinoma stem (ECS) cells. The fluorescence intensities of FNDs were increased by treatment with FNDs in both the mouse P19 and human NT2/D1 ECS cells. FNDs were taken into ECS cells; however, FNDs did not alter the cellular morphology and growth ability. Moreover, FNDs did not change the protein expression of stem cell marker SSEA-1 of ECS cells. The neuronal differentiation of ECS cells could be induced by retinoic acid (RA). Interestingly, FNDs did not affect on the morphological alteration, cytotoxicity and apoptosis during the neuronal differentiation. Besides, FNDs did not alter the cell viability and the expression of neuron-specific marker β-III-tubulin in these differentiated neuron cells. The existence of FNDs in the neuron cells can be identified by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Together, FND is a biocompatible and readily detectable nanomaterial for the labeling and tracking of neuronal differentiation process and neuron cells from stem cells.

  1. Sloppiness in spontaneously active neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Panas, Dagmara; Amin, Hayder; Maccione, Alessandro; Muthmann, Oliver; van Rossum, Mark; Berdondini, Luca; Hennig, Matthias H

    2015-06-03

    Various plasticity mechanisms, including experience-dependent, spontaneous, as well as homeostatic ones, continuously remodel neural circuits. Yet, despite fluctuations in the properties of single neurons and synapses, the behavior and function of neuronal assemblies are generally found to be very stable over time. This raises the important question of how plasticity is coordinated across the network. To address this, we investigated the stability of network activity in cultured rat hippocampal neurons recorded with high-density multielectrode arrays over several days. We used parametric models to characterize multineuron activity patterns and analyzed their sensitivity to changes. We found that the models exhibited sloppiness, a property where the model behavior is insensitive to changes in many parameter combinations, but very sensitive to a few. The activity of neurons with sloppy parameters showed faster and larger fluctuations than the activity of a small subset of neurons associated with sensitive parameters. Furthermore, parameter sensitivity was highly correlated with firing rates. Finally, we tested our observations from cell cultures on an in vivo recording from monkey visual cortex and we confirm that spontaneous cortical activity also shows hallmarks of sloppy behavior and firing rate dependence. Our findings suggest that a small subnetwork of highly active and stable neurons supports group stability, and that this endows neuronal networks with the flexibility to continuously remodel without compromising stability and function.

  2. Securing Single Points of Compromise (SPoC)

    SciTech Connect

    Belangia, David Warren

    2015-06-25

    Securing the Single Points of Compromise that provide central services to the institution’s environment is paramount to success when trying to protect the business. (Fisk, 2014) Time Based Security mandates protection (erecting and ensuring effective controls) that last longer than the time to detect and react to a compromise. When enterprise protections fail, providing additional layered controls for these central services provides more time to detect and react. While guidance is readily available for securing the individual critical asset, protecting these assets as a group is not often discussed. Using best business practices to protect these resources as individual assets while leveraging holistic defenses for the group increases the opportunity to maximize protection time, allowing detection and reaction time for the SPoCs that is commensurate with the inherent risk of these centralized services.

  3. Creating clones, kids & chimera: liberal democratic compromise at the crossroads.

    PubMed

    Adams, Nathan A

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this article is to find middle ground between the supporters and opponents of biotechnology by perpetuating the existing legal compromise pertaining to the complete range of health and welfare doctrines relevant to the biotechnological industry. The author aspires neither to add to nor detract from this liberal democratic consensus, but to preserve its constitutive balance between positivism and natural law and over-regulation and under-regulation in the hopes of stabilizing new political fault lines developing around the few biotechnological innovations already grabbing headlines. The most feasible solution is to extend the existing liberal democratic compromise with respect to equal protection, reproductive rights, the First Amendment, human subject experimentation, patent law, and parental rights. This includes banning or monopolizing certain biotechnologies and extending substantive special respect to the ex vivo living human embryo. Biotechnology must not be left to regulate itself.

  4. Differential viability response of prokaryotes and eukaryotes to high strength pulsed magnetic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Boda, Sunil Kumar; Ravikumar, K; Saini, Deepak K; Basu, Bikramjit

    2015-12-01

    The present study examines the efficacy of a high strength pulsed magnetic field (PMF) towards bacterial inactivation in vitro, without compromising eukaryotic cell viability. The differential response of prokaryotes [Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Escherichia coli], and eukaryotes [C2C12 mouse myoblasts and human mesenchymal stem cells, hMSCs] upon exposure to varying PMF stimuli (1-4 T, 30 pulses, 40 ms pulse duration) is investigated. Among the prokaryotes, ~60% and ~70% reduction was recorded in the survival of staphylococcal species and E. coli, respectively at 4 T PMF as evaluated by colony forming unit (CFU) analysis and flow cytometry. A 2-5 fold increase in intracellular ROS (reactive oxygen species) levels suggests oxidative stress as the key mediator in PMF induced bacterial death/injury. The 4 T PMF treated staphylococci also exhibited longer doubling times. Both TEM and fluorescence microscopy revealed compromised membranes of PMF exposed bacteria. Under similar PMF exposure conditions, no immediate cytotoxicity was recorded in C2C12 mouse myoblasts and hMSCs, which can be attributed to the robust resistance towards oxidative stress. The ion interference of iron containing bacterial proteins is invoked to analytically explain the PMF induced ROS accumulation in prokaryotes. Overall, this study establishes the potential of PMF as a bactericidal method without affecting eukaryotic viability. This non-invasive stimulation protocol coupled with antimicrobial agents can be integrated as a potential methodology for the localized treatment of prosthetic infections.

  5. In situ monitoring of surgical flap viability using THz imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa, Neha; Sung, Shijun; Grundfest, Warren; Taylor, Zachary

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores the utility of reflective THz imaging to assess the viability of surgical flaps. Flap surgery is a technique where tissue is harvested from a donor site and moved to a recipient while keeping the blood supply intact. This technique is common in head and neck tumor resection surgery where the reconstruction of complex and sensitive anatomic structures is routine following the resection of large and/or invasive tumors. Successful flap surgery results in tissue that is sufficiently perfused with both blood and extracellular water. If insufficient fluid levels are maintained, the flap tissue becomes necrotic and must be excised immediately to prevent infection developing and spreading to the surrounding areas. The goal of this work is to investigate the hydration of surgical flaps and correlate image features to successful graft outcomes. Advancement flaps were created on the abdomens of rat models. One rat model was labeled control and care was taken to ensure a successful flap outcome. The flap on the second rat was compromised with restricted blood flow and allowed to fail. The flaps of both rats were imaged once a day over the course of a week at which point the compromised flap had begun to show signs of necrosis. Significant differences in tissue water content were observed between rats over the experimental period. The results suggest that THz imaging may enable early assessment of flap viability.

  6. The ethics of moral compromise for stem cell research policy.

    PubMed

    Master, Zubin; Crozier, G K D

    2012-03-01

    In the US, stem cell research is at a moral impasse-many see this research as ethically mandated due to its potential for ameliorating major diseases, while others see this research as ethically impermissible because it typically involves the destruction of embryos and use of ova from women. Because their creation does not require embryos or ova, induced pluripotent stem cells offer the most promising path for addressing the main ethical objections to stem cell research; however, this technology is still in development. In order for scientists to advance induced pluripotent stem cell research to a point of translational readiness, they must continue to use ova and embryos in the interim. How then are we to ethically move forward with stem cell research? We argue that there is personal integrity and value in adopting a 'moral compromise' as a means for moving past the moral impasse in stem cell research. In a moral compromise, each party concedes part of their desired outcome in order to engage in a process that respects the values and desires of all parties equitably. Whereas some contend that moral compromise in stem cell research necessarily involves self-contradiction or loss of personal integrity, we argue that in the US context, stem cell research satisfies many of the key pre-conditions of an effective moral compromise. To illustrate our point, we offer a model solution wherein eggs and embryos are temporarily used until non-egg and non-embryonic sources of pluripotent stem cells are developed to a state of translational readiness.

  7. Adaptive Design of a Decision Support System for Compromise Assessment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    for a reasonable amount of time to pro - vide continuity to the system. This lack of continuity was a con - tributing factor to the current problem of...compromise assess- ments. The only requirements specified by SAC are that the following general topics be discussed: * Currency /accuracy • Relationship to...be presented to SAC. 9. .* k, - .".4. 4. A. Ill. Methodology The following four objectives (as discussed in Chapter I) pro - vide a course of action

  8. Viability of piping plover Charadrius melodus metapopulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plissner, Jonathan H.; Haig, Susan M.

    2000-01-01

    The metapopulation viability analysis package, VORTEX, was used to examine viability and recovery objectives for piping plovers Charadrius melodus, an endangered shorebird that breeds in three distinct regions of North America. Baseline models indicate that while Atlantic Coast populations, under current management practices, are at little risk of near-term extinction, Great Plains and Great Lakes populations require 36% higher mean fecundity for a significant probability of persisting for the next 100 years. Metapopulation structure (i.e. the delineation of populations within the metapopulation) and interpopulation dispersal rates had varying effects on model results; however, spatially-structured metapopulations exhibited lower viability than that reported for single-population models. The models were most sensitive to variation in survivorship; hence, additional mortality data will improve their accuracy. With this information, such models become useful tools in identifying successful management objectives; and sensitivity analyses, even in the absence of some data, may indicate which options are likely to be most effective. Metapopulation viability models are best suited for developing conservation strategies for achieving recovery objectives based on maintaining an externally derived, target population size and structure.

  9. Observability in strategic models of viability selection.

    PubMed

    Gámez, M; Carreño, R; Kósa, A; Varga, Z

    2003-10-01

    Strategic models of frequency-dependent viability selection, in terms of mathematical systems theory, are considered as a dynamic observation system. Using a general sufficient condition for observability of nonlinear systems with invariant manifold, it is studied whether, observing certain phenotypic characteristics of the population, the development of its genetic state can be recovered, at least near equilibrium.

  10. Rural Education and Rural Community Viability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Patricia Cahape

    This thesis examines the ways in which rural schools support or undermine rural community viability in the United States. Beginning in the late 19th century, the diverse people of the United States came under the power of a single ideology of modernization and the superiority of urban culture. This ideology has resulted in the American transition…

  11. Viability of nonminimally coupled f (R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolami, Orfeu; Páramos, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    In this work we explore the viability of nonminimally coupled matter-curvature gravity theories, namely the conditions required for the absence of tachyon instabilities and ghost degrees of freedom. We contrast our finds with recent claims of a pathological behaviour of this class of models, which resorted to, in our view, an incorrect analogy with k-essence.

  12. Fetal pain, abortion, viability, and the Constitution.

    PubMed

    Cohen, I Glenn; Sayeed, Sadath

    2011-01-01

    In early 2010, the Nebraska state legislature passed a new abortion restricting law asserting a new, compelling state interest in preventing fetal pain. In this article, we review existing constitutional abortion doctrine and note difficulties presented by persistent legal attention to a socially derived viability construct. We then offer a substantive biological, ethical, and legal critique of the new fetal pain rationale.

  13. Viability of mesenchymal stem cells during electrospinning

    PubMed Central

    Zanatta, G.; Steffens, D.; Braghirolli, D.I.; Fernandes, R.A.; Netto, C.A.; Pranke, P.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a technique by which a live tissue can be re-constructed and one of its main goals is to associate cells with biomaterials. Electrospinning is a technique that facilitates the production of nanofibers and is commonly used to develop fibrous scaffolds to be used in tissue engineering. In the present study, a different approach for cell incorporation into fibrous scaffolds was tested. Mesenchymal stem cells were extracted from the wall of the umbilical cord and mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood. Cells were re-suspended in a 10% polyvinyl alcohol solution and subjected to electrospinning for 30 min under a voltage of 21 kV. Cell viability was assessed before and after the procedure by exclusion of dead cells using trypan blue staining. Fiber diameter was observed by scanning electron microscopy and the presence of cells within the scaffolds was analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. After electrospinning, the viability of mesenchymal stem cells was reduced from 88 to 19.6% and the viability of mononuclear cells from 99 to 8.38%. The loss of viability was possibly due to the high viscosity of the polymer solution, which reduced the access to nutrients associated with electric and mechanical stress during electrospinning. These results suggest that the incorporation of cells during fiber formation by electrospinning is a viable process that needs more investigation in order to find ways to protect cells from damage. PMID:22183245

  14. Viability of mesenchymal stem cells during electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, G; Steffens, D; Braghirolli, D I; Fernandes, R A; Netto, C A; Pranke, P

    2012-02-01

    Tissue engineering is a technique by which a live tissue can be re-constructed and one of its main goals is to associate cells with biomaterials. Electrospinning is a technique that facilitates the production of nanofibers and is commonly used to develop fibrous scaffolds to be used in tissue engineering. In the present study, a different approach for cell incorporation into fibrous scaffolds was tested. Mesenchymal stem cells were extracted from the wall of the umbilical cord and mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood. Cells were re-suspended in a 10% polyvinyl alcohol solution and subjected to electrospinning for 30 min under a voltage of 21 kV. Cell viability was assessed before and after the procedure by exclusion of dead cells using trypan blue staining. Fiber diameter was observed by scanning electron microscopy and the presence of cells within the scaffolds was analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. After electrospinning, the viability of mesenchymal stem cells was reduced from 88 to 19.6% and the viability of mononuclear cells from 99 to 8.38%. The loss of viability was possibly due to the high viscosity of the polymer solution, which reduced the access to nutrients associated with electric and mechanical stress during electrospinning. These results suggest that the incorporation of cells during fiber formation by electrospinning is a viable process that needs more investigation in order to find ways to protect cells from damage.

  15. Splitting the difference? Principled compromise and assisted dying.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, Richard

    2014-11-01

    Compromise on moral matters attracts ambivalent reactions, since it seems at once laudable and deplorable. When a hotly-contested phenomenon like assisted dying is debated, all-or-nothing positions tend to be advanced, with little thought given to the desirability of, or prospects for, compromise. In response to recent articles by Søren Holm and Alex Mullock, in this article I argue that principled compromise can be encouraged even in relation to this phenomenon, provided that certain conditions are present (which I suggest they are). In order to qualify as appropriately principled, the ensuing negotiations require disputants to observe three constraints: they should be suitably reflective, reliable and respectful in their dealings with one another. The product that will result from such a process will also need to split the difference between the warring parties. In assisted dying, I argue that a reduced offence of 'compassionate killing' can achieve this. I acknowledge, however, that splitting the difference can induce splitting headaches, as there remain certain questions to be answered. Hopefully, however, sufficient work is done here to defend attempts to occupy the middle ground, whether these relate to assisted dying specifically or to other disputed moral matters. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Potential Soviet compromise on ballistic missile defense. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H.P.

    1989-11-01

    The body of this research memorandum was written before the Baker-Shevardnadze meeting in Wyoming. It presented evidence suggesting that the Soviet Union might agree to a compromise at the Wyoming meeting that defers the issue of ballistic missile defense (BMD) negotiations to a later stage in arms reductions, thus facilitating a first-stage cut in offensive arms without an explicit Soviet endorsement of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). Through this compromise, offensive arms reductions should first be delinked from an agreement on BMD, and then be relinked during the second stage of deeper cuts. Therefore, negotiations on limiting BMD systems, though deterred, are deemed inevitable if the U.S. persists in deploying a strategic defense system (SDS). Moreover, some Soviet arms controllers already look beyond the first stage to the prospect of negotiated transition into a strategic defense environment (i.e., a reliance on defensive deterrence). In this approach, Wyoming, then, was expected to be only a first move in the Soviet negotiating strategy for a grand compromise on strategic defense. As explained in the afterword added to the paper, the actual events at Wyoming seem consistent with that interpretation.

  17. Placental angiogenesis in sheep models of compromised pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Lawrence P; Borowicz, Pawel P; Vonnahme, Kimberly A; Johnson, Mary Lynn; Grazul-Bilska, Anna T; Redmer, Dale A; Caton, Joel S

    2005-01-01

    Because the placenta is the organ that transports nutrients, respiratory gases and wastes between the maternal and fetal systems, development of its vascular beds is essential to normal placental function, and thus in supporting normal fetal growth. Compromised fetal growth and development have adverse health consequences during the neonatal period and throughout adult life. To establish the role of placental angiogenesis in compromised pregnancies, we first evaluated the pattern of placental angiogenesis and expression of angiogenic factors throughout normal pregnancy. In addition, we and others have established a variety of sheep models to evaluate the effects on fetal growth of various factors including maternal nutrient excess or deprivation and specific nutrients, maternal age, maternal and fetal genotype, increased numbers of fetuses, environmental thermal stress, and high altitude (hypobaric) conditions. Although placental angiogenesis is altered in each of these models in which fetal growth is adversely affected, the specific effect on placental angiogenesis depends on the type of ‘stress’ to which the pregnancy is subjected, and also differs between the fetal and maternal systems and between genotypes. We believe that the models of compromised pregnancy and the methods described in this review will enable us to develop a much better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for alterations in placental vascular development. PMID:15760944

  18. Versican knock-down compromises chondrogenesis in the embryonic chick limb.

    PubMed

    Shepard, John B; Gliga, Diana A; Morrow, Amanda P; Hoffman, Stanley; Capehart, Anthony A

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal cell aggregation is critical for cartilage formation in the vertebrate limb. The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a critical role in governing cell behavior and cell phenotype in this tissue, and the hyalectin versican is highly expressed in the ECM of precartilage mesenchymal cells and developing synovial joints. Although several in vitro studies have been conducted in an attempt to address versican's role during limb mesenchymal condensation, factors such as differences in cell density in culture, variations between chondrogenic cell lines, and the inability to prolong the viability of limb explants have led to conflicting data, mandating an in vivo analysis. By using a morpholino directed strategy in ovo, we performed knock-down of versican expression in the presumptive ulnar region of the developing chick wing at time points critical to skeletogenesis. These data indicate that in ovo misexpression of versican compromised mesenchymal condensation with resulting ulnar cartilages reduced in length distally by an average of 53% relative to contralateral control limbs. In select versican morphants the olecranon process was also reduced in size proximally and failed to cup the humerus, likely impairing joint morphogenesis. This study represents the first report assessing the role of versican in the developing chick limb in ovo, further demonstrating the importance of versican proteoglycan expression during chondrogenesis and extending previous findings to suggest a role for versican during synovial joint development.

  19. Neurons Are Host Cells for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Philippa J.; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Lang, Dirk; Cooper, Susan; Sebesho, Boipelo; Allie, Nasiema; Keeton, Roanne; Francisco, Ngiambudulu M.; Salie, Sumayah; Labuschagné, Antoinette; Quesniaux, Valerie; Ryffel, Bernhard; Kellaway, Lauriston

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of the central nervous system is thought to be initiated once the bacilli have breached the blood brain barrier and are phagocytosed, primarily by microglial cells. In this study, the interactions of M. tuberculosis with neurons in vitro and in vivo were investigated. The data obtained demonstrate that neurons can act as host cells for M. tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis bacilli were internalized by murine neuronal cultured cells in a time-dependent manner after exposure, with superior uptake by HT22 cells compared to Neuro-2a cells (17.7% versus 9.8%). Internalization of M. tuberculosis bacilli by human SK-N-SH cultured neurons suggested the clinical relevance of the findings. Moreover, primary murine hippocampus-derived neuronal cultures could similarly internalize M. tuberculosis. Internalized M. tuberculosis bacilli represented a productive infection with retention of bacterial viability and replicative potential, increasing 2- to 4-fold within 48 h. M. tuberculosis bacillus infection of neurons was confirmed in vivo in the brains of C57BL/6 mice after intracerebral challenge. This study, therefore, demonstrates neurons as potential new target cells for M. tuberculosis within the central nervous system. PMID:24566619

  20. Neurons are host cells for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Randall, Philippa J; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Lang, Dirk; Cooper, Susan; Sebesho, Boipelo; Allie, Nasiema; Keeton, Roanne; Francisco, Ngiambudulu M; Salie, Sumayah; Labuschagné, Antoinette; Quesniaux, Valerie; Ryffel, Bernhard; Kellaway, Lauriston; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2014-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of the central nervous system is thought to be initiated once the bacilli have breached the blood brain barrier and are phagocytosed, primarily by microglial cells. In this study, the interactions of M. tuberculosis with neurons in vitro and in vivo were investigated. The data obtained demonstrate that neurons can act as host cells for M. tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis bacilli were internalized by murine neuronal cultured cells in a time-dependent manner after exposure, with superior uptake by HT22 cells compared to Neuro-2a cells (17.7% versus 9.8%). Internalization of M. tuberculosis bacilli by human SK-N-SH cultured neurons suggested the clinical relevance of the findings. Moreover, primary murine hippocampus-derived neuronal cultures could similarly internalize M. tuberculosis. Internalized M. tuberculosis bacilli represented a productive infection with retention of bacterial viability and replicative potential, increasing 2- to 4-fold within 48 h. M. tuberculosis bacillus infection of neurons was confirmed in vivo in the brains of C57BL/6 mice after intracerebral challenge. This study, therefore, demonstrates neurons as potential new target cells for M. tuberculosis within the central nervous system.

  1. Neuronal growth and differentiation on biodegradable membranes.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Sabrina; Piscioneri, Antonella; Messina, Antonietta; Salerno, Simona; Al-Fageeh, Mohamed B; Drioli, Enrico; De Bartolo, Loredana

    2015-02-01

    Semipermeable polymeric membranes with appropriate morphological, physicochemical and transport properties are relevant to inducing neural regeneration. We developed novel biodegradable membranes to support neuronal differentiation. In particular, we developed chitosan, polycaprolactone and polyurethane flat membranes and a biosynthetic blend between polycaprolactone and polyurethane by phase-inversion techniques. The biodegradable membranes were characterized in order to evaluate their morphological, physicochemical, mechanical and degradation properties. We investigated the efficacy of these different membranes to promote the adhesion and differentiation of neuronal cells. We employed as model cell system the human neuroblastoma cell line SHSY5Y, which is a well-established system for studying neuronal differentiation. The investigation of viability and specific neuronal marker expression allowed assessment that the correct neuronal differentiation and the formation of neuronal network had taken place in vitro in the cells seeded on different biodegradable membranes. Overall, this study provides evidence that neural cell responses depend on the nature of the biodegradable polymer used to form the membranes, as well as on the dissolution, hydrophilic and, above all, mechanical membrane properties. PCL-PU membranes exhibit mechanical properties that improve neurite outgrowth and the expression of specific neuronal markers.

  2. Fibrinogen nitrotyrosination after ischemic stroke impairs thrombolysis and promotes neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Ill-Raga, Gerard; Palomer, Ernest; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Guix, Francesc X; Bosch-Morató, Mònica; Guivernau, Biuse; Tajes, Marta; Valls-Comamala, Victòria; Jiménez-Conde, Jordi; Ois, Angel; Pérez-Asensio, Fernando; Reyes-Navarro, Mario; Caballo, Carolina; Gil-Gómez, Gabriel; Lopez-Vilchez, Irene; Galan, Ana M; Alameda, Francesc; Escolar, Gines; Opazo, Carlos; Planas, Anna M; Roquer, Jaume; Valverde, Miguel A; Muñoz, Francisco J

    2015-03-01

    Ischemic stroke is an acute vascular event that compromises neuronal viability, and identification of the pathophysiological mechanisms is critical for its correct management. Ischemia produces increased nitric oxide synthesis to recover blood flow but also induces a free radical burst. Nitric oxide and superoxide anion react to generate peroxynitrite that nitrates tyrosines. We found that fibrinogen nitrotyrosination was detected in plasma after the initiation of ischemic stroke in human patients. Electron microscopy and protein intrinsic fluorescence showed that in vitro nitrotyrosination of fibrinogen affected its structure. Thromboelastography showed that initially fibrinogen nitrotyrosination retarded clot formation but later made the clot more resistant to fibrinolysis. This result was independent of any effect on thrombin production. Immunofluorescence analysis of affected human brain areas also showed that both fibrinogen and nitrotyrosinated fibrinogen spread into the brain parenchyma after ischemic stroke. Therefore, we assayed the toxicity of fibrinogen and nitrotyrosinated fibrinogen in a human neuroblastoma cell line. For that purpose we measured the activity of caspase-3, a key enzyme in the apoptotic pathway, and cell survival. We found that nitrotyrosinated fibrinogen induced higher activation of caspase 3. Accordingly, cell survival assays showed a more neurotoxic effect of nitrotyrosinated fibrinogen at all concentrations tested. In summary, nitrotyrosinated fibrinogen would be of pathophysiological interest in ischemic stroke due to both its impact on hemostasis - it impairs thrombolysis, the main target in stroke treatments - and its neurotoxicity that would contribute to the death of the brain tissue surrounding the infarcted area.

  3. Neurons other than motor neurons in motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Ruffoli, Riccardo; Biagioni, Francesca; Busceti, Carla L; Gaglione, Anderson; Ryskalin, Larisa; Gambardella, Stefano; Frati, Alessandro; Fornai, Francesco

    2017-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is typically defined by a loss of motor neurons in the central nervous system. Accordingly, morphological analysis for decades considered motor neurons (in the cortex, brainstem and spinal cord) as the neuronal population selectively involved in ALS. Similarly, this was considered the pathological marker to score disease severity ex vivo both in patients and experimental models. However, the concept of non-autonomous motor neuron death was used recently to indicate the need for additional cell types to produce motor neuron death in ALS. This means that motor neuron loss occurs only when they are connected with other cell types. This concept originally emphasized the need for resident glia as well as non-resident inflammatory cells. Nowadays, the additional role of neurons other than motor neurons emerged in the scenario to induce non-autonomous motor neuron death. In fact, in ALS neurons diverse from motor neurons are involved. These cells play multiple roles in ALS: (i) they participate in the chain of events to produce motor neuron loss; (ii) they may even degenerate more than and before motor neurons. In the present manuscript evidence about multi-neuronal involvement in ALS patients and experimental models is discussed. Specific sub-classes of neurons in the whole spinal cord are reported either to degenerate or to trigger neuronal degeneration, thus portraying ALS as a whole spinal cord disorder rather than a disease affecting motor neurons solely. This is associated with a novel concept in motor neuron disease which recruits abnormal mechanisms of cell to cell communication.

  4. Extracellular low-n oligomers of tau cause selective synaptotoxicity without affecting cell viability.

    PubMed

    Kaniyappan, Senthilvelrajan; Chandupatla, Ram Reddy; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2017-05-18

    Tau-mediated toxicity in Alzheimer's disease is thought to operate through low-n oligomers, rather than filamentous aggregates. However, the nature of oligomers and pathways of toxicity are poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated structural and functional aspects of highly purified oligomers of a pro-aggregant tau species. Purified oligomers of the tau repeat domain were characterized by biophysical and structural methods. Functional aspects were investigated by cellular assays ((3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay of cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase release assay [for cell toxicity], reactive oxygen species production, and calcium assay), combined with analysis of neuronal dendritic spines exposed to oligomers. Purified low-n oligomers are roughly globular, with sizes around 1.6 to 5.4 nm, exhibit an altered conformation, but do not have substantial β-structure. Treatment of primary neurons with oligomers impairs spine morphology and density, accompanied by increased reactive oxygen species and intracellular calcium, but without affecting cell viability (by (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay of cell viability and lactate dehydrogenase release assay [for cell toxicity]). Tau oligomers are toxic to synapses but not lethal to cells. Copyright © 2017 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. No. 347-Obstetric Management at Borderline Viability.

    PubMed

    Ladhani, Noor Niyar N; Chari, Radha S; Dunn, Michael S; Jones, Griffith; Shah, Prakesh; Barrett, Jon F R

    2017-09-01

    The primary objective of this guideline was to develop consensus statements to guide clinical practice and recommendations for obstetric management of a pregnancy at borderline viability, currently defined as prior to 25+6 weeks. Clinicians involved in the obstetric management of women whose fetus is at the borderline of viability. Women presenting for possible birth at borderline viability. This document presents a summary of the literature and a general consensus on the management of pregnancies at borderline viability, including maternal transfer and consultation, administration of antenatal corticosteroids and magnesium sulfate, fetal heart rate monitoring, and considerations in mode of delivery. Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were searched using the following keywords: extreme prematurity, borderline viability, preterm, pregnancy, antenatal corticosteroids, mode of delivery. The results were then studied, and relevant articles were reviewed. The references of the reviewed studies were also searched, as were documents citing pertinent studies. The evidence was then presented at a consensus meeting, and statements were developed. The content and recommendations were developed by the consensus group from the fields of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Neonatology, Perinatal Nursing, Patient Advocacy, and Ethics. The quality of evidence was rated using criteria described in the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology framework (reference 1). The Board of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada approved the final draft for publication. The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology framework. The interpretation of strong and weak recommendations is described later. The Summary of Findings is available upon request. A multidisciplinary approach should be used in counselling women and families at borderline

  6. The cybernetics of viability: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechansky, Helmut

    2011-10-01

    A three-level approach to viability is developed, considering (1) living systems, (2) a niche, understood as the area within the reach of their actions, and (3) an environment. A systematic analysis of the interrelations between these levels shows that living systems emerge with matter/energy processing systems. These can add controller structures when producing excess energy. A three-sensor controller structure enables a living system to deal with unfavourable and scarce environments. Further evolution of these controller structures offers improved ways to act on niches. Maintaining niches in scarce environments can require technology or economy. So social systems emerge, which are understood as aggregates of living systems. Basic patterns of interactions within social systems are analysed. So the introduction of the notion of the niche into the discussion of viability allows us to explain phenomena ranging from properties of single living systems to societal organization.

  7. The tissue viability nurse and effective documentation.

    PubMed

    Culley, F

    2001-08-01

    The problems associated with inadequate record keeping in tissue viability have been highlighted in a number of related legal proceedings, professional misconduct cases (UKCC 2001a,b), and investigations by the Health Service Commissioner (Ombudsman) (HSC, 2001). Each serves as a reminder of the importance of nursing documentation towards protecting the welfare of patients and clients. A rising tide in clinical negligence (National Audit Office, 2001), and in an increase in the number of nurses removed from the UKCC register (UKCC 2001c), indicate a greater likelihood of nurses (including specialists), being called to provide evidence of standards of care when investigating, predicting and managing clinical risk. This article examines the continued importance of documentary evidence to support such inquiries, clarifying the tissue viability nurse's responsibility in producing accurate and effective records in all aspects of an increasingly expanding role.

  8. Protective effects of curcumin on amyloid-β-induced neuronal oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Huang, Han-Chang; Chang, Ping; Dai, Xue-Ling; Jiang, Zhao-Feng

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the protective effects of curcumin against amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced neuronal damage. Primary rat cortical neurons were cultured with different treatments of Aβ and curcumin. Neuronal morphologies, viability and damage were assessed. Neuronal oxidative stress was assessed, including extracellular hydrogen peroxide and intracellular reactive oxygen species. The abilities of curcumin to scavenge free radicals and to inhibit Aβ aggregation and β-sheeted formation are further assessed and discussed. Curcumin preserves cell viability, which is decreased by Aβ. The results of changed morphology, released Lactate dehydrogenases and cell viability assays indicate that curcumin protects Aβ-induced neuronal damage. Curcumin depresses Aβ-induced up-regulation of neuronal oxidative stress. The treatment sequence impacts the protective effect of curcumin on Aβ-induced neuronal damage. Curcumin shows a more protective effect on neuronal oxidative damage when curcumin was added into cultured neurons not later than Aβ, especially prior to Aβ. The abilities of curcumin to scavenge free radicals and to inhibit the formation of β-sheeted aggregation are both beneficial to depress Aβ-induced oxidative damage. Curcumin prevents neurons from Aβ-induced oxidative damage, implying the therapeutic usage for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease patients.

  9. Investigation of the effects of Chinese medicine on fibroblast viability: implications in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Lau, T W; Chan, Y W; Lau, C P; Chan, C M; Lau, C B S; Fung, K P; Leung, P C; Ho, Y Y

    2007-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus has been a clinical problem for hundreds of years. Over 194 million people suffer from this disease worldwide. Improper control of diabetes may result in diabetic foot ulcer or even amputation. Granulation formation is an important issue essential for ulcer healing. The CRL-7522 fibroblast cell line and primary fibroblasts from a diabetic foot ulcer patient were used to model the wound healing enhancing activities of two clinically efficacious Chinese herbal formulae, Formula 1 (F1) and Formula 2 (F2) and their component herbs. Results showed that the two formulae and four of their component herbs, Radix Astragali, Radix Rehmanniae, Rhizoma Alismatis and Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae significantly enhanced CRL-7522 cell viability. However, these component herbs showed compromised effects on the viability of primary fibroblasts cultured from the ulcerous tissue of a diabetic patient. Interestingly, F1 and F2 enhanced the viability of primary cultured fibroblasts from the diabetic patient even in the face of insulin resistance. These results further support the previously reported clinical efficacies of the two formulae on healing diabetic foot ulcers.

  10. New device for high-throughput viability screening of flow biofilms.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Michael R; Conant, Carolyn G; Ionescu-Zanetti, Cristian; Schwartz, Michael; Matin, A

    2010-07-01

    Control of biofilms requires rapid methods to identify compounds effective against them and to isolate resistance-compromised mutants for identifying genes involved in enhanced biofilm resistance. While rapid screening methods for microtiter plate well ("static") biofilms are available, there are no methods for such screening of continuous flow biofilms ("flow biofilms"). Since the latter biofilms more closely approximate natural biofilms, development of a high-throughput (HTP) method for screening them is desirable. We describe here a new method using a device comprised of microfluidic channels and a distributed pneumatic pump (BioFlux) that provides fluid flow to 96 individual biofilms. This device allows fine control of continuous or intermittent fluid flow over a broad range of flow rates, and the use of a standard well plate format provides compatibility with plate readers. We show that use of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing bacteria, staining with propidium iodide, and measurement of fluorescence with a plate reader permit rapid and accurate determination of biofilm viability. The biofilm viability measured with the plate reader agreed with that determined using plate counts, as well as with the results of fluorescence microscope image analysis. Using BioFlux and the plate reader, we were able to rapidly screen the effects of several antimicrobials on the viability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 flow biofilms.

  11. Hospital Viability during a Pandemic Influenza Outbreak

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    provide protection from the next pandemic. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Hospital Security, Pandemic Influenza , Viability Checklist, 1918 Spanish Flu, 2003 SARS...pandemic influenza : 1918 Spanish Flu, 1957 Asian Flu, 1968 Hong Kong Flu, 2003 SARS epidemic, and 2005 Hurricane Katrina. Understanding the...emergency management events: 1918 , Spanish flu (H1N1); 2003, SARS outbreak; 2005, Hurricane Katrina, and the 2009, Swine flu (H1N1) outbreak, for the

  12. Neonatal Airway Compromise by a Giant Cervicothoracic Venous Haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Janardhan; Coutinho, Anita; Pai, Suresh; Rai, Santosh PV

    2017-01-01

    Haemangiomas are most common non-malignant vascular tumours of infancy. Here, we describe an antenatally detected mass over the neck causing compressive respiratory compromise at birth requiring resuscitative measures at birth. The mass showed increased vascularity on Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography (CECT) with extension upto superior mediastinum. Surgical excision was required following failure to medical measures with steroids and propranolol. Histopathology confirmed it to be a venous haemangioma. This case highlights that these benign lesions may reach large sizes and antenatal detection may help in planning effective delivery and resuscitative measures. PMID:28384953

  13. Periodontics: 8. Periodontal problems associated with compromised anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Patrick J; Irwin, Chris; Mullally, Brian; Allen, Edith; Ziada, Hassan

    2008-01-01

    Periodontal disease can significantly impact on the appearance of the anterior teeth. Prior to any definitive treatment, stabilization of the periodontal condition is a requirement. Treatment options can range from the placement of simple restorations, through orthodontic realignment, to the extraction and replacement of hopeless teeth. Each treatment plan must be individually tailored to the patient and level of periodontal disease, and must include provision for maintenance periodontal therapy. Periodontal diseases may compromise the prognosis of anterior teeth. Management is challenging and clinicians should take into consideration the short and long-term survival in treatment planning.

  14. Compromise budget gives extra funding for HIV programs.

    PubMed

    1999-06-25

    California lawmakers will vote soon on the proposed 1999-2000 State budget that would increase funding for HIV prevention, treatment, and housing programs by $16.9 million. The Senate and Assembly did not originally agree on the appropriation, but the Budget Conference Committee resolved the dispute. Details of the compromise are included. The plan must now go back to both chambers for final action, and the California HIV Advocacy Coalition is optimistic the budget measures will reach the governor's office intact. Governor Gray Davis has promised that the budget will be enacted by the start of the next fiscal year.

  15. Compromise - An effective approach for conceptual aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mistree, Farrokh; Marinopoulos, Stergios; Jackson, david; Shupe, Jon

    1987-01-01

    The Decision Support Problem (DSP) technique for aircraft design is presently demonstrated through the development of a compromise DSP template for the conceptual design of subsonic transport aircraft. System variables are wing span and area, fuselage diameter and length, takeoff weight, and installed thrust. Such system constraints as range and wing loading are represented algebraically using standard subsonic aircraft theory, and economic efficiency is modeled in terms of rates-of-return. The DSP template thus obtained has been tested and validated using the known mission requirements and design constants of the B 727-200 airliner.

  16. Congenital Microstomia in a Neonate with Impending Respiratory Compromise

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Khoa N.; Semenov, Igor; Blasiole, Brian; Robison, Jacob G.; Chi, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Microstomia is the term used to describe a reduction in the size of the oral aperture that is severe enough to compromise quality of life, nutrition, and cosmesis. Few cases of congenital microstomia have been reported as most microstomia cases are due to burn injuries. We are presenting a case of a neonate who was found to be in respiratory distress with severe congenital microstomia from no known cause. This case illustrates the rarity of this type of pathologic anatomy as well as the teamwork and tools necessary to treat these patients. PMID:25610661

  17. Thyroid Hormone Signaling and Cone Photoreceptor Viability.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongwei; Ding, Xi-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) signaling regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In the retina, TH signaling plays a central role in cone opsin expression. TH signaling inhibits S opsin expression, stimulates M opsin expression, and promotes dorsal-ventral opsin patterning. TH signaling has also been associated with cone photoreceptor viability. Treatment with thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3) or induction of high T3 by deleting the hormone-inactivating enzyme type 3 iodothyronine deiodinase (DIO3) causes cone death in mice. This effect is reversed by deletion of the TH receptor (TR) gene. Consistent with the T3 treatment effect, suppressing TH signaling preserves cones in mouse models of retinal degeneration. The regulation of cone survival by TH signaling appears to be independent of its regulatory role in cone opsin expression. The mechanism by which TH signaling regulates cone viability remains to be identified. The current understanding of TH signaling regulation in photoreceptor viability suggests that suppressing TH signaling locally in the retina may represent a novel strategy for retinal degeneration management.

  18. Radiation-induced glioblastoma signaling cascade regulates viability, apoptosis and differentiation of neural stem cells (NSC).

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Vladimir N; Hei, Tom K

    2014-12-01

    Ionizing radiation alone or in combination with chemotherapy is the main treatment modality for brain tumors including glioblastoma. Adult neurons and astrocytes demonstrate substantial radioresistance; in contrast, human neural stem cells (NSC) are highly sensitive to radiation via induction of apoptosis. Irradiation of tumor cells has the potential risk of affecting the viability and function of NSC. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of irradiated glioblastoma cells on viability, proliferation and differentiation potential of non-irradiated (bystander) NSC through radiation-induced signaling cascades. Using media transfer experiments, we demonstrated significant effects of the U87MG glioblastoma secretome after gamma-irradiation on apoptosis in non-irradiated NSC. Addition of anti-TRAIL antibody to the transferred media partially suppressed apoptosis in NSC. Furthermore, we observed a dramatic increase in the production and secretion of IL8, TGFβ1 and IL6 by irradiated glioblastoma cells, which could promote glioblastoma cell survival and modify the effects of death factors in bystander NSC. While differentiation of NSC into neurons and astrocytes occurred efficiently with the corresponding differentiation media, pretreatment of NSC for 8 h with medium from irradiated glioblastoma cells selectively suppressed the differentiation of NSC into neurons, but not into astrocytes. Exogenous IL8 and TGFβ1 increased NSC/NPC survival, but also suppressed neuronal differentiation. On the other hand, IL6 was known to positively affect survival and differentiation of astrocyte progenitors. We established a U87MG neurosphere culture that was substantially enriched by SOX2(+) and CD133(+) glioma stem-like cells (GSC). Gamma-irradiation up-regulated apoptotic death in GSC via the FasL/Fas pathway. Media transfer experiments from irradiated GSC to non-targeted NSC again demonstrated induction of apoptosis and suppression of neuronal differentiation of NSC. In

  19. Radiation-induced glioblastoma signaling cascade regulates viability, apoptosis and differentiation of neural stem cells (NSC)

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Vladimir N.; Hei, Tom K.

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation alone or in combination with chemotherapy is the main treatment modality for brain tumors including glioblastoma. Adult neurons and astrocytes demonstrate substantial radioresistance; in contrast, human neural stem cells (NSC) are highly sensitive to radiation via induction of apoptosis. Irradiation of tumor cells has the potential risk of affecting the viability and function of NSC. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of irradiated glioblastoma cells on viability, proliferation and differentiation potential of non-irradiated (bystander) NSC through radiation-induced signaling cascades. Using media transfer experiments, we demonstrated significant effects of the U87MG glioblastoma secretome after gamma-irradiation on apoptosis in non-irradiated NSC. Addition of anti-TRAIL antibody to the transferred media partially suppressed apoptosis in NSC. Furthermore, we observed a dramatic increase in the production and secretion of IL8, TGFβ1 and IL6 by irradiated glioblastoma cells, which could promote glioblastoma cell survival and modify the effects of death factors in bystander NSC. While differentiation of NSC into neurons and astrocytes occurred efficiently with the corresponding differentiation media, pretreatment of NSC for 8 h with medium from irradiated glioblastoma cells selectively suppressed the differentiation of NSC into neurons, but not into astrocytes. Exogenous IL8 and TGFβ1 increased NSC/NPC survival, but also suppressed neuronal differentiation. On the other hand, IL6 was known to positively affect survival and differentiation of astrocyte progenitors. We established a U87MG neurosphere culture that was substantially enriched by SOX2+ and CD133+ glioma stem-like cells (GSC). Gamma-irradiation up-regulated apoptotic death in GSC via the FasL/Fas pathway. Media transfer experiments from irradiated GSC to non-targeted NSC again demonstrated induction of apoptosis and suppression of neuronal differentiation of NSC. In summary

  20. Prospective evaluation of femoral head viability following femoral neck fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Binkert, B.; Kroop, S.A.; Nepola, I.V.; Grantham, A.S.; Alderson, P.O.

    1984-01-01

    The bone scans of 33 patients (pts) with recent subcapital fractures (fx) of the femur were evaluated prospectively to determine their value in predicting femoral head visability. Each of the 33 pts (ll men, 22 women, age range 30-92) had a pre-operative bone scan within 72 hrs of the fx (23 pts within 24 hrs). Anterior and posterior planar views of both hips and pinhole views (50% of pts) were obtained 2 hrs after administration of Tc-99m HDP. The femoral head was classified as perfused if it showed the same activity as the opposite normal side or if it showed only slightly decreased activity. Femoral heads showing absent activity were classified as nonperfused. Overall, 20 of the 33 pts showed a photopenic femoral head on the side of the fx. Only 2 pts showed increased activity at hte site of the fx. Internal fixation of the fx was performed in 23 pts, 12 of whom had one or more follow-up scans. Five of these 12 pts showed absent femoral head activity on their initial scan, but 2 showed later reperfusion. The other 7 pts showed good perfusion initially, with only 1 later showing decreased femoral head activity. The other 10 pts (7 of whom had absent femoral head activity) had immediate resection of the femoral head and insertion of a Cathcart prosthesis. The results suggest that femoral head activity seen on a bone scan in the immediate post-fx period is not always a reliable indicator of femoral head viability. Decreased femoral head activity may reflect, in part, compromised perfusion secondary to post-traumatic edema, with or without anatomic disruption of the blood supply.

  1. Electromagnetic limits to radiofrequency (RF) neuronal telemetry.

    PubMed

    Diaz, R E; Sebastian, T

    2013-12-18

    The viability of a radiofrequency (RF) telemetry channel for reporting individual neuron activity wirelessly from an embedded antenna to an external receiver is determined. Comparing the power at the transmitting antenna required for the desired Channel Capacity, to the maximum power that this antenna can dissipate in the body without altering or damaging surrounding tissue reveals the severe penalty incurred by miniaturization of the antenna. Using both Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) and thermal damage limits as constraints, and 300 Kbps as the required capacity for telemetry streams 100 ms in duration, the model shows that conventional antennas smaller than 0.1 mm could not support human neuronal telemetry to a remote receiver (1 m away.) Reducing the antenna to 10 microns in size to enable the monitoring of single human neuron signals to a receiver at the surface of the head would require operating with a channel capacity of only 0.3 bps.

  2. Voices of discontent? Conscience, compromise, and assisted dying.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, Richard; Mullock, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    If some form of assisted dying is to be legalised, we are likely to hear voices of discontent, not least from the medical profession and some of its members, who might be expected to provide the service. The profession generally favours a position of opposition, premised on an ethic of 'caring not killing', which might be said to convey its 'professional conscience'. There will, of course, also be individual conscientious objectors. In this article, we initially explore the nature and sources of conscience and we argue that conscience does merit respect. We also recognise that professionals, qua professionals, are bound to serve their patients, some of whom will want (and may be entitled to) that which their doctors do not wish to provide. Reflecting on the different values in issue, we suggest that there is a case for principled compromise which would afford professionals a limited right to conscientiously object, while also protecting patients. We then relate these reflections to assisted dying specifically. In the absence of any definitive steer from the purported integrity of medicine, we suspect that the profession could adopt a neutral stance on this divisive issue. We nevertheless anticipate individual objections if the law does move to embrace assisted dying, and we argue that such objections should be respected, according to the terms of the compromise model we defend. © The Author [2015]. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Telomere shortening and metabolic compromise underlie dystrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alex Chia Yu; Ong, Sang-Ging; LaGory, Edward L.; Kraft, Peggy E.; Giaccia, Amato J.; Wu, Joseph C.; Blau, Helen M.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an incurable X-linked genetic disease that is caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene and affects one in every 3,600 boys. We previously showed that long telomeres protect mice from the lethal cardiac disease seen in humans with the same genetic defect, dystrophin deficiency. By generating the mdx4cv/mTRG2 mouse model with “humanized” telomere lengths, the devastating dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype seen in patients with DMD was recapitulated. Here, we analyze the degenerative sequelae that culminate in heart failure and death in this mouse model. We report progressive telomere shortening in developing mouse cardiomyocytes after postnatal week 1, a time when the cells are no longer dividing. This proliferation-independent telomere shortening is accompanied by an induction of a DNA damage response, evident by p53 activation and increased expression of its target gene p21 in isolated cardiomyocytes. The consequent repression of Pgc1α/β leads to impaired mitochondrial biogenesis, which, in conjunction with the high demands of contraction, leads to increased oxidative stress and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. As a result, cardiomyocyte respiration and ATP output are severely compromised. Importantly, treatment with a mitochondrial-specific antioxidant before the onset of cardiac dysfunction rescues the metabolic defects. These findings provide evidence for a link between short telomere length and metabolic compromise in the etiology of dilated cardiomyopathy in DMD and identify a window of opportunity for preventive interventions. PMID:27799523

  4. Frontostriatal fiber bundle compromise in HIV infection without dementia

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Rosenbloom, Margaret J.; Rohlfing, Torsten; Kemper, Carol A.; Deresinski, Stanley; Sullivan, Edith V.

    2010-01-01

    Background Quantitative fiber tracking derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to determine whether white matter association, projection, or commissural tracts are affected in nondemented individuals with HIV infection and to identify the regional distribution of sparing and impairment of fiber systems. Methods DTI measured fractional anisotropy and diffusivity, quantified separately for longitudinal (λL) diffusivity (index of axonal injury) and transverse (λT) diffusivity (index of myelin injury), in 11 association and projection white matter tracts and six commissural tracts in 29 men and 13 women with HIV infection and 88 healthy, age-matched controls (42 men and 46 women). Results The total group of HIV-infected individuals had higher diffusivity (principally longitudinal) than controls in the posterior sectors of the corpus callosum, internal and external capsules, and superior cingulate bundles. High longitudinal diffusivity, indicative of axonal compromise, was especially prominent in posterior callosal sectors, fornix, and superior cingulate bundle in HIV with AIDS. Unmedicated patients had notably high transverse diffusivity, indicative of myelin compromise, in the occipital forceps, inferior cingulate bundle, and superior longitudinal fasciculus. Pontocerebellar projection fibers were resistant to HIV effects as were commissural fibers coursing through premotor and sensorimotor callosal sectors. Conclusion This quantitative survey of brain fiber tract integrity indicates that even nondemented HIV patients can have neuroradiological evidence for damage to association and commissural tracts. These abnormalities were vulnerable to exacerbation with AIDS and possibly mitigated by HAART. PMID:19730350

  5. Placental Abruption With Delayed Fetal Compromise in Maternal Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Taney, Juliana; Anastasio, Hannah; Paternostro, Amanda; Berghella, Vincenzo; Roman, Amanda

    2017-07-01

    After maternal acetaminophen overdose, fetal fulminant liver failure, stillbirth, neonatal death, or preterm delivery may occur. A 27-year-old woman, gravida 2 para 1, presented at 28 weeks of gestation after unintentional acetaminophen overdose. Four days after ingestion, her laboratory values worsened, including serum aspartate aminotransferase of 5,460 units/L, alanine aminotransferase of 4,936 units/L, and international normalized ratio of 2.9. On day 6 after ingestion, fetal monitoring showed minimal variability with repetitive variable and late decelerations, which prompted cesarean delivery when a hematoma was noted on the maternal placental surface, consistent with placental abruption. The neonate showed no evidence of hepatic dysfunction. Review of the literature suggests that maternal acetaminophen overdose in the second and third trimester is associated with a 5% incidence of fetal compromise (mostly the result of nonreassuring fetal status leading to delivery or stillbirth) occurring within 6 days of ingestion. Maternal acetaminophen overdose can be associated with delayed fetal compromise, suggesting the importance of continued fetal surveillance several days after ingestion.

  6. Orthodontic management of dentition in patients with periodontally compromised dentition

    PubMed Central

    Panwar, Mohinder; Jayan, B.; Arora, Vimal; Singh, Sukhdeep

    2014-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of adult patients are seeking orthodontic treatment to improve their dental appearance. However, special attention must be given to the periodontal status of the adults as periodontal disease and its sequel, such as pathologic migration of anterior teeth, result in esthetic and functional problems. In such adult patients, an interdisciplinary approach often offers the best option for achieving a predictable outcome to solve complex clinical problems. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was carried out on 20 adult patients [mean age = 33.3 ± 4.52 (SD), 11 females and nine males] with periodontally compromised and malaligned dentition. Loe and Silness Gingival Index (GI), Ramfjord's Periodontal Disease Index (PDI) and Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI) were recorded at the start and after completion of treatment. Results: Comparison of GI, PDI and DAI before and after completion of treatment showed statistically significant differences, indicating the relevance of combined orthodontic–periodontic treatment in periodontally compromised dentition (P < 0.01). Conclusion: The outcome of the study showed that an interdisciplinary approach is a simple solution for complex clinical problems arising as a sequel to periodontitis, such as pathological tooth migration, restoring function, esthetics and periodontal health. PMID:24872629

  7. GGGGCC repeat expansion in C9orf72 compromises nucleocytoplasmic transport.

    PubMed

    Freibaum, Brian D; Lu, Yubing; Lopez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Kim, Nam Chul; Almeida, Sandra; Lee, Kyung-Ha; Badders, Nisha; Valentine, Marc; Miller, Bruce L; Wong, Philip C; Petrucelli, Leonard; Kim, Hong Joo; Gao, Fen-Biao; Taylor, J Paul

    2015-09-03

    The GGGGCC (G4C2) repeat expansion in a noncoding region of C9orf72 is the most common cause of sporadic and familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. The basis for pathogenesis is unknown. To elucidate the consequences of G4C2 repeat expansion in a tractable genetic system, we generated transgenic fly lines expressing 8, 28 or 58 G4C2-repeat-containing transcripts that do not have a translation start site (AUG) but contain an open-reading frame for green fluorescent protein to detect repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN) translation. We show that these transgenic animals display dosage-dependent, repeat-length-dependent degeneration in neuronal tissues and RAN translation of dipeptide repeat (DPR) proteins, as observed in patients with C9orf72-related disease. This model was used in a large-scale, unbiased genetic screen, ultimately leading to the identification of 18 genetic modifiers that encode components of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), as well as the machinery that coordinates the export of nuclear RNA and the import of nuclear proteins. Consistent with these results, we found morphological abnormalities in the architecture of the nuclear envelope in cells expressing expanded G4C2 repeats in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we identified a substantial defect in RNA export resulting in retention of RNA in the nuclei of Drosophila cells expressing expanded G4C2 repeats and also in mammalian cells, including aged induced pluripotent stem-cell-derived neurons from patients with C9orf72-related disease. These studies show that a primary consequence of G4C2 repeat expansion is the compromise of nucleocytoplasmic transport through the nuclear pore, revealing a novel mechanism of neurodegeneration.

  8. Reduced Neurite Density in Neuronal Cell Cultures Exposed to Serum of Patients with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wollenhaupt-Aguiar, Bianca; Pfaffenseller, Bianca; Chagas, Vinicius de Saraiva; Castro, Mauro A A; Passos, Ives Cavalcante; Kauer-Sant’Anna, Márcia; Kapczinski, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased inflammatory markers and oxidative stress have been reported in serum among patients with bipolar disorder (BD). The aim of this study is to assess whether biochemical changes in the serum of patients induces neurotoxicity in neuronal cell cultures. Methods: We challenged the retinoic acid-differentiated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells with the serum of BD patients at early and late stages of illness and assessed neurite density and cell viability as neurotoxic endpoints. Results: Decreased neurite density was found in neurons treated with the serum of patients, mostly patients at late stages of illness. Also, neurons challenged with the serum of late-stage patients showed a significant decrease in cell viability. Conclusions: Our findings showed that the serum of patients with bipolar disorder induced a decrease in neurite density and cell viability in neuronal cultures. PMID:27207915

  9. Impact of ZnO and Ag Nanoparticles on Bacterial Growth and Viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, M. S.; Digiovanni, K. A.

    2007-12-01

    Hundreds of consumer products containing nanomaterials are currently available in the U.S., including computers, clothing, cosmetics, sports equipment, medical devices and product packaging. Metallic nanoparticles can be embedded in or coated on product surfaces to provide antimicrobial, deodorizing, and stain- resistant properties. Although these products have the potential to provide significant benefit to the user, the impact of these products on the environment remains largely unknown. The purpose of this project is to study the effect of metallic nanoparticles released to the environment on bacterial growth and viability. Inhibition of bacterial growth was tested by adding doses of suspended ZnO and Ag nanoparticles into luria broth prior to inoculation of Escherichia coli cells. ZnO particles (approximately 40 nm) were obtained commercially and Ag particles (12-14 nm) were fabricated by reduction of silver nitrate with sodium borohydride. Toxicity assays were performed to test the viability of E. coli cells exposed to both ZnO and Ag nanoparticles using the LIVE/DEAD BacLight bacterial viability kit (Invitrogen). Live cells stain green whereas cells with compromised membranes that are considered dead or dying stain red. Cells were first grown, stained, and exposed to varying doses of metallic nanoparticles, and then bacterial viability was measured hourly using fluorescence microscopy. Results indicate that both ZnO and Ag nanoparticles inhibit the growth of E. coli in liquid media. Preliminary results from toxicity assays confirm the toxic effect of ZnO and Ag nanoparticles on active cell cultures. Calculated death rates resulting from analyses of toxicity studies will be presented.

  10. Echinococcus metacestode: in search of viability markers

    PubMed Central

    Gottstein, Bruno; Wang, Junhua; Blagosklonov, Oleg; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Millon, Laurence; Vuitton, Dominique A.; Müller, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that most humans infected with Echinococcus spp. exhibit resistance to disease. When infection leads to disease, the parasite is partially controlled by host immunity: in case of immunocompetence, the normal alveolar echinococcosis (AE) or cystic echinococcosis (CE) situation, the metacestode grows slowly, and first clinical signs appear years after infection; in case of impaired immunity (AIDS; other immunodeficiencies), uncontrolled proliferation of the metacestode leads to rapidly progressing disease. Assessing Echinococcus multilocularis viability in vivo following therapeutic interventions in AE patients may be of tremendous benefit when compared with the invasive procedures used to perform biopsies. Current options are F18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), which visualizes periparasitic inflammation due to the metabolic activity of the metacestode, and measurement of antibodies against recEm18, a viability-associated protein, that rapidly regresses upon metacestode inactivation. For Echinococcus granulosus, similar prognosis-associated follow-up parameters are still lacking but a few candidates may be listed. Other possible markers include functional and diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and measurement of products from the parasite (circulating antigens or DNA), and from the host (inflammation markers, cytokines, or chemokines). Even though some of them have been promising in pilot studies, none has been properly validated in an appropriate number of patients until now to be recommended for further use in clinical settings. There is therefore still a need to develop reliable tools for improved viability assessment to provide the sufficient information needed to reliably withdraw anti-parasite benzimidazole chemotherapy, and a basis for the development of new alternative therapeutic tools. PMID:25429386

  11. Chondrocyte Viability After a Simulated Blast Exposure.

    PubMed

    Shaw, K Aaron; Johnson, Peter C; Williams, David; Zumbrun, Steven D; Topolski, Richard; Cameron, Craig D

    2017-07-01

    The effects of blast exposure have gained increasing interest in the military medical community with their continued occurrence on the battlefield. The impact of the direct and indirect energy imparted from blasts to hollow viscera, as well as closed head injuries, have been well studied. However, the injury to articular cartilage has not been investigated, despite previous correlations regarding the development of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to assess the degree of injury to articular chondrocytes after exposure to a simulated blast overpressure wave. Fresh juvenile porcine stifle joints were subjected to a simulated blast overpressure wave utilizing a custom fabricated blast simulator with compressed gases, within the reported range of observed battlefield blasts. Chondrocyte viability was assessed with live/dead staining using ethidium homodimer-2 and calcien acetoxymethylester stain and confocal laser scanning microscopy, calculated as a ratio of dead chondrocytes to live chondrocytes. Testing was performed at time points of 2, 4, and 8 hours after blast exposure and was compared with unblasted control samples. Chondrocyte viability decreased after exposure to a blast overpressure wave when compared with control samples. The amount of death was greater closer to the articular surface and dissipated with increasing tissue depth. Chondrocyte death increased with time after exposure. Chondrocyte death is present after exposure to a simulated blast wave. There is an inverse relationship between chondrocyte viability and the depth from the articular surface. Additional studies are needed to further characterize dose and time effects of blast exposure. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  12. [Nicotinamide influence on pancreatic cells viability].

    PubMed

    Kuchmerovs'ka, T M; Donchenko, H V; Tykhonenko, T M; Huzyk, M M; Stavniĭchuk, R V; Ianits'ka, L V; Stepanenko, S P; Klymenko, A P

    2012-01-01

    The study was undertaken to investigate the modulating effect of nicotinamide (NAm) in different concentrations and under different glucose concentrations on the viability and oxidative stress induced by streptozotocin (STZ, 5 mmol/l) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 100 micromol/l) on isolated rat pancreatic cells of the Langerhans islets in vitro. Cell viability did not depend on the concentration of glucose in the range of 5-20 mmol/l, and in subsequent studies we used glucose in concentration of 10 mmol/l to protect cells against its hypo- and hyperglycemic action. Cytoprotective effect of NAm in concentrations from 5 to 20 mmol/l on cells survival was the same. It was found that the destructive action of STZ and H2O2 during 24 hours on isolated cells of the pancreas resulted in the significant cell death. It was revealed that NAm in concentration of 5 mmol/l not only had cytoprotective effects against STZ and H2O2 but also partially reduced the level of oxidative stress in the investigated cells induced by these compounds. High concentration of NAm, 35 mmol/l, causes cytotoxic effect on the viability of pancreatic islet cells and increase of oxidative stress induced by STZ and H2O2. Most likely these effects could be associated with direct modulatory action of NAm on important effector mechanisms involved in cell death, including PARP-dependent processes, or/and indirectly, through metabolic and antioxidant effects of the compound.

  13. Rapid onsite assessment of spore viability.

    SciTech Connect

    Branda, Steven; Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Gaucher, Sara P.; Jokerst, Amanda S.

    2005-12-01

    This one year LDRD addresses problems of threat assessment and restoration of facilities following a bioterror incident like the incident that closed down mail facilities in late 2001. Facilities that are contaminated with pathogenic spores such as B. anthracis spores must be shut down while they are treated with a sporicidal agent and the effectiveness of the treatment is ascertained. This process involves measuring the viability of spore test strips, laid out in a grid throughout the facility; the CDC accepted methodologies require transporting the samples to a laboratory and carrying out a 48 hr outgrowth experiment. We proposed developing a technique that will ultimately lead to a fieldable microfluidic device that can rapidly assess (ideally less than 30 min) spore viability and effectiveness of sporicidal treatment, returning facilities to use in hours not days. The proposed method will determine viability of spores by detecting early protein synthesis after chemical germination. During this year, we established the feasibility of this approach and gathered preliminary results that should fuel a future more comprehensive effort. Such a proposal is currently under review with the NIH. Proteomic signatures of Bacillus spores and vegetative cells were assessed by both slab gel electrophoresis as well as microchip based gel electrophoresis employing sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection. The conditions for germination using a number of chemical germinants were evaluated and optimized and the time course of protein synthesis was ascertained. Microseparations were carried out using both viable spores and spores inactivated by two different methods. A select number of the early synthesis proteins were digested into peptides for analysis by mass spectrometry.

  14. Depletion of hCINAP by RNA interference causes defects in Cajal body formation, histone transcription, and cell viability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinfang; Zhang, Feiyun; Zheng, Xiaofeng

    2010-06-01

    hCINAP is a highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed protein in eukaryotic organisms and its overexpression decreases the average number of Cajal bodies (CBs) with diverse nuclear functions. Here, we report that hCINAP is associated with important components of CBs. Depletion of hCINAP by RNA interference causes defects in CB formation and disrupts subcellular localizations of its components including coilin, survival motor neurons protein, spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins, and nuclear protein ataxia-telangiectasia. Moreover, knockdown of hCINAP expression results in marked reduction of histone transcription, lower levels of U small nuclear RNAs (U1, U2, U4, and U5), and a loss of cell viability. Detection of increased caspase-3 activities in hCINAP-depleted cells indicate that apoptosis is one of the reasons for the loss of viability. Altogether, these data suggest that hCINAP is essential for the formation of canonical CBs, histone transcription, and cell viability.

  15. 7 CFR 3.19 - Standards for the compromise of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Standards for the compromise of claims. 3.19 Section 3.19 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DEBT MANAGEMENT Standards for the Administrative Collection and Compromise of Claims § 3.19 Standards for the compromise of claims. An agency shall...

  16. Perceived Career Compromise, Affect and Work-Related Satisfaction in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaousides, Theodore; Jome, LaRae

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of career compromise on positive affect (PA), negative affect (NA), and work-related satisfaction (WRS). Career compromise refers to the modification of occupational preferences under pressing external circumstances [Gottfredson, L. S. (1981). Circumscription and compromise: A…

  17. Compromises along the Way: Balancing Speed To Market with Sustainability while Delivering Knowledge Management Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyman, Martha K.

    This paper will discuss some of the compromises, and the path to those compromises, that must be made while implementing a successful knowledge management program within a for-profit enterprise. Specifically the following compromises are addressed: (1) manage knowledge where it is created, but do that within a global system; (2) no single scope…

  18. 38 CFR 1.903 - Settlement, waiver, or compromise under other statutory or regulatory authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... compromise under other statutory or regulatory authority. 1.903 Section 1.903 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Standards for Collection, Compromise, Suspension... Settlement, waiver, or compromise under other statutory or regulatory authority. Nothing in §§ 1.900...

  19. Perceived Career Compromise, Affect and Work-Related Satisfaction in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaousides, Theodore; Jome, LaRae

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of career compromise on positive affect (PA), negative affect (NA), and work-related satisfaction (WRS). Career compromise refers to the modification of occupational preferences under pressing external circumstances [Gottfredson, L. S. (1981). Circumscription and compromise: A…

  20. 46 CFR 502.604 - Compromise of penalties: Relation to assessment proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compromise of penalties: Relation to assessment... PROVISIONS RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Compromise, Assessment, Mitigation, Settlement, and Collection of Civil Penalties § 502.604 Compromise of penalties: Relation to assessment proceedings. (a) Scope. Except...

  1. 32 CFR 842.124 - Waiver and compromise of United States interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... damages. (c) A compromise can be made upon written request from the injured party or the injured party's... CLAIMS AND LITIGATION ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS Hospital Recovery Claims (42 U.S.C. 2651-2653) § 842.124 Waiver and compromise of United States interest. Waivers and compromises of government claims can be...

  2. Quintessence reconstructed: New constraints and tracker viability

    SciTech Connect

    Sahlen, Martin; Liddle, Andrew R.; Parkinson, David

    2007-01-15

    We update and extend our previous work reconstructing the potential of a quintessence field from current observational data. We extend the cosmological data set to include new supernova data, plus information from the cosmic microwave background and from baryon acoustic oscillations. We extend the modeling by considering Pade approximant expansions as well as Taylor series, and by using observations to assess the viability of the tracker hypothesis. We find that parameter constraints have improved by a factor of 2, with a strengthening of the preference of the cosmological constant over evolving quintessence models. Present data show some signs, though inconclusive, of favoring tracker models over nontracker models under our assumptions.

  3. Fatigue reversibly reduced cortical and hippocampal dendritic spines concurrent with compromise of motor endurance and spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Chen, J-R; Wang, T-J; Huang, H-Y; Chen, L-J; Huang, Y-S; Wang, Y-J; Tseng, G-F

    2009-07-21

    Fatigue could be induced following forced exercise, sickness, heat stroke or sleep disturbance and impaired brain-related functions such as concentration, attention and memory. Here we investigated whether fatigue altered the dendrites of central neurons. Central fatigue was induced by housing rats in cage with 1.5-cm deep water for 1-5 days. Three days of sleep deprivation seriously compromised rats' performance in weight-loaded forced swimming and spatial learning tests, and 5 days of treatment worsened it further. Combinations of intracellular dye injection and three-dimensional analysis revealed that dendritic spines on retrograde tracer-identified corticospinal neurons and Cornu Ammonis (CA)1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons were significantly reduced while the shape or length of the dendritic arbors was not altered. Three days of rest restored the spine loss and the degraded spatial learning and weight-loaded forced swimming performances to control levels. In conclusion, although we could not rule out additional non-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress, the apparent fatigue induced following a few days of sleep deprivation could change brain structurally and functionally and the effects were reversible with a few days of rest.

  4. Ran-dependent TPX2 activation promotes acentrosomal microtubule nucleation in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Shin; Chen, Yi-Ju; Huang, Yung-An; Hsieh, Bing-Yuan; Chiu, Ho-Chieh; Kao, Pei-Ying; Chao, Chih-Yuan; Hwang, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is essential for the formation of morphologically appropriate neurons. The existence of the acentrosomal MT organizing center in neurons has been proposed but its identity remained elusive. Here we provide evidence showing that TPX2 is an important component of this acentrosomal MT organizing center. First, neurite elongation is compromised in TPX2-depleted neurons. In addition, TPX2 localizes to the centrosome and along the neurite shaft bound to MTs. Depleting TPX2 decreases MT formation frequency specifically at the tip and the base of the neurite, and these correlate precisely with the regions where active GTP-bound Ran proteins are enriched. Furthermore, overexpressing the downstream effector of Ran, importin, compromises MT formation and neuronal morphogenesis. Finally, applying a Ran-importin signaling interfering compound phenocopies the effect of TPX2 depletion on MT dynamics. Together, these data suggest a model in which Ran-dependent TPX2 activation promotes acentrosomal MT nucleation in neurons. PMID:28205572

  5. Glutathione synthesis is compromised in erythrocytes from individuals with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Devin; Ly, Judy; Chi, Po-Ting; Daliva, John; Nguyen, Truongson; Soofer, Charleen; Chen, Yung C.; Lagman, Minette; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated that the levels of enzymes responsible for the synthesis of glutathione (GSH) such as glutathione synthase (GSS), glutamate-cysteine ligase-catalytic subunit (GCLC), and glutathione reductase (GSR) were significantly reduced in the red blood cells (RBCs) isolated from individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and this reduction correlated with decreased levels of intracellular GSH. GSH content in RBCs can be used as a marker for increased overall oxidative stress and immune dysfunctions caused by HIV infection. Our data supports our hypothesis that compromised levels of GSH in HIV infected individuals’ is due to decreased levels of GSH-synthetic enzymes. The role of GSH in combating oxidative stress and improving the functions of immune cells in HIV patients’ indicates the benefit of an antioxidant supplement which can reduce the cellular damage and promote the functions of immune cells. PMID:24782776

  6. Glutathione synthesis is compromised in erythrocytes from individuals with HIV.

    PubMed

    Morris, Devin; Ly, Judy; Chi, Po-Ting; Daliva, John; Nguyen, Truongson; Soofer, Charleen; Chen, Yung C; Lagman, Minette; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated that the levels of enzymes responsible for the synthesis of glutathione (GSH) such as glutathione synthase (GSS), glutamate-cysteine ligase-catalytic subunit (GCLC), and glutathione reductase (GSR) were significantly reduced in the red blood cells (RBCs) isolated from individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and this reduction correlated with decreased levels of intracellular GSH. GSH content in RBCs can be used as a marker for increased overall oxidative stress and immune dysfunctions caused by HIV infection. Our data supports our hypothesis that compromised levels of GSH in HIV infected individuals' is due to decreased levels of GSH-synthetic enzymes. The role of GSH in combating oxidative stress and improving the functions of immune cells in HIV patients' indicates the benefit of an antioxidant supplement which can reduce the cellular damage and promote the functions of immune cells.

  7. Neglecting legumes has compromised human health and sustainable food production.

    PubMed

    Foyer, Christine H; Lam, Hon-Ming; Nguyen, Henry T; Siddique, Kadambot H M; Varshney, Rajeev K; Colmer, Timothy D; Cowling, Wallace; Bramley, Helen; Mori, Trevor A; Hodgson, Jonathan M; Cooper, James W; Miller, Anthony J; Kunert, Karl; Vorster, Juan; Cullis, Christopher; Ozga, Jocelyn A; Wahlqvist, Mark L; Liang, Yan; Shou, Huixia; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jingquan; Fodor, Nandor; Kaiser, Brent N; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Valliyodan, Babu; Considine, Michael J

    2016-08-02

    The United Nations declared 2016 as the International Year of Pulses (grain legumes) under the banner 'nutritious seeds for a sustainable future'. A second green revolution is required to ensure food and nutritional security in the face of global climate change. Grain legumes provide an unparalleled solution to this problem because of their inherent capacity for symbiotic atmospheric nitrogen fixation, which provides economically sustainable advantages for farming. In addition, a legume-rich diet has health benefits for humans and livestock alike. However, grain legumes form only a minor part of most current human diets, and legume crops are greatly under-used. Food security and soil fertility could be significantly improved by greater grain legume usage and increased improvement of a range of grain legumes. The current lack of coordinated focus on grain legumes has compromised human health, nutritional security and sustainable food production.

  8. Pneumocystis carinii, Toxoplasma gondii, Cytomegalovirus and the Compromised Host

    PubMed Central

    Ryning, Frank W.; Mills, John

    1979-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii and Toxoplasma gondii are the two major parasitic protozoan pathogens in the immunocompromised host. Both organisms cause latent infection in humans and many animals. Cats are the definitive hosts for toxoplasmosis; the animal vector for pneumocystis (if any) has not been defined. Toxoplasma is an obligate intracellular parasite, whereas the available evidence suggests that Pneumocystis carinii exists primarily extracellularly. In compromised hosts, pneumocystis infection usually involves only lungs, whereas toxoplasma causes a generalized infection with encephalitis being the principal clinical manifestation. Both types of infection are treated with combinations of folate antagonists (trimethoprim or pyrimethamine with sulfonamide). Both parasites are associated with cytomegalovirus infection in immunosuppressed hosts, an association which may be due to symbiosis between parasites, or to an additive immunosuppressive effect of dual infection on the hosts. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9. PMID:217182

  9. [Amputation or reconstruction of a circulatory compromised severely injured extremity?].

    PubMed

    Høiness, P; Røise, O

    1999-11-20

    18 patients treated with primary or secondary amputations after severe lower limb open fractures were studied. All limbs had clinical signs of a compromised circulation at the primary evaluation. The various injuries are described and discussed with respect to the general guidelines for primary amputation. The Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) and Nerve, Ischemia, Soft tissues, Skeletal, Shock, Age (NISSSA) scores were calculated. In view of the described injuries, primary amputation was indicated in ten patients according to the general recommendations, 11 patients according to NISSSA and 15 patients according to MESS. Delayed amputation leads t a significantly (p = 0.005) higher number of operative procedures than early amputation (9.2 vs. 2.9 treatments). The decision of whether to amputate or not should be based on sound clinical judgement, but injury scores such as MESS and NISSSA may be helpful.

  10. Glycan Side Reaction May Compromise ETD-Based Glycopeptide Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darula, Zsuzsanna; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.

    2014-06-01

    Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) is one of the most frequently used buffer ingredients. Among other things, it is recommended and is usually used for lectin-based affinity enrichment of glycopeptides. Here we report that sialic acid, a common `capping' unit in both N- and O-linked glycans may react with this chemical, and this side reaction may compromise glycopeptide identification when ETD spectra are the only MS/MS data used in the database search. We show that the modification may alter N- as well as O-linked glycans, the Tris-derivative is still prone to fragmentation both in `beam-type' CID (HCD) and ETD experiments, at the same time—since the acidic carboxyl group was `neutralized'—it will display a different retention time than its unmodified counterpart. We also suggest solutions that—when incorporated into existing search engines—may significantly improve the reliability of glycopeptide assignments.

  11. Thiamine absorption is not compromised in folate-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Walzem, R.L.; Clifford, A.J.

    1988-11-01

    Thiamine absorption and excretion were assessed in rats with severe folate deficiency (FD) by determining the fate of oral TH-labeled and intravenous UC-labeled thiamine over a 6-h test period. Thiamine status was evaluated in these same rats by measuring transketolase activity levels of blood before (TKA) and after (TPPE) addition of thiamine pyrophosphate to the incubation mixture of the assay procedure. Two additional experiments assessed active transport of thiamine and the effect of dietary succinylsulfathiazole (SST) on TKA and TPPE in rats with moderate FD. Intestinal absorption in general and thiamine absorption in particular and thiamine status were unaltered in rats with severe FD. Inanition associated with severe FD may impair thiamine status. Thiamine absorption by active transport was not compromised in FD, and dietary succinylsulfathiazole did not affect thiamine status.

  12. Food irradiation: Special solutions for the immuno-compromised

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohácsi-Farkas, Csilla

    2016-12-01

    Safety of food is particularly important for immuno-compromised patients, because these people are vulnerable to all sorts of infectious complications and foodborne pathogens as well, and even organisms normally considered non-pathogenic may cause problems. According to the guidelines published by the FDA, immunocompromised patients have to avoid high-risk foods, and advised to consume only pasteurized juice, milk or cheese, and well-cooked eggs, poultry, meat and fish. In the frame of an IAEA CRP the objective was to develop, in collaborations with the healthcare community, the use of irradiation to increase the variety, availability and acceptability of foods for immunocompromised, for example irradiated fresh produce (fruits, vegetables, salads) and ready-to-eat meals. Further aim was to widen the acceptance of irradiated foods by the healthcare and regulatory communities.

  13. Protecting Privacy of Shared Epidemiologic Data without Compromising Analysis Potential

    PubMed Central

    Cologne, John; Grant, Eric J.; Nakashima, Eiji; Chen, Yun; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Katayama, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Ensuring privacy of research subjects when epidemiologic data are shared with outside collaborators involves masking (modifying) the data, but overmasking can compromise utility (analysis potential). Methods of statistical disclosure control for protecting privacy may be impractical for individual researchers involved in small-scale collaborations. Methods. We investigated a simple approach based on measures of disclosure risk and analytical utility that are straightforward for epidemiologic researchers to derive. The method is illustrated using data from the Japanese Atomic-bomb Survivor population. Results. Masking by modest rounding did not adequately enhance security but rounding to remove several digits of relative accuracy effectively reduced the risk of identification without substantially reducing utility. Grouping or adding random noise led to noticeable bias. Conclusions. When sharing epidemiologic data, it is recommended that masking be performed using rounding. Specific treatment should be determined separately in individual situations after consideration of the disclosure risks and analysis needs. PMID:22505949

  14. Protecting Privacy of Shared Epidemiologic Data without Compromising Analysis Potential

    DOE PAGES

    Cologne, John; Grant, Eric J.; Nakashima, Eiji; ...

    2012-01-01

    Objective . Ensuring privacy of research subjects when epidemiologic data are shared with outside collaborators involves masking (modifying) the data, but overmasking can compromise utility (analysis potential). Methods of statistical disclosure control for protecting privacy may be impractical for individual researchers involved in small-scale collaborations. Methods . We investigated a simple approach based on measures of disclosure risk and analytical utility that are straightforward for epidemiologic researchers to derive. The method is illustrated using data from the Japanese Atomic-bomb Survivor population. Results . Masking by modest rounding did not adequately enhance security but rounding to remove several digits ofmore » relative accuracy effectively reduced the risk of identification without substantially reducing utility. Grouping or adding random noise led to noticeable bias. Conclusions . When sharing epidemiologic data, it is recommended that masking be performed using rounding. Specific treatment should be determined separately in individual situations after consideration of the disclosure risks and analysis needs.« less

  15. A compromised liver alters polychlorinated biphenyl-mediated toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wahlang, Banrida; Perkins, Jordan T; Petriello, Michael C; Hoffman, Jessie B; Stromberg, Arnold J; Hennig, Bernhard

    2017-02-02

    Exposure to environmental toxicants namely polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is correlated with multiple health disorders including liver and cardiovascular diseases. The liver is important for both xenobiotic and endobiotic metabolism. However, the responses of an injured liver to subsequent environmental insults has not been investigated. The current study aims to evaluate the role of a compromised liver in PCB-induced toxicity and define the implications on overall body homeostasis. Male C57Bl/6 mice were fed either an amino acid control diet (CD) or a methionine-choline deficient diet (MCD) during the 12-week study. Mice were subsequently exposed to either PCB126 (4.9mg/kg) or the PCB mixture, Arcolor1260 (20mg/kg) and analyzed for inflammatory, calorimetry and metabolic parameters. Consistent with the literature, MCD diet-fed mice demonstrated steatosis, indicative of a compromised liver. Mice fed the MCD-diet and subsequently exposed to PCB126 showed observable wasting syndrome leading to mortality. PCB126 and Aroclor1260 exposure worsened hepatic fibrosis exhibited by the MCD groups. Interestingly, PCB126 but not Aroclor1260 induced steatosis and inflammation in CD-fed mice. Mice with liver injury and subsequently exposed to PCBs also manifested metabolic disturbances due to alterations in hepatic gene expression. Furthermore, PCB exposure in MCD-fed mice led to extra-hepatic toxicity such as upregulated circulating inflammatory biomarkers, implicating endothelial cell dysfunction. Taken together, these results indicate that environmental pollution can exacerbate toxicity caused by diet-induced liver injury which may be partially due to dysfunctional energy homeostasis. This is relevant to PCB-exposed human cohorts who suffer from alcohol or diet-induced fatty liver diseases.

  16. Blood–Retinal Barrier Compromise and Endogenous Staphylococcus aureus Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Coburn, Phillip S.; Wiskur, Brandt J.; Astley, Roger A.; Callegan, Michelle C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that blood–retinal barrier compromise is associated with the development of endogenous Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis. Methods To compromise the blood–retinal barrier in vivo, streptozotocin-induced diabetes was induced in C57BL/6J mice for 1, 3, or 5 months. Diabetic and age-matched nondiabetic mice were intravenously injected with 108 colony-forming units (cfu) of S. aureus, a common cause of endogenous endophthalmitis in diabetics. After 4 days post infection, electroretinography, histology, and bacterial counts were performed. Staphylococcus aureus–induced alterations in in vitro retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell barrier structure and function were assessed by anti–ZO-1 immunohistochemistry, FITC-dextran conjugate diffusion, and bacterial transmigration assays. Results We observed one bilateral infection in a control, nondiabetic animal (mean = 1.54 × 103 ± 1.78 × 102 cfu/eye, 7% incidence). Among the 1-month diabetic mice, we observed culture-confirmed unilateral infections in two animals (mean = 5.54 × 102 ± 7.09 × 102 cfu/eye, 12% incidence). Among the 3-month diabetic mice, infections were observed in 11 animals, three with bilateral infections (mean = 2.67 × 102 ± 2.49 × 102 cfu/eye, 58% incidence). Among the 5-month diabetic mice, we observed infections in five animals (mean = 7.88 × 102 ± 1.08 × 103 cfu/eye, 33% incidence). In vitro, S. aureus infection reduced ZO-1 immunostaining and disrupted the barrier function of cultured RPE cells, resulting in diffusion of fluorophore-conjugated dextrans and transmigration of live bacteria across a permeabilized RPE barrier. Conclusions Taken together, these results indicated that S. aureus is capable of inducing blood–retinal barrier permeability and causing endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis in normal and diabetic animals. PMID:26559476

  17. Treatment of Lung Cancer in Medically Compromised Patients.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jeffrey; Wheatley-Price, Paul; Feliciano, Josephine Louella

    2016-01-01

    Outcomes for patients with lung cancer have been improved substantially through the integration of surgery, radiation, and systemic therapy for patients with early-stage disease. Meanwhile, advances in our understanding of molecular mechanisms have substantially advanced our treatment of patients with advanced lung cancer through the introduction of targeted therapies, immune approaches, improvements in chemotherapy, and better supportive care. However, the majority of these advances have occurred among patients with good functional status, normal organ function, and with the social and economic support systems to be able to benefit most from these treatments. The aim of this article is to bring greater attention to management of lung cancer in patients who are medically compromised, which remains a major barrier to care delivery. Impaired performance status is associated with poor outcomes and correlates with the high prevalence of cachexia among patients with advanced lung cancer. CT imaging is emerging as a research tool to quantify muscle loss in patients with cancer, and new therapeutics are on the horizon that may provide important adjunctive therapy in the future. The benefits of cancer therapy for patients with organ failure are poorly understood because of their exclusion from clinical trials. The availability of targeted therapy and immunotherapy may provide alternatives that may be easier to deliver in this population, but clinical trials of these new agents in this population are vital. Patients with lower socioeconomic status are disproportionately affected by lung cancer because of higher rates of tobacco addiction and the impact of socioeconomic status on delay in diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes. For all patients who are medically compromised with lung cancer, multidisciplinary approaches are particularly needed to evaluate these patients and to incorporate rapidly changing therapeutics to improve outcomes.

  18. Cerebral autoregulation is compromised during simulated fluctuations in gravitational stress.

    PubMed

    Brown, Clive M; Dütsch, Matthias; Ohring, Susanne; Neundörfer, Bernhard; Hilz, Max J

    2004-03-01

    Gravity places considerable stress on the cardiovascular system but cerebral autoregulation usually protects the cerebral blood vessels from fluctuations in blood pressure. However, in conditions such as those encountered on board a high-performance aircraft, the gravitational stress is constantly changing and might compromise cerebral autoregulation. In this study we assessed the effect of oscillating orthostatic stress on cerebral autoregulation. Sixteen (eight male) healthy subjects [aged 27 (1) years] were exposed to steady-state lower body negative pressure (LBNP) at -15 and -40 mmHg and then to oscillating LBNP at the same pressures. The oscillatory LBNP was applied at 0.1 and 0.2 Hz. We made continuous recordings of RR-interval, blood pressure, cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV), respiratory frequency and end-tidal CO(2). Oscillations in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and CBFV were assessed by autoregressive spectral analysis. Respiration was paced at 0.25 Hz to avoid interference from breathing. Steady-state LBNP at -40 mmHg significantly increased low-frequency (LF, 0.03-0.14 Hz) powers of MAP ( P<0.01) but not of CBFV. Oscillatory 0.1 Hz LBNP (0 to -40 mmHg) significantly increased the LF power of MAP to a similar level as steady-state LBNP but also resulted in a significant increase in the LF power of CBFV ( P<0.01). Oscillatory LBNP at 0.2 Hz induced oscillations in MAP and CBFV at 0.2 Hz. Cross-spectral analysis showed that the transfer of LBNP-induced oscillations in MAP onto the CBFV was significantly greater at 0.2 Hz than at 0.1 Hz ( P<0.01). These results show that the ability of the cerebral vessels to modulate fluctuations in blood pressure is compromised during oscillatory compared with constant gravitational stress. Furthermore, this effect seems to be more pronounced at higher frequencies of oscillatory stress.

  19. Mitigating Reptile Road Mortality: Fence Failures Compromise Ecopassage Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Baxter-Gilbert, James H.; Riley, Julia L.; Lesbarrères, David; Litzgus, Jacqueline D.

    2015-01-01

    Roadways pose serious threats to animal populations. The installation of roadway mitigation measures is becoming increasingly common, yet studies that rigorously evaluate the effectiveness of these conservation tools remain rare. A highway expansion project in Ontario, Canada included exclusion fencing and ecopassages as mitigation measures designed to offset detrimental effects to one of the most imperial groups of vertebrates, reptiles. Taking a multispecies approach, we used a Before-After-Control-Impact study design to compare reptile abundance on the highway before and after mitigation at an Impact site and a Control site from 1 May to 31 August in 2012 and 2013. During this time, radio telemetry, wildlife cameras, and an automated PIT-tag reading system were used to monitor reptile movements and use of ecopassages. Additionally, a willingness to utilize experiment was conducted to quantify turtle behavioral responses to ecopassages. We found no difference in abundance of turtles on the road between the un-mitigated and mitigated highways, and an increase in the percentage of both snakes and turtles detected dead on the road post-mitigation, suggesting that the fencing was not effective. Although ecopassages were used by reptiles, the number of crossings through ecopassages was lower than road-surface crossings. Furthermore, turtle willingness to use ecopassages was lower than that reported in previous arena studies, suggesting that effectiveness of ecopassages may be compromised when alternative crossing options are available (e.g., through holes in exclusion structures). Our rigorous evaluation of reptile roadway mitigation demonstrated that when exclusion structures fail, the effectiveness of population connectivity structures is compromised. Our project emphasizes the need to design mitigation measures with the biology and behavior of the target species in mind, to implement mitigation designs in a rigorous fashion, and quantitatively evaluate road

  20. Neurotoxic effects of indocyanine green -cerebellar granule cell culture viability study

    PubMed Central

    Toczylowska, Beata; Zieminska, Elzbieta; Goch, Grazyna; Milej, Daniel; Gerega, Anna; Liebert, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine neurotoxicity indocyanine green (ICG). We assessed viability of primary cerebellar granule cell culture (CGC) exposed to ICG to test two mechanisms that could be the first triggers causing neuronal toxicity: imbalance in calcium homeostasis and the degree of oligomerization of ICG molecules. We have observed this imbalance in CGC after exposure to 75-125μΜ ICG and dose and application sequence dependent protective effect of Gadovist on surviving neurons in vitro when used with ICG. Spectroscopic studies suggest the major cause of toxicity of the ICG is connected with oligomers formation. ICG at concentration of 25 μM (which is about 4 times higher than the highest concentration of ICG in the brain applied in in-vivo human studies) is not neurotoxic in the cell culture. PMID:24688815

  1. Population Viability Analysis of Riverine Fishes

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, P.; Chandler, J.; Jager, H.I.; Lepla, K.; Van Winkle, W.

    1999-04-12

    Many utilities face conflkts between two goals: cost-efficient hydropower generation and protecting riverine fishes. Research to develop ecological simulation tools that can evaluate alternative mitigation strategies in terms of their benefits to fish populations is vital to informed decision-making. In this paper, we describe our approach to population viability analysis of riverine fishes in general and Snake River white sturgeon in particular. We are finding that the individual-based modeling approach used in previous in-stream flow applications is well suited to addressing questions about the viability of species of concern for several reasons. Chief among these are: (1) the abiIity to represent the effects of individual variation in life history characteristics on predicted population viabili~, (2) the flexibili~ needed to quanti~ the ecological benefits of alternative flow management options by representing spatial and temporal variation in flow and temperaturty and (3) the flexibility needed to quantifi the ecological benefits of non-flow related manipulations (i.e., passage, screening and hatchery supplementation).

  2. Artificial evolution by viability rather than competition.

    PubMed

    Maesani, Andrea; Fernando, Pradeep Ruben; Floreano, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary algorithms are widespread heuristic methods inspired by natural evolution to solve difficult problems for which analytical approaches are not suitable. In many domains experimenters are not only interested in discovering optimal solutions, but also in finding the largest number of different solutions satisfying minimal requirements. However, the formulation of an effective performance measure describing these requirements, also known as fitness function, represents a major challenge. The difficulty of combining and weighting multiple problem objectives and constraints of possibly varying nature and scale into a single fitness function often leads to unsatisfactory solutions. Furthermore, selective reproduction of the fittest solutions, which is inspired by competition-based selection in nature, leads to loss of diversity within the evolving population and premature convergence of the algorithm, hindering the discovery of many different solutions. Here we present an alternative abstraction of artificial evolution, which does not require the formulation of a composite fitness function. Inspired from viability theory in dynamical systems, natural evolution and ethology, the proposed method puts emphasis on the elimination of individuals that do not meet a set of changing criteria, which are defined on the problem objectives and constraints. Experimental results show that the proposed method maintains higher diversity in the evolving population and generates more unique solutions when compared to classical competition-based evolutionary algorithms. Our findings suggest that incorporating viability principles into evolutionary algorithms can significantly improve the applicability and effectiveness of evolutionary methods to numerous complex problems of science and engineering, ranging from protein structure prediction to aircraft wing design.

  3. Novel diffuse optics system for continuous tissue viability monitoring: extended recovery in vivo testing in a porcine flap model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Yup; Pakela, Julia M.; Hedrick, Taylor L.; Vishwanath, Karthik; Helton, Michael C.; Chung, Yooree; Kolodziejski, Noah J.; Stapels, Christopher J.; McAdams, Daniel R.; Fernandez, Daniel E.; Christian, James F.; O'Reilly, Jameson; Farkas, Dana; Ward, Brent B.; Feinberg, Stephen E.; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2017-02-01

    In reconstructive surgery, tissue perfusion/vessel patency is critical to the success of microvascular free tissue flaps. Early detection of flap failure secondary to compromise of vascular perfusion would significantly increase the chances of flap salvage. We have developed a compact, clinically-compatible monitoring system to enable automated, minimally-invasive, continuous, and quantitative assessment of flap viability/perfusion. We tested the system's continuous monitoring capability during extended non-recovery surgery using an in vivo porcine free flap model. Initial results indicated that the system could assess flap viability/perfusion in a quantitative and continuous manner. With proven performance, the compact form constructed with cost-effective components would make this system suitable for clinical translation.

  4. Rit GTPase Signaling Promotes Immature Hippocampal Neuronal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weikang; Carlson, Shaun W.; Brelsfoard, Jennifer M.; Mannon, Catherine E.; Moncman, Carole L.; Saatman, Kathryn E.; Andres, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing the spontaneous recovery seen following brain injury remain elusive, but recent studies indicate that injury-induced stimulation of hippocampal neurogenesis contributes to the repair process. The therapeutic potential of endogenous neurogenesis is tempered by the demonstration that traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in the selective death of adult-born immature neurons, compromising the cell population poised to compensate for trauma-induced neuronal loss. Here, we identify the Ras-related GTPase, Rit, as a critical player in the survival of immature hippocampal neurons following brain injury. While Rit knockout (Rit−/−) did not alter hippocampal development, hippocampal neural cultures derived from Rit−/− mice display increased cell death and blunted MAPK cascade activation in response to oxidative stress, without affecting BDNF-dependent signaling. When compared to wild-type hippocampal cultures, Rit loss rendered immature (Dcx+) neurons susceptible to oxidative damage, without altering the survival of neural progenitor (Nestin+) cells. Oxidative stress is a major contributor to neuronal cell death following brain injury. Consistent with the enhanced vulnerability of cultured Rit−/− immature neurons, Rit−/− mice exhibited a significantly greater loss of adult-born immature neurons within the dentate gyrus after TBI. In addition, post-TBI neuronal remodeling was blunted. Taken together, these data identify a new and unexpected role for Rit in injury-induced neurogenesis, functioning as a selective survival mechanism for immature hippocampal neurons within the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus following TBI. PMID:22815504

  5. Oxidative stress induced by cumene hydroperoxide evokes changes in neuronal excitability of rat motor cortex neurons.

    PubMed

    Pardillo-Díaz, R; Carrascal, L; Ayala, A; Nunez-Abades, P

    2015-03-19

    Oxidative stress and the production of reactive oxygen radicals play a key role in neuronal cell damage. This paper describes an in vitro study that explores the neuronal responses to oxidative stress focusing on changes in neuronal excitability and functional membrane properties. This study was carried out in pyramidal cells of the motor cortex by applying whole-cell patch-clamp techniques on brain slices from young adult rats. Oxygen-derived free radical formation was induced by bath application of 10μM cumene hydroperoxide (CH) for 30min. CH produced marked changes in the electrophysiological properties of neurons (n=30). Resting membrane potential became progressively depolarized, as well as depolarization voltage, with no variations in voltage threshold. Membrane resistance showed a biphasic behavior, increasing after 5min of drug exposure and then it started to decrease, even under control values, after 15 and 30min. At the same time, changes in membrane resistance produced compensatory variations in the rheobase. The amplitude of the action potentials diminished and the duration increased progressively over time. Some of the neurons under study also lost their ability to discharge action potentials in a repetitive way. Most of the neurons, however, kept their repetitive discharge even though their maximum frequency and gain decreased. Furthermore, cancelation of the repetitive firing discharge took place at intensities that decreased with time of exposure to CH, which resulted in a narrower working range. We can conclude that oxidative stress compromises both neuronal excitability and the capability of generating action potentials, and so this type of neuronal functional failure could precede the neuronal death characteristics of many neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Necrostatin-1 protection of dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing-ru; Wang, Jie; Zhou, Sheng-kui; Yang, Long; Yin, Jia-le; Cao, Jun-ping; Cheng, Yan-bo

    2015-01-01

    Necroptosis is characterized by programmed necrotic cell death and autophagic activation and might be involved in the death process of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. We hypothesized that necrostatin-1 could block necroptosis and give protection to dopaminergic neurons. There is likely to be crosstalk between necroptosis and other cell death pathways, such as apoptosis and autophagy. PC12 cells were pretreated with necroststin-1 1 hour before exposure to 6-hydroxydopamine. We examined cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and expression patterns of apoptotic and necroptotic death signaling proteins. The results showed that the autophagy/lysosomal pathway is involved in the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced death process of PC12 cells. Mitochondrial disability induced overactive autophagy, increased cathepsin B expression, and diminished Bcl-2 expression. Necrostatin-1 within a certain concentration range (5–30 μM) elevated the viability of PC12 cells, stabilized mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited excessive autophagy, reduced the expression of LC3-II and cathepsin B, and increased Bcl-2 expression. These findings suggest that necrostatin-1 exerted a protective effect against injury on dopaminergic neurons. Necrostatin-1 interacts with the apoptosis signaling pathway during this process. This pathway could be a new neuroprotective and therapeutic target in Parkinson's disease. PMID:26330837

  7. Necrostatin-1 protection of dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing-Ru; Wang, Jie; Zhou, Sheng-Kui; Yang, Long; Yin, Jia-le; Cao, Jun-Ping; Cheng, Yan-Bo

    2015-07-01

    Necroptosis is characterized by programmed necrotic cell death and autophagic activation and might be involved in the death process of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. We hypothesized that necrostatin-1 could block necroptosis and give protection to dopaminergic neurons. There is likely to be crosstalk between necroptosis and other cell death pathways, such as apoptosis and autophagy. PC12 cells were pretreated with necroststin-1 1 hour before exposure to 6-hydroxydopamine. We examined cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and expression patterns of apoptotic and necroptotic death signaling proteins. The results showed that the autophagy/lysosomal pathway is involved in the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced death process of PC12 cells. Mitochondrial disability induced overactive autophagy, increased cathepsin B expression, and diminished Bcl-2 expression. Necrostatin-1 within a certain concentration range (5-30 μM) elevated the viability of PC12 cells, stabilized mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited excessive autophagy, reduced the expression of LC3-II and cathepsin B, and increased Bcl-2 expression. These findings suggest that necrostatin-1 exerted a protective effect against injury on dopaminergic neurons. Necrostatin-1 interacts with the apoptosis signaling pathway during this process. This pathway could be a new neuroprotective and therapeutic target in Parkinson's disease.

  8. Myocardial Viability on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Souto, Ana Luiza Mansur; Souto, Rafael Mansur; Teixeira, Isabella Cristina Resende; Nacif, Marcelo Souto

    2017-05-01

    The study of myocardial viability is of great importance in the orientation and management of patients requiring myocardial revascularization or angioplasty. The technique of delayed enhancement (DE) is accurate and has transformed the study of viability into an easy test, not only for the detection of fibrosis but also as a binary test detecting what is viable or not. On DE, fibrosis equal to or greater than 50% of the segmental area is considered as non-viable, whereas that below 50% is considered viable. During the same evaluation, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) may also use other techniques for functional and perfusion studies to obtain a global evaluation of ischemic heart disease. This study aims to highlight the current concepts and broadly emphasize the use of CMR as a method that over the last 20 years has become a reference in the detection of infarction and assessment of myocardial viability. Resumo O estudo de viabilidade miocárdica é de grande importância para a orientação e manejo de pacientes que necessitam de cirurgia de revascularização miocárdica ou angioplastia. A técnica de realce tardio (RT) é precisa e transformou o estudo de viabilidade em um teste fácil, não só para a detecção de fibrose, mas também como um modelo binário para a detecção do que é ou não é viável. Uma fibrose identificada pelo RT é considerada como não viável quando igual ou maior do que 50% da área segmentar e como viável quando menor que 50%. A ressonância magnética cardíaca (RMC) também pode lançar mão de outras técnicas para estudo funcional e de perfusão para uma avaliação global da doença isquêmica do coração no mesmo exame. Este estudo tem como objetivo destacar os conceitos atuais e enfatizar amplamente o uso da RMC como um método que nos últimos 20 anos se tornou referência na detecção de infarto e avaliação de viabilidade miocárdica.

  9. Stepwise chilling: tender pork without compromising water-holding capacity.

    PubMed

    Rosenvold, K; Borup, U; Therkildsen, M

    2010-05-01

    The current pork slaughter process is primarily optimized to reduce cooler shrink and the incidence of PSE pork. Elimination of the halothane gene and improved preslaughter handling have decreased the incidence of PSE pork and improved the water-holding capacity of the muscle; however, the chilling process has not been optimized to accommodate these changes. The hypothesis that stepwise chilling could improve tenderness without compromising water-holding capacity was tested in this study. The stepwise chilling treatments were composed of a rapid chilling to 10 or 15 degrees C (in a chilling tunnel) and a 6-h holding period at 10 or 15 degrees C, followed by rapid chilling to 4 degrees C. Both treatments were compared directly with a chilling treatment that simulated conventional tunnel chilling; one carcass half from each pig was allocated to a stepwise chilling treatment, whereas the other carcass half was allocated to the control treatment. A total of 42 pigs were slaughtered on 6 slaughter days. Biopsies were collected for analysis of glycogen degradation and glycogen debranching enzyme activity from slaughter until 72 h postmortem, and samples for color, sarcomere length, drip loss, Warner-Bratzler shear force, and sensory analysis were removed from the carcass 24 h postmortem. Substantial temperature differences were obtained during the holding period between the stepwise and conventionally chilled carcass halves. These had almost, but not completely, disappeared by 22 h postmortem, and although the differences were small, pH was significantly (P < 0.01) less in the stepwise-chilled carcasses compared with the control carcasses. The stepwise chilling treatments led to significantly improved (P < 0.01) tenderness in LM without compromising quality indicators or attributes such as pH, drip loss, or ham processing yield, although color of the stepwise-chilled pork was affected. Neither the tenderness of processed semimembranosus muscle nor the shear force of

  10. Incorporating evolutionary processes into population viability models.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Jennifer C; Beissinger, Steven R; Bragg, Jason G; Coates, David J; Oostermeijer, J Gerard B; Sunnucks, Paul; Schumaker, Nathan H; Trotter, Meredith V; Young, Andrew G

    2015-06-01

    We examined how ecological and evolutionary (eco-evo) processes in population dynamics could be better integrated into population viability analysis (PVA). Complementary advances in computation and population genomics can be combined into an eco-evo PVA to offer powerful new approaches to understand the influence of evolutionary processes on population persistence. We developed the mechanistic basis of an eco-evo PVA using individual-based models with individual-level genotype tracking and dynamic genotype-phenotype mapping to model emergent population-level effects, such as local adaptation and genetic rescue. We then outline how genomics can allow or improve parameter estimation for PVA models by providing genotypic information at large numbers of loci for neutral and functional genome regions. As climate change and other threatening processes increase in rate and scale, eco-evo PVAs will become essential research tools to evaluate the effects of adaptive potential, evolutionary rescue, and locally adapted traits on persistence.

  11. VIABILITY OF COLIFORM BACTERIA IN ANTARCTIC SOIL

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, William L.; Boyd, Josephine W.

    1963-01-01

    Boyd, William L. (Ohio State University, Columbus) and Josephine W. Boyd. Viability of coliform bacteria in antarctic soil. J. Bacteriol. 85:1121–1123. 1963.—The distribution of coliform bacteria in soils of Ross Island and the nearby mainland was studied. None was found in almost all of the samples collected, including some from the Adelie penguin rookeries at Cape Royds and Cape Crozier and in soil at the McMurdo Base which had been recently contaminated by human sewage. Samples of pony manure left from previous expeditions were also negative, with one exception where Escherichia coli were present. Studies carried out with two freshly isolated human strains of E. coli and the isolate from pony manure showed that the death rate was extremely rapid, although the animal strain was much more resistant to the various factors of the environment causing death. PMID:14044003

  12. VIABILITY OF COLIFORM BACTERIA IN ANTARCTIC SOIL.

    PubMed

    BOYD, W L; BOYD, J W

    1963-05-01

    Boyd, William L. (Ohio State University, Columbus) and Josephine W. Boyd. Viability of coliform bacteria in antarctic soil. J. Bacteriol. 85:1121-1123. 1963.-The distribution of coliform bacteria in soils of Ross Island and the nearby mainland was studied. None was found in almost all of the samples collected, including some from the Adelie penguin rookeries at Cape Royds and Cape Crozier and in soil at the McMurdo Base which had been recently contaminated by human sewage. Samples of pony manure left from previous expeditions were also negative, with one exception where Escherichia coli were present. Studies carried out with two freshly isolated human strains of E. coli and the isolate from pony manure showed that the death rate was extremely rapid, although the animal strain was much more resistant to the various factors of the environment causing death.

  13. Viability of Selected Microorganisms in Hydrocarbon Fuels.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, H G; Carroll, M T; Owen, H P; Pritchard, D J

    1963-11-01

    A laboratory study of the viability of selected microorganisms in a hydrocarbon fuel medium was carried out on 19 species of microorganisms, representative of the types found as natural contaminants in aircraft fuels. More species remained viable when inoculated in pure cultures than when inoculated in mixed (composite) cultures. Of the 19 species selected, 10 were still viable after 3 months and 5 were viable after 4 months in the pure culture inoculants. In the complete composite culture inoculant, the bacterial species which were viable at the end of 4 months were the same as those found in the pure culture inoculant. No fungi remained viable in the complete composite cultures after a 3-week period. The microorganisms which remain viable in a hydrocarbon fuel medium are considered indicative of a satisfactory inoculum to be used as a test culture in laboratory analysis of mechanical control techniques.

  14. Astrocyte Mediated Protection of Fetal Cerebral Cortical Neurons from Rotenone and Paraquat

    PubMed Central

    Rathinam, Mary Latha; Watts, Lora Talley; Narasimhan, Madhusudhanan; Riar, Amanjot Kaur; Mahimainathan, Lenin; Henderson, George.I.

    2012-01-01

    Primary cultures of fetal rat cortical neurons and astrocytes were used to test the hypothesis that astrocyte-mediated control of neuronal glutathione (GSH) is a potent factor in neuroprotection against rotenone and paraquat. In neurons, rotenone (0.025 to 1μM) for 4 and 24 h decreased viability as did paraquat (2 to 100μM). Rotenone (30nM) decreased neuronal viability and GSH by 24% and 30%, while ROS were increased by 56%. Paraquat (30μM) decreased neuronal viability and GSH by 36% and 70%, while ROS were increased by 23%. When neurons were co-cultured with astrocytes, their GSH increased 1.5 fold and 5 fold at 12 and 24 h. Co-culturing with astrocytes blocked neuronal death and damage by rotenone and paraquat. Astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection was dependent on the activity of components of the γ-glutamyl cycle. These studies illustrate the importance of astrocyte-mediated glutathione homeostasis for protection of neurons from rotenone and paraquat and the role of the γ-glutamyl cycle in this neuroprotection PMID:22301167

  15. Ginkgolides protect primary cortical neurons from potassium cyanide-induced hypoxic injury.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Xu, You Jia; Du, Fang; Qian, Zhong Ming

    2007-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of ginkgolides (Gins A, B, C and J), the main constituent of the non-flavone fraction of EGb 761, on hypoxic injury induced by potassium cyanide (KCN) in primary cortical neurons. The neurons were pretreated with or without ginkgolides for 24 h before incubation with KCN for 4 h. Cell viability was then determined by a MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyletrazolium bromide] assay and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release from neurons into the medium was measured. The morphological changes of neurons were observed under inverse microscopy and electron microscopy. The results demonstrated that KCN (0.05 mmol/l) significantly decreased cell viability and increased LDH release (P < 0.05 versus the control). The characteristic changes of neuronal morphology induced by KCN were observed. However, pretreatment of neurons with 37.5 microg/ml of ginkgolides (ginkgolides + KCN group) led to a significant increase in cell viability, a decrease in LDH release (P < 0.05 versus the KCN group) and a remarkable improvement in cellular morphology in hypoxic neurons compared with the KCN group. The data suggested that ginkgolides have a significant role to protect the primary cortical neurons from hypoxic injury induced by KCN.

  16. The relationship between sperm viability and DNA fragmentation rates.

    PubMed

    Samplaski, Mary K; Dimitromanolakis, Apostolos; Lo, Kirk C; Grober, Ethan D; Mullen, Brendan; Garbens, Alaina; Jarvi, Keith A

    2015-05-14

    In humans, sperm DNA fragmentation rates have been correlated with sperm viability rates. Reduced sperm viability is associated with high sperm DNA fragmentation, while conversely high sperm viability is associated with low rates of sperm DNA fragmentation. Both elevated DNA fragmentation rates and poor viability are correlated with impaired male fertility, with a DNA fragmentation rate of >30% indicating subfertility. We postulated that in some men, the sperm viability assay could predict the sperm DNA fragmentation rates. This in turn could reduce the need for sperm DNA fragmentation assay testing, simplifying the infertility investigation and saving money for infertile couples. All men having semen analyses with both viability and DNA fragmentation testing were identified via a prospectively collected database. Viability was measured by eosin-nigrosin assay. DNA fragmentation was measured using the sperm chromosome structure assay. The relationship between DNA fragmentation and viability was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. From 2008-2013, 3049 semen analyses had both viability and DNA fragmentation testing. A strong inverse relationship was seen between sperm viability and DNA fragmentation rates, with r=-0.83. If viability was ≤50% (n=301) then DNA fragmentation was ≥ 30% for 95% of the samples. If viability was ≥75% (n=1736), then the DNA fragmentation was ≤30% for 95% of the patients. Sperm viability correlates strongly with DNA fragmentation rates. In men with high levels of sperm viability≥75%, or low levels of sperm viability≤ 30%, DFI testing may be not be routinely necessary. Given that DNA fragmentation testing is substantially more expensive than vitality testing, this may represent a valuable cost-saving measure for couples undergoing a fertility evaluation.

  17. Evaluating the Role of Viral Proteins in HIV-Mediated Neurotoxicity Using Primary Human Neuronal Cultures.

    PubMed

    Rao, Vasudev R; Eugenin, Eliseo A; Prasad, Vinayaka R

    2016-01-01

    Despite the inability of HIV-1 to infect neurons, over half of the HIV-1-infected population in the USA suffers from neurocognitive dysfunction. HIV-infected immune cells in the periphery enter the central nervous system by causing a breach in the blood-brain barrier. The damage to the neurons is mediated by viral and host toxic products released by activated and infected immune and glial cells. To evaluate the toxicity of any viral isolate, viral protein, or host inflammatory protein, we describe a protocol to assess the neuronal apoptosis and synaptic compromise in primary cultures of human neurons and astrocytes.

  18. Evaluating the Role of Viral Proteins in HIV-Mediated Neurotoxicity Using Primary Human Neuronal Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Vasudev R.; Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Prasad, Vinayaka R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the inability of HIV-1 to infect neurons, over half of the HIV-1-infected population in the USA suffers from neurocognitive dysfunction. HIV-infected immune cells in the periphery enter the central nervous system by causing a breach in the blood–brain barrier. The damage to the neurons is mediated by viral and host toxic products released by activated and infected immune and glial cells. To evaluate the toxicity of any viral isolate, viral protein, or host inflammatory protein, we describe a protocol to assess the neuronal apoptosis and synaptic compromise in primary cultures of human neurons and astrocytes. PMID:26714725

  19. Immunologic reaction and viability of cryopreserved homografts.

    PubMed

    Fischlein, T; Schütz, A; Haushofer, M; Frey, R; Uhlig, A; Detter, C; Reichart, B

    1995-08-01

    Homograft cell viability after cryopreservation was investigated and cytoimmunologic monitoring was performed during the early postoperative course to research possible immunologic reactions after allograft aortic valve replacement. After cryopreservation, morphologic observations were made, a nonradioactive cell proliferation assay was used, and prostaglandin I2 secretion of the remaining endothelial cells was determined. Cytoimmunologic monitoring was performed daily within the first 3 weeks postoperatively. An increase of the activation index greater than 1 was rated as an immunologic reaction. Maintained metabolic activity of graft endothelial cells after cryopreservation was confirmed by prostaglandin I2 release (9.24 +/- 3.48 ng/cm2 basic release and 20.1 +/- 5.76 ng/cm2 when stimulated with 25 mumol/L Na arachidonic acid). Cell proliferation was indicated after graft incubation with the nonradioactive viability kit (0.27 +/- 0.9 at 450 nm). Cytoimmunologic examinations (n = 861) after homograft implantation showed a more intense activation in patients with ABO-incompatible grafts (activation index 2.1 +/- 1.6, n = 16) than in those with ABO-compatible grafts (activation index 1.3 +/- 0.8, n = 17). In these groups, the duration of activation by cytoimmunologic monitoring was 2.8 +/- 1.5 days and 1.3 +/- 0.6 days, respectively (p < 0.041). No activation was observed in 8 patients after xenograft valve replacement (p < 0.01). Our data indicate that cryopreservation of homograft valves represents a cell- and tissue-protective preservation method. Postoperatively, all homograft valves caused immunologic reactions, which were reversible without immunosuppression treatment.

  20. Artificial Evolution by Viability Rather than Competition

    PubMed Central

    Maesani, Andrea; Fernando, Pradeep Ruben; Floreano, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary algorithms are widespread heuristic methods inspired by natural evolution to solve difficult problems for which analytical approaches are not suitable. In many domains experimenters are not only interested in discovering optimal solutions, but also in finding the largest number of different solutions satisfying minimal requirements. However, the formulation of an effective performance measure describing these requirements, also known as fitness function, represents a major challenge. The difficulty of combining and weighting multiple problem objectives and constraints of possibly varying nature and scale into a single fitness function often leads to unsatisfactory solutions. Furthermore, selective reproduction of the fittest solutions, which is inspired by competition-based selection in nature, leads to loss of diversity within the evolving population and premature convergence of the algorithm, hindering the discovery of many different solutions. Here we present an alternative abstraction of artificial evolution, which does not require the formulation of a composite fitness function. Inspired from viability theory in dynamical systems, natural evolution and ethology, the proposed method puts emphasis on the elimination of individuals that do not meet a set of changing criteria, which are defined on the problem objectives and constraints. Experimental results show that the proposed method maintains higher diversity in the evolving population and generates more unique solutions when compared to classical competition-based evolutionary algorithms. Our findings suggest that incorporating viability principles into evolutionary algorithms can significantly improve the applicability and effectiveness of evolutionary methods to numerous complex problems of science and engineering, ranging from protein structure prediction to aircraft wing design. PMID:24489790

  1. The RNA-binding protein SFPQ orchestrates an RNA regulon to promote axon viability.

    PubMed

    Cosker, Katharina E; Fenstermacher, Sara J; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F; Elliott, Hunter L; Segal, Rosalind A

    2016-05-01

    To achieve accurate spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) guide nuclear processing, intracellular trafficking and local translation of target mRNAs. In neurons, RBPs direct transport of target mRNAs to sites of translation in remote axons and dendrites. However, it is not known whether an individual RBP coordinately regulates multiple mRNAs within these morphologically complex cells. Here we identify SFPQ (splicing factor, poly-glutamine rich) as an RBP that binds and regulates multiple mRNAs in dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons and thereby promotes neurotrophin-dependent axonal viability. SFPQ acts in nuclei, cytoplasm and axons to regulate functionally related mRNAs essential for axon survival. Notably, SFPQ is required for coassembly of LaminB2 (Lmnb2) and Bclw (Bcl2l2) mRNAs in RNA granules and for axonal trafficking of these mRNAs. Together these data demonstrate that SFPQ orchestrates spatial gene expression of a newly identified RNA regulon essential for axonal viability.

  2. Predicting early nonelective hospital readmission in nutritionally compromised older adults.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, J M; Jensen, G L; Smiciklas-Wright, H; McCamish, M A

    1997-06-01

    This study determined predictors of early nonelective hospital readmission in 92 (49 women and 43 men) nutritionally compromised Medicare patients. Subjects ranged in age from 65 to 92 y and represented patients hospitalized previously for medical or surgical services. The study used a repeated-measures design of multiple variables representing demographics, anthropometric and clinical values, and functional status. Data were collected during hospitalization and during home visits at 1 and 3 mo postdischarge. There were 26 readmissions, making the 4-mo nonelective readmission rate 26%. Subjects who were readmitted nonelectively were compared with those not readmitted. Univariate analyses suggested strong relations between readmission outcome and serum albumin, total lymphocyte count, change in weight, and change in white blood cell count. Sociodemographic variables were less useful in predicting readmission than were measurements of patients' clinical status. Measurements of change in clinical variables were generally more predictive of readmission than was any one single measurement. Multivariate-logistic-regression analyses suggested a model consisting of change in weight and change in serum albumin from hospitalization to 1 mo after discharge as being highly predictive of early nonelective readmission. Individuals with any amount of weight loss and no improvement in albumin concentrations during the first month after hospitalization were at a much higher risk of readmission than were those who maintained or increased their postdischarge weight and had repleted their serum albumin concentrations. More study is warranted to clarify whether routine monitoring of changes in weight and serum albumin after hospitalization is appropriate in older adults.

  3. Oviposition site selection in Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera): constraints and compromises.

    PubMed

    Robertson, H G

    1987-10-01

    Oviposition by Cactoblastis cactorum on Opuntia ficus-indica and O. aurantiaca was assessed from the positioning of egg sticks on plants in the field. The number of egg sticks laid on O. ficus-indica plants was affected by: (1) plant size; (2) moth emergence near the plant; (3) cladode condition; and (4) plant conspicuousness. These factors contributed towards the clumping of egg sticks on plants. There was no apparent oviposition preference for one of the two host plant species despite the fact that egg predation was higher and fecundity lower on O. aurantiaca. The selection of a site for oviposition on the host plants was influenced by: (1) cladode condition; (2) height above ground; and (3) shelter from wind during oviposition. Succulent cladodes were the favoured sites for oviposition. The evidence suggests that in C. cactorum, oviposition site selection is largely the net result of a compromise between oviposition behaviour selected for increasing the probability of juvenile survival and oviposition behaviour selected for increasing the probability of laying the full complement of eggs. In addition, environmental and physiological factors such as wind and wing-loading, are thought to place constraints on the range of sites available for oviposition.

  4. Identification of medically compromised dental patients in a Portuguese population.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Helder José; Quintanilla, José Maria

    2013-01-01

    The age of the patients, the presence of one or more chronic disorders and the patients' drug regimens can influence dental treatment and oral health. This is a prospective, descriptive study to identify subjects with compromised health who received dental treatment between November 2010 and June 2011 at private dental practices run by graduates of the Portuguese Catholic University. Application software in Microsoft Excel was developed containing the questionnaire, based on the EMRRH (European medical risk related history), which allowed the collection of data from 1603 adult patients. Microsoft Excel, G*Power and SPSS V.18 were used for statistical treatment. The five most frequent medical conditions found were: 1) hypertension, 21.0%; 2) arrhythmias, 11.2%; 3) Angina pectoris, 8.3%; 4) allergies, 77%; 5) thyroid disease, 6.2%. The medications taken related to these were: a) antihypertensives, 11.0%; b) antidepressants, anxiolytics and hypnotics, 10.6%; c) acetylsalicylic acid, 4.2%; d) antiarrhythmic and sympathomimetic drugs, 4.1%; e) haemostatic treatment, 3.6%. 42.7% of the patients had no medical risks, 32.9% were classified as ASA II, 11.7% as ASA III and 12.7% as ASA IV. This study emphasises the importance of often-neglected anamnesis in oral care. The high prevalence of patients with medical conditions should be continuously studied to verify the changes over time and should be expanded to other regions and countries.

  5. Silicone rubber contact lenses for the compromised cornea.

    PubMed

    Bacon, A S; Astin, C; Dart, J K

    1994-09-01

    Silicone rubber contact lenses (SRCLs) are infrequently used because of the risk of developing unpredictable lens tightening, their poor availability, and their expense. However, their high oxygen transmissibility and nonabsorption of water make them valuable as therapeutic lenses. SRCLs are routinely used in our management of severely dry eyes, decompensated or vascularised corneas, and conditions where the corneal shape is flat or irregular. The records of 48 consecutive patients fitted with SRCLs between January 1989 and June 1990 were studied. The clinical history, indications, complications, success, and duration of SRCL wear were analysed. Therapeutic goals, which included epithelial healing, sealing of corneal perforations, and improved comfort and vision, were achieved in 53 of 62 eyes. The best corrected acuity was attained using SRCLs in 58 of 62 eyes. Failure of lens wear was due to lens tightening (four eyes), spoilation (two), discomfort, fornix shortening, handling problems, and decentration (one each). Infective keratitis complicated one case, but SRCL wear was resumed after successful treatment. With adequate follow-up, SRCLs have a low complication rate and are well tolerated even in severely compromised eyes, for which conventional lenses may be contraindicated. Their continued use as therapeutic lenses is advocated in carefully selected cases.

  6. The maintenance of energy balance is compromised after weight loss.

    PubMed

    Reed, Jennifer L; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Tremblay, Angelo; Doucet, Éric

    2013-04-01

    Available literature reveals that of the majority of individuals who are able to lose weight, only a small number are able to maintain their weight loss over time. Effective weight maintenance strategies after weight loss are illusive, which is most likely the result of a number of yet poorly understood factors. In fact, both appetite and energy expenditure are profoundly altered in response to reductions in body energy reserves. Weight reduction leads to decreased energy needs, but to an augmented drive to eat, thus compromising the maintenance of energy balance in the weight-reduced state by widening the theoretical gap between the 2 components of energy balance. This review first provides a summary of the factors related to the control of feeding and energy expenditure during weight stability. More specifically related to the topic of this review, the bulk of the literature presented depicts the post weight-loss control of appetite and energy expenditure. The integration of the literature presented in this paper reveals that body weight loss seems to orchestrate a coordinated response to resist further energy depletion, that would seem to create a state of increased vulnerability of weight regain. It is argued that these changes are largely responsible for the more than apparent difficulty in maintaining weight maintenance after weight loss. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Protection characteristics of a Faraday cage compromised by lightning burnthrough.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Bystrom, Edward; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Montoya, Sandra L.; Merewether, Kimball O.; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Martinez, Leonard E.; Jojola, John M.

    2012-01-01

    A lightning flash consists of multiple, high-amplitude but short duration return strokes. Between the return strokes is a lower amplitude, continuing current which flows for longer duration. If the walls of a Faraday cage are made of thin enough metal, the continuing current can melt a hole through the metal in a process called burnthrough. A subsequent return stroke can couple energy through this newly-formed hole. This LDRD is a study of the protection provided by a Faraday cage when it has been compromised by burnthrough. We initially repeated some previous experiments and expanded on them in terms of scope and diagnostics to form a knowledge baseline of the coupling phenomena. We then used a combination of experiment, analysis and numerical modeling to study four coupling mechanisms: indirect electric field coupling, indirect magnetic field coupling, conduction through plasma and breakdown through the hole. We discovered voltages higher than those encountered in the previous set of experiments (on the order of several hundreds of volts).

  8. Compromised central tolerance of ICA69 induces multiple organ autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yong; Gualtierotti, Giulio; Tajima, Asako; Grupillo, Maria; Coppola, Antonina; He, Jing; Bertera, Suzanne; Owens, Gregory; Pietropaolo, Massimo; Rudert, William A.; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    For reasons not fully understood, patients with an organ-specific autoimmune disease have increased risks of developing autoimmune responses against other organs/tissues. We identified ICA69, a known β-cell autoantigen in Type 1 diabetes, as a potential common target in multi-organ autoimmunity. NOD mice immunized with ICA69 polypeptides exhibited exacerbated inflammation not only in the islets, but also in the salivary glands. To further investigate ICA69 autoimmunity, two genetically modified mouse lines were generated to modulate thymic ICA69 expression: the heterozygous ICA69del/wt line and the thymic medullary epithelial cell-specific deletion Aire-ΔICA69 line. Suboptimal central negative selection of ICA69-reactive T-cells was observed in both lines. Aire-ΔICA69 mice spontaneously developed coincident autoimmune responses to the pancreas, the salivary glands, the thyroid, and the stomach. Our findings establish a direct link between compromised thymic ICA69 expression and autoimmunity against multiple ICA69-expressing organs, and identify a potential novel mechanism for the development of multi-organ autoimmune diseases. PMID:25088457

  9. Compromised Rat Testicular Antioxidant Defence System by Hypothyroidism before Puberty.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Dipak K; Roy, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Altered thyroid function during early stages of development is known to affect adversely testicular growth, physiology, and antioxidant defence status at adulthood. The objective of the present study is to investigate the modulation of antioxidant defence status in neonatal persistent hypothyroid rats before their sexual maturation and also to identify the specific testicular cell populations vulnerable to degeneration during neonatal hypothyroidism in immature rats. Hypothyroidism was induced in neonates by feeding the lactating mother with 0.05% 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) through the drinking water. From the day of parturition till weaning (25 day postpartum), the pups received PTU through mother's milk (or) drinking water and then directly from drinking water containing PTU for the remaining period of experimentation. On the 31st day postpartum, the animals were sacrificed for the study. An altered antioxidant defence system marked by elevated SOD, CAT, and GR activities, with decreased GPx and GST activities were observed along with increased protein carbonylation, disturbed redox status in hypothyroid immature rat testis. This compromised testicular antioxidant status might have contributed to poor growth and development by affecting the spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis in rats before puberty as indicated by reduced germ cell number, complete absence of round spermatids, decreased seminiferous tubule diameter, and decreased testosterone level.

  10. Metabolic Stress and Compromised Identity of Pancreatic Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Swisa, Avital; Glaser, Benjamin; Dor, Yuval

    2017-01-01

    Beta cell failure is a central feature of type 2 diabetes (T2D), but the molecular underpinnings of the process remain only partly understood. It has been suggested that beta cell failure in T2D involves massive cell death. Other studies ascribe beta cell failure to cell exhaustion, due to chronic oxidative or endoplasmic reticulum stress leading to cellular dysfunction. More recently it was proposed that beta cells in T2D may lose their differentiated identity, possibly even gaining features of other islet cell types. The loss of beta cell identity appears to be driven by glucotoxicity inhibiting the activity of key beta cell transcription factors including Pdx1, Nkx6.1, MafA and Pax6, thereby silencing beta cell genes and derepressing alternative islet cell genes. The loss of beta cell identity is at least partly reversible upon normalization of glycemia, with implications for the reversibility of T2D, although it is not known if beta cell failure reaches eventually a point of no return. In this review we discuss current evidence for metabolism-driven compromised beta cell identity, key knowledge gaps and opportunities for utility in the treatment of T2D. PMID:28270834

  11. Physiologic assessment of fetal compromise: biomarkers of toxic exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, L.D.

    1987-10-01

    Understanding the physiologic and endocrinologic basis of fetal development is a major goal of perinatal biology. During the past decade a number of technological developments have allowed more precise evaluation of the fetus in utero and diagnosis of abnormalities. Despite these methodological achievements, however, there are no specific biological markers currently available to indicate that exposure to a given xenobiotic is associated with a cellular, subcellular, or pharmacodynamic event. This paper evaluates the following issues: what are some of the unique physiologic and endocrinologic features of the fetal milieu interieur. What problems are peculiar to fetal assessment. What are some examples of validated biomarkers and their applicability. What promising biomarkers are on the horizon. How may molecular probes be of value as biological markers of fetal compromise. What are some of the major research gaps and needs, and how should research priorities be set. Some of these topics are addressed. Moreover, the more general role(s) that various diagnostic methods and biological markers can have in an understanding of the regulation of fetal growth and differentiation and the role of xenobiotics in affecting the normal course of events are discussed.

  12. Taking a Bad Turn: Compromised DNA Damage Response in Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nilles, Nadine; Fahrenkrog, Birthe

    2017-01-01

    Genomic integrity is of outmost importance for the survival at the cellular and the organismal level and key to human health. To ensure the integrity of their DNA, cells have evolved maintenance programs collectively known as the DNA damage response. Particularly challenging for genome integrity are DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and defects in their repair are often associated with human disease, including leukemia. Defective DSB repair may not only be disease-causing, but further contribute to poor treatment outcome and poor prognosis in leukemia. Here, we review current insight into altered DSB repair mechanisms identified in leukemia. While DSB repair is somewhat compromised in all leukemic subtypes, certain key players of DSB repair are particularly targeted: DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and Ku70/80 in the non-homologous end-joining pathway, as well as Rad51 and breast cancer 1/2 (BRCA1/2), key players in homologous recombination. Defects in leukemia-related DSB repair may not only arise from dysfunctional repair components, but also indirectly from mutations in key regulators of gene expression and/or chromatin structure, such as p53, the Kirsten ras oncogene (K-RAS), and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2). A detailed understanding of the basis for defective DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms for each leukemia subtype may allow to further develop new treatment methods to improve treatment outcome and prognosis for patients. PMID:28471392

  13. Compromise and Synergy in High-Efficiency Thermoelectric Materials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tiejun; Liu, Yintu; Fu, Chenguang; Heremans, Joseph P; Snyder, Jeffrey G; Zhao, Xinbing

    2017-03-06

    The past two decades have witnessed the rapid growth of thermoelectric (TE) research. Novel concepts and paradigms are described here that have emerged, targeting superior TE materials and higher TE performance. These superior aspects include band convergence, "phonon-glass electron-crystal", multiscale phonon scattering, resonant states, anharmonicity, etc. Based on these concepts, some new TE materials with distinct features have been identified, including solids with high band degeneracy, with cages in which atoms rattle, with nanostructures at various length scales, etc. In addition, the performance of classical materials has been improved remarkably. However, the figure of merit zT of most TE materials is still lower than 2.0, generally around 1.0, due to interrelated TE properties. In order to realize an "overall zT > 2.0," it is imperative that the interrelated properties are decoupled more thoroughly, or new degrees of freedom are added to the overall optimization problem. The electrical and thermal transport must be synergistically optimized. Here, a detailed discussion about the commonly adopted strategies to optimize individual TE properties is presented. Then, four main compromises between the TE properties are elaborated from the point of view of the underlying mechanisms and decoupling strategies. Finally, some representative systems of synergistic optimization are also presented, which can serve as references for other TE materials. In conclusion, some of the newest ideas for the future are discussed.

  14. Bacterial viability and antibiotic susceptibility testing with SYTOX green nucleic acid stain.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, B L; Poot, M; Yue, S T; Millard, P J

    1997-01-01

    A fluorescent nucleic acid stain that does not penetrate living cells was used to assess the integrity of the plasma membranes of bacteria. SYTOX Green nucleic acid stain is an unsymmetrical cyanine dye with three positive charges that is completely excluded from live eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Binding of SYTOX Green stain to nucleic acids resulted in a > 500-fold enhancement in fluorescence emission (absorption and emission maxima at 502 and 523 nm, respectively), rendering bacteria with compromised plasma membranes brightly green fluorescent. SYTOX Green stain is readily excited by the 488-nm line of the argon ion laser. The fluorescence signal from membrane-compromised bacteria labeled with SYTOX Green stain was typically > 10-fold brighter than that from intact organisms. Bacterial suspensions labeled with SYTOX Green stain emitted green fluorescence in proportion to the fraction of permeabilized cells in the population, which was quantified by microscopy, fluorometry, or flow cytometry. Flow cytometric and fluorometric approaches were used to quantify the effect of beta-lactam antibiotics on the cell membrane integrity of Escherichia coli. Detection and discrimination of live and permeabilized cells labeled with SYTOX Green stain by flow cytometry were markedly improved over those by propidium iodide-based tests. These studies showed that bacterial labeling with SYTOX Green stain is an effective alternative to conventional methods for measuring bacterial viability and antibiotic susceptibility. PMID:9172364

  15. Loading of Articular Cartilage Compromises Chondrocyte Respiratory Function

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Mitchell C.; Ramakrishnan, Prem S.; Brouillette, Marc J.; Martin, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Determine whether repeatedly overloading healthy cartilage disrupts mitochondrial function in a manner similar to that associated with osteoarthritis pathogenesis. Methods We exposed normal articular cartilage on bovine osteochondral explants to 1 day or 7 consecutive days of cyclic axial compression (0.25 or 1.0 MPa, 0.5 Hz, 3 hours) and evaluated effects on chondrocyte viability, ATP concentration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, indicators of oxidative stress, respiration, and mitochondrial membrane potential. Results Neither 0.25 nor 1.0 MPa cyclic compression caused extensive chondrocyte death, macroscopic tissue damage, or overt changes in stress-strain behavior. After one day of loading, differences in respiratory activities between the 0.25 and 1.0 MPa groups were minimal; after 7 loading days, however, respiratory activity and ATP levels were suppressed in the 1.0 MPa group relative to the 0.25 MPa group, an effect prevented with pretreatment with 10 mM N-acetylcysteine. These changes were accompanied by increased proton leakage and decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential as well as by increased ROS formation indicated by dihydroethidium staining and glutathione oxidation. Conclusion Repeated overloading leads to chondrocyte oxidant-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction. This mitochondrial dysfunction may contribute to destabilization of cartilage during various stages of OA in distinct ways by disrupting chondrocyte anabolic responses to mechanical stimuli. PMID:26473613

  16. The Influence of Micronutrients in Cell Culture: A Reflection on Viability and Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Arigony, Ana Lúcia Vargas; de Oliveira, Iuri Marques; Bordin, Diana Lilian; Prá, Daniel; Pêgas Henriques, João Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Micronutrients, including minerals and vitamins, are indispensable to DNA metabolic pathways and thus are as important for life as macronutrients. Without the proper nutrients, genomic instability compromises homeostasis, leading to chronic diseases and certain types of cancer. Cell-culture media try to mimic the in vivo environment, providing in vitro models used to infer cells' responses to different stimuli. This review summarizes and discusses studies of cell-culture supplementation with micronutrients that can increase cell viability and genomic stability, with a particular focus on previous in vitro experiments. In these studies, the cell-culture media include certain vitamins and minerals at concentrations not equal to the physiological levels. In many common culture media, the sole source of micronutrients is fetal bovine serum (FBS), which contributes to only 5–10% of the media composition. Minimal attention has been dedicated to FBS composition, micronutrients in cell cultures as a whole, or the influence of micronutrients on the viability and genetics of cultured cells. Further studies better evaluating micronutrients' roles at a molecular level and influence on the genomic stability of cells are still needed. PMID:23781504

  17. Interaction of CarD with RNA polymerase mediates Mycobacterium tuberculosis viability, rifampin resistance, and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Leslie A; Harrison, Phillip G; Nickels, Bryce E; Glickman, Michael S; Campbell, Elizabeth A; Darst, Seth A; Stallings, Christina L

    2012-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection continues to cause substantial human suffering. New chemotherapeutic strategies, which require insight into the pathways essential for M. tuberculosis pathogenesis, are imperative. We previously reported that depletion of the CarD protein in mycobacteria compromises viability, resistance to oxidative stress and fluoroquinolones, and pathogenesis. CarD associates with the RNA polymerase (RNAP), but it has been unknown which of the diverse functions of CarD are mediated through the RNAP; this question must be answered to understand the CarD mechanism of action. Herein, we describe the interaction between the M. tuberculosis CarD and the RNAP β subunit and identify point mutations that weaken this interaction. The characterization of mycobacterial strains with attenuated CarD/RNAP β interactions demonstrates that the CarD/RNAP β association is required for viability and resistance to oxidative stress but not for fluoroquinolone resistance. Weakening the CarD/RNAP β interaction also increases the sensitivity of mycobacteria to rifampin and streptomycin. Surprisingly, depletion of the CarD protein did not affect sensitivity to rifampin. These findings define the CarD/RNAP interaction as a new target for chemotherapeutic intervention that could also improve the efficacy of rifampin treatment of tuberculosis. In addition, our data demonstrate that weakening the CarD/RNAP β interaction does not completely phenocopy the depletion of CarD and support the existence of functions for CarD independent of direct RNAP binding.

  18. Relation between serum ischemia-modified albumin levels and rectus abdominis muscle flap viability.

    PubMed

    Livaoğlu, Murat; Arvas, Leyla; Karaçal, Naci; Menteşe, Ahmet; Karahan, S Caner; Sözen, Emrah

    2011-05-01

    Ischemia is a major cause of flap failure in reconstructive surgery. To detect circulatory compromise, many flap monitoring methods are used; however, there is no any optimal standard method. Ischemia-modified albumin (IMA) is an ischemia marker, which has recently been investigated in many studies and largely validated for early detection of ischemia. In this study, we investigated possible relationship between muscle flap viability and serum IMA levels in experimental flap model. The rectus abdominis muscle flap model was used in 18 New Zealand white rabbits. The study was planned using 3 groups. In group 1, the rectus abdominis muscle flap was harvested as a superior pedicle-based flap in which the inferior pedicle was sacrificed. In group 2, the flap was harvested by severing the superior pedicle. Both pedicles were harvested in group 3. Serum IMA levels were measured before the procedure and 1 hour, 6 hours, and 7 days postoperatively and then compared. In group 3, in which the ischemia was evident, and in group 1, IMA levels were significantly high 1 hour postoperatively (P < 0.05). There was no other significant difference in any of the other studied parameters between the groups. In conclusion, IMA can be used as a biochemical parameter for monitoring muscle flap viability.

  19. Effect of Selenate on Viability and Selenomethionine Accumulation of Chlorella sorokiniana Grown in Batch Culture

    PubMed Central

    Vílchez, Carlos; Torronteras, Rafael; Vigara, Javier; Gómez-Jacinto, Veronica; Janzer, Nora; Gómez-Ariza, José-Luis; Márová, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of Se(+VI) on viability, cell morphology, and selenomethionine accumulation of the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana grown in batch cultures. Culture exposed to sublethal Se concentrations of 40 mg·L−1 (212 μM) decreased growth rates for about 25% compared to control. A selenate EC50 value of 45 mg·L−1 (238.2 μM) was determined. Results showed that chlorophyll and carotenoids contents were not affected by Se exposure, while oxygen evolution decreased by half. Ultrastructural studies revealed granular stroma, fingerprint-like appearance of thylakoids which did not compromise cell activity. Unlike control cultures, SDS PAGE electrophoresis of crude extracts from selenate-exposed cell cultures revealed appearance of a protein band identified as 53 kDa Rubisco large subunit of Chlorella sorokiniana, suggesting that selenate affects expression of the corresponding chloroplast gene as this subunit is encoded in the chloroplast DNA. Results revealed that the microalga was able to accumulate up to 140 mg·kg−1 of SeMet in 120 h of cultivation. This paper shows that Chlorella sorokiniana biomass can be enriched in the high value aminoacid SeMet in batch cultures, while keeping photochemical viability and carbon dioxide fixation activity intact, if exposed to suitable sublethal concentrations of Se. PMID:24688385

  20. The influence of micronutrients in cell culture: a reflection on viability and genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Arigony, Ana Lúcia Vargas; de Oliveira, Iuri Marques; Machado, Miriana; Bordin, Diana Lilian; Bergter, Lothar; Prá, Daniel; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas

    2013-01-01

    Micronutrients, including minerals and vitamins, are indispensable to DNA metabolic pathways and thus are as important for life as macronutrients. Without the proper nutrients, genomic instability compromises homeostasis, leading to chronic diseases and certain types of cancer. Cell-culture media try to mimic the in vivo environment, providing in vitro models used to infer cells' responses to different stimuli. This review summarizes and discusses studies of cell-culture supplementation with micronutrients that can increase cell viability and genomic stability, with a particular focus on previous in vitro experiments. In these studies, the cell-culture media include certain vitamins and minerals at concentrations not equal to the physiological levels. In many common culture media, the sole source of micronutrients is fetal bovine serum (FBS), which contributes to only 5-10% of the media composition. Minimal attention has been dedicated to FBS composition, micronutrients in cell cultures as a whole, or the influence of micronutrients on the viability and genetics of cultured cells. Further studies better evaluating micronutrients' roles at a molecular level and influence on the genomic stability of cells are still needed.

  1. Absence of Rybp Compromises Neural Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Gergo; Szabo, Viktoria; Pirity, Melinda K.

    2016-01-01

    Rybp (Ring1 and Yy1 Binding Protein) is a transcriptional regulator and member of the noncanonical polycomb repressive complex 1 with essential role in early embryonic development. We have previously described that alteration of Rybp dosage in mouse models induced striking neural tube defects (NTDs), exencephaly, and disorganized neurocortex. In this study we further investigated the role of Rybp in neural differentiation by utilising wild type (rybp +/+) and rybp null mutant (rybp −/−) embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and tried to uncover underlying molecular events that are responsible for the observed phenotypic changes. We found that rybp null mutant ESCs formed less matured neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes from existing progenitors than wild type cells. Furthermore, lack of rybp coincided with altered gene expression of key neural markers including Pax6 and Plagl1 pinpointing a possible transcriptional circuit among these genes. PMID:26788067

  2. Atypical Cadherins Celsr1-3 Differentially Regulate Migration of Facial Branchiomotor Neurons in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yibo; Glasco, Derrick M.; Zhou, Libing; Sawant, Anagha; Ravni, Aurélia; Fritzsch, Bernd; Damrau, Christine; Murdoch, Jennifer N.; Evans, Sylvia; Pfaff, Samuel L.; Formstone, Caroline; Goffinet, André M.; Chandrasekhar, Anand; Tissir, Fadel

    2011-01-01

    During hindbrain development, facial branchiomotor neurons (FBM neurons) migrate from medial rhombomere (r) 4 to lateral r6. In zebrafish, mutations in planar cell polarity genes celsr2 and frizzled3a block caudal migration of FBM neurons. Here, we investigated the role of cadherins Celsr1-3, and Fzd3 in FBM neuron migration in mice. In Celsr1 mutants (knock-out and Crash alleles), caudal migration was compromised and neurons often migrated rostrally into r2 and r3, as well as laterally. These phenotypes were not caused by defects in hindbrain patterning or neuronal specification. Celsr1 is expressed in FBM neuron precursors and the floor plate, but not in FBM neurons. Consistent with this, conditional inactivation showed that the function of Celsr1 in FBM neuron migration was non-cell autonomous. In Celsr2 mutants, FBM neurons initiated caudal migration but moved prematurely into lateral r4 and r5. This phenotype was enhanced by inactivation of Celsr3 in FBM neurons and mimicked by inactivation of Fzd3. Furthermore, Celsr2 was epistatic to Celsr1. These data indicate that Celsr1-3 differentially regulate FBM neuron migration. Celsr1 helps to specify the direction of FBM neuron migration, whereas Celsr2 and 3 control its ability to migrate. PMID:20631168

  3. Microtissues Enhance Smooth Muscle Differentiation and Cell Viability of hADSCs for Three Dimensional Bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Yipeng, Jin; Yongde, Xu; Yuanyi, Wu; Jilei, Sun; Jiaxiang, Guo; Jiangping, Gao; Yong, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Smooth muscle differentiated human adipose derived stem cells (hADSCs) provide a crucial stem cell source for urinary tissue engineering, but the induction of hADSCs for smooth muscle differentiation still has several issues to overcome, including a relatively long induction time and equipment dependence, which limits access to abundant stem cells within a short period of time for further application. Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting holds great promise in regenerative medicine due to its controllable construction of a designed 3D structure. When evenly mixed with bioink, stem cells can be spatially distributed within a bioprinted 3D structure, thus avoiding drawbacks such as, stem cell detachment in a conventional cell-scaffold strategy. Notwithstanding the advantages mentioned above, cell viability is often compromised during 3D bioprinting, which is often due to pressure during the bioprinting process. The objective of our study was to improve the efficiency of hADSC smooth muscle differentiation and cell viability of a 3D bioprinted structure. Here, we employed the hanging-drop method to generate hADSC microtissues in a smooth muscle inductive medium containing human transforming growth factor β1 and bioprinted the induced microtissues onto a 3D structure. After 3 days of smooth muscle induction, the expression of α-smooth muscle actin and smoothelin was higher in microtissues than in their counterpart monolayer cultured hADSCs, as confirmed by immunofluorescence and western blotting analysis. The semi-quantitative assay showed that the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was 0.218 ± 0.077 in MTs and 0.082 ± 0.007 in Controls; smoothelin expression was 0.319 ± 0.02 in MTs and 0.178 ± 0.06 in Controls. Induced MTs maintained their phenotype after the bioprinting process. Live/dead and cell count kit 8 assays showed that cell viability and cell proliferation in the 3D structure printed with microtissues were higher at all time points compared to

  4. Astrocytes Prevent Ethanol Induced Apoptosis of Nrf2 Depleted Neurons by Maintaining GSH Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Madhusudhanan; Rathinam, Marylatha; Patel, Dhyanesh; Henderson, George; Mahimainathan, Lenin

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH), a major cellular antioxidant protects cells against oxidative stress injury. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NFE2L2/Nrf2) is a redox sensitive master regulator of battery of antioxidant enzymes including those involved in GSH antioxidant machinery. Earlier we reported that ethanol (ETOH) elicits apoptotic death of primary cortical neurons (PCNs) which in partly due to depletion of intracellular GSH levels. Further a recent report from our laboratory illustrated that ETOH exacerbated the dysregulation of GSH and caspase mediated cell death of cortical neurons that are compromised in Nrf2 machinery (Narasimhan et al., 2011). In various experimental models of neurodegeneration, neuronal antioxidant defenses mainly GSH has been shown to be supported by astrocytes. We therefore sought to determine whether astrocytes can render protection to neurons against ETOH toxicity, particularly when the function of Nrf2 is compromised in neurons. The experimental model consisted of co-culturing primary cortical astrocytes (PCA) with Nrf2 downregulated PCNs that were exposed with 4 mg/mL ETOH for 24 h. Monochlorobimane (MCB) staining followed by FACS analysis showed that astrocytes blocked ETOH induced GSH decrement in Nrf2-silenced neurons as opposed to exaggerated GSH depletion in Nrf2 downregulated PCNs alone. Similarly, the heightened activation of caspase 3/7 observed in Nrf2-compromised neurons was attenuated when co-cultured with astrocytes as measured by luminescence based caspase Glo assay. Furthermore, annexin-V-FITC staining followed by FACS analysis revealed that Nrf2 depleted neurons showed resistance to ETOH induced neuronal apoptosis when co-cultured with astrocytes. Thus, the current study identifies ETOH induced dysregulation of GSH and associated apoptotic events observed in Nrf2-depleted neurons can be blocked by astrocytes. Further our results suggest that this neuroprotective effect of astrocyte despite dysfunctional Nrf2 system

  5. Astrocytes Prevent Ethanol Induced Apoptosis of Nrf2 Depleted Neurons by Maintaining GSH Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Madhusudhanan; Rathinam, Marylatha; Patel, Dhyanesh; Henderson, George; Mahimainathan, Lenin

    2012-07-01

    Glutathione (GSH), a major cellular antioxidant protects cells against oxidative stress injury. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NFE2L2/Nrf2) is a redox sensitive master regulator of battery of antioxidant enzymes including those involved in GSH antioxidant machinery. Earlier we reported that ethanol (ETOH) elicits apoptotic death of primary cortical neurons (PCNs) which in partly due to depletion of intracellular GSH levels. Further a recent report from our laboratory illustrated that ETOH exacerbated the dysregulation of GSH and caspase mediated cell death of cortical neurons that are compromised in Nrf2 machinery (Narasimhan et al., 2011). In various experimental models of neurodegeneration, neuronal antioxidant defenses mainly GSH has been shown to be supported by astrocytes. We therefore sought to determine whether astrocytes can render protection to neurons against ETOH toxicity, particularly when the function of Nrf2 is compromised in neurons. The experimental model consisted of co-culturing primary cortical astrocytes (PCA) with Nrf2 downregulated PCNs that were exposed with 4 mg/mL ETOH for 24 h. Monochlorobimane (MCB) staining followed by FACS analysis showed that astrocytes blocked ETOH induced GSH decrement in Nrf2-silenced neurons as opposed to exaggerated GSH depletion in Nrf2 downregulated PCNs alone. Similarly, the heightened activation of caspase 3/7 observed in Nrf2-compromised neurons was attenuated when co-cultured with astrocytes as measured by luminescence based caspase Glo assay. Furthermore, annexin-V-FITC staining followed by FACS analysis revealed that Nrf2 depleted neurons showed resistance to ETOH induced neuronal apoptosis when co-cultured with astrocytes. Thus, the current study identifies ETOH induced dysregulation of GSH and associated apoptotic events observed in Nrf2-depleted neurons can be blocked by astrocytes. Further our results suggest that this neuroprotective effect of astrocyte despite dysfunctional Nrf2 system

  6. Viability analysis of fisheries management on hermaphrodite population.

    PubMed

    Ferchichi, A; Jerry, M; Miled, S Ben

    2014-09-01

    We study the viability domains of bio-economic constraints for fishing model of hermaphrodite population, displaying three stages, juvenile, female and male. The dynamic of this model is subject to two constraints: an ecological constraint ensuring the stock perennity, and an economic constraint ensuring a minimum revenue for fishermen. Using viability kernel, we find out a viability domain which simultaneously guarantees a minimum stock level and a minimum income for fleets.

  7. Fault Detection and Isolation using Viability Theory and Interval Observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaniee Zarch, Majid; Puig, Vicenç; Poshtan, Javad

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of interval observers and viability theory in fault detection and isolation (FDI). Viability theory develops mathematical and algorithmic methods for investigating the adaptation to viability constraints of evolutions governed by complex systems under uncertainty. These methods can be used for checking the consistency between observed and predicted behavior by using simple sets that approximate the exact set of possible behavior (in the parameter or state space). In this paper, fault detection is based on checking for an inconsistency between the measured and predicted behaviors using viability theory concepts and sets. Finally, an example is provided in order to show the usefulness of the proposed approach.

  8. Raised Intensity Phonation Compromises Vocal Fold Epithelial Barrier Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Bernard; Suehiro, Atsushi; Echemendia, Nicholas; Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi

    2010-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis We investigated the hypothesis that 30 minutes of raised intensity phonation alters transcript levels of vocal fold intercellular tight junction proteins and disrupts the vocal fold epithelial barrier. Study Design Prospective animal study. Methods Eighteen New Zealand white breeder rabbits were randomly assigned to receive 30 minutes of raised intensity phonation or approximation of the vocal folds without phonation. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was used to investigate transcript levels of the epithelial intercellular tight junction proteins, occludin and zonula occludin-1 (Z0-1), and the adherens junction proteins β-catenin and E-cadherin. Structural alterations to the vocal fold epithelium were further examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results Mann Whitney U revealed significantly decreased occludin (P = .016) and β-catenin (P = .016) gene expression from rabbits undergoing raised intensity phonation, compared to control. There were no significant differences in Z0-1 and E-Cadherin gene expression between groups (P >.025). SEM revealed significant obliteration, desquamation, and evidence of microhole formation in rabbit vocal folds exposed to raised intensity phonation, compared to control, while TEM revealed dilated intercellular morphology between groups. Conclusions Results provide support for the hypothesis that a transient episode of raised intensity phonation alters transcript levels of vocal fold intercellular tight junction proteins and disrupts integrity of the epithelial barrier. The loss of barrier integrity may have significant consequences on epithelial defenses and compromise protection of the underlying mucosa from damage secondary to prolonged vibration exposure. PMID:21271586

  9. Efficacy of New Adhesion Promoters on Compromised Hypocalcified Enamel.

    PubMed

    Vamsilatha, Kurapati; Venkata, Kishore Mayakuntla Sai; Aileni, Kaladhar Reddy; Sashidhar, Nagam Reddy

    2015-07-01

    The amount of technological progress occurred in the last few years has brought an add up to the benefits of bonding in Orthodontics. Research-based findings have constantly led to the development of new materials that are aimed to simplify the clinical procedures like bonding of brackets to compromised enamel surfaces. Hence, the present study is aimed to assess the bond strength of orthodontic brackets on fluorosed enamel using adhesion promoters. To evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded on fluorosed enamel using conventional Transbond XT and new adhesion promoters such as Enhance LC and All Bond 3. The study involved 90 non carious, extracted teeth with mild to moderate fluorosis randomly divided into 3 Groups. In Group - I (control group) the teeth were bonded with conventional Transbond XT and cured with LED light. In Group - II Enhance LC was applied to fluorosed enamel before bonding and in Group - III All Bond 3 was used. Shear bond strength was tested by using Universal testing Instron machine. ANOVA and Post-Hoc Tukey's tests were used to compare shear bond strength. Adhesive remnant on the tooth was assessed and scored using adhesive remnant index (ARI). Results showed a reduced SBS values (9.43MPa ±3.03) with conventional Transbond XT on fluorosed enamel. Among the adhesion boosters used Enhance LC illustrated lesser SBS values (12.03 MPa ± 4.42) compared with All Bond 3 (14.38MPa ±4.92). ARI showed bond failure at bracket resin interface in group I & group II and at enamel resin interface in group III although statistically insignificant. It was concluded that using adhesion boosters on fluorosed enamel showed higher bond strength compared to the control group. Among the two adhesion promoters used All Bond 3 expressed highest bond strength compared to Enhance LC although statistically insignificant.

  10. Zinc reduces epithelial barrier compromise induced by human seminal plasma

    PubMed Central

    Mullin, James M.; Diguilio, Katherine M.; Valenzano, Mary C.; Deis, Rachael; Thomas, Sunil; Zurbach, E. Peter; Abdulhaqq, Shaheed; Montaner, Luis J.

    2017-01-01

    Human semen has the potential to modulate the epithelial mucosal tissues it contacts, as seminal plasma (SP) is recognized to contain both pro- and anti-barrier components, yet its effects on epithelial barrier function are largely unknown. We addressed the role of human SP when exposed to the basal-lateral epithelial surface, a situation that would occur clinically with prior mechanical or disease-related injury of the human epithelial mucosal cell layers in contact with semen. The action of SP on claudins-2, -4, -5, and -7 expression, as well as on a target epithelium whose basolateral surface has been made accessible to SP, showed upregulation of claudins-4 and -5 in CACO-2 human epithelial cell layers, despite broad variance in SP-induced modulation of transepithelial electrical resistance and mannitol permeability. Upregulation of claudin-2 by SP also exhibited such variance by SP sample. We characterize individual effects on CACO-2 barrier function of nine factors known to be present abundantly in seminal plasma (zinc, EGF, citrate, spermine, fructose, urea, TGF, histone, inflammatory cytokines) to establish that zinc, spermine and fructose had significant potential to raise CACO-2 transepithelial resistance, whereas inflammatory cytokines and EGF decreased this measure of barrier function. The role of zinc as a dominant factor in determining higher levels of transepithelial resistance and lower levels of paracellular leak were confirmed by zinc chelation and exogenous zinc addition. As expected, SP presentation to the basolateral cell surface also caused a very dramatic yet transient elevation of pErk levels. Results suggest that increased zinc content in SP can compete against the barrier-compromising effect of negative modulators in SP when SP gains access to that epithelium’s basolateral surface. Prophylactic elevation of zinc in an epithelial cell layer prior to contact by SP may help to protect an epithelial barrier from invasion by SP-containing STD

  11. Glutaric acid moderately compromises energy metabolism in rat brain.

    PubMed

    da C Ferreira, Gustavo; Viegas, Carolina M; Schuck, Patrícia F; Latini, Alexandra; Dutra-Filho, Carlos S; Wyse, Angela T S; Wannmacher, Clóvis M D; Vargas, Carmen R; Wajner, Moacir

    2005-12-01

    Glutaric acidemia type I is an inherited metabolic disorder biochemically characterized by tissue accumulation of predominantly glutaric acid (GA). Affected patients present frontotemporal hypotrophy, as well as caudate and putamen injury following acute encephalopathic crises. Considering that the underlying mechanisms of basal ganglia damage in this disorder are poorly known, in the present study we tested the effects of glutaric acid (0.2-5mM) on critical enzyme activities of energy metabolism, namely the respiratory chain complexes I-IV, succinate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase in midbrain of developing rats. Glutaric acid significantly inhibited creatine kinase activity (up to 26%) even at the lowest dose used in the assays (0.2mM). We also observed that CK inhibition was prevented by pre-incubation of the homogenates with reduced glutathione, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of GA was possibly mediated by oxidation of essential thiol groups of the enzyme. In addition, the activities of the respiratory chain complex I-III and of succinate dehydrogenase were also significantly inhibited by 20 and 30%, respectively, at the highest glutaric acid concentration tested (5mM). In contrast, complexes II-III and IV activities of the electron transport chain were not affected by the acid. The effect of glutaric acid on the rate of oxygen consumption in intact mitochondria from the rat cerebrum was also investigated. Glutaric acid (1mM) significantly lowered the respiratory control ratio (state III/state IV) up to 40% in the presence of the respiratory substrates glutamate/malate or succinate. Moreover, state IV respiration linked to NAD and FAD substrates was significantly increased in GA-treated mitochondria while state III was significantly diminished. The results indicate that the major metabolite accumulating in glutaric acidemia type I moderately compromises brain energy metabolism in vitro.

  12. Experimental nonalcoholic steatohepatitis compromises ureagenesis, an essential hepatic metabolic function.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Karen Louise; Grønbæk, Henning; Glavind, Emilie; Hebbard, Lionel; Jessen, Niels; Clouston, Andrew; George, Jacob; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2014-08-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is increasing in prevalence, yet its consequences for liver function are unknown. We studied ureagenesis, an essential metabolic liver function of importance for whole body nitrogen homeostasis, in a rodent model of diet-induced NASH. Rats were fed a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet for 4 and 16 wk, resulting in early and advanced experimental NASH, respectively. We examined the urea cycle enzyme mRNAs in liver tissue, the hepatocyte urea cycle enzyme proteins, and the in vivo capacity of urea-nitrogen synthesis (CUNS). Early NASH decreased all of the urea cycle mRNAs to an average of 60% and the ornithine transcarbamylase protein to 10%, whereas the CUNS remained unchanged. Advanced NASH further decreased the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase protein to 63% and, in addition, decreased the CUNS by 20% [from 5.65 ± 0.23 to 4.58 ± 0.30 μmol × (min × 100 g)(-1); P = 0.01]. Early NASH compromised the genes and enzyme proteins involved in ureagenesis, whereas advanced NASH resulted in a functional reduction in the capacity for ureagenesis. The pattern of urea cycle perturbations suggests a prevailing mitochondrial impairment by NASH. The decrease in CUNS has consequences for the ability of the body to adjust to changes in the requirements for nitrogen homeostasis e.g., at stressful events. NASH, thus, in terms of metabolic consequences, is not an innocuous lesion, and the manifestations of the damage seem to be a continuum with increasing disease severity.

  13. Photofunctionalized dental implants: a case series in compromised bone.

    PubMed

    Funato, Akiyoshi; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light treatment of titanium, or photofunctionalization, has been shown to enhance its osteoconductivity in animal and in vitro studies, but its clinical performance has yet to be reported. This clinical case series sought to examine the effect of photofunctionalization on implant success, healing time, osseointegration speed, and peri-implant marginal bone level changes at 1 year after restoration. Four partially edentulous patients were included in the study. Seven implants with identical microroughened surfaces were photofunctionalized with UV light for 15 minutes. Osseointegration speed was calculated by measuring the increase in implant stability quotient (ISQ) per month. Marginal bone levels were evaluated radiographically at crown placement and at 1 year. All implants placed into fresh extraction sockets, vertically augmented bone, simultaneously augmented sinuses, or the site of a failing implant remained functional and healthy at 1 year, even with an earlier loading protocol (2.1 to 4.5 months). ISQs of 48 to 75 at implant placement had increased to 68 to 81 at loading. In particular, implants with low primary stability (initial ISQ < 70) showed large increases in ISQ. The speed of osseointegration of photofunctionalized implants was considerably greater than that of as-received implants documented in the literature. Mean marginal bone levels were -0.35 ± 0.71 mm at crown placement and had significantly increased to 0.16 ± 0.53 mm at 1 year, with coronal gains in marginal bone level that surpassed the implant platform. No implants showed marginal bone loss. Within the limits of this study, photofunctionalization expedited and enhanced osseointegration of commercial dental implants in various clinically challenging/compromised bone conditions. Photofunctionalization resulted in preservation--and often a gain--of marginal bone level, and long-term large-scale clinical validation is warranted.

  14. Ebselen Alters Mitochondrial Physiology and Reduces Viability of Rat Hippocampal Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Santofimia-Castaño, Patricia; Salido, Ginés M.

    2013-01-01

    The seleno-organic compound and radical scavenger ebselen (2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one) have been extensively employed as an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective compound. However, its glutathione peroxidase activity at the expense of cellular thiols groups could underlie certain deleterious actions of the compound on cell physiology. In this study, we have analyzed the effect of ebselen on rat hippocampal astrocytes in culture. Cellular viability, the intracellular free-Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c), the mitochondrial free-Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]m), and mitochondrial membrane potential (ψm) were analyzed. The caspase-3 activity was also assayed. Our results show that cell viability was reduced by treatment of cells with ebselen, depending on the concentration employed. In the presence of ebselen, we observed an initial transient increase in [Ca2+]c that was then followed by a progressive increase to an elevated plateau. We also observed a transient increase in [Ca2+]m in the presence of ebselen that returned toward a value over the prestimulation level. The compound induced depolarization of ψm and altered the permeability of the mitochondrial membrane. Additionally, a disruption of the mitochondrial network was observed. Finally, we did not detect changes in caspase-3 activation in response to ebselen treatment. Collectively, these data support the likelihood of ebselen, depending on the concentration employed, reduces viability of rat hippocampal astrocytes via its action on the mitochondrial activity. These may be early effects that do not involve caspase-3 activation. We conclude that, depending on the concentration used, ebselen might exert deleterious actions on astrocyte physiology that could compromise cell function. PMID:23496767

  15. Storage Viability and Optimization Web Service

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Christ; Lai, Judy; Siddiqui, Afzal; Limpaitoon, Tanachai; Phan, Trucy; Megel, Olivier; Chang, Jessica; DeForest, Nicholas

    2010-10-11

    Non-residential sectors offer many promising applications for electrical storage (batteries) and photovoltaics (PVs). However, choosing and operating storage under complex tariff structures poses a daunting technical and economic problem that may discourage potential customers and result in lost carbon and economic savings. Equipment vendors are unlikely to provide adequate environmental analysis or unbiased economic results to potential clients, and are even less likely to completely describe the robustness of choices in the face of changing fuel prices and tariffs. Given these considerations, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) have designed the Storage Viability and Optimization Web Service (SVOW): a tool that helps building owners, operators and managers to decide if storage technologies and PVs merit deeper analysis. SVOW is an open access, web-based energy storage and PV analysis calculator, accessible by secure remote login. Upon first login, the user sees an overview of the parameters: load profile, tariff, technologies, and solar radiation location. Each parameter has a pull-down list of possible predefined inputs and users may upload their own as necessary. Since the non-residential sectors encompass a broad range of facilities with fundamentally different characteristics, the tool starts by asking the users to select a load profile from a limited cohort group of example facilities. The example facilities are categorized according to their North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code. After the load profile selection, users select a predefined tariff or use the widget to create their own. The technologies and solar radiation menus operate in a similar fashion. After these four parameters have been inputted, the users have to select an optimization setting as well as an optimization objective. The analytic engine of SVOW is LBNL?s Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), which is a mixed

  16. The muscle-mechanical compromise framework: Implications for the scaling of gait and posture

    PubMed Central

    Usherwood, James Richard (Jim)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many aspects of animal and human gait and posture cannot be predicted from purely mechanical work minimization or entirely based on optimizing muscle efficiency. Here, the Muscle-Mechanical Compromise Framework is introduced as a conceptual paradigm for considering the interactions and compromises between these two objectives. Current assumptions in implementing the Framework are presented. Implications of the compromise are discussed and related to the scaling of running mechanics and animal posture. PMID:28149398

  17. Chitin and carbon nanotube composites as biocompatible scaffolds for neuron growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nandita; Chen, Jinhu; Koziol, Krzysztof K.; Hallam, Keith R.; Janas, Dawid; Patil, Avinash J.; Strachan, Ally; G. Hanley, Jonathan; Rahatekar, Sameer S.

    2016-04-01

    The design of biocompatible implants for neuron repair/regeneration ideally requires high cell adhesion as well as good electrical conductivity. Here, we have shown that plasma-treated chitin carbon nanotube composite scaffolds show very good neuron adhesion as well as support of synaptic function of neurons. The addition of carbon nanotubes to a chitin biopolymer improved the electrical conductivity and the assisted oxygen plasma treatment introduced more oxygen species onto the chitin nanotube scaffold surface. Neuron viability experiments showed excellent neuron attachment onto plasma-treated chitin nanotube composite scaffolds. The support of synaptic function was evident on chitin/nanotube composites, as confirmed by PSD-95 staining. The biocompatible and electrically-conducting chitin nanotube composite scaffold prepared in this study can be used for in vitro tissue engineering of neurons and, potentially, as an implantable electrode for stimulation and repair of neurons.

  18. Chitin and carbon nanotube composites as biocompatible scaffolds for neuron growth.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nandita; Chen, Jinhu; Koziol, Krzysztof K; Hallam, Keith R; Janas, Dawid; Patil, Avinash J; Strachan, Ally; G Hanley, Jonathan; Rahatekar, Sameer S

    2016-04-21

    The design of biocompatible implants for neuron repair/regeneration ideally requires high cell adhesion as well as good electrical conductivity. Here, we have shown that plasma-treated chitin carbon nanotube composite scaffolds show very good neuron adhesion as well as support of synaptic function of neurons. The addition of carbon nanotubes to a chitin biopolymer improved the electrical conductivity and the assisted oxygen plasma treatment introduced more oxygen species onto the chitin nanotube scaffold surface. Neuron viability experiments showed excellent neuron attachment onto plasma-treated chitin nanotube composite scaffolds. The support of synaptic function was evident on chitin/nanotube composites, as confirmed by PSD-95 staining. The biocompatible and electrically-conducting chitin nanotube composite scaffold prepared in this study can be used for in vitro tissue engineering of neurons and, potentially, as an implantable electrode for stimulation and repair of neurons.

  19. Incorporating landscape stochasticity into population viability analysis.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Ryan A; Wintle, Brendan A

    2007-03-01

    The importance of incorporating landscape dynamics into population viability analysis (PVA) has previously been acknowledged, but the need to repeat the landscape generation process to encapsulate landscape stochasticity in model outputs has largely been overlooked. Reasons for this are that (1) there is presently no means for quantifying the relative effects of landscape stochasticity and population stochasticity on model outputs, and therefore no means for determining how to allocate simulation time optimally between the two; and (2) the process of generating multiple landscapes to incorporate landscape stochasticity is tedious and user-intensive with current PVA software. Here we demonstrate that landscape stochasticity can be an important source of variance in model outputs. We solve the technical problems with incorporating landscape stochasticity by deriving a formula that gives the optimal ratio of population simulations to landscape simulations for a given model, and by providing a computer program that incorporates the formula and automates multiple landscape generation in a dynamic landscape metapopulation (DLMP) model. Using a case study of a bird population, we produce estimates of DLMP model output parameters that are up to four times more precise than those estimated from a single landscape in the same amount of total simulation time. We use the DLMP modeling software RAMAS Landscape to run the landscape and metapopulation models, though our method is general and could be applied to any PVA platform. The results of this study should motivate DLMP modelers to consider landscape stochasticity in their analyses.

  20. Membrane Potential Dye Imaging of Ventromedial Hypothalamus Neurons From Adult Mice to Study Glucose Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Vazirani, Reema P.; Fioramonti, Xavier; Routh, Vanessa H.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of neuronal activity are often performed using neurons from rodents less than 2 months of age due to the technical difficulties associated with increasing connective tissue and decreased neuronal viability that occur with age. Here, we describe a methodology for the dissociation of healthy hypothalamic neurons from adult-aged mice. The ability to study neurons from adult-aged mice allows the use of disease models that manifest at a later age and might be more developmentally accurate for certain studies. Fluorescence imaging of dissociated neurons can be used to study the activity of a population of neurons, as opposed to using electrophysiology to study a single neuron. This is particularly useful when studying a heterogeneous neuronal population in which the desired neuronal type is rare such as for hypothalamic glucose sensing neurons. We utilized membrane potential dye imaging of adult ventromedial hypothalamic neurons to study their responses to changes in extracellular glucose. Glucose sensing neurons are believed to play a role in central regulation of energy balance. The ability to study glucose sensing in adult rodents is particularly useful since the predominance of diseases related to dysfunctional energy balance (e.g. obesity) increase with age. PMID:24326343

  1. Membrane potential dye imaging of ventromedial hypothalamus neurons from adult mice to study glucose sensing.

    PubMed

    Vazirani, Reema P; Fioramonti, Xavier; Routh, Vanessa H

    2013-11-27

    Studies of neuronal activity are often performed using neurons from rodents less than 2 months of age due to the technical difficulties associated with increasing connective tissue and decreased neuronal viability that occur with age. Here, we describe a methodology for the dissociation of healthy hypothalamic neurons from adult-aged mice. The ability to study neurons from adult-aged mice allows the use of disease models that manifest at a later age and might be more developmentally accurate for certain studies. Fluorescence imaging of dissociated neurons can be used to study the activity of a population of neurons, as opposed to using electrophysiology to study a single neuron. This is particularly useful when studying a heterogeneous neuronal population in which the desired neuronal type is rare such as for hypothalamic glucose sensing neurons. We utilized membrane potential dye imaging of adult ventromedial hypothalamic neurons to study their responses to changes in extracellular glucose. Glucose sensing neurons are believed to play a role in central regulation of energy balance. The ability to study glucose sensing in adult rodents is particularly useful since the predominance of diseases related to dysfunctional energy balance (e.g. obesity) increase with age.

  2. Analyses of several seed viability markers in individual recalcitrant seeds of Eugenia stipitata McVaugh with totipotent germination.

    PubMed

    Calvi, G P; Aud, F F; Ferraz, I D K; Pritchard, H W; Kranner, I

    2017-01-01

    The use of biochemical seed viability markers is often compromised by the unknown partitioning of analytes in bulk seed lots consisting of inseparable populations of viable and nonviable seeds. We took advantage of an unusual morphological syndrome found in the recalcitrant, undifferentiated seeds of Eugenia stipitata: one seed can be cut into several parts, each of which can germinate and develop into seedlings. We used four seed parts from one individual seed to analyse seed moisture content (MC), seed viability and the antioxidant glutathione (γ-glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH), glutathione disulphide (GSSG) and intermediates of glutathione synthesis and breakdown. Seeds were exposed to different environmental MC to induce various levels of desiccation stress. Upon storage at high seed MC, seed viability was maintained, while GSH concentration increased and the glutathione half-cell reduction potential (EGSSG/2GSH ) was less negative than -215 mV, indicating GSH production and highly reducing conditions. Storage at low seed MC led to loss of GSH, resulting in a shift in EGSSG/2GSH , and seed death. In contrast, the cyst(e)ine half-cell reduction potential (ECySS/2CYS ) could not distinguish between the viability categories. Previous studies on seed populations revealed that the probability for a seed being alive is 50% at EGSSG/2GSH values between -180 and -160 mV. The single seed approach revealed that the window in which seed viability was lost could be slightly shifted towards more negative values. We discuss the contribution of cellular pH to EGSSG/2GSH and recommend E. stipitata as a recalcitrant seed model to study stress response on a single seed basis. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  3. DL-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid protects primary neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation induced injury

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Di; Xu, Jun; Xu, Quanyi; Zuo, Guokun

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral infarction is a type of ischemic stroke and is one of the main causes of irreversible brain damage. Although multiple neuroprotective agents have been investigated recently, the potential of DL-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid (DL-AP3) in treating oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal injury, has not been clarified yet. This study was aimed to explore the role of DL-AP3 in primary neuronal cell cultures. Primary neurons were divided into four groups: (1) A control group that was not treated; (2) DL-AP3 group treated with 10 µM of DL-AP3; (3) OGD group, in which neurons were cultured under OGD conditions; (4) OGD + DL-AP3 group, in which OGD model was first established and then the cells were treated with 10 µM of DL-AP3. Neuronal viability and apoptosis were measured using Cell Counting Kit-8 and flow cytometry. Expressions of phospho-Akt1 (p-Akt1) and cytochrome C were detected using Western blot. The results showed that DL-AP3 did not affect neuronal viability and apoptosis in DL-AP3 group, nor it changed p-Akt1 and cytochrome C expression (p > 0.05). In OGD + DL-AP3 group, DL-AP3 significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects of OGD on neuronal viability (p < 0.001) and reduced OGD induced apoptosis (p < 0.01). In addition, the down-regulation of p-Akt1 and up-regulation of cytochrome C, induced by OGD, were recovered to some extent after DL-AP3 treatment (p < 0.05 or p < 0.001). Overall, DL-AP3 could protect primary neurons from OGD-induced injury by affecting the viability and apoptosis of neurons, and by regulating the expressions of p-Akt1 and cytochrome C. PMID:27968708

  4. Toxicity of neurons treated with herbicides and neuroprotection by mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SS31.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Tejaswini P; Manczak, Maria; Calkins, Marcus J; Mao, Peizhong; Reddy, Arubala P; Shirendeb, Ulziibat; Park, Byung; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the neurotoxicity of two commonly used herbicides: picloram and triclopyr and the neuroprotective effects of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, SS31. Using mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells and primary neurons from C57BL/6 mice, we investigated the toxicity of these herbicides, and protective effects of SS1 peptide against picloram and triclopyr toxicity. We measured total RNA content, cell viability and mRNA expression of peroxiredoxins, neuroprotective genes, mitochondrial-encoded electron transport chain (ETC) genes in N2a cells treated with herbicides and SS31. Using primary neurons from C57BL/6 mice, neuronal survival was studied in neurons treated with herbicides, in neurons pretreated with SS31 plus treated with herbicides, neurons treated with SS31 alone, and untreated neurons. Significantly decreased total RNA content, and cell viability in N2a cells treated with picloram and triclopyr were found compared to untreated N2a cells. Decreased mRNA expression of neuroprotective genes, and ETC genes in cells treated with herbicides was found compared to untreated cells. Decreased mRNA expression of peroxiredoxins 1-6 in N2a cells treated with picloram was found, suggesting that picloram affects the antioxidant enzymes in N2a cells. Immunofluorescence analysis of primary neurons revealed that decreased neuronal branching and degenerating neurons in neurons treated with picloram and triclopyr. However, neurons pretreated with SS31 prevented degenerative process caused by herbicides. Based on these results, we propose that herbicides--picloram and triclopyr appear to damage neurons, and the SS31 peptide appears to protect neurons from herbicide toxicity.

  5. Toxicity of Neurons Treated with Herbicides and Neuroprotection by Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant SS31

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Tejaswini P.; Manczak, Maria; Calkins, Marcus J.; Mao, Peizhong; Reddy, Arubala P.; Shirendeb, Ulziibat; Park, Byung; Reddy, P. Hemachandra

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the neurotoxicity of two commonly used herbicides: picloram and triclopyr and the neuroprotective effects of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, SS31. Using mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells and primary neurons from C57BL/6 mice, we investigated the toxicity of these herbicides, and protective effects of SS1 peptide against picloram and triclopyr toxicity. We measured total RNA content, cell viability and mRNA expression of peroxiredoxins, neuroprotective genes, mitochondrial-encoded electron transport chain (ETC) genes in N2a cells treated with herbicides and SS31. Using primary neurons from C57BL/6 mice, neuronal survival was studied in neurons treated with herbicides, in neurons pretreated with SS31 plus treated with herbicides, neurons treated with SS31 alone, and untreated neurons. Significantly decreased total RNA content, and cell viability in N2a cells treated with picloram and triclopyr were found compared to untreated N2a cells. Decreased mRNA expression of neuroprotective genes, and ETC genes in cells treated with herbicides was found compared to untreated cells. Decreased mRNA expression of peroxiredoxins 1–6 in N2a cells treated with picloram was found, suggesting that picloram affects the antioxidant enzymes in N2a cells. Immunofluorescence analysis of primary neurons revealed that decreased neuronal branching and degenerating neurons in neurons treated with picloram and triclopyr. However, neurons pretreated with SS31 prevented degenerative process caused by herbicides. Based on these results, we propose that herbicides—picloram and triclopyr appear to damage neurons, and the SS31 peptide appears to protect neurons from herbicide toxicity. PMID:21318024

  6. Child mental health consultation with families of medically compromised infants.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Linda C

    2003-07-01

    behavioral and psychological interventions are integrated with the child's biomedical care. 5. Fostering a brief, or sometimes long-term, therapeutic relationship with the family or facilitating the family's finding such a relationship with another clinician. There will never be enough child and adolescent psychiatrists and psychologists to treat all families of medically compromised infants. Knowledge of normative responses has advanced to the point at which basic skills can be used by and transmitted to others who can provide basic services. There is much to be learned about the short- and long-term sequelae of such stressful situations on individuals and family systems with preexisting psychopathology. For such families, child mental health professionals are uniquely suited to play a further role in research and treatment.

  7. Neurofibromin and Neuronal Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    for these differences in the response of Nfl-/- neurons. "So What" Section. The learning disabilities associated with NF I constitute a highly variable...and +/+ neurons appear to become more significant with age. Our results may have implications for two areas: 1) the pathogenesis of learning ... disabilities in children with NF I, and 2) therapeutic strategies or targets for prolonging neuron survival, or for increasing neuronal response to protective

  8. Population viability assessment of salmonids by using probabilistic networks

    Treesearch

    Danny C. Lee; Bruce E. Rieman

    1997-01-01

    Public agencies are being asked to quantitatively assess the impact of land management activities on sensitive populations of salmonids. To aid in these assessments, we developed a Bayesian viability assessment procedure (BayVAM) to help characterize land use risks to salmonids in the Pacific Northwest. This procedure incorporates a hybrid approach to viability...

  9. Viability, Advantages and Design Methodologies of M-Learning Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabel, Todd W.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the viability and principle design methodologies of Mobile Learning models in developing regions. Demographic and market studies were utilized to determine the viability of M-Learning delivery as well as best uses for such technologies and methods given socioeconomic and political conditions within the…

  10. Role of neuronal glutamate transporter in the cysteine uptake and intracellular glutathione levels in cultured cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Himi, T; Ikeda, M; Yasuhara, T; Nishida, M; Morita, I

    2003-12-01

    Cysteine uptake is the rate-limiting process in glutathione synthesis. Previously we have shown that the inhibitors of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) significantly enhance glutamate toxicity via depletion of intracellular glutathione. In this study we show evidence that the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAT3 is directly enrolled in cysteine uptake in cultured neurons. Neuronal cysteine uptake was dependent on the extracellular sodium, and was suppressed by EAAT inhibitors. Cysteine uptake was suppressed by extracellular glutamate and aspartate, substrates of EAATs, and not by substrates of cysteine transporters. Intracellular glutathione levels were reduced by EAAT inhibitors, and not by inhibitors of cysteine transporters. Knock down of EAAT3 expression using antisense oligonucleotide significantly reduced cysteine uptake, intracellular glutathione level, and neuronal viability against oxidative stress. These facts indicate that EAAT3 functions as a cysteine transporter, and this function seems to be unique and distinct from cysteine transporters that have been reported.

  11. Dyrk1A Haploinsufficiency Affects Viability and Causes Developmental Delay and Abnormal Brain Morphology in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fotaki, Vassiliki; Dierssen, Mara; Alcántara, Soledad; Martínez, Salvador; Martí, Eulàlia; Casas, Caty; Visa, Joana; Soriano, Eduardo; Estivill, Xavier; Arbonés, Maria L.

    2002-01-01

    DYRK1A is the human orthologue of the Drosophila minibrain (mnb) gene, which is involved in postembryonic neurogenesis in flies. Because of its mapping position on chromosome 21 and the neurobehavioral alterations shown by mice overexpressing this gene, involvement of DYRK1A in some of the neurological defects of Down syndrome patients has been suggested. To gain insight into its physiological role, we have generated mice deficient in Dyrk1A function by gene targeting. Dyrk1A−/− null mutants presented a general growth delay and died during midgestation. Mice heterozygous for the mutation (Dyrk1A+/−) showed decreased neonatal viability and a significant body size reduction from birth to adulthood. General neurobehavioral analysis revealed preweaning developmental delay of Dyrk1A+/− mice and specific alterations in adults. Brains of Dyrk1A+/− mice were decreased in size in a region-specific manner, although the cytoarchitecture and neuronal components in most areas were not altered. Cell counts showed increased neuronal densities in some brain regions and a specific decrease in the number of neurons in the superior colliculus, which exhibited a significant size reduction. These data provide evidence about the nonredundant, vital role of Dyrk1A and suggest a conserved mode of action that determines normal growth and brain size in both mice and flies. PMID:12192061

  12. The Location of Viability Genes within a Testcross Framework.

    PubMed

    Chapco, W

    1972-02-01

    The maximum likelihood method is applied to the problem of estimating the positions and effects of viability genes. Whenever testcross linkage data indicate the presence of differential viability, it is hypothesized that there exists one viability gene between each marker. Estimation is possible only for two-point data since the number of independent expectation expressions is less than the number of parameters for three or more markers. It is pointed out that within the two-point testcross system, it is impossible to distinguish between pleiotropic effects of the marker genes and the effect of a middle viability gene, if existent. The methods outlined will be useful in their application to experiments specifically designed to locate induced viability genes.

  13. A novel technique for micro-dissection of neuronal processes.

    PubMed

    Kirson, E D; Yaari, Y

    2000-06-01

    A simple system for cutting dendrites of single neurons without damaging the viability of the cell is described. The system utilizes a rapidly vibrating (100 Hz) micropipette (<1 microm tip diameter), which is dragged under direct visual control across the dendrite of a selected neuron. We used this system in a thin slice preparation to dissect the apical dendrites of rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells. We then used the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration to record from the isolated somata of these cells and to inject a dye into them. Both a functional and an anatomical disconnection of the dendrites from their somata were verified.

  14. Viability and functional integrity of washed platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda, A.A.; Zylstra, V.W.; Clare, D.E.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Forstrom, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    The viability and functional integrity of saline- and ACD-saline-washed platelets were compared with those of unwashed platelets. After template bleeding time (TBT) was measured, 15 healthy volunteers underwent plateletpheresis and ingested 600 mg of aspirin. Autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets were transfused: unwashed (n = 5), washed with 0.9 percent saline solution (SS) (n = 5), and washed with a buffered 12.6 percent solution of ACD-A in 0.9 percent saline solution (n = 5). After transfusion, we measured TBT at 1, 4, and 24 hours; platelet survival at 10 minutes and 1, 4, and 24 hours and daily for 6 days; and the percentage of uptake in liver and spleen by quantitative whole-body radionuclide scintigraphy at 24 and 190 hours. We found that saline washing affected platelet recovery, 23.47 +/- 12 percent (p less than 0.001) as compared to 52.43 +/- 17 percent (p less than 0.002) for ACD-saline and 73.17 +/- 8 percent for control; that saline washing resulted in a greater liver uptake than control and ACD-saline-washed platelets (31.9 +/- 8% (p less than 0.001) vs 17.7 +/- 4.1 and 19.3 +/- 2.1% (p greater than 0.1), respectively); that, unlike control and ACD-saline-washed platelets, saline-washed platelets did not shorten bleeding time; and that neither type of washing affected survival. Although ACD-saline washing affects recovery, it also results in intact function, normal survival, higher recovery than SS platelets, and no significant liver uptake.

  15. Economic viability of geriatric hip fracture centers.

    PubMed

    Clement, R Carter; Ahn, Jaimo; Mehta, Samir; Bernstein, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Management of geriatric hip fractures in a protocol-driven center can improve outcomes and reduce costs. Nonetheless, this approach has not spread as broadly as the effectiveness data would imply. One possible explanation is that operating such a center is not perceived as financially worthwhile. To assess the economic viability of dedicated hip fracture centers, the authors built a financial model to estimate profit as a function of costs, reimbursement, and patient volume in 3 settings: an average US hip fracture program, a highly efficient center, and an academic hospital without a specific hip fracture program. Results were tested with sensitivity analysis. A local market analysis was conducted to assess the feasibility of supporting profitable hip fracture centers. The results demonstrate that hip fracture treatment only becomes profitable when the annual caseload exceeds approximately 72, assuming costs characteristic of a typical US hip fracture program. The threshold of profitability is 49 cases per year for high-efficiency hip fracture centers and 151 for the urban academic hospital under review. The largest determinant of profit is reimbursement, followed by costs and volume. In the authors’ home market, 168 hospitals offer hip fracture care, yet 85% fall below the 72-case threshold. Hip fracture centers can be highly profitable through low costs and, especially, high revenues. However, most hospitals likely lose money by offering hip fracture care due to inadequate volume. Thus, both large and small facilities would benefit financially from the consolidation of hip fracture care at dedicated hip fracture centers. Typical US cities have adequate volume to support several such centers.

  16. Assessment of tissue viability by polarization spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, G.; Anderson, C.; Henricson, J.; Leahy, M.; O'Doherty, J.; Sjöberg, F.

    2008-09-01

    A new and versatile method for tissue viability imaging based on polarization spectroscopy of blood in superficial tissue structures such as the skin is presented in this paper. Linearly polarized light in the visible wavelength region is partly reflected directly by the skin surface and partly diffusely backscattered from the dermal tissue matrix. Most of the directly reflected light preserves its polarization state while the light returning from the deeper tissue layers is depolarized. By the use of a polarization filter positioned in front of a sensitive CCD-array, the light directly reflected from the tissue surface is blocked, while the depolarized light returning from the deeper tissue layers reaches the detector array. By separating the colour planes of the detected image, spectroscopic information about the amount of red blood cells (RBCs) in the microvascular network of the tissue under investigation can be derived. A theory that utilizes the differences in light absorption of RBCs and bloodless tissue in the red and green wavelength region forms the basis of an algorithm for displaying a colour coded map of the RBC distribution in a tissue. Using a fluid model, a linear relationship (cc. = 0.99) between RBC concentration and the output signal was demonstrated within the physiological range 0-4%. In-vivo evaluation using transepidermal application of acetylcholine by the way of iontophoresis displayed the heterogeneity pattern of the vasodilatation produced by the vasoactive agent. Applications of this novel technology are likely to be found in drug and skin care product development as well as in the assessment of skin irritation and tissue repair processes and even ultimately in a clinic case situation.

  17. Population viability analysis for endangered Roanoke logperch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, James H.; Angermeier, Paul; Anderson, Gregory B.

    2016-01-01

    A common strategy for recovering endangered species is ensuring that populations exceed the minimum viable population size (MVP), a demographic benchmark that theoretically ensures low long-term extinction risk. One method of establishing MVP is population viability analysis, a modeling technique that simulates population trajectories and forecasts extinction risk based on a series of biological, environmental, and management assumptions. Such models also help identify key uncertainties that have a large influence on extinction risk. We used stochastic count-based simulation models to explore extinction risk, MVP, and the possible benefits of alternative management strategies in populations of Roanoke logperch Percina rex, an endangered stream fish. Estimates of extinction risk were sensitive to the assumed population growth rate and model type, carrying capacity, and catastrophe regime (frequency and severity of anthropogenic fish kills), whereas demographic augmentation did little to reduce extinction risk. Under density-dependent growth, the estimated MVP for Roanoke logperch ranged from 200 to 4200 individuals, depending on the assumed severity of catastrophes. Thus, depending on the MVP threshold, anywhere from two to all five of the logperch populations we assessed were projected to be viable. Despite this uncertainty, these results help identify populations with the greatest relative extinction risk, as well as management strategies that might reduce this risk the most, such as increasing carrying capacity and reducing fish kills. Better estimates of population growth parameters and catastrophe regimes would facilitate the refinement of MVP and extinction-risk estimates, and they should be a high priority for future research on Roanoke logperch and other imperiled stream-fish species.

  18. On diamond surface properties and interactions with neurons.

    PubMed

    Ariano, P; Budnyk, O; Dalmazzo, S; Lovisolo, D; Manfredotti, Ch; Rivolo, P; Vittone, E

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we report about the role the diamond surface morphology and atomic termination plays in the survival and viability of neuronal cells, which represent an appropriate experimental model for the development of cell-based biosensors. The samples we have investigated were both CVD homoepitaxial diamond films and nanocrystalline diamond layers deposited on quartz substrates. Different surface terminations were induced through exposure to atomic hydrogen and to intense UV irradiation. GT1-7 cells, a neuronal line of hypothalamic origin, were plated directly onto the diamond surfaces without exogenous adhesion molecules, in order to correlate the surface topography and chemistry to cell growth and viability. The cell density on nanocrystalline diamonds after 48 h from plating was approximately 55% of the control on plastic dishes, whatever is the atomic termination of the surface, whereas the performances of homoepitaxial samples in terms of cell growth depend on surface termination and were significantly lower, 30%.

  19. Near-infrared spectroscopy for detection of vascular compromise in paediatric supracondylar fractures.

    PubMed

    Skowno, Justin J; Quick, Tom J; Carpenter, Eleanor C; De Lima, Jonathan; Gibbons, Paul J; Little, David G

    2014-03-01

    Children suffering supracondylar fractures of the humerus are at risk of vascular compromise, which is currently assessed clinically, although other modalities such as angiography, pulse oximetry, Doppler ultrasound and magnetic resonance angiography have been used. We sought to ascertain whether tissue haemoglobin oxygenation (StO2) measurement could distinguish between patients with and without clinical vascular compromise following supracondylar fractures of the humerus. We prospectively observed StO2 using near-infrared spectroscopy in 29 paediatric patients with supracondylar fractures requiring operative manipulation. The injured and uninjured volar forearm compartments were monitored immediately before and after fracture reduction. The relationship between StO2 in the injured and uninjured limb, and the presence of pre-operative vascular compromise was assessed. Seven out of 29 children presented with vascular compromise. Patients with clinical vascular compromise had significantly lower pre-reduction StO2 (63.5% ± 15%, mean ± standard deviation), compared to those without compromise (80.9% ± 10%). StO2 normalized following surgery in all children with vascular compromise. These improvements in muscle StO2 were associated, in all patients, with the clinical return of pulses and resolution of neurological symptoms if present. StO2 monitoring can identify patients with clinical vascular compromise, can identify the return of adequate perfusion following operative correction of supracondylar fractures, and may be a useful adjunct to clinical assessment.

  20. 32 CFR 2001.48 - Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure. 2001.48 Section 2001.48 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense... SECURITY INFORMATION Safeguarding § 2001.48 Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure....

  1. 32 CFR 2001.48 - Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure. 2001.48 Section 2001.48 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense... SECURITY INFORMATION Safeguarding § 2001.48 Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure....

  2. 32 CFR 2001.48 - Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure. 2001.48 Section 2001.48 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense... SECURITY INFORMATION Safeguarding § 2001.48 Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure....

  3. 22 CFR 304.7 - Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims. 304.7 Section 304.7 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS CLAIMS AGAINST GOVERNMENT UNDER FEDERAL... the Peace Corps retains authority to consider, ascertain, adjust, determine, compromise and settle...

  4. 22 CFR 304.7 - Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims. 304.7 Section 304.7 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS CLAIMS AGAINST GOVERNMENT UNDER FEDERAL... the Peace Corps retains authority to consider, ascertain, adjust, determine, compromise and settle...

  5. 48 CFR 239.7102-2 - Compromising emanations-TEMPEST or other standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Security and Privacy for Computer Systems 239.7102-2 Compromising emanations—TEMPEST or... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compromising emanations-TEMPEST or other standard. 239.7102-2 Section 239.7102-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE...

  6. 48 CFR 239.7102-2 - Compromising emanations-TEMPEST or other standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Security and Privacy for Computer Systems 239.7102-2 Compromising emanations—TEMPEST or... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compromising emanations-TEMPEST or other standard. 239.7102-2 Section 239.7102-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE...

  7. 48 CFR 239.7102-2 - Compromising emanations-TEMPEST or other standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Security and Privacy for Computer Systems 239.7102-2 Compromising emanations—TEMPEST or... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compromising emanations-TEMPEST or other standard. 239.7102-2 Section 239.7102-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE...

  8. 20 CFR 340.14 - Factors due to be considered in a compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Factors due to be considered in a compromise. 340.14 Section 340.14 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT RECOVERY OF BENEFITS § 340.14 Factors due to be considered in a compromise....

  9. 22 CFR 304.7 - Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims. 304.7 Section 304.7 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS CLAIMS AGAINST GOVERNMENT UNDER FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT Procedures § 304.7 Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims. The...

  10. 22 CFR 304.7 - Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims. 304.7 Section 304.7 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS CLAIMS AGAINST GOVERNMENT UNDER FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT Procedures § 304.7 Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims. The...

  11. 48 CFR 239.7102-2 - Compromising emanations-TEMPEST or other standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Security and Privacy for Computer Systems 239.7102-2 Compromising emanations—TEMPEST or... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compromising emanations-TEMPEST or other standard. 239.7102-2 Section 239.7102-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...

  12. 22 CFR 304.7 - Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims. 304.7 Section 304.7 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS CLAIMS AGAINST GOVERNMENT UNDER FEDERAL... the Peace Corps retains authority to consider, ascertain, adjust, determine, compromise and...

  13. Compromise, Well-Being, and Action Behaviors in Young Adults in Career Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creed, Peter A.; Blume, Kellie

    2013-01-01

    The authors surveyed 186 first-year university students and assessed their level of career compromise associated with making the transition to university. Compromise was operationalized as the discrepancy between the job characteristics of ideal and expected occupations. The authors also assessed career well-being (satisfaction, distress), action…

  14. Compromise, Well-Being, and Action Behaviors in Young Adults in Career Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creed, Peter A.; Blume, Kellie

    2013-01-01

    The authors surveyed 186 first-year university students and assessed their level of career compromise associated with making the transition to university. Compromise was operationalized as the discrepancy between the job characteristics of ideal and expected occupations. The authors also assessed career well-being (satisfaction, distress), action…

  15. 38 CFR 1.955 - Regional office Committees on Waivers and Compromises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... duties, delegations of authority, and all actions required of the Committees on Waivers and Compromises... Compromises to perform the duties and assume the responsibilities delegated by §§ 1.956 and 1.957. The term..., when workload warrants a full-time committee, such designation will be part-time additional duty upon...

  16. 38 CFR 1.955 - Regional office Committees on Waivers and Compromises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... duties, delegations of authority, and all actions required of the Committees on Waivers and Compromises... Compromises to perform the duties and assume the responsibilities delegated by §§ 1.956 and 1.957. The term..., when workload warrants a full-time committee, such designation will be part-time additional duty upon...

  17. 10 CFR 15.41 - When a claim may be compromised.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false When a claim may be compromised. 15.41 Section 15.41 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DEBT COLLECTION PROCEDURES Compromise of a Claim § 15.41 When a... principal balance of a debt, exclusive of interest, penalties, and administrative costs, exceeds $100,000...

  18. 10 CFR 15.41 - When a claim may be compromised.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... it has not been referred to DOJ for litigation. (b) Unless otherwise provided by law, when the... with the DOJ. The NRC will evaluate the compromise offer, using the factors set forth in this part. If an offer to compromise any debt in excess of $100,000 is acceptable to the NRC, the NRC shall...

  19. 27 CFR 70.484 - Offers in compromise of forfeiture liabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... proponent is notified of the acceptance or rejection of the offer. If the offer is rejected, the sum... is notified and the case is closed. Acceptance of an offer in compromise of civil liabilities does not remit criminal liabilities, nor does acceptance of an offer in compromise of criminal...

  20. GABA-CREB signalling regulates maturation and survival of newly generated neurons in the adult hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Jagasia, Ravi; Steib, Kathrin; Englberger, Elisabeth; Herold, Sabine; Faus-Kessler, Theresa; Saxe, Michael; Gage, Fred H.; Song, Hongjun; Lie, D. Chichung

    2009-01-01

    Survival and integration of new neurons in the hippocampal circuit are rate-limiting steps in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Neuronal network activity is a major regulator of these processes, yet little is known about the respective downstream signalling pathways. Here, we investigate the role of CREB signalling in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. CREB is activated in new granule neurons during a distinct developmental period. Loss of CREB function in a cell-autonomous fashion impairs dendritic development, decreases the expression of the neurogenic transcription factor NeuroD and of the neuronal microtubule associated protein, DCX, and compromises the survival of newborn neurons. In addition, GABA-mediated excitation regulates CREB activation at early developmental stages. Importantly, developmental defects following loss of GABA-mediated excitation can be compensated by enhanced CREB signalling. These results indicate that CREB signalling is a central pathway in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, regulating the development and survival of new hippocampal neurons downstream of GABA-mediated excitation. PMID:19553437

  1. Surface Defection Reduces Cytotoxicity of Zn(2-methylimidazole)2 (ZIF-8) without Compromising its Drug Delivery Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Shearier, Emily; Cheng, Peifu; Bao, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    Zn(2-methylimidazole)2 (ZIF-8), as one of the most important metal-organic framework (MOF) molecules, is a promising candidate for drug delivery due to its low-density structure, high surface area, and tunable frameworks. However, ZIF-8 exhibits a high cytotoxicity associated with its external hydrophobic surface, which significantly restricts its application in drug delivery and other biomedical applications. Commonly used chemical functionalization methods would convert the hydrophobic surface of ZIF-8 to hydrophilic, but the generated functional groups on its internal surface may reduce its pore sizes or even block its pores. Herein, a surface defection strategy was applied on the external surface of ZIF-8 to enhance its hydrophilicity without reducing or blocking the internal pores. In this approach, mechanical ball-milling was used to incur defects on the external surface of ZIF-8, leading to unsaturated Zn-sites and N-sites which subsequently bound H2O molecules in an aqueous environment. Furthermore, hydroxyurea delivery and cell cytotoxicity of ZIF-8 with and without the external surface treatment were evaluated. It was found that 5-min ball milling changed the hydrophobic–hydrophilic balance of ZIF-8, resulting in significantly higher cell viability without compromising its hydroxyurea loading and release capacity. Such a simple mechanical ball-milling followed by water-treatment provides a general technique for surface-modification of other MOF molecules, which will undoubtedly magnify their biomedical applications. PMID:26998256

  2. AMP-activated protein kinase supports the NGF-induced viability of human HeLa cells to glucose starvation.

    PubMed

    Ting, Luo; Bo, Wan; Li, Ruwei; Chen, Xinya; Wang, Yingli; Jun, Zhou; Yu, Long

    2010-07-01

    As an important cellular energy regulation kinase, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been demonstrated as a key molecule in the development of tolerance to nutrient starvation. Activation of AMPK includes the phosphorylation of Thr172 of the alpha-subunit. Nerve growth factor (NGF) was originally isolated for its ability to stimulate both survival and differentiation in peripheral neurons, but many investigations have shown that the NGF also plays an important role in survival, growth and invasion of many human cancers. In this study, we used CCK-8 cell viability assay to find that NGF could facilitate the viability of HeLa cells following glucose deprivation while not in glucose-normal control groups. This effect of NGF-induced viability promotion to glucose starvation can be suppressed by Compound C, a specific inhibitor of AMPK. Meanwhile, western blot analysis showed that AMPKalpha1/alpha2 Thr172 phosphorylation level in HeLa cells was up-regulated after NGF treatment under glucose starvation, and Compound C was able to reduce the AMPKalpha1/alpha2 Thr172 phosphorylation level which was up-regulated by NGF in HeLa cells. Taken together, these results indicate that AMP-activated protein kinase supports the NGF-induced viability of human HeLa cells to glucose starvation.

  3. Cryopreservation by slow cooling of rat neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Robert, M Celeste; Juan de Paz, Leonardo; Graf, Daniel A; Gazzin, Silvia; Tiribelli, Claudio; Bottai, Hebe; Rodriguez, Joaquín V

    2016-06-01

    Although primary neuronal cells are routinely used for neuroscience research, with potential clinical applications such as neuronal transplantation and tissue engineering, a gold standard protocol for preservation has not been yet developed. In the present work, a slow cooling methodology without ice seeding was studied and optimized for cryopreservation of rat cerebellar granular cells. Parameters such as cooling rate, plunge temperature and cryoprotective agent concentration were assessed using a custom built device based on Pye's freezer idea. Cryopreservation outcome was evaluated by post thawing cell viability/viable cell yield and in culture viability over a period of 14 days. The best outcome was achieved when 10% of Me2SO as cryoprotective agent, a cooling rate of 3.1 ± 0.2 °C/min and a plunge temperature of -48.2 ± 1.5 °C were applied. The granular cells cryopreserved under these conditions exhibited a cell viability of 82.7 ± 2.7% and a viable cell yield of 28.6 ± 2.2%. Moreover, cell viability in culture remained above 50%, very similar to not cryopreserved cells (control). Our results also suggest that post-thaw viability (based on membrane integrity assays) not necessarily reflects the quality of the cryopreservation procedure and proper functionality tests must be carried out in order to optimize both post thaw viability/cell yield and in culture performance.

  4. Active cortical innervation protects striatal neurons from slow degeneration in culture.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Ianai; Segal, Menahem

    2011-03-01

    Spiny striatal GABAergic neurons receive most of their excitatory input from the neocortex. In culture, striatal neurons form inhibitory connections, but the lack of intrinsic excitatory afferents prevents the development of spontaneous network activity. Addition of cortical neurons to the striatal culture provides the necessary excitatory input to the striatal neurons, and in the presence of these neurons, striatal cultures do express spontaneous network activity. We have confirmed that cortical neurons provide excitatory drive to striatal neurons in culture using paired recording from cortical and striatal neurons. In the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX), which blocks action potential discharges, the connections between cortical and striatal neurons are still formed, and in fact synaptic currents generated between them when TTX is removed are far larger than in control, undrugged cultures. Interestingly, the continuous presence of TTX in the co-culture caused striatal cell death. These observations indicate that the mere presence of cortical neurons is not sufficient to preserve striatal neurons in culture, but their synchronous activity, triggered by cortical excitatory synapses, is critical for the maintenance of viability of striatal neurons. These results have important implications for understanding the role of activity in neurodegenerative diseases of the striatum.

  5. The optimal neural strategy for a stable motor task requires a compromise between level of muscle cocontraction and synaptic gain of afferent feedback

    PubMed Central

    Dideriksen, Jakob L.; Negro, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Increasing joint stiffness by cocontraction of antagonist muscles and compensatory reflexes are neural strategies to minimize the impact of unexpected perturbations on movement. Combining these strategies, however, may compromise steadiness, as elements of the afferent input to motor pools innervating antagonist muscles are inherently negatively correlated. Consequently, a high afferent gain and active contractions of both muscles may imply negatively correlated neural drives to the muscles and thus an unstable limb position. This hypothesis was systematically explored with a novel computational model of the peripheral nervous system and the mechanics of one limb. Two populations of motor neurons received synaptic input from descending drive, spinal interneurons, and afferent feedback. Muscle force, simulated based on motor unit activity, determined limb movement that gave rise to afferent feedback from muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs. The results indicated that optimal steadiness was achieved with low synaptic gain of the afferent feedback. High afferent gains during cocontraction implied increased levels of common drive in the motor neuron outputs, which were negatively correlated across the two populations, constraining instability of the limb. Increasing the force acting on the joint and the afferent gain both effectively minimized the impact of an external perturbation, and suboptimal adjustment of the afferent gain could be compensated by muscle cocontraction. These observations show that selection of the strategy for a given contraction implies a compromise between steadiness and effectiveness of compensations to perturbations. This indicates that a task-dependent selection of neural strategy for steadiness is necessary when acting in different environments. PMID:26203102

  6. Viability and Virulence of Entomopathogenic Nematodes Exposed to Ultraviolet Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I.; Hazir, Selcuk; Lete, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) can be highly effective biocontrol agents, but their efficacy can be reduced due to exposure to environmental stress such as from ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Our objectives were to 1) compare UV tolerance among a broad array of EPN species, and 2) investigate the relationship between reduced nematode viability (after exposure to UV) and virulence. Nematodes exposed to a UV radiation (254 nm) for 10 or 20 min were assessed separately for viability (survival) and virulence to Galleria mellonella. We compared 9 different EPN species and 15 strains: Heterorhabditis bacteriophora (Baine, fl11, Oswego, and Vs strains), H. floridensis (332), H. georgiana (Kesha), H. indica (HOM1), H. megidis (UK211), Steinernema carpocapsae (All, Cxrd, DD136, and Sal strains), S. feltiae (SN), S. rarum (17C&E), and S. riobrave (355). In viability assessments, steinernematids, particularly strains of S. carpocapsae, generally exhibited superior UV tolerance compared with the heterorhabditids. However, some heterorhabditids tended to be more tolerant than others, e.g., H. megidis and H. bacteriophora (Baine) were most susceptible and H. bacteriophora (Vs) was the only heterorhabditid that did not exhibit a significant effect after 10 min of exposure. All heterorhabditids experienced reduced viability after 20 min exposure though several S. carpocapsae strains did not. In total, after 10 or 20 min exposure, the viability of seven nematode strains did not differ from their non-UV exposed controls. In virulence assays, steinernematids (particularly S. carpocapsae strains) also tended to exhibit higher UV tolerance. However, in contrast to the viability measurements, all nematodes experienced a reduction in virulence relative to their controls. Correlation analysis revealed that viability among nematode strains is not necessarily related to virulence. In conclusion, our results indicate that the impact of UV varies substantially among EPNs, and viability alone

  7. Methylmalonate toxicity in primary neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, B A; Nelson, D; Silver, I A; Erecinska, M; Chesselet, M F

    1998-09-01

    Several inhibitors of mitochondrial complex II cause neuronal death in vivo and in vitro. The goal of the present work was to characterize in vitro the effects of malonate (a competitive blocker of the complex) which induces neuronal death in a pattern similar to that seen in striatum in Huntington's disease. Exposure of striatal and cortical cultures from embryonic rat brain for 24 h to methylmalonate, a compound which produces malonate intracellularly, led to a dose-dependent cell death. Methylmalonate (10 mM) caused >90% mortality of neurons although cortical cells were unexpectedly more vulnerable. Cell death was attenuated in a medium containing antioxidants. Further characterization revealed that DNA laddering could be detected after 3 h of treatment. Morphological observations (videomicroscopy and Hoechst staining) showed that both necrotic and apoptotic cell death occurred in parallel; apoptosis was more prevalent. A decrease in the ATP/ADP ratio was observed after 3 h of treatment with 10 mM methylmalonate. In striatal cultures it occurred concomitantly with a decline in GABA and a rise in aspartate content and the aspartate/glutamate ratio. Changes in ion concentrations were measured in similar cortical cultures from mouse brain. Neuronal [Na+]i increased while [K+]i and membrane potential decreased after 20 min of continuous incubation in 10 mM methylmalonate. These changes progressed with time, and a rise in [Ca2+]i was also observed after 1 h. The results demonstrate that malonate collapses cellular ion gradients, restoration of which imposes an additional load on the already compromised ATP-generation machinery. An early elevation in [Ca2+]i may trigger an increase in activity of proteases, lipases and endonucleases and production of free radicals and DNA damage which, ultimately, leads to cells death. The data also suggest that maturational and/or extrinsic factors are likely to be critical for the increased vulnerability of striatal neurons to

  8. Cellular and molecular neuronal plasticity.

    PubMed

    Griesbach, Grace S; Hovda, David A

    2015-01-01

    The brain has the capability to adapt to function when tissue is compromised. This capability of adaptation paves the road to recovery and allows for rehabilitation after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). This chapter addresses neuroplasticity within the context of TBI. Here neuroplasticity is defined as changes in neuronal structure and function, including synaptic changes as well as modifications in neural pathways. First, the influence of TBI pathology on neuroplasticity is addressed. Here, proteins that are important in neuroplasticity are introduced and a description given of how these are affected in a temporal and severity-dependent manner. Secondly, given that we are becoming increasingly aware that the brain's response to injury is highly influenced by the environmental milieu, the manner in which behavioral manipulations have an effect on TBI-associated neuroplasticity is addressed. A description is given of how specific environmental qualities may facilitate or hinder neuroplasticity. Finally, the long-term effects of neuroplasticity and the relevance it has to rehabilitation are described.

  9. Cajal bodies in neurons.

    PubMed

    Lafarga, Miguel; Tapia, Olga; Romero, Ana M; Berciano, Maria T

    2016-09-14

    Cajal is commonly regarded as the father of modern neuroscience in recognition of his fundamental work on the structure of the nervous system. But Cajal also made seminal contributions to the knowledge of nuclear structure in the early 1900s, including the discovery of the "accessory body" later renamed "Cajal body" (CB). This important nuclear structure has emerged as a center for the assembly of ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) required for splicing, ribosome biogenesis and telomere maintenance. The modern era of CB research started in the 1990s with the discovery of coilin, now known as a scaffold protein of CBs, and specific probes for small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). In this review, we summarize what we have learned in the recent decades concerning CBs in post-mitotic neurons, thereby ruling out dynamic changes in CB functions during the cell cycle. We show that CBs are particularly prominent in neurons, where they frequently associate with the nucleolus. Neuronal CBs are transcription-dependent nuclear organelles. Indeed, their number dynamically accommodates to support the high neuronal demand for splicing and ribosome biogenesis required for sustaining metabolic and bioelectrical activity. Mature neurons have canonical CBs enriched in coilin, survival motor neuron protein and snRNPs. Disruption and loss of neuronal CBs associate with severe neuronal dysfunctions in several neurological disorders such as motor neuron diseases. In particular, CB depletion in motor neurons seems to reflect a perturbation of transcription and splicing in spinal muscular atrophy, the most common genetic cause of infant mortality.

  10. Diminished hippocalcin expression in Huntington's disease brain does not account for increased striatal neuron vulnerability as assessed in primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Rudinskiy, Nikita; Kaneko, Yoshio A; Beesen, Ayshe Ana; Gokce, Ozgun; Régulier, Etienne; Déglon, Nicole; Luthi-Carter, Ruth

    2009-10-01

    Hippocalcin is a neuronal calcium sensor protein previously implicated in regulating neuronal viability and plasticity. Hippocalcin is the most highly expressed neuronal calcium sensor in the medium spiny striatal output neurons that degenerate selectively in Huntington's disease (HD). We have previously shown that decreased hippocalcin expression occurs in parallel with the onset of disease phenotype in mouse models of HD. Here we show by in situ hybridization histochemistry that hippocalcin RNA is also diminished by 63% in human HD brain. These findings lead us to hypothesize that diminished hippocalcin expression might contribute to striatal neurodegeneration in HD. We tested this hypothesis by assessing whether restoration of hippocalcin expression would decrease striatal neurodegeneration in cellular models of HD comprising primary striatal neurons exposed to mutant huntingtin, the mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionic acid or an excitotoxic concentration of glutamate. Counter to our hypothesis, hippocalcin expression did not improve the survival of striatal neurons under these conditions. Likewise, expression of hippocalcin together with interactor proteins including the neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein did not increase the survival of striatal cells in cellular models of HD. These results indicate that diminished hippocalcin expression does not contribute to HD-related neurodegeneration.

  11. The market viability of nuclear hydrogen technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    Botterud, A.; Conzelmann, G.; Petri, M. C.; Yildiz, B.

    2007-04-06

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is supporting system studies to gain a better understanding of nuclear power's potential role in a hydrogen economy and what hydrogen production technologies show the most promise. This assessment includes identifying commercial hydrogen applications and their requirements, comparing the characteristics of nuclear hydrogen systems to those market requirements, evaluating nuclear hydrogen configuration options within a given market, and identifying the key drivers and thresholds for market viability of nuclear hydrogen options. One of the objectives of the current analysis phase is to determine how nuclear hydrogen technologies could evolve under a number of different futures. The outputs of our work will eventually be used in a larger hydrogen infrastructure and market analysis conducted for DOE-EE using a system-level market simulation tool now underway. This report expands on our previous work by moving beyond simple levelized cost calculations and looking at profitability, risk, and uncertainty from an investor's perspective. We analyze a number of technologies and quantify the value of certain technology and operating characteristics. Our model to assess the profitability of the above technologies is based on Real Options Theory and calculates the discounted profits from investing in each of the production facilities. We use Monte-Carlo simulations to represent the uncertainty in hydrogen and electricity prices. The model computes both the expected value and the distribution of discounted profits from a production plant. We also quantify the value of the option to switch between hydrogen and electricity production in order to maximize investor profits. Uncertainty in electricity and hydrogen prices can be represented with two different stochastic processes: Geometric Brownian Motion (GBM) and Mean Reversion (MR). Our analysis finds that the flexibility to switch between hydrogen and electricity leads to

  12. Holographic optogenetic stimulation of patterned neuronal activity for vision restoration.

    PubMed

    Reutsky-Gefen, Inna; Golan, Lior; Farah, Nairouz; Schejter, Adi; Tsur, Limor; Brosh, Inbar; Shoham, Shy

    2013-01-01

    When natural photoreception is disrupted, as in outer-retinal degenerative diseases, artificial stimulation of surviving nerve cells offers a potential strategy for bypassing compromised neural circuits. Recently, light-sensitive proteins that photosensitize quiescent neurons have generated unprecedented opportunities for optogenetic neuronal control, inspiring early development of optical retinal prostheses. Selectively exciting large neural populations are essential for eliciting meaningful perceptions in the brain. Here we provide the first demonstration of holographic photo-stimulation strategies for bionic vision restoration. In blind retinas, we demonstrate reliable holographically patterned optogenetic stimulation of retinal ganglion cells with millisecond temporal precision and cellular resolution. Holographic excitation strategies could enable flexible control over distributed neuronal circuits, potentially paving the way towards high-acuity vision restoration devices and additional medical and scientific neuro-photonics applications.

  13. Probiotic fermented sausage: viability of probiotic microorganisms and sensory characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rouhi, M; Sohrabvandi, S; Mortazavian, A M

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics are from functional foods that bring health benefits for humans. Nowadays, a major development in functional foods is related to food containing probiotic cultures, mainly lactic acid bacteria or bifidobacteria. Probiotics must be alive and ingested in sufficient amounts to exert the positive effects on the health and the well-being of the host. Therefore, viability of probiotic products (the minimum viable probiotic cells in each gram or milliliter of product till the time of consumption) is their most important characteristic. However, these organisms often show poor viability in fermented products due to their detrimental conditions. Today, the variety of fermented meat products available around the world is nearly equal to that of cheese. With meat products, raw fermented sausages could constitute an appropriate vehicle for such microorganisms into the human gastrointestinal tract. In present article, the viability of probiotic microorganisms in fermented sausage, the main factors affect their viability, and the sensorial characteristics of final product are discussed.

  14. Equine ovarian tissue viability after cryopreservation and in vitro culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The efficiency of several cryoprotective agents were compared using both slow-freezing and vitrification methods. Results indicate that the viability of ovarian tissue cells increases when DMSO (slow-freezing) and ethylene glycol (vitrification) are used....

  15. [Guidelines for chagas disease: Part IV. Chagas disease in immune compromised patients].

    PubMed

    Apt B, Werner; Heitmann G, Ingrid; Jercic L, M Isabel; Jotré M, Leonor; Muñoz C Del V, Patricia; Noemí H, Isabel; San Martin V, Ana M; Sapunar P, Jorge; Torres H, Marisa; Zulantay A, Inés

    2008-08-01

    A summary of different kind of immune suppressed hosts and the importance of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in this group of patients is presented. Then, most relevant aspects of immune compromised host-parasite interaction are analyzed such as the moment of acquiring the infection, immune compromise level, mechanisms of acquisition the infection and geographic region. Clinical features of primary infection and reactivation of infection in chronic Chagasic patients are described making special emphasis in solid organ transplant and BMT. Chagas disease in AIDS patients is discussed including its treatment, follow up, monitoring the immune compromise level and prophylaxis.

  16. In vitro radiolabel uptake viability assay for Onchocerca microfilariae

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, H.L.; Wakeman, J.M.; Crouch, R.K.; James, E.R.

    1989-02-01

    A radiolabel uptake viability assay for Onchocerca cervicalis using (/sup 3/H)2-deoxy-D-glucose in Hanks' balanced salt solution, pH 7.5, at 30 C is described and compared to the traditional visual motility assay. A correlation of r = 0.92 between the assays was found, with the radiolabel uptake method apparently a more sensitive indicator of microfilarial viability.

  17. Neurofibromin and Neuronal Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    role of familial pheochromocytoma genes, including succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and Nf1, in modulating neuronal apoptosis following neurotrophin...gene products, in Nf1-/- sensory and sympathetic neurons; this work will also have relevance to the biology of familial pheochromocytoma . "So what...Schlisio, S. (2005). Neuronal apoptosis linked to EglN3 prolyl hydroxylase and familial pheochromocytoma genes: Developmental culling and cancer. Cancer

  18. Neurons and tumor suppressors.

    PubMed

    Zochodne, Douglas W

    2014-08-20

    Neurons choose growth pathways with half hearted reluctance, behavior that may be appropriate to maintain fixed long lasting connections but not to regenerate them. We now recognize that intrinsic brakes on regrowth are widely expressed in these hesitant neurons and include classical tumor suppressor molecules. Here, we review how two brakes, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and retinoblastoma emerge as new and exciting knockdown targets to enhance neuron plasticity and improve outcome from damage or disease.

  19. Motility, viability, and calcium in the sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Jorge

    2014-04-01

    Sperm cells are complicated in vitro models. Their viability is limited, and physiology is complex. The study of their properties is of great application in the animal production as viable and functional gametes are essential. It has been shown that the decrease of sperm cell viability parallels an increase of the reactive oxygen species (ROS). Reactive oxygen species is secondary to normal metabolic processes of the cell-like flagellar movement. There is evidence of strategies that reduce ROS levels by using exogenous or endogenous antioxidants with the intention that seminal plasma protects the sperm cells and increases viability. Perhaps viability can increase by reducing that flagellar movement which is regulated by calcium. The phenomenon has not been fully characterized, but it is established that in certain mammalian models, the entrance of calcium via specific channels such as CATsper or voltage-dependent channels, signals flagellar movement. Previous reports have indicated that a change in the concentration of calcium or if the temperature is altered, the function of mammal sperm cells is reduced or blocked and viability prolonged. Fish sperm can remain immobile for several weeks but when activated the number of mobile and viable sperm is reduced at a faster rate. However, if the cells are not mobilized the semen can be preserved for longer periods. As presented in this paper, this supports the notion that by modulating calcium channels to reduce motility the viability of these cells can increase.

  20. ATF3 expression improves motor function in the ALS mouse model by promoting motor neuron survival and retaining muscle innervation.

    PubMed

    Seijffers, Rhona; Zhang, Jiangwen; Matthews, Jonathan C; Chen, Adam; Tamrazian, Eric; Babaniyi, Olusegun; Selig, Martin; Hynynen, Meri; Woolf, Clifford J; Brown, Robert H

    2014-01-28

    ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by a progressive loss of motor neurons and atrophy of distal axon terminals in muscle, resulting in loss of motor function. Motor end plates denervated by axonal retraction of dying motor neurons are partially reinnervated by remaining viable motor neurons; however, this axonal sprouting is insufficient to compensate for motor neuron loss. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) promotes neuronal survival and axonal growth. Here, we reveal that forced expression of ATF3 in motor neurons of transgenic SOD1(G93A) ALS mice delays neuromuscular junction denervation by inducing axonal sprouting and enhancing motor neuron viability. Maintenance of neuromuscular junction innervation during the course of the disease in ATF3/SOD1(G93A) mice is associated with a substantial delay in muscle atrophy and improved motor performance. Although disease onset and mortality are delayed, disease duration is not affected. This study shows that adaptive axonal growth-promoting mechanisms can substantially improve motor function in ALS and importantly, that augmenting viability of the motor neuron soma and maintaining functional neuromuscular junction connections are both essential elements in therapy for motor neuron disease in the SOD1(G93A) mice. Accordingly, effective protection of optimal motor neuron function requires restitution of multiple dysregulated cellular pathways.

  1. ATF3 expression improves motor function in the ALS mouse model by promoting motor neuron survival and retaining muscle innervation

    PubMed Central

    Seijffers, Rhona; Zhang, Jiangwen; Matthews, Jonathan C.; Chen, Adam; Tamrazian, Eric; Babaniyi, Olusegun; Selig, Martin; Hynynen, Meri; Woolf, Clifford J.; Brown, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by a progressive loss of motor neurons and atrophy of distal axon terminals in muscle, resulting in loss of motor function. Motor end plates denervated by axonal retraction of dying motor neurons are partially reinnervated by remaining viable motor neurons; however, this axonal sprouting is insufficient to compensate for motor neuron loss. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) promotes neuronal survival and axonal growth. Here, we reveal that forced expression of ATF3 in motor neurons of transgenic SOD1G93A ALS mice delays neuromuscular junction denervation by inducing axonal sprouting and enhancing motor neuron viability. Maintenance of neuromuscular junction innervation during the course of the disease in ATF3/SOD1G93A mice is associated with a substantial delay in muscle atrophy and improved motor performance. Although disease onset and mortality are delayed, disease duration is not affected. This study shows that adaptive axonal growth-promoting mechanisms can substantially improve motor function in ALS and importantly, that augmenting viability of the motor neuron soma and maintaining functional neuromuscular junction connections are both essential elements in therapy for motor neuron disease in the SOD1G93A mice. Accordingly, effective protection of optimal motor neuron function requires restitution of multiple dysregulated cellular pathways. PMID:24474789

  2. Effects of surgical anaesthesia on the viability of nigral grafts in the rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Dunnett, S B; Torres, E M; Richards, H; Barker, R A

    1998-01-01

    Only a small proportion of dopamine neurons in nigral grafts typically survive transplantation into the adult striatum. Since many anaesthetics reduce blood flow and disturb a variety of brain metabolites, surgical anaesthesia may be one of the factors that compromise graft survival. Conversely, the lowered core body temperature induced by some anaesthetics might promote the survival of grafted cells by slowing their metabolism. In an initial screen, the widely-used surgical anaesthetic, equithesin, was found to reduce core temperature, mean arterial blood pressure, and to increase the partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood without producing any significant alteration in arterial pH or the partial pressure of carbon dioxide. In the main experiment, rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the nigrostriatal bundle received dopamine-rich embryonic nigral grafts injected into the deafferented neostriatum via previously implanted guide cannulae, which allowed comparison to be made of graft survival after transplantation into awake and in re-anaesthetised animals. There were no significant differences between groups in either the functional effects of the grafts to compensate amphetamine-induced rotation, or in the survival and growth of the grafts as measured in post mortem histology. We therefore conclude that anaesthesia per se is not a major contributory factor in the relatively poor survival of dopamine neurons following transplantation into the rat striatum.

  3. Maximization of cell viability rather than biocatalyst activity improves whole-cell ω-oxyfunctionalization performance.

    PubMed

    Kadisch, Marvin; Julsing, Mattijs K; Schrewe, Manfred; Jehmlich, Nico; Scheer, Benjamin; von Bergen, Martin; Schmid, Andreas; Bühler, Bruno

    2017-04-01

    It is a common misconception in whole-cell biocatalysis to refer to an enzyme as the biocatalyst, thereby neglecting the structural and metabolic framework provided by the cell. Here, the low whole-cell biocatalyst stability, that is, the stability of specific biocatalyst activity, in a process for the terminal oxyfunctionalization of renewable fatty acid methyl esters was investigated. This reaction, which is difficult to achieve by chemical means, is catalyzed by Escherichia coli featuring the monooxygenase system AlkBGT and the uptake facilitator AlkL from Pseudomonas putida GPo1. Corresponding products, that is, terminal alcohols, aldehydes, and acids, constitute versatile bifunctional building blocks, which are of special interest for polymer synthesis. It could clearly be shown that extensive dodecanoic acid methyl ester uptake mediated by high AlkL levels leads to whole-cell biocatalyst toxification. Thus, cell viability constitutes the primary factor limiting biocatalyst stability and, as a result, process durability. Hence, a compromise had to be found between low biocatalyst activity due to restricted substrate uptake and poor biocatalyst stability due to AlkL-mediated toxification. This was achieved by the fine-tuning of heterologous alkL expression, which, furthermore, enabled the identification of the alkBGT expression level as another critical factor determining biocatalyst stability. Controlled synthesis of AlkL and reduced alkBGT expression finally enabled an increase of product titers by a factor of 4.3 up to 229 g Lorg(-1) in a two-liquid phase bioprocess setup. Clearly, ω-oxyfunctionalization process performance was determined by cell viability and thus biocatalyst stability rather than the maximally achievable specific biocatalyst activity. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 874-884. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Sample Processing Impacts the Viability and Cultivability of the Sponge Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Ana I. S.; Amer, Nimra; Nguyen, Mary; Thomas, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Sponges host complex microbial communities of recognized ecological and biotechnological importance. Extensive cultivation efforts have been made to isolate sponge bacteria, but most still elude cultivation. To identify the bottlenecks of sponge bacterial cultivation, we combined high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing with a variety of cultivation media and incubation conditions. We aimed to determine the extent to which sample processing and cultivation conditions can impact bacterial viability and recovery in culture. We isolated 325 sponge bacteria from six specimens of Cymbastela concentrica and three specimens of Scopalina sp. These isolates were distributed over 37 different genera and 47 operational taxonomic units (defined at 97% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity). The cultivable bacterial community was highly specific to its sponge host and different media compositions yielded distinct microbial isolates. Around 97% of the isolates could be detected in the original sponge and represented a large but highly variable proportion (0.5–92% total abundance, depending on sponge species) of viable bacteria obtained after sample processing, as determined by propidium monoazide selective DNA modification of compromised cells. Our results show that the most abundant viable bacteria are also the most predominant groups found in cultivation, reflecting, to some extent, the relative abundances of the viable bacterial community, rather than the overall community estimated by direct molecular approaches. Cultivation is therefore shaped not only by the growth conditions provided, but also by the different cell viabilities of the bacteria that constitute the cultivation inoculum. These observations highlight the need to perform experiments to assess each method of sample processing for its accurate representation of the actual in situ bacterial community and its yield of viable cells. PMID:27242673

  5. Morphological changes and viability of primary cultured human ocular trabecular meshwork cells after exposure to air.

    PubMed

    Kopsachilis, Nikolaos; Tsaousis, Konstantinos T; Carifi, Gianluca; Welge-Luessen, Ulrich

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the possible toxic effect of air exposure for an in vitro model of primary human ocular trabecular meshwork cells (HTM). HTM were isolated from five donor eyes and cultivated at 37 °C. After reaching confluence the cells were seeded on two well chamber slides. The chamber slides were turned upside down in a Petri culture dish full of culture medium and filled with air using a 5 ml syringe, starting this way the exposure of the cells to the air. Subsequently they were placed in the incubation chamber at 37 °C. Six groups of HTM cultures were set up: group 1 consisted of samples in which HTM were exposed to air for 30 min, group 2 for 1 h, group 3 for 3 h, group 4 for 6 h, group 5 for 12 h and group 6 for 24 h. At 3 h after exposure, the morphology of the cells was still intact, at 6 h few cells appeared deformed and exhibited characteristics of more senescent cells. At 12 h after exposure to air the HTM cells started losing their typical morphology and appeared enlarged and compromised. Viability was superior to 94% in groups 1-3 while for groups 4, 5, 6 it was 82.7%, 39.5% and 12.7% respectively. The toxic effect of air exposure for the studied in vitro model of HTM is not significant for the time period of one to three hours. However it starts reducing viability and alternating morphology 6 h after exposure until the time period of 24 h, where the percentage of living cells is drastically decreased. Therefore, we suggest that the use of an air bubble especially in glaucomatous patients should be applied with caution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Beadex function in the motor neurons is essential for female reproduction in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kairamkonda, Subhash; Nongthomba, Upendra

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has served as an excellent model system for understanding the neuronal circuits and molecular mechanisms regulating complex behaviors. The Drosophila female reproductive circuits, in particular, are well studied and can be used as a tool to understand the role of novel genes in neuronal function in general and female reproduction in particular. In the present study, the role of Beadex, a transcription co-activator, in Drosophila female reproduction was assessed by generation of mutant and knock down studies. Null allele of Beadex was generated by transposase induced excision of P-element present within an intron of Beadex gene. The mutant showed highly compromised reproductive abilities as evaluated by reduced fecundity and fertility, abnormal oviposition and more importantly, the failure of sperm release from storage organs. However, no defect was found in the overall ovariole development. Tissue specific, targeted knock down of Beadex indicated that its function in neurons is important for efficient female reproduction, since its neuronal knock down led to compromised female reproductive abilities, similar to Beadex null females. Further, different neuronal class specific knock down studies revealed that Beadex function is required in motor neurons for normal fecundity and fertility of females. Thus, the present study attributes a novel and essential role for Beadex in female reproduction through neurons.

  7. Beadex Function in the Motor Neurons Is Essential for Female Reproduction in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Kairamkonda, Subhash; Nongthomba, Upendra

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has served as an excellent model system for understanding the neuronal circuits and molecular mechanisms regulating complex behaviors. The Drosophila female reproductive circuits, in particular, are well studied and can be used as a tool to understand the role of novel genes in neuronal function in general and female reproduction in particular. In the present study, the role of Beadex, a transcription co-activator, in Drosophila female reproduction was assessed by generation of mutant and knock down studies. Null allele of Beadex was generated by transposase induced excision of P-element present within an intron of Beadex gene. The mutant showed highly compromised reproductive abilities as evaluated by reduced fecundity and fertility, abnormal oviposition and more importantly, the failure of sperm release from storage organs. However, no defect was found in the overall ovariole development. Tissue specific, targeted knock down of Beadex indicated that its function in neurons is important for efficient female reproduction, since its neuronal knock down led to compromised female reproductive abilities, similar to Beadex null females. Further, different neuronal class specific knock down studies revealed that Beadex function is required in motor neurons for normal fecundity and fertility of females. Thus, the present study attributes a novel and essential role for Beadex in female reproduction through neurons. PMID:25396431

  8. Beclin-1-mediated autophagy protects spinal cord neurons against mechanical injury-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Yu; Lin, Jian-Hua; Muharram, Akram; Liu, Wen-Ge

    2014-06-01

    Apoptosis has been widely reported to be involved in the pathogenesis associated with spinal cord injury (SCI). Recently, autophagy has also been implicated in various neuronal damage models. However, the role of autophagy in SCI is still controversial and its interrelationship with apoptosis remains unclear. Here, we used an in vitro SCI model to observe a time-dependent induction of autophagy and apoptosis. Mechanical injury induced autophagy markers such as LC3 lipidation, LC3II/LC3I conversion, and Beclin-1 expression. Injured neurons showed decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis. To elucidate the effect of autophagy on apoptosis, the mechanically-injured neurons were treated with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and 3-methyl adenine (3-MA), which are known to regulate autophagy positively and negatively, respectively. Rapamycin-treated neurons showed the highest level of cell viability and lowest level of apoptosis among the injured neurons and those treated with 3-MA showed the reciprocal effect. Notably, rapamycin-treated neurons exhibited slightly reduced Bax expression and significantly increased Bcl-2 expression. Furthermore, by plasmid transfection, we showed that Beclin-1-overexpressing neuronal cells responded to mechanical injury with greater LC3II/LC3I conversion and cell viability, lower levels of apoptosis, higher Bcl-2 expression, and unaltered Bax expression as compared to vector control cells. Beclin-1-knockdown neurons showed almost the opposite effects. Taken together, our results suggest that autophagy may serve as a protection against apoptosis in mechanically-injured spinal cord neurons. Targeting mTOR and/or enhancing Beclin-1 expression might be alternative therapeutic strategies for SCI.

  9. Molecular morphology and toxicity of cytoplasmic prion protein aggregates in neuronal and non-neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, Catherine; Bissonnette, Cyntia; Volkov, Leonid; Roucou, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that accumulation of prion protein (PrP) in the cytoplasm results in the production of aggregates that are insoluble in non-ionic detergents and partially resistant to proteinase K. Transgenic mice expressing PrP in the cytoplasm develop severe ataxia with cerebellar degeneration and gliosis, suggesting that cytoplasmic PrP may play a role in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. The mechanism of cytoplasmic PrP neurotoxicity is not known. In this report, we determined the molecular morphology of cytoplasmic PrP aggregates by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Transient expression of cytoplasmic PrP produced juxtanuclear aggregates reminiscent of aggresomes in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, human neuroblastoma BE(2)-M17 cells and mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells. Time course studies revealed that discrete aggregates form first throughout the cytoplasm, and then coalesce to form an aggresome. Aggresomes containing cytoplasmic PrP were 1–5-μm inclusion bodies and were filled with electron-dense particles. Cytoplasmic PrP aggregates induced mitochondrial clustering, reorganization of intermediate filaments, prevented the secretion of wild-type PrP molecules and diverted these molecules to the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic PrP decreased the viability of neuronal and non-neuronal cells. We conclude that any event leading to accumulation of PrP in the cytoplasm is likely to result in cell death. PMID:16696854

  10. Molecular morphology and toxicity of cytoplasmic prion protein aggregates in neuronal and non-neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Catherine; Bissonnette, Cyntia; Volkov, Leonid; Roucou, Xavier

    2006-06-01

    Recent studies have revealed that accumulation of prion protein (PrP) in the cytoplasm results in the production of aggregates that are insoluble in non-ionic detergents and partially resistant to proteinase K. Transgenic mice expressing PrP in the cytoplasm develop severe ataxia with cerebellar degeneration and gliosis, suggesting that cytoplasmic PrP may play a role in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. The mechanism of cytoplasmic PrP neurotoxicity is not known. In this report, we determined the molecular morphology of cytoplasmic PrP aggregates by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Transient expression of cytoplasmic PrP produced juxtanuclear aggregates reminiscent of aggresomes in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, human neuroblastoma BE2-M17 cells and mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells. Time course studies revealed that discrete aggregates form first throughout the cytoplasm, and then coalesce to form an aggresome. Aggresomes containing cytoplasmic PrP were 1-5-microm inclusion bodies and were filled with electron-dense particles. Cytoplasmic PrP aggregates induced mitochondrial clustering, reorganization of intermediate filaments, prevented the secretion of wild-type PrP molecules and diverted these molecules to the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic PrP decreased the viability of neuronal and non-neuronal cells. We conclude that any event leading to accumulation of PrP in the cytoplasm is likely to result in cell death.

  11. Electromagnetic limits to radiofrequency (RF) neuronal telemetry

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, R. E.; Sebastian, T.

    2013-01-01

    The viability of a radiofrequency (RF) telemetry channel for reporting individual neuron activity wirelessly from an embedded antenna to an external receiver is determined. Comparing the power at the transmitting antenna required for the desired Channel Capacity, to the maximum power that this antenna can dissipate in the body without altering or damaging surrounding tissue reveals the severe penalty incurred by miniaturization of the antenna. Using both Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) and thermal damage limits as constraints, and 300 Kbps as the required capacity for telemetry streams 100 ms in duration, the model shows that conventional antennas smaller than 0.1 mm could not support human neuronal telemetry to a remote receiver (1 m away.) Reducing the antenna to 10 microns in size to enable the monitoring of single human neuron signals to a receiver at the surface of the head would require operating with a channel capacity of only 0.3 bps. PMID:24346503

  12. 32 CFR 2001.48 - Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... governments normally will not be advised of any security system vulnerabilities that contributed to the... INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE, NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION CLASSIFIED NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Safeguarding § 2001.48 Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure....

  13. 45 CFR 608.2 - Collection, compromise, and use of consumer reporting agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CLAIMS COLLECTION AND ADMINISTRATIVE OFFSET § 608.2 Collection, compromise, and... briefly describing the nature of the review performed and the conclusion reached shall be made....

  14. 45 CFR 608.2 - Collection, compromise, and use of consumer reporting agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CLAIMS COLLECTION AND ADMINISTRATIVE OFFSET § 608.2 Collection, compromise, and... briefly describing the nature of the review performed and the conclusion reached shall be made....

  15. 7 CFR 1956.68 - Compromise or adjustment without debtor's signature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY... Loan Programs and Multi-Family Housing § 1956.68 Compromise or adjustment without debtor's...

  16. Folate deprivation induces cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and apoptosis in hippocampal neuron cells through down-regulation of IGF-1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Li, Xi; Sun, Qinwei; He, Bin; Jia, Yimin; Cai, Demin; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-10-01

    Folate deficiency contributes to impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis, yet the mechanisms remain unclear. Here we use HT-22 hippocampal neuron cells as model to investigate the effect of folate deprivation (FD) on cell proliferation and apoptosis, and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. FD caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and increased the rate of apoptosis, which was associated with disrupted expression of folate transport and methyl transfer genes. FOLR1 and SLC46A1 were (P<0.01) down-regulated, while SLC19A1 was up-regulated (P<0.01) in FD group. FD cells exhibited significantly (P<0.05) higher protein content of BHMT, MAT2b and DNMT3a, as well as increased SAM/SAH concentrations and global DNA hypermethylation. The expression of the total and all the 3 classes of IGF-1 mRNA variants was significantly (P<0.01) down-regulated and IGF-1 concentration was decreased (P<0.05) in the culture media. IGF-1 signaling pathway was also compromised with diminished activation (P<0.05) of STAT3, AKT and mTOR. CpG hypermethylation was detected in the promoter regions of IGF-1 and FOLR1 genes, while higher SLC19A1 mRNA corresponded to hypomethylation of its promoter. IGF-1 supplementation in FD media significantly abolished FD-induced decrease in cell viability. However, IGF-1 had limited effect in rescuing the cell phenotype when added 24h after FD. Taken together, down-regulation of IGF-1 expression and signaling is involved in FD-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HT-22 hippocampal neuron cells, which is associated with an abnormal activation of methyl transfer pathway and hypermethylation of IGF-1 gene promoter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pacemaking Kisspeptin Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Martin J.; Zhang, Chunguang; Qiu, Jian; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.

    2013-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) neurons are vital for reproduction. GnRH neurons express the kisspeptin receptor, GPR 54, and kisspeptins potently stimulate the release of GnRH by depolarising and inducing sustained action potential firing in GnRH neurons. As such Kiss1 neurons may be the pre-synaptic pacemaker neurons in the hypothalamic circuitry that controls reproduction. There are at least two different populations of Kiss1 neurons: one in the rostral periventricular area (RP3V) that is stimulated by oestrogens and the other in the arcuate nucleus that is inhibited by oestrogens. How each of these Kiss1 neuronal populations participate in the regulation of the reproductive cycle is currently under intense investigation. Based on electrophysiological studies in the guinea pig and mouse, Kiss1 neurons in general are capable of generating burst firing behavior. Essentially all Kiss1 neurons, which have been studied thus far in the arcuate nucleus, express the ion channels necessary for burst firing, which include hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide gated cation (HCN) channels and the T-type calcium (Cav3.1) channels. Under voltage clamp conditions, these channels produce distinct currents that under current clamp conditions can generate burst firing behavior. The future challenge is to identify other key channels and synaptic inputs involved in the regulation of the firing properties of Kiss1 neurons and the physiological regulation of the expression of these channels and receptors by oestrogens and other hormones. The ultimate goal is to understand how Kiss1 neurons control the different phases of GnRH neurosecretion and hence reproduction. PMID:23884368

  18. Knowledge is power: averting safety-compromising events in the OR.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Kathleen

    2008-12-01

    Surgical procedures can be unpredictable, and safety-compromising events can jeopardize patient safety. Perioperative nurses should be watchful for factors that can contribute to safety-compromising events, as well as the errors that can follow, and know how to avert them if possible. Knowledge is power and increased awareness of patient safety issues and the resources that are available to both health care practitioners and consumers can help perioperative nurses ward off patient safety problems before they occur.

  19. Combating QR-Code-Based Compromised Accounts in Mobile Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Cao, Jian; Wang, Xiaoqi; Fu, Qiang; Li, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cyber Physical Social Sensing makes mobile social networks (MSNs) popular with users. However, such attacks are rampant as malicious URLs are spread covertly through quick response (QR) codes to control compromised accounts in MSNs to propagate malicious messages. Currently, there are generally two types of methods to identify compromised accounts in MSNs: one type is to analyze the potential threats on wireless access points and the potential threats on handheld devices’ operation systems so as to stop compromised accounts from spreading malicious messages; the other type is to apply the method of detecting compromised accounts in online social networks to MSNs. The above types of methods above focus neither on the problems of MSNs themselves nor on the interaction of sensors’ messages, which leads to the restrictiveness of platforms and the simplification of methods. In order to stop the spreading of compromised accounts in MSNs effectively, the attacks have to be traced to their sources first. Through sensors, users exchange information in MSNs and acquire information by scanning QR codes. Therefore, analyzing the traces of sensor-related information helps to identify the compromised accounts in MSNs. This paper analyzes the diversity of information sending modes of compromised accounts and normal accounts, analyzes the regularity of GPS (Global Positioning System)-based location information, and introduces the concepts of entropy and conditional entropy so as to construct an entropy-based model based on machine learning strategies. To achieve the goal, about 500,000 accounts of Sina Weibo and about 100 million corresponding messages are collected. Through the validation, the accuracy rate of the model is proved to be as high as 87.6%, and the false positive rate is only 3.7%. Meanwhile, the comparative experiments of the feature sets prove that sensor-based location information can be applied to detect the compromised accounts in MSNs. PMID:27657071

  20. Combating QR-Code-Based Compromised Accounts in Mobile Social Networks.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Cao, Jian; Wang, Xiaoqi; Fu, Qiang; Li, Qiang

    2016-09-20

    Cyber Physical Social Sensing makes mobile social networks (MSNs) popular with users. However, such attacks are rampant as malicious URLs are spread covertly through quick response (QR) codes to control compromised accounts in MSNs to propagate malicious messages. Currently, there are generally two types of methods to identify compromised accounts in MSNs: one type is to analyze the potential threats on wireless access points and the potential threats on handheld devices' operation systems so as to stop compromised accounts from spreading malicious messages; the other type is to apply the method of detecting compromised accounts in online social networks to MSNs. The above types of methods above focus neither on the problems of MSNs themselves nor on the interaction of sensors' messages, which leads to the restrictiveness of platforms and the simplification of methods. In order to stop the spreading of compromised accounts in MSNs effectively, the attacks have to be traced to their sources first. Through sensors, users exchange information in MSNs and acquire information by scanning QR codes. Therefore, analyzing the traces of sensor-related information helps to identify the compromised accounts in MSNs. This paper analyzes the diversity of information sending modes of compromised accounts and normal accounts, analyzes the regularity of GPS (Global Positioning System)-based location information, and introduces the concepts of entropy and conditional entropy so as to construct an entropy-based model based on machine learning strategies. To achieve the goal, about 500,000 accounts of Sina Weibo and about 100 million corresponding messages are collected. Through the validation, the accuracy rate of the model is proved to be as high as 87.6%, and the false positive rate is only 3.7%. Meanwhile, the comparative experiments of the feature sets prove that sensor-based location information can be applied to detect the compromised accounts in MSNs.

  1. Recognizing and caring for the medically compromised child: 4. Children with other chronic medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, S C; Barnard, K M; Harrison, V E

    1999-01-01

    This is the fourth and final part of a series on recognizing and caring for medically compromised children. In this article, an outline of appropriate dental management for children with other more commonly encountered chronic medical conditions is given, together with a description of the disorders and their significance in dentistry. This group includes children with physically handicapping conditions and children with learning difficulties, as well as those who are medically compromised.

  2. A one-appointment impression and centric relation record technique for compromised complete denture patients.

    PubMed

    Ansari, I H

    1997-09-01

    This article describes a two-in-one modified custom tray and record block system that is recommended for compromised elderly patients. Custom trays, which are made on primary casts and formed from a patient's functionally corrected old dentures, are used to make final impressions and centric jaw relation records in one clinical appointment. The clinical visits are reduced without compromising the quality of denture construction.

  3. N-acetyl-L-cysteine pre-treatment protects cryopreserved bovine spermatozoa from reactive oxygen species without compromising the in vitro developmental potential of intracytoplasmic sperm injection embryos.

    PubMed

    Pérez, L; Arias, M E; Sánchez, R; Felmer, R

    2015-12-01

    Excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on in vitro embryo production systems negatively affects the quality and developmental potential of embryos, as result of a decreased sperm quality and increased DNA fragmentation. This issue is of major importance in assisted fertilisation procedures such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), because this technique does not allow the natural selection of competent spermatozoa, and therefore, DNA-damaged spermatozoa might be used to fertilise an egg. The aim of this study was to investigate a new strategy to prevent the potential deleterious effect of ROS on cryopreserved bovine spermatozoa. We evaluated the effect of a sperm pre-treatment with different concentrations of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) on ROS production, viability and DNA fragmentation and assessed the effect of this treatment on the in vitro developmental potential and quality of embryos generated by ICSI. The results show a strong scavenging effect of 1 and 10 mm NAC after exposure of spermatozoa to a ROS inducer, without compromising the viability and DNA integrity. Importantly, in vitro developmental potential and quality of embryos generated by ICSI with spermatozoa treated with NAC were not affected, confirming the feasibility of using this treatment before an ICSI cycle.

  4. Respiratory Compromise as a New Paradigm for the Care of Vulnerable Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Morris, Timothy A; Gay, Peter C; MacIntyre, Neil R; Hess, Dean R; Hanneman, Sandra K; Lamberti, James P; Doherty, Dennis E; Chang, Lydia; Seckel, Maureen A

    2017-04-01

    Acute respiratory compromise describes a deterioration in respiratory function with a high likelihood of rapid progression to respiratory failure and death. Identifying patients at risk for respiratory compromise coupled with monitoring of patients who have developed respiratory compromise might allow earlier interventions to prevent or mitigate further decompensation. The National Association for the Medical Direction of Respiratory Care (NAMDRC) organized a workshop meeting with representation from many national societies to address the unmet needs of respiratory compromise from a clinical practice perspective. Respiratory compromise may arise de novo or may complicate preexisting lung disease. The group identified distinct subsets of respiratory compromise that present similar opportunities for early detection and useful intervention to prevent respiratory failure. The subtypes were characterized by the pathophysiological mechanisms they had in common: impaired control of breathing, impaired airway protection, parenchymal lung disease, increased airway resistance, hydrostatic pulmonary edema, and right-ventricular failure. Classification of acutely ill respiratory patients into one or more of these categories may help in selecting the screening and monitoring strategies that are most appropriate for the patient's particular pathophysiology. Standardized screening and monitoring practices for patients with similar mechanisms of deterioration may enhance the ability to predict respiratory failure early and prevent its occurrence.

  5. In vitro models to estimate drug penetration through the compromised stratum corneum barrier.

    PubMed

    Engesland, André; Škalko-Basnet, Nataša; Flaten, Gøril Eide

    2016-11-01

    The phospholipid vesicle-based permeation assay (PVPA) is a recently established in vitro stratum corneum model to estimate the permeability of intact and healthy skin. The aim here was to further evolve this model to mimic the stratum corneum in a compromised skin barrier by reducing the barrier functions in a controlled manner. To mimic compromised skin barriers, PVPA barriers were prepared with explicitly defined reduced barrier function and compared with literature data from both human and animal skin with compromised barrier properties. Caffeine, diclofenac sodium, chloramphenicol and the hydrophilic marker calcein were tested to compare the PVPA models with established models. The established PVPA models mimicking the stratum corneum in healthy skin showed good correlation with biological barriers by ranking drugs similar to those ranked by the pig ear skin model and were comparable to literature data on permeation through healthy human skin. The PVPA models provided reproducible and consistent results with a distinction between the barriers mimicking compromised and healthy skin. The trends in increasing drug permeation with an increasing degree of compromised barriers for the model drugs were similar to the literature data from other in vivo and in vitro models. The PVPA models have the potential to provide permeation predictions when investigating drugs or cosmeceuticals intended for various compromised skin conditions and can thus possibly reduce the time and cost of testing as well as the use of animal testing in the early development of drug candidates, drugs and cosmeceuticals.

  6. Neuronal Stress and Injury Caused by HIV-1, cART and Drug Abuse: Converging Contributions to HAND

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Ana B.; Kaul, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    Multiple mechanisms appear to contribute to neuronal stress and injury underlying HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), which occur despite the successful introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Evidence is accumulating that components of cART can itself be neurotoxic upon long-term exposure. In addition, abuse of psychostimulants, such as methamphetamine (METH), seems to compromise antiretroviral therapy and aggravate HAND. However, the combined effect of virus and recreational and therapeutic drugs on the brain is still incompletely understood. However, several lines of evidence suggest a shared critical role of oxidative stress, compromised neuronal energy homeostasis and autophagy in promotion and prevention of neuronal dysfunction associated with HIV-1 infection, cART and psychostimulant use. In this review, we present a synopsis of recent work related to neuronal stress and injury induced by HIV infection, antiretrovirals (ARVs) and the highly addictive psychostimulant METH. PMID:28241493

  7. Neuronal Stress and Injury Caused by HIV-1, cART and Drug Abuse: Converging Contributions to HAND.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Ana B; Kaul, Marcus

    2017-02-23

    Multiple mechanisms appear to contribute to neuronal stress and injury underlying HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), which occur despite the successful introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Evidence is accumulating that components of cART can itself be neurotoxic upon long-term exposure. In addition, abuse of psychostimulants, such as methamphetamine (METH), seems to compromise antiretroviral therapy and aggravate HAND. However, the combined effect of virus and recreational and therapeutic drugs on the brain is still incompletely understood. However, several lines of evidence suggest a shared critical role of oxidative stress, compromised neuronal energy homeostasis and autophagy in promotion and prevention of neuronal dysfunction associated with HIV-1 infection, cART and psychostimulant use. In this review, we present a synopsis of recent work related to neuronal stress and injury induced by HIV infection, antiretrovirals (ARVs) and the highly addictive psychostimulant METH.

  8. Susceptibility of hippocampal neurons to mechanically induced injury.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Donna M; LaPlaca, Michelle C; Cargill, Robert S

    2003-11-01

    Experimental models of traumatic cortical brain injury in rodents reveal that specific regions of the hippocampus (e.g., CA3 and hilar subfields) are severely injured despite their distance from the initial insult. Hippocampal neurons may be intrinsically more vulnerable to mechanical insult than cortical neurons due to increased NMDA receptor densities and lower energy capacities, as evidenced by increased susceptibility to ischemic insults. The selective vulnerability of hippocampal neurons was evaluated using an in vitro model of TBI in which either primary rat cortical or hippocampal neurons (E17) seeded onto silicone substrates were subjected to graded levels of mechanical stretch. Although cortical neurons exhibited significantly longer increases in stretch-induced membrane permeability, injury of hippocampal neurons resulted in larger increases in intracellular free calcium concentration [Ca(2+)](i) and cell death. [ATP](i) deficits due to stretch were apparent by 60 min after injury in cortical neurons but recovered by 24 h, whereas significant deficits in [ATP](i) were not observed in hippocampal neurons until 24 h after injury. MK801 pretreatment decreased the stretch-induced [Ca(2+)](i) transients in both hippocampal and cortical cultures, thereby negating the regional specificity. However, MK801 pretreatment did not improve hippocampal viability and paradoxically, significantly increased cell death among cortical neurons. As the hippocampus is the primary brain region responsible for the memory deficits and epileptic seizures associated with TBI, understanding why this region is selectively damaged could lead to the development of more accurate mechanical tolerances as well as effective pharmaceutical agents.

  9. Clinical evaluation of tuberculosis viability microscopy for assessing treatment response.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sumona; Sherman, Jonathan M; Bravard, Marjory A; Valencia, Teresa; Gilman, Robert H; Evans, Carlton A

    2015-04-15

    It is difficult to determine whether early tuberculosis treatment is effective in reducing the infectiousness of patients' sputum, because culture takes weeks and conventional acid-fast sputum microscopy and molecular tests cannot differentiate live from dead tuberculosis. To assess treatment response, sputum samples (n=124) from unselected patients (n=35) with sputum microscopy-positive tuberculosis were tested pretreatment and after 3, 6, and 9 days of empiric first-line therapy. Tuberculosis quantitative viability microscopy with fluorescein diacetate, quantitative culture, and acid-fast auramine microscopy were all performed in triplicate. Tuberculosis quantitative viability microscopy predicted quantitative culture results such that 76% of results agreed within ±1 logarithm (rS=0.85; P<.0001). In 31 patients with non-multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis, viability and quantitative culture results approximately halved (both 0.27 log reduction, P<.001) daily. For patients with non-MDR tuberculosis and available data, by treatment day 9 there was a >10-fold reduction in viability in 100% (24/24) of cases and quantitative culture in 95% (19/20) of cases. Four other patients subsequently found to have MDR tuberculosis had no significant changes in viability (P=.4) or quantitative culture (P=.6) results during early treatment. The change in viability and quantitative culture results during early treatment differed significantly between patients with non-MDR tuberculosis and those with MDR tuberculosis (both P<.001). Acid-fast microscopy results changed little during early treatment, and this change was similar for non-MDR tuberculosis vs MDR tuberculosis (P=.6). Tuberculosis quantitative viability microscopy is a simple test that within 1 hour predicted quantitative culture results that became available weeks later, rapidly indicating whether patients were responding to tuberculosis therapy. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  10. A cellular viability assay to monitor drug toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jakob; Bross, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A central part of the research in protein misfolding and its associated disorders is the development of treatment strategies based on ensuring cellular protein homeostasis. This often includes testing chemical substances or drugs for their ability to counteract protein misfolding processes and to promote correct folding. Such investigations also include assessment of how the tested chemical substances affect cellular viability, that is, their cytotoxic effect. Investigations of cytotoxicity often require testing several different concentrations and drug exposure times using cells in culture. It is therefore attractive to use a viability test that permits the analysis of many samples with little handling time. This protocol describes a simple and fast methodology to analyze viability of lymphoblastoid cells and to test putative cytotoxic effects associated with exposure to a chemical substance, here exemplified by celastrol. The natural substance celastrol has been used for many years in traditional Chinese medicine and has subsequently been shown to induce transcription of genes encoding molecular chaperones (heat shock proteins) that are involved in promoting folding of cellular proteins. The well-described colorimetric tetrazolium salt (MTT) assay, which monitors metabolic activity of cultured cells, was adapted to analyze the viability of cells exposed to celastrol. After having established a suitable cell seeding density, the dose-dependence and time-course of viability reduction of lymphoblastoid cells treated with celastrol were determined. It was found that 4- and 24-h exposure to 0.8 microM celastrol reduced the viability of lymphoblastoid cells, with the most severe effect observed at 24 h with MTT reductions approaching 30% of non-exposed cells. For a series of incubations for 24 h, it was found that concentrations as low as 0.2 microM were sufficient to affect the viability, and celastrol concentrations of 0.5 microM reduced the MTT reduction rate to

  11. Comparison of reintroduction and enhancement effects on metapopulation viability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halsey, Samniqueka J; Bell, Timothy J.; McEachern, Kathryn; Pavlovic, Noel B.

    2015-01-01

    Metapopulation viability depends upon a balance of extinction and colonization of local habitats by a species. Mechanisms that can affect this balance include physical characteristics related to natural processes (e.g. succession) as well as anthropogenic actions. Plant restorations can help to produce favorable metapopulation dynamics and consequently increase viability; however, to date no studies confirm this is true. Population viability analysis (PVA) allows for the use of empirical data to generate theoretical future projections in the form of median time to extinction and probability of extinction. In turn, PVAs can inform and aid the development of conservation, recovery, and management plans. Pitcher's thistle (Cirsium pitcheri) is a dune endemic that exhibited metapopulation dynamics. We projected viability of three natural and two restored populations with demographic data spanning 15–23 years to determine the degree the addition of reintroduced population affects metapopulation viability. The models were validated by comparing observed and projected abundances and adjusting parameters associated with demographic and environmental stochasticity to improve model performance. Our chosen model correctly predicted yearly population abundance for 60% of the population-years. Using that model, 50-year projections showed that the addition of reintroductions increases metapopulation viability. The reintroduction that simulated population performance in early-successional habitats had the maximum benefit. In situ enhancements of existing populations proved to be equally effective. This study shows that restorations can facilitate and improve metapopulation viability of species dependent on metapopulation dynamics for survival with long-term persistence of C. pitcheri in Indiana likely to depend on continued active management.

  12. Neuronal Mechanisms of Intelligence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-21

    The underlying premise of this research is that the neuron itself is the functional unit in the brain for positive reinforcement . Our early studies...preference studies (an alternative method to self-stimulation for measuring reward). Keywords: Neuronal conditioning; Positive reinforcement ; Learning; and Adaptive networks.

  13. Culturing rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T; Ferguson, C

    2001-01-01

    Cultured neurons are widely used to investigate the mechanisms of neurotoxicity. Embryonic rat hippocampal neurons may be grown as described under a wide variety of conditions to suit differing experimental procedures, including electrophysiology, morphological analysis of neurite development, and various biochemical and molecular analyses.

  14. Corticospinal mirror neurons.

    PubMed

    Kraskov, A; Philipp, R; Waldert, S; Vigneswaran, G; Quallo, M M; Lemon, R N

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the properties of neurons with mirror-like characteristics that were identified as pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) and recorded in the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) and primary motor cortex (M1) of three macaque monkeys. We analysed the neurons' discharge while the monkeys performed active grasp of either food or an object, and also while they observed an experimenter carrying out a similar range of grasps. A considerable proportion of tested PTNs showed clear mirror-like properties (52% F5 and 58% M1). Some PTNs exhibited 'classical' mirror neuron properties, increasing activity for both execution and observation, while others decreased their discharge during observation ('suppression mirror-neurons'). These experiments not only demonstrate the existence of PTNs as mirror neurons in M1, but also reveal some interesting differences between M1 and F5 mirror PTNs. Although observation-related changes in the discharge of PTNs must reach the spinal cord and will include some direct projections to motoneurons supplying grasping muscles, there was no EMG activity in these muscles during action observation. We suggest that the mirror neuron system is involved in the withholding of unwanted movement during action observation. Mirror neurons are differentially recruited in the behaviour that switches rapidly between making your own movements and observing those of others.

  15. A generalized analog implementation of piecewise linear neuron models using CCII building blocks.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Hamid; Ahmadi, Arash; Bavandpour, Mohammad; Sharifipoor, Ozra

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a set of reconfigurable analog implementations of piecewise linear spiking neuron models using second generation current conveyor (CCII) building blocks. With the same topology and circuit elements, without W/L modification which is impossible after circuit fabrication, these circuits can produce different behaviors, similar to the biological neurons, both for a single neuron as well as a network of neurons just by tuning reference current and voltage sources. The models are investigated, in terms of analog implementation feasibility and costs, targeting large scale hardware implementations. Results show that, in order to gain the best performance, area and accuracy; these models can be compromised. Simulation results are presented for different neuron behaviors with CMOS 350 nm technology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. NEURON and Python.

    PubMed

    Hines, Michael L; Davison, Andrew P; Muller, Eilif

    2009-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including graphical user interface tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the xml module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications.

  17. NEURON and Python

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Michael L.; Davison, Andrew P.; Muller, Eilif

    2008-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including graphical user interface tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the xml module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications. PMID:19198661

  18. Imaging calcium in neurons.

    PubMed

    Grienberger, Christine; Konnerth, Arthur

    2012-03-08

    Calcium ions generate versatile intracellular signals that control key functions in all types of neurons. Imaging calcium in neurons is particularly important because calcium signals exert their highly specific functions in well-defined cellular subcompartments. In this Primer, we briefly review the general mechanisms of neuronal calcium signaling. We then introduce the calcium imaging devices, including confocal and two-photon microscopy as well as miniaturized devices that are used in freely moving animals. We provide an overview of the classical chemical fluorescent calcium indicators and of the protein-based genetically encoded calcium indicators. Using application examples, we introduce new developments in the field, such as calcium imaging in awake, behaving animals and the use of calcium imaging for mapping single spine sensory inputs in cortical neurons in vivo. We conclude by providing an outlook on the prospects of calcium imaging for the analysis of neuronal signaling and plasticity in various animal models.

  19. Neuronal signaling through endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cosker, Katharina E; Segal, Rosalind A

    2014-02-01

    The distinctive morphology of neurons, with complex dendritic arbors and extensive axons, presents spatial challenges for intracellular signal transduction. The endosomal system provides mechanisms that enable signaling molecules initiated by extracellular cues to be trafficked throughout the expanse of the neuron, allowing intracellular signals to be sustained over long distances. Therefore endosomes are critical for many aspects of neuronal signaling that regulate cell survival, axonal growth and guidance, dendritic branching, and cell migration. An intriguing characteristic of neuronal signal transduction is that endosomal trafficking enables physiological responses that vary based on the subcellular location of signal initiation. In this review, we will discuss the specialized mechanisms and the functional significance of endosomal signaling in neurons, both during normal development and in disease.

  20. Neuronal Signaling through Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Cosker, Katharina E.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2014-01-01

    The distinctive morphology of neurons, with complex dendritic arbors and extensive axons, presents spatial challenges for intracellular signal transduction. The endosomal system provides mechanisms that enable signaling molecules initiated by extracellular cues to be trafficked throughout the expanse of the neuron, allowing intracellular signals to be sustained over long distances. Therefore endosomes are critical for many aspects of neuronal signaling that regulate cell survival, axonal growth and guidance, dendritic branching, and cell migration. An intriguing characteristic of neuronal signal transduction is that endosomal trafficking enables physiological responses that vary based on the subcellular location of signal initiation. In this review, we will discuss the specialized mechanisms and the functional significance of endosomal signaling in neurons, both during normal development and in disease. PMID:24492712

  1. Mice with compromised 5-HTT function lack phosphotyrosine-mediated inhibitory control over prefrontal 5-HT responses.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Nathalie M; Sargin, Derya; Ansorge, Mark S; Gingrich, Jay A; Lambe, Evelyn K

    2014-04-23

    The activity of the prefrontal cortex is essential for normal emotional processing and is strongly modulated by serotonin (5-HT). Yet, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms that control the activity of the prefrontal 5-HT receptors. Here, we found and characterized a deregulation of prefrontal 5-HT receptor electrophysiological signaling in mouse models of disrupted serotonin transporter (5-HTT) function, a risk factor for emotional and cognitive disturbances. We identified a novel tyrosine kinase-dependent mechanism that regulates 5-HT-mediated inhibition of prefrontal pyramidal neurons. We report that mice with compromised 5-HTT, resulting from either genetic deletion or brief treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors during development, have amplified 5-HT1A receptor-mediated currents in adulthood. These greater inhibitory effects of 5-HT are accompanied by enhanced downstream coupling to Kir3 channels. Notably, in normal wild-type mice, we found that these larger 5-HT1A responses can be mimicked through inhibition of Src family tyrosine kinases. By comparison, in our 5-HTT mouse models, the larger 5-HT1A responses were rapidly reduced through inhibition of tyrosine phosphatases. Our findings implicate tyrosine phosphorylation in regulating the electrophysiological effects of prefrontal 5-HT1A receptors with implications for neuropsychiatric diseases associated with emotional dysfunction, such as anxiety and depressive disorders.

  2. Cajal bodies in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lafarga, Miguel; Tapia, Olga; Romero, Ana M.; Berciano, Maria T.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cajal is commonly regarded as the father of modern neuroscience in recognition of his fundamental work on the structure of the nervous system. But Cajal also made seminal contributions to the knowledge of nuclear structure in the early 1900s, including the discovery of the “accessory body” later renamed “Cajal body” (CB). This important nuclear structure has emerged as a center for the assembly of ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) required for splicing, ribosome biogenesis and telomere maintenance. The modern era of CB research started in the 1990s with the discovery of coilin, now known as a scaffold protein of CBs, and specific probes for small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). In this review, we summarize what we have learned in the recent decades concerning CBs in post-mitotic neurons, thereby ruling out dynamic changes in CB functions during the cell cycle. We show that CBs are particularly prominent in neurons, where they frequently associate with the nucleolus. Neuronal CBs are transcription-dependent nuclear organelles. Indeed, their number dynamically accommodates to support the high neuronal demand for splicing and ribosome biogenesis required for sustaining metabolic and bioelectrical activity. Mature neurons have canonical CBs enriched in coilin, survival motor neuron protein and snRNPs. Disruption and loss of neuronal CBs associate with severe neuronal dysfunctions in several neurological disorders such as motor neuron diseases. In particular, CB depletion in motor neurons seems to reflect a perturbation of transcription and splicing in spinal muscular atrophy, the most common genetic cause of infant mortality. PMID:27627892

  3. Culturing thick brain slices: an interstitial 3D microperfusion system for enhanced viability.

    PubMed

    Rambani, Komal; Vukasinovic, Jelena; Glezer, Ari; Potter, Steve M

    2009-06-15

    and catabolites. We examined the utility of this perfusion method to enhance the viability of the thick organotypic brain slice cultures after 2 days and 5 days in vitro (DIV). We investigated the range of amenable flow rates that enhance the viability of 700 microm thick organotypic brain slices compared to the unperfused control cultures. Our perfusion method allows up to 84.6% viability (p<0.01) and up to 700 microm thickness, even after 5 DIV. Our results also confirm that these cultures are functionally active and have their in vivo cyto-architecture preserved. Prolonged viability of thick organotypic brain slice cultures will benefit scientists investigating network properties of intact organotypic neuronal networks in a reliable and repeatable manner.

  4. Culturing thick brain slices: An interstitial 3D microperfusion system for enhanced viability

    PubMed Central

    Rambani, Komal; Vukasinovic, Jelena; Glezer, Ari; Potter, Steve M.

    2009-01-01

    preserved. Prolonged viability of thick organotypic brain slice cultures will benefit scientists investigating network properties of intact organotypic neuronal networks in a reliable and repeatable manner. PMID:19443039

  5. Neurotoxin-induced selective ubiquitination and regulation of MEF2A isoform in neuronal stress response

    PubMed Central

    She, Hua; Yang, Qian; Mao, Zixu

    2014-01-01

    The myocyte enhancer factor 2A-D (MEF2) proteins are members of the MCM1-agamous-deficiens-serum (MADS) response factor family of transcription factors. Various MEF2 isoform proteins are enriched in neurons and exhibit distinct patterns of expression in different regions of the brain. In neurons, MEF2 functions as a converging factor to regulate many neuronal functions including survival. MEF2 activities are tightly controlled in neurons in response to stress. Whether stress signal may differentially regulate MEF2s remains largely unknown. In this work, we showed that MEF2A but not MEF2C or MEF2D was modified by ubiquitination in dopaminergic neuronal cell line SN4741 cells. MEF2A was ubiquitinated at its N’-terminus, and the ubiquitination of MEF2A was first detectable in the nuclear compartment and later in the cytoplasm. Ubiquitination of MEF2A correlated with reduced DNA-binding activity and transcriptional activity. More importantly, disturbing the degradation of ubiquitinated MEF2A through proteasome pathway by neurotoxins known to induce Parkinson’s disease (PD) features in model animals caused accumulation of ubiquitinated MEF2A, reduced MEF2 activity, and impaired cellular viability. Our work thus provides the first evidence to demonstrate an isoforms specific regulation of MEF2s by ubiquitination-proteasome pathway in dopaminergic neuronal cell by neurotoxins, suggesting that stress signal and cellular context dependent dysregulation of MEF2s may underlie the loss of neuronal viability. PMID:22764880

  6. Specific Roles of Akt iso Forms in Apoptosis and Axon Growth Regulation in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Diez, Hector; Garrido, Juan Jose; Wandosell, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Akt is a member of the AGC kinase family and consists of three isoforms. As one of the major regulators of the class I PI3 kinase pathway, it has a key role in the control of cell metabolism, growth, and survival. Although it has been extensively studied in the nervous system, we have only a faint knowledge of the specific role of each isoform in differentiated neurons. Here, we have used both cortical and hippocampal neuronal cultures to analyse their function. We characterized the expression and function of Akt isoforms, and some of their substrates along different stages of neuronal development using a specific shRNA approach to elucidate the involvement of each isoform in neuron viability, axon development, and cell signalling. Our results suggest that three Akt isoforms show substantial compensation in many processes. However, the disruption of Akt2 and Akt3 significantly reduced neuron viability and axon length. These changes correlated with a tendency to increase in active caspase 3 and a decrease in the phosphorylation of some elements of the mTORC1 pathway. Indeed, the decrease of Akt2 and more evident the inhibition of Akt3 reduced the expression and phosphorylation of S6. All these data indicate that Akt2 and Akt3 specifically regulate some aspects of apoptosis and cell growth in cultured neurons and may contribute to the understanding of mechanisms of neuron death and pathologies that show deregulated growth. PMID:22509246

  7. Short Peptides Enhance Single Cell Adhesion and Viability on Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C.; Asphahani, Fareid; Zhang, Miqin

    2011-01-01

    Single cell patterning holds important implications for biology, biochemistry, biotechnology, medicine, and bioinformatics. The challenge for single cell patterning is to produce small islands hosting only single cells and retaining their viability for a prolonged period of time. This study demonstrated a surface engineering approach that uses a covalently-bound short peptide as a mediator to pattern cells with improved single cell adhesion and prolonged cellular viability on gold patterned SiO2 substrates. The underlying hypothesis is that cell adhesion is regulated by the type, availability and stability of effective cell adhesion peptides, and thus covalently bound short peptides would promote cell spreading and thus, single cell adhesion and viability. The effectiveness of this approach and the underlying mechanism for the increased probability of single cell adhesion and prolonged cell viability by short peptides were studied by comparing cellular behavior of human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells on three model surfaces whose gold electrodes were immobilized with fibronectin, physically adsorbed Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, and covalently-bound Lys-Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, respectively. The surface chemistry and binding properties were characterized by reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Both short peptides were superior to fibronectin in producing adhesion of only single cells, while the covalently bound peptide also reduced apoptosis and necrosis of adhered cells. Controlling cell spreading by peptide binding domains to regulate apoptosis and viability represents a fundamental mechanism in cell-materials interaction and provides an effective strategy in engineering arrays of single cells. PMID:17371055

  8. Hydrogen Supplementation of Preservation Solution Improves Viability of Osteochondral Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Takuya; Onuma, Kenji; Kuzuno, Jun; Ujihira, Masanobu; Kurokawa, Ryosuke; Sakai, Rina; Takaso, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Allogenic osteochondral tissue (OCT) is used for the treatment of large cartilage defects. Typically, OCTs collected during the disease-screening period are preserved at 4°C; however, the gradual reduction in cell viability during cold preservation adversely affects transplantation outcomes. Therefore, improved storage methods that maintain the cell viability of OCTs are needed to increase the availability of high-quality OCTs and improve treatment outcomes. Here, we evaluated whether long-term hydrogen delivery to preservation solution improved the viability of rat OCTs during cold preservation. Hydrogen-supplemented Dulbecco's Modified Eagles Medium (DMEM) and University of Wisconsin (UW) solution both significantly improved the cell viability of OCTs during preservation at 4°C for 21 days compared to nonsupplemented media. However, the long-term cold preservation of OCTs in DMEM containing hydrogen was associated with the most optimal maintenance of chondrocytes with respect to viability and morphology. Our findings demonstrate that OCTs preserved in DMEM supplemented with hydrogen are a promising material for the repair of large cartilage defects in the clinical setting. PMID:25506061

  9. Negative dielectrophoretic force assisted construction of ordered neuronal networks on cell positioning bioelectronic chips.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhe; Xiang, Guangxin; Pan, Liangbin; Huang, Lihua; Yu, Zhongyao; Xing, Wanli; Cheng, Jing

    2004-12-01

    Developing new methods and technologies in order to pattern neurons into regular networks is of utmost scientific interest in the field of neurological research. An efficient method here is developed for trapping neurons and constructing ordered neuronal networks on bioelectronic chips by using arrayed negative dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces. A special bioelectronic chip with well defined positioning electrode arrays was designed and fabricated on silicon substrate. When a high frequency AC signal was applied, the cell positioning bioelectronic chip (CPBC) is able to provide a well-defined non-uniform electric field, and thus generate negative DEP forces. The parameters, such as size of positioning electrode, conductivity of working solution, amplitude and frequency of power signal and cell concentration, were investigated to optimize the performance of the CPBC. When the neuron suspension was added onto the energized bioelectronic chip, the neurons were immediately trapped and quickly formed the predetermined pattern. Neurons may adhere and then be cultured directly on the CPBC, and show good neuron viability and neurite development. The formation of the ordered neuronal networks after two-week culture demonstrates that negative dielectrophoretic force assisted construction of ordered neuronal networks is effective, and it could be used to assist in monitoring functional activities of neuronal networks.

  10. Insulin-like growth factor-1 attenuates apoptosis and protects neurochemical phenotypes of dorsal root ganglion neurons with paclitaxel-induced neurotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Bai, Xue; Bi, Yanwen; Liu, Guixiang; Li, Hao; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Huaxiang

    2017-02-01

    Paclitaxel (PT)-induced neurotoxicity is a significant problem associated with successful treatment of cancers. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is a neurotrophic factor and plays an important role in promoting axonal growth from dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Whether IGF-1 has protective effects on neurite growth, cell viability, neuronal apoptosis and neuronal phenotypes in DRG neurons with PT-induced neurotoxicity is still unclear. In this study, primary cultured rat DRG neurons were used to assess the effects of IGF-1 on DRG neurons with PT-induced neurotoxicity. The results showed that PT exposure caused neurite retraction in a dose-dependent manner. PT exposure caused a decrease of cell viability and an increase in the ratio of apoptotic cells which could be reversed by IGF-1. The percentage of calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactive (CGRP-IR) neurons and neurofilament (NF)-200-IR neurons, mRNA, and protein levels of CGRP and NF-200 decreased significantly after treatment with PT. IGF-1 administration had protective effects on CGRP-IR neurons, but not on NF-200-IR neurons. Either extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) inhibitor PD98059 or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3 K) inhibitor LY294002 blocked the effect of IGF-1. The results imply that IGF-1 may attenuate apoptosis to improve neuronal cell viability and promote neurite growth of DRG neurons with PT-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, these results support an important neuroprotective role of exogenous IGF-1 on distinct subpopulations of DRG neurons which is responsible for skin sensation. The effects of IGF-1 might be through ERK1/2 or PI3 K/Akt signaling pathways. These findings provide experimental evidence for IGF-1 administration to alleviate neurotoxicity of distinct subpopulations of DRG neurons induced by PT.

  11. Morin hydrate promotes inner ear neural stem cell survival and differentiation and protects cochlea against neuronal hearing loss.

    PubMed

    He, Qiang; Jia, Zhanwei; Zhang, Ying; Ren, Xiumin

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of morin hydrate on neural stem cells (NSCs) isolated from mouse inner ear and its potential in protecting neuronal hearing loss. 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays were employed to assess the effect of morin hydrate on the viability and proliferation of in vitro NSC culture. The NSCs were then differentiated into neurons, in which neurosphere formation and differentiation were evaluated, followed by neurite outgrowth and neural excitability measurements in the subsequent in vitro neuronal network. Mechanotransduction of cochlea ex vivo culture and auditory brainstem responses threshold and distortion product optoacoustic emissions amplitude in mouse ototoxicity model were also measured following gentamicin treatment to investigate the protective role of morin hydrate against neuronal hearing loss. Morin hydrate improved viability and proliferation, neurosphere formation and neuronal differentiation of inner ear NSCs, and promoted in vitro neuronal network functions. In both ex vivo and in vivo ototoxicity models, morin hydrate prevented gentamicin-induced neuronal hearing loss. Morin hydrate exhibited potent properties in promoting growth and differentiation of inner ear NSCs into functional neurons and protecting from gentamicin ototoxicity. Our study supports its clinical potential in treating neuronal hearing loss.

  12. Prolactin mediates neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons via its receptor.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Castañeda, E; Grattan, D R; Pasantes-Morales, H; Pérez-Domínguez, M; Cabrera-Reyes, E A; Morales, T; Cerbón, M

    2016-04-01

    Recently it has been reported that prolactin (PRL) exerts a neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity in hippocampus in the rat in vivo models. However, the exact mechanism by which PRL mediates this effect is not completely understood. The aim of our study was to assess whether prolactin exerts neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in an in vitro model using primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons, and to determine whether this effect is mediated via the prolactin receptor (PRLR). Primary cell cultures of rat hippocampal neurons were used in all experiments, gene expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR, and protein expression was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Cell viability was assessed by using the MTT method. The results demonstrated that PRL treatment of neurons from primary cultures did not modify cell viability, but that it exerted a neuroprotective effect, with cells treated with PRL showing a significant increase of viability after glutamate (Glu)--induced excitotoxicity as compared with neurons treated with Glu alone. Cultured neurons expressed mRNA for both PRL and its receptor (PRLR), and both PRL and PRLR expression levels changed after the excitotoxic insult. Interestingly, the PRLR protein was detected as two main isoforms of 100 and 40 kDa as compared with that expressed in hypothalamic cells, which was present only as a 30 kDa variant. On the other hand, PRL was not detected in neuron cultures, either by western blot or by immunohistochemistry. Neuroprotection induced by PRL was significantly blocked by specific oligonucleotides against PRLR, thus suggesting that the PRL role is mediated by its receptor expressed in these neurons. The overall results indicated that PRL induces neuroprotection in neurons from primary cell cultures.

  13. Micro-organism and cell viability on antimicrobially modified titanium.

    PubMed

    Omori, S; Shibata, Y; Arimoto, T; Igarashi, T; Baba, K; Miyazaki, T

    2009-10-01

    When titanium is anodized by discharge in NaCl solution, both antimicrobial activity and osteoconductivity are conferred. The viability of adherent micro-organisms and cells on antimicrobial titanium remains uncertain. We hypothesized that a thin peroxidation barrier would efficiently destroy adherent bacteria, whereas adherent osteoblastic cells would be viable, since these cells adhere to the surface indirectly though serum proteins. The efficacy of antimicrobial titanium appears to be based on peroxidation, since peroxidation products were detected in parallel with the destruction of bacterial cell-surface structures. The peroxidation effect of antimicrobial titanium was confined to the surface within narrow limits. The viability of osteoblastic cells on the surface was strongly dependent on the presence of serum protein, whereas that of adherent Streptococcus mutans was not affected by the presence of serum proteins. Therefore, differences in the adherent systems used by bacteria and osteoblastic cells are important determinants of their viability on antimicrobial titanium.

  14. DNA methylation is critical for Arabidopsis embryogenesis and seed viability.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wenyan; Custard, Kendra D; Brown, Roy C; Lemmon, Betty E; Harada, John J; Goldberg, Robert B; Fischer, Robert L

    2006-04-01

    DNA methylation (5-methylcytosine) in mammalian genomes predominantly occurs at CpG dinucleotides, is maintained by DNA methyltransferase1 (Dnmt1), and is essential for embryo viability. The plant genome also has 5-methylcytosine at CpG dinucleotides, which is maintained by METHYLTRANSFERASE1 (MET1), a homolog of Dnmt1. In addition, plants have DNA methylation at CpNpG and CpNpN sites, maintained, in part, by the CHROMOMETHYLASE3 (CMT3) DNA methyltransferase. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana embryos with loss-of-function mutations in MET1 and CMT3 develop improperly, display altered planes and numbers of cell division, and have reduced viability. Genes that specify embryo cell identity are misexpressed, and auxin hormone gradients are not properly formed in abnormal met1 embryos. Thus, DNA methylation is critical for the regulation of plant embryogenesis and for seed viability.

  15. DNA Methylation Is Critical for Arabidopsis Embryogenesis and Seed Viability

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wenyan; Custard, Kendra D.; Brown, Roy C.; Lemmon, Betty E.; Harada, John J.; Goldberg, Robert B.; Fischer, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    DNA methylation (5-methylcytosine) in mammalian genomes predominantly occurs at CpG dinucleotides, is maintained by DNA methyltransferase1 (Dnmt1), and is essential for embryo viability. The plant genome also has 5-methylcytosine at CpG dinucleotides, which is maintained by METHYLTRANSFERASE1 (MET1), a homolog of Dnmt1. In addition, plants have DNA methylation at CpNpG and CpNpN sites, maintained, in part, by the CHROMOMETHYLASE3 (CMT3) DNA methyltransferase. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana embryos with loss-of-function mutations in MET1 and CMT3 develop improperly, display altered planes and numbers of cell division, and have reduced viability. Genes that specify embryo cell identity are misexpressed, and auxin hormone gradients are not properly formed in abnormal met1 embryos. Thus, DNA methylation is critical for the regulation of plant embryogenesis and for seed viability. PMID:16531498

  16. Viability of glycerol-preserved and cryopreserved anuran skin.

    PubMed

    Willens, Scott; Stoskopf, Michael K; Martin, Linda D; Lewbart, Gregory A

    2005-01-01

    Anurans are important animal models for studying the effects of anthropogenic chemical contamination of the environment. Two-compartment Teflon flow-through diffusion cells can be used to study percutaneous absorption of xenobiotics across harvested skin. However, such an approach currently necessitates that skin be harvested just before experimentation, a requirement that calls for the continuous growth and housing of living animals. The ability to preserve and store skin would allow more efficient use of animals and more flexibility in experimental design. To this end, we examined the viability of harvested anuran skin stored under various protocols consistent with current practices of mammalian skin preservation. Skin from the American bullfrog maintained 80-85% viability after 28 d, whereas viability of skin from the marine toad was only maintained for 7-10 d.

  17. Rethinking the approach to viability monitoring in seed genebanks

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Katherine J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Seed viability monitoring, usually through a germination test, is a key aspect of genebank management; a low viability result triggers the regeneration of an accession in order to ensure that the genetic diversity of the accession is conserved and available for distribution. However, regular viability monitoring of large collections is costly in terms of seeds, labour and other resources. Genebanks differ in how they conduct their viability monitoring and how they collect, manage and store the data that are generated. In this article, we propose alternatives to the current norm of conducting an initial germination test soon after arrival at the genebank and then testing after regular, set storage intervals, as recommended in the Food and Agriculture Organization's Genebank Standards for Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture. We use real data from the International Rice Genebank (held at the International Rice Research Institute) to illustrate some of the issues regarding the accuracy and reliability of germination test results, in particular when they are used to predict the longevity of a seed lot in storage and to set viability monitoring intervals. We suggest the use of seed storage experiments on samples of seeds to identify which seed lots from a particular crop season to test first. We also give advice on the use of sequential testing schemes potentially to reduce the number of seeds used for viability testing; the use of tolerance tables to identify unlikely results when samples are subdivided into replicates; and what data to include in a genebank management database to improve the management of seed collections. PMID:28361000

  18. Rethinking the approach to viability monitoring in seed genebanks.

    PubMed

    Hay, Fiona R; Whitehouse, Katherine J

    2017-01-01

    Seed viability monitoring, usually through a germination test, is a key aspect of genebank management; a low viability result triggers the regeneration of an accession in order to ensure that the genetic diversity of the accession is conserved and available for distribution. However, regular viability monitoring of large collections is costly in terms of seeds, labour and other resources. Genebanks differ in how they conduct their viability monitoring and how they collect, manage and store the data that are generated. In this article, we propose alternatives to the current norm of conducting an initial germination test soon after arrival at the genebank and then testing after regular, set storage intervals, as recommended in the Food and Agriculture Organization's Genebank Standards for Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture. We use real data from the International Rice Genebank (held at the International Rice Research Institute) to illustrate some of the issues regarding the accuracy and reliability of germination test results, in particular when they are used to predict the longevity of a seed lot in storage and to set viability monitoring intervals. We suggest the use of seed storage experiments on samples of seeds to identify which seed lots from a particular crop season to test first. We also give advice on the use of sequential testing schemes potentially to reduce the number of seeds used for viability testing; the use of tolerance tables to identify unlikely results when samples are subdivided into replicates; and what data to include in a genebank management database to improve the management of seed collections.

  19. Identification of nonviable genes affecting touch sensitivity in Caenorhabditis elegans using neuronally enhanced feeding RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyin; Cuadros, Margarete Diaz; Chalfie, Martin

    2015-01-09

    Caenorhabditis elegans senses gentle touch along the body via six touch receptor neurons. Although genetic screens and microarray analyses have identified several genes needed for touch sensitivity, these methods miss pleiotropic genes that are essential for the viability, movement, or fertility of the animals. We used neuronally enhanced feeding RNA interference to screen genes that cause lethality or paralysis when mutated, and we identified 61 such genes affecting touch sensitivity, including five positive controls. We confirmed 18 genes by using available alleles, and further studied one of them, tag-170, now renamed txdc-9. txdc-9 preferentially affects anterior touch response but is needed for tubulin acetylation and microtubule formation in both the anterior and posterior touch receptor neurons. Our results indicate that neuronally enhanced feeding RNA interference screens complement traditional mutageneses by identifying additional nonviable genes needed for specific neuronal functions.

  20. Carnosine protects neurons against oxidative stress and modulates the time profile of MAPK cascade signaling.

    PubMed

    Kulebyakin, Konstantin; Karpova, Larisa; Lakonsteva, Ekaterina; Krasavin, Mikhail; Boldyrev, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Carnosine is a known protector of neuronal cells against oxidative injury which prevents both apoptotic and necrotic cellular death. It was shown earlier that carnosine serves as an intracellular buffer of free radicals. Using the model of ligand-dependent oxidative stress in neurons, we have shown that homocysteine (HC) initiates long-term activation of extracellular signal regulated kinase, isoforms 1 and 2 (ERK 1/2) and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) which corresponds to exitotoxic effect resulting in cellular death. L-carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) protects neurons from both excitotoxic effect of homocysteine and cellular death. Its analogs, β-alanyl-D-histidine (D-carnosine) and L-histidyl-β-alanine, restricted accumulation of free radicals and delayed activation of ERK1/2 and JNK in neuronal cells, but did not promote neuronal viability.