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Sample records for computed tomography arthrography

  1. Computed tomography arthrography in traumatic hip dislocation. Intra-articular and capsular findings.

    PubMed

    Glynn, T P; Kreipke, D L; DeRosa, G P

    1989-01-01

    The newer diagnostic modalities such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are becoming increasingly used in the evaluation of joint trauma. The combination of computed tomography and arthrography can also be of significant diagnostic value in certain specific situations. In our case report, we describe its use in post-traumatic recurrent hip dislocation and its value, not only in depicting a posterior capsular tear, but also in the diagnosis of an internal joint derangement which may contribute to incongruous reduction of the hip joint.

  2. Dislocation of the temporomandibular joint meniscus: contrast arthrography vs. computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.R.; Christiansen, E.; Sauser, D.; Hasso, A.N.; Hinshaw, D.B. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A prospective study to determine the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) meniscus was made by performing both CT and contrast arthrography on 18 joints suspected of meniscus dislocation. Arthography rather than surgery was chosen as the quality standard for comparing CT findings, as not all patients undergoing the studies underwent surgery. The results of each test were reported independently by the radiologist who obtained either all of the arthograms or all of the CT scans. For dislocation of the meniscus, there were excellent agreement between the two methods. CT seems to be nearly as accurate as arthrography for showing meniscus dislocation, is performed with lower x-ray exposure, and is noninvasive. Arthrograpy discloses more detailed information about the joint meniscus, such as perforation and maceration, and should continue to be used when this kind of information is clinically important.

  3. Value of computed tomography arthrography with delayed acquisitions in the work-up of ganglion cysts of the tarsal tunnel: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Omoumi, Patrick; de Gheldere, Antoine; Leemrijse, Thibaut; Galant, Christine; Van den Bergh, Peter; Malghem, Jacques; Simoni, Paolo; Vande Berg, Bruno C; Lecouvet, Frédéric E

    2010-04-01

    Ganglion cysts are a common cause of tarsal tunnel syndrome. As in other locations, these cysts are believed to communicate with neighboring joints. The positive diagnosis and preoperative work-up of these cysts require identification and location of the cyst pedicles so that they may be excised and the risk of recurrence decreased. This can be challenging with ultrasonography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. We present three cases of symptomatic ganglion cysts of the tarsal tunnel, diagnosed by MR imaging, where computed tomography (CT) arthrography with delayed acquisitions helped to confirm the diagnosis and identify precisely the topography of the communication with the subtalar joint. These cases provide new evidence of the articular origin of ganglion cysts developing in the tarsal tunnel.

  4. Clinical arthrography

    SciTech Connect

    Arndt, R.; Horns, J.W.; Gold, R.H.; Blaschke, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    This book deals with the method and interpretation of arthrography of the shoulder, knee, ankle, elbow, hip, wrist, and metacarpophalangeal, interphalangeal, and temporomandibular joints. The emphasis is on orthopaedic disorders, usually of traumatic origin, which is in keeping with the application of arthrography in clinical practice. Other conditions, such as inflammatory and degenerative diseases, congenital disorders and, in the case of the hip, arthrography of reconstructive joint surgery, are included. Each chapter is devoted to one joint and provides a comprehensive discussion on the method of arthrography, including single and double contrast techniques where applicable, normal radiographic anatomy, and finally, the interpretation of the normal and the abnormal arthrogram.

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the ...

  6. Nasal computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Ned F

    2006-05-01

    Chronic nasal disease is often a challenge to diagnose. Computed tomography greatly enhances the ability to diagnose chronic nasal disease in dogs and cats. Nasal computed tomography provides detailed information regarding the extent of disease, accurate discrimination of neoplastic versus nonneoplastic diseases, and identification of areas of the nose to examine rhinoscopically and suspicious regions to target for biopsy.

  7. Bursae and abscess cavities communicating with the hip: diagnosis using arthrography and CT

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbach, L.S.; Schneider, R.; Goldman, A.B.; Kazam, E.; Ranawat, C.S.; Ghelman, B.

    1985-08-01

    Bursae or abscess cavities communicating with the hip joint were demonstrated by hip arthrography or by computed tomography (CT) in 40 cases. The bursae or abscess cavities were associated with underlying abnormalities in the hip, including painful hip prostheses, infection, and inflammatory or degenerative arthritis. Symptoms may be produced directly as a result of infection or indirectly as a result of inflammation or pressure on adjacent structures. Hip arthrography can confirm a diagnosis of bursae and abscess cavities communicating with the hip joint in patients with hip pain or soft-tissue masses around the groin. Differentiation of enlarged bursae from other abnormalities is important to avoid unnecessary or incorrect surgery.

  8. Computed tomography status

    SciTech Connect

    Hansche, B.D.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

  9. Computed Tomography Status

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Hansche, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

  10. Proton computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucciantonio, Martina; Sauli, Fabio

    2015-05-01

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a diagnostic method capable of in situ imaging the three-dimensional density distribution in a patient before irradiation with charged particle beams. Proposed long time ago, this technology has been developed by several groups, and may become an essential tool for advanced quality assessment in hadrontherapy. We describe the basic principles of the method, its performance and limitations as well as provide a summary of experimental systems and of results achieved.

  11. High Resolution Computed Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-31

    samples. 14. SUBJECTTERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 38 High Resolution, Microfocus , Characterization, X - Ray , Micrography, Computed Tomography (CT), Failure...high resolutions (50 g.tm feature sensitivity) when a small field of view (50 mm) is used [11]. Specially designed detectors and a microfocus X - ray ...Wright Laboratories. Feldkamp [14] at Ford used a microfocus X - ray source and an X - ray image intensifier to develop a system capable of 20 g.m

  12. Abdominal perfusion computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis.

  13. Abdominal Perfusion Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M. Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis. PMID:25610249

  14. Controlled Cardiac Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenglin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Ge

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has been a hot topic for years because of the clinical importance of cardiac diseases and the rapid evolution of CT systems. In this paper, we propose a novel strategy for controlled cardiac CT that may effectively reduce image artifacts due to cardiac and respiratory motions. Our approach is radically different from existing ones and is based on controlling the X-ray source rotation velocity and powering status in reference to the cardiac motion. We theoretically show that by such a control-based intervention the data acquisition process can be optimized for cardiac CT in the cases of periodic and quasiperiodic cardiac motions. Specifically, we formulate the corresponding coordination/control schemes for either exact or approximate matches between the ideal and actual source positions, and report representative simulation results that support our analytic findings. PMID:23165017

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ...

  17. Computed tomography of intracranial ependymomas

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, J.D.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.

    1982-04-01

    Twenty-six patients with ependymoma were evaluated by computed tomography (CT) over a period of 5 1/2 years. The usual CT appearance was an isodense, partially calcified mass, capable of contrast enhancement, occurring in the posterior fossa (73%) in an infant or child (77%). Outcome remains poor despite modern diagnostic and therapeutic methods.

  18. Computed tomography:the details.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-07-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a well established technique, particularly in medical imaging, but also applied in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging. Basic CT imaging via back-projection is treated in many texts, but often with insufficient detail to appreciate subtleties such as the role of non-uniform sampling densities. Herein are given some details often neglected in many texts.

  19. Computed tomography of the thorax

    SciTech Connect

    Naidich, D.P.; Zerhouni, E.A.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains chapters on: Principles and Techniques of Chest Computed Tomography; Aortic Arch and Great Vessels; Normal Anatomy and Variants; Mediastinum/Airways/Lobar Collapse/Pulmonary Hila/Pulmonary Nodule/Pulmonary Parenchyma/Pleura and Chest Wall/Pericardium/Diaphragm.

  20. Computed tomography in hepatic echinococcosis

    SciTech Connect

    Choliz, J.D.; Olaverri, F.J.L.; Casas, T.F.; Zubieta, S.O.

    1982-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was used to evaluate 50 cases of hydatid disease of the liver. It was definite in 49 cases and negative in one case. Pre- and postcontrast scans were performed. CT may reveal the exact location and extension of cysts and possible complications. However, a false-negative case was found in a hydatid cyst located in a fatty liver.

  1. Computed tomography of the gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    This volume presents computed tomography of the major disease states involving the gastrointestinal tract, mesentery, and peritoneal cavity. Computed Tomography of the Gastrointestinal Tract combined experience of l5 authorities includes illustrations (most of these radiographs).

  2. NASA's computed tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, H. Peter

    1989-03-01

    The computerized industrial tomographic analyzer (CITA) is designed to examine the internal structure and material integrity of a wide variety of aerospace-related objects, particularly in the NASA space program. The nondestructive examination is performed by producing a two-dimensional picture of a selected slice through an object. The penetrating sources that yield data for reconstructing the slice picture are radioactive cobalt or a high-power X-ray tube. A series of pictures and computed tomograms are presented which illustrate a few of the applications the CITA has been used for since its August 1986 initial service at the Kennedy Space Center.

  3. Pediatric cranial computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.

    1984-01-01

    The introduction of CT in the investigation of intercranial pathology has revolutionized the approach to clinical neurological and neurosurgical practice. This book applies the advances of cranial CT to the pediatric patient. The test is divided into two sections. The first portion describes the practical methodology, anatomy and normal and abnormal CT scan appearance, including high or low density lesions, cystic lesions and ventricular or subarachnoid space dilation. The characteristic scans for various neurological diseases are presented and discussed. The author has given special attention to the CT diagnosis of congenital malformations and cerebral neoplasms. Partial Contents: Normal Computed Tomographic Anatomy/ High Density Lesions/Low Density Lesions/Cystic Lesions; Supratentorial/Cystic Lesions; Infratentorial/Increased Head Circumference/Increased Ventricular Size/Small Ventricular Size/Cranial Lesions/Spinal Lesions/CT Cisternography/Part II CT in Neonates/Congenital Craniocerebral Malformations/Hydrocephalus/Craniosynostosis/Head Trauma/Cerebrovascular Lesions/Intracranial Lesions/Seizure Disorders/Intracranial and Other Chronic Neurological Disorders.

  4. X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-05-01

    The primary advantage of the X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) NDE method is that features are not superposed in the image, thereby rendering them easier to interpret than radiographic projection images. Industrial XRCT systems, unlike medical diagnostic systems, have no size and dosage constraints; they are accordingly used for systems from the scale of gas turbine blades, with hundreds-of-kV energies, to those of the scale of ICBMs, requiring MV-level X-ray energies.

  5. Computed tomography of neutropenic colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, M.P.; Maile, C.W.; Crass, J.R.; Goldberg, M.E.; Delaney, J.P.

    1984-10-01

    Four patients developed neutropenic colitis as a complication of acute leukemia (three) or aplastic anemia (one). On computed tomography (CT), neutropenic colitis was characterized by cecal wall thickening (four) and pneumatosis (one). Intramural areas of lower density presumably reflected edema or hemorrhage. Clinical improvement and return of adequate numbers of functioning neutrophils coincided with decrease in cecal wall thickening on CT. Prompt radiologic recognition of this serious condition is crucial, since surgical intervention is probably best avoided.

  6. Computed tomography of gynecologic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, B.H.; Moss, A.A.; Mihara, K.; Goldberg, H.I.; Glazer, G.M.

    1983-10-01

    Although computed tomography (CT) provides superb images of all areas of the body, sonography, because of its lack of ionizing radiation and its real-time and multiplanar capacities, has become the preferred initial method of evaluating the female pelvis. This has resulted in a relative paucity of information in the literature concerning CT features of benign pelvic disorders in particular and prompted the authors to review our experience with third-generation CT scanning of the uterus and ovaries.

  7. Computed Tomography software and standards

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, S.G.; Martz, H.E.; Skeate, M.F.; Schneberk, D.J.; Roberson, G.P.

    1990-02-20

    This document establishes the software design, nomenclature, and conventions for industrial Computed Tomography (CT) used in the Nondestructive Evaluation Section at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It is mainly a users guide to the technical use of the CT computer codes, but also presents a proposed standard for describing CT experiments and reconstructions. Each part of this document specifies different aspects of the CT software organization. A set of tables at the end describes the CT parameters of interest in our project. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Computed Tomography Imaging in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lisa J

    2016-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging has become the mainstay of oncology, providing accurate tumor staging and follow-up imaging to monitor treatment response. Presurgical evaluation of tumors is becoming commonplace and guides surgeons as to the extent and whether complete tumor resection is possible. CT imaging plays a crucial role in radiotherapy treatment planning. CT imaging in oncology has become ubiquitous in veterinary medicine because of increased availability of this imaging modality. This article focuses on CT cancer staging in veterinary oncology, CT imaging for surgical planning, and advances in CT simulation for radiation therapy planning.

  9. Computed tomography of stress fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Murcia, M.; Brennan, R.E.; Edeiken, J.

    1982-06-01

    An athletic young female developed gradual onset of pain in the right leg. Plain radiographs demonstrated solid periosteal reaction in the tibia compatible with stress fracture. She stopped sport activites but her pain continued. Follow-up radiographs of the tibia revealed changes suspicious for osteoid osteoma. Computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated periosteal reaction, but in addition, lucent fracture lines in the tibial cortex were evident. CT obviated the need for more invasive diagnostic procedures in this patient. In selected cases CT may be useful to confirm the diagnosis of stress fracture when plain radiographic or routine tomographic studies are not diagnostic.

  10. Computed tomography of intrathoracic goiters

    SciTech Connect

    Bashist, B.; Ellis, K.; Gold, R.P.

    1983-03-01

    Ten patients with intrathoracic goiters were evaluated by computed tomography (CT). In comparison with chest radiographs, CT showed additional features helpful in suggesting the correct diagnosis. These observations included: (1) clear continuity with the cervical thyroid gland (8/10 cases); (2) well defined borders (9/10); (3) punctate, coarse, or ringlike calcifications (8/10); (4) nonhomogeneity (9/10) often with discrete, nonenhancing, low-density areas (6/10); (5) precontrast attenuation values at least 15 H greater than adjacent muscles (4/10) with more than 25 H after contrast enhancement (8/8); and (6) characteristic patterns of goiter extension into mediastinum.

  11. Computed tomography of Krukenberg tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, K.C.; Gold, B.M.

    1985-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of three patients with Kurkenberg tumor was reviewed retrospectively. CT showed large, lobulated, multicystic masses with soft-tissue components, indistinguishable from primary ovarian carcinoma. Much has been written about metastatic ovarian tumor, but this is the first report in the radiologic literature about their CT features. The authors emphasize the importance of recognizing the ovary as a frequent site of metastases and the proper approach to this problem. In patients with a history of colon or gastric carcinoma, the mixed cystic and solid ovarian mass on CT should be regarded as metastatic tumor until proven otherwise. A careful search for gastrointestinal tract signs or symptoms should be done in any patient with a pelvic tumor. When CT is done for evaluation of ovarian tumor, the stomach and colon should be carefully evaluated, and the ovaries routinely examined in the preoperative CT staging of gastric or colon carcinoma.

  12. Single photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Piez, C.W. Jr.; Holman, B.L.

    1985-07-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is becoming an increasingly important part of routine clinical nuclear medicine. By providing tomographic reconstructions in multiple planes through the patient, SPECT expands the clinical applications in nuclear medicine as well as providing better contrast, edge definition and separation of target from background activities. Imaging techniques have been developed for the evaluation of regional cerebral blood flow using radiolabeled amines. Thus, cerebral functional imaging can be used in the diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction, cerebral vascular disease, dementia and epilepsy. SPECT plays a complementary role in the evaluation of coronary artery disease, particularly when it is coupled with thallium-201 and exercise testing. SPECT extends our diagnostic capabilities in additional areas, such as liver and bone scintigraphy as well as tumor imaging with gallium-67.

  13. Computed tomography of cryogenic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Gerd; Anderson, E.; Vogt, S.; Knochel, C.; Weiss, D.; LeGros, M.; Larabell, C.

    2001-08-30

    Due to the short wavelengths of X-rays and low numerical aperture of the Fresnel zone plates used as X-ray objectives, the depth of field is several microns. Within the focal depth, imaging a thick specimen is to a good approximation equivalent to projecting the specimen absorption. Therefore, computed tomography based on a tilt series of X-ray microscopic images can be used to reconstruct the local linear absorption coefficient and image the three-dimensional specimen structure. To preserve the structural integrity of biological objects during image acquisition, microscopy is performed at cryogenic temperatures. Tomography based on X-ray microscopic images was applied to study the distribution of male specific lethal 1 (MSL-1), a nuclear protein involved in dosage compensation in Drosophila melanogaster, which ensures that males with single X chromosome have the same amount of most X-linked gene products as females with two X chromosomes. Tomographic reconstructions of X-ray microscopic images were used to compute the local three-dimensional linear absorption coefficient revealing the arrangement of internal structures of Drosophila melanogaster cells. Combined with labelling techniques, nanotomography is a new technique to study the 3D distribution of selected proteins inside whole cells. We want to improve this technique with respect to resolution and specimen preparation. The resolution in the reconstruction can be significantly improved by reducing the angular step size to collect more viewing angles, which requires an automated data acquisition. In addition, fast-freezing with liquid ethane instead of cryogenic He gas will be applied to improve the vitrification of the hydrated samples. We also plan to apply cryo X-ray nanotomography in order to study different types of cells and their nuclear protein distributions.

  14. [What remains of arthrography?].

    PubMed

    Morvan, G

    1994-06-15

    At the time of RMI, arthrography appears sometimes old-fashioned. However this exam, which knows a second youth in relation with the supply of CT-scan (arthro-CT) remains the gold-standard in the exploration of many pathologic situations: intra-articular foreign bodies, tears of glenoid or acetabular labrum, precise assessment of chondral or ligamentous lesions (especially of the ankle), sub-scapularis tendon tears, adhesive capsulitis, complications of prosthesis, appreciation of intra-articular position of the needle's tip before injection of a therapeutic drug. Arthrography, completed or not by CT-slices gives, in this indications, excellent spatial resolution images, easy to perform, to read, to understand and to transmit at the clinicians, with a reasonable cost and a minor risk. RMI is a more and more used alternative, especially for the study of meniscus and ligaments of the knee, and rotator's cuff of the shoulder. It's sure that, with the increase of the RMI image's quality, other common indications will slip towards this technique, but nevertheless at this time (and it seams to me, for a long time) arthrography and arthro-CT will remain an excellent diagnostic tool with a very competitive advantages/inconvenience ratio.

  15. Prospectively gated cardiac computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Moore, S C; Judy, P F; Garnic, J D; Kambic, G X; Bonk, F; Cochran, G; Margosian, P; McCroskey, W; Foote, F

    1983-01-01

    A fourth-generation scanner has been modified to perform prospectively gated cardiac computed tomography (CT). A computer program monitors the electrocardiogram (ECG) and predicts when to initiate the next scan in a gated series in order to acquire all projection data for a desired phase of the heart cycle. The system has been tested with dogs and has produced cross-sectional images of all phases of the cardiac cycle. Eight to ten scans per series were sufficient to obtain reproducible images of each transverse section in the end-diastolic and end-systolic phases. The radiation dose to the skin was approximately 1.4 cGy per scan. The prospectively gated system is more than twice as efficient as a retrospectively gated system in obtaining complete angular projection data for a 10% heart cycle window. A temporal smoothing technique to suppress reconstruction artifacts due to sorting inconsistent projection data was developed and evaluated. Image noise was reduced by averaging together any overlapping projection data. Prospectively gated cardiac CT has also been used to demonstrate that the error in attenuation measured with a single nongated CT scan through the heart can be as large as 50-60 CT numbers outside the heart in the lung field.

  16. [Computed tomography and cranial paleoanthropology].

    PubMed

    Cabanis, Emmanuel Alain; Badawi-Fayad, Jackie; Iba-Zizen, Marie-Thérèse; Istoc, Adrian; de Lumley, Henry; de Lumley, Marie-Antoinette; Coppens, Yves

    2007-06-01

    Since its invention in 1972, computed tomography (C.T.) has significantly evolved. With the advent of multi-slice detectors (500 times more sensitive than conventional radiography) and high-powered computer programs, medical applications have also improved. CT is now contributing to paleoanthropological research. Its non-destructive nature is the biggest advantage for studying fossil skulls. The second advantage is the possibility of image analysis, storage, and transmission. Potential disadvantages include the possible loss of files and the need to keep up with rapid technological advances. Our experience since the late 1970s, and a recent PhD thesis, led us to describe routine applications of this method. The main contributions of CT to cranial paleoanthropology are five-fold: --Numerical anatomy with rapid acquisition and high spatial resolution (helicoidal and multidetector CT) offering digital storage and stereolithography (3D printing). --Numerical biometry (2D and 3D) can be used to create "normograms" such as the 3D craniofacial reference model used in maxillofacial surgery. --Numerical analysis offers thorough characterization of the specimen and its state of conservation and/or restoration. --From "surrealism" to virtual imaging, anatomical structures can be reconstructed, providing access to hidden or dangerous zones. --The time dimension (4D imaging) confers movement and the possibility for endoscopic simulation and internal navigation (see Iconography). New technical developments will focus on data processing and networking. It remains our duty to deal respectfully with human fossils.

  17. [Computer tomography of the brain in neurology].

    PubMed

    Shmidt, E V; Vereshchagin, N V; Bragina, L K; Vavilov, S B

    1978-01-01

    The results of the studies, obtained in a computer head tomography confirms its effectiveness in the diagnosis of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes, tumor and degenerative brain diseases, as well as in investigations of the brain ventricular systems and subarachnoidal spaces. A computer head tomography--is a perspective method in the study of brain lesions with the aid of X-ray equipment and computers.

  18. [Clinical application of computed tomography in cattle].

    PubMed

    Nuss, K; Schnetzler, C; Hagen, R; Schwarz, A; Kircher, P

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography involves the use of x-rays to produce cross-sectional images of body regions. It provides non-overlapping, two-dimensional images of all desired planes as well as three-dimensional reconstruction of regions of interest. There are few reports on the clinical use of computed tomography in farm animals. Its use in cattle is limited by high cost, the application of off-label drugs and the need for general anaesthesia. In cattle computed tomography is indicated primarily for diseases of the head, e.g. dental diseases and otitis media, and neurological disorders. Less often it is used for diseases of the vertebrae and limbs. In valuable cattle, the results of computed tomography can be an important part of preoperative planning or be used to avoid unnecessary surgery when the prognosis is poor.

  19. Computed tomography of orbital-facial neurofibromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Metzger, R.A.; Grossman, R.I.; Schut, L.; Bruce, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-four patients with orbital-facial manifestations of neurofibromations were examined by computed tomography. Delineation of the extent of the disease, and differentiation of the disease processes (orbital tumor, osseous orbital dysplasia, plexiform neurofibromatosis, and buphthalmos) was possible.

  20. Intraperitoneal contrast agents for computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Stork, J.

    1985-08-01

    Intraperitoneal contrast agents have been used to diagnose mass lesions, adhesions, and hernias using conventional radiographic techniques. The use of intraperitoneal contrast agents in conjunction with computed tomography (CT) has been limited and is the subject of this report.

  1. Interlaced X-ray diffraction computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakeros, Antonios; Jacques, Simon D. M.; Di Michiel, Marco; Senecal, Pierre; Middelkoop, Vesna; Cernik, Robert J.; Beale, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction computed tomography data-collection strategy that allows, post experiment, a choice between temporal and spatial resolution is reported. This strategy enables time-resolved studies on comparatively short timescales, or alternatively allows for improved spatial resolution if the system under study, or components within it, appear to be unchanging. The application of the method for studying an Mn–Na–W/SiO2 fixed-bed reactor in situ is demonstrated. Additionally, the opportunities to improve the data-collection strategy further, enabling post-collection tuning between statistical, temporal and spatial resolutions, are discussed. In principle, the interlaced scanning approach can also be applied to other pencil-beam tomographic techniques, like X-ray fluorescence computed tomography, X-ray absorption fine structure computed tomography, pair distribution function computed tomography and tomographic scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. PMID:27047305

  2. Interlaced X-ray diffraction computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Vamvakeros, Antonios; Jacques, Simon D M; Di Michiel, Marco; Senecal, Pierre; Middelkoop, Vesna; Cernik, Robert J; Beale, Andrew M

    2016-04-01

    An X-ray diffraction computed tomography data-collection strategy that allows, post experiment, a choice between temporal and spatial resolution is reported. This strategy enables time-resolved studies on comparatively short timescales, or alternatively allows for improved spatial resolution if the system under study, or components within it, appear to be unchanging. The application of the method for studying an Mn-Na-W/SiO2 fixed-bed reactor in situ is demonstrated. Additionally, the opportunities to improve the data-collection strategy further, enabling post-collection tuning between statistical, temporal and spatial resolutions, are discussed. In principle, the interlaced scanning approach can also be applied to other pencil-beam tomographic techniques, like X-ray fluorescence computed tomography, X-ray absorption fine structure computed tomography, pair distribution function computed tomography and tomographic scanning transmission X-ray microscopy.

  3. Computed Tomography of the Musculoskeletal System.

    PubMed

    Ballegeer, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has specific uses in veterinary species' appendicular musculoskeletal system. Parameters for acquisition of images, interpretation limitations, as well as published information regarding its use in small animals is reviewed.

  4. [Arthrography in congenital hip dislocation].

    PubMed

    Sipukhin, Ia M; Bazlova, E S; Cheberiak, N V

    1992-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the results of contrast arthrography in 73 children with hip joint dysplasia, among which true dislocations prevailed (70 patients). In addition to bone alterations, arthrography revealed various soft tissue changes like hypertrophy and deformity of limbus, soft tissue interposition, separation of the articular sac with the presence of an isthmus, disintegration of articular cartilages. These findings are used to define indications for surgical intervention as well as for planning the area of operation.

  5. Panoramic cone beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Jenghwa; Zhou Lili; Wang Song; Clifford Chao, K. S.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is the main imaging tool for image-guided radiotherapy but its functionality is limited by a small imaging volume and restricted image position (imaged at the central instead of the treatment position for peripheral lesions to avoid collisions). In this paper, the authors present the concept of ''panoramic CBCT,'' which can image patients at the treatment position with an imaging volume as large as practically needed. Methods: In this novel panoramic CBCT technique, the target is scanned sequentially from multiple view angles. For each view angle, a half scan (180 deg. + {theta}{sub cone} where {theta}{sub cone} is the cone angle) is performed with the imaging panel positioned in any location along the beam path. The panoramic projection images of all views for the same gantry angle are then stitched together with the direct image stitching method (i.e., according to the reported imaging position) and full-fan, half-scan CBCT reconstruction is performed using the stitched projection images. To validate this imaging technique, the authors simulated cone-beam projection images of the Mathematical Cardiac Torso (MCAT) thorax phantom for three panoramic views. Gaps, repeated/missing columns, and different exposure levels were introduced between adjacent views to simulate imperfect image stitching due to uncertainties in imaging position or output fluctuation. A modified simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (modified SART) was developed to reconstruct CBCT images directly from the stitched projection images. As a gold standard, full-fan, full-scan (360 deg. gantry rotation) CBCT reconstructions were also performed using projection images of one imaging panel large enough to encompass the target. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and geometric distortion were evaluated to quantify the quality of reconstructed images. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate the effect of scattering on the image quality and

  6. Computed tomography in supratentorial hemangioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Romero, F J; Rovira, M; Ortega, A; Ibarra, B

    1984-01-01

    Supratentorial hemangioblastomas are rare. A 28-yr-old man with a solid tumor in the left temporal region is described. There was neither meningeal connection nor associated polycythemia or Von Hippel-Lindau disease. Contrast enhanced computerized tomography showed a hyperdense, homogeneous lesion and cerebral angiography demonstrated a nodular tumor blush. The microscopic appearance of the lesion is described with a review of previously reported cases.

  7. Computed Tomography: Image and Dose Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Valencia-Ortega, F.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Buenfil, A. E.; Mora-Hernandez, L. A.

    2006-09-08

    In this work an experimental evaluation of image quality and dose imparted during a computed tomography study in a Public Hospital in Mexico City is presented; The measurements required the design and construction of two phantoms at the Institute of Physics, UNAM, according to the recommendations of American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). Image assessment was performed in terms the spatial resolution and image contrast. Dose measurements were carried out using LiF: Mg,Ti (TLD-100) dosemeters and pencil-shaped ionisation chamber; The results for a computed tomography head study in single and multiple detector modes are presented.

  8. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the abdomen.

    PubMed

    Güven, Koray; Acunaş, Bülent

    2004-10-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography has provided excellent opportunities for advancement of computed tomography (CT) technology and clinical applications. It has a wide range of applications in the abdomen including vascular pathologies either occlusive or aneurysmal; enables the radiologist to produce vascular mapping that clearly show tumor invasion of vasculature and the relationship of vessels to mass lesions. MDCTA can be used in preoperative planning for hepatic resection, preoperative evaluation and planning for liver transplantation. MDCTA can also provide extremely valuable information in the evaluation of ischemic bowel disease, active Crohn disease, the extent and location of collateral vessels in cirrhosis.

  9. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... which are then displayed on a monitor. Special software can also generate three-dimensional (3-D) images ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ...

  10. Nephrocutaneous fistula diagnosed by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Cooper, S G; Richman, A H; Tager, M G

    1989-01-01

    We present an unusual case of isolated nephrocutaneous fistula secondary to renal calculi with perirenal infection. The usefulness of computed tomography (CT), with its depiction of the extent of involvement and its characterization of the disease process, is described and the literature is reviewed.

  11. Computed Tomography For Inspection Of Thermistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Lloyd A.

    1991-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) enables identification of cracked thermistors without disassembly of equipment containing them. CT unit used to scan equipment and locate thermistors. Further scans made in various radial orientations perpendicular to plane of devices to find cracks. Cracks invisible in conventional x-radiographs seen.

  12. Computed Tomography Analysis of NASA BSTRA Balls

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R L; Schneberk, D J; Thompson, R R

    2004-10-12

    Fifteen 1.25 inch BSTRA balls were scanned with the high energy computed tomography system at LLNL. This system has a resolution limit of approximately 210 microns. A threshold of 238 microns (two voxels) was used, and no anomalies at or greater than this were observed.

  13. Cerebral computed tomography, 3rd Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Weisberg, L.; Nice, C.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the utilization of computed tomography in evaluating patients with intracranial and orbital disorders. It features clinical correlations and provides an overview of general principles, performance, and normal anatomy of CT. It covers evaluation of specific neurologic signs and symptoms, including stroke, metastatic disease, increased intracranial pressure, head injury, pediatric conditions, and more.

  14. Bladder trauma: multidetector computed tomography cystography.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Charbel; Kanth, Nalini

    2011-08-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) cystography is rapidly becoming the most recommended study for evaluation of the bladder for suspected trauma. This article reviews the bladder trauma with emphasis on the application of MDCT cystography to traumatic bladder injuries using a pictorial essay based on images collected in our level I trauma center.

  15. A Guide to Computed Tomography System Specifications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    X - ray source and detectors and the mechanical handling equipment. The X - ray source could be as simple as a gamma- ray source; it could be a microfocus ...ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if r cessary and identify by block number) The sensitivity to featu e and anomaly detection in industrial X - ray computed...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE UNCLASSIFIED ABSTRACT The sensitivity to feature and anomaly detection in industrial X - ray computed tomography

  16. Computed tomography of the abnormal pericardium

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, P.M.; Harell, G.S.; Korobkin, M.

    1983-06-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) findings in 18 patients with documented pericardial disease are reported. The pericardium appears as a thin, curvilinear, 1- to 2-mm-thick density best seen anterior to the right ventricular part of the heart. Pericardial abnormalities detected by CT include effusions, thickening, calcification, and cystic and solid masses. Computed tomography is complimentary to echocardiography in its ability to more accurately characterize pericardial effusions, masses, and pericardial thickening.

  17. Proton computed tomography images with algebraic reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzi, M.; Civinini, C.; Scaringella, M.; Bonanno, D.; Brianzi, M.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Presti, D. Lo; Maccioni, G.; Pallotta, S.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Sipala, V.; Talamonti, C.; Vanzi, E.

    2017-02-01

    A prototype of proton Computed Tomography (pCT) system for hadron-therapy has been manufactured and tested in a 175 MeV proton beam with a non-homogeneous phantom designed to simulate high-contrast material. BI-SART reconstruction algorithms have been implemented with GPU parallelism, taking into account of most likely paths of protons in matter. Reconstructed tomography images with density resolutions r.m.s. down to 1% and spatial resolutions <1 mm, achieved within processing times of 15‧ for a 512×512 pixels image prove that this technique will be beneficial if used instead of X-CT in hadron-therapy.

  18. Computed tomography of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Haughton, V.M.; Williams, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The book describes the computed tomographic (CT) techniques for imaging the different elements comprising the spinal column and canal. The use of intravenous and intrathecal contrast enhancement and of xenon enhancement is briefly mentioned. Reconstruction techniques and special problems regarding CT of the spine are presented. CT of the spinal cord, meninges and subarachnoid space, epidural space, intervertebral discs, facet joints, and vertebrae present normal anatomy, and several common pathologic conditions. (KRM)

  19. Computed tomography of the medulla

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1982-10-01

    The medulla was studied in cadavers and in 100 patients both with and without the intrathecal administration of contrast material. The computed tomographic (CT) anatomy was correlated with the appearance on anatomic dissections. The pyramids, olives, and inferior cerebellar peduncles produced characteristic contours on cross sections of the medulla. The hypoglossal nerve by its location and course in the medullary cistern could be distinguished from the glossopharyngeal, vagal, and spinal accessory nerves. For optimal evaluation of the medulla, intrathecal administration of metrizamide and 5- and/or 1.5-mm-thick axial and coronal sections are recommended.

  20. Computed tomography in the diagnosis of iliopsoas abscesses.

    PubMed

    Sykes, J T; Sage, M R; Burke, A M

    1984-04-14

    Two cases in which patients presented with lower back pain and bacteraemia, and in which the diagnosis of iliopsoas abscess was made by computed tomography, are reported. Before the introduction of computed tomography, this diagnosis was difficult to establish by means of clinical and radiological investigations. Computed tomography makes it possible to obtain a clear view of the retroperitoneum.

  1. Computed tomography of renal oncocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.; Huntrakoon, M.

    1983-10-01

    Renal oncocytoma is a relatively rare tumor that has an excellent prognosis and usually may be treated adequately by local resection. Preoperative differentiation from renal cell carcinoma, which requires radical nephrectomy, is thus of importance. The computed tomographic (CT) and pathologic features of three incidentally-detected renal oncocytomas were compared with those of six renal cell carcinomas of comparable size. Renal cell carcinoma appears on CT as a solid mass that generally has an indistinct interface with normal renal parenchyma, a lobulated contour, and a nonhomogeneous pattern of contrast enhancement. These features correlate with the pathologic findings of an irregular tumor margin and the frequent presence of tumor hemorrhage and necrosis. Oncocytoma, on the other hand, generally has a distinct margin, a smooth contour, and a homogeneous appearance on contrast-enhanced CT scans. These findings correlate with a smooth tumor margin and absence of tumor hemorrhage and necrosis on pathologic examination. These features are not pathognomonic of oncocytoma, as angiographic evidence suggests that renal cell carcinoma may show both distinct margination and a homogeneous blush in 6% of cases. However, their demonstration by CT should alert radiologists and surgeons to the possibility that a renal mass may be an oncocytoma. Such a presumptive diagnosis then can lead to a surgical approach that allows for renal-conserving surgery.

  2. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Durack, Conor; Patel, Shanon

    2012-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillo-facial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontics. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice.

  3. Computed Tomography of Transverse Phase Space

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, A.; Johnstone, C.; Johnstone, J.

    2016-09-19

    Two computed tomography techniques are explored to reconstruct beam transverse phase space using both simulated beam and multi-wire profile data in the Fermilab Muon Test Area ("MTA") beamline. Both Filtered Back-Projection ("FBP") and Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique ("SART") algorithms [2] are considered and compared. Errors and artifacts are compared as a function of each algorithm’s free parameters, and it is shown through simulation and MTA beamline profiles that SART is advantageous for reconstructions with limited profile data.

  4. Cone beam computed tomography use in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Nervina, J M

    2012-03-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is widely used by orthodontists to obtain three-dimensional (3-D) images of their patients. This is of value as malocclusion results from discrepancies in three planes of space. This review tracks the use of CBCT in orthodontics, from its validation as an accurate and reliable tool, to its use in diagnosing and treatment planning, and in assessing treatment outcomes in orthodontics.

  5. Computed tomography of the eye and orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerschlag, S.B.; Hesselink, J.R.; Weber, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    This book is the product of the evolution of computed tomography (CT) into subspecialization and the need for one source of information for the busy radiologist. The authors have succeeded in providing a readable overview of orbital CT as well as a reference book. The book is divided into seven major catagories of pathology (Neurofibromatosis, Primary Orbital Neoplasms, Secondary and Metastic Tumors of the Orbit, Vascular Disorders, Inflammatory Disease, Occular Lesions, and Trauma) after separate discussions of anatomy and technique.

  6. Therapy response evaluation with positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Segall, George M

    2010-12-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography with F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose is widely used for evaluation of therapy response in patients with solid tumors but has not been as readily adopted in clinical trials because of the variability of acquisition and processing protocols and the absence of universal response criteria. Criteria proposed for clinical trials are difficult to apply in clinical practice, and gestalt impression is probably accurate in individual patients, especially with respect to the presence of progressive disease and complete response. Semiquantitative methods of determining tissue glucose metabolism, such as standard uptake value, can be a useful descriptor for levels of tissue glucose metabolism and changes in response to therapy if technical quality control measures are carefully maintained. The terms partial response, complete response, and progressive disease are best used in clinical trials in which the terms have specific meanings and precise definitions. In clinical practice, it may be better to use descriptive terminology agreed upon by imaging physicians and clinicians in their own practice.

  7. Computed tomography and thin-section tomography in facial trauma.

    PubMed

    Kreipke, D L; Moss, J J; Franco, J M; Maves, M D; Smith, D J

    1984-05-01

    The efficacy of radiographic methods in detecting and classifying facial fractures was assessed. Thirty-one patients with maxillofacial trauma were studied with plain radiography, coronal and lateral pluridirectional tomography (PT), and axial and direct coronal computed tomography (CT). PT and CT were compared to assess how many fractures each method could demonstrate. In addition, plain films were used in combination with each special study to see how efficacious each combination was at classifying fractures into types, such as blow-out, tripod, etc. To reflect the fact that it is sometimes impossible to obtain lateral PT or direct coronal CT scans at this institution, the same analysis was done using just coronal PT and axial CT. With two projections, CT was better than PT at demonstrating fractured surfaces (168 vs. 156) and in classifying fractures in combination with plain films (48 vs. 43). However, when only one projection from each special study was used, PT surpassed CT in showing fractures (137 vs. 124) and in classifying fractures (42 vs. 40). Failures with each method occurred when the plane of section was parallel or oblique to the plane of the structure being examined, that is, axial CT failed to show the floor of the orbit well and coronal PT failed to show the anterior maxillary sinus wall well. Imaging in two planes, including the coronal plane, is desirable for greatest accuracy in fracture detection, whether by CT, PT, or both. CT is generally better for the display of soft-tissue abnormalities.

  8. Computed tomography and thin-section tomography in facial trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Kreipke, D.L.; Moss, J.J.; Franco, J.M.; Maves, M.D.; Smith, D.J.

    1984-05-01

    The efficacy of radiographic methods in detecting and classifying facial fractures was assessed. Thirty-one patients with maxillofacial trauma were studied with plain radiography, coronal and lateral pluridirectional tomography (PT), and axial and direct coronal computed tomography (CT). PT and CT were compared to assess how many fractures each method could demonstrate. In addition, plain films were used in combination with each special study to see how efficacious each combination was at classifying fractures into types. With two projection, CT was better than PT at demonstrating fracture surfaces (168 vs. 156) and in classifying fractures in combination with plain films (48 vs. 43). However, when only one projection from each special study was used, PT surpassed CT in showing fractures (137 vs. 124) and in classifying fractures (42 vs. 40). Failures with each method occurred when the plane of section was parallel or oblique to the plane of the structure being examined. Imaging in two planes, including the coronal plane, is desirable for greatest accuracy in fracture detection, whether by CT, PT, or both. CT is generally better for the display of soft-tissue abnormalities.

  9. Computer tomography imaging of fast plasmachemical processes

    SciTech Connect

    Denisova, N. V.; Katsnelson, S. S.; Pozdnyakov, G. A.

    2007-11-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the interaction of a high-enthalpy methane plasma bunch with gaseous methane in a plasmachemical reactor. The interaction of the plasma flow with the rest gas was visualized by using streak imaging and computer tomography. Tomography was applied for the first time to reconstruct the spatial structure and dynamics of the reagent zones in the microsecond range by the maximum entropy method. The reagent zones were identified from the emission of atomic hydrogen (the H{sub {alpha}} line) and molecular carbon (the Swan bands). The spatiotemporal behavior of the reagent zones was determined, and their relation to the shock-wave structure of the plasma flow was examined.

  10. Positron Computed Tomography: Current State, Clinical Results and Future Trends

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Schelbert, H. R.; Phelps, M. E.; Kuhl, D. E.

    1980-09-01

    An overview is presented of positron computed tomography: its advantages over single photon emission tomography, its use in metabolic studies of the heart and chemical investigation of the brain, and future trends. (ACR)

  11. Positron computed tomography: current state, clinical results and future trends

    SciTech Connect

    Schelbert, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1980-09-01

    An overview is presented of positron computed tomography: its advantages over single photon emission tomography, its use in metabolic studies of the heart and chemical investigation of the brain, and future trends. (ACR)

  12. Emerging clinical applications of computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Carlo; Frauenfelder, Giulia; Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Giurazza, Francesco; Pitocco, Francesca; Marano, Riccardo; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has recently been experiencing remarkable growth as a result of technological advances and new clinical applications. This paper reviews the essential physics of X-ray CT and its major components. Also reviewed are recent promising applications of CT, ie, CT-guided procedures, CT-based thermometry, photon-counting technology, hybrid PET-CT, use of ultrafast-high pitch scanners, and potential use of dual-energy CT for material differentiations. These promising solutions and a better knowledge of their potentialities should allow CT to be used in a safe and effective manner in several clinical applications. PMID:26089707

  13. Emerging clinical applications of computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Liguori, Carlo; Frauenfelder, Giulia; Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Giurazza, Francesco; Pitocco, Francesca; Marano, Riccardo; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has recently been experiencing remarkable growth as a result of technological advances and new clinical applications. This paper reviews the essential physics of X-ray CT and its major components. Also reviewed are recent promising applications of CT, ie, CT-guided procedures, CT-based thermometry, photon-counting technology, hybrid PET-CT, use of ultrafast-high pitch scanners, and potential use of dual-energy CT for material differentiations. These promising solutions and a better knowledge of their potentialities should allow CT to be used in a safe and effective manner in several clinical applications.

  14. Cross-sectional anatomy for computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    This self-study guide recognizes that evaluation and interpretation of CT-images demands a firm understanding of both cross-sectional anatomy and the principles of computed tomography. The objectives of this book are: to discuss the basic principles of CT, to stress the importance of cross-sectional anatomy to CT through study of selected cardinal transverse sections of head, neck, and trunk, to explain orientation and interpretation of CT-images with the aid of corresponding cross-sectional preparations.

  15. Alzheimer disease: focus on computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, April

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most common type of dementia, affecting approximately 5.3 million Americans. This debilitating disease is marked by memory loss, confusion, and loss of cognitive ability. The exact cause of Alzheimer disease is unknown although research suggests that it might result from a combination of factors. The hallmarks of Alzheimer disease are the presence of beta-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Radiologic imaging can help physicians detect these structural characteristics and monitor disease progression and brain function. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are considered first-line imaging modalities for the routine evaluation of Alzheimer disease.

  16. Cone Beam Computed Tomography - Know its Secrets

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mohan; Shanavas, Muhammad; Sidappa, Ashwin; Kiran, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an advanced imaging modality that has high clinical applications in the field of dentistry. CBCT proved to be a successful investigative modality that has been used for dental and maxillofacial imaging. Radiation exposure dose from CBCT is 10 times less than from conventional CT scans during maxillofacial exposure. Furthermore, CBCT is highly accurate and can provide a three-dimensional volumetric data in axial, sagittal and coronal planes. This article describes the basic technique, difference in CBCT from CT and main clinical applications of CBCT. PMID:25859112

  17. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY OF TOOTH RESORPTION IN CATS.

    PubMed

    Lang, Linda G; Wilkinson, Thomas E; White, Tammy L; Farnsworth, Raelynn K; Potter, Kathleen A

    2016-09-01

    Tooth resorption is the most common dental disease in cats and can be a source of oral pain. The current clinical gold standard for diagnosis includes a combination of oral exam and dental radiography, however early lesions are not always detected. Computed tomography (CT) of the skull, including the dental arches, is a commonly performed diagnostic procedure, however the appearance of tooth resorption on CT and the diagnostic ability of CT to detect tooth resorption have not been evaluated. The purpose of this prospective, descriptive, diagnostic accuracy study was to characterize the CT appearance of tooth resorption in a sample of affected cats and to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of CT for tooth resorption compared to the clinical gold standard of oral exam and intraoral dental radiography. Twenty-eight cat cadaver specimens were recruited for inclusion. Each specimen was evaluated using oral exam, intraoral dental radiography, and computed tomography (four different slice thicknesses). Each tooth was evaluated for the presence or absence of tooth resorption. Teeth with lesions and a subset of normal teeth were evaluated with histopathology. On CT, tooth resorption appeared as irregularly marginated hypoattenuating defects in the mineral attenuating tooth components, most commonly involving the root or cementoenamel junction. Sensitivity for CT detection of tooth resorption was fair to poor (42.2-57.7%) and specificity was good to excellent (92.8-96.3%). Findings from this study indicated that CT has high specificity but low sensitivity for detection of tooth resorption in cats.

  18. Coronary Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Birgit; Nagel, Eike; Schoenhagen, Paul; Barkhausen, Jörg; Gerber, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography and magnetic resonance are relatively new imaging modalities that can exceed the ability of established imaging modalities to detect present pathology or predict patient outcomes. Coronary calcium scoring may be useful in asymptomatic patients at intermediate risk. Computed tomographic coronary angiography is a first-line indication to evaluate congenitally abnormal coronary arteries and, along with stress magnetic resonance myocardial perfusion imaging, is useful in symptomatic patients with nondiagnostic conventional stress tests. Cardiac magnetic resonance is indicated for visualizing cardiac structure and function, and delayed enhancement magnetic resonance is a first-line indication for assessing myocardial viability. Imaging plaque and molecular mechanisms related to plaque rupture holds great promise for the presymptomatic detection of patients at risk for coronary events but is not yet suitable for routine clinical use. PMID:19269527

  19. Coronary computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kantor, Birgit; Nagel, Eike; Schoenhagen, Paul; Barkhausen, Jörg; Gerber, Thomas C

    2009-04-01

    Cardiac computed tomography and magnetic resonance are relatively new imaging modalities that can exceed the ability of established imaging modalities to detect present pathology or predict patient outcomes. Coronary calcium scoring may be useful in asymptomatic patients at intermediate risk. Computed tomographic coronary angiography is a first-line indication to evaluate congenitally abnormal coronary arteries and, along with stress magnetic resonance myocardial perfusion imaging, is useful in symptomatic patients with nondiagnostic conventional stress tests. Cardiac magnetic resonance is indicated for visualizing cardiac structure and function, and delayed enhancement magnetic resonance is a first-line indication for assessing myocardial viability. Imaging plaque and molecular mechanisms related to plaque rupture holds great promise for the presymptomatic detection of patients at risk for coronary events but is not yet suitable for routine clinical use.

  20. Optical computing for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao; Huo, Tiancheng; Wang, Chengming; Liao, Wenchao; Chen, Tianyuan; Ai, Shengnan; Zhang, Wenxin; Hsieh, Jui-Cheng; Xue, Ping

    2016-11-01

    We propose an all-optical Fourier transformation system for real-time massive data processing in high speed optical coherence tomography (OCT). In the so-called optical computing OCT, fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of A-scan signal is optically processed in real time before being detected by photoelectric detector. Therefore, the processing time for interpolation and FFT in traditional Fourier domain OCT can be dramatically eliminated. A processing rate of 10 mega-A-scans/second was experimentally achieved, which is, to our knowledge, the highest speed for OCT imaging. Due to its fiber based all-optical configuration, this optical computing OCT system is ideal for ultrahigh speed volumetric OCT imaging in clinical application.

  1. Optical computing for optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao; Huo, Tiancheng; Wang, Chengming; Liao, Wenchao; Chen, Tianyuan; Ai, Shengnan; Zhang, Wenxin; Hsieh, Jui-Cheng; Xue, Ping

    2016-01-01

    We propose an all-optical Fourier transformation system for real-time massive data processing in high speed optical coherence tomography (OCT). In the so-called optical computing OCT, fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of A-scan signal is optically processed in real time before being detected by photoelectric detector. Therefore, the processing time for interpolation and FFT in traditional Fourier domain OCT can be dramatically eliminated. A processing rate of 10 mega-A-scans/second was experimentally achieved, which is, to our knowledge, the highest speed for OCT imaging. Due to its fiber based all-optical configuration, this optical computing OCT system is ideal for ultrahigh speed volumetric OCT imaging in clinical application. PMID:27869131

  2. X-Ray Computed Tomography for Failure Analysis Investigations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    AD-A268 086 WL-TR-93-4047 X - RAY COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY FOR FAILURE ANALYSIS INVESTIGATIONS Richard H. Bossi William Shepherd Boeing Defense & Space... X - Ray Computed Tomography for Failure Analysis Investigations PE: 63112F PR: 3153 6. AUTilOR(S) TA: 00 Richard H. Bossi and William Shepherd WU: 06 7...feature detection and three-dimensional positioning capability of X - ray computed tomography are valuable and cost saving assets to a failure analysis

  3. Computed Tomography Technology: Development and Applications for Defence

    SciTech Connect

    Baheti, G. L.; Saxena, Nisheet; Tripathi, D. K.; Songara, K. C.; Meghwal, L. R.; Meena, V. L.

    2008-09-26

    Computed Tomography(CT) has revolutionized the field of Non-Destructive Testing and Evaluation (NDT and E). Tomography for industrial applications warrants design and development of customized solutions catering to specific visualization requirements. Present paper highlights Tomography Technology Solutions implemented at Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (DLJ). Details on the technological developments carried out and their utilization for various Defence applications has been covered.

  4. Computed Tomography Technology: Development and Applications for Defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baheti, G. L.; Saxena, Nisheet; Tripathi, D. K.; Songara, K. C.; Meghwal, L. R.; Meena, V. L.

    2008-09-01

    Computed Tomography(CT) has revolutionized the field of Non-Destructive Testing and Evaluation (NDT&E). Tomography for industrial applications warrants design and development of customized solutions catering to specific visualization requirements. Present paper highlights Tomography Technology Solutions implemented at Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (DLJ). Details on the technological developments carried out and their utilization for various Defence applications has been covered.

  5. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT): Applications and potential

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, B.L.; Tumeh, S.S. )

    1990-01-26

    Single-photon emission computed tomography has received increasing attention as radiopharmaceuticals that reflect perfusion, metabolism, and receptor and cellular function have become widely available. Perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography of the brain provides functional information useful for the diagnosis and management of stroke, dementia, and epilepsy. Single-photon emission computed tomography has been applied to myocardial, skeletal, hepatic, and tumor scintigraphy, resulting in increased diagnostic accuracy over planar imaging because background activity and overlapping tissues interfere far less with activity from the target structure when tomographic techniques are used. Single-photon emission computed tomography is substantially less expensive and far more accessible than positron emission tomography and will become an increasingly attractive alternative for transferring the positron emission tomography technology to routine clinical use.

  6. Quality assessment of clinical computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, Dorothea; Luckow, Marlen; Lambrecht, J. Thomas; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2008-08-01

    Three-dimensional images are vital for the diagnosis in dentistry and cranio-maxillofacial surgery. Artifacts caused by highly absorbing components such as metallic implants, however, limit the value of the tomograms. The dominant artifacts observed are blowout and streaks. Investigating the artifacts generated by metallic implants in a pig jaw, the data acquisition for the patients in dentistry should be optimized in a quantitative manner. A freshly explanted pig jaw including related soft-tissues served as a model system. Images were recorded varying the accelerating voltage and the beam current. The comparison with multi-slice and micro computed tomography (CT) helps to validate the approach with the dental CT system (3D-Accuitomo, Morita, Japan). The data are rigidly registered to comparatively quantify their quality. The micro CT data provide a reasonable standard for quantitative data assessment of clinical CT.

  7. Ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging

    DOEpatents

    Paulus, Michael J.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed; Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William; Gleason, Shaun S.; Thomas, Jr., Clarence E.

    2002-01-01

    A method for ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging, comprising the steps of: focusing a high energy particle beam, for example x-rays or gamma-rays, onto a target object; acquiring a 2-dimensional projection data set representative of the target object; generating a corrected projection data set by applying a deconvolution algorithm, having an experimentally determined a transfer function, to the 2-dimensional data set; storing the corrected projection data set; incrementally rotating the target object through an angle of approximately 180.degree., and after each the incremental rotation, repeating the radiating, acquiring, generating and storing steps; and, after the rotating step, applying a cone-beam algorithm, for example a modified tomographic reconstruction algorithm, to the corrected projection data sets to generate a 3-dimensional image. The size of the spot focus of the beam is reduced to not greater than approximately 1 micron, and even to not greater than approximately 0.5 microns.

  8. Computed Tomography Findings in Xanthogranulomatous Pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, Arumugam; Jakanani, George; Mayer, Nick; Mulcahy, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XGN) is an uncommon condition characterized by chronic suppurative renal inflammation that leads to progressive parenchymal destruction. Purpose: To review the computed tomography (CT) findings of patients diagnosed with XGN. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of CT findings in patients with histologically proven XGN was carried out. Results: Thirteen CT examinations of 11 patients were analyzed. Renal enlargement was demonstrable on the affected side in all patients. Nine patients (82%) had multiple dilated calyces and abnormal parenchyma. Six patients (55%) had a renal pelvis or upper ureteric calculus causing obstruction. Three patients (27%) had focal fat deposits identifiable within the inflamed renal parenchyma. Two patients had renal abscesses. Ten patients (91%) had extrarenal extension of the inflammatory changes. Three patients (27%) demonstrated extensive retroperitoneal inflammation. Conclusion: Unilateral renal enlargement and inflammation were the most consistent findings of XGN on CT. Perinephric inflammation and collections or abscess should also alert the radiologist to the possibility of this diagnosis. PMID:22315712

  9. Computed tomography of radioactive objects and materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicka, B. D.; Murphy, R. V.; Tosello, G.; Reynolds, P. W.; Romaniszyn, T.

    1990-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been performed on a number of radioactive objects and materials. Several unique technical problems are associated with CT of radioactive specimens. These include general safety considerations, techniques to reduce background-radiation effects on CT images and selection criteria for the CT source to permit object penetration and to reveal accurate values of material density. In the present paper, three groups of experiments will be described, for objects with low, medium and high levels of radioactivity. CT studies on radioactive specimens will be presented. They include the following: (1) examination of individual ceramic reactor-fuel (uranium dioxide) pellets, (2) examination of fuel samples from the Three Mile Island reactor, (3) examination of a CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uraniun: registered trademark) nuclear-fuel bundle which underwent a simulated loss-of-coolant accident resulting in high-temperature damage and (4) examination of a PWR nuclear-reactor fuel assembly.

  10. Computed tomography in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Nyree; Grant, Lee Alexander; Bharwani, Nishat; Sohaib, S Aslam

    2009-08-01

    Recent developments in chemotherapy have resulted in several new drug treatments for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). These therapies have shown improved progression-free survival and are applicable to many more patients than the conventional cytokine-based treatments for metastatic RCC. Consequently imaging is playing a greater part in the management of such patients. Computed tomography (CT) remains the primary imaging modality with other imaging modalities playing a supplementary role. CT is used in the diagnosis and staging of metastatic RCC. It is used in the follow-up of patients after nephrectomy, in assessing the extent of metastatic disease, and in evaluating response to treatment. This review looks at the role of CT in patients with metastatic RCC and describes the appearances of metastatic RCC before and following systemic therapy.

  11. Mobile computed tomography for mass fatality investigations.

    PubMed

    Rutty, Guy N; Robinson, Claire; Jeffery, Amanda; Morgan, Bruno

    2007-06-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) has received growing interest within the forensic world. To date, most publications have been related to the use of clinical or institutional sited scanners with few publications reporting on the actual, as opposed to the theoretical, use of mobile CT scanners in forensic practice. This review paper considers the use of mobile CT scanning for forensic investigations. It reviews the literature and presents the experience gained from a 6-month trial undertaken by the Forensic Pathology Unit, at the University of Leicester, UK of the use of CT for mass fatality investigation. Protocols for the use of mobile CT are discussed to assist other centres contemplating the use of mobile CT for mass fatality investigations.

  12. Computed tomography of primary intrahepatic biliary malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Itai, Y.; Araki, T.; Furui, S.; Yashiro, N.; Ohtomo, K.; Iio, M.

    1983-05-01

    Fifteen patients with primary intrahepatic biliary malignancy (cholangiocarcinoma in 13, biliary cystadenocarcinoma in two) were examined by computed tomography (CT). The CT features were classified into three types: (A) a well-defined round cystic mass with internal papillary projections, (B) a localized intrahepatic biliary dilatation without a definite mass lesion, and (C) miscellaneous low-density masses. Intraphepatic biliary dilatation was noted in all cases of Types A and B and half of those of Type C; dilatation of extrahepatic bile ducts occurred in 4/4, 1/3, and 0/8, respectively. CT patterns, such as a well-defined round cystic mass with papillary projections or dilatation of intra- and extrahepatic ducts, give important clues leading to a correct diagnosis of primary intrahepatic biliary malignancy.

  13. Reconstructing cetacean brain evolution using computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Marino, Lori; Uhen, Mark D; Pyenson, Nicholas D; Frohlich, Bruno

    2003-05-01

    Until recently, there have been relatively few studies of brain mass and morphology in fossil cetaceans (dolphins, whales, and porpoises) because of difficulty accessing the matrix that fills the endocranial cavity of fossil cetacean skulls. As a result, our knowledge about cetacean brain evolution has been quite limited. By applying the noninvasive technique of computed tomography (CT) to visualize, measure, and reconstruct the endocranial morphology of fossil cetacean skulls, we can gain vastly more information at an unprecedented rate about cetacean brain evolution. Here, we discuss our method and demonstrate it with several examples from our fossil cetacean database. This approach will provide new insights into the little-known evolutionary history of cetacean brain evolution.

  14. Computed tomography of the pituitary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Bonneville, J.F.; Cattin, F.; Dietemann, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    This book is written entirely to include the imaging of the pituitary gland by computed tomography (CT). The first three chapters illustrated technical aspects of scanning, anatomic depiction of the gland by CT, and the use of dynamic CT scanning for detecting and displaying abnormalities. The chapters discuss and illustrate various types of pathologic processes in and around the pituitary gland. One short but very helpful chapter demonstrates potential pitfalls due to the combination of anatomic variants and the geometry of CT sections. Some illustrations of disease processed are depicted by magnetic resonance imaging. All major types of pituitary diseases are illustrated. Lists of readily available English-language references are available. A small subject index is provided at the end of the book in which the illustrations are identified by use of a special numeric front.

  15. Mouse brain imaging using photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yang; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) provides structural and functional information when used in small animal brain imaging. Acoustic distortion caused by bone structures largely limits the deep brain image quality. In our work, we present ex vivo PACT images of freshly excised mouse brain, intending that can serve as a gold standard for future PACT in vivo studies on small animal brain imaging. Our results show that structures such as the striatum, hippocampus, ventricles, and cerebellum can be clearly di erentiated. An artery feature called the Circle of Willis, located at the bottom of the brain, can also be seen. These results indicate that if acoustic distortion can be accurately accounted for, PACT should be able to image the entire mouse brain with rich structural information.

  16. Computed tomography of the gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Megibow, A.J.; Balthazar, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    New generation CT scans combined with high-detail barium studies have now allowed radiologists to see and gain a more complete understanding of the wall and surrounding structures of the gastrointestinal tract. The editors state that their intent is to ''present in a comprehensive volume an up-to-date evaluation o the role, significance, indications, and limitations of computed tomography of the gastrointestinal tract.'' There is an initial chapter on CT scanning techniques and the use of oral contrast agents. Chapters follow on Ct of the esophagus, stomach, duodenum, small bowel, and colon. The chapters start with a description of the anatomic structures and then cover in detail common pathologic conditions that affect the organ. Indications for examinations are also included in many chapters. There are final chapters on percutaneous drainage of abscesses and fluid collections and on radiologic-patholoic correlation of some of the more common entities.

  17. Computed tomography of the abnormal thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, R.L.; Lee, J.K.T.; Sagel, S.S.; Levitt, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) should be the imaging method of choice following plain chest radiographs when a suspected thymic abnormality requires further evaluation. Based upon a six-year experience, including the evaluation of 25 patients with thymic pathology, CT was found useful in suggesting or excluding a diagnosis of thymoma and in distinguishing thymic hyperplasis from thymoma in patients with myasthenia gravis. The thickness of the thymic lobes determined by CT was found to be a more accurate indicator of infiltrative disease (thymic hyperplasia and lymphoma) than the width. CT was helpful in differentiating benign thymic cysts from solid tumors, and in defining the extent of a thymic neoplasms. On occasion, CT may suggest the specific histologic nature of a thymic lesion.

  18. System Matrix Analysis for Computed Tomography Imaging.

    PubMed

    Flores, Liubov; Vidal, Vicent; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2015-01-01

    In practical applications of computed tomography imaging (CT), it is often the case that the set of projection data is incomplete owing to the physical conditions of the data acquisition process. On the other hand, the high radiation dose imposed on patients is also undesired. These issues demand that high quality CT images can be reconstructed from limited projection data. For this reason, iterative methods of image reconstruction have become a topic of increased research interest. Several algorithms have been proposed for few-view CT. We consider that the accurate solution of the reconstruction problem also depends on the system matrix that simulates the scanning process. In this work, we analyze the application of the Siddon method to generate elements of the matrix and we present results based on real projection data.

  19. Arterioportal shunts on dynamic computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, T.; Hiyama, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Tsuchiya, S.; Kohno, K.; Nakajima, Y.; Okuda, K.

    1983-05-01

    Thirty-two patients, 20 with hepatocelluar carcinoma and 12 with liver cirrhosis, were examined by dynamic computed tomography (CT) using intravenous bolus injection of contrast medium and by celiac angiography. Dynamic CT disclosed arterioportal shunting in four cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and in one of cirrhosis. In three of the former, the arterioportal shunt was adjacent to a mass lesion on CT, suggesting tumor invasion into the portal branch. In one with hepatocellular carcinoma, the shunt was remote from the mass. In the case with cirrhosis, there was no mass. In these last two cases, the shunt might have been caused by prior percutaneous needle puncture. In another case of hepatocellular carcinoma, celiac angiography but not CT demonstrated an arterioportal shunt. Thus, dynamic CT was diagnostic in five of six cases of arteriographically demonstrated arterioportal shunts.

  20. Computed tomography of axial skeletal osteoid osteomas

    SciTech Connect

    Gamba, J.L.; Martinez, S.; Apple, J.; Harrelson, J.M.; Nunley, J.A.

    1984-04-01

    Five cases of axial skeletal osteoid osteomas were viewed with particular attention to the role of computed tomography (CT) as a key diagnostic tool in the evaluation of osteoid osteoma. The complex anatomy of the axial skeleton can make the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma extremely difficult on routine films or tomograms, and the lesion often is well delineated only on CT scans. As complete surgical excision of this benign bony tumor is curative, precise anatomic localization is essential to the surgeon. Conventional radiographs were normal in all patients. Bone scans were positive when obtained and were useful in localizing the lesion and directing CT to the appropriate level. In all five cases CT was of proven value in accurately demonstrating the location, nidus, and other characteristic diagnostic radiographic features of osteoid osteoma.

  1. Analysis of Ventricular Function by Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Asim; Deaño, Roderick C.; Bachman, Daniel P.; Xiong, Guanglei; Min, James K.; Truong, Quynh A.

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of ventricular function, cardiac chamber dimensions and ventricular mass is fundamental for clinical diagnosis, risk assessment, therapeutic decisions, and prognosis in patients with cardiac disease. Although cardiac computed tomography (CT) is a noninvasive imaging technique often used for the assessment of coronary artery disease, it can also be utilized to obtain important data about left and right ventricular function and morphology. In this review, we will discuss the clinical indications for the use of cardiac CT for ventricular analysis, review the evidence on the assessment of ventricular function compared to existing imaging modalities such cardiac MRI and echocardiography, provide a typical cardiac CT protocol for image acquisition and post-processing for ventricular analysis, and provide step-by-step instructions to acquire multiplanar cardiac views for ventricular assessment from the standard axial, coronal, and sagittal planes. Furthermore, both qualitative and quantitative assessments of ventricular function as well as sample reporting are detailed. PMID:25576407

  2. System Matrix Analysis for Computed Tomography Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Liubov; Vidal, Vicent; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2015-01-01

    In practical applications of computed tomography imaging (CT), it is often the case that the set of projection data is incomplete owing to the physical conditions of the data acquisition process. On the other hand, the high radiation dose imposed on patients is also undesired. These issues demand that high quality CT images can be reconstructed from limited projection data. For this reason, iterative methods of image reconstruction have become a topic of increased research interest. Several algorithms have been proposed for few-view CT. We consider that the accurate solution of the reconstruction problem also depends on the system matrix that simulates the scanning process. In this work, we analyze the application of the Siddon method to generate elements of the matrix and we present results based on real projection data. PMID:26575482

  3. The ligamentum capitis femoris: anatomic, magnetic resonance and computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Perez-Carro, Luis; Golano, Pau; Vega, Jordi; Escajadillo, Natalia F; Rubin, Carlos G; Cerezal, Luis

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to describe the normal anatomy of the ligamentum capitis femoris and to determine the neurovascular structures potentially at risk during its reconstruction. Ten cadaveric specimens of the ligamentum capitis femoris (LCF) were dissected and photographed. Magnetic resonance (MR) and Computed tomography (CT) arthrography evaluation of the anatomy of the LCF in 30 hips were performed to measure length of the ligament and to study the proximity of neurovascular structures. The anatomical study showed that the LCF has a pyramidal structure and a banded appearance. The thickness of the medial wall of the acetabulum 3 mm superior to the inferior acetabular boundary was found to be 6.7 mm (4-9 mm) at point 1 (anterior), 4.1 mm (3-7 mm) at point 2 (central), and 6.5 mm (4-9 mm) at point 3 (posterior). Central anchors or screws were found to lie within 1.7 cm (1.6-1.9 cm) of the external iliac vein and artery. Angulation of anchors in the anterior and posterior columns in the axial plane with respect to acetabular fossa floor (the Optimal Angulation Angle or OAA), is safer (0 to 45º the safest optimal angles). The sagittal angulation created by the safe pathway in the anterior and posterior columns with respect to the plane of the facies lunata in this area was also measured and termed the Optimal Angle of Penetration (OAP) with normal values being: 110º (102-123º) for the posterior column and 90º (85-94º) for the anterior column. Our results suggest that reconstruction of the LCF can be safely performed if these guidelines are followed.

  4. Standardized medical terminology for cardiac computed tomography: a report of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Weigold, Wm Guy; Abbara, Suhny; Achenbach, Stephan; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Berman, Daniel; Carr, J Jeffrey; Cury, Ricardo C; Halliburton, Sandra S; McCollough, Cynthia H; Taylor, Allen J

    2011-01-01

    Since the emergence of cardiac computed tomography (CT) at the turn of the 21st century, there has been an exponential growth in research and clinical development of the technique, with contributions from investigators and clinicians from varied backgrounds: physics and engineering, informatics, cardiology, and radiology. However, terminology for the field is not unified. As a consequence, there are multiple abbreviations for some terms, multiple terms for some concepts, and some concepts that lack clear definitions and/or usage. In an effort to aid the work of all those who seek to contribute to the literature, clinical practice, and investigation of the field, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography sets forth a standard set of medical terms commonly used in clinical and investigative practice of cardiac CT.

  5. [Cardiac computed tomography: new applications of an evolving technique].

    PubMed

    Martín, María; Corros, Cecilia; Calvo, Juan; Mesa, Alicia; García-Campos, Ana; Rodríguez, María Luisa; Barreiro, Manuel; Rozado, José; Colunga, Santiago; de la Hera, Jesús M; Morís, César; Luyando, Luis H

    2015-01-01

    During the last years we have witnessed an increasing development of imaging techniques applied in Cardiology. Among them, cardiac computed tomography is an emerging and evolving technique. With the current possibility of very low radiation studies, the applications have expanded and go further coronariography In the present article we review the technical developments of cardiac computed tomography and its new applications.

  6. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... system. (a) Identification. An emission computed tomography system is a device intended to detect...

  7. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... system. (a) Identification. An emission computed tomography system is a device intended to detect...

  8. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... system. (a) Identification. An emission computed tomography system is a device intended to detect...

  9. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... system. (a) Identification. An emission computed tomography system is a device intended to detect...

  10. Terahertz Computed Tomography of NASA Thermal Protection System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Reyes-Rodriguez, S.; Zimdars, D. A.; Rauser, R. W.; Ussery, W. W.

    2011-01-01

    A terahertz axial computed tomography system has been developed that uses time domain measurements in order to form cross-sectional image slices and three-dimensional volume renderings of terahertz-transparent materials. The system can inspect samples as large as 0.0283 cubic meters (1 cubic foot) with no safety concerns as for x-ray computed tomography. In this study, the system is evaluated for its ability to detect and characterize flat bottom holes, drilled holes, and embedded voids in foam materials utilized as thermal protection on the external fuel tanks for the Space Shuttle. X-ray micro-computed tomography was also performed on the samples to compare against the terahertz computed tomography results and better define embedded voids. Limits of detectability based on depth and size for the samples used in this study are loosely defined. Image sharpness and morphology characterization ability for terahertz computed tomography are qualitatively described.

  11. Texture classification of lung computed tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pheng, Hang See; Shamsuddin, Siti M.

    2013-03-01

    Current development of algorithms in computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme is growing rapidly to assist the radiologist in medical image interpretation. Texture analysis of computed tomography (CT) scans is one of important preliminary stage in the computerized detection system and classification for lung cancer. Among different types of images features analysis, Haralick texture with variety of statistical measures has been used widely in image texture description. The extraction of texture feature values is essential to be used by a CAD especially in classification of the normal and abnormal tissue on the cross sectional CT images. This paper aims to compare experimental results using texture extraction and different machine leaning methods in the classification normal and abnormal tissues through lung CT images. The machine learning methods involve in this assessment are Artificial Immune Recognition System (AIRS), Naive Bayes, Decision Tree (J48) and Backpropagation Neural Network. AIRS is found to provide high accuracy (99.2%) and sensitivity (98.0%) in the assessment. For experiments and testing purpose, publicly available datasets in the Reference Image Database to Evaluate Therapy Response (RIDER) are used as study cases.

  12. Computed Tomography in Diagnosis of Admantinoma

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Akansha; Misra, Deepankar; Rai, Shalu; Panjwani, Sapna; Ranjan, Vikash; Prabhat, Mukul; Bhalla, Kanika; Bhatnagar, Puneet

    2015-01-01

    Context: Admantinoma is second most common benign odontogenic tumor which clinically appears as an aggressive odontogenic tumor, often asymptomatic and slow growing, associated with symptoms such as swelling, dental malocclusion, pain, and paresthesia of the affected area. The radiographic appearance may vary from unilocular to multilocular radiolucencies, imparting a characteristic honey comb, soap bubble appearance or may resemble a caricature of spider. Case Report: This report highlights the importance of conventional and advanced imaging in the diagnosis of large and invasive lesions. Patient reported with complaint of swelling in jaw, which progressively increased; and was found to be bony hard, both intra- and extraorally. Radiographs revealed large multilocular radiolucency on left body and ramus of mandible with soap bubble pattern and knife edged root resorption. Computed tomographic examination evaluated the extent of the lesion, internal structure, and relation to adjacent structures; further a reconstructed image was obtained to evaluate extent of destruction in three dimensions. Conclusion: Computed tomography has an important role in the diagnosis and treatment planning is imperative as it is superior in revealing the cortical destruction and extension into the neighboring soft tissues than conventional radiography. PMID:26110136

  13. Technical errors in MR arthrography.

    PubMed

    Hodler, Juerg

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses potential technical problems of MR arthrography. It starts with contraindications, followed by problems relating to injection technique, contrast material and MR imaging technique. For some of the aspects discussed, there is only little published evidence. Therefore, the article is based on the personal experience of the author and on local standards of procedures. Such standards, as well as medico-legal considerations, may vary from country to country. Contraindications for MR arthrography include pre-existing infection, reflex sympathetic dystrophy and possibly bleeding disorders, avascular necrosis and known allergy to contrast media. Errors in injection technique may lead to extra-articular collection of contrast agent or to contrast agent leaking from the joint space, which may cause diagnostic difficulties. Incorrect concentrations of contrast material influence image quality and may also lead to non-diagnostic examinations. Errors relating to MR imaging include delays between injection and imaging and inadequate choice of sequences. Potential solutions to the various possible errors are presented.

  14. Evaluation of Sinonasal Diseases by Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Phatak, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Computed Tomography (CT) plays an important diagnostic role in patients with sinonasal diseases and determines the treatment. The CT images clearly show fine structural architecture of bony anatomy thereby determining various anatomical variation, extent of disease and characterization of various inflammatory, benign and malignant sinonasal diseases. Aim To evaluate sensitivity and specificity of CT in diagnosis of sinonasal diseases and to characterise the benign and malignant lesions with the help of various CT parameters. Also, to correlate findings of CT with histo-pathological and diagnostic nasal endoscopy/ Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery (FESS) findings. Materials and Methods In this hospital based prospective study 175 patients with symptomatic sinonasal diseases were evaluated by clinical diagnosis and 16 slice Multi Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT). The details of findings of nasal endoscopy, Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery (FESS), histopathological examination and fungal culture were collected in all those cases where those investigations were done. All those findings were correlated with CT findings and statistical analysis was done by using Test statistics (sensitivity, specificity, Positive Predictive Value (PPV), Negative Predictive Value (NPV) and accuracy), Chi-Square test and Z-test for single proportions. Software used in the analysis was SPSS 17.0 version and graph pad prism 6.0 version and p < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results CT diagnosis had higher sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV in diagnosing various sinonasal diseases in comparison to clinical diagnosis. On correlating CT diagnosis with final diagnosis, congenital conditions have 100% sensitivity and specificity. Chronic sinusitis has 98.3% sensitivity and 97.8% specificity. For fungal sinusitis the sensitivity was 60% and specificity was 99.3%. Polyps have sensitivity of 94.4% and specificity of 98.1%. Benign neoplasms have sensitivity

  15. A Detector for Proton Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Blazey, G.; et al.,

    2013-12-06

    Radiation therapy is a widely recognized treatment for cancer. Energetic protons have distinct features that set them apart from photons and make them desirable for cancer therapy as well as medical imaging. The clinical interest in heavy ion therapy is due to the fact that ions deposit almost all of their energy in a sharp peak – the Bragg peak- at the very end of their path. Proton beams can be used to precisely localize a tumor and deliver an exact dose to the tumor with small doses to the surrounding tissue. Proton computed tomography (pCT) provides direct information on the location on the target tumor, and avoids position uncertainty caused by treatment planning based on imaging with X-ray CT. The pCT project goal is to measure and reconstruct the proton relative stopping power distribution directly in situ. To ensure the full advantage of cancer treatment with 200 MeV proton beams, pCT must be realized.

  16. Computed tomography imaging and angiography - principles.

    PubMed

    Kamalian, Shervin; Lev, Michael H; Gupta, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of patients with diverse neurologic disorders was forever changed in the summer of 1973, when the first commercial computed tomography (CT) scanners were introduced. Until then, the detection and characterization of intracranial or spinal lesions could only be inferred by limited spatial resolution radioisotope scans, or by the patterns of tissue and vascular displacement on invasive pneumoencaphalography and direct carotid puncture catheter arteriography. Even the earliest-generation CT scanners - which required tens of minutes for the acquisition and reconstruction of low-resolution images (128×128 matrix) - could, based on density, noninvasively distinguish infarct, hemorrhage, and other mass lesions with unprecedented accuracy. Iodinated, intravenous contrast added further sensitivity and specificity in regions of blood-brain barrier breakdown. The advent of rapid multidetector row CT scanning in the early 1990s created renewed enthusiasm for CT, with CT angiography largely replacing direct catheter angiography. More recently, iterative reconstruction postprocessing techniques have made possible high spatial resolution, reduced noise, very low radiation dose CT scanning. The speed, spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and low radiation dose capability of present-day scanners have also facilitated dual-energy imaging which, like magnetic resonance imaging, for the first time, has allowed tissue-specific CT imaging characterization of intracranial pathology.

  17. Industrial computed tomography image size measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Chen; Jin-Xiao, Pan; Bin, Liu

    2009-09-01

    As one of the most useful modern detection technologies, Industrial Computed Tomography (ICT) image size measurement can correctly non-destructively measure the size of workpieces' inner construction, and it is considered as the standard for quality assurance and reverse engineering. In view of the advantages and disadvantages compared to conventional methods, this paper improves the precision of image size measurement with a new algorithm that uses an approximate function to describe edge degradation. First, this algorithm constructs the approximate function and determines the optimal point of edge detection, based on image intensity and inflexions. Then, in order to accurately extract the image edge, this algorithm is used to revise the primary image, completing construction of the CT image. Excellent results are obtained from simulations and experiments. The experimental results indicate that the relative error is 2% for the CT image when the step evolution of the image edge is pooled. The relative error of this method is decreased by as much as 1.5% compared to wavelet transformation and ridgelet transformation. Therefore, this new algorithm demonstrates increased effectiveness in extracting an accurate measurement of the CT image edge.

  18. Cosine fitting radiography and computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pan-Yun; Zhang, Kai; Huang, Wan-Xia; Yuan, Qing-Xi; Wang, Yan; Ju, Zai-Qiang; Wu, Zi-Yu; Zhu, Pei-Ping

    2015-06-01

    A new method in diffraction-enhanced imaging computed tomography (DEI-CT) that follows the idea developed by Chapman et al. [Chapman D, Thomlinson W, Johnston R E, Washburn D, Pisano E, Gmur N, Zhong Z, Menk R, Arfelli F and Sayers D 1997 Phys. Med. Biol. 42 2015] in 1997 is proposed in this paper. Merged with a “reverse projections” algorithm, only two sets of projection datasets at two defined orientations of the analyzer crystal are needed to reconstruct the linear absorption coefficient, the decrement of the real part of the refractive index and the linear scattering coefficient of the sample. Not only does this method reduce the delivered dose to the sample without degrading the image quality, but, compared with the existing DEI-CT approaches, it simplifies data-acquisition procedures. Experimental results confirm the reliability of this new method for DEI-CT applications. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB825800), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11205189, 11375225, and U1332109), the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant Nos. KJCX2-YW-N42, Y4545320Y2, and 542014IHEPZZBS50659).

  19. Dedicated breast computed tomography: Basic aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Sarno, Antonio; Mettivier, Giovanni Russo, Paolo

    2015-06-15

    X-ray mammography of the compressed breast is well recognized as the “gold standard” for early detection of breast cancer, but its performance is not ideal. One limitation of screening mammography is tissue superposition, particularly for dense breasts. Since 2001, several research groups in the USA and in the European Union have developed computed tomography (CT) systems with digital detector technology dedicated to x-ray imaging of the uncompressed breast (breast CT or BCT) for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. This CT technology—tracing back to initial studies in the 1970s—allows some of the limitations of mammography to be overcome, keeping the levels of radiation dose to the radiosensitive breast glandular tissue similar to that of two-view mammography for the same breast size and composition. This paper presents an evaluation of the research efforts carried out in the invention, development, and improvement of BCT with dedicated scanners with state-of-the-art technology, including initial steps toward commercialization, after more than a decade of R and D in the laboratory and/or in the clinic. The intended focus here is on the technological/engineering aspects of BCT and on outlining advantages and limitations as reported in the related literature. Prospects for future research in this field are discussed.

  20. Three energy computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, R.H.; Thomlinson, W.; Zhong, Z.; Charvet, A.M.; Arfelli, F. |; Chapman, L.

    1997-09-01

    Preliminary experiments for digital subtraction computed tomography (CT) at the K-edge of iodine (33.1 keV) were carried out at SMERF (Synchrotron Medical Research Facility X17B2) at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The major goal was to evaluate the availability of this kind of imaging for in vivo neurological studies. Using the transvenous coronary angiography system, CT images of various samples and phantoms were taken simultaneously at two slightly different energies bracketing the K-absorption edge of iodine. The logarithmic subtraction of the two images resulted in the contrast enhancement of iodine filled structures. An additional CT image was taken at 99.57 keV (second harmonic of the fundamental wave). The third energy allowed the calculation of absolute iodine, tissue and bone images by means of a matrix inversion. A spatial resolution of 0.8 LP/mm was measured in single energy images and iodine concentrations down to 0.082 mg/ml in a 1/4 diameter detail were visible in the reconstructed subtraction image.

  1. Portable Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-11-01

    This user manual describes the function and use of the portable digital radiography and computed tomography (DRCT) scanner. The manual gives a general overview of x-ray imaging systems along with a description of the DRCT system. An inventory of the all the system components, organized by shipping container, is also included. In addition, detailed, step-by-step procedures are provided for all of the exercises necessary for a novice user to successfully collect digital radiographs and tomographic images of an object, including instructions on system assembly and detector calibration and system alignment. There is also a short section covering the limited system care and maintenance needs. Descriptions of the included software packages, the DRCT Digital Imager used for system operation, and the DRCT Image Processing Interface used for image viewing and tomographic data reconstruction are given in the appendixes. The appendixes also include a cheat sheet for more experienced users, a listing of known system problems and how to mitigate them, and an inventory check-off sheet suitable for copying and including with the machine for shipment purposes.

  2. Shape threat detection via adaptive computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudi, Ahmad; Thamvichai, Ratchaneekorn; Neifeld, Mark A.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is used widely for screening purposes. Conventional x-ray threat detection systems employ image reconstruction and segmentation algorithms prior to making threat/no-threat decisions. We find that in many cases these pre-processing steps can degrade detection performance. Therefore in this work we will investigate methods that operate directly on the CT measurements. We analyze a fixed-gantry system containing 25 x-ray sources and 2200 photon counting detectors. We present a new method for improving threat detection performance. This new method is a so-called greedy adaptive algorithm which at each time step uses information from previous measurements to design the next measurement. We utilize sequential hypothesis testing (SHT) in order to derive both the optimal "next measurement" and the stopping criterion to insure a target probability of error Pe. We find that selecting the next x-ray source according to such a greedy adaptive algorithm, we can reduce Pe by a factor of 42.4× relative to the conventional measurement sequence employing all 25 sources in sequence.

  3. Computed tomography characterisation of additive manufacturing materials.

    PubMed

    Bibb, Richard; Thompson, Darren; Winder, John

    2011-06-01

    Additive manufacturing, covering processes frequently referred to as rapid prototyping and rapid manufacturing, provides new opportunities in the manufacture of highly complex and custom-fitting medical devices and products. Whilst many medical applications of AM have been explored and physical properties of the resulting parts have been studied, the characterisation of AM materials in computed tomography has not been explored. The aim of this study was to determine the CT number of commonly used AM materials. There are many potential applications of the information resulting from this study in the design and manufacture of wearable medical devices, implants, prostheses and medical imaging test phantoms. A selection of 19 AM material samples were CT scanned and the resultant images analysed to ascertain the materials' CT number and appearance in the images. It was found that some AM materials have CT numbers very similar to human tissues, FDM, SLA and SLS produce samples that appear uniform on CT images and that 3D printed materials show a variation in internal structure.

  4. Computed tomography: the investigation of choice for aortic dissection?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, H; Fitzgerald, E; Ruttley, M S

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomography has become established as complementary to aortography in the investigation of patients with suspected aortic dissection. Two cases of dissecting aneurysm are reported in which extensive aortography failed to show evidence of dissection. In both cases dissection was demonstrated by computed tomography. The diagnosis was confirmed in one case at operation and in the other case by follow up. It is suggested that computed tomography is the diagnostic method of first choice in aortic dissection. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:3730218

  5. Non-uniform projection angle processing in computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simo, Yanic; Tayag, Tristan J.

    In this paper, we present a novel approach for the collection of computed tomography data. Non-uniform increments in projection angle may be used to reduce data acquisition time with minimal reduction in the accuracy of the reconstructed profile. The key is to exploit those projection angles which correspond to regions where the object contains few high spatial frequency components. This technique is applicable to optical phase computed tomography, as well as X-ray computed tomography. We present simulation results on intraocular lenses used in cataract surgery.

  6. Blueprint of the certification examination in cardiovascular computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Min, James K; Abbara, Suhny; Berman, Daniel S; Edgertond, Dawn M; Gerson, Myron C; Halliburton, Sandra; Hines, Jerome L; Hodgson, John M; Lesser, John R; Lennond, Lorraine; Taylor, Allen J; Wann, L Samuel; Ziffer, Jack A; Cerqueira, Manuel D

    2008-01-01

    Physician certification is critical in all areas of cardiovascular imaging to assure optimal performance and interpretation of quality studies for patient diagnosis and management. This is especially important in the field of cardiovascular computed tomography where practitioners have varied training and expertise that may not cover the full range of skills in the technical, image interpretative and clinical application of the results for patient management. The Certification Board of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography was developed to test the minimal level of competence of physicians performing cardiovascular computed tomography. In this article, the process of defining the content areas, determining candidate eligibility and the process of examination development and testing will be defined.

  7. Role of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in dementia.

    PubMed

    Hinds, Sidney R; Stocker, Derek J; Bradley, Yong C

    2013-09-01

    This article provides a clinically based review of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for dementia. Significant advances in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging techniques have improved the understanding of the genetic and molecular processes that define neurodegenerative dementia diseases. Metabolic imaging remains constant in its ability to document neuronal loss and lost function. Amyloid-β radiotracers are useful in documenting amyloid deposition, differentiating origins of dementia and possibly predicting disease progression. These radiotracers may be useful in diagnosis-specific treatment. PET radiotracers have increased sensitivity and specificity to complement clinical presentation and other adjunct testing in the evaluation of dementia.

  8. Atlas of computed body tomography: normal and abnormal anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, L.C.; Schapiro, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    This atlas contains comparative sections on normal and abnormal computed tomography of the neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis, upper and lower limbs, fascia, and peritoneum. Also included is a subject index to aid in the identification of abnormal scans. (DLS)

  9. Patient dose considerations in computed tomography examinations

    PubMed Central

    Tsalafoutas, Ioannis A; Koukourakis, Georgios V

    2010-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is extensively used in medicine and its contribution to both diagnosis and therapy is undisputable. However, the use of ionizing radiation also involves a certain risk since it may cause damage to tissues and organs and trigger carcinogenesis. Computed tomography (CT) is currently one of the major contributors to the collective population radiation dose both because it is a relatively high dose examination and an increasing number of people are subjected to CT examinations many times during their lifetime. The evolution of CT scanner technology has greatly increased the clinical applications of CT and its availability throughout the world and made it a routine rather than a specialized examination. With the modern multislice CT scanners, fast volume scanning of the whole human body within less than 1 min is now feasible. Two dimensional images of superb quality can be reconstructed in every possible plane with respect to the patient axis (e.g. axial, sagital and coronal). Furthermore, three-dimensional images of all anatomic structures and organs can be produced with only minimal additional effort (e.g. skeleton, tracheobronchial tree, gastrointestinal system and cardiovascular system). All these applications, which are diagnostically valuable, also involve a significant radiation risk. Therefore, all medical professionals involved with CT, either as referring or examining medical doctors must be aware of the risks involved before they decide to prescribe or perform CT examinations. Ultimately, the final decision concerning justification for a prescribed CT examination lies upon the radiologist. In this paper, we summarize the basic information concerning the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation, as well as the CT dosimetry background. Furthermore, after a brief summary of the evolution of CT scanning, the current CT scanner technology and its special features with respect to patient doses are given in detail. Some numerical data is also

  10. Computed tomography quality indexes: evaluation experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strocchi, Sabina; Vite, Cristina; Novario, Raffaele; Cacciatori, Marco; Frigerio, Giovanna; Conte, Leopoldo

    2009-02-01

    Aim of this work was to identify proper figures of merit (FoM's) to quantitatively and objectively assess the whole acquisition process of a CT image and to evaluate which are more significant. Catphan® phantom images where acquired with a 64 slices computed tomography system, with head and abdomen protocols. Automatic exposure modulation system was on, with different settings. We defined three FoM's (Q, Q1 and Q2) including image quality parameters and acquisition modalities; two of them (Q and Q1) include also a radiation dose quantity, the third (Q2) does not. Then we drew from these the comparable FoM's (CNR, Q1 *, Q2), that do not have dose in their definitions, in order to investigate how they depend on perceived image quality. The FoM's were evaluated for each series. At the same time, expert observers evaluated the number of low contrast inserts seen in the phantom' images. The considered CNR, Q1*, Q2 FoM's are linearly related to the perceived image quality for both the acquisition protocols (head: r2=0.91;0.94;0.91; abdomen: r2=0.93;0.93;0.85). Q and Q1 values analysis shows that these FoM's can distinguish between different acquisition modalities (head or abdomen) with statistically significant difference (p<0.05). The studied FoM's can be usefully used to quantitatively and objectively assess the whole CT image acquisition process. Those FoM's including also radiation dose (Q, Q1) can be used to objectively quantify the equilibrium between image quality and radiation dose for a certain acquisition modality.

  11. Lung in Dengue: Computed Tomography Findings

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Brum, Ana Livia Garcia; Paes, Marciano Viana; Póvoa, Tiago Fajardo; Basilio-de-Oliveira, Carlos Alberto; Marchiori, Edson; Borghi, Danielle Provençano; Ramos, Grazielle Viana; Bozza, Fernando Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue is the most important mosquito-borne viral disease in the world. Dengue virus infection may be asymptomatic or lead to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever with or without warning signs, or severe dengue. Lower respiratory symptoms are unusual and lung-imaging data in patients with dengue are scarce. Methodology/Principal Findings To evaluate lung changes associated with dengue infection, we retrospectively analyzed 2,020 confirmed cases of dengue. Twenty-nine of these patients (11 females and 18 males aged 16–90 years) underwent chest computed tomography (CT), which yielded abnormal findings in 17 patients: 16 patients had pleural effusion (the sole finding in six patients) and 11 patients had pulmonary abnormalities. Lung parenchyma involvement ranged from subtle to moderate unilateral and bilateral abnormalities. The most common finding was ground-glass opacity in eight patients, followed by consolidation in six patients. Less common findings were airspace nodules (two patients), interlobular septal thickening (two patients), and peribronchovascular interstitial thickening (one patient). Lung histopathological findings in four fatal cases showed thickening of the alveolar septa, hemorrhage, and interstitial edema. Conclusions/Significance In this largest series involving the use of chest CT to evaluate lung involvement in patients with dengue, CT findings of lower respiratory tract involvement were uncommon. When abnormalities were present, pleural effusion was the most frequent finding and lung involvement was often mild or moderate and bilateral. Extensive lung abnormalities are infrequent even in severe disease and when present should lead physicians to consider other diagnostic possibilities. PMID:24836605

  12. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, Orazio; Filippi, Luca; Manni, Carlo; Santoni, Riccardo

    2007-01-01

    Anatomic imaging procedures (computed tomography [CT] and magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) have become essential tools for brain tumor assessment. Functional images (positron emission tomography [PET] and single-photon emission computed tomography [SPECT]) can provide additional information useful during the diagnostic workup to determine the degree of malignancy and as a substitute or guide for biopsy. After surgery and/or radiotherapy, nuclear medicine examinations are essential to assess persistence of tumor, to differentiate recurrence from radiation necrosis and gliosis, and to monitor the disease. The combination of functional images with anatomic ones is of the utmost importance for a full evaluation of these patients, which can be obtained by means of imaging fusion. Despite the fast-growing diffusion of PET, in most cases of brain tumors, SPECT studies are adequate and provide results that parallel those obtained with PET. The main limitation of SPECT imaging with brain tumor-seeking radiopharmaceuticals is the lack of precise anatomic details; this drawback is overcome by the fusion with morphological studies that provide an anatomic map to scintigraphic data. In the past, software-based fusion of independently performed SPECT and CT or MRI demonstrated usefulness for brain tumor assessment, but this process is often time consuming and not practical for everyday nuclear medicine studies. The recent development of dual-modality integrated imaging systems, which allow the acquisition of SPECT and CT images in the same scanning session, and their co-registration by means of the hardware, has facilitated this process. In SPECT studies of brain tumors with various radiopharmaceuticals, fused images are helpful in providing the precise localization of neoplastic lesions, and in excluding the disease in sites of physiologic tracer uptake. This information is useful for optimizing diagnosis, therapy monitoring, and radiotherapy treatment planning, with a

  13. Comparison of Tissue Density in Hounsfield Units in Computed Tomography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Varshowsaz, Masoud; Goorang, Sepideh; Ehsani, Sara; Azizi, Zeynab; Rahimian, Sepideh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Bone quality and quantity assessment is one of the most important steps in implant treatment planning. Different methods such as computed tomography (CT) and recently suggested cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with lower radiation dose and less time and cost are used for bone density assessment. This in vitro study aimed to compare the tissue density values in Hounsfield units (HUs) in CBCT and CT scans of different tissue phantoms with two different thicknesses, two different image acquisition settings and in three locations in the phantoms. Materials and Methods: Four different tissue phantoms namely hard tissue, soft tissue, air and water were scanned by three different CBCT and a CT system in two thicknesses (full and half) and two image acquisition settings (high and low kVp and mA). The images were analyzed at three sites (middle, periphery and intermediate) using eFilm software. The difference in density values was analyzed by ANOVA and correction coefficient test (P<0.05). Results: There was a significant difference between density values in CBCT and CT scans in most situations, and CBCT values were not similar to CT values in any of the phantoms in different thicknesses and acquisition parameters or the three different sites. The correction coefficients confirmed the results. Conclusions: CBCT is not reliable for tissue density assessment. The results were not affected by changes in thickness, acquisition parameters or locations. PMID:27928239

  14. Pleuropancreatic fistula: endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, S.; Pellegrini, C.A.; Moss, A.A.; Way, L.W.

    1984-06-01

    The complementary use of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and computed tomography in the diagnosis and management of pleuropancreatic fistulas is described in relation to four cases in which computed tomography revealedthe thoracic extension of a pancreatic fistula not demonstrable by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, although the latter indicated an abnormal pancreatic duct. The complementary use of both techniques may be necessary to define the pathologic anatomy so that the appropriate therapy, particularly the surgical approach, can be decided.

  15. A Clinical Evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-31

    multidetector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography in the assessment of dental implant site dimensions. Dentomaxillofac Radiol 2011;40:67-75...submitted to the Faculty of the Endodontics Graduate Program Naval Postgraduate Dental School Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences...in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science in Oral Biology June 2013 Naval Postgraduate Dental

  16. Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics - a review.

    PubMed

    Patel, S; Durack, C; Abella, F; Shemesh, H; Roig, M; Lemberg, K

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces undistorted three-dimensional information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissues with a lower effective radiation dose than computed tomography. The aim of this paper is to: (i) review the current literature on the applications and limitations of CBCT; (ii) make recommendations for the use of CBCT in Endodontics; (iii) highlight areas of further research of CBCT in Endodontics.

  17. Image analysis of particle field by means of computed tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakayama, Mitsushige

    1987-01-01

    In order to visualize and investigate spray structures, computed tomography technique is applied to analyze droplet information. From the transmitted light intensity through the spray and/or the data of particle size distribution obtained from a Fraunhofer diffraction principle, the quantitative volume of spray droplet or local particle size was calculated and the reconstruction of spray structures was made. The background of computed tomography is described along with some experimental results of the structure of intermittent spray such as diesel spray.

  18. Application of Computer Tomography for Life Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapin, A.; Nealson, K.

    2001-01-01

    Perhaps one of the most fundamentally difficult challenges facing those who would search for life is that of scale determination. Spatial scales of life on Earth range over more than 15 orders of magnitude in mass and volume, and more than 8 orders of magnitude in 2 dimensional space. If the distribution of life is sparse in comparison to the background on which it is found, then the choice of the right scale is critical to finding that life. But how does one identify the proper scale? To put this in other words, how does one recognize the "haystacks" in which the needles (biosignatures and evidence of life) might be most profitably searched for? The problem is further exacerbated when conditions get extreme because much of the life moves from the clement surface environment into the pores and more clement environments inside of rocks, minerals and soils. Once encased in their lithic homes, these microbes become nearly impossible to study by standard techniques because of the opacity of the rocks. It is this problem that we propose to address in the work proposed here. Computer Tomography (CT) has been a very valuable tool in medicine, where the best resolution available has typically been of the order of about 0.5 mm. However, to adapt the approach for life detection of microbial endoliths, the resolution needs to be moved to the micrometer and even submicrometer levels. Thus for the studies proposed here, we begin with a commercially available instrument that can yield resolution of approximately 10 micrometers. The rational for this is twofold: first, this is the "state of the art" in laboratory instruments; and second, that while the usual size of a microbial cell is about 1 micron, microorganisms tend to live in communities that usually exceed the 10 micrometer size range. The resolution also depends on the sample size itself, so having a small lab instrument into which small samples can be placed will be beneficial to the resolution. We have now used several

  19. Skeletal dosimetry in cone beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, B. R. B.; Ding, G. X.; Kramer, R.; Kawrakow, I.

    2009-07-15

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new patient imaging technique that has proved invaluable for treatment target verification and patient positioning during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). It has been shown that CBCT results in additional dose to bone that may amount to 10% of the prescribed dose. In this study, voxelized human phantoms, FAX06 (adult female) and MAX06 (adult male), are used together with phase-space data collected from a realistic model of a CBCT imager to calculate dose in the red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface cells (BSCs), the two organs at risk within the bone spongiosa, during simulated head and neck, chest and pelvis CBCT scans. The FAX06/MAX06 phantoms model spongiosa based on micro-CT images, filling the relevant phantom voxels, which are 0.12x0.12x0.12 cm{sup 3}, with 17x17x17 {mu}m{sup 3} microvoxels to form a micromatrix of trabecular bone and bone marrow. FAX06/MAX06 have already been implemented in an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code to simulate radiation transport in the phantoms; however, this study required significant modifications of the code to allow use of phase-space data from a simulated CBCT imager as a source and to allow scoring of total dose, RBM dose and BSC dose on a voxel-by-voxel basis. In simulated CBCT scans, the BSC dose is significantly greater than the dose to other organs at risk. For example, in a simulated head and neck scan, the average BSC dose is 25% higher than the average dose to eye lens ({approx}8.3 cGy), and 80% greater than the average dose to brain (5.7 cGy). Average dose to RBM, on the other hand, is typically only {approx}50% of the average BSC dose and less than the dose to other organs at risk (54% of the dose to eye lens and 76% of dose to brain in a head and neck scan). Thus, elevated dose in bone due to CBCT results in elevated BSC dose. This is potentially of concern when using CBCT in conjunction with radiotherapy treatment.

  20. Investigation of coherent-scatter computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westmore, Michael S.; Fenster, Aaron; Cunningham, Ian A.

    1995-05-01

    Conventional computed tomography (CT) images are `maps' of the x ray linear attenuation coefficient within a slice through an object. A novel approach to CT is being developed which instead produces tomographic images based on an object's low-angle (0 - 10 degree(s)) x-ray diffraction properties. The coherent-scatter cross sections of many materials vary greatly, and this coherent-scatter CT (CSCT) system gives material-specific information on this basis. The goal of this research is to produce tomographic maps of bone-mineral content (BMC), first in laboratory specimens, and potentially in patients. The concept of reconstructing tomographic images using coherently scattered x rays was first demonstrated by Harding et al. The approach described here is a modification of their method. First generation CT geometry is used in which a diffraction pattern is acquired for each pencil-beam using a CsI image intensifier coupled to a CCD. Each pattern is sectioned into concentric annular rings so that the integrated signal in each ring gives the scatter intensity at a particular scatter angle, integrated along the path through the object. An image is reconstructed for each ring, resulting in a series of tomographic images corresponding to the scatter intensity at a series of scatter angles. A test phantom was imaged (70 kVp, 50 mAs per exposure, 100 mSv average dose) to demonstrate CSCT. The phantom consists of a water-filled Lucite cylinder containing rods of polyethylene, Lucite, polycarbonate, and nylon. The resulting series of images was used to extract the angular-dependent scatter cross section for every pixel. Using pure material cross sections as basis functions, the cross section from each pixel was fitted using non-negative least squares. The results were used to create material-specific images. These results show that CSCT is feasible with this approach and that if the materials in an object have distinguishable scatter cross sections, the method has the ability

  1. Arthrography

    MedlinePlus

    ... fluoroscopy to guide and evaluate the injection of iodine contrast material directly into the joint. In some ... bones, joints and internal organs in motion. When iodine contrast is injected into the joint, it fills ...

  2. Arthrography

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  3. Endocrine radionuclide scintigraphy with fusion single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ka-Kit; Gandhi, Arpit; Viglianti, Benjamin L; Fig, Lorraine M; Rubello, Domenico; Gross, Milton D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To review the benefits of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) hybrid imaging for diagnosis of various endocrine disorders. METHODS: We performed MEDLINE and PubMed searches using the terms: “SPECT/CT”; “functional anatomic mapping”; “transmission emission tomography”; “parathyroid adenoma”; “thyroid cancer”; “neuroendocrine tumor”; “adrenal”; “pheochromocytoma”; “paraganglioma”; in order to identify relevant articles published in English during the years 2003 to 2015. Reference lists from the articles were reviewed to identify additional pertinent articles. Retrieved manuscripts (case reports, reviews, meta-analyses and abstracts) concerning the application of SPECT/CT to endocrine imaging were analyzed to provide a descriptive synthesis of the utility of this technology. RESULTS: The emergence of hybrid SPECT/CT camera technology now allows simultaneous acquisition of combined multi-modality imaging, with seamless fusion of three-dimensional volume datasets. The usefulness of combining functional information to depict the bio-distribution of radiotracers that map cellular processes of the endocrine system and tumors of endocrine origin, with anatomy derived from CT, has improved the diagnostic capability of scintigraphy for a range of disorders of endocrine gland function. The literature describes benefits of SPECT/CT for 99mTc-sestamibi parathyroid scintigraphy and 99mTc-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy, 123I- or 131I-radioiodine for staging of differentiated thyroid carcinoma, 111In- and 99mTc- labeled somatostatin receptor analogues for detection of neuroendocrine tumors, 131I-norcholesterol (NP-59) scans for assessment of adrenal cortical hyperfunction, and 123I- or 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging for evaluation of pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma. CONCLUSION: SPECT/CT exploits the synergism between the functional information from radiopharmaceutical imaging and anatomy

  4. Quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography for technetium pertechnetate thyroid uptake measurement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunjong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kang, Yeon-koo; Moon, Jae Hoon; So, Young; Lee, Won Woo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Technetium pertechnetate (99mTcO4) is a radioactive tracer used to assess thyroid function by thyroid uptake system (TUS). However, the TUS often fails to deliver accurate measurements of the percent of thyroid uptake (%thyroid uptake) of 99mTcO4. Here, we investigated the usefulness of quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) after injection of 99mTcO4 in detecting thyroid function abnormalities. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed data from 50 patients (male:female = 15:35; age, 46.2 ± 16.3 years; 17 Graves disease, 13 thyroiditis, and 20 euthyroid). All patients underwent 99mTcO4 quantitative SPECT/CT (185 MBq = 5 mCi), which yielded %thyroid uptake and standardized uptake value (SUV). Twenty-one (10 Graves disease and 11 thyroiditis) of the 50 patients also underwent conventional %thyroid uptake measurements using a TUS. Results: Quantitative SPECT/CT parameters (%thyroid uptake, SUVmean, and SUVmax) were the highest in Graves disease, second highest in euthyroid, and lowest in thyroiditis (P < 0.0001, Kruskal–Wallis test). TUS significantly overestimated the %thyroid uptake compared with SPECT/CT (P < 0.0001, paired t test) because other 99mTcO4 sources in addition to thyroid, such as salivary glands and saliva, contributed to the %thyroid uptake result by TUS, whereas %thyroid uptake, SUVmean and SUVmax from the SPECT/CT were associated with the functional status of thyroid. Conclusions: Quantitative SPECT/CT is more accurate than conventional TUS for measuring 99mTcO4 %thyroid uptake. Quantitative measurements using SPECT/CT may facilitate more accurate assessment of thyroid tracer uptake. PMID:27399139

  5. Shifted helical computed tomography to optimize cardiac positron emission tomography-computed tomography coregistration: quantitative improvement and limitations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nils P; Pan, Tinsu; Gould, K Lance

    2010-10-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) uses CT attenuation correction but suffers from misregistration artifacts. However, the quantitative accuracy of helical versus cine CT in the same patient after optimized coregistration by shifting both CT data as needed for each patient is unknown. We studied 293 patients undergoing cardiac perfusion PET-CT using helical CT attenuation correction for comparison to cine CT. Objective, quantitative criteria identified perfusion abnormalities that were associated visually with PET-CT misregistration. Custom software shifted CT data to optimize coregistration with quantitative artifact improvement. The majority (58.1%) of cases with both helical and shifted helical CT data (n  = 93) had artifacts that improved or resolved by software shifting helical CT data. Translation of shifted helical CT was greatest in the x-direction (8.8 ± 3.3 mm) and less in the y- and z-directions (approximately 3.5 mm). The magnitude of differences in quantitative end points was greatest for helical (p  =  .0001, n  =  177 studies), less for shifted helical but significant (p  =  .0001, n  =  93 studies), and least for cine (not significant, n  =  161 studies) CT compared to optimal attenuation correction for each patient. Frequent artifacts owing to attenuation-emission misregistration are substantially corrected by software shifting helical CT scans to achieve proper coregistration that, however, remains on average significantly inferior to cine CT attenuation quantitatively.

  6. Computed tomography in the evaluation of Crohn disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, H.I.; Gore, R.M.; Margulis, A.R.; Moss, A.A.; Baker, E.L.

    1983-02-01

    The abdominal and pelvic computed tomographic examinations in 28 patients with Crohn disease were analyzed and correlated with conventional barium studies, sinograms, and surgical findings. Mucosal abnormalities such as aphthous lesions, pseudopolyps, and ulcerations were only imaged by conventional techniques. Computed tomography proved superior in demonstrating the mural, serosal, and mesenteric abnormalities such as bowel wall thickening (82%), fibrofatty proliferation of mesenteric fat (39%), mesenteric abscess (25%), inflammatory reaction of the mesentery (14%), and mesenteric lymphadenopathy (18%). Computed tomography was most useful clinically in defining the nature of mass effects, separation, or displacement of small bowel segments seen on small bowel series. Although conventional barium studies remain the initial diagnostic procedure in evaluating Crohn disease, computed tomography can be a useful adjunct in resolving difficult clinical and radiologic diagnostic problems.

  7. Development of a proton Computed Tomography detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naimuddin, Md.; Coutrakon, G.; Blazey, G.; Boi, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Erdelyi, B.; Hedin, D.; Johnson, E.; Krider, J.; Rukalin, V.; Uzunyan, S. A.; Zutshi, V.; Fordt, R.; Sellberg, G.; Rauch, J. E.; Roman, M.; Rubinov, P.; Wilson, P.

    2016-02-01

    Computer tomography is one of the most promising new methods to image abnormal tissues inside the human body. Tomography is also used to position the patient accurately before radiation therapy. Hadron therapy for treating cancer has become one of the most advantegeous and safe options. In order to fully utilize the advantages of hadron therapy, there is a necessity of performing radiography with hadrons as well. In this paper we present the development of a proton computed tomography system. Our second-generation proton tomography system consists of two upstream and two downstream trackers made up of fibers as active material and a range detector consisting of plastic scintillators. We present details of the detector system, readout electronics, and data acquisition system as well as the commissioning of the entire system. We also present preliminary results from the test beam of the range detector.

  8. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1200 Emission computed...

  9. Domain identification in impedance computed tomography by spline collocation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, Fumio

    1990-01-01

    A method for estimating an unknown domain in elliptic boundary value problems is considered. The problem is formulated as an inverse problem of integral equations of the second kind. A computational method is developed using a splice collocation scheme. The results can be applied to the inverse problem of impedance computed tomography (ICT) for image reconstruction.

  10. Tracheal rupture in a cat: diagnosis by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bhandal, Jitender; Kuzma, Alan

    2008-06-01

    A cat was presented with a history of worsening generalized subcutaneous emphysema following dental prophylaxis. Tentative diagnosis of tracheal rupture was made. The location and extent of the tear was confirmed with the help of computed tomography. This is the 1st computed tomographic description of tracheal rupture in the veterinary literature.

  11. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography coregistration for diagnosis and intraoperative localization in recurrent nelson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hintz, Eric B; Tomlin, Jeffery M; Chengazi, Vaseem; Vates, G Edward

    2013-06-01

    Recurrent pituitary disease presents unique challenges, including in some cases difficulty localizing a tumor radiographically. Here, we present the case of a patient with recurrent Nelson syndrome whose radiographic work-up was complicated by a significant parasellar metallic artifact. Positron emission tomography ultimately localized the lesion, and coregistration with computed tomography allowed for accurate intraoperative navigation. Additionally, we review a range of imaging techniques available in the evaluation of pituitary disease.

  12. Evaluating iterative reconstruction performance in computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baiyu Solomon, Justin; Ramirez Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) offers notable advantages in computed tomography (CT). However, its performance characterization is complicated by its potentially nonlinear behavior, impacting performance in terms of specific tasks. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of IR with both task-specific and task-generic strategies. Methods: The performance of IR in CT was mathematically assessed with an observer model that predicted the detection accuracy in terms of the detectability index (d′). d′ was calculated based on the properties of the image noise and resolution, the observer, and the detection task. The characterizations of image noise and resolution were extended to accommodate the nonlinearity of IR. A library of tasks was mathematically modeled at a range of sizes (radius 1–4 mm), contrast levels (10–100 HU), and edge profiles (sharp and soft). Unique d′ values were calculated for each task with respect to five radiation exposure levels (volume CT dose index, CTDI{sub vol}: 3.4–64.8 mGy) and four reconstruction algorithms (filtered backprojection reconstruction, FBP; iterative reconstruction in imaging space, IRIS; and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction with strengths of 3 and 5, SAFIRE3 and SAFIRE5; all provided by Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). The d′ values were translated into the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) to represent human observer performance. For each task and reconstruction algorithm, a threshold dose was derived as the minimum dose required to achieve a threshold AUC of 0.9. A task-specific dose reduction potential of IR was calculated as the difference between the threshold doses for IR and FBP. A task-generic comparison was further made between IR and FBP in terms of the percent of all tasks yielding an AUC higher than the threshold. Results: IR required less dose than FBP to achieve the threshold AUC. In general, SAFIRE5 showed the most significant dose reduction

  13. Diagnostic Value of CT Arthrography for Evaluation of Osteochondral Lesions at the Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Kirschke, Jan S.; Braun, Sepp; Baum, Thomas; Holwein, Christian; Schaeffeler, Christoph; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Background. To retrospectively determine the diagnostic value of computed tomography arthrography (CTA) of the ankle in the evaluation of (osteo)chondral lesions in comparison to conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and intraoperative findings. Methods. A total of N = 79 patients had CTAs and MRI of the ankle; in 17/79 cases surgical reports with statements on cartilage integrity were available. Cartilage lesions and bony defects at talus and tibia were scored according to defect depth and size by two radiologists. Statistical analysis included sensitivity analyses and Cohen's kappa calculations. Results. On CTA, 41/79 and 31/79 patients had full thickness cartilage defects at the talus and at the tibia, respectively. MRI was able to detect 54% of these defects. For the detection of full thickness cartilage lesions, interobserver agreement was substantial (0.72 ± 0.05) for CTA and moderate (0.55 ± 0.07) for MRI. In surgical reports, 88–92% and 46–62% of full thickness defects detected by CTA and MRI were described. CTA findings changed the further clinical management in 15.4% of cases. Conclusions. As compared to conventional MRI, CTA improves detection and visualization of cartilage defects at the ankle and is a relevant tool for treatment decisions in unclear cases. PMID:27891511

  14. Diagnosis of dementia with single photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jagust, W.J.; Budinger, T.F.; Reed, B.R.

    1987-03-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography is a practical modality for the study of physiologic cerebral activity in vivo. We utilized single photon emission computed tomography and N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine iodine 123 to evaluate regional cerebral blood flow in nine patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), five healthy elderly control subjects, and two patients with multi-infarct dementia. We found that all subjects with AD demonstrated flow deficits in temporoparietal cortex bilaterally, and that the ratio of activity in bilateral temporoparietal cortex to activity in the whole slice allowed the differentiation of all patients with AD from both the controls and from the patients with multi-infarct dementia. Furthermore, this ratio showed a strong correlation with disease severity in the AD group. Single photon emission computed tomography appears to be useful in the differential diagnosis of dementia and reflects clinical features of the disease.

  15. [Value and future of electron beam computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Kirchgeorg, M; Plainfossé, M C; Hernigou, A

    1994-12-01

    Mecanic computed tomography would probably never reach the acquisition brevity obtained by EBT. This machine is the best for exploration of cardiovascular diseases, and non cooperative patients, and for cine and flow studies. Morever, there are never tube cooling delays or interruptions in any procedures. Its disadvantages are the price, the impossibility to tilt the gantry, and the computer which are to be improved. With "Evolution", Siemens proposes now improvements with the CVS mode and a computer release without increasing of the price.

  16. C-Arm Computed Tomography Compared With Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Treatment Planning Before Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Christoph Waggershauser, Tobias; Tiling, Reinhold; Weckbach, Sabine; Johnson, Thorsten; Meissner, Oliver; Klingenbeck-Regn, Klaus; Reiser, Maximilian; Hoffmann, Ralf Thorsten

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether rotational C-arm computed tomography (CT) allows visualization of liver metastases and adds relevant information for radioembolization (RE) treatment planning. Technetium angiography, together with C-arm CT, was performed in 47 patients to determine the feasibility for RE. C-arm CT images were compared with positron emission tomography (PET)/CT images for the detection of liver tumors. The images were also rated according one of the following three categories: (1) images that provide no additional information compared with DSA alone; (2) images that do provide additional information compared with DSA; and (2) images that had an impact on eligibility determination for and planning of the RE procedure. In all patients, 283 FDG-positive liver lesions were detected by PET. In venous contrast-phase CT, 221 (78.1%) and 15 (5.3%) of these lesions were either hypodense or hyperdense, respectively. In C-arm CT, 103 (36.4%) liver lesions were not detectable because they were outside of either the field of view or the contrast-enhanced liver segment. Another 25 (8.8%) and 98 (34.6%) of the liver lesions were either hyperdense or presented primarily as hypodense lesions with a rim enhancement, respectively. With PET/CT as the standard of reference, venous CT and C-arm CT failed to detect 47 (16.6%) and 57 (20.1%) of all liver lesions, respectively. For RE planning, C-arm CT provided no further information, provide some additional information, or had an impact on the procedure in 20 (42.5%), 15 (31.9%) and 12 (25.6%) of patients, respectively. We conclude that C-arm CT may add decisive information in patients scheduled for RE.

  17. Investigation of a near-infrared-ray computed tomography scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Satoi, Yuichi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Ishii, Tomotaka; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2016-10-01

    In the near-infrared-ray computed tomography (NIR-CT) scanner, NIR rays are produced from a light-emitting diode (LED) and detected using an NIR phototransistor (PT). The wavelengths of the LED peak intensity and the PT high sensitivity in the data table are both 940 nm. The photocurrents flowing through the PTR are converted into voltages using an emitter-follower circuit, and the output voltages are sent to a personal computer through an analog-digital converter. The NIR projection curves for tomography are obtained by repeated linear scans and rotations of the object, and the scanning is conducted in both directions of its movement.

  18. Revisiting Seismic Tomography Through Direct Methods and High Performance Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, M.; Bogiatzis, P.; Davis, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last two decades, the rapid increase in data availability and computational power significantly increased the number of data and model parameters that can be investigated in seismic tomography problems. Often, the model space consists of 105-106 unknown parameters and there are comparable numbers of observations, making direct computational methods such as the singular value decomposition prohibitively expensive or impossible, leaving iterative solvers as the only alternative option. Among the disadvantages of the iterative algorithms is that the inverse of the matrix that defines the system is not explicitly formed. As a consequence, the model resolution and covariance matrices, that are crucial for the quantitative assessment of the uncertainty of the tomographic models, cannot be computed. Despite efforts in finding computationally affordable approximations of these matrices, challenges remain, and approaches such as the checkerboard resolution tests continue to be used. Based upon recent developments in sparse algorithms and high performance computing resources, we demonstrate that direct methods are becoming feasible for large seismic tomography problems, and apply the technique to obtain a regional P-wave tomography model and its full resolution matrix with 267,520 parameters. Furthermore, we show that the structural analysis of the forward operators of the seismic tomography problems can provide insights into the inverse problem, and allows us to determine and exploit approximations that yield accurate solutions.

  19. Feasibility Study of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography Based on Dual-Source Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Yu, Jie; Shi, Heshui

    2017-01-01

    Background Adding functional features to morphological features offers a new method for non-invasive assessment of myocardial perfusion. This study aimed to explore technical routes of assessing the left coronary artery pressure gradient, wall shear stress distribution and blood flow velocity distribution, combining three-dimensional coronary model which was based on high resolution dual-source computed tomography (CT) with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Methods Three cases of no obvious stenosis, mild stenosis and severe stenosis in left anterior descending (LAD) were enrolled. Images acquired on dual-source CT were input into software Mimics, ICEMCFD and FLUENT to simulate pressure gradient, wall shear stress distribution and blood flow velocity distribution. Measuring coronary enhancement ratio of coronary artery was to compare with pressure gradient. Results Results conformed to theoretical values and showed difference between normal and abnormal samples. Conclusions The study verified essential parameters and basic techniques in blood flow numerical simulation preliminarily. It was proved feasible. PMID:27924174

  20. 21 CFR 1020.33 - Computed tomography (CT) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Computed tomography (CT) equipment. 1020.33 Section 1020.33 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... diameters of 32.0 centimeters for testing any CT system designed to image any section of the body...

  1. 21 CFR 1020.33 - Computed tomography (CT) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Computed tomography (CT) equipment. 1020.33 Section 1020.33 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... diameters of 32.0 centimeters for testing any CT system designed to image any section of the body...

  2. Computed tomography as a definitive method for diagnosing gastrointestinal lipomas

    SciTech Connect

    Heiken. J.P.; Forde, K.A; Gold, R.P.

    1982-02-01

    Four cases of gastrointestinal lipoma that were demonstrated by computed tomography (CT) are presented. Until now, definitive diagnosis of gastrointestinal lipomas has required fiberoptic endoscopy, biopsy, or surgical excision. The results of this study indicate that CT may become a definitive diagnostic examination for lipomas of the gastrointestinal tract.

  3. How to interpret computed tomography of the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Mobasheri, R; Das, T; Vaidya, S; Mallik, S; El-Hussainy, M; Casey, A

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the spine has remained an important tool in the investigation of spinal pathology. This article helps to explain the basics of CT of the lumbar spine to allow the clinician better use of this diagnostic tool. PMID:25245727

  4. Computed Tomography-Enhanced Anatomy Course Using Enterprise Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Hila; Cohen, Haim; Medlej, Bahaa; Kornreich, Liora; Peled, Nathan; Hershkovitz, Israel

    2013-01-01

    Rapid changes in medical knowledge are forcing continuous adaptation of the basic science courses in medical schools. This article discusses a three-year experience developing a new Computed Tomography (CT)-based anatomy curriculum at the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, including describing the motivations and reasoning for the…

  5. Computed tomography: Will the slices reveal the truth

    PubMed Central

    Haridas, Harish; Mohan, Abarajithan; Papisetti, Sravanthi; Ealla, Kranti K. R.

    2016-01-01

    With the advances in the field of imaging sciences, new methods have been developed in dental radiology. These include digital radiography, density analyzing methods, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and nuclear imaging techniques, which provide high-resolution detailed images of oral structures. The current review aims to critically elaborate the use of CBCT in endodontics. PMID:27652253

  6. An Easily Assembled Laboratory Exercise in Computed Tomography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mylott, Elliot; Klepetka, Ryan; Dunlap, Justin C.; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a laboratory activity in computed tomography (CT) primarily composed of a photogate and a rotary motion sensor that can be assembled quickly and partially automates data collection and analysis. We use an enclosure made with a light filter that is largely opaque in the visible spectrum but mostly transparent to the near…

  7. RADIAL COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY OF AIR CONTAMINANTS USING OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the application of an optical remote-sensing (ORS) system to map air contaminants and locate fugitive emissions. Many ORD systems may utilize radial non-overlapping beam geometry and a computed tomography (CT) algorithm to map the concentrations in a plane. In...

  8. A comparative study of indium-111 DTPA radionuclide and iothalamate meglumine roentgenographic arthrography in the evaluation of painful total hip arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Maxon, H.R.; Schneider, H.J.; Hopson, C.N.; Miller, E.H.; Von Stein, D.E.; Kereiakes, J.G.; Cummings, D.D.; McDevitt, R.M. )

    1989-08-01

    Fifteen patients with painful total hip prostheses were referred for nuclear medicine and roentgenographic arthrography studies to exclude loosening of the acetabular and/or the femoral component. A new radioisotopic technique suitable for the evaluation of both components was developed using dual-isotope single-photon tomography with {sup 99m}technetium methylene diphosphonate bone imaging and indium-111 diethylenetriaminepentacetic acid arthrography. Thirteen of the 15 subjects were subsequently treated with additional surgery. The surgical findings were compared with the nuclear medicine and roentgenographic results. The overall diagnostic accuracy of both arthrographic procedures was approximately 80%, but the roentgenographic arthrogram was more sensitive and the radionuclide arthrogram was more specific.

  9. Cranial computed tomography in infancy and childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Hammock, M.K.; Mihorat, T.H.

    1981-01-01

    A large number of pediatric cases have been accumulated and categorized according to congenital abnormalities, trauma, hydrocephalus, tumors, and infection. Each category contains background material accompanied by computed-tomographic (CT) illustrations and a related discussion. The material is derived from 6,000 CT scans performed at Children's Hospital National Medical Center in Washington, DC since 1973. (JMT)

  10. Positron emission tomography and computed tomography assessments of the aging human brain

    SciTech Connect

    de Leon, M.J.; George, A.E.; Ferris, S.H.; Christman, D.R.; Fowler, J.S.; Gentes, C.I.; Brodie, J.; Reisberg, B.; Wolf, A.P.

    1984-02-01

    The relationship between alterations in brain structure and brain function was studied in vivo in both young and elderly human subjects. Computed tomography revealed significant age-related ventricular and cortical sulcal dilatation. The cortical changes were most closely related to age. Positron emission tomography failed to show regional changes in brain glucose metabolic rate. The results suggest that the normal aging brain undergoes structural atrophic changes without incurring regional metabolic changes. Examination of the correlations between the structural and the metabolic measures revealed no significant relationships. These data are discussed with respect to the significant structure-function relationships that have been reported in Alzheimer disease. 27 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Radiology of giant cell tumors of bone: computed tomography, arthro-tomography, and scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Hudson, T M; Schiebler, M; Springfield, D S; Enneking, W F; Hawkins, I F; Spanier, S S

    1984-01-01

    Radiologic studies of 50 giant cell tumors of bone in 48 patients were useful in assessing the anatomic extent for planning surgical treatment. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) provided the most useful and complete evaluation, including soft tissue extent and relationship to major vessels. Angiography was useful when the extraosseous extent and vascular relationships were not entirely clear on CT. Arthro-tomography was the best way to evaluate tumor invasion through subchondral cortex and articular cartilage. Reactive soft tissues, with edema and hyperemia, were difficult to distinguish from tumor tissue on CT and angiograms. Bone scintigrams often showed intense uptake beyond the true tumor limits.

  12. Assessment of asthmatic inflammation using hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography-x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaopeng; Prakash, Jaya; Ruscitti, Francesca; Glasl, Sarah; Stellari, Fabio Franco; Villetti, Gino; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear imaging plays a critical role in asthma research but is limited in its readings of biology due to the short-lived signals of radio-isotopes. We employed hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and x-ray computed tomography (XCT) for the assessment of asthmatic inflammation based on resolving cathepsin activity and matrix metalloproteinase activity in dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillus species-challenged mice. The reconstructed multimodal fluorescence distribution showed good correspondence with ex vivo cryosection images and histological images, confirming FMT-XCT as an interesting alternative for asthma research.

  13. Computer tomography of large dust clouds in complex plasmas.

    PubMed

    Killer, Carsten; Himpel, Michael; Melzer, André

    2014-10-01

    The dust density is a central parameter of a dusty plasma. Here, a tomography setup for the determination of the three-dimensionally resolved density distribution of spatially extended dust clouds is presented. The dust clouds consist of micron-sized particles confined in a radio frequency argon plasma, where they fill almost the entire discharge volume. First, a line-of-sight integrated dust density is obtained from extinction measurements, where the incident light from an LED panel is scattered and absorbed by the dust. Performing these extinction measurements from many different angles allows the reconstruction of the 3D dust density distribution, analogous to a computer tomography in medical applications.

  14. Computed tomography in suspected osteoid osteomas of tubular bones

    SciTech Connect

    Herrlin, K.; Ekelund, L.; Loevdahl, R.; Persson, B.

    1982-12-01

    Six cases of suspected osteoid osteoma of tubular bones were evaluated by computed tomography (CT). In all cases a radiolucent nidus was clearly demonstrated. In two cases a radiodense center of the nidus was visualized. It is suggested that CT may replace conventional tomography in the evaluation of these lesions. Due to its ability to locate the lesion in the transverse plane, CT is superior for the exact planning of surgery to avoid unnecessary large or misdirected resections. Adequate window settings are essential in the evaluation of these lesions.

  15. Computer tomography of large dust clouds in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Killer, Carsten; Himpel, Michael; Melzer, André

    2014-10-15

    The dust density is a central parameter of a dusty plasma. Here, a tomography setup for the determination of the three-dimensionally resolved density distribution of spatially extended dust clouds is presented. The dust clouds consist of micron-sized particles confined in a radio frequency argon plasma, where they fill almost the entire discharge volume. First, a line-of-sight integrated dust density is obtained from extinction measurements, where the incident light from an LED panel is scattered and absorbed by the dust. Performing these extinction measurements from many different angles allows the reconstruction of the 3D dust density distribution, analogous to a computer tomography in medical applications.

  16. Case report of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving the lacrimal glands demonstrated by computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kniskern, J.A.; Hart, K.; Decker, D.A.; Harris, J.H.

    1981-12-15

    A case of bilateral lacrimal gland infiltration by diffuse, mixed histiocytic-lymphocytic lymphoma demonstrated by computed tomography is reported. Non-Hodgkin's lymphomatous involvement of the lacrimal gland is uncommon. Computed tomography provides precise delineation of perioccular neoplasia.

  17. Discontinuous splenogonadal fusion diagnosed on computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jakkani, Ravikanth; Alhajri, Fayzah A; Alteriki, Abdullattif; Almuteri, Meshari F; Athyal, Reji P; Hashem, Khaled Z

    2016-01-01

    Splenogonadal fusion is a very rare congenital anomaly which often manifests as a scrotal mass and rarely as cryptorchidism. It can be of continuous and discontinuous type based on the presence of a band of connecting splenic tissue. We report a rare case of discontinuous type of splenogonadal fusion in an adolescent male presenting as cryptorchidism. We emphasize the computed tomographic findings, which helped us in preoperative diagnosis and aided in appropriate management. PMID:28104947

  18. Computed tomography of localized pleural mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Dedrick, C.G.; McLoud, T.C.; Shepard, J.O.; Shipley, R.T.

    1985-02-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) features of six pathologically proven cases of fibrous mesothelioma were reviewed. There were no pathognomonic CT characteristics, but in all cases CT suggested or supported the preoperative diagnosis. CT findings included well delineated, often lobulated, noncalcified soft-tissue masses in close relation to a pleural surface, associated crural thickening, and absence of chest wall invasion. An obtuse angle of the mass with respect to the pleural surface was not particularly useful. Rather, a smoothly tapering margin was more characteristic of a pleural lesion.

  19. Clinical utility of dental cone-beam computed tomography: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Jaju, Prashant P; Jaju, Sushma P

    2014-01-01

    Panoramic radiography and computed tomography were the pillars of maxillofacial diagnosis. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography, dental practice has seen a paradigm shift. This review article highlights the potential applications of cone-beam computed tomography in the fields of dental implantology and forensic dentistry, and its limitations in maxillofacial diagnosis. PMID:24729729

  20. Computed tomography of human joints and radioactive waste drums

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, Harry E.; Roberson, G. Patrick; Hollerbach, Karin; Logan, Clinton M.; Ashby, Elaine; Bernardi, Richard

    1999-12-02

    X- and gamma-ray imaging techniques in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and assay (NDA) have seen increasing use in an array of industrial, environmental, military, and medical applications. Much of this growth in recent years is attributed to the rapid development of computed tomography (CT) and the use of NDE throughout the life-cycle of a product. Two diverse examples of CT are discussed, 1.) Our computational approach to normal joint kinematics and prosthetic joint analysis offers an opportunity to evaluate and improve prosthetic human joint replacements before they are manufactured or surgically implanted. Computed tomography data from scanned joints are segmented, resulting in the identification of bone and other tissues of interest, with emphasis on the articular surfaces. 2.) We are developing NDE and NDA techniques to analyze closed waste drums accurately and quantitatively. Active and passive computed tomography (A and PCT) is a comprehensive and accurate gamma-ray NDA method that can identify all detectable radioisotopes present in a container and measure their radioactivity.

  1. Computed tomography of human joints and radioactive waste drums

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, E; Bernardi, R; Hollerbach, K; Logan, C; Martz, H; Roberson, G P

    1999-06-01

    X- and gamma-ray imaging techniques in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and assay (NDA) have been increasing use in an array of industrial, environmental, military, and medical applications. Much of this growth in recent years is attributed to the rapid development of computed tomography (CT) and the use of NDE throughout the life-cycle of a product. Two diverse examples of CT are discussed. (1) The computational approach to normal joint kinematics and prosthetic joint analysis offers an opportunity to evaluate and improve prosthetic human joint replacements before they are manufactured or surgically implanted. Computed tomography data from scanned joints are segmented, resulting in the identification of bone and other tissues of interest, with emphasis on the articular surfaces. (2) They are developing NDE and NDE techniques to analyze closed waste drums accurately and quantitatively. Active and passive computed tomography (A and PCT) is a comprehensive and accurate gamma-ray NDA method that can identify all detectable radioisotopes present in a container and measure their radioactivity.

  2. Initial water quantification results using neutron computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, A. K.; Shi, L.; Brenizer, J. S.; Mench, M. M.

    2009-06-01

    Neutron computed tomography is an important imaging tool in the field of non-destructive testing and in fundamental research for many engineering applications. Contrary to X-rays, neutrons can be attenuated by some light materials, such as hydrogen, but can penetrate many heavy materials. Thus, neutron computed tomography is useful in obtaining important three-dimensional information about a sample's interior structure and material properties that other traditional methods cannot provide. The neutron computed tomography system at the Pennsylvania State University's Radiation Science and Engineering Center is being utilized to develop a water quantification technique for investigation of water distribution in fuel cells under normal conditions. A hollow aluminum cylinder test sample filled with a known volume of water was constructed for purposes of testing the quantification technique. Transmission images of the test sample at different angles were easily acquired through the synthesis of a dedicated image acquisition computer driving a rotary table controller and an in-house developed synchronization software package. After data acquisition, Octopus (version 8.2) and VGStudio Max (version 1.2) were used to perform cross-sectional and three-dimensional reconstructions of the sample, respectively. The initial reconstructions and water quantification results are presented.

  3. Computed Tomography of the Normal Bovine Tarsus.

    PubMed

    Hagag, U; Tawfiek, M; Brehm, W; Gerlach, K

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a detailed multiplanar computed tomographic (CT) anatomic reference for the bovine tarsus. The tarsal regions from twelve healthy adult cow cadavers were scanned in both soft and bone windows via a 16-slice multidetector CT scanner. Tarsi were frozen at -20(o) C and sectioned to 10-mm-thick slices in transverse, dorsal and sagittal planes respecting the imaging protocol. The frozen sections were cleaned and then photographed. Anatomic structures were identified, labelled and compared with the corresponding CT images. The sagittal plane was indispensable for evaluation of bone contours, the dorsal plane was valuable in examination of the collateral ligaments, and both were beneficial for assessment of the tarsal joint articulations. CT images allowed excellent delineation between the cortex and medulla of bones, and the trabecular structure was clearly depicted. The tarsal soft tissues showed variable shades of grey, and the synovial fluid was the lowest attenuated structure. This study provided full assessment of the clinically relevant anatomic structures of the bovine tarsal joint. This technique may be of value when results from other diagnostic imaging techniques are indecisive. Images presented in this study should serve as a basic CT reference and assist in the interpretation of various bovine tarsal pathology.

  4. Classification of breast computed tomography data

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Thomas R.; Cervino, Laura I.; Boone, John M.; Lindfors, Karen K.

    2008-03-15

    Differences in breast tissue composition are important determinants in assessing risk, identifying disease in images and following changes over time. This paper presents an algorithm for tissue classification that separates breast tissue into its three primary constituents of skin, fat and glandular tissue. We have designed and built a dedicated breast CT scanner. Fifty-five normal volunteers and patients with mammographically identified breast lesions were scanned. Breast CT voxel data were filtered using a 5 pt median filter and the image histogram was computed. A two compartment Gaussian fit of histogram data was used to provide an initial estimate of tissue compartments. After histogram analysis, data were input to region-growing algorithms and classified as to belonging to skin, fat or gland based on their value and architectural features. Once tissues were classified, a more detailed analysis of glandular tissue patterns and a more quantitative analysis of breast composition was made. Algorithm performance assessment demonstrated very good or excellent agreement between algorithm and radiologist observers in 97.7% of the segmented data. We observed that even in dense breasts the fraction of glandular tissue seldom exceeded 50%. For most individuals the composition is better characterized as being a 70% (fat)-30% (gland) composition than a 50% (fat)-50% (gland) composition.

  5. Analytic reconstruction approach for parallel translational computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kong, Huihua; Yu, Hengyong

    2015-01-01

    To develop low-cost and low-dose computed tomography (CT) scanners for developing countries, recently a parallel translational computed tomography (PTCT) is proposed, and the source and detector are translated oppositely with respect to the imaging object without a slip-ring. In this paper, we develop an analytic filtered-backprojection (FBP)-type reconstruction algorithm for two dimensional (2D) fan-beam PTCT and extend it to three dimensional (3D) cone-beam geometry in a Feldkamp-type framework. Particularly, a weighting function is constructed to deal with data redundancy for multiple translations PTCT to eliminate image artifacts. Extensive numerical simulations are performed to validate and evaluate the proposed analytic reconstruction algorithms, and the results confirm their correctness and merits.

  6. Blood-brain barrier permeability imaging using perfusion computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Avsenik, Jernej; Bisdas, Sotirios; Popovic, Katarina Surlan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The blood-brain barrier represents the selective diffusion barrier at the level of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Other functions of blood-brain barrier include transport, signaling and osmoregulation. Endothelial cells interact with surrounding astrocytes, pericytes and neurons. These interactions are crucial to the development, structural integrity and function of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Dysfunctional blood-brain barrier has been associated with pathologies such as acute stroke, tumors, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Conclusions. Blood-brain barrier permeability can be evaluated in vivo by perfusion computed tomography - an efficient diagnostic method that involves the sequential acquisition of tomographic images during the intravenous administration of iodinated contrast material. The major clinical applications of perfusion computed tomography are in acute stroke and in brain tumor imaging. PMID:26029020

  7. Consolidation with diffuse or focal high attenuation: computed tomography findings.

    PubMed

    Marchiori, Edson; Franquet, Tomás; Gasparetto, Taísa Davaus; Gonçalves, Letícia Pereira; Escuissato, Dante L

    2008-11-01

    This pictorial essay aims to present various lesions that could present as consolidations with diffuse of focal high attenuation on computed tomography, helping to make the diagnosis more confident and specific. The radiologic literature has limited information about such findings and the role of computed tomography in the differential diagnosis. The following diseases are presented: metastatic pulmonary calcification, pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis, amiodarone lung, talcosis, iodinated oil embolism, tuberculosis, silicoproteinosis, and amyloidosis. In conclusion, air-space consolidations can be seen in a wide variety of diseases affecting the lungs. The identification of the different patterns of consolidation with focal high attenuation narrows the differential diagnosis. We present a diagnostic approach based on appearance and distribution of these lesions.

  8. Single photon emission computed tomography in seizure disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Denays, R; Rubinstein, M; Ham, H; Piepsz, A; Noël, P

    1988-01-01

    Fourteen children with various seizure disorders were studied using a cerebral blood flow tracer, 123I iodoamphetamine (0.05 mCi/kg), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In the five patients with radiological lesions, SPECT showed congruent or more extensive abnormalities. Five of the nine children with a normal scan on computed tomography had abnormal SPECT studies consisting of focal hypoperfusion, diffuse hemispheric hypoperfusion, multifocal and bilateral hypoperfusion, or focal hyperperfusion. A focal lesion seen on SPECT has been found in children with tonic-clonic seizures suggesting secondarily generalised seizures. Moreover the pattern seen on SPECT seemed to be related to the clinical status. An extensive impairment found on SPECT was associated with a poor evolution in terms of intellectual performance and seizure frequency. Conversely all children with a normal result on SPECT had less than two seizures per year and normal neurological and intellectual development. Images Figure PMID:3264135

  9. Intracranial Carotid Calcification on Cranial Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Deepak; Zishan, Umme Sara; Chappell, Francesca; Gregoriades, Maria-Lena; Sudlow, Cathie; Sellar, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification is associated with cerebrovascular risk factors and stroke, but few quantification methods are available. We tested the reliability of visual scoring, semiautomated Agatston score, and calcium volume measurement in patients with recent stroke. Methods— We used scans from a prospective hospital stroke registry and included patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke or transient ischemic stroke whose noncontrast cranial computed tomographic scans were available electronically. Two raters measured semiautomatic quantitative Agatston score, and calcium volume, and performed qualitative visual scoring using the original 4-point Woodcock score and a modified Woodcock score, where each image on which the internal carotid arteries appeared was scored and the slice scores summed. Results— Intra- and interobserver coefficient of variations were 8.8% and 16.5% for Agatston, 8.8% and 15.5% for calcium volume, and 5.7% and 5.4% for the modified Woodcock visual score, respectively. The modified Woodcock visual score correlated strongly with both Agatston and calcium volume quantitative measures (both R2=0.84; P<0.0001); calcium volume increased by 0.47-mm/point increase in modified Woodcock visual score. Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification increased with age by all measures (eg, visual score, Spearman ρ=0.4; P=0.005). Conclusions— Visual scores correlate highly with quantitative intracranial internal carotid artery calcification measures, with excellent observer agreements. Visual intracranial internal carotid artery scores could be a rapid and practical method for epidemiological studies. PMID:26251250

  10. Comparison of computed tomography and pluridirectional tomography of the temporal bone

    SciTech Connect

    Lufkin, R.; Barni, J.J.; Glen, W.; Mancuso, A.; Canalis, R.; Hanafee, W.

    1982-06-01

    During pluridirectional tomography dense bone creates ghost shadows that simulate chronic disease and soft-tissue masses within the middle ear cavity. This effect was demonstrated in three dried skulls. Cholesteatomas were simulated in three more temporal bones with a mixture of 2% iodine in paraffin. Three different high-resolution computed tomographic scanners clearly demonstrated middle ear anatomy and the simulated soft-tissue masses in the skulls.

  11. Micro Computer Tomography for medical device and pharmaceutical packaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Hindelang, Florine; Zurbach, Raphael; Roggo, Yves

    2015-04-10

    Biomedical device and medicine product manufacturing are long processes facing global competition. As technology evolves with time, the level of quality, safety and reliability increases simultaneously. Micro Computer Tomography (Micro CT) is a tool allowing a deep investigation of products: it can contribute to quality improvement. This article presents the numerous applications of Micro CT for medical device and pharmaceutical packaging analysis. The samples investigated confirmed CT suitability for verification of integrity, measurements and defect detections in a non-destructive manner.

  12. Three-dimensional terahertz computed tomography of human bones.

    PubMed

    Bessou, Maryelle; Chassagne, Bruno; Caumes, Jean-Pascal; Pradère, Christophe; Maire, Philippe; Tondusson, Marc; Abraham, Emmanuel

    2012-10-01

    Three-dimensional terahertz computed tomography has been used to investigate dried human bones such as a lumbar vertebra, a coxal bone, and a skull, with a direct comparison with standard radiography. In spite of lower spatial resolution compared with x-ray, terahertz imaging clearly discerns a compact bone from a spongy one, with strong terahertz absorption as shown by additional terahertz time-domain transmission spectroscopy.

  13. Dual-Energy Computed Tomography in Genitourinary Imaging.

    PubMed

    Mileto, Achille; Marin, Daniele

    2017-03-01

    Reignited by innovations in scanner engineering and software design, dual-energy computed tomography (CT) has come back into the clinical radiology arena in the last decade. Possibilities for noninvasive in vivo characterization of genitourinary disease, especially for renal stones and renal masses, have become the pinnacle offerings of dual-energy CT for body imaging in clinical practice. This article renders a state-of-the-art review on clinical applications of dual-energy CT in genitourinary imaging.

  14. Computed Tomography Inspection and Analysis for Additive Manufacturing Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshears, Ronald D.

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) inspection was performed on test articles additively manufactured from metallic materials. Metallic AM and machined wrought alloy test articles with programmed flaws were inspected using a 2MeV linear accelerator based CT system. Performance of CT inspection on identically configured wrought and AM components and programmed flaws was assessed using standard image analysis techniques to determine the impact of additive manufacturing on inspectability of objects with complex geometries.

  15. Cerebral computed tomography in maple syrup urine disease.

    PubMed

    Romero, F J; Ibarra, B; Rovira, M; Natal, A; Herrera, M; Segarra, A

    1984-06-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inherited metabolic disorder due to decreased decarboxylation of branched chain keto acids triggering an accumulation of leucine, isoleucine, and valine. We describe two infants with biochemically confirmed MSUD in whom computed tomography (CT) revealed cerebral edema. In one of these cases repeat CT 40 days after institution of appropriate therapy revealed that the edema had disappeared and the ventricles had enlarged.

  16. SADMFR guidelines for the use of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography/ Digital Volume Tomography.

    PubMed

    Dula, Karl; Bornstein, Michael M; Buser, Daniel; Dagassan-Berndt, Dorothea; Ettlin, Dominik A; Filippi, Andreas; Gabioud, François; Katsaros, Christos; Krastl, Gabriel; Lambrecht, J Thomas; Lauber, Roland; Luebbers, Heinz-Theo; Pazera, Pawel; Türp, Jens C

    2014-01-01

    Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) has been introduced in 1998. This radiological imaging procedure has been provided for dentistry and is comparable to computed tomography (CT) in medicine. It is expected that CBCT will have the same success in dental diagnostic imaging as computed tomography had in medicine. Just as CT is responsible for a significant rise in radiation dose to the population from medical X-ray diagnostics, CBCT studies will be accompanied by a significant increase of the dose to our patients by dentistry. Because of the growing concern for an uncritical and consequently rapidly increasing use of CBCT the Swiss Society of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology convened a first consensus conference in 2011 to formulate indications for CBCT, which can be used as guidelines. In this meeting, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthodontics and temporomandibular joint disorders and diseases were treated and the most important and most experienced users of DVT in these areas were asked to participate. In general, a highly restrictive use of CBCT is required. Justifying main criterion for CBCT application is that additional, therapy-relevant information is expected that should lead to a significant benefit in patient care. All users of CBCT should have completed a structured, high-level training, just like that offered by the Swiss Society of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology.

  17. Validation of visual surface measurement using computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanBerlo, Amy M.; Campbell, Aaron R.; Ellis, Randy E.

    2011-03-01

    Although dysesthesia is a common and persistent surgical complication, there is no accepted method for quantitatively tracking affected skin. To address this, two types of computer vision technologies were tested in a total of four configurations. Surface regions on plastic models of limbs were delineated with colored tape, imaged, and compared with computed tomography scans. The most accurate system used visually projected texture captured by a binocular stereo camera, capable of measuring areas to within 0.05% of the ground-truth areas with 1.4% variance. This simple, inexpensive technology shows promise for postoperative monitoring of dysesthesia surrounding surgical scars.

  18. [Role of cone-beam computed tomography in diagnostic otorhinolaryngological imaging].

    PubMed

    Perényi, Ádám; Bella, Zsolt; Baráth, Zoltán; Magyar, Péter; Nagy, Katalin; Rovó, László

    2016-01-10

    Accurate diagnosis and preoperative planning in modern otorhinolaryngology is strongly supported by imaging with enhanced visualization. Computed tomography is often used to examine structures within bone frameworks. Given the hazards of ionizing radiation, repetitive imaging studies exponentially increase the risk of damages to radiosensitive tissues. The authors compare multislice and cone-beam computed tomography and determine the role, advantages and disadvantages of cone-beam computed tomography in otorhinolaryngological imaging. They summarize the knowledge from the international literature and their individual imaging studies. They conclude that cone-beam computed tomography enables high-resolution imaging and reconstruction in any optional plane and in space with considerably lower effective radiation dose. Cone-beam computed tomography with appropriate indications proved to be an excellent diagnostic tool in otorhinolaryngological imaging. It makes an alternative to multislice computed tomography and it is an effective tool in perioperative and postoperative follow-up, especially in those cases which necessitate repetitive imaging with computed tomography.

  19. Perfusion computed tomography in patients with stroke thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Hiroyuki; Bivard, Andrew; Lin, Longting; Ma, Henry; Cheng, Xin; Aviv, Richard; O’Brien, Billy; Butcher, Kenneth; Lou, Min; Zhang, Jingfen; Jannes, Jim; Dong, Qiang; Levi, Christopher R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract See Saver (doi:10.1093/awx020) for a scientific commentary on this article. Stroke shortens an individual’s disability-free life. We aimed to assess the relative prognostic influence of pre- and post-treatment perfusion computed tomography imaging variables (e.g. ischaemic core and penumbral volumes) compared to standard clinical predictors (such as onset-to-treatment time) on long-term stroke disability in patients undergoing thrombolysis. We used data from a prospectively collected international, multicentre, observational registry of acute ischaemic stroke patients who had perfusion computed tomography and computed tomography angiography before treatment with intravenous alteplase. Baseline perfusion computed tomography and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging were analysed to derive the baseline penumbra volume, baseline ischaemic core volume, and penumbra salvaged from infarction. The primary outcome measure was the effect of imaging and clinical variables on Disability-Adjusted Life Year. Clinical variables were age, sex, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, and onset-to-treatment time. Age, sex, country, and 3-month modified Rankin Scale were extracted from the registry to calculate disability-adjusted life-year due to stroke, such that 1 year of disability-adjusted life-year equates to 1 year of healthy life lost due to stroke. There were 772 patients receiving alteplase therapy. The number of disability-adjusted life-year days lost per 1 ml of baseline ischaemic core volume was 17.5 (95% confidence interval, 13.2–21.9 days, P < 0.001). For every millilitre of penumbra salvaged, 7.2 days of disability-adjusted life-year days were saved (β = −7.2, 95% confidence interval, −10.4 to −4.1 days, P < 0.001). Each minute of earlier onset-to-treatment time resulted in a saving of 4.4 disability-free days after stroke (1.3–7.5 days, P = 0.006). However, after adjustment for imaging variables, onset-to-treatment time was not

  20. Mycosis fungoides staged by 18F-flurodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lu; Pang, Hua; Zhu, Jin; Chen, Xi; Guan, Lili; Wang, Jie; Chen, Jing; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Mycosis fungoides is a kind of malignant lymphoma arising from T cells, but primarily occurs in skin, and it is the most common type of cutaneous lymphoma. Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a rare non-Hodgkin lymphoma but the most common type of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Because of unknown etiology and mechanism, and lack of typical clinical and histophysiological manifestations, the final diagnosis of MF is currently dependent on pathology and immunohistochemistry. Subsequently, tumor staging is very important. Different approaches would be taken according to varying degrees of cutaneous and extracutaneous lesions. Computed tomography (CT) scan has been chosen to stage tumors customarily. However, CT could only provide morphological information and analyze lymphadenopathy by the size criteria. 18F-flurodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) could provide morphological information and metabolic conditions simultaneously, which is helpful to locate and stage lesion. Conclusion: 18F-flurodeoxyglucose PET/CT could identify cutaneous and extracutaneous lesions in patients with MF. It could provide the range of lesions and biopsy target. PMID:27828842

  1. Computed tomography and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography findings in adrenal candidiasis and histoplasmosis: two cases.

    PubMed

    Altinmakas, Emre; Guo, Ming; Kundu, Uma R; Habra, Mouhammed Amir; Ng, Chaan

    2015-01-01

    We report the contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography findings in adrenal histoplasmosis and candidiasis. Both demonstrated bilateral hypermetabolic heterogeneous adrenal masses with limited wash-out on delayed CT. Adrenal candidiasis has not been previously reported, nor have the CT wash-out findings in either infection. The adrenal imaging findings are indistinguishable from malignancy, which is more common; but in this setting, physicians should be alert to the differential diagnosis of fungal infections, since it can be equally deadly.

  2. [Spiral computed tomography in the diagnosis of limb osteomyelitis].

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, A Iu; Bulanova, T V; Panin, M G; Onishchenko, M P

    2002-01-01

    The results of radiation studies in 121 patients of different age (4 to 75 years) examined for limb osteomyelitis are analyzed. All the patients underwent routine X-ray study and computed tomography (CT), 26 patients had X-ray fistulography; 8, linear tomography; 10, CT fistulography; 6, scintigraphy, and 15, ultrasound study. Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis (AHO), chronic hematogenous osteomyelitis (CHO), and atypical (here Garre's sclerosing osteomyelitis and Brodie's abscess) osteomyelitis were ascertained in 10.6, 26.4, and 10.1% of cases, respectively. Posttraumatic osteomyelitis was diagnosed in almost 50% of the patients. CT defined the phase of chronic limb osteomyelitis. Spiral CT has proven to be the most effective technique for diagnosing limb osteomyelitis as compared with routine X-ray study: the accuracy of X-ray study was 81.8%, its sensitivity, 84.9%, and specificity, 60.0% and those of computed tomography were 96.7, 99.1, and 80.0%, respectively.

  3. [Spiral computed tomography in the diagnosis of limb osteomyelitis].

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, A Iu; Bulanova, T V; Onishchenko, M P

    2003-01-01

    The results of radiation studies in 121 patients of different age (4 to 75 years) examined for limb osteomyelitis are analyzed. All the patients underwent routine X-ray study and computed tomography (CT), 26 patients had X-ray fistulography; 8, linear tomography; 10, CT fistulography; 6, scintigraphy, and 15, ultrasound study. Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis (AHO), chronic hematogenous osteomyelitis (CHO), and atypical (here Garre's sclerosing osteomyelitis and Brodie's abscess) osteomyelitis were ascertained in 10.6, 26.4, and 10.1% of cases, respectively. Posttraumatic osteomyelitis was diagnosed in almost 50% of the patients. CT defined the phase of chronic limb osteomyelitis. Spiral CT has proven to be the most effective technique for diagnosing limb osteomyelitis as compared with routine X-ray study: the accuracy of X-ray study was 81.8%, its sensitivity, 84.9%, and specificity, 60.0% and those of computed tomography were 96.7, 99.1, and 80.0%, respectively.

  4. Imaging in breast cancer: Single-photon computed tomography and positron-emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bénard, François; Turcotte, Éric

    2005-01-01

    Although mammography remains a key imaging method for the early detection and screening of breast cancer, the overall accuracy of this test remains low. Several radiopharmaceuticals have been proposed as adjunct imaging methods to characterize breast masses by single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron-emission tomography (PET). Useful in characterizing indeterminate palpable masses and in the detection of axillary metastases, these techniques are insufficiently sensitive to detect subcentimetric tumor deposits. Their role in staging nodal involvement of the axillary areas therefore currently remains limited. Several enzymes and receptors have been targeted for imaging breast cancers with PET. [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose is particularly useful in the detection and staging of recurrent breast cancer and in assessing the response to chemotherapy. Several other ligands targeting proliferative activity, protein synthesis, and hormone and cell-membrane receptors may complement this approach by providing unique information about biological characteristics of breast cancer across primary and metastatic tumor sites. PMID:15987467

  5. Fasciola Hepatica Mimicking Malignancy on 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sürücü, Erdem; Demir, Yusuf; Dülger, Ahmet C.; Batur, Abdüssamed; Ölmez, Şehmus; Kitapçı, Mehmet T.

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old female with complaints of gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, fatigue, vomiting, nausea, and weight loss was diagnosed with neuroendocrine tumor after removal of a 2 mm lesion from the stomach with endoscopic biopsy. Her magnetic resonance imaging that was performed due to on-going symptoms showed multiple linear hypointense lesions in the liver. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scan was performed for differential diagnosis, which showed high fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in these lesions. Clinical and laboratory findings revealed the final diagnosis as Fasciola hepatica. The imaging features of this case is presented to aid in differentiating this infectious disease from malignancy and avoid misdiagnosis on FDG-PET/CT. PMID:27751978

  6. Extramedullary Plasmacytoma of the Gallbladder Detected on Fluorine 18-fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fakhri, Asif Ali; Rodrigue, Paul David; Fakhri, Amena Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Extramedullary plasmacytoma is rare in patients with diagnosed multiple myeloma. Soft tissue plasmacytoma of the gallbladder is particularly uncommon and has been described in only a handful of cases. Diagnosis of gallbladder plasmacytoma with fluorine 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F18-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has not previously been reported. We present a 65-year-old female with a history of multiple myeloma who underwent a restaging F18-FDG-PET/CT which showed a focal area of hypermetabolic activity, corresponding to a nodular lesion within the posterior gallbladder wall. The patient underwent successful cholecystectomy, with surgical pathology revealing gallbladder plasmacytoma. A follow-up scan was negative for active malignancy. This is a novel case of gallbladder plasmacytoma diagnosed on whole-body F18-FDG PET/CT – thus demonstrating the clinical value of this imaging modality in staging, restaging, and surveillance for patients with multiple myeloma. PMID:27761300

  7. Combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography to visualize and quantify fluid flow in sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernø, M. A.; Gauteplass, J.; Hauge, L. P.; Abell, G. E.; Adamsen, T. C. H.; Graue, A.

    2015-09-01

    Here we show for the first time the combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) imaging of flow processes within porous rocks to quantify the development in local fluid saturations. The coupling between local rock structure and displacement fronts is demonstrated in exploratory experiments using this novel approach. We also compare quantification of 3-D temporal and spatial water saturations in two similar CO2 storage tests in sandstone imaged separately with PET and CT. The applicability of each visualization technique is evaluated for a range of displacement processes, and the favorable implementation of combining PET/CT for laboratory core analysis is discussed. We learn that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is over an order of magnitude higher for PET compared with CT for the studied processes.

  8. Positron emission tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography in substance abuse research.

    PubMed

    Volkow, Nora D; Fowler, Joanna S; Wang, Gene-Jack

    2003-04-01

    Many advances in the conceptualization of addiction as a disease of the brain have come from the application of imaging technologies directly in the human drug abuser. New knowledge has been driven by advances in radiotracer design and chemistry and positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) instrumentation and the integration of these scientific tools with the tools of biochemistry, pharmacology, and medicine. This topic cuts across the medical specialties of neurology, psychiatry, oncology, and cardiology because of the high medical, social, and economic toll that drugs of abuse, including the legal drugs, cigarettes and alcohol, take on society. This article highlights recent advances in the use of PET and SPECT imaging to measure the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects of drugs of abuse on the human brain.

  9. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin

    2014-11-10

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging.

  10. Right parietal stroke with Gerstmann's syndrome. Appearance on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and single-photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Moore, M R; Saver, J L; Johnson, K A; Romero, J A

    1991-04-01

    We examined a patient who exhibited Gerstmann's syndrome (left-right disorientation, finger agnosia, dyscalculia, and dysgraphia) in association with a perioperative stroke in the right parietal lobe. This is the first description of the Gerstmann tetrad occurring in the setting of discrete right hemisphere pathologic findings. A well-localized vascular lesion was demonstrated by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and single-photon emission computed tomographic studies. The patient had clinical evidence of reversed functional cerebral dominance and radiologic evidence of reversed anatomic cerebral asymmetries.

  11. Imaging local brain function with emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1984-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to map local cerebral glucose utilization in the study of local cerebral function. This information differs fundamentally from structural assessment by means of computed tomography (CT). In normal human volunteers, the FDG scan was used to determine the cerebral metabolic response to conrolled sensory stimulation and the effects of aging. Cerebral metabolic patterns are distinctive among depressed and demented elderly patients. The FDG scan appears normal in the depressed patient, studded with multiple metabolic defects in patients with multiple infarct dementia, and in the patients with Alzheimer disease, metabolism is particularly reduced in the parietal cortex, but only slightly reduced in the caudate and thalamus. The interictal FDG scan effectively detects hypometabolic brain zones that are sites of onset for seizures in patients with partial epilepsy, even though these zones usually appear normal on CT scans. The future prospects of PET are discussed.

  12. Single photon emission computed tomography in AIDS dementia complex

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, P.; Vogl, G.; Fill, H.; Roessler, H.Z.; Zangerle, R.; Gerstenbrand, F.

    1988-08-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies were performed in AIDS dementia complex using IMP in 12 patients (and HM-PAO in four of these same patients). In all patients, SPECT revealed either multiple or focal uptake defects, the latter corresponding with focal signs or symptoms in all but one case. Computerized tomography showed a diffuse cerebral atrophy in eight of 12 patients, magnetic resonance imaging exhibited changes like atrophy and/or leukoencephalopathy in two of five cases. Our data indicate that both disturbance of cerebral amine metabolism and alteration of local perfusion share in the pathogenesis of AIDS dementia complex. SPECT is an important aid in the diagnosis of AIDS dementia complex and contributes to the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of this disorder.

  13. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging in a Patient with HIV (-) Kaposi Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Arzu; Şavk, Ekin; Tataroğlu, Canten; Yürekli, Yakup

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a vascular neoplasm that often manifests with multiple vascular nodules on the skin and other organs. Various imaging modalities can be used to display disease extent. Herein we present a 65-year-old female patient with human immunodeficiency virus negative KS along with her whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging findings. PMID:27751977

  14. Rare case of an ovarian vein tumor thrombosis identified on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Piyush; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography is valuable in the identification of tumor thrombus and differentiating it from bland thrombus which has implications in initiating anticoagulation. We present a rare case of tumor thrombosis in ovarian vein, in a recurrent case of uterine carcinosarcoma. PMID:27833321

  15. Multi-GPU Jacobian Accelerated Computing for Soft Field Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Borsic, A.; Attardo, E. A.; Halter, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    Image reconstruction in soft-field tomography is based on an inverse problem formulation, where a forward model is fitted to the data. In medical applications, where the anatomy presents complex shapes, it is common to use Finite Element Models to represent the volume of interest and to solve a partial differential equation that models the physics of the system. Over the last decade, there has been a shifting interest from 2D modeling to 3D modeling, as the underlying physics of most problems are three-dimensional. Though the increased computational power of modern computers allows working with much larger FEM models, the computational time required to reconstruct 3D images on a fine 3D FEM model can be significant, on the order of hours. For example, in Electrical Impedance Tomography applications using a dense 3D FEM mesh with half a million elements, a single reconstruction iteration takes approximately 15 to 20 minutes with optimized routines running on a modern multi-core PC. It is desirable to accelerate image reconstruction to enable researchers to more easily and rapidly explore data and reconstruction parameters. Further, providing high-speed reconstructions are essential for some promising clinical application of EIT. For 3D problems 70% of the computing time is spent building the Jacobian matrix, and 25% of the time in forward solving. In the present work, we focus on accelerating the Jacobian computation by using single and multiple GPUs. First, we discuss an optimized implementation on a modern multi-core PC architecture and show how computing time is bounded by the CPU-to-memory bandwidth; this factor limits the rate at which data can be fetched by the CPU. Gains associated with use of multiple CPU cores are minimal, since data operands cannot be fetched fast enough to saturate the processing power of even a single CPU core. GPUs have a much faster memory bandwidths compared to CPUs and better parallelism. We are able to obtain acceleration factors of

  16. The role of single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in benign and malignant bone disease.

    PubMed

    Horger, Marius; Bares, Roland

    2006-10-01

    Radiological (plain radiographs, computed tomography [CT], magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) and nuclear medicine methods (bone scan, leukocyte scan) both provide unique information about the status of the skeleton. Both have typical strengths and weaknesses, which often lead to the sequential use of different procedures in daily routine. This use causes the unnecessary loss of time and sometimes money, if redundant information is obtained without establishing a final diagnosis. Recently, new devices for hybrid imaging (single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography [SPECT/CT], positron emission tomography/computed tomography [PET/CT]) were introduced, which allow for direct fusion of morphological (CT) and functional (SPECT, PET) data sets. With regard to skeletal abnormalities, this approach appears to be extremely useful because it combines the advantages of both techniques (high-resolution imaging of bone morphology and high sensitivity imaging of bone metabolism). By the accurate correlation of both, a new quality of bone imaging has now become accessible. Although researchers undertaking the initial studies exclusively used low-dose CT equipment, a new generation of SPECT/CT devices has emerged recently. By integrating high-resolution spiral CT, quality of bone imaging may improve once more. Ongoing prospective studies will have to show whether completely new diagnostic algorithms will come up for classification of bone disease as a consequence of this development. Besides, the role of ultrasonography and MRI for bone and soft-tissue imaging also will have to be re-evaluated. Looking at the final aim of all imaging techniques--to achieve correct diagnosis in a fast, noninvasive, comprehensive, and inexpensive way--we are now on the edge of a new era of multimodality imaging that will probably change the paths and structure of medicine in many ways. Presently, hybrid imaging using SPECT/CT has been proven to increase sensitivity and specificity

  17. Clinical efficacy of 2-phase versus 4-phase computed tomography for localization in primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Adriana G.; Shada, Amber L.; Martin, Allison N.; Raghavan, Prashant; Durst, Christopher R.; Mukherjee, Sugoto; Gaughen, John R.; Ornan, David A.; Hanks, John B.; Smith, Philip W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Four-dimensional computed tomography is being used increasingly for localization of abnormal glands in primary hyperparathyroidism. We hypothesized that compared with traditional 4-phase imaging, 2-phase imaging would halve the radiation dose without compromising parathyroid localization and clinical outcomes. Methods A transition from 4-phase to 2-phase imaging was instituted between 2009 and 2010. A pre-post analysis was performed on patients undergoing operative treatment with a parathyroid protocol computed tomography, and relevant data were correlated with operative findings. Sensitivity, positive predictive value, technical success, and cure rates were calculated. The Fisher exact test or χ2 test assessed the significance of 2-phase and 4-phase imaging and operative findings. Results Twenty-seven patients had traditional four-dimensional computed tomography and 35 had modified 2-phase computed tomography. Effective radiation doses were 6.8 mSy for 2-phase and 14 mSv for 4-phase. Four-phase computed tomography had a sensitivity and positive predictive value of 93% and 96%, respectively. Two-phase computed tomography had a comparable sensitivity and positive predictive value of 97% and 94%, respectively. Eight patients with discordant imaging had an average parathyroid weight of 240 g compared with 1,300 g for all patients. Technical surgical success (90% for 4-phase computed tomography versus 91% 2-phase computed tomography) and normocalcemia rates at 6 months (88% for both) did not differ between computed tomography protocols. Computed tomography correctly predicted multiglandular disease and localization for reoperations in 88% and 90% of cases, respectively, with no difference by computed tomography protocol. Conclusion With regard to surgical outcomes and localization, 2-phase parathyroid computed tomography is equivalent to 4-phase for parathyroid localization, including small adenomas, reoperative cases, and multiglandular disease. Two

  18. Ptychographic X-ray computed tomography at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Dierolf, Martin; Menzel, Andreas; Thibault, Pierre; Schneider, Philipp; Kewish, Cameron M; Wepf, Roger; Bunk, Oliver; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2010-09-23

    X-ray tomography is an invaluable tool in biomedical imaging. It can deliver the three-dimensional internal structure of entire organisms as well as that of single cells, and even gives access to quantitative information, crucially important both for medical applications and for basic research. Most frequently such information is based on X-ray attenuation. Phase contrast is sometimes used for improved visibility but remains significantly harder to quantify. Here we describe an X-ray computed tomography technique that generates quantitative high-contrast three-dimensional electron density maps from phase contrast information without reverting to assumptions of a weak phase object or negligible absorption. This method uses a ptychographic coherent imaging approach to record tomographic data sets, exploiting both the high penetration power of hard X-rays and the high sensitivity of lensless imaging. As an example, we present images of a bone sample in which structures on the 100 nm length scale such as the osteocyte lacunae and the interconnective canalicular network are clearly resolved. The recovered electron density map provides a contrast high enough to estimate nanoscale bone density variations of less than one per cent. We expect this high-resolution tomography technique to provide invaluable information for both the life and materials sciences.

  19. Multimodality Imaging in Coronary Artery Disease: Focus on Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Han, Donghee; Danad, Ibrahim; Hartaigh, Bríain ó; Lin, Fay Y.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide, and various cardiovascular imaging modalities have been introduced for the purpose of diagnosing and determining the severity of CAD. More recently, advances in computed tomography (CT) technology have contributed to the widespread clinical application of cardiac CT for accurate and noninvasive evaluation of CAD. In this review, we focus on imaging assessment of CAD based upon CT, which includes coronary artery calcium screening, coronary CT angiography, myocardial CT perfusion, and fractional flow reserve CT. Further, we provide a discussion regarding the potential implications, benefits and limitations, as well as the possible future directions according to each modality. PMID:27081438

  20. Compressive sampling in computed tomography: Method and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhanli; Liang, Dong; Xia, Dan; Zheng, Hairong

    2014-06-01

    Since Donoho and Candes et al. published their groundbreaking work on compressive sampling or compressive sensing (CS), CS theory has attracted a lot of attention and become a hot topic, especially in biomedical imaging. Specifically, some CS based methods have been developed to enable accurate reconstruction from sparse data in computed tomography (CT) imaging. In this paper, we will review the progress in CS based CT from aspects of three fundamental requirements of CS: sparse representation, incoherent sampling and reconstruction algorithm. In addition, some potential applications of compressive sampling in CT are introduced.

  1. MWIR computed-tomography imaging spectrometer: calibration and imaging experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volin, Curtis E.; Garcia, John P.; Dereniak, Eustace L.; Descour, Michael R.; Sass, David T.; Simi, Christopher G.

    1999-10-01

    We report results of experimentation with a MWIR non-scanning, high speed imaging spectrometer capable of simultaneously recording spatial and spectral data from a rapidly varying target scene. High speed spectral imaging was demonstrated by collecting spectral and spatial snapshots of filtered blackbodies, combustion products and a coffee cup. The instrument is based on computed tomography concepts and operates in a mid-wave infrared band of 3.0 to 4.6 micrometer. Raw images were recorded at a video frame rate of 30 fps using a 160 X 120 InSb focal plane array. Reconstructions of simple objects are presented.

  2. [Vascular assessment in stroke codes: role of computed tomography angiography].

    PubMed

    Mendigaña Ramos, M; Cabada Giadas, T

    2015-01-01

    Advances in imaging studies for acute ischemic stroke are largely due to the development of new efficacious treatments carried out in the acute phase. Together with computed tomography (CT) perfusion studies, CT angiography facilitates the selection of patients who are likely to benefit from appropriate early treatment. CT angiography plays an important role in the workup for acute ischemic stroke because it makes it possible to confirm vascular occlusion, assess the collateral circulation, and obtain an arterial map that is very useful for planning endovascular treatment. In this review about CT angiography, we discuss the main technical characteristics, emphasizing the usefulness of the technique in making the right diagnosis and improving treatment strategies.

  3. Non-functioning adrenal adenomas discovered incidentally on computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mitnick, J.S.; Bosniak, M.A.; Megibow, A.J.; Naidich, D.P.

    1983-08-01

    Eighteen patients with unilateral non-metastatic non-functioning adrenal masses were studied with computed tomography (CT). Pathological examination in cases revealed benign adrenal adenomas. The others were followed up with serial CT scans and found to show no change in tumor size over a period of six months to three years. On the basis of these findings, the authors suggest certain criteria of a benign adrenal mass, including (a) diameter less than 5 cm, (b) smooth contour, (c) well-defined margin, and (d) no change in size on follow-up. Serial CT scanning can be used as an alternative to surgery in the management of many of these patients.

  4. Material reconstruction for spectral computed tomography with detector response function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiulong; Gao, Hao

    2016-11-01

    Different from conventional computed tomography (CT), spectral CT using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is able to provide the unprecedented material compositions. However accurate spectral CT needs to account for the detector response function (DRF), which is often distorted by factors such as pulse pileup and charge-sharing. In this work, we propose material reconstruction methods for spectral CT with DRF. The simulation results suggest that the proposed methods reconstructed more accurate material compositions than the conventional method without DRF. Moreover, the proposed linearized method with linear data fidelity from spectral resampling had improved reconstruction quality from the nonlinear method directly based on nonlinear data fidelity.

  5. PET/Computed Tomography in Renal, Bladder, and Testicular Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Choyke, Peter L

    2015-07-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of cancer patients. Hybrid imaging with PET/computed tomography (CT) is having a broad impact in oncology, and in recent years PET/CT is beginning to have an impact in urooncology. In both bladder and renal cancers, there is a need to study the efficacy of other tracers than F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), particularly tracers with limited renal excretion. Thus, new tracers are being introduced. This review focuses on the clinical role of FDG and other PET agents in renal, bladder, and testicular cancers.

  6. Contraindications to lumbar puncture as defined by computed cranial tomography.

    PubMed Central

    Gower, D J; Baker, A L; Bell, W O; Ball, M R

    1987-01-01

    Papilloedema is not always an adequate predictor of potential complications from lumbar puncture, and many clinicians are using computed tomography (CT) before lumbar puncture in an effort to identify more accurately the "at risk" patient. This paper identifies the following anatomical criteria defined by CT scanning that correlate with unequal pressures between intracranial compartments and predispose a patient to herniation following decompression of the spinal compartment: lateral shift of midline structures, loss of the suprachiasmatic and basilar cisterns, obliteration of the fourth ventricle, or obliteration of the superior cerebellar and quadrigeminal plate cisterns with sparing of the ambient cisterns. These criteria should be considered to be contraindications to lumbar puncture. Images PMID:3655817

  7. [The different manifestations of pulmonary aspergillosis: multidetector computed tomography findings].

    PubMed

    Koren Fernández, L; Alonso Charterina, S; Alcalá-Galiano Rubio, A; Sánchez Nistal, M A

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary aspergillosis is a fungal infection usually caused by inhaling Aspergillus fumigatus spores. However, when we talk about aspergillosis, we normally refer to the spectrum of clinical and radiological findings that depend directly on the patient's immune status, on the prior existence of lung disease, and on the virulence of the infective organism. There are four types of pulmonary aspergillosis (aspergilloma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis, and invasive aspergillosis), and each type has its own distinct radiologic findings. We review the signs of pulmonary aspergillosis on multidetector computed tomography and we correlate them with patients' symptoms and immune responses. Likewise, we discuss the differential diagnoses.

  8. Computed tomography of CNS disease. A teaching file

    SciTech Connect

    Yock, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    This ''teaching file'' comprises a clinically representative collection of over 400 cases of neuropathology diagnosed by computed tomography. Each case is accompanied by a discussion of CT interpretation. Comments on clinical presentation, pathophysiological findings, and therapy are included where appropriate. Abnormalities covered include metastases, meningiomas, posterior fossa tumors inflammatory and degenerative diseases, infarction and anoxia, and spinal lesions. Each pathological category demonstrates a range of CT findings from ''classic'' patterns to atypical examples. Anatomical variants are included only if they mimic pathology. Diverse lesions that potentially resemble each other are highlighted throughout the book in special sections entitled, ''Differential Diagnoses''.

  9. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Matos, António P.; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall. PMID:25295188

  10. Multidetector computer tomography: evaluation of blunt chest trauma in adults.

    PubMed

    Palas, João; Matos, António P; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco; Ramalho, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  11. The value of computed tomography in myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.R.; Muhm, J.R.; Sheedy, P.F. II; Unni, K.K.; Bernatz, P.E.; Hermann, R.C. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    In a 5 year study, 19 patients with myasthenia gravis were studied by computed tomography (CT) and underwent thymectomy. CT was accurate in detecting the nine true thymic masses but could not differentiate thymomas from nonthymomatous masses, including thymic cysts. No thymoma was found in a patient under 25 years of age. In one case, the 18 sec scanner could not differentiate a large gland from a thymoma. In eight cases, glands with histologic thymic hyperplasia and histologically normal thymus appeared to be similar and could not be differentiated by CT.

  12. Neurologic applications of whole-brain volumetric multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Kenneth V; Mokin, Maxim; Bates, Vernice E

    2014-02-01

    The introduction of computed tomography (CT) scanning in the 1970s revolutionized the way clinicians could diagnose and treat stroke. Subsequent advances in CT technology significantly reduced radiation dose, reduced metallic artifact, and achieved speeds that enable dynamic functional studies. The recent addition of whole-brain volumetric CT perfusion technology has given clinicians a powerful tool to assess parenchymal perfusion parameters as well as visualize dynamic changes in blood vessel flow throughout the brain during a single cardiac cycle. This article reviews clinical applications of volumetric multimodal CT that helped to guide and manage care.

  13. X-Ray Computed Tomography of Tranquility Base Moon Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Justin S.; Garvin, Jim; Viens, Mike; Kent, Ryan; Munoz, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) was used for the first time on the Apollo 11 Lunar Sample number 10057.30, which had been previously maintained by the White House, then transferred back to NASA under the care of Goddard Space Flight Center. Results from this analysis show detailed images of the internal structure of the moon rock, including vesicles (pores), crystal needles, and crystal bundles. These crystals, possibly the common mineral ilmenite, are found in abundance and with random orientation. Future work, in particular a greater understanding of these crystals and their formation, may lead to a more in-depth understanding of the lunar surface evolution and mineral content.

  14. Patient doses using multidetector computed tomography scanners in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Korir, G K; Wambani, J S; Korir, I K

    2012-08-01

    Assessment of patient dose attributed to multislice computed tomography (CT) examination. A questionnaire method was developed and used in recording the patient dose and scanning parameters for the head, chest, abdomen and lumbar spine examinations. The patient doses due to brain, chest and abdomen examination were above the international diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) by factors of between one and four. The study demonstrated that the use of multislice CT elevates patient radiation dose, justifying the need for local optimised scanning protocols and the use of institutional DRL for dose management without affecting diagnostic image quality.

  15. Differential diagnosis of intrasellar tumors by computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Williams, A.L.; Thornton, R.S.; Meyer, G.A.; Cusick, J.F.; Haughton, V.M.

    1981-12-01

    The specificity of the computed tomography (CT) diagnosis of intrasellar adenoma has not been studied. We compared the CT findings in intrasellar meningiomas, craniopharyngiomas, aneurysms, and metastases with those of pituitary adenomas. Calcification was a feature of intrasellar meningiomas, aneurysms, and craniopharyngiomas, but not a typical feature of adenomas. Low-density regions representing necrosis or cyst were found in most types of intrasellar tumors. Eccentricity, hyperostosis, and bone destruction were useful signs of aneurysm, meningioma, and metastasis, respectively. Since adenoma cannot always be distinghished from another intrasellar mass, angiography to demonstrate tumor angioarchitecture may be needed to characterize some neoplasms or to confirm an intrasellar aneurysm.

  16. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of pericardial disease

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Muhammad; Watkin, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Pericardial diseases are commonly encountered in clinical practice and may present as an isolated process or in association with various systemic conditions. Traditionally transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) has been the method of choice for the evaluation of suspected pericardial disease but increasingly computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are also being used as part of a rational multi-modality imaging approach tailored to the specific clinical scenario. This paper reviews the role of CT and MRI across the spectrum of pericardial diseases. PMID:27429911

  17. Precision Medicine and PET/Computed Tomography: Challenges and Implementation.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2017-01-01

    Precision Medicine is about selecting the right therapy for the right patient, at the right time, specific to the molecular targets expressed by disease or tumors, in the context of patient's environment and lifestyle. Some of the challenges for delivery of precision medicine in oncology include biomarkers for patient selection for enrichment-precision diagnostics, mapping out tumor heterogeneity that contributes to therapy failures, and early therapy assessment to identify resistance to therapies. PET/computed tomography offers solutions in these important areas of challenges and facilitates implementation of precision medicine.

  18. PRaVDA: High Energy Physics towards proton Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, T.

    2016-07-01

    Proton radiotherapy is an increasingly popular modality for treating cancers of the head and neck, and in paediatrics. To maximise the potential of proton radiotherapy it is essential to know the distribution, and more importantly the proton stopping powers, of the body tissues between the proton beam and the tumour. A stopping power map could be measured directly, and uncertainties in the treatment vastly reduce, if the patient was imaged with protons instead of conventional x-rays. Here we outline the application of technologies developed for High Energy Physics to provide clinical-quality proton Computed Tomography, in so reducing range uncertainties and enhancing the treatment of cancer.

  19. Computed tomography in the evaluation of thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, P.M.; Newman, G.E.; Korobkin, M.; Workman, J.B.; Moore, A.V.; Coleman, R.E.

    1984-05-01

    Traditionally, thyroid imaging has been performed primarily using radionuclide scanning. High-resolution computed tomography (CT) was performed in 18 patients to evaluate the CT appearance of various thyroid abnormalities including diffuse toxic goiter, multinodular goiter, Hashimoto thyroiditis, thyroid adenoma, and malignant thyroid tumors. CT images of the thyroid were correlated with radionuclide scanning, surgical findings, and clinical and laboratory results. CT provided a complementary method for evaluation of the thyroid by defining the morphology of the thyroid gland and more precisely defining the anatomic extent of thyroid abnormalities in relation to the normal structures of the neck and mediastinum.

  20. PET/Computed Tomography Using New Radiopharmaceuticals in Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Punit; Kumar, Rakesh; Alavi, Abass

    2015-10-01

    Targeted therapy is gaining prominence in the management of different cancers. Given different mechanism of action compared with traditional chemoradiotherapy, selection of patients for targeted therapy and monitoring response to these agents is difficult with conventional imaging. Various new PET radiopharmaceuticals have been evaluated for molecular imaging of these targets to achieve specific patient selection and response monitoring. These PET/computed tomography (CT) agents target the cell surface receptors, hormone receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases, or angiogenesis components. This article reviews the established and potential role of PET/CT with new radiopharmaceuticals for guiding targeted therapy.

  1. Computed tomography of localized dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, T.; Itai Y.; Tasaka, A.

    1981-12-01

    Twenty-nine patients showed localized dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts on computed tomography, usually unaccompanied by jaundice. Congenital dilatation was diagnosed when associated with a choledochal cyst, while cholangiographic contrast material was helpful in differentiating such dilatation from a simple cyst by showing its communication with the biliary tract when no choledochal cyst was present. Obstructive dilatation was associated with intrahepatic calculi in 4 cases, hepatoma in 9, cholangioma in 5, metastatic tumor in 5, and polycystic disease in 2. Cholangioma and intrahepatic calculi had a greater tendency to accompany such localized dilatation; in 2 cases, the dilatation was the only clue to the underlying disorder.

  2. Computer Tomography Analysis of Fastrac Composite Thrust Chamber Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshears, Ronald D.

    2000-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) inspection has been integrated into the production process for NASA's Fastrac composite thrust chamber assemblies (TCAs). CT has been proven to be uniquely qualified to detect the known critical flaw for these nozzles, liner cracks that are adjacent to debonds between the liner and overwrap. CT is also being used as a process monitoring tool through analysis of low density indications in the nozzle overwraps. 3d reconstruction of CT images to produce models of flawed areas is being used to give program engineers better insight into the location and nature of nozzle flaws.

  3. Arthrography and arthrotomy of the knee in sports injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Kulthanan, T; Noiklang, P

    1993-01-01

    A total of 266 patients with injuries to the knee sustained during sports activities were managed by arthroscopy and/or arthrotomy. All of them received systemic examination and a standard battery of knee stability tests. Fifty-three were examined by arthrography and all underwent arthrotomy for surgical correction of the lesion diagnosed by both clinical examination and arthrography. Our study showed that clinical examination could give an accurate clinical diagnosis in 88.35% of cases and arthrography in 76.89%. No complication from arthrography was found. Injury occurred most commonly between 21 and 30 years of age and was more common to the right knee than the left. The sport in which most injuries occurred was football. PMID:8358590

  4. Observation of the pulp horn by swept source optical coherence tomography and cone beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iino, Yoshiko; Yoshioka, Toshihiko; Hanada, Takahiro; Ebihara, Arata; Sunakawa, Mitsuhiro; Sumi, Yasunori; Suda, Hideaki

    2015-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is one of the most useful diagnostic techniques in dentistry but it involves ionizing radiation, while swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) has been introduced recently as a nondestructive, real-time, high resolution imaging technique using low-coherence interferometry, which involves no ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of SS-OCT to detect the pulp horn (PH) in comparison with that of CBCT. Ten extracted human mandibular molars were used. After horizontally removing a half of the tooth crown, the distance from the cut dentin surface to PH was measured using microfocus computed tomography (Micro CT) (SL) as the gold standard, by CBCT (CL) and by SS-OCT (OL). In the SS-OCT images, only when PH was observed beneath the overlying dentin, the distance from the cut dentin surface to PH was recorded. If the pulp was exposed, it was defined as pulp exposure (PE). The results obtained by the above three methods were statistically analyzed by Spearman's rank correlation coefficient at a significance level of p < 0.01. SS-OCT detected the presence of PH when the distance from the cut dentin surface to PH determined by SL was 2.33 mm or less. Strong correlations of the measured values were found between SL and CL (r=0.87), SL and OL (r=0.96), and CL and OL (r=0.86). The results showed that SS-OCT images correlated closely with CBCT images, suggesting that SS-OCT can be a useful tool for the detection of PH.

  5. Simulation study of respiratory-induced errors in cardiac positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, Gianna M.; Wells, R. Glenn

    2006-08-15

    Heart disease is a leading killer in Canada and positron emission tomography (PET) provides clinicians with in vivo metabolic information for diagnosing heart disease. Transmission data are usually acquired with {sup 68}Ge, although the advent of PET/CT scanners has made computed tomography (CT) an alternative option. The fast data acquisition of CT compared to PET may cause potential misregistration problems, leading to inaccurate attenuation correction (AC). Using Monte Carlo simulations and an anthropomorphic dynamic computer phantom, this study determines the magnitude and location of respiratory-induced errors in radioactivity uptake measured in cardiac PET/CT. A homogeneous tracer distribution in the heart was considered. The AC was based on (1) a time-averaged attenuation map (2) CT maps from a single phase of the respiratory cycle, and (3) CT maps phase matched to the emission data. Circumferential profiles of the heart uptake were compared and differences of up to 24% were found between the single-phase CT-AC method and the true phantom values. Simulation results were supported by a PET/CT canine study which showed differences of up to 10% in the heart uptake in the lung-heart boundary region when comparing {sup 68}Ge- to CT-based AC with the CT map acquired at end inhalation.

  6. Assessment of metabolic bone diseases by quantitative computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, M.L.; Genant, H.K.; Cann, C.E.; Ettinger, B.; Gordan, G.S.; Kolb, F.O.; Reiser, U.J.

    1985-05-01

    Advances in the radiologic sciences have permitted the development of numerous noninvasive techniques for measuring the mineral content of bone, with varying degrees of precision, accuracy, and sensitivity. The techniques of standard radiography, radiogrammetry, photodensitometry, Compton scattering, neutron activation analysis, single and dual photon absorptiometry, and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) are described and reviewed in depth. Results from previous cross-sectional and longitudinal QCT investigations are given. They then describe a current investigation in which they studied 269 subjects, including 173 normal women, 34 patients with hyperparathyroidism, 24 patients with steroid- induced osteoporosis, and 38 men with idiopathic osteoporosis. Spinal quantitative computed tomography, radiogrammetry, and single photon absorptiometry were performed, and a spinal fracture index was calculated on all patients. The authors found a disproportionate loss of spinal trabecular mineral compared to appendicular mineral in the men with idiopathic osteoporosis and the patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis. They observed roughly equivalent mineral loss in both the appendicular and axial regions in the hyperparathyroid patients. The appendicular cortical measurements correlated moderately well with each other but less well with spinal trabecular QCT. The spinal fracture index correlated well with QCT and less well with the appendicular measurements.

  7. Computed tomography screening for lung cancer: back to basics.

    PubMed

    Ellis, S M; Husband, J E; Armstrong, P; Hansell, D M

    2001-09-01

    After some years in the doldrums, interest in screening for lung cancer is resurging. Conflicting evidence from previous lung cancer screening trials, based on plain chest radiography, has been the subject of much debate: the failure to demonstrate a reduction in mortality has led to the widely held conclusion that screening for lung cancer is ineffective. The validity of this assumption has been questioned sporadically and a large study currently under way in the U.S.A. should help settle the issue. Recently, there has been interest in the use of computed tomography to screen for lung cancer; radiation doses have been reduced to 'acceptable' levels and the superiority of computed tomography (CT) over chest radiography for the identification of pulmonary nodules is unquestioned. However, whether improved nodule detection will result in a reduction in mortality has not yet been demonstrated. The present review provides a historical background to the current interest in low-dose CT screening, explains the arguments that previous studies have provoked, and discusses the recent and evolving status of lung cancer screening with CT. Ellis, S. M. et al. (2001).

  8. Glandular dose in breast computed tomography with synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Mettivier, G; Fedon, C; Di Lillo, F; Longo, R; Sarno, A; Tromba, G; Russo, P

    2016-01-21

    The purpose of this work is to provide an evaluation of the mean glandular dose (MGD) for breast computed tomography (CT) with synchrotron radiation in an axial scanning configuration with a partial or total organ volume irradiation, for the in vivo program of breast CT ongoing at the ELETTRA facility (Trieste, Italy). A Geant4 Monte Carlo code was implemented, simulating the photon irradiation from a synchrotron radiation source in the energetic range from 8 to 50 keV with 1 keV intervals, to evaluate the MGD. The code was validated with literature data, in terms of mammographic normalized glandular dose coefficients (DgN) and with ad hoc experimental data, in terms of computed tomography dose index (CTDI). Simulated cylindrical phantoms of different sizes (diameter at phantom base 8, 10, 12, 14 or 16 cm, axial length 1.5 times the radius) and glandular fraction by weight (0%, 14.3%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%) were implemented into the code. The validation of the code shows an excellent agreement both with previously published work and in terms of DgN and CDTI measurements. The implemented simulations show a dependence of the glandular dose estimate on the vertical dimension of the irradiated zone when a partial organ irradiation was implemented. Specific normalized coefficients for calculating the MGD to the whole breast or to the single irradiated slice were reported.

  9. Applications of cone beam computed tomography for a prosthodontist

    PubMed Central

    John, George Puthenpurayil; Joy, Tatu Elenjickal; Mathew, Justin; Kumar, Vinod R. B.

    2016-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a medical imaging technique of X-ray computed tomography where the X-rays are divergent, forming a cone. CBCT systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the maxillofacial region. The increasing availability of this technology provides the dental clinician with an imaging modality capable of providing a three-dimensional representation of the maxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion. This article is intended to elaborate and enunciate on the various applications and benefits of CBCT, in the realm of maxillofacial prosthodontics, over and beyond its obvious benefits in the rehabilitation of patients with implants. With the onus of meticulous reconstruction of near ideal occlusion resting on the prosthodontist, CBCT provides a unique imaging option, which can be a boon in various aspects of prosthodontic practice – from imaging of the temporomandibular joint for accurate movement simulation, to template assisted maxillofacial reconstruction or even over denture therapy. CBCT could play a crucial role in lessening the burden of a hectic prosthodontic routine for the clinician and critically contribute to accurate and effective treatment for the patient. Apart from the authors’ clinical experiences shared here, a web-based search for relevant articles in this specific area of interest was also conducted. The selected articles were critically reviewed and the data acquired were systematically compiled. PMID:27134420

  10. X-ray computed tomography using curvelet sparse regularization

    SciTech Connect

    Wieczorek, Matthias Vogel, Jakob; Lasser, Tobias; Frikel, Jürgen; Demaret, Laurent; Eggl, Elena; Pfeiffer, Franz; Kopp, Felix; Noël, Peter B.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Reconstruction of x-ray computed tomography (CT) data remains a mathematically challenging problem in medical imaging. Complementing the standard analytical reconstruction methods, sparse regularization is growing in importance, as it allows inclusion of prior knowledge. The paper presents a method for sparse regularization based on the curvelet frame for the application to iterative reconstruction in x-ray computed tomography. Methods: In this work, the authors present an iterative reconstruction approach based on the alternating direction method of multipliers using curvelet sparse regularization. Results: Evaluation of the method is performed on a specifically crafted numerical phantom dataset to highlight the method’s strengths. Additional evaluation is performed on two real datasets from commercial scanners with different noise characteristics, a clinical bone sample acquired in a micro-CT and a human abdomen scanned in a diagnostic CT. The results clearly illustrate that curvelet sparse regularization has characteristic strengths. In particular, it improves the restoration and resolution of highly directional, high contrast features with smooth contrast variations. The authors also compare this approach to the popular technique of total variation and to traditional filtered backprojection. Conclusions: The authors conclude that curvelet sparse regularization is able to improve reconstruction quality by reducing noise while preserving highly directional features.

  11. Forensic imaging of projectiles using cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    von See, Constantin; Bormann, Kai-Hendrik; Schumann, Paul; Goetz, Friedrich; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Rücker, Martin

    2009-09-10

    In patients with gunshot injuries, it is easy to detect a projectile within the body due to the high-density of the object, but artefacts make it difficult to obtain information about the deformation and the exact location of the projectile in surrounding tissues. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a new radiological imaging modality that allows radio-opaque objects to be localised and assessed in three dimensions. The full potential of the use of CBCT in forensic medicine has not yet been explored. In this study, three different modern projectiles were fired into the heads of pig cadavers (n=6) under standardised conditions. Tissue destruction and the location of the projectiles were analysed separately using CBCT and multi-slice computed tomography (MDCT). The projectiles had the same kinetic energy but showed considerable differences in deformation behaviour. Within the study groups, tissue destruction was reproducible. CBCT is less severely affected by metallic artefacts than MDCT. Therefore CBCT is superior in visualising bone destruction in the immediate vicinity of the projectile and projectile deformation, whereas MDCT allows soft tissue to be evaluated in more detail. CBCT is an improved diagnostic tool for the evaluation of gunshot injuries. In particular, it is superior to MDCT in detecting structural hard-tissue damage in the immediate vicinity of high-density metal projectiles and in identifying the precise location of a projectile in the body.

  12. Limited-data computed tomography algorithms for the physical sciences.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, D

    1993-07-10

    Five limited-data computed tomography algorithms are compared. The algorithms used are adapted versions of the algebraic reconstruction technique, the multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique, the Gerchberg-Papoulis algorithm, a spectral extrapolation algorithm descended from that of Harris [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 54, 931-936 (1964)], and an algorithm based on the singular value decomposition technique. These algorithms were used to reconstruct phantom data with realistic levels of noise from a number of different imaging geometries. The phantoms, the imaging geometries, and the noise were chosen to simulate the conditions encountered in typical computed tomography applications in the physical sciences, and the implementations of the algorithms were optimized for these applications. The multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique algorithm gave the best results overall; the algebraic reconstruction technique gave the best results for very smooth objects or very noisy (20-dB signal-to-noise ratio) data. My implementations of both of these algorithms incorporate apriori knowledge of the sign of the object, its extent, and its smoothness. The smoothness of the reconstruction is enforced through the use of an appropriate object model (by use of cubic B-spline basis functions and a number of object coefficients appropriate to the object being reconstructed). The average reconstruction error was 1.7% of the maximum phantom value with the multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique of a phantom with moderate-to-steep gradients by use of data from five viewing angles with a 30-dB signal-to-noise ratio.

  13. Fundamentals of cone beam computed tomography for a prosthodontist.

    PubMed

    John, George Puthenpurayil; Joy, Tatu Elenjickal; Mathew, Justin; Kumar, Vinod R B

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT, also referred to as C-arm computed tomography [CT], cone beam volume CT, or flat panel CT) is a medical imaging technique of X-ray CT where the X-rays are divergent, forming a cone.[1] CBCT systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the maxillofacial region. CBCT is capable of providing sub-millimeter resolution in images of high diagnostic quality, with short scanning times (10-70 s) and radiation dosages reportedly up to 15-100 times lower than those of conventional CT scans. Increasing availability of this technology provides the dental clinician with an imaging modality capable of providing a three-dimensional representation of the maxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion. The aim of this article is to sensitize the Prosthodontist to CBCT technology, provide an overview of currently available maxillofacial CBCT systems and review the specific application of various CBCT display modes to clinical Prosthodontic practice. A MEDLINE search for relevant articles in this specific area of interest was conducted. The selected articles were critically reviewed and the data acquired were systematically compiled.

  14. Applications of cone beam computed tomography for a prosthodontist.

    PubMed

    John, George Puthenpurayil; Joy, Tatu Elenjickal; Mathew, Justin; Kumar, Vinod R B

    2016-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a medical imaging technique of X-ray computed tomography where the X-rays are divergent, forming a cone. CBCT systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the maxillofacial region. The increasing availability of this technology provides the dental clinician with an imaging modality capable of providing a three-dimensional representation of the maxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion. This article is intended to elaborate and enunciate on the various applications and benefits of CBCT, in the realm of maxillofacial prosthodontics, over and beyond its obvious benefits in the rehabilitation of patients with implants. With the onus of meticulous reconstruction of near ideal occlusion resting on the prosthodontist, CBCT provides a unique imaging option, which can be a boon in various aspects of prosthodontic practice - from imaging of the temporomandibular joint for accurate movement simulation, to template assisted maxillofacial reconstruction or even over denture therapy. CBCT could play a crucial role in lessening the burden of a hectic prosthodontic routine for the clinician and critically contribute to accurate and effective treatment for the patient. Apart from the authors' clinical experiences shared here, a web-based search for relevant articles in this specific area of interest was also conducted. The selected articles were critically reviewed and the data acquired were systematically compiled.

  15. Use of cone beam computed tomography in periodontology.

    PubMed

    Acar, Buket; Kamburoğlu, Kıvanç

    2014-05-28

    Diagnosis of periodontal disease mainly depends on clinical signs and symptoms. However, in the case of bone destruction, radiographs are valuable diagnostic tools as an adjunct to the clinical examination. Two dimensional periapical and panoramic radiographs are routinely used for diagnosing periodontal bone levels. In two dimensional imaging, evaluation of bone craters, lamina dura and periodontal bone level is limited by projection geometry and superpositions of adjacent anatomical structures. Those limitations of 2D radiographs can be eliminated by three-dimensional imaging techniques such as computed tomography. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) generates 3D volumetric images and is also commonly used in dentistry. All CBCT units provide axial, coronal and sagittal multi-planar reconstructed images without magnification. Also, panoramic images without distortion and magnification can be generated with curved planar reformation. CBCT displays 3D images that are necessary for the diagnosis of intra bony defects, furcation involvements and buccal/lingual bone destructions. CBCT applications provide obvious benefits in periodontics, however; it should be used only in correct indications considering the necessity and the potential hazards of the examination.

  16. Computed tomography findings of paracoccidiodomycosis in musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    Lima Júnior, Francisco Valtenor Araújo; Savarese, Leonor Garbin; Monsignore, Lucas Moretti; Martinez, Roberto; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate musculoskeletal involvement in paracoccidioidomycosis at computed tomography. Materials and Methods Development of a retrospective study based on a review of radiologic and pathologic reports in the institution database. Patients with histopathologically confirmed musculoskeletal paracoccidioidomycosis and submitted to computed tomography were included in the present study. The imaging findings were consensually described by two radiologists. In order to avoid bias in the analysis, one patient with uncountable bone lesions was excluded from the study. Results A total of seven patients were included in the present study. A total of 18 bone lesions were counted. The study group consisted of 7 patients. A total number of 18 bone lesions were counted. Osteoarticular lesions were the first manifestation of the disease in four patients (57.14%). Bone lesions were multiple in 42.85% of patients. Appendicular and axial skeleton were affected in 85.71% and 42.85% of cases, respectively. Bone involvement was characterized by well-demarcated osteolytic lesions. Marginal osteosclerosis was identified in 72.22% of the lesions, while lamellar periosteal reaction and soft tissue component were present in 5.55% of them. One patient showed multiple small lesions with bone sequestra. Conclusion Paracoccidioidomycosis can be included in the differential diagnosis of either single or multiple osteolytic lesions in young patients even in the absence of a previous diagnosis of pulmonary or visceral paracoccidioidomycosis PMID:25798000

  17. Fundamentals of cone beam computed tomography for a prosthodontist

    PubMed Central

    John, George Puthenpurayil; Joy, Tatu Elenjickal; Mathew, Justin; Kumar, Vinod R. B.

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT, also referred to as C-arm computed tomography [CT], cone beam volume CT, or flat panel CT) is a medical imaging technique of X-ray CT where the X-rays are divergent, forming a cone.[1] CBCT systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the maxillofacial region. CBCT is capable of providing sub-millimeter resolution in images of high diagnostic quality, with short scanning times (10–70 s) and radiation dosages reportedly up to 15–100 times lower than those of conventional CT scans. Increasing availability of this technology provides the dental clinician with an imaging modality capable of providing a three-dimensional representation of the maxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion. The aim of this article is to sensitize the Prosthodontist to CBCT technology, provide an overview of currently available maxillofacial CBCT systems and review the specific application of various CBCT display modes to clinical Prosthodontic practice. A MEDLINE search for relevant articles in this specific area of interest was conducted. The selected articles were critically reviewed and the data acquired were systematically compiled. PMID:26929479

  18. Incidental Findings on Cone Beam Computed Tomography Images

    PubMed Central

    Allareddy, Veeratrishul; Vincent, Steven D.; Hellstein, John W.; Qian, Fang; Smoker, Wendy R. K.; Ruprecht, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Background. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has gained widespread acceptance in dentistry for a variety of applications. Most dentists who are not radiologists/trained in radiology are generally not familiar with interpretation of anatomical structures and/or pathosis outside their area of primary interest, as often this was not within the scope of their training. Objectives. To assess that the number of incidental findings on a CBCT scan is high both within and outside of the primary area of interest, thereby emphasizing the importance of interpretation of all areas visualized on the scan. Materials and Methods. An oral and maxillofacial radiologist reviewed 1000 CBCT scans (382 males and 618 females) for findings both in- and outside the area of interest. Results. Of the 1000 subjects that were reviewed, 943 scans showed findings in the primary regions of interest and/or outside the regions of interest, and 76 different conditions were visualized in these scans both in and outside the areas of interest. Conclusion. From the wide scope of findings noted on these scans, it can be concluded that it is essential that a person trained in advanced interpretation techniques in radiology interprets cone beam computed tomography scans. PMID:23304148

  19. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; Cardia, Patricia Prando; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding.

  20. Radiation doses from computed tomography practice in Johor Bahru, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, M. K. A.; Hashim, S.; Bradley, D. A.; Bakar, K. A.; Haron, M. R.; Kayun, Z.

    2016-04-01

    Radiation doses for Computed Tomography (CT) procedures have been reported, encompassing a total of 376 CT examinations conducted in one oncology centre (Hospital Sultan Ismail) and three diagnostic imaging departments (Hospital Sultanah Aminah, Hospital Permai and Hospital Sultan Ismail) at Johor hospital's. In each case, dose evaluations were supported by data from patient questionnaires. Each CT examination and radiation doses were verified using the CT EXPO (Ver. 2.3.1, Germany) simulation software. Results are presented in terms of the weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw), dose length product (DLP) and effective dose (E). The mean values of CTDIw, DLP and E were ranged between 7.6±0.1 to 64.8±16.5 mGy, 170.2±79.2 to 943.3±202.3 mGy cm and 1.6±0.7 to 11.2±6.5 mSv, respectively. Optimization techniques in CT are suggested to remain necessary, with well-trained radiology personnel remaining at the forefront of such efforts.

  1. Computed tomography of air pollutants in street canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Driscoll, Stephen; Murphy, John G.; Smith, Niall J.

    2003-03-01

    We present the results of preliminary research investigating the generation of two-dimensional pollutant gas concentration maps of street canyons. This research uses computed tomography (CT) to reconstruct the spatial distribution of gas concentrations from path-integral data obtained using differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). This work represents a novel application of these two techniques and is aimed at the validation of theoretical gas distribution models in selected urban settings. The derived results are based on model data and investigate the viability of constrained geometry sensing networks and the accuracy of current computed tomography algorithms. We also present results on the use of an evolutionary algorithm applied to pollutant reconstruction in an open area as part of initial investigations into its applicability to street canyon pollutant reconstruction. Future work will include the reconstruction of gas distributions in a real urban setting with the long-term goal of a system that is capable of performing this task in near real-time allowing the visualisation of short to medium time scale spatial dynamics.

  2. Proton Computed Tomography: iterative image reconstruction and dose evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civinini, C.; Bonanno, D.; Brianzi, M.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Maccioni, G.; Pallotta, S.; Randazzo, N.; Scaringella, M.; Romano, F.; Sipala, V.; Talamonti, C.; Vanzi, E.; Bruzzi, M.

    2017-01-01

    Proton Computed Tomography (pCT) is a medical imaging method with a potential for increasing accuracy of treatment planning and patient positioning in hadron therapy. A pCT system based on a Silicon microstrip tracker and a YAG:Ce crystal calorimeter has been developed within the INFN Prima-RDH collaboration. The prototype has been tested with a 175 MeV proton beam at The Svedberg Laboratory (Uppsala, Sweden) with the aim to reconstruct and characterize a tomographic image. Algebraic iterative reconstruction methods (ART), together with the most likely path formalism, have been used to obtain tomographies of an inhomogeneous phantom to eventually extract density and spatial resolutions. These results will be presented and discussed together with an estimation of the average dose delivered to the phantom and the dependence of the image quality on the dose. Due to the heavy computation load required by the algebraic algorithms the reconstruction programs have been implemented to fully exploit the high calculation parallelism of Graphics Processing Units. An extended field of view pCT system is in an advanced construction stage. This apparatus will be able to reconstruct objects of the size of a human head making possible to characterize this pCT approach in a pre-clinical environment.

  3. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding*

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; Cardia, Patricia Prando; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26811556

  4. Simulation of computed tomography dose based on voxel phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunyu; Lv, Xiangbo; Li, Zhaojun

    2017-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is one of the preferred and the most valuable imaging tool used in diagnostic radiology, which provides a high-quality cross-sectional image of the body. It still causes higher doses of radiation to patients comparing to the other radiological procedures. The Monte-Carlo method is appropriate for estimation of the radiation dose during the CT examinations. The simulation of the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) phantom was developed in this paper. Under a similar conditions used in physical measurements, dose profiles were calculated and compared against the measured values that were reported. The results demonstrate a good agreement between the calculated and the measured doses. From different CT exam simulations using the voxel phantom, the highest absorbed dose was recorded for the lung, the brain, the bone surface. A comparison between the different scan type shows that the effective dose for a chest scan is the highest one, whereas the effective dose values during abdomen and pelvis scan are very close, respectively. The lowest effective dose resulted from the head scan. Although, the dose in CT is related to various parameters, such as the tube current, exposure time, beam energy, slice thickness and patient size, this study demonstrates that the MC simulation is a useful tool to accurately estimate the dose delivered to any specific organs for patients undergoing the CT exams and can be also a valuable technique for the design and the optimization of the CT x-ray source.

  5. Computed tomography of nonanesthetized cats with upper airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Krystina; O'Brien, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Upper airway obstruction is a potentially life-threatening problem in cats and for which a noninvasive, sensitive method rapid diagnosis is needed. The purposes of this prospective study were to describe a computed tomography (CT) technique for nonanesthetized cats with upper airway obstruction, CT characteristics of obstructive diseases, and comparisons between CT findings and findings from other diagnostic tests. Ten cats with clinical signs of upper airway obstruction were recruited for the study. Four cats with no clinical signs of upper airway obstruction were recruited as controls. All cats underwent computed tomography imaging without sedation or anesthesia, using a 16-slice helical CT scanner and a previously described transparent positional device. Three-dimensional (3D) internal volume rendering was performed on all CT image sets and 3D external volume rendering was also performed on cats with evidence of mass lesions. Confirmation of upper airway obstruction was based on visual laryngeal examination, endoscopy, fine-needle aspirate, biopsy, or necropsy. Seven cats were diagnosed with intramural upper airway masses, two with laryngotracheitis, and one with laryngeal paralysis. The CT and 3D volume-rendered images identified lesions consistent with upper airway disease in all cats. In cats with mass lesions, CT accurately identified the mass and location. Findings from this study supported the use of CT imaging as an effective technique for diagnosing upper airway obstruction in nonanesthetized cats.

  6. Estimation of feline renal volume using computed tomography and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Reid; Logsdon, Stacy A; Werre, Stephen R; Daniel, Gregory B

    2013-01-01

    Renal volume estimation is an important parameter for clinical evaluation of kidneys and research applications. A time efficient, repeatable, and accurate method for volume estimation is required. The purpose of this study was to describe the accuracy of ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) for estimating feline renal volume. Standardized ultrasound and CT scans were acquired for kidneys of 12 cadaver cats, in situ. Ultrasound and CT multiplanar reconstructions were used to record renal length measurements that were then used to calculate volume using the prolate ellipsoid formula for volume estimation. In addition, CT studies were reconstructed at 1 mm, 5 mm, and 1 cm, and transferred to a workstation where the renal volume was calculated using the voxel count method (hand drawn regions of interest). The reference standard kidney volume was then determined ex vivo using water displacement with the Archimedes' principle. Ultrasound measurement of renal length accounted for approximately 87% of the variability in renal volume for the study population. The prolate ellipsoid formula exhibited proportional bias and underestimated renal volume by a median of 18.9%. Computed tomography volume estimates using the voxel count method with hand-traced regions of interest provided the most accurate results, with increasing accuracy for smaller voxel sizes in grossly normal kidneys (-10.1 to 0.6%). Findings from this study supported the use of CT and the voxel count method for estimating feline renal volume in future clinical and research studies.

  7. Can Dental Cone Beam Computed Tomography Assess Bone Mineral Density?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mineral density distribution of bone tissue is altered by active bone modeling and remodeling due to bone complications including bone disease and implantation surgery. Clinical cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been examined whether it can assess oral bone mineral density (BMD) in patient. It has been indicated that CBCT has disadvantages of higher noise and lower contrast than conventional medical computed tomography (CT) systems. On the other hand, it has advantages of a relatively lower cost and radiation dose but higher spatial resolution. However, the reliability of CBCT based mineral density measurement has not yet been fully validated. Thus, the objectives of this review are to discuss 1) why assessment of BMD distribution is important and 2) whether the clinical CBCT can be used as a potential tool to measure the BMD. Brief descriptions of image artefacts associated with assessment of gray value, which has been used to account for mineral density, in CBCT images are provided. Techniques to correct local and conversion errors in obtaining the gray values in CBCT images are also introduced. This review can be used as a quick reference for users who may encounter these errors during analysis of CBCT images. PMID:25006568

  8. Temporomandibular joint computed tomography: development of a direct sagittal technique

    SciTech Connect

    van der Kuijl, B.; Vencken, L.M.; de Bont, L.G.; Boering, G. )

    1990-12-01

    Radiology plays an important role in the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders. Different techniques are used with computed tomography offering simultaneous imaging of bone and soft tissues. It is therefore suited for visualization of the articular disk and may be used in patients with suspected internal derangements and other disorders of the temporomandibular joint. Previous research suggests advantages to direct sagittal scanning, which requires special positioning of the patient and a sophisticated scanning technique. This study describes the development of a new technique of direct sagittal computed tomographic imaging of the temporomandibular joint using a specially designed patient table and internal light visor positioning. No structures other than the patient's head are involved in the imaging process, and misleading artifacts from the arm or the shoulder are eliminated. The use of the scanogram allows precise correction of the condylar axis and selection of exact slice level.

  9. Deformable registration of 4D computed tomography data.

    PubMed

    Rietzel, Eike; Chen, George T Y

    2006-11-01

    Four-dimensional radiotherapy requires deformable registration to track delivered dose across varying anatomical states. Deformable registration based on B-splines was implemented to register 4D computed tomography data to a reference respiratory phase. To assess registration performance, anatomical landmarks were selected across ten respiratory phases in five patients. These point landmarks were transformed according to global registration parameters between different respiratory phases. Registration uncertainties were computed by subtraction of transformed and reference landmark positions. The selection of appropriate registration masks to separate independently moving anatomical subunits is crucial to registration performance. The average registration error for five landmarks for each of five patients was 2.1 mm. This level of accuracy is acceptable for most radiotherapy applications.

  10. Three-dimensional surface reconstruction for industrial computed tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannier, M. W.; Knapp, R. H.; Gayou, D. E.; Sammon, N. P.; Butterfield, R. L.; Larson, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Modern high resolution medical computed tomography (CT) scanners can produce geometrically accurate sectional images of many types of industrial objects. Computer software has been developed to convert serial CT scans into a three-dimensional surface form, suitable for display on the scanner itself. This software, originally developed for imaging the skull, has been adapted for application to industrial CT scanning, where serial CT scans thrrough an object of interest may be reconstructed to demonstrate spatial relationships in three dimensions that cannot be easily understood using the original slices. The methods of three-dimensional reconstruction and solid modeling are reviewed, and reconstruction in three dimensions from CT scans through familiar objects is demonstrated.

  11. Relationship between previous training and experience and results of the certification examination in cardiovascular computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Allen J; Patrick, Jonathan; Abbara, Suhny; Berman, Daniel S; Halliburton, Sandra S; Hines, Jerome L; Hodgson, John McB; Lesser, John R; Wann, L Samuel; Williams, Kim A; Ziffer, Jack A; Lennon, Lorraine J; Edgerton, Dawn M; Cerqueira, Manuel D

    2010-09-01

    Examinees of the first Certifying Examination in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography were surveyed regarding their training and experience in cardiac computed tomography. The results support the current training pathways within the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association competency criteria that include either experience-based or formal training program in cardiovascular computed tomography. Increased duration in clinical practice, the number of scans clinically interpreted in practice, and level 3 competency were associated with higher passing rates.

  12. Breast ultrasound computed tomography using waveform inversion with source encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Matthews, Thomas; Anis, Fatima; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) holds great promise for improving the detection and management of breast cancer. Because they are based on the acoustic wave equation, waveform inversion-based reconstruction methods can produce images that possess improved spatial resolution properties over those produced by ray-based methods. However, waveform inversion methods are computationally demanding and have not been applied widely in USCT breast imaging. In this work, source encoding concepts are employed to develop an accelerated USCT reconstruction method that circumvents the large computational burden of conventional waveform inversion methods. This method, referred to as the waveform inversion with source encoding (WISE) method, encodes the measurement data using a random encoding vector and determines an estimate of the speed-of-sound distribution by solving a stochastic optimization problem by use of a stochastic gradient descent algorithm. Computer-simulation studies are conducted to demonstrate the use of the WISE method. Using a single graphics processing unit card, each iteration can be completed within 25 seconds for a 128 × 128 mm2 reconstruction region. The results suggest that the WISE method maintains the high spatial resolution of waveform inversion methods while significantly reducing the computational burden.

  13. Evaluation of external beam hardening filters on image quality of computed tomography and single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Rana, Nivedita; Rawat, Dinesh; Parmar, Madan; Dhawan, Devinder Kumar; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of external metal filters on the image quality of computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT images. Images of Jaszack phantom filled with water and containing iodine contrast filled syringes were acquired using CT (120 kV, 2.5 mA) component of SPECT/CT system, ensuring fixation of filter on X-ray collimator. Different thickness of filters of Al and Cu (1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm, and 4 mm) and filter combinations Cu 1 mm, Cu 2 mm, Cu 3 mm each in combination with Al (1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm, and 4 mm), respectively, were used. All image sets were visually analyzed for streak artifacts and contrast to noise ratio (CNR) was derived. Similar acquisition was done using Philips CT quality control (QC) phantom and CNR were calculated for its lexan, perspex, and teflon inserts. Attenuation corrected SPECT/CT images of Jaszack phantom filled with 444-555 MBq (12-15 mCi) of (99m)Tc were obtained by applying attenuation correction map generated by hardened X-ray beam for different filter combination, on SPECT data. Uniformity, root mean square (rms) and contrast were calculated in all image sets. Less streak artifacts at iodine water interface were observed in images acquired using external filters as compared to those without a filter. CNR for syringes, spheres, and inserts of Philips CT QC phantom was almost similar to Al 2 mm, Al 3 mm, and without the use of filters. CNR decreased with increasing copper thickness and other filter combinations. Uniformity and rms were lower, and value of contrast was higher for SPECT/CT images when CT was acquired with Al 2 mm and 3 mm filter than for images acquired without a filter. The study suggests that for Infinia Hawkeye 4, SPECT/CT system, Al 2 mm, and 3 mm are the optimum filters for improving image quality of SPECT/CT images of Jaszack or Philips CT QC phantom keeping other parameters of CT constant.

  14. Complementary roles of brain scintigraphy and computed tomography in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.J.; Brown, J.M.; Waller, S.F.; Lundy, M.M.; Brown, T.J.

    1983-12-01

    Cerebral computed tomography, with and without iodinated contrast, revealed the appearance and evolution of lesions in a 32-year-old man with multiple sclerosis. Two areas were enhanced with contrast, with one showing a mild mass effect and rim of enhancement. Serial brain scintigraphy using technetium-/sub 99m/ glucoheptonate, following the computed tomography, showed the appearance and regression of corresponding regions of increased uptake. Computed tomography one day prior to brain scintigraphy failed to demonstrate a region of increased accumulation of radiotracer. One week later, however, evidence of a corresponding unenhanced defect was noted on computed tomography. Clinical correlation is given additionally.

  15. Is there a role for the use of volumetric cone beam computed tomography in periodontics?

    PubMed

    du Bois, A H; Kardachi, B; Bartold, P M

    2012-03-01

    Volumetric computed cone beam tomography offers a number of significant advantages over conventional intraoral and extraoral panoramic radiography, as well as computed tomography. To date, periodontal diagnosis has relied heavily on the assessment of both intraoral radiographs and extraoral panoramic radiographs. With emerging technology in radiology there has been considerable interest in the role that volumetric cone beam computed tomography might play in periodontal diagnostics. This narrative reviews the current evidence and considers whether there is a role for volumetric cone beam computed tomography in periodontics.

  16. Diagnosis of simulated condylar bone defects using panoramic radiography, spiral tomography and cone-beam computed tomography: A comparison study

    PubMed Central

    Salemi, Fatemeh; Shokri, Abbas; Baharvand, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Radiographic examination is one of the most important parts of the clinical assessment routine for temporomandibular disorders. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography(CBCT) with panoramic radiography and spiral computed tomography for the detection of the simulated mandibular condyle bone lesions. Study Design: The sample consisted of 10 TMJs from 5 dried human skulls. Simulated erosive and osteophytic lesions were created in 3 different sizes using round diamond bur and bone chips, respectively. Panoramic radiography, spiral tomography and cone-beam computed tomography were used in defect detection. Data were statistically analyzed with the Mann-Whitney test. The reliability and degrees of agreement between two observers were also determined by the mean of Cohen’s Kappa analysis. Results: CBCT had a statistically significant superiority than other studied techniques in detection of both erosive and osteophytic lesions with different sizes. There were significant differences between tomography and panoramic in correct detection of both erosive and osteophytic lesions with 1mm and 1.5 mm in size. However, there were no significant differences between Tomography and Panoramic in correct detection of both erosive and osteophytic lesions with 0.5 mm in size. Conclusions: CBCT images provide a greater diagnostic accuracy than spiral tomography and panoramic radiography in the detection of condylar bone erosions and osteophytes. Key words:Bone defect, Condyle, CBCT, Panoramic, radiography. PMID:25810839

  17. Evaluation of dosimetry and image of very low-dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric positron emission tomography/computed tomography: phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahn, Y. K.; Park, H. H.; Lee, C. H.; Kim, H. S.; Lyu, K. Y.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.; Cho, J. H.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, phantom was used to evaluate attenuation correction computed tomography (CT) dose and image in case of pediatric positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan. Three PET/CT scanners were used along with acryl phantom in the size for infant and ion-chamber dosimeter. The CT image acquisition conditions were changed from 10 to 20, 40, 80, 100 and 160 mA and from 80 to 100, 120 and 140 kVp, which aimed at evaluating penetrate dose and computed tomography dose indexvolume (CTDIvol) value. And NEMA PET Phantom™ was used to obtain PET image under the same CT conditions in order to evaluate each attenuation-corrected PET image based on standard uptake value (SUV) value and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In general, the penetrate dose was reduced by around 92% under the minimum CT conditions (80 kVp and 10 mA) with the decrease in CTDIvol value by around 88%, compared with the pediatric abdomen CT conditions (100 kVp and 100 mA). The PET image with its attenuation corrected according to each CT condition showed no change in SUV value and no influence on the SNR. In conclusion, if the minimum dose CT that is properly applied to body of pediatric patient is corrected for attenuation to ensure that the effective dose is reduced by around 90% or more compared with that for adult patient, this will be useful to reduce radiation exposure level.

  18. Radiolabeling, whole-body single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography imaging, and pharmacokinetics of carbon nanohorns in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Minfang; Jasim, Dhifaf A; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Nunes, Antonio; Iijima, Sumio; Bianco, Alberto; Yudasaka, Masako; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report that the biodistribution and excretion of carbon nanohorns (CNHs) in mice are dependent on their size and functionalization. Small-sized CNHs (30–50 nm; S-CNHs) and large-sized CNHs (80–100 nm; L-CNHs) were chemically functionalized and radiolabeled with [111In]-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and intravenously injected into mice. Their tissue distribution profiles at different time points were determined by single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography. The results showed that the S-CNHs circulated longer in blood, while the L-CNHs accumulated faster in major organs like the liver and spleen. Small amounts of S-CNHs- and L-CNHs were excreted in urine within the first few hours postinjection, followed by excretion of smaller quantities within the next 48 hours in both urine and feces. The kinetics of excretion for S-CNHs were more rapid than for L-CNHs. Both S-CNH and L-CNH material accumulated mainly in the liver and spleen; however, S-CNH accumulation in the spleen was more prominent than in the liver. PMID:27524892

  19. Nondestructive assay using active and passive computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, G. P. ,LLNL

    1998-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has over 600,000 transuranic (TRU) waste drums temporarily stored at nearly 40 sites within the United States. Contents of these drums must be characterized before they are transported for permanent disposal. Traditional gamma-ray methods used to characterize nuclear waste introduce errors that are related to nonuniform measurement responses associated with unknown radioactive source and matrix material distributions. These errors can be reduced by application of tomographic techniques, that measure these distributions. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed two tomographic-based waste assay systems. They use external radioactive sources and tomography-protocol to map the attenuation within a waste drum as a function of mono-energetic gamma-ray energy in waste containers. Passive tomography is used to localize and identify specific radioactive waste contents within the same waste containers. Reconstruction of the passive data via the active images allows internal waste radioactivities in a drum to be corrected for any overlying heterogeneous materials, thus yielding an absolute assay of the waste radioactivities. Calibration of both systems requires only point source measurements and are independent of matrix materials. The first system is housed at LLNL and was developed to study and validate research concepts. The second system is being developed with Bioimaging Research, Inc. (BIR) and is housed within a mobile waste characterization trailer. This system has traveled to three DOE facilities to demonstrate the active and passive computed tomography capability. Both systems have participated in and successfully passed the requirements of formal DOE-sponsored intercomparison studies. The systems have measured approximately 1 to 100 grains of plutonium within a variety of waste matrix materials. Laboratory and field results from these two systems over the past several years show that both systems

  20. Clinical applications of positron emission tomography/computed tomography treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Macapinlac, Homer A

    2008-03-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has provided an incremental dimension to the management of cancer patients by allowing the incorporation of important molecular images in radiotherapy treatment planning, ie, direct evaluation of tumor metabolism, cell proliferation, apoptosis, hypoxia, and angiogenesis. The CT component allows 4D imaging techniques, allowing improvements in the accuracy of treatment delivery by compensating for tumor/normal organ motion, improving PET quantification, and correcting PET and CT image misregistration. The combination of PET and CT in a single imaging system to obtain a fused anatomical and functional image data is now emerging as a promising tool in radiotherapy departments for improved delineation of tumor volumes and optimization of treatment plans. PET has the potential to improve radiotherapy planning by minimizing unnecessary irradiation of normal tissues and by reducing the risk of geographic miss. PET influences treatment planning in a high proportion of cases and therefore radiotherapy dose escalation without PET may be futile. This article examines the increasing role of hybrid PET/CT imaging techniques in process of improving treatment planning in oncology with emphasis on non small cell lung cancer.

  1. Overview of positron emission tomography chemistry: clinical and technical considerations and combination with computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Koukourakis, G; Maravelis, G; Koukouraki, S; Padelakos, P; Kouloulias, V

    2009-01-01

    The concept of emission and transmission tomography was introduced by David Kuhl and Roy Edwards in the late 1950s. Their work later led to the design and construction of several tomographic instruments at the University of Pennsylvania. Tomographic imaging techniques were further developed by Michel Ter-Pogossian, Michael E. Phelps and others at the Washington University School of Medicine. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine imaging technique which produces a 3-dimensional image or map of functional processes in the body. The system detects pairs of gamma rays emitted indirectly by a positron-emitting radionuclide (tracer), which is introduced into the body on a biologically active molecule. Images of tracer concentration in 3-dimensional space within the body are then reconstructed by computer analysis. In modern scanners, this reconstruction is often accomplished with the aid of a CT X-ray scan performed on the patient during the same session, in the same machine. If the biologically active molecule chosen for PET is 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), an analogue of glucose, the concentrations of tracer imaged give tissue metabolic activity in terms of regional glucose uptake. Although use of this tracer results in the most common type of PET scan, other tracer molecules are used in PET to image the tissue concentration of many other types of molecules of interest. The main role of this article was to analyse the available types of radiopharmaceuticals used in PET-CT along with the principles of its clinical and technical considerations.

  2. Quantifying the debonding of inclusions through tomography and computational homology.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Johnson, George C.; Mota, Alejandro; Foulk, James W., III; Jin, Huiqing

    2010-09-01

    This report describes a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to use of synchrotron-radiation computed tomography (SRCT) data to determine the conditions and mechanisms that lead to void nucleation in rolled alloys. The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has provided SRCT data of a few specimens of 7075-T7351 aluminum plate (widely used for aerospace applications) stretched to failure, loaded in directions perpendicular and parallel to the rolling direction. The resolution of SRCT data is 900nm, which allows elucidation of the mechanisms governing void growth and coalescence. This resolution is not fine enough, however, for nucleation. We propose the use statistics and image processing techniques to obtain sub-resolution scale information from these data, and thus determine where in the specimen and when during the loading program nucleation occurs and the mechanisms that lead to it. Quantitative analysis of the tomography data, however, leads to the conclusion that the reconstruction process compromises the information obtained from the scans. Alternate, more powerful reconstruction algorithms are needed to address this problem, but those fall beyond the scope of this project.

  3. Simulation of emission tomography using grid middleware for distributed computing.

    PubMed

    Thomason, M G; Longton, R F; Gregor, J; Smith, G T; Hutson, R K

    2004-09-01

    SimSET is Monte Carlo simulation software for emission tomography. This paper describes a simple but effective scheme for parallel execution of SimSET using NetSolve, a client-server system for distributed computation. NetSolve (version 1.4.1) is "grid middleware" which enables a user (the client) to run specific computations remotely and simultaneously on a grid of networked computers (the servers). Since the servers do not have to be identical machines, computation may take place in a heterogeneous environment. To take advantage of diversity in machines and their workloads, a client-side scheduler was implemented for the Monte Carlo simulation. The scheduler partitions the total decay events by taking into account the inherent compute-speeds and recent average workloads, i.e., the scheduler assigns more decay events to processors expected to give faster service and fewer decay events to those expected to give slower service. When compute-speeds and sustained workloads are taken into account, the speed-up is essentially linear in the number of equivalent "maximum-service" processors. One modification in the SimSET code (version 2.6.2.3) was made to ensure that the total number of decay events specified by the user is maintained in the distributed simulation. No other modifications in the standard SimSET code were made. Each processor runs complete SimSET code for its assignment of decay events, independently of others running simultaneously. Empirical results are reported for simulation of a clinical-quality lung perfusion study.

  4. Quantifying Void Ratio Variation in Sand using Computed Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alshibli, Khalid A.; Batiste, Susan N.; Swanson, Roy A.; Sture, Stein; Costes, Nicholas C.; Lankton, Mark R.

    1999-01-01

    A series of displacement-controlled, conventional, drained axisymmetric (triaxial) experiments were conducted on dry Ottawa sand specimens at very low effective confining stresses in a microgravity environment aboard the Space Shuttle during the NASA STS-89 mission. Post-flight analysis included studying the internal fabric and failure patterns of these specimens using Computed Tomography (CT). The CT scans of three specimens subjected to different compression levels (uncompressed specimen, a specimen compressed to 3.3% nominal axial strain (epsilon(sub a)), and a specimen compressed to 25% epsilon(sub a)) are presented to investigate the evolution of instability patterns and to quantify void ratio variation. The progress of failure is described and discussed. Also, specimens' densities were calibrated using standard ASTM procedures and void ratio spatial variation was calculated and represented by contour maps and histograms. The CT technique demonstrated good ability to detect specimen inhomogeneities, localization patterns, and quantifying void ratio variation within sand specimens.

  5. High-resolution computed tomography of the normal larynx

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, P.M.; Korobkin, M.

    1983-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) provides a unique method of evaluating abnormalities of the larynx by virture of its cross-sectional images. Several reports have demonstrated its utility in staging laryngeal carcinoma and defining the extent of injury in cases of laryngeal trauma. In order to appreciate subtle abnormalities of the larynx, a thorough understanding of the normal structures in this small anatomic area is crucial. Although previous studies have defined the normal CT anatomy of the larynx, many of the CT-anatomic correlations of the normal larynx used earlier-generation CT scanners with relatively poor resolution or were limited to transaxial images. High-resolution transaxial, coronal, and sagittal CT in vivo images are correlated with line drawings displaying normal laryngeal anatomy. The exquisite anatomic detail apparent in these images provides a sound basis for understanding subtle abnormalities in pathologic cases. (JMT)

  6. Dose reduction with adaptive bolus chasing computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhijun; Bai, Er-Wei; Wang, Ge; Sharafuddin, Melhem J; Abada, Hicham T

    2010-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) has become an effective diagnosis and evaluating tool in clinical; however, its radiation exposure has drawn great attention as more and more CT scans are performed every year. How to reduce the radiation dose and meanwhile keep the resultant CT images diagnosable becomes an important research topic. In this paper, we propose a dose reduction approach along with the adaptive bolus chasing CT Angiography (CTA) techniques, which are capable of tracking the contrast bolus peak over all the blood vessel segments during the CTA scan. By modulating the tube current (and collimator width) online, we can reduce the total radiation dose and maintain the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of the blood vessel. Numerical experiments on reference DSA data sets show that by using the proposed dose reduction method, the effective radiation dose can be saved about 39%.

  7. Inspection of a Medieval Wood Sculpture Using Computer Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitany, K.; Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.

    2016-06-01

    Computer tomography (CT) is an excellent technique for obtaining accurate 3D information about the human body. It allows to visualize the organs, bones and blood vessels, furthermore it enables to diagnose anomalies and diseases. Its spatial reconstruction capability supports other interesting applications, such as inspecting different, even valuable objects like ancient sculptures. Current paper presents a methodology of evaluating CT and video imagery through the example of investigating a wood Madonna with infant Jesus sculpture from the 14th century. The developed techniques extract the outer boundary of the statue, which has been triangulated to derive the surface model. The interior of the sculpture has also been revealed: the iron bolts and rivets as well as the woodworm holes can be mapped. By merging the interior and outer data (geometry and texture) interesting visualizations (perspective views, sections etc.) have been created.

  8. Hematologic neoplasms: interpreting lung findings in chest computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Calvillo Batllés, P; Carreres Polo, J; Sanz Caballer, J; Salavert Lletí, M; Compte Torrero, L

    2015-01-01

    Lung disease is very common in patients with hematologic neoplasms and varies in function of the underlying disease and its treatment. Lung involvement is associated with high morbidity and mortality, so it requires early appropriate treatment. Chest computed tomography (CT) and the analysis of biologic specimens are the first line diagnostic tools in these patients, and sometimes invasive methods are necessary. Interpreting the images requires an analysis of the clinical context, which is often complex. Starting from the knowledge about the differential diagnosis of lung findings that radiologists acquire during training, this article aims to explain the key clinical and radiological aspects that make it possible to orient the diagnosis correctly and to understand the current role of CT in the treatment strategy for this group of patients.

  9. An easily assembled laboratory exercise in computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylott, Elliot; Klepetka, Ryan; Dunlap, Justin C.; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we present a laboratory activity in computed tomography (CT) primarily composed of a photogate and a rotary motion sensor that can be assembled quickly and partially automates data collection and analysis. We use an enclosure made with a light filter that is largely opaque in the visible spectrum but mostly transparent to the near IR light of the photogate (880 nm) to scan objects hidden from the human eye. This experiment effectively conveys how an image is formed during a CT scan and highlights the important physical and imaging concepts behind CT such as electromagnetic radiation, the interaction of light and matter, artefacts and windowing. Like our setup, previous undergraduate level laboratory activities which teach the basics of CT have also utilized light sources rather than x-rays; however, they required a more extensive setup and used devices not always easily found in undergraduate laboratories. Our setup is easily implemented with equipment found in many teaching laboratories.

  10. Multidetector computed tomography findings in deaths with severe burns.

    PubMed

    Levy, Angela D; Harcke, Howard T; Getz, John M; Mallak, Craig T

    2009-06-01

    This study compared autopsy with postmortem multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings in charred remains. Seventeen consecutive male subjects (mean age, 29.4 years) who perished in a fire-related event resulting in charred remains underwent total body MDCT immediately prior to routine autopsy that included serum carboxyhemoglobin measurement. MDCT showed all thermal tissue changes (skin and subcutaneous fat loss, skeletal muscle retraction, pugilistic attitude, cortical fractures, bone and organ destruction, thermal epidural hematoma, and thermal amputation) and established all fracture patterns that were lethal, but autopsy added the fire as a contributory cause of death when there was carboxyhemoglobin elevation. MDCT had limited value in determination of lethal vascular and visceral injuries. MDCT is an effective complement to autopsy in the setting of charred remains and may serve to augment a limited autopsy. This may be particularly useful in mass casualty scenarios.

  11. Dose Reduction with Adaptive Bolus Chasing Computed Tomography Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhijun; Bai, Er-Wei; Wang, Ge; Sharafuddin, Melhem J.; Abada, Hicham T.

    2010-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) has become an effective diagnosis and evaluating tool in clinical; however, its radiation exposure has drawn great attention as more and more CT scans are performed every year. How to reduce the radiation dose and meanwhile keep the resultant CT images diagnosable becomes an important research topic. In this paper, we propose a dose reduction approach along with the adaptive bolus chasing CT Angiography (CTA) techniques, which are capable of tracking the contrast bolus peak over all the blood vessel segments during the CTA scan. By modulating the tube current (and collimator width) online, we can reduce the total radiation dose and maintain the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of the blood vessel. Numerical experiments on reference DSA data sets show that by using the proposed dose reduction method, the effective radiation dose can be saved about 39%. PMID:20421701

  12. Evaluation of thymic volume by postmortem computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Abe, Shuntaro; Hasegawa, Iwao; Vogel, Hermann; Heinemann, Axel; Suzuki, Koichi; Püschel, Klaus

    2015-07-01

    The thymus is exceedingly sensitive to stress and undergoes abrupt involution as a result of exposure to strong stress in early childhood. Therefore, thymic involution is often utilized to assess the presence of a stressful environment, such as an environment involving child abuse, in forensic medicine. In recent years, computed tomography (CT) has been commonly used in the daily practice of forensic medicine. We have focused on the thymic volume in postmortem CT images to evaluate the presence of a stressful antemortem environment. We calculated the thymus volume from postmortem CT images of children under six years old and demonstrated that the volume showed a positive correlation with the real weight obtained from an autopsy. The evaluation of thymic volume by CT may make it possible for us to identify child maltreatment. The most useful feature of this application of CT is to be able to demonstrate thymic involution less invasively in a surviving victim.

  13. Visual claudicatio: diagnosis with 64-slice computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Cademartiri, Filippo; Maffei, Erica; Palumbo, Alessandro; Mollet, Nico R; van der Lugt, Aad; Crisi, Girolamo

    2007-06-01

    We present a case of a 78-year-old male referred presented to our institution with amaurosis fugax after walking 20 steps ("visual claudicatio"). Duplex ultrasound was not able to visualize the carotid arteries. Multislice computed tomography (Sensation 64 Cardiac, Siemens, Germany) of the cerebro-vascular circulation was performed from its origin at the level of the aortic arch to the circle of Willis. The investigation demonstrated a complete occlusion of both common carotid arteries at their origin and a severe origo stenosis of both vertebral arteries. An important collateral circulation of the vertebral arteries through the minor vessels of the neck was also displayed. Both comunicans posterior arteries were small but patent. The intra-cranial arteries were patent. Multislice CT of the cerebro-vascular circulation is an optimal tool for a comprehensive evaluation when duplex ultrasound fails.

  14. Noninvasive photoacoustic computed tomography of mouse brain metabolism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Xia, Jun; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging mouse brain metabolism using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a fast, noninvasive and functional imaging modality with optical contrast and acoustic resolution. Brain responses to forepaw stimulations were imaged transdermally and transcranially. 2-NBDG, which diffuses well across the blood-brain-barrier, provided exogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of glucose response. Concurrently, hemoglobin provided endogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of hemodynamic response. Glucose and hemodynamic responses were quantitatively decoupled by using two-wavelength measurements. We found that glucose uptake and blood perfusion around the somatosensory region of the contralateral hemisphere were both increased by stimulations, indicating elevated neuron activity. While the glucose response area was more homogenous and confined within the somatosensory region, the hemodynamic response area had a clear vascular pattern and spread wider than the somatosensory region. Our results demonstrate that 2-NBDG-enhanced PACT is a promising tool for noninvasive studies of brain metabolism. PMID:22940116

  15. Automatic computed tomography patient dose calculation using DICOM header metadata.

    PubMed

    Jahnen, A; Kohler, S; Hermen, J; Tack, D; Back, C

    2011-09-01

    The present work describes a method that calculates the patient dose values in computed tomography (CT) based on metadata contained in DICOM images in support of patient dose studies. The DICOM metadata is preprocessed to extract necessary calculation parameters. Vendor-specific DICOM header information is harmonized using vendor translation tables and unavailable DICOM tags can be completed with a graphical user interface. CT-Expo, an MS Excel application for calculating the radiation dose, is used to calculate the patient doses. All relevant data and calculation results are stored for further analysis in a relational database. Final results are compiled by utilizing data mining tools. This solution was successfully used for the 2009 CT dose study in Luxembourg. National diagnostic reference levels for standard examinations were calculated based on each of the countries' hospitals. The benefits using this new automatic system saved time as well as resources during the data acquisition and the evaluation when compared with earlier questionnaire-based surveys.

  16. Software innovations in computed tomography for structural heart disease interventions.

    PubMed

    Hell, Michaela; Marwan, Mohamed; Gaede, Luise; Achenbach, Stephan

    2016-05-17

    Computed tomography (CT) provides high, isotropic spatial resolution and has become firmly established in pre-procedural imaging for structural heart disease interventions. It allows determination of the exact dimensions of the target structure, provides information regarding the access route and permits identification of fluoroscopic projection angles to provide optimal visualisation for device placement. Several software solutions are available and have been systematically evaluated in the context of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The use of software products to perform automated measurements can be useful, especially when the experience and expertise regarding evaluation of CT in the context of structural heart disease are limited. In scientific studies, software has been demonstrated to provide accurate support for annulus sizing and prosthesis selection, to aid in reliably identifying patients in whom a transfemoral access may be problematic, and to suggest suitable angulations for fluoroscopic imaging to achieve an orthogonal view onto the aortic valve during implantation.

  17. Computed tomography of mesenteric involvement in fulminant pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffery, R.B.; Federle, M.P.; Laing, F.C.

    1983-04-01

    Although extension into the mesentery has been recognized as a frequent pathway of extrapancreatic spread in acute pancreatitis, it has received relatively little attention in the computed tomography (CT) literature. The medical records and CT scans of 55 patients with severe pancreatitis were reviewed in this study; of these patients, 19 (35%) had mesenteric abnormalities, which in 11 patients (20%) represented the most extensive extrapancreatic site of the most extensive extrapancreatic site of involvement. In fulminant pancreatitis, dissection along the mesentery is an important pathway for spread of pancreatic abscesses or phlegmons. Clinical correlation suggests that a combination of mesenteric with lesser sac and anterior pararenal space involvement is frequently associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Of the 19 patients with mesenteric involvement, two died and 14 (74%) required surgery for abscesses, pseudocysts, or, in one case, a colonic fistula. The CT features of the normal mesentery and CT criteria for diagnosing mesenteric inflammatory lesions are reviewed.

  18. The role of mobile computed tomography in mass fatality incidents.

    PubMed

    Rutty, Guy N; Robinson, Claire E; BouHaidar, Ralph; Jeffery, Amanda J; Morgan, Bruno

    2007-11-01

    Mobile multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) scanners are potentially available to temporary mortuaries and can be operational within 20 min of arrival. We describe, to our knowledge, the first use of mobile MDCT for a mass fatality incident. A mobile MDCT scanner attended the disaster mortuary after a five vehicle road traffic incident. Five out of six bodies were successfully imaged by MDCT in c. 15 min per body. Subsequent full radiological analysis took c. 1 h per case. The results were compared to the autopsy examinations. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of imaging with mobile MDCT in relation to mass fatality work, illustrating the body pathway process, and its role in the identification of the pathology, personal effects, and health and safety hazards. We propose that the adoption of a single modality of mobile MDCT could replace the current use of multiple radiological sources within a mass fatality mortuary.

  19. Low-dose cardiovascular computed tomography: where are the limits?

    PubMed

    Schoenhagen, Paul; Thompson, Carla M; Halliburton, Sandra S

    2012-02-01

    Since its introduction in the 1970s, diagnostic computed tomography (CT) imaging has grown rapidly and developed into a standard diagnostic test for a wide variety of cardiovascular conditions. Although this has undoubtedly led to improved medical care, it has also been associated with a significant increase in population-based radiation exposure and the potential downstream increase in cancer is a justified concern. For cardiovascular CT, new CT scanner technologies were initially directed toward maximizing image quality rather than minimizing radiation exposure. Only more recently have technologic advances yielded dose-saving protocols for cardiovascular applications, with impressive reduction of radiation exposure. The achievable limits of population-based exposure are dependent on responsible, evidence-based use of CT for cardiovascular imaging as well as exploitation of available and emerging dose-saving strategies.

  20. The role of computed tomography in renal trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Federie, M.P.; Kaiser, J.A.; McAninch, J.W.; Jeffery, B.; Mall, J.C.

    1981-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and excretory urography were performed in 15 patients thought to have major renal trauma. In 4 cases, CT demonstrated extravasation of urine not detected by urography, and in all cases parenchymal injuries and extrarenal hematomas were depicted more accurately by CT. CT also proved to be superior to excretory urography in distinguishing relatively minor renal injuries (confusion, incomplete laceration, intrarenal hematoma, small extrarenal hematoma) from major or catastrophic injuries (complete laceration, fracture, shattered kidney), which significantly influenced the choice of surgical or medical therapy. CT also detected concurrent injuries of the spleen, liver, and/or pancrease in 4 cases. The authors feel that CT is valuable in the assessment of major renal trauma.

  1. Occult neuroblastoma presenting with opsomyoclonus: utility of computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Farrelly, C.; Daneman, A.; Chan, H.L.S.; Martin, D.J.

    1984-04-01

    The clinical and radiographic findings in 10 children with neuroblastoma presenting with opsomyoclonus are described and the literature is reviewed. Children with opsomyoclonus are often a diagnostic dilemma, as they may not have a palpable tumor or increased urinary catecholamines. Computed tomography (CT) is the most sensitive imaging method in locating tumors (100%) compared with plain radiography of the chest and abdomen (sensitivity 40%), excretory urography (50%), and /sup 99m/Tc radionuclide bone scans (50%). Since most neuroblastomas are solitary lesions that may arise in the adrenal glands or along the sympathetic chain from the neck down into the pelvis, the policy is to use plain radiography, sonography, and /sup 99m/Tc methylene diphosphonate (MDP) bone scans for the preliminary investigations of patients with opsomyoclonus. Body CT can then be tailored to suit the needs of the individual patients.

  2. Breast computed tomography with the PICASSO detector: A feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigon, Luigi; Tapete, Federica; Dreossi, Diego; Arfelli, Fulvia; Bergamaschi, Anna; Chen, Rong-Chang; Longo, Renata; Menk, Ralf-Hendrik; Schmitt, Bernd; Vallazza, Erik; Castelli, Edoardo

    2011-02-01

    The SYRMEP (Synchrotron Radiation for Medical Physics) collaboration has performed, for the first time in the world, a clinical program of mammography with synchrotron radiation. This program provided excellent results, although utilizing a commercial screen-film system as a detector. The PICASSO (Phase Imaging for Clinical Application with Silicon detector and Synchrotron radiation) project has developed a detector prototype capable of fully exploiting the peculiar characteristics of the synchrotron source, utilizing silicon microstrip sensors illuminated in the edge-on geometry and operated in single-photon counting. In this paper the potential of the PICASSO detector in breast computed tomography was evaluated by means of custom phantoms. Very encouraging results have been obtained with severe dose constrains as far as both spatial and contrast resolution are concerned. Moreover, the capability of detecting phase contrast effects was demonstrated, albeit with a higher delivered dose.

  3. High resolution computed tomography of advanced composite and ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yancey, R. N.; Klima, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced composite and ceramic materials are being developed for use in many new defense and commercial applications. In order to achieve the desired mechanical properties of these materials, the structural elements must be carefully analyzed and engineered. A study was conducted to evaluate the use of high resolution computed tomography (CT) as a macrostructural analysis tool for advanced composite and ceramic materials. Several samples were scanned using a laboratory high resolution CT scanner. Samples were also destructively analyzed at the locations of the scans and the nondestructive and destructive results were compared. The study provides useful information outlining the strengths and limitations of this technique and the prospects for further research in this area.

  4. Computer Tomography Imaging Findings of Abdominal Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Xie, Chuan-Miao; Zhang, Xin-Ke; Chen, Rui-Ying; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Lv, Xiao-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) is a neoplasm that arises from follicular dendritic cells. FDCSs originating in the abdomen are extremely rare. Clinically, they often mimic a wide variety of other abdominal tumors, and correct preoperative diagnosis is often a challenging task. To date, only scattered cases of abdominal FDCS have been reported and few data are available on their radiological features. Here we present the computer tomography imaging findings of 5 patients with surgically and pathologically demonstrated abdominal FDCS. An abdominal FDCS should be included in the differential diagnosis when single or multiple masses with relatively large size, well- or ill-defined borders, complex internal architecture with marked internal necrosis and/or focal calcification, and heterogeneous enhancement with “rapid wash-in and slow wash-out” or “progressive enhancement” enhancement patterns in the solid component are seen. PMID:26735543

  5. Contrast Media in PET/Computed Tomography Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dhull, Varun Singh; Rana, Neelima; Nazar, Aftab Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Is there a need for the contrast-enhanced PET/computed tomography (CT) scan or is the low-dose, non-contrast-enhanced PET/CT scan sufficient? The topic has been debated time and again. Although low-dose noncontrast CT serves the purpose of simple anatomic correlation and attenuation correction of PET images, many times patients have to undergo additional contrast-enhanced diagnostic imaging modalities, which may lead to a delay in decision-making. In this review, the authors have addressed various such issues related to the use of contrast agents and special techniques of clinical interest based on their utility in dual-modality PET/CT.

  6. Fossa navicularis magna detection on cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mupparapu, Mel

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report and discuss the detection of fossa navicularis magna, a close radiographic anatomic variant of canalis basilaris medianus of the basiocciput, as an incidental finding in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. The CBCT data of the patients in question were referred for the evaluation of implant sites and to rule out pathology in the maxilla and mandible. CBCT analysis showed osseous, notch-like defects on the inferior aspect of the clivus in all four cases. The appearance of fossa navicularis magna varied among the cases. In some, it was completely within the basiocciput and mimicked a small rounded, corticated, lytic defect, whereas it appeared as a notch in others. Fossa navicularis magna is an anatomical variant that occurs on the inferior aspect of the clivus. The pertinent literature on the anatomical variations occurring in this region was reviewed. PMID:27051639

  7. A pointwise limit theorem for filtered backprojection in computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yangbo; Zhu, Jiehua; Wang, Ge

    2003-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most important areas in the modern science and technology. The most popular approach for image reconstruction is filtered backprojection. It is essential to understand the limit behavior of the filtered backprojection algorithms. The classic results on the limit of image reconstruction are typically done in the norm sense. In this paper, we use the method of limited bandwidth to handle filtered backprojection-based image reconstruction when the spectrum of an underlying image is not absolutely integrable. Our main contribution is, assuming the method of limited bandwidth, to prove a pointwise limit theorem for a class of functions practically relevant and quite general. Further work is underway to extend the theory and explore its practical applications.

  8. Computed tomography of the retroperitoneum in patients with femoral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Eustace, S; McCarthy, C; O'Byrne, J; Breatnach, E; Fitzgerald, E

    1994-08-01

    The authors illustrate the value of computed tomography (CT) of the retroperitoneum in patients presenting with femoral nerve signs. They describe 28 such patients, examined at a tertiary-care hospital between June 1990 and January 1993, in whom CT of the retroperitoneum contributed significantly to the diagnosis. The patients, 19 males and 9 females, ranged in age from 11 to 81 years. CT showed disease of the psoas compartment in 17 cases; the condition was due to a malignant lesion in 9 cases and was secondary to infection in 5 and to other causes in 3. Disease of the iliacus compartment was shown in 11 cases; it was due to a malignant lesion in 6 cases and was secondary to hemorrhage in 2, to infection in 1 and to a bursa in 1. The diagnostic features of the diseases encountered are discussed, and the importance of performing CT early is stressed.

  9. Computed tomography dose optimisation in cystic fibrosis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Helena; Twomey, Maria; Moloney, Fiachra; O’Neill, Siobhan B; Murphy, Kevin; O’Connor, Owen J; Maher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common autosomal recessive disease of the Caucasian population worldwide, with respiratory disease remaining the most relevant source of morbidity and mortality. Computed tomography (CT) is frequently used for monitoring disease complications and progression. Over the last fifteen years there has been a six-fold increase in the use of CT, which has lead to a growing concern in relation to cumulative radiation exposure. The challenge to the medical profession is to identify dose reduction strategies that meet acceptable image quality, but fulfil the requirements of a diagnostic quality CT. Dose-optimisation, particularly in CT, is essential as it reduces the chances of patients receiving cumulative radiation doses in excess of 100 mSv, a dose deemed significant by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. This review article explores the current trends in imaging in CF with particular emphasis on new developments in dose optimisation. PMID:27158420

  10. Data fusion in neutron and X-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schrapp, Michael J.; Goldammer, Matthias; Schulz, Michael; Issani, Siraj; Bhamidipati, Suryanarayana; Böni, Peter

    2014-10-28

    We present a fusion methodology between neutron and X-ray computed tomography (CT). On the one hand, the inspection by X-ray CT of a wide class of multimaterials in non-destructive testing applications suffers from limited information of object features. On the other hand, neutron imaging can provide complementary data in such a way that the combination of both data sets fully characterizes the object. In this contribution, a novel data fusion procedure, called Fusion Regularized Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique, is developed where the X-ray reconstruction is modified to fulfill the available data from the imaging with neutrons. The experiments, which were obtained from an aluminum profile containing a steel screw, and attached carbon fiber plates demonstrate that the image quality in CT can be significantly improved when the proposed fusion method is used.

  11. Quantitative computed tomography imaging in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Lalita; Fernandes, Yasmin; Mesquita, Anthony Menezes

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease having small airway inflammation, emphysema, and pulmonary hypertension. It is now clear that spirometry alone cannot differentiate each component. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) is increasingly used to quantify the amount of emphysema and small airway involvement in COPD. Inspiratory CT guides in assessing emphysema while expiratory CT identifies areas of air trapping which is a surrogate of small airway inflammation. By constructing a three-dimensional model of airways, we can also measure the airway wall thickness of segmental and subsegmental airways. The aim of this review is to present the current knowledge and methodologies in QCT of the lung that aid in identifying discrete COPD phenotypes. PMID:27890994

  12. Diagnostic reference level of computed tomography (CT) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Tsushima, Yoshito; Takei, Hiroyuki; Taketomi-Takahashi, Ayako; Otake, Hidenori; Endo, Keigo

    2012-08-01

    Optimisation of computed tomography (CT) parameters is important in avoiding excess radiation exposure. The aim of this study is to establish the diagnostic reference levels (DRL) of CT in Japan by using dose-length product (DLP). Datasheets were sent to all hospitals/clinics which had CT scanner(s) in Gunma prefecture. Data were obtained for all patients who underwent CT during a single month (June 2010), and the distributions of DLP were evaluated for eight anatomical regions and five patient age groups. The DRL was defined as the 25th and 75th percentiles of DLP. Datasheets were collected from 80 of 192 hospitals/clinics (26 090 patients). DLP for head CT of paediatric patients tended to be higher in Japan compared with DRLs of paediatric head CTs reported from the EU or Syria. Although this study was performed with limited samples, DLP for adult patients were at comparable levels for all anatomical regions.

  13. Perirenal PEComa: Computed Tomography Findings and Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gkizas, Christos V; Tsili, Athina C; Katsios, Christos; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization defines perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas) as mesenchymal tumors and tumor-like conditions composed of epithelioid cells with a perivascular distribution. These tumors may show benign or malignant histology and/or biological behavior. However, the pathological features of malignancy may not correlate with biologic aggressiveness, and the criteria for malignancy are not clearly defined. Abdominopelvic PEComas are very rare and have been reported in various locations, including kidney, liver, pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, peritoneum, and retroperitoneum. Cross-sectional imaging techniques, including computed tomography (CT) may play an important role in the accurate detection and characterization of these tumors. We present the third case of an extremely rare PEComa with perirenal location, discuss CT findings and differential diagnosis. PMID:26900493

  14. Building a 3D Computed Tomography Scanner From Surplus Parts.

    PubMed

    Haidekker, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanners are expensive imaging devices, often out of reach for small research groups. Designing and building a CT scanner from modular components is possible, and this article demonstrates that realization of a CT scanner from components is surprisingly easy. However, the high costs of a modular X-ray source and detector limit the overall cost savings. In this article, the possibility of building a CT scanner with available surplus X-ray parts is discussed, and a practical device is described that incurred costs of less than $16,000. The image quality of this device is comparable with commercial devices. The disadvantage is that design constraints imposed by the available components lead to slow scan speeds and a resolution of 0.5 mm. Despite these limitations, a device such as this is attractive for imaging studies in the biological and biomedical sciences, as well as for advancing CT technology itself.

  15. Initial results of finger imaging using photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Es, Peter; Biswas, Samir K.; Moens, Hein J. Bernelot; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2014-06-01

    We present a photoacoustic computed tomography investigation on a healthy human finger, to image blood vessels with a focus on vascularity across the interphalangeal joints. The cross-sectional images were acquired using an imager specifically developed for this purpose. The images show rich detail of the digital blood vessels with diameters between 100 μm and 1.5 mm in various orientations and at various depths. Different vascular layers in the skin including the subpapillary plexus could also be visualized. Acoustic reflections on the finger bone of photoacoustic signals from skin were visible in sequential slice images along the finger except at the location of the joint gaps. Not unexpectedly, the healthy synovial membrane at the joint gaps was not detected due to its small size and normal vascularization. Future research will concentrate on studying digits afflicted with rheumatoid arthritis to detect the inflamed synovium with its heightened vascularization, whose characteristics are potential markers for disease activity.

  16. Survey of patient dose in computed tomography in Syria 2009.

    PubMed

    Kharita, M H; Khazzam, S

    2010-09-01

    The radiation doses to patient in computed tomography (CT) in Syria have been investigated and compared with similar studies in different countries. This work surveyed 30 CT scanners from six different manufacturers distributed all over Syria. Some of the results in this paper were part of a project launched by the International Atomic Energy Agency in different regions of the world covering Asia, Africa and Eastern Europe. The dose quantities covered are CT dose index (CTDI(w)), dose-length product (DLP), effective dose (E) and collective dose. It was found that most CTDI(w) and DLP values were similar to the European reference levels and in line with the results of similar surveys in the world. The results were in good agreement with the UNSCEAR Report 2007. This study concluded a recommendation for national diagnostic reference level for the most common CT protocols in Syria. The results can be used as a base for future optimisation studies in the country.

  17. Glasses for 3D ultrasound computer tomography: phase compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapf, M.; Hopp, T.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT), developed at KIT, is a promising new imaging system for breast cancer diagnosis, and was successfully tested in a pilot study. The 3D USCT II prototype consists of several hundreds of ultrasound (US) transducers on a semi-ellipsoidal aperture. Spherical waves are sequentially emitted by individual transducers and received in parallel by many transducers. Reflectivity volumes are reconstructed by synthetic aperture focusing (SAFT). However, straight forward SAFT imaging leads to blurred images due to system imperfections. We present an extension of a previously proposed approach to enhance the images. This approach includes additional a priori information and system characteristics. Now spatial phase compensation was included. The approach was evaluated with a simulation and clinical data sets. An increase in the image quality was observed and quantitatively measured by SNR and other metrics.

  18. Digital tomosynthesis aided by low-resolution exact computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Kai; Yu, Hengyong; Zhao, Shiying; Fajardo, Laurie Lee; Ruth, Christopher; Jing, Zhenxue; Wang, Ge

    2007-01-01

    Tomosynthesis reconstructs 3-dimensional images of an object from a significantly fewer number of projections as compared with that required by computed tomography (CT). A major problem with tomosynthesis is image artifacts associated with the data incompleteness. In this article, we propose a hybrid tomosynthesis approach to achieve higher image quality as compared with competing methods. In this approach, a low-resolution CT scan is followed by a high-resolution tomosynthesis scan. Then, both scans are combined to reconstruct images. To evaluate the image quality of the proposed method, we design a new breast phantom for numerical simulation and physical experiments. The results show that images obtained by our approach are clearly better than those obtained without such a CT scan.

  19. Complicated cholecystitis: the complementary roles of sonography and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Charalel, Resmi A; Jeffrey, R Brooke; Shin, Lewis K

    2011-09-01

    Acute cholecystitis is a common cause of abdominal pain in the Western world. Unless treated promptly, patients with acute cholecystitis may develop complications such as gangrenous, perforated, or emphysematous cholecystitis. Because of the increased morbidity and mortality of complicated cholecystitis, early diagnosis and treatment are essential for optimal patient care. Nevertheless, complicated cholecystitis may pose significant challenges with cross-sectional imaging, including sonography and computed tomography (CT). Interpreting radiologists should be familiar with the spectrum of sonographic findings seen with complicated cholecystitis and as well as understand the complementary role of CT. Worrisome imaging findings for complicated cholecystitis include intraluminal findings (sloughed mucosa, hemorrhage, abnormal gas), gallbladder wall abnormalities (striations, asymmetric wall thickening, abnormal gas, loss of sonoreflectivity and contrast enhancement), and pericholecystic changes (echogenic fat, pericholecystic fluid, abscess formation). Finally, diagnosis of complicated cholecystitis by sonography and CT can guide alternative treatments including minimally invasive percutaneous and endoscopic options.

  20. Low-dose computed tomography to diagnose fetal bone dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Montoya Filardi, A; Guasp Vizcaíno, M; Gómez Fernández-Montes, J; Llorens Salvador, R

    We present a case of cleidocranial dysplasia diagnosed by low-dose fetal computed tomography (CT) in the 25th week of gestation. Severe bone dysplasia was suspected because of the fetus' low percentile in long bones length and the appearance of craniosynostosis on sonography. CT found no abnormalities incompatible with life. The effective dose was 5 mSv, within the recommended range for this type of examination. Low-dose fetal CT is a new technique that makes precision study of the bony structures possible from the second trimester of pregnancy. In Spain, abortion is legal even after the 22nd week of gestation in cases of severe fetal malformations. Therefore, in cases in which severe bone dysplasia is suspected, radiologists must know the strategies for reducing the dose of radiation while maintaining sufficient diagnostic quality, and they must also know which bony structures to evaluate.

  1. Malignant uveal melanoma and similar lesions studied by computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mafee, M.F.; Peyman, G.A.; McKusick, M.A.

    1985-08-01

    Forty-four patients with intraocular disease were studied by computed tomography (CT); in 19 cases malignant uveal melanoma was considered the likely diagnosis. CT proved to be accurate in determining the location and size of uveal melanomas, demonstrating scleral invasion, and differentiating melanoma from choroidal detachment or angioma, toxocariasis, and senile macular degeneration. On CT, uveal melanomas appeared as hyperdense lesions with slight to moderate contrast enhancement. Tumors thinner than 2 mm could not be seen. Using dynamic CT, the authors noted moderate peak amplitude, normal or delayed tissue transit time, and persistently elevated washout phase (downslope), indicating increased permeability as the result of an impaired tumor blood barrier. Histological types of uveal melanoma could not be differentiated on the basis of circulatory patterns. Dynamic CT may be useful in distinguishing uveal melanoma from choroidal hemangioma or hematoma.

  2. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosing hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dalla Palma, L; Pozzi-Mucelli, R S

    1992-02-01

    The evaluation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is based upon ultrasonography (US) which has proved to have a high sensitivity and is also extremely useful in guiding the percutaneous needle biopsy. The main role of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to supplement US in evaluating the extent of HCC. The Authors discuss the different techniques of examinations of the liver both for CT and MRI as far as the modalities of contrast enhancement, site of injection, and type of contrast agents are concerned. The differences between low field and high field magnets are also discussed. The main CT and MRI findings are illustrated, depending upon the technique of examination. Finally the role of these techniques is discussed. Based upon personal experience and the data in CT literature, and if performed with updated technology and intraarterial injection (lipiodol), CT is the method of choice in order to supplement US in the evaluation of HCC.

  3. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging comparisons in boxers

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, B.D. ); Zimmerman, R.D. )

    1990-03-23

    The efficacy of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in identifying traumatic injuries of the brain was compared in a referred population of 21 amateur and professional boxers. Three boxers displayed CT scans with equivocal findings that were verified as artifacts by MRI. Eleven boxers had both CT and MRI scans with normal findings, and 7 boxers had both CT and MRI scans with abnormal findings. There were no instances where abnormalities demonstrated on CT scanning were not detected by MRI. However, some abnormalities detected on MRI were not detected on CT scans. These included a subdural hematoma, white-matter changes, and a focal contusion. Magnetic resonance imaging appears to be the neuroradiodiagnostic test of choice compared with CT.

  4. Computed tomography of cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Itai, Y.; Moss, A.A.; Ohtomo, K.

    1982-11-01

    Ten cases of cystadenoma or cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas were examined by computed tomography (CT). All but one showed characteristic findings consisting of both cystic and solid components. Innumerable small cysts producing a honeycomb appearance were noticed in serous cystadenomas. A well-defined multilocular cystic mass containing thin, straight, and/or curvilinear septa or a unilocular cystic tumor with a papillary projection and locally thickened wall was present in mucinous cystadenomas. The CT findings in cystadenocarcinomas varied depending on the relative size of the cystic and solid portions and the grade of malignancy. CT was useful in detecting and diagnosing cystic neoplasms of the pancreas and differentiating benign serous cystadenomas from potentially malignant cystadenomas in typical cases. However, aspiration biopsy is recommended when findings are equivocal.

  5. [Multislice computed tomography in the diagnosis of nephrotuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Nersesian, A A; Merkur'eva, Ia A; Batyrov, F A

    2007-01-01

    The sensitivity of the conventional radiotherapy involving excretory urography and ultrasound scanning is 80.3%. The clinical and X-ray form of new-onset nephrotuberculosis is being specified and revised during a follow-up and, in some cases, intraoperatively or at autopsy. The main reason for discrepancy between preoperative and postoperative diagnoses is inadequate visualization of the upper urinary tract when standard radiation diagnosis is used. Multislice computed tomography makes it possible to visualize the renal parenchyma, its vessels and urinary tract and yields a real three-dimensional image of urinary organs, to ascertain the pattern of urinary tract abnormalities, the preservation of the renal vasculature, and the functional reserves of the diseased and contralateral kidneys, and to define the only correct management tactics for patients with nephrotuberculosis in 93.3% of cases.

  6. Coronary plaque imaging by coronary computed tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) has become the useful noninvasive imaging modality alternative to the invasive coronary angiography for detecting coronary artery stenoses in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). With the development of technical aspects of coronary CTA, clinical practice and research are increasingly shifting toward defining the clinical implication of plaque morphology and patients outcomes by coronary CTA. In this review we discuss the coronary plaque morphology estimated by CTA beyond coronary angiography including the comparison to the currently available other imaging modalities used to examine morphological characteristics of the atherosclerotic plaque. Furthermore, this review underlies the value of a combined assessment of coronary anatomy and myocardial perfusion in patients with CAD, and adds to an increasing body of evidence suggesting an added diagnostic value when combining both modalities. We hope that an integrated, multi-modality imaging approach will become the gold standard for noninvasive evaluation of coronary plaque morphology and outcome data in clinical practice. PMID:24876919

  7. Computed tomography and sonography of cavernous hemangioma of the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Itai, Y.; Ohtomo, K.; Araki, T.; Furui, S.; Iio, M.; Atomi, Y.

    1983-08-01

    Accuracy and limitations of computed tomography (CT) and sonography in the detection and diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma of the liver were analyzed in 39 cases. In 35 of 38 lesions examined by CT before and after bolus contrast enhancement, findings were dense contrast enhancement spreading in all directions on subsequent scans and/or density (other than capsule or septa) higher than normal hepatic parenchyma after 2 min. Lesions smaller than 1 cm were not detected. Misregistration in sequential scane prevented diagnosis of three of nine lesions smaller than 2 cm. Sonography revealed various patterns of mass, but in the smaller lesions, an extremely hyperechoic pattern was dominant. The contributions of CT and sonography depend on the size of the lesions.

  8. Industrial Computed Tomography (ICT) System—A Versatile Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidhar, C.; Rao, G. V. Siva; Kumaran, K.; Subramanian, M. P.; Lukose, Sijo N.; Reddy, M. Venkata

    2008-09-01

    Industrial Computed Tomography (ICT) system has been developed indigenously for Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE) applications. ICT system consists of 450 keV X-ray source, 256-channel detector array, 6-axes mechanical manipulator, data acquisition system and reconstruction software. This system handles objects up to 1000mm (shell) diameter, 10 m height and 2000 kg weight with a spatial resolution of 1-line pair (lp)/mm. Metallic, nonmetallic, composite hardware including assemblies of varying densities and sizes were scanned and analyzed for identification of defects such as delaminations, debonds, cracks, voids, foreign inclusions and for internal details. Various image-processing techniques were employed for better visualization and interpretation of defects. The defects were analyzed for their location, area, depth and dimensions. The salient features of ICT system in handling a wide variety of hardware have been highlighted.

  9. X- and {gamma}-ray computed tomography applications at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, G.P.; Martz, H.E.; Schneberk, D.J.; Azevedo, S.G.

    1993-04-01

    Members of the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Section at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have implemented the advanced three-dimensional imaging technique of x and {gamma}-ray computed tomography (CAT or CT) for industrial and scientific nondestructive evaluation. This technique provides internal and external views of materials, components, and assemblies nonintrusively. Our research and development includes building CT scanners as well as data preprocessing, image reconstruction, display and analysis algorithms. These capabilities have been applied for a variety of industrial and scientific NDE applications where objects can range in size from 1 mm{sup 3} to 1 m{sup 3}. Here we discuss the usefulness of Cr to evaluate: Ballistic target materials, high-explosives shape charges, missile nosetips, and reactor-fuel tubes.

  10. Assessment of feline abdominal adipose tissue using computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyeon; Kim, Mieun; Choi, Mihyun; Lee, Namsoon; Chang, Jinhwa; Yoon, Junghee; Choi, Mincheol

    2010-12-01

    Obesity is a common nutritional disorder in cats and it increases the risk factors for various diseases. The aim of this study is to suggest a method for the evaluation of feline obesity using computed tomography. The attenuation range from -156 to -106 was determined as the range of feline abdominal adipose tissue. With this range, total (TAT), visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) adipose tissues were measured. The best correlation between the adipose tissue in cross-sectional image and entire abdomen volume was obtained at the L3 and L5 levels. The mean VAT/SAT ratio was 1.18±0.32, which was much higher than in humans. The cats with an overweight body condition had a significantly lower VAT/SAT ratio than cats with an ideal body condition. This technique may contribute to both the clinical diagnosis and the experimental study of feline obesity.

  11. FDG positron emission computed tomography in a study of aphasia

    SciTech Connect

    Metter, E.J.; Wasterlain, C.G.; Kuhl, D.E.; Hanson, W.R.; Phelps, M.E.

    1981-08-01

    Positron emission computed tomography (PECT) using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) was used to investigate the correlations between clinical status, anatomy (as described by CT), and metabolism in five patients with stable aphasia resulting from ischemic cerebral infarction. Local cerebral metabolic activity was diminished in an area larger than the area of infarction demonstrated by CT. In one patient, FDG PECT revealed a metabolic lesion that probably caused the aphasic syndrome and was not apparent by CT. The data suggest that reliance on CT in delineating the extent of the brain lesion in aphasia or other neuropsychological defects can be misleading; FDG PECT may provide important additional information. Two patients with similar metabolic lesions had very different clinical syndromes, showing that even when currently available methods are combined, major gaps remain in clinicoanatomical correlations in aphasia.

  12. Fast automatic segmentation of anatomical structures in x-ray computed tomography images to improve fluorescence molecular tomography reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freyer, Marcus; Ale, Angelique; Schulz, Ralf B.; Zientkowska, Marta; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Englmeier, Karl-Hans

    2010-05-01

    The recent development of hybrid imaging scanners that integrate fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and x-ray computed tomography (XCT) allows the utilization of x-ray information as image priors for improving optical tomography reconstruction. To fully capitalize on this capacity, we consider a framework for the automatic and fast detection of different anatomic structures in murine XCT images. To accurately differentiate between different structures such as bone, lung, and heart, a combination of image processing steps including thresholding, seed growing, and signal detection are found to offer optimal segmentation performance. The algorithm and its utilization in an inverse FMT scheme that uses priors is demonstrated on mouse images.

  13. 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography improves the diagnostic accuracy of osteoid osteoma

    PubMed Central

    Squier, Samuel Brian; Lewis, Jacob Ian; Accurso, Joseph Matthew; Jain, Manoj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 17-year-old football player who had previously received multiple facet joint injections for presumed secondary osteoarthritis. 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography imaging of the cervical spine demonstrated focal increased radiopharmaceutical activity in the right C2 lamina, which was associated with an osteolytic lesion with a central irregular sclerotic nidus. Surgical pathology confirmed an osteoid osteoma. PMID:27833319

  14. Effect of object location on the density measurement in cone-beam computed tomography versus multislice computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Eskandarloo, Amir; Abdinian, Mehrdad; Salemi, Fatemeh; Hashemzadeh, Zahra; Safaei, Mehran

    2012-01-01

    Background: Bone density measurement in a radiographic view is a valuable method for evaluating the density of bone quality before performing some dental procedures such as, dental implant placements. It seems that Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) can be used as a diagnostic tool for evaluating the density of the bone, prior to any treatment, as the reported radiation dose in this method is minimal. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of object location on the density measurement in CBCT versus Multislice computed tomography (CT). Materials and Methods: In an experimental study, three samples with similar dimensions, but different compositions, different densities (Polyethylene, Polyamide, Polyvinyl Chloride), and three bone pieces of different parts of the mandibular bone were imaged in three different positions by CBCT and Multislice CT sets. The average density value was computed for each sample in each position. Then the data obtained from each CBCT was converted to a Hounsfield unit and evaluated using a single variable T analysis. A P value <0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: The density in a Multislice CT is stable in the form of a Hounsfield Number, but this density is variable in the images acquired through CBCT, and the change in the position results in significant changes in the density. In this study, a statistically significant difference (P value = 0.000) has been observed for the position of the sample and its density in CBCT in comparison to Multislice CT. Conclusions: Density values in CBCT are not real because they are affected by the position of the object in the machine. PMID:23814567

  15. Contrast-enhanced fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/contrast-enhanced computed tomography in mediastinal T-cell lymphoma with superior vena cava syndrome.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sampath; Gorla, Arun Kumar Reddy; Bhattacharya, Anish; Varma, Subhash Chander; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) is a routine investigation for the staging of lymphomas. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is mandatory whenever parenchymal lesions, especially in the liver and spleen are suspected. We report a rare case of primary mediastinal T-cell lymphoma evaluated with contrast-enhanced PET/CT that showed features of superior vena cava syndrome.

  16. Ictal onset zone and seizure propagation delineated on ictal F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Madhavi; Tripathi, Manjari; Garg, Ajay; Damle, Nishikant; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    The present case highlights the utility of ictal F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in delineating the seizure onset zone in a child with complex partial seizures. Although F-18 FDG PET has been successfully used to delineate interictal hypometabolism, planned ictal FDG PET, in cases with prolonged seizure activity, can provide better spatial resolution than single-photon emission CT by delineating the seizure onset zone and propagation pathway.

  17. Retroperitoneal Endometriosis: A Possible Cause of False Positive Finding at 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Maffione, Anna Margherita; Panzavolta, Riccardo; Lisato, Laura Camilla; Ballotta, Maria; D'Isanto, Mariangela Zanforlini; Rubello, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is a frequent and clinically relevant problem in young women. Laparoscopy is still the gold standard for the diagnosis of endometriosis, but frequently both morphologic and functional imaging techniques are involved in the diagnostic course before achieving a conclusive diagnosis. We present a case of a patient affected by infiltrating retroperitoneal endometriosis falsely interpreted as a malignant mass by contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography. PMID:26097425

  18. Assessment of metabolic bone diseases by quantitative computed tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, M. L.; Genant, H. K.; Cann, C. E.; Ettinger, B.; Gordan, G. S.; Kolb, F. O.; Reiser, U. J.

    1985-01-01

    Advances in the radiologic sciences have permitted the development of numerous noninvasive techniques for measuring the mineral content of bone, with varying degrees of precision, accuracy, and sensitivity. The techniques of standard radiography, radiogrammetry, photodensitometry, Compton scattering, neutron activation analysis, single and dual photon absorptiometry, and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) are described and reviewed in depth. Results from previous cross-sectional and longitudinal QCT investigations are given. They then describe a current investigation in which they studied 269 subjects, including 173 normal women, 34 patients with hyperparathyroidism, 24 patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis, and 38 men with idiopathic osteoporosis. Spinal quantitative computed tomography, radiogrammetry, and single photon absorptiometry were performed, and a spinal fracture index was calculated on all patients. The authors found a disproportionate loss of spinal trabecular mineral compared to appendicular mineral in the men with idiopathic osteoporosis and the patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis. They observed roughly equivalent mineral loss in both the appendicular and axial regions in the hyperparathyroid patients. The appendicular cortical measurements correlated moderately well with each other but less well with spinal trabecular QCT. The spinal fracture index correlated well with QCT and less well with the appendicular measurements. Knowledge of appendicular cortical mineral status is important in its own right but is not a valid predictor of axial trabecular mineral status, which may be disproportionately decreased in certain diseases. Quantitative CT provides a reliable means of assessing the latter region of the skeleton, correlates well with the spinal fracture index (a semiquantitative measurement of end-organ failure), and offers the clinician a sensitive means of following the effects of therapy.

  19. Sex estimation from sternal measurements using multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ekizoglu, Oguzhan; Hocaoglu, Elif; Inci, Ercan; Bilgili, Mustafa Gokhan; Solmaz, Dilek; Erdil, Irem; Can, Ismail Ozgur

    2014-12-01

    We aimed to show the utility and reliability of sternal morphometric analysis for sex estimation.Sex estimation is a very important step in forensic identification. Skeletal surveys are main methods for sex estimation studies. Morphometric analysis of sternum may provide high accuracy rated data in sex discrimination. In this study, morphometric analysis of sternum was evaluated in 1 mm chest computed tomography scans for sex estimation. Four hundred forty 3 subjects (202 female, 241 male, mean age: 44 ± 8.1 [distribution: 30-60 year old]) were included the study. Manubrium length (ML), mesosternum length (2L), Sternebra 1 (S1W), and Sternebra 3 (S3W) width were measured and also sternal index (SI) was calculated. Differences between genders were evaluated by student t-test. Predictive factors of sex were determined by discrimination analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Male sternal measurement values are significantly higher than females (P < 0.001) while SI is significantly low in males (P < 0.001). In discrimination analysis, MSL has high accuracy rate with 80.2% in females and 80.9% in males. MSL also has the best sensitivity (75.9%) and specificity (87.6%) values. Accuracy rates were above 80% in 3 stepwise discrimination analysis for both sexes. Stepwise 1 (ML, MSL, S1W, S3W) has the highest accuracy rate in stepwise discrimination analysis with 86.1% in females and 83.8% in males. Our study showed that morphometric computed tomography analysis of sternum might provide important information for sex estimation.

  20. Sex Estimation From Sternal Measurements Using Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ekizoglu, Oguzhan; Hocaoglu, Elif; Inci, Ercan; Bilgili, Mustafa Gokhan; Solmaz, Dilek; Erdil, Irem; Can, Ismail Ozgur

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to show the utility and reliability of sternal morphometric analysis for sex estimation. Sex estimation is a very important step in forensic identification. Skeletal surveys are main methods for sex estimation studies. Morphometric analysis of sternum may provide high accuracy rated data in sex discrimination. In this study, morphometric analysis of sternum was evaluated in 1 mm chest computed tomography scans for sex estimation. Four hundred forty 3 subjects (202 female, 241 male, mean age: 44 ± 8.1 [distribution: 30–60 year old]) were included the study. Manubrium length (ML), mesosternum length (2L), Sternebra 1 (S1W), and Sternebra 3 (S3W) width were measured and also sternal index (SI) was calculated. Differences between genders were evaluated by student t-test. Predictive factors of sex were determined by discrimination analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Male sternal measurement values are significantly higher than females (P < 0.001) while SI is significantly low in males (P < 0.001). In discrimination analysis, MSL has high accuracy rate with 80.2% in females and 80.9% in males. MSL also has the best sensitivity (75.9%) and specificity (87.6%) values. Accuracy rates were above 80% in 3 stepwise discrimination analysis for both sexes. Stepwise 1 (ML, MSL, S1W, S3W) has the highest accuracy rate in stepwise discrimination analysis with 86.1% in females and 83.8% in males. Our study showed that morphometric computed tomography analysis of sternum might provide important information for sex estimation. PMID:25501090

  1. Australian diagnostic reference levels for multi detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hayton, Anna; Wallace, Anthony; Marks, Paul; Edmonds, Keith; Tingey, David; Johnston, Peter

    2013-03-01

    The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) is undertaking web based surveys to obtain data to establish national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for diagnostic imaging. The first set of DRLs to be established are for multi detector computed tomography (MDCT). The survey samples MDCT dosimetry metrics: dose length product (DLP, mGy.cm) and volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol, mGy), for six common protocols/habitus: Head, Neck, Chest, AbdoPelvis, ChestAbdoPelvis and Lumbar Spine from individual radiology clinics and platforms. A practice reference level (PRL) for a given platform and protocol is calculated from a compliant survey containing data collected from at least ten patients. The PRL is defined as the median of the DLP/CTDIvol values for a single compliant survey. Australian National DRLs are defined as the 75th percentile of the distribution of the PRLs for each protocol and age group. Australian National DRLs for adult MDCT have been determined in terms of DLP and CTDIvol. In terms of DLP the national DRLs are 1,000 mGy cm, 600 mGy cm, 450 mGy cm, 700 mGy cm, 1,200 mGy cm, and 900 mGy cm for the protocols Head, Neck, Chest, AbdoPelvis, ChestAbdoPelvis and Lumbar Spine respectively. Average dose values obtained from the European survey Dose Datamed I reveal Australian doses to be higher by comparison for four out of the six protocols. The survey is ongoing, allowing practices to optimise dose delivery as well as allowing the periodic update of DRLs to reflect changes in technology and technique.

  2. Synergistic image reconstruction for hybrid ultrasound and photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Thomas P.; Wang, Kun; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-03-01

    Conventional photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) image reconstruction methods assume that the object and surrounding medium are described by a constant speed-of-sound (SOS) value. In order to accurately recover fine structures, SOS heterogeneities should be quantified and compensated for during PACT reconstruction. To address this problem, several groups have proposed hybrid systems that combine PACT with ultrasound computed tomography (USCT). In such systems, a SOS map is reconstructed first via USCT. Consequently, this SOS map is employed to inform the PACT reconstruction method. Additionally, the SOS map can provide structural information regarding tissue, which is complementary to the functional information from the PACT image. We propose a paradigm shift in the way that images are reconstructed in hybrid PACT-USCT imaging. Inspired by our observation that information about the SOS distribution is encoded in PACT measurements, we propose to jointly reconstruct the absorbed optical energy density and SOS distributions from a combined set of USCT and PACT measurements, thereby reducing the two reconstruction problems into one. This innovative approach has several advantages over conventional approaches in which PACT and USCT images are reconstructed independently: (1) Variations in the SOS will automatically be accounted for, optimizing PACT image quality; (2) The reconstructed PACT and USCT images will possess minimal systematic artifacts because errors in the imaging models will be optimally balanced during the joint reconstruction; (3) Due to the exploitation of information regarding the SOS distribution in the full-view PACT data, our approach will permit high-resolution reconstruction of the SOS distribution from sparse array data.

  3. Photoacoustic computed tomography without accurate ultrasonic transducer responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Qiwei; Wang, Kun; Xia, Jun; Zhu, Liren; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-03-01

    Conventional photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) image reconstruction methods assume that the object and surrounding medium are described by a constant speed-of-sound (SOS) value. In order to accurately recover fine structures, SOS heterogeneities should be quantified and compensated for during PACT reconstruction. To address this problem, several groups have proposed hybrid systems that combine PACT with ultrasound computed tomography (USCT). In such systems, a SOS map is reconstructed first via USCT. Consequently, this SOS map is employed to inform the PACT reconstruction method. Additionally, the SOS map can provide structural information regarding tissue, which is complementary to the functional information from the PACT image. We propose a paradigm shift in the way that images are reconstructed in hybrid PACT-USCT imaging. Inspired by our observation that information about the SOS distribution is encoded in PACT measurements, we propose to jointly reconstruct the absorbed optical energy density and SOS distributions from a combined set of USCT and PACT measurements, thereby reducing the two reconstruction problems into one. This innovative approach has several advantages over conventional approaches in which PACT and USCT images are reconstructed independently: (1) Variations in the SOS will automatically be accounted for, optimizing PACT image quality; (2) The reconstructed PACT and USCT images will possess minimal systematic artifacts because errors in the imaging models will be optimally balanced during the joint reconstruction; (3) Due to the exploitation of information regarding the SOS distribution in the full-view PACT data, our approach will permit high-resolution reconstruction of the SOS distribution from sparse array data.

  4. Measurement of Three-dimensional Density Distributions by Holographic Interferometry and Computer Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The use of holographic interferometry to measure two and threedimensional flows and the interpretation of multiple-view interferograms with computer tomography are discussed. Computational techniques developed for tomography are reviewed. Current research topics are outlined including the development of an automated fringe readout system, optimum reconstruction procedures for when an opaque test model is present in the field, and interferometry and tomography with strongly refracting fields and shocks.

  5. Pore scale definition and computation from tomography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, P. M.; Austin, P.; Delaney, G. W.; Schwarz, M. P.

    2011-10-01

    During recent years characterisation capabilities of porous media have been transformed by advances in computation and visualisation technologies. It is now possible to obtain detailed topological and hydrodynamic information of porous media by combining tomographic and computational fluid dynamic studies. Despite the existence of these new capabilities, the characterisation process itself is based on the same antiquated experimental macroscopic concepts. We are interested in an up-scaling process where we can keep key information for every pore size present in the media in order to feed multi-scale transport models. Hydrometallurgical, environmental, food, pharmaceutical and chemical engineering are industries with process outcomes based on homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions and therefore sensitive to the reaction and transport processes happening at different pore scales. The present work addresses a key step in the information up-scaling process, i.e. a pore identification algorithm similar to alternating sequential filters. In a preliminary study, topological and hydrodynamic variables are correlated with the pore size. Micrometre and millimetre resolution tomographies are used to characterise the pore size distribution of a packed column and different rocks. Finally, we compute the inter-pore-scale redistribution function which is a measure of the heterogeneity of the media and magnitude needed in multi-scale modelling.

  6. Time-Domain Terahertz Computed Axial Tomography NDE System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimdars, David

    2012-01-01

    NASA has identified the need for advanced non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods to characterize aging and durability in aircraft materials to improve the safety of the nation's airline fleet. 3D THz tomography can play a major role in detection and characterization of flaws and degradation in aircraft materials, including Kevlar-based composites and Kevlar and Zylon fabric covers for soft-shell fan containment where aging and durability issues are critical. A prototype computed tomography (CT) time-domain (TD) THz imaging system has been used to generate 3D images of several test objects including a TUFI tile (a thermal protection system tile used on the Space Shuttle and possibly the Orion or similar capsules). This TUFI tile had simulated impact damage that was located and the depth of damage determined. The CT motion control gan try was designed and constructed, and then integrated with a T-Ray 4000 control unit and motion controller to create a complete CT TD-THz imaging system prototype. A data collection software script was developed that takes multiple z-axis slices in sequence and saves the data for batch processing. The data collection software was integrated with the ability to batch process the slice data with the CT TD-THz image reconstruction software. The time required to take a single CT slice was decreased from six minutes to approximately one minute by replacing the 320 ps, 100-Hz waveform acquisition system with an 80 ps, 1,000-Hz waveform acquisition system. The TD-THZ computed tomography system was built from pre-existing commercial off-the-shelf subsystems. A CT motion control gantry was constructed from COTS components that can handle larger samples. The motion control gantry allows inspection of sample sizes of up to approximately one cubic foot (.0.03 cubic meters). The system reduced to practice a CT-TDTHz system incorporating a COTS 80- ps/l-kHz waveform scanner. The incorporation of this scanner in the system allows acquisition of 3D

  7. Just Scan It!-Weapon Reconstruction in Computed Tomography on Historical and Current Swiss Military Guns.

    PubMed

    Franckenberg, Sabine; Binder, Thomas; Bolliger, Stephan; Thali, Michael J; Ross, Steffen G

    2016-09-01

    Cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography, has been increasingly implemented in both historic and recent postmortem forensic investigations. It aids in determining cause and manner of death as well as in correlating injuries to possible weapons. This study illuminates the feasibility of reconstructing guns in computed tomography and gives a distinct overview of historic and recent Swiss Army guns.

  8. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section 892.1750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1750 Computed tomography x-ray...

  9. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section 892.1750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1750 Computed tomography x-ray...

  10. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section 892.1750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1750 Computed tomography x-ray...

  11. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section 892.1750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1750 Computed tomography x-ray...

  12. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section 892.1750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1750 Computed tomography x-ray...

  13. Radiography, computed tomography and virtual bronchoscopy in four dogs and two cats with lung lobe torsion.

    PubMed

    Schultz, R M; Peters, J; Zwingenberger, A

    2009-07-01

    This report describes the imaging features of radiography, computed tomography and virtual bronchoscopy in dogs and cats with lung lobe torsions. The medical records, thoracic radiographs and computed tomography images of four dogs and two cats with confirmed lung lobe torsions were retrospectively reviewed. Computed tomography with virtual bronchoscopy showed bronchial narrowing, collapse or occlusion in all six animals, while this was only appreciated on one radiographic examination. A tapering terminating angle of the air-filled bronchus proximal or distal to the collapsed region was seen only on computed tomography and virtual bronchoscopy in all six animals. The vesicular emphysema pattern typical of lung lobe torsion was seen on three computed tomographies but only on one radiographic examination. The lung lobe torsion-specific findings of vesicular emphysema and a proximally narrowed or occluded bronchus were more easily recognised on computed tomography and virtual bronchoscopy than with radiographs. Computed tomography slices acquired through the bronchus and lung lobe of interest in a cat or dog with possible lung lobe torsion can be reformatted into virtual bronchoscopic images that can be utilised along with computed tomography to help make a more definitive preoperative diagnosis.

  14. Detection of root perforations using conventional and digital intraoral radiography, multidetector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Eskandarloo, Amir; Noruzi-Gangachin, Maruf; Khajeh, Samira

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to compare the accuracy of conventional intraoral (CI) radiography, photostimulable phosphor (PSP) radiography, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for detection of strip and root perforations in endodontically treated teeth. Materials and Methods Mesial and distal roots of 72 recently extracted molar were endodontically prepared. Perforations were created in 0.2, 0.3, or 0.4 mm diameter around the furcation of 48 roots (strip perforation) and at the external surface of 48 roots (root perforation); 48 roots were not perforated (control group). After root obturation, intraoral radiography, CBCT and MDCT were taken. Discontinuity in the root structure was interpreted as perforation. Two observers examined the images. Data were analyzed using Stata software and Chi-square test. Results The sensitivity and specificity of CI, PSP, CBCT and MDCT in detection of strip perforations were 81.25% and 93.75%, 85.42% and 91.67%, 97.92% and 85.42%, and 72.92% and 87.50%, respectively. For diagnosis of root perforation, the sensitivity and specificity were 87.50% and 93.75%, 89.58% and 91.67%, 97.92% and 85.42%, and 81.25% and 87.50%, respectively. For detection of strip perforation, the difference between CBCT and all other methods including CI, PSP and MDCT was significant (p < 0.05). For detection of root perforation, only the difference between CBCT and MDCT was significant, and for all the other methods no statistically significant difference was observed. Conclusions If it is not possible to diagnose the root perforations by periapical radiographs, CBCT is the best radiographic technique while MDCT is not recommended. PMID:25671214

  15. Preoperative N Staging of Gastric Cancer by Stomach Protocol Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se Hoon; Kim, Jeong Jae; Lee, Jeong Sub; Kim, Seung Hyoung; Kim, Bong Soo; Maeng, Young Hee; Hyun, Chang Lim; Kim, Min Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Clinical stage of gastric cancer is currently assessed by computed tomography. Accurate clinical staging is important for the tailoring of therapy. This study evaluated the accuracy of clinical N staging using stomach protocol computed tomography. Materials and Methods Between March 2004 and November 2012, 171 patients with gastric cancer underwent preoperative stomach protocol computed tomography (Jeju National University Hospital; Jeju, Korea). Their demographic and clinical characteristics were reviewed retrospectively. Two radiologists evaluated cN staging using axial and coronal computed tomography images, and cN stage was matched with pathologic results. The diagnostic accuracy of stomach protocol computed tomography for clinical N staging and clinical characteristics associated with diagnostic accuracy were evaluated. Results The overall accuracy of stomach protocol computed tomography for cN staging was 63.2%. Computed tomography images of slice thickness 3.0 mm had a sensitivity of 60.0%; a specificity of 89.6%; an accuracy of 78.4%; and a positive predictive value of 78.0% in detecting lymph node metastases. Underestimation of cN stage was associated with larger tumor size (P<0.001), undifferentiated type (P=0.003), diffuse type (P=0.020), more advanced pathologic stage (P<0.001), and larger numbers of harvested and metastatic lymph nodes (P<0.001 each). Tumor differentiation was an independent factor affecting underestimation by computed tomography (P=0.045). Conclusions Computed tomography with a size criterion of 8 mm is highly specific but relatively insensitive in detecting nodal metastases. Physicians should keep in mind that computed tomography may not be an appropriate tool to detect nodal metastases for choosing appropriate treatment. PMID:24156034

  16. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography-computed tomography to diagnose recurrent cancer

    PubMed Central

    You, J J; Cline, K J; Gu, C-S; Pritchard, K I; Dayes, I S; Gulenchyn, K Y; Inculet, R I; Dhesy-Thind, S K; Freeman, M A; Chan, A M; Julian, J A; Levine, M N

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sometimes the diagnosis of recurrent cancer in patients with a previous malignancy can be challenging. This prospective cohort study assessed the clinical utility of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography-computed tomography (18F-FDG PET-CT) in the diagnosis of clinically suspected recurrence of cancer. Methods: Patients were eligible if cancer recurrence (non-small-cell lung (NSCL), breast, head and neck, ovarian, oesophageal, Hodgkin's or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) was suspected clinically, and if conventional imaging was non-diagnostic. Clinicians were asked to indicate their management plan before and after 18F-FDG PET-CT scanning. The primary outcome was change in planned management after 18F-FDG PET-CT. Results: Between April 2009 and June 2011, 101 patients (age, median 65 years; 55% female) were enroled from four cancer centres in Ontario, Canada. Distribution by primary tumour type was: NSCL (55%), breast (19%), ovarian (10%), oesophageal (6%), lymphoma (6%), and head and neck (4%). Of the 99 subjects who underwent 18F-FDG PET-CT, planned management changed after 18F-FDG PET-CT in 52 subjects (53%, 95% confidence interval (CI), 42–63%); a major change in plan from no treatment to treatment was observed in 38 subjects (38%, 95% CI, 29–49%), and was typically associated with 18F-FDG PET-CT findings that were positive for recurrent cancer (37 subjects). After 3 months, the stated post-18F-FDG PET-CT management plan was actually completed in 88 subjects (89%, 95% CI, 81–94%). Conclusion: In patients with suspected cancer recurrence and conventional imaging that is non-diagnostic, 18F-FDG PET-CT often provides new information that leads to important changes in patient management. PMID:25942398

  17. Accuracy of 18F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in staging of pediatric sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Tateishi, Ukihide; Hosono, Ako; Makimoto, Atsushi; Sakurada, Aine; Terauchi, Takashi; Arai, Yasuaki; Imai, Yutaka; Kim, Euishin Edmund

    2007-09-01

    The present study was conducted to clarify the diagnostic accuracy of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in the staging in pediatric sarcomas. Fifty pediatric patients with histologically proven sarcomas who underwent 18FDG PET/CT before treatment were evaluated retrospectively for the detection of nodal and distant metastases. Diagnostic accuracy of 18FDG PET/CT in detecting nodal and distant metastases was compared with that of 18FDG PET and conventional imaging (CI). The images were reviewed and a diagnostic consensus was reached by 3 observers. REFERENCE standard was histologic examination in 15 patients and confirmation of an obvious progression in size of the lesions on follow-up examinations. Nodal metastasis was correctly assessed in 48 patients (96%) with PET/CT, in contrast to 43 patients (86%) with PET, and 46 patients (92%) with CI. Diagnostic accuracies of nodal metastasis in 3 modalities were similar. Using PET/CT, distant metastasis was correctly assigned in 43 patients (86%), whereas interpretation based on PET alone or CI revealed distant metastasis in 33 patients (66%) and 35 patients (70%), respectively. Diagnostic accuracy of distant metastasis with PET/CT was significantly higher than that of PET (P=0.002) or CI (P=0.008). False negative results regarding distant metastasis by PET/CT in 7 patients (14%) were caused by subcentimetric lesions (n=4), bone marrow lesion (n=2), and soft tissue lesions (n=1). PET/CT is more accurate and probably more cost-effective than PET alone or CI regarding distant metastasis in pediatric sarcomas.

  18. Trends in radiation protection of positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Alenezi, A; Soliman, K

    2015-06-01

    Over the past decade, the number of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging procedures has increased substantially. This imaging technique provides accurate functional and anatomical information, particularly for oncological applications. Separately, both PET and CT are considered as high-dose imaging modalities. With the increased use of PET/CT, one could expect an increase in radiation doses to staff and patients. As such, major efforts have been made to reduce radiation dose in PET/CT facilities. Variations in working techniques have made it difficult to compare published results. This study aimed to review the literature on proposed methods to reduce patient and staff dose in clinical PET/CT imaging. A brief overview of some published information on staff and patient doses will be analysed and presented. Recent trends regarding radiation protection in PET/CT imaging will be discussed, and practical recommendations for reducing radiation doses to staff and patients will be discussed and summarised. Generally, the CT dose component is often higher in magnitude than the dose from PET alone; as such, focusing on CT dose reduction will decrease the overall patient dose in PET/CT imaging studies. The following factors should be considered in order to reduce the patient's dose from CT alone: proper justification for ordering contrast-enhanced CT; use of automatic exposure control features; use of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms; and optimisation of scan parameters, especially scan length. The PET dose component can be reduced by administration of lower activity to the patient, optimisation of the workflow, and appropriate use of protective devices and engineered systems. At the international level, there is wide variation in work practices among institutions. The current observed trends are such that the annual dose limits for radiation workers in PET/CT imaging are unlikely to be exceeded.

  19. Relationship of computed tomography perfusion and positron emission tomography to tumour progression in malignant glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, Timothy P C; Yartsev, Slav; Lee, Ting-Yim; Wong, Eugene; He, Wenqing; Fisher, Barbara; VanderSpek, Lauren L; Macdonald, David; Bauman, Glenn

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: This study aimed to explore the potential for computed tomography (CT) perfusion and 18-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in predicting sites of future progressive tumour on a voxel-by-voxel basis after radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Methods: Ten patients underwent pre-radiotherapy magnetic resonance (MR), FDG-PET and CT perfusion near the end of radiotherapy and repeated post-radiotherapy follow-up MR scans. The relationships between these images and tumour progression were assessed using logistic regression. Cross-validation with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the value of these images in predicting sites of tumour progression. Results: Pre-radiotherapy MR-defined gross tumour; near-end-of-radiotherapy CT-defined enhancing lesion; CT perfusion blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and permeability-surface area (PS) product; FDG-PET standard uptake value (SUV); and SUV:BF showed significant associations with tumour progression on follow-up MR imaging (P < 0.0001). The mean sensitivity (±standard deviation), specificity and area under the ROC curve (AUC) of PS were 0.64 ± 0.15, 0.74 ± 0.07 and 0.72 ± 0.12 respectively. This mean AUC was higher than that of the pre-radiotherapy MR-defined gross tumour and near-end-of-radiotherapy CT-defined enhancing lesion (both AUCs = 0.6 ± 0.1, P ≤ 0.03). The multivariate model using BF, BV, PS and SUV had a mean AUC of 0.8 ± 0.1, but this was not significantly higher than the PS only model. Conclusion: PS is the single best predictor of tumour progression when compared to other parameters, but voxel-based prediction based on logistic regression had modest sensitivity and specificity.

  20. A Novel Automated Method for Analyzing Cylindrical Computed Tomography Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Burke, E. R.; Rauser, R. W.; Martin, R. E.

    2011-01-01

    A novel software method is presented that is applicable for analyzing cylindrical and partially cylindrical objects inspected using computed tomography. This method involves unwrapping and re-slicing data so that the CT data from the cylindrical object can be viewed as a series of 2-D sheets in the vertical direction in addition to volume rendering and normal plane views provided by traditional CT software. The method is based on interior and exterior surface edge detection and under proper conditions, is FULLY AUTOMATED and requires no input from the user except the correct voxel dimension from the CT scan. The software is available from NASA in 32- and 64-bit versions that can be applied to gigabyte-sized data sets, processing data either in random access memory or primarily on the computer hard drive. Please inquire with the presenting author if further interested. This software differentiates itself in total from other possible re-slicing software solutions due to complete automation and advanced processing and analysis capabilities.

  1. Iterative image reconstruction and its role in cardiothoracic computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarabjeet; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Pourjabbar, Sarvenaz; Padole, Atul; Lira, Diego; Kalra, Mannudeep K

    2013-11-01

    Revolutionary developments in multidetector-row computed tomography (CT) scanner technology offer several advantages for imaging of cardiothoracic disorders. As a result, expanding applications of CT now account for >85 million CT examinations annually in the United States alone. Given the large number of CT examinations performed, concerns over increase in population-based risk for radiation-induced carcinogenesis have made CT radiation dose a top safety concern in health care. In response to this concern, several technologies have been developed to reduce the dose with more efficient use of scan parameters and the use of "newer" image reconstruction techniques. Although iterative image reconstruction algorithms were first introduced in the 1970s, filtered back projection was chosen as the conventional image reconstruction technique because of its simplicity and faster reconstruction times. With subsequent advances in computational speed and power, iterative reconstruction techniques have reemerged and have shown the potential of radiation dose optimization without adversely influencing diagnostic image quality. In this article, we review the basic principles of different iterative reconstruction algorithms and their implementation for various clinical applications in cardiothoracic CT examinations for reducing radiation dose.

  2. High-resolution computed tomography reconstructions of invertebrate burrow systems.

    PubMed

    Hale, Rachel; Boardman, Richard; Mavrogordato, Mark N; Sinclair, Ian; Tolhurst, Trevor J; Solan, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The architecture of biogenic structures can be highly influential in determining species contributions to major soil and sediment processes, but detailed 3-D characterisations are rare and descriptors of form and complexity are lacking. Here we provide replicate high-resolution micro-focus computed tomography (μ-CT) data for the complete burrow systems of three co-occurring, but functionally contrasting, sediment-dwelling inter-tidal invertebrates assembled alone, and in combination, in representative model aquaria. These data (≤ 2,000 raw image slices aquarium(-1), isotropic voxel resolution, 81 μm) provide reference models that can be used for the development of novel structural analysis routines that will be of value within the fields of ecology, pedology, geomorphology, palaeobiology, ichnology and mechanical engineering. We also envisage opportunity for those investigating transport networks, vascular systems, plant rooting systems, neuron connectivity patterns, or those developing image analysis or statistics related to pattern or shape recognition. The dataset will allow investigators to develop or test novel methodology and ideas without the need to generate a complete three-dimensional computation of exemplar architecture.

  3. X-ray computed tomography for casting development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgeson, Gary E.; Crews, Alan R.; Bossi, Richard H.

    1992-09-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used to evaluate specific sand casting product examples for technical and economic benefits. The representative results are applicable to other casting technologies as well. CT has been shown to be cost effective in the development of new castings. The areas which would benefit include internal dimensional measurements (eliminating destructive sectioning), specific region inspections, flaw characterization in critical regions (to allow passing or informed repair of castings), and geometric acquisition for CAD/CAM. The quantitative capability of CT allows an engineering evaluation of castings based upon a correlation with performance. This quantitative measurement capability has also been used to measure the benefit of hot isostatic pressing in casting production. CT is also cost effective for engineering design and analysis by providing rapid geometry acquisition for input to computer aided design systems. This is particularly beneficial for components that do not have existing drawings or cannot be adequately defined until they are made for any reason. Presently CT can serve as an engineering aid to casting manufacturing. In order for CT evaluation to become routine in foundry applications, however, casting designers need to call it out as a measurement technique in the original casting design drawings, specifications on the application of CT must be written, contracts must include CT evaluation as a means for accepting casting quality, and lower cost CT systems must be available.

  4. 3D ultrasound computer tomography: update from a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, T.; Zapf, M.; Kretzek, E.; Henrich, J.; Tukalo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Kaiser, C.; Knaudt, J.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) is a promising new imaging method for breast cancer diagnosis. We developed a 3D USCT system and tested it in a pilot study with encouraging results: 3D USCT was able to depict two carcinomas, which were present in contrast enhanced MRI volumes serving as ground truth. To overcome severe differences in the breast shape, an image registration was applied. We analyzed the correlation between average sound speed in the breast and the breast density estimated from segmented MRIs and found a positive correlation with R=0.70. Based on the results of the pilot study we now carry out a successive clinical study with 200 patients. For this we integrated our reconstruction methods and image post-processing into a comprehensive workflow. It includes a dedicated DICOM viewer for interactive assessment of fused USCT images. A new preview mode now allows intuitive and faster patient positioning. We updated the USCT system to decrease the data acquisition time by approximately factor two and to increase the penetration depth of the breast into the USCT aperture by 1 cm. Furthermore the compute-intensive reflectivity reconstruction was considerably accelerated, now allowing a sub-millimeter volume reconstruction in approximately 16 minutes. The updates made it possible to successfully image first patients in our ongoing clinical study.

  5. A dual-frequency applied potential tomography technique: computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, H; Ahmed, A

    1987-01-01

    Applied potential tomography has been discussed in relation to both static and dynamic imaging. We have investigated the feasibility of obtaining static images by measuring profiles at two frequencies of drive current to exploit the differing gradients of electrical conductivity with frequency for different tissues. This method has the advantages that no profile for the homogeneous medium is then needed, and the electrodes can be coupled directly to the skin. To demonstrate the principle, computer simulations have been carried out using published electrical parameters for mammalian tissues at frequencies of 100 and 150 kHz. The distribution of complex electric potentials was calculated by the successive over-relaxation method in two dimensions for an abdominal cross-section with 16 electrodes equally spaced around the surface. From the computed electrode potentials, images were reconstructed using a back-projection method (neglecting phase information). Liver and kidney appeared most distinctly on the image because of their comparatively large conductivity gradients. The perturbations in the electrode potential differences between the two frequencies had a mean value of 5%, requiring accurate measurement in a practical system, compared with 150% when the 100 kHz values were related to a simulation of homogeneous saline equal in conductivity to muscle. The perturbations could be increased by widening the separation of the frequencies. Static imaging using a dual-frequency technique appears to be feasible, but a more detailed consideration of the electrical properties of tissues is needed to determine the optimum choice of frequencies.

  6. Physics-based modeling of computed tomography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hanbean; Kim, Ho Kyung; Kam, Soohwa; Kim, Seung Ho; Park, Ji Woong; Jeon, Hosang

    2015-03-01

    We present a theoretical framework describing projections obtained from computed tomography systems considering physics of each component consisting of the systems. The projection model mainly consists of the attenuation of x-ray photons through objects including x-ray scatter and the detection of attenuated/scattered x-ray photons at pixel detector arrays. X-ray photons are attenuated by the Beers-Lambert law and scattered by using the Klein-Nishina formula. The cascaded signal-transfer model for the detector includes x-ray photon detection and light photon conversion/spreading in scintillators, light photon detection in photodiodes, and the addition of electronic noise quanta. On the other hand, image noise is considered by re-distributing the pixel signals in pixel-by-pixel ways at each image formation stage using the proper distribution functions. Instead of iterating the ray tracing over each energy bin in the x-ray spectrum, we first perform the ray tracing for an object only considering the thickness of each component. Then, we assign energy-dependent linear attenuation coefficients to each component in the projected images. This approach reduces the computation time by a factor of the number of energy bins in the x-ray spectrum divided by the number of components in the object compared with the conventional ray-tracing method. All the methods developed in this study are validated in comparisons with the measurements or the Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Pediatric Computed Tomography. Radiation Dose in Abdominal Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, X.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Buenfil, A. E.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Dies, P

    2008-08-11

    Computed tomography is one of the most popular medical imaging modalities used in the last years. However, because is one of the techniques that delivered a considerable radiation dose, precautions should be taken into account. Pediatric patients are more radiosensitive than adults, and the probability that no desirable biological effects can occur is greater. To this, also it adds the probability that they will need more radiological studies in the future. The work consisted in determining the received dose by the pediatric patients undergoing abdominal studies in a multislice computed tomograph, according to the dosimetric quantities established by a Code of Practice published by the International Atomic Energy Agency; using a ionization chamber and a phantom that simulates the abdomen of a pediatric patient. The weighted air kerma index (C{sub w}) was 14.3{+-}0.4 mGy, this value is lower than the published by the American College of Radiology, 25 mGy. The multiple scan average dose (MSAD), which is a quantity established by the NOM-229-SSA1-2002 was determined, finding a value of 14.2{+-}0.1 mGy, it is also below the value established, 25 mGy for an adult study.

  8. Compensation for air voids in photoacoustic computed tomography image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Thomas P.; Li, Lei; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    Most image reconstruction methods in photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) assume that the acoustic properties of the object and the surrounding medium are homogeneous. This can lead to strong artifacts in the reconstructed images when there are significant variations in sound speed or density. Air voids represent a particular challenge due to the severity of the differences between the acoustic properties of air and water. In whole-body small animal imaging, the presence of air voids in the lungs, stomach, and gastrointestinal system can limit image quality over large regions of the object. Iterative reconstruction methods based on the photoacoustic wave equation can account for these acoustic variations, leading to improved resolution, improved contrast, and a reduction in the number of imaging artifacts. However, the strong acoustic heterogeneities can lead to instability or errors in the numerical wave solver. Here, the impact of air voids on PACT image reconstruction is investigated, and procedures for their compensation are proposed. The contributions of sound speed and density variations to the numerical stability of the wave solver are considered, and a novel approach for mitigating the impact of air voids while reducing the computational burden of image reconstruction is identified. These results are verified by application to an experimental phantom.

  9. Use of cone beam computed tomography in otolaryngologic treatments.

    PubMed

    Cakli, Hamdi; Cingi, Cemal; Ay, Yazgi; Oghan, Fatih; Ozer, Torun; Kaya, Ercan

    2012-03-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) allows us to evaluate 3-dimensional (3D) morphology of the maxillofacial skeleton and also used in dentomaxillofacial imaging to solve complex diagnostic and treatment planning problems such as craniofacial fractures, temporamandibular dysfunctions or sinus imaging. CBCT uses a rectangular or round 2D detector, which allows a single rotation of the gantry to generate a scan of the entire region of interest. Technological and application-specific factors such as development of compact, relatively low-cost, high-quality, large, flat-panel detector arrays; the availability of low-cost computers with processing power sufficient for cone beam image reconstruction; the fabrication of highly efficient radiograph tubes capable of multiple exposures necessary for cone beam scanning at prices lower than those currently used for fan beam CT; and limited volume scanning (e.g., head and neck) eliminating the need for subsecond gantry rotation speeds make this possible. The objective of this study is to review published evidence for CBCT having an important role in ORL treatments. We aimed to review all the available literature about the CBCT imagination in ORL treatments. Systematic literature search was performed using PubMed and Ovid. Additional literature was retrieved from reference lists in the articles. Systematic analysis of the literature from 1998 to 2010 was performed. A total of 40 abstracts were evaluated independently by two members of the project group, and 38 articles were included in the review.

  10. Investigating the geometry of pig airways using computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Azad, Md Khurshidul; McMurray, Brandon; Henry, Brian; Royston, Thomas J.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2015-03-01

    Numerical modeling of sound propagation in the airways requires accurate knowledge of the airway geometry. These models are often validated using human and animal experiments. While many studies documented the geometric details of the human airways, information about the geometry of pig airways is scarcer. In addition, the morphology of animal airways can be significantly different from that of humans. The objective of this study is to measure the airway diameter, length and bifurcation angles in domestic pigs using computed tomography. After imaging the lungs of 3 pigs, segmentation software tools were used to extract the geometry of the airway lumen. The airway dimensions were then measured from the resulting 3 D models for the first 10 airway generations. Results showed that the size and morphology of the airways of different animals were similar. The measured airway dimensions were compared with those of the human airways. While the trachea diameter was found to be comparable to the adult human, the diameter, length and branching angles of other airways were noticeably different from that of humans. For example, pigs consistently had an early airway branching from the trachea that feeds the superior (top) right lung lobe proximal to the carina. This branch is absent in the human airways. These results suggested that the human geometry may not be a good approximation of the pig airways and may contribute to increasing the errors when the human airway geometric values are used in computational models of the pig chest.

  11. High-resolution computed tomography reconstructions of invertebrate burrow systems

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Rachel; Boardman, Richard; Mavrogordato, Mark N.; Sinclair, Ian; Tolhurst, Trevor J.; Solan, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The architecture of biogenic structures can be highly influential in determining species contributions to major soil and sediment processes, but detailed 3-D characterisations are rare and descriptors of form and complexity are lacking. Here we provide replicate high-resolution micro-focus computed tomography (μ-CT) data for the complete burrow systems of three co-occurring, but functionally contrasting, sediment-dwelling inter-tidal invertebrates assembled alone, and in combination, in representative model aquaria. These data (≤2,000 raw image slices aquarium−1, isotropic voxel resolution, 81 μm) provide reference models that can be used for the development of novel structural analysis routines that will be of value within the fields of ecology, pedology, geomorphology, palaeobiology, ichnology and mechanical engineering. We also envisage opportunity for those investigating transport networks, vascular systems, plant rooting systems, neuron connectivity patterns, or those developing image analysis or statistics related to pattern or shape recognition. The dataset will allow investigators to develop or test novel methodology and ideas without the need to generate a complete three-dimensional computation of exemplar architecture. PMID:26396743

  12. Development of Proton Computed Tomography for Applications in Proton Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkirov, Vladimir; Schulte, Reinhard; Coutrakon, George; Erdelyi, Bela; Wong, Kent; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Penfold, Scott; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; McAllister, Scott; Schubert, Keith

    2009-03-01

    Determination of the Bragg peak position in proton therapy requires accurate knowledge of the electron density and ratio of effective atomic number and mass (Z/A) of the body tissues traversed. While the Z/A ratio is fairly constant for human tissues, the density of tissues varies significantly. One possibility to obtain accurate electron density information of tissues is to use protons of sufficient energy to penetrate the patient and measure their energy loss. From these transmission measurements, it is possible to reconstruct a three-dimensional map of electron densities using algebraic techniques. The interest in proton computed tomography (pCT) has considerably increased in recent years due to the more common use of proton accelerators for cancer treatment world-wide and a modern design concept based on current high-energy physics technology has been suggested. This contribution gives a status update on the pCT project carried out by the pCT Collaboration, a group of institutions sharing interest and expertise in the development of pCT. We will present updated imaging data obtained with a small pCT prototype developed in collaboration with the Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics and installed on the proton research beam line at Loma Linda University Medical Center. We will discuss hardware decisions regarding the next-generation pCT scanner, which will permit scanning of head-sized objects. Progress has also been made in the formulation of the most likely path of protons through an object and parallelizable iterative reconstruction algorithms that can be implemented on general-purpose commodity graphics processing units. Finally, we will present simulation studies for utilizing pCT technology for on-line proton dose verification and tumor imaging with positron emission tomography (PET).

  13. Role of Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography in the Management of Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mistrangelo, Massimiliano; Pelosi, Ettore; Bello, Marilena; Ricardi, Umberto; Milanesi, Enrica; Cassoni, Paola; Baccega, Massimo; Filippini, Claudia; Racca, Patrizia; Lesca, Adriana; Munoz, Fernando H.; Fora, Gianluca; Skanjeti, Andrea; Cravero, Francesca; Morino, Mario

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Pre- and post-treatment staging of anal cancer are often inaccurate. The role of positron emission tomograpy-computed tomography (PET-CT) in anal cancer is yet to be defined. The aim of the study was to compare PET-CT with CT scan, sentinel node biopsy results of inguinal lymph nodes, and anal biopsy results in staging and in follow-up of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty-three consecutive patients diagnosed with anal cancer underwent PET-CT. Results were compared with computed tomography (CT), performed in 40 patients, and with sentinel node biopsy (SNB) (41 patients) at pretreatment workup. Early follow-up consisted of a digital rectal examination, an anoscopy, a PET-CT scan, and anal biopsies performed at 1 and 3 months after the end of treatment. Data sets were then compared. Results: At pretreatment assessment, anal cancer was identified by PET-CT in 47 patients (88.7%) and by CT in 30 patients (75%). The detection rates rose to 97.9% with PET-CT and to 82.9% with CT (P=.042) when the 5 patients who had undergone surgery prior to this assessment and whose margins were positive at histological examination were censored. Perirectal and/or pelvic nodes were considered metastatic by PET-CT in 14 of 53 patients (26.4%) and by CT in 7 of 40 patients (17.5%). SNB was superior to both PET-CT and CT in detecting inguinal lymph nodes. PET-CT upstaged 37.5% of patients and downstaged 25% of patients. Radiation fields were changed in 12.6% of patients. PET-CT at 3 months was more accurate than PET-CT at 1 month in evaluating outcomes after chemoradiation therapy treatment: sensitivity was 100% vs 66.6%, and specificity was 97.4% vs 92.5%, respectively. Median follow-up was 20.3 months. Conclusions: In this series, PET-CT detected the primary tumor more often than CT. Staging of perirectal/pelvic or inguinal lymph nodes was better with PET-CT. SNB was more accurate in staging inguinal lymph nodes.

  14. Thoracic Sarcoidosis: Imaging with High Resolution Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvinder; Jain, Megha; Singh, Satyendra Narayan; Sharma, Rajat Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Sarcoidosis is a disease of unknown aetiology that primarily affects the lungs. Clinical and radiological findings with demonstration of non caseating granulomas on pathology is utilised for diagnosing the disease. Aim To assess and evaluate the features of thoracic sarcoidosis on High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) chest. Materials and Methods A total of 40 (31 males and 9 females) cases of pulmonary sarcoidosis in a period of three years were included in this study. Patients underwent detailed clinical evaluation, imaging, Pulmonary Function Tests (PFT) and pathological confirmation of disease. Chest radiograph was obtained in all patients. HRCT was done on 16 slice Computed Tomography (CT) using 1 mm slice thickness and high spatial frequency algorithm for image re-construction. Images were viewed and evaluated using appropriate lung and mediastinal windows. The lymph nodes were classified as hilar and mediastinal with Maximum Short Axis Diameter (MSAD) more than 10 mm taken as cut-off for enlargement. Pulmonary opacities were classified as nodules (micronodules 1-4 mm and macronodules >5 mm), reticular opacities, fibrotic lesions, ground glass opacities and consolidations. Nodule distribution classified as perilymphatic centrilobular and random. Repeat scanning done on follow up or as clinically indicated. Results A total of five patients had Stage I disease, 24 patients had Stage II disease, eight patients had Stage III disease and three patients had stage IV disease. Mediastinal lymphdenopathy present in 29 patients. Bilateral hilar adenopathy was the predominant pattern seen in 22 patients. Lung parenchymal lesions excluding end stage disease noted in 32 patients. The characteristic HRCT lung parenchymal involvement of micronodules with a perilymphatic distribution was seen in 26 patients. HRCT features of predominant upper and middle lobe distribution seen in majority of patients. Documented atypical lesions and the characteristic

  15. Sinonasal Neoplasia – Clinicopathological Profile And Importance of Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sarawagi, Radha; Raghuwanshi, Sameer; Yadav, Pankaj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background Nasal cavity and Paranasal sinus malignancies are very rare, in which maxillary sinus is the commonest, followed by ethmoid, frontal and sphenoid sinus. Computed Tomography (CT) & Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) play a key role in diagnosis, staging and management of paranasal sinuses and nasal pathologies. Multiplanar imaging in CT helps better imaging of critical anatomical areas. Aim of our study was to study the incidence, clinical features, CT features and its importance in the management of sinonasal neoplasms. Materials and Methods This prospective study was carried out in a tertiary care hospital of MP, India. Consecutive 40 histologically proven cases of sinonasal neoplasia who visited the Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Radiotherapy are included in our study. Demography and clinical features were recorded. Cases of nasal and paranasal sinus masses diagnosed on CT attending ENT and Radiotherapy OPD or admitted in the Radiotherapy ward forms the material of this study. This included patients of both sexes and all ages. Histopathological examination was asked to confirm the diagnosis made on CT. Results There were total 40 cases of sinonasal neoplasia among which 24 were benign. Almost all the benign cases were seen in the age group <40 y with mean age of 20 y and most of the malignant cases were seen in the age group above 40 y with mean age of 55 y. In our study we found male preponderance with male female ratio of 4:1 in both benign and malignant conditions. The commonest presenting symptoms of the patients with sinonasal masses in our study was nasal obstruction (75%) and nasal discharge (67.5%) followed by nasal mass (65%), epistaxis (62.5%) and headache (60%). Angiofibroma and papilloma were the commonest benign lesions. Commonest malignant lesion was squamous cell carcinoma. Of the malignant Sinonasal tumours studied in our series, maxillary sinus was involved in 13, ethmoid sinuses and nasal cavity in 10 cases each, and frontal

  16. Computer-aided classification of lung nodules on computed tomography images via deep learning technique

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Kai-Lung; Hsu, Che-Hao; Hidayati, Shintami Chusnul; Cheng, Wen-Huang; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer has a poor prognosis when not diagnosed early and unresectable lesions are present. The management of small lung nodules noted on computed tomography scan is controversial due to uncertain tumor characteristics. A conventional computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme requires several image processing and pattern recognition steps to accomplish a quantitative tumor differentiation result. In such an ad hoc image analysis pipeline, every step depends heavily on the performance of the previous step. Accordingly, tuning of classification performance in a conventional CAD scheme is very complicated and arduous. Deep learning techniques, on the other hand, have the intrinsic advantage of an automatic exploitation feature and tuning of performance in a seamless fashion. In this study, we attempted to simplify the image analysis pipeline of conventional CAD with deep learning techniques. Specifically, we introduced models of a deep belief network and a convolutional neural network in the context of nodule classification in computed tomography images. Two baseline methods with feature computing steps were implemented for comparison. The experimental results suggest that deep learning methods could achieve better discriminative results and hold promise in the CAD application domain. PMID:26346558

  17. Computer-aided classification of lung nodules on computed tomography images via deep learning technique.

    PubMed

    Hua, Kai-Lung; Hsu, Che-Hao; Hidayati, Shintami Chusnul; Cheng, Wen-Huang; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer has a poor prognosis when not diagnosed early and unresectable lesions are present. The management of small lung nodules noted on computed tomography scan is controversial due to uncertain tumor characteristics. A conventional computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme requires several image processing and pattern recognition steps to accomplish a quantitative tumor differentiation result. In such an ad hoc image analysis pipeline, every step depends heavily on the performance of the previous step. Accordingly, tuning of classification performance in a conventional CAD scheme is very complicated and arduous. Deep learning techniques, on the other hand, have the intrinsic advantage of an automatic exploitation feature and tuning of performance in a seamless fashion. In this study, we attempted to simplify the image analysis pipeline of conventional CAD with deep learning techniques. Specifically, we introduced models of a deep belief network and a convolutional neural network in the context of nodule classification in computed tomography images. Two baseline methods with feature computing steps were implemented for comparison. The experimental results suggest that deep learning methods could achieve better discriminative results and hold promise in the CAD application domain.

  18. Serial computed tomography scanning in acute pancreatitis: a prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    London, N J; Neoptolemos, J P; Lavelle, J; Bailey, I; James, D

    1989-01-01

    One hundred and two patients with acute pancreatitis had abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans within 72 hours of admission, at one week and at six weeks. Twenty eight attacks were clinically severe, 74 clinically mild. Ninety three (91%) admission scans, 85 (84%) one week scans, and 52 (51%) six week scans were abnormal. The aetiology of the pancreatitis could be inferred from 28 (27%) of admission scans, the CT sign of fatty liver having a sensitivity of 21% and specificity of 100% for alcoholic aetiology. The sensitivity of CT for gall stone aetiology was 34%, specificity 100%. The pancreatic size indices (max anteroposterior measurement of head x max anteroposterior measurement of body) of those patients with severe attacks were significantly greater than those with mild attacks on admission, at one week and at six weeks (p less than 0.004). Fourteen pseudocysts were detected by CT, five (36%) of which were clinically apparent. The pseudocyst size indices (max anteroposterior x max transverse measurement) of the pseudocysts which were clinically apparent were significantly greater than those which were not apparent (p less than 0.01) and only those pseudocysts with a size index greater than or equal to 15 cm2 required treatment. PMID:2651228

  19. Review methods for image segmentation from computed tomography images

    SciTech Connect

    Mamat, Nurwahidah; Rahman, Wan Eny Zarina Wan Abdul; Soh, Shaharuddin Cik; Mahmud, Rozi

    2014-12-04

    Image segmentation is a challenging process in order to get the accuracy of segmentation, automation and robustness especially in medical images. There exist many segmentation methods that can be implemented to medical images but not all methods are suitable. For the medical purposes, the aims of image segmentation are to study the anatomical structure, identify the region of interest, measure tissue volume to measure growth of tumor and help in treatment planning prior to radiation therapy. In this paper, we present a review method for segmentation purposes using Computed Tomography (CT) images. CT images has their own characteristics that affect the ability to visualize anatomic structures and pathologic features such as blurring of the image and visual noise. The details about the methods, the goodness and the problem incurred in the methods will be defined and explained. It is necessary to know the suitable segmentation method in order to get accurate segmentation. This paper can be a guide to researcher to choose the suitable segmentation method especially in segmenting the images from CT scan.

  20. A framework of modeling detector systems for computed tomography simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, H.; Kim, D.; Kim, S. H.; Kam, S.; Jeon, H.; Nam, J.; Kim, H. K.

    2016-01-01

    Ultimate development in computed tomography (CT) technology may be a system that can provide images with excellent lesion conspicuity with the patient dose as low as possible. Imaging simulation tools have been cost-effectively used for these developments and will continue. For a more accurate and realistic imaging simulation, the signal and noise propagation through a CT detector system has been modeled in this study using the cascaded linear-systems theory. The simulation results are validated in comparisons with the measured results using a laboratory flat-panel micro-CT system. Although the image noise obtained from the simulations at higher exposures is slightly smaller than that obtained from the measurements, the difference between them is reasonably acceptable. According to the simulation results for various exposure levels and additive electronic noise levels, x-ray quantum noise is more dominant than the additive electronic noise. The framework of modeling a CT detector system suggested in this study will be helpful for the development of an accurate and realistic projection simulation model.

  1. Quantitative analyses of maxillary sinus using computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Perella, Andréia; Rocha, Sara Dos Santos; Cavalcanti, Marcelo de Gusmão Paraiso

    2003-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the precision and accuracy of linear measurements of maxillary sinus made in tomographic films, by comparing with 3D reconstructed images. Linear measurements of both maxillary sinus in computed tomography CT of 17 patients, with or without lesion by two calibrated examiners independently, on two occasions, with a single manual caliper. A third examiner has done the same measurements electronically in 3D-CT reconstruction. The statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA (analyses of variance). Intra-observer percentage error was little in both cases, with and without lesion; it ranged from 1.14% to 1.82%. The inter-observer error was a little higher reaching a 2.08% value. The accuracy presented a higher value. The perceptual accuracy error was higher in samples, which had lesion compared to that which had not. CT had provided adequate precision and accuracy for maxillary sinus analyses. The precision in cases with lesion was considered inferior when compared to that without lesion, but it can't affect the method efficacy.

  2. Halo and reverse halo signs in canine pulmonary computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Secrest, Scott; Sakamoto, Kaori

    2014-01-01

    The halo sign (HS) and reverse halo sign (RHS) are radiologic signs identified on pulmonary computed tomography (CT) in people. The HS is described as a circular area of ground-glass attenuation surrounding a pulmonary nodule or mass. The RHS is defined as a focal, rounded area of ground-glass attenuation surrounded by a more or less complete ring of consolidation. These signs have been identified in a variety of diseases in people. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine if the HS and RHS occur in dogs with pulmonary disease and to determine if they are associated with a particular disease process. In addition, the appearance of the HS and RHS was correlated with the histopathologic changes. Our results indicate that the HS and RHS are not common signs identified in dogs with pulmonary disease with an HS noted in five cases and an RHS in 4 of the 33 dogs that met the inclusion criteria. An association between the HS (P-value 0.8163) or RHS (P-value 0.5988) and neoplasia, infectious/inflammatory, and other disease processes was not identified using a Fisher's exact test. The HS was identified in neoplastic, infectious, and inflammatory conditions, with the RHS identified in neoplastic and infectious diseases and a lung lobe torsion. Histologically, the HS and RHS were caused by tumor extension, necrosis, and/or hemorrhage of the pulmonary parenchyma.

  3. Computed tomography perfusion imaging denoising using Gaussian process regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fan; Carpenter, Trevor; Rodriguez Gonzalez, David; Atkinson, Malcolm; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2012-06-01

    Brain perfusion weighted images acquired using dynamic contrast studies have an important clinical role in acute stroke diagnosis and treatment decisions. However, computed tomography (CT) images suffer from low contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) as a consequence of the limitation of the exposure to radiation of the patient. As a consequence, the developments of methods for improving the CNR are valuable. The majority of existing approaches for denoising CT images are optimized for 3D (spatial) information, including spatial decimation (spatially weighted mean filters) and techniques based on wavelet and curvelet transforms. However, perfusion imaging data is 4D as it also contains temporal information. Our approach using Gaussian process regression (GPR), which takes advantage of the temporal information, to reduce the noise level. Over the entire image, GPR gains a 99% CNR improvement over the raw images and also improves the quality of haemodynamic maps allowing a better identification of edges and detailed information. At the level of individual voxel, GPR provides a stable baseline, helps us to identify key parameters from tissue time-concentration curves and reduces the oscillations in the curve. GPR is superior to the comparable techniques used in this study.

  4. Dual band infared computed tomography: Searching for hidden defects

    SciTech Connect

    Del Grande, N.

    1996-05-01

    Federal highway official estimate that 20% of the country`s half-million two-lane bridges are structurally deficient. In April 1996, the Federal Highway Administration began road testing a dual-band infrared computed tomography (DBIR-CT) system developed at Lawrence livermore that images in three dimension the defect in the subsurface of bridge decks by using two thermal infrared bands to sense time-dependent temperature differences. Mounted on a converted motor home, the system can scan a 3-meter-wide (10ft) lane on a bridge and locate defects while traveling at 40km/h (25 mph). This system enable inspectors to peer beneath a roadbed`s surface to find and evaluate hidden trouble spots before they become hazardous. In addition to its applications for the nondestructive inspection and evaluation of bridge decks, DBIR-CT has a number of other application both inside and outside the Laboratory. Recently, for example, it has been used to detect corrosion within the skins of aircraft and differentiate it from other benign subsurface anomalies such as excess sealant. LLNL has a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with Bales Scientific Incorporated to commercialize DBIR-CT technology.

  5. Cochlear anatomy using micro computed tomography (μCT) imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Namkeun; Yoon, Yongjin; Steele, Charles; Puria, Sunil

    2008-02-01

    A novel micro computed tomography (μCT) image processing method was implemented to measure anatomical features of the gerbil and chinchilla cochleas, taking into account the bent modailosis axis. Measurements were made of the scala vestibule (SV) area, the scala tympani (SV) area, and the basilar membrane (BM) width using prepared cadaveric temporal bones. 3-D cochlear structures were obtained from the scanned images using a process described in this study. It was necessary to consider the sharp curvature of mododailosis axis near the basal region. The SV and ST areas were calculated from the μCT reconstructions and compared with existing data obtained by Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM), showing both qualitative and quantitative agreement. In addition to this, the width of the BM, which is the distance between the primary and secondary osseous spiral laminae, is calculated for the two animals and compared with previous data from the MRM method. For the gerbil cochlea, which does not have much cartilage in the osseous spiral lamina, the μCT-based BM width measurements show good agreement with previous data. The chinchilla BM, which contains more cartilage in the osseous spiral lamina than the gerbil, shows a large difference in the BM widths between the μCT and MRM methods. The SV area, ST area, and BM width measurements from this study can be used in building an anatomically based mathematical cochlear model.

  6. Evaluation of variations in sinonasal region with computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dasar, Ufuk; Gokce, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the frequency of anatomical variations in sinonasal region and association of these variations with mucosal diseases. METHODS: The study included 400 cases (191 female and 209 male) who were considered to have preliminary diagnoses of sinonasal pathology and who had paranasal sinus computed tomography (CT) examination in axial plane. Reformatted CT images were studied in all planes. RESULTS: Age range of the patients was 20-83 (mean 40.26 ± 14.85). Most commonly detected anatomical variation was Agger nasi cell (74.8%). There was a significant association between clinoid process pneumatization and protrusion of internal carotid arteries and optic nerves into sphenoid sinus (P < 0.001). Besides, the relationships between pterygoid process pneumatization and protrusion of vidian nerve into sphenoid sinus, and between pneumatization of large sphenoid wing and protrusion of maxillary nerves into sphenoid sinus were also significant (P < 0.001). Uncinate bulla and giant ethmoid bulla were found to be significantly associated with sinonasal mucosal diseases (P = 0.004 and P = 0.002, respectively). CONCLUSION: Sinonasal region has a great number of variations, and some of them have been determined to be associated with sinonasal mucosal disease. It is necessary to know that some of these variations are associated with protrusion of significant structures such as carotid artery or optic nerve into the sinus and care should be observed in surgeries on patients carrying these variations. PMID:26834948

  7. [Diagnosis. Radiological study. Ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Gallo Vallejo, Francisco Javier; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Because of its low cost, availability in primary care and ease of interpretation, simple X-ray should be the first-line imaging technique used by family physicians for the diagnosis and/or follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, this technique should only be used if there are sound indications and if the results will influence decision-making. Despite the increase of indications in patients with rheumatological disease, the role of ultrasound in patients with osteoarthritis continues to be limited. Computed tomography (CT) is of some -although limited- use in osteoarthritis, especially in the study of complex joints (such as the sacroiliac joint and facet joints). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has represented a major advance in the evaluation of joint cartilage and subchondral bone in patients with osteoarthritis but, because of its high cost and diagnostic-prognostic yield, this technique should only be used in highly selected patients. The indications for ultrasound, CT and MRI in patients with osteoarthritis continue to be limited in primary care and often coincide with situations in which the patient may require hospital referral. Patient safety should be bourne in mind. Patients should be protected from excessive ionizing radiation due to unnecessary repeat X-rays or inadequate views or to requests for tests such as CT, when not indicated.

  8. Computed tomography findings in senile dementia and normal aging.

    PubMed Central

    Soininen, H; Puranen, M; Riekkinen, P J

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) findings in 57 patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT), 19 patients with multi-infarct dementia and 85 controls of similar age and sex were studied. The SDAT patients differed from the controls of ventricular dilatation, frontal horn index, cella media index and the width of the third ventricle, and also in the index of cortical atrophy. Even the least severely demented SDAT patients differed from the controls. In the SDAT group with the increasing degree of intellectual impairment the ventricular dilatation increased, but cortical atrophy did not correlate with the psychological test score. The multi-infarct dementia patients differed from the controls in all CT variables including local changes. The SDAT patients had a more marked ventricular dilatation than the multi-infarct dementia patients. The multi-infarct dementia patients had more frequently local changes in SDAT patients. In the control group age correlated with ventricular dilatation, and the lower test scores correlated with cortical atrophy in the left temporal region. PMID:7062070

  9. Additive Manufacturing of Anatomical Models from Computed Tomography Scan Data.

    PubMed

    Gür, Y

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study presented here was to investigate the manufacturability of human anatomical models from Computed Tomography (CT) scan data via a 3D desktop printer which uses fused deposition modelling (FDM) technology. First, Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) CT scan data were converted to 3D Standard Triangle Language (STL) format by using In Vaselius digital imaging program. Once this STL file is obtained, a 3D physical version of the anatomical model can be fabricated by a desktop 3D FDM printer. As a case study, a patient's skull CT scan data was considered, and a tangible version of the skull was manufactured by a 3D FDM desktop printer. During the 3D printing process, the skull was built using acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) co-polymer plastic. The printed model showed that the 3D FDM printing technology is able to fabricate anatomical models with high accuracy. As a result, the skull model can be used for preoperative surgical planning, medical training activities, implant design and simulation to show the potential of the FDM technology in medical field. It will also improve communication between medical stuff and patients. Current result indicates that a 3D desktop printer which uses FDM technology can be used to obtain accurate anatomical models.

  10. Bone marrow scintigraphy and computed tomography in myloproliferative disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, S.J.; Gilbert, H.S.; Hermann, G.

    1985-05-01

    Peripheral bone marrow (BM) expansion in myeloproliferative disease (MPD) is demonstrated by scintigraphy (scint) with Technetium 99m sulfur colloid (TSC) or Indium III chloride (In). Computed tomography (CT) of the normal adult medullary cavity yields negative attenuation coefficients (AC) which become positive when BM fat is replaced. BM scint and CT of the medullary cavity are obtained in 23 studies in 21 pts: 6 polycythemia vera (PCV), 6 post PCV myeloid metaplasis (MyM), 4 agnogenic MyM, 3 myelodysplasia with refractory anemia, 1 acute myelocytic leukemia and 1 chronic myelocytic with acute leukemic transformation. AC were measured for BM cavity of lower extremities at each third of the femur and tibia. Values ranged from -89 to +289 Hounsfield units. The results are presented in this paper. There was agreement between SCINT and CT in 83% pts and segments. 80% of MB segments with + AC had scint identified BM. BM biopsy of the iliac crest demonstrated fibrosis or blast proliferation in pts with +AC rather than hypercellularity or osteosclerosis. The highest AC values (>200) were seen in pts with blast proliferation and fibrosis. Decreased BM scint visualization and +CT AC correlated with BM fibrosis and may reflect replacement of BM elements or decreased RES function. BM scint and CT are useful to monitor MPD and select BM sites for biopsy.

  11. Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Computed Tomography: A Focus on Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Cormode, David P.; Naha, Pratap C.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an X-ray based whole body imaging technique that is widely used in medicine. Clinically approved contrast agents for CT are iodinated small molecules or barium suspensions. Over the past seven years there has been a great increase in the development of nanoparticles as CT contrast agents. Nanoparticles have several advantages over small molecule CT contrast agents, such as long blood-pool residence times, and the potential for cell tracking and targeted imaging applications. Furthermore, there is a need for novel CT contrast agents, due to the growing population of renally impaired patients and patients hypersensitive to iodinated contrast. Micelles and lipoproteins, a micelle-related class of nanoparticle, have notably been adapted as CT contrast agents. In this review we discuss the principles of CT image formation and the generation of CT contrast. We discuss the progress in developing non-targeted, targeted and cell tracking nanoparticle CT contrast agents. We feature agents based on micelles and used in conjunction with spectral CT. The large contrast agent doses needed will necessitate careful toxicology studies prior to clinical translation. However, the field has seen tremendous advances in the past decade and we expect many more advances to come in the next decade. PMID:24470293

  12. Computed tomography-based training model for otoplasty.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Gerlind; Voigt, Sibylle; Rettinger, Gerhard

    2016-09-01

    Otoplasty for the correction of protruding ears is characterized by various techniques and a common and popular cosmetic procedure. For the surgeon, whether beginner or advanced, it is essential to understand the principles and master techniques for standard auricular deformities before applying further sophisticated methods, because a lot of complications and failures are caused by wrong indication and incorrect surgical techniques. The different surgical steps are best learned from teaching models. Therefore, we developed two different silicone models of protruding ears with moderate auricular deformities: one with conchal hyperplasia for the training of conchal resection, and one without antihelix for creating an antihelical fold by suturing technique, based on computed tomography scans of patients. The silicone ear models were evaluated during four standardized surgery courses for residents in otorhinolaryngology by 91 participants using specially designed questionnaires. Nearly all participants rated the training on the auricular models as very helpful (n = 51) or good (n = 31); the scores for the different techniques and properties of the models ranged from 2.0 to 2.6 in a range from 1 (very good) to 4 (inadequate). The good results demonstrate the possibility for learning different surgical otoplasty techniques with this newly designed teaching tool.

  13. Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography (DRCT) Product Improvement Plan (PIP)

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Roney; Bob Pink; Karen Wendt; Robert Seifert; Mike Smith

    2010-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing and deploying x-ray inspection systems for chemical weapons containers for the past 12 years under the direction of the Project Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM). In FY-10 funding was provided to advance the capabilities of these systems through the DRCT (Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography) Product Improvement Plan (PIP), funded by the PMNSCM. The DRCT PIP identified three research tasks; end user study, detector evaluation and DRCT/PINS integration. Work commenced in February, 2010. Due to the late start and the schedule for field inspection of munitions at various sites, it was not possible to spend sufficient field time with operators to develop a complete end user study. We were able to interact with several operators, principally Mr. Mike Rowan who provided substantial useful input through several discussions and development of a set of field notes from the Pueblo, CO field mission. We will be pursuing ongoing interactions with field personnel as opportunities arise in FY-11.

  14. Value of coronary computed tomography as a prognostic tool.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Tahmeed; Parekh, Maansi; Ahmed, Shameer; Martinez, Matthew W

    2012-08-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) has become an important part of our armamentarium for noninvasive diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). Emerging technologies have produced lower radiation dose, improved spatial and temporal resolution, as well as information about coronary physiology. Although the prognostic role of coronary artery calcium scoring is known, similar evidence for CCTA has only recently emerged. Initial, small studies in various patient populations have indicated that CCTA-identified CAD may have a prognostic value. These findings were confirmed in a recent analysis of the international, prospective Coronary CT Angiography Evaluation For Clinical Outcomes: An International Multicenter (CONFIRM) registry. An incremental increase in mortality was found with a worse severity of CAD on a per-patient, per-vessel, and per-segment basis. In addition, age-, sex-, and ethnicity-based differences in mortality were also found. Whether changing our management algorithms based on these findings will affect outcomes is unclear. Large prospective studies utilizing targeted management strategies for obstructive and nonobstructive CAD are required to incorporate these recent findings into our daily practice.

  15. Multi-Mounted X-Ray Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jian; Liu, Zhenzhong; Wang, Jingzheng

    2016-01-01

    Most existing X-ray computed tomography (CT) techniques work in single-mounted mode and need to scan the inspected objects one by one. It is time-consuming and not acceptable for the inspection in a large scale. In this paper, we report a multi-mounted CT method and its first engineering implementation. It consists of a multi-mounted scanning geometry and the corresponding algebraic iterative reconstruction algorithm. This approach permits the CT rotation scanning of multiple objects simultaneously without the increase of penetration thickness and the signal crosstalk. Compared with the conventional single-mounted methods, it has the potential to improve the imaging efficiency and suppress the artifacts from the beam hardening and the scatter. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a developed multi-mounted X-ray CT prototype system. We believe that this technique is of particular interest for pushing the engineering applications of X-ray CT. PMID:27073911

  16. Brain single photon emission computed tomography in neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Denays, R.; Van Pachterbeke, T.; Tondeur, M.; Spehl, M.; Toppet, V.; Ham, H.; Piepsz, A.; Rubinstein, M.; Nol, P.H.; Haumont, D. )

    1989-08-01

    This study was designed to rate the clinical value of ({sup 123}I)iodoamphetamine (IMP) or ({sup 99m}Tc) hexamethyl propylene amine oxyme (HM-PAO) brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in neonates, especially in those likely to develop cerebral palsy. The results showed that SPECT abnormalities were congruent in most cases with structural lesions demonstrated by ultrasonography. However, mild bilateral ventricular dilatation and bilateral subependymal porencephalic cysts diagnosed by ultrasound were not associated with an abnormal SPECT finding. In contrast, some cortical periventricular and sylvian lesions and all the parasagittal lesions well visualized in SPECT studies were not diagnosed by ultrasound scans. In neonates with subependymal and/or intraventricular hemorrhage the existence of a parenchymal abnormality was only diagnosed by SPECT. These results indicate that ({sup 123}I)IMP or ({sup 99m}Tc)HM-PAO brain SPECT shows a potential clinical value as the neurodevelopmental outcome is clearly related to the site, the extent, and the number of cerebral lesions. Long-term clinical follow-up is, however, mandatory in order to define which SPECT abnormality is associated with neurologic deficit.

  17. Evaluation of image-enhanced paediatric computed tomography brain examinations.

    PubMed

    Ledenius, K; Stålhammar, F; Wiklund, L M; Fredriksson, C; Forsberg, A; Thilander-Klang, A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of reducing the radiation dose to paediatric patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) brain examination by using image-enhancing software. Artificial noise was added to the raw data collected from 20 patients aged between 1 and 10 y to simulate tube current reductions of 20, 40 and 60 mA. All images were created in duplicate; one set of images remained unprocessed whereas the other was processed with image-enhancing software. Three paediatric radiologists assessed the image quality based on their ability to visualise the high- and low-contrast structures and their overall impression of the diagnostic value of the image. For patients aged 6-10 y, it was found that dose reductions from 27 mGy (CTDI(vol)) to 23 mGy (15 %) in the upper brain and from 32 to 28 mGy (13 %) in the lower brain were possible for standard diagnostic CT examinations when using the image-enhancing filter. For patients 1-5 y, the results for standard diagnostics in the upper brain were inconclusive, for the lower brain no dose reductions were found possible.

  18. Artifact reduction in industrial computed tomography via data fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Schrapp, Michael; Goldammer, Matthias; Stephan, Jürgen

    2014-02-18

    As the most stressed part of a gas turbine the first row of turbine blades is not only a challenge for the materials used. Also the testing of these parts have to meet the highest standards. Computed tomography (CT) as the technique which could reveal the most details also provides the biggest challenges [1]: A full penetration of large sized turbine blades is often only possible at high X-ray voltages causing disproportional high costs. A reduction of the X-ray voltage is able to reduce these arising costs but yields non penetration artifacts in the reconstructed CT image. In most instances, these artifacts manifests itself as blurred and smeared regions at concave edges due to a reduced signal to noise ratio. In order to complement the missing information and to increase the overall image quality of our reconstruction, we use further imaging modalities such as a 3-D Scanner and ultrasonic imaging. A 3-D scanner is easy and cost effective to implement and is able to acquire all relevant data simultaneously with the CT projections. If, however, the interior structure is of supplemental interest, an ultrasonic imaging method is additionally used. We consider this data as a priori knowledge to employ them in an iterative reconstruction. To do so, standard iterative reconstruction methods are modified to incorporate the a priori data in a regularization approach in combination with minimizing the total variation of our image. Applying this procedure on turbine blades, we are able to reduce the apparent artifacts almost completely.

  19. [Flat-detector computed tomography in diagnostic and interventional neuroradiology].

    PubMed

    Struffert, T; Doerfler, A

    2009-09-01

    Originally aimed at improving standard radiography by providing higher absorption efficiency and a wider dynamic range than available with film-screen and phosphor luminescence, radiography flat detector technology is now widely accepted for neuroangiographic imaging. Especially flat-detector computed tomography (FD-CT), which uses rotational C-arm mounted flat-panel detector technology, is capable of volumetric imaging with a high spatial resolution. As "angiographic CT" FD-CT may be helpful in many diagnostic and neurointerventional procedures, e.g. intracranial stenting for cerebrovascular stenoses, stent-assisted coil embolization of wide-necked cerebral aneurysms and embolization of arteriovenous malformations. By providing morphologic, CT-like images of the brain within the angiography suite FD-CT allows rapid visualization of periprocedural hemorrhaging and may thus improve rapid complication management without the need of patient transfer. In addition, myelography and postmyelographic FD-CT imaging can be carried out using a single modality. Spinal interventions, such as kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty might also benefit from FD-CT. Imaging of the temporal bone may also develop into an important field of FD-CT. This paper briefly reviews the technical principles of FD technology and the potential applications in diagnostic and interventional neuroradiology.

  20. Computed Tomography Angiography of Carotid Arteries and Vertebrobasilar System

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Manuel; Ellmann, Stephan; Allmendinger, Thomas; Eller, Achim; Kammerer, Ferdinand; May, Matthias S.; Baigger, João F.; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Computed tomography angiography (CTA) of carotid arteries and vertebrobasilar system is a standardized procedure with excellent image quality, but radiation exposure remains a matter of concern. The aim of this study is to examine to what extent radiation dose can be lowered in relation to a standard protocol by simulating examinations with lower tube currents applying a dedicated software. Lower tube current was simulated by a dedicated noise insertion and reconstruction software (ReconCT). In a phantom study, true scans were performed with different dose protocols and compared to the results of simulated dose reductions of the same degree, respectively. In a patient study, 30 CTAs of supra-aortic vessels were reconstructed at a level of 100%, 75%, 50%, and 25% of the initial dose. Objective and subjective image analyses were performed. No significant noise differences between true scans and simulated scans of mimicked contrasted vessels were found. In the patient study, the quality scores of the 4 dose groups differed statistically significant; this difference vanished for the comparison of the 100% and 75% datasets after dichotomization into the categories of diagnostic and nondiagnostic image quality (P = .50). This study suggests an easy-to-implement method of simulating CTAs of carotid arteries and vertebrobasilar system with lower tube current for dose reduction by artificially adding noise to the original raw data. Lowering the radiation dose in a moderate extent to 75% of the original dose levels does not significantly alter the diagnostic image quality. PMID:26131822

  1. Dual-energy computed tomography for gout diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Dalbeth, Nicola; Choi, Hyon K

    2013-01-01

    The central feature of gout is deposition of monosodium urate crystals. Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) is a recently developed advanced imaging method that enables visualisation of urate deposits by analysis of the chemical composition of the scanned materials. This review summarises recent research describing the use of DECT in gout management. This technology may assist in both diagnosis and monitoring of the disease. Studies of patients with established disease indicate diagnostic accuracy for gout is high. Excellent inter-reader agreement has been reported for detection of urate deposits by use of DECT. Automated volume assessment software also enables rapid and reproducible measurement of urate deposits within tophi, suggesting that this modality may be useful for monitoring the disease. Although several case reports indicate DECT can be used to reveal reduction in the size of urate deposits, the sensitivity to change in response to urate-lowering therapy has not yet been systematically reported. DECT images reveal variable urate deposition within tophi of the same physical size. The ability to visualise urate deposits in tissue may provide new insights into the pathology and mechanisms of gout.

  2. Quantitative Computed Tomography and Image Analysis for Advanced Muscle Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Kyle Joseph; Gíslason, Magnus K.; Arnadottir, Iris D.; Marcante, Andrea; Piccione, Francesco; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Medical imaging is of particular interest in the field of translational myology, as extant literature describes the utilization of a wide variety of techniques to non-invasively recapitulate and quantity various internal and external tissue morphologies. In the clinical context, medical imaging remains a vital tool for diagnostics and investigative assessment. This review outlines the results from several investigations on the use of computed tomography (CT) and image analysis techniques to assess muscle conditions and degenerative process due to aging or pathological conditions. Herein, we detail the acquisition of spiral CT images and the use of advanced image analysis tools to characterize muscles in 2D and 3D. Results from these studies recapitulate changes in tissue composition within muscles, as visualized by the association of tissue types to specified Hounsfield Unit (HU) values for fat, loose connective tissue or atrophic muscle, and normal muscle, including fascia and tendon. We show how results from these analyses can be presented as both average HU values and compositions with respect to total muscle volumes, demonstrating the reliability of these tools to monitor, assess and characterize muscle degeneration. PMID:27478562

  3. Quantitative computed tomography imaging of airway remodeling in severe asthma

    PubMed Central

    Fetita, Catalin I.; Brillet, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous condition and approximately 5–10% of asthmatic subjects have severe disease associated with structure changes of the airways (airway remodeling) that may develop over time or shortly after onset of disease. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) imaging of the tracheobronchial tree and lung parenchyma has improved during the last 10 years, and has enabled investigators to study the large airway architecture in detail and assess indirectly the small airway structure. In severe asthmatics, morphologic changes in large airways, quantitatively assessed using 2D-3D airway registration and recent algorithms, are characterized by airway wall thickening, luminal narrowing and bronchial stenoses. Extent of expiratory gas trapping, quantitatively assessed using lung densitometry, may be used to assess indirectly small airway remodeling. Investigators have used these quantitative imaging techniques in order to attempt severity grading of asthma, and to identify clusters of asthmatic patients that differ in morphologic and functional characteristics. Although standardization of image analysis procedures needs to be improved, the identification of remodeling pattern in various phenotypes of severe asthma and the ability to relate airway structures to important clinical outcomes should help target treatment more effectively. PMID:26981458

  4. Continuous analog of multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique for computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateishi, Kiyoko; Yamaguchi, Yusaku; Abou Al-Ola, Omar M.; Kojima, Takeshi; Yoshinaga, Tetsuya

    2016-03-01

    We propose a hybrid dynamical system as a continuous analog to the block-iterative multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (BI-MART), which is a well-known iterative image reconstruction algorithm for computed tomography. The hybrid system is described by a switched nonlinear system with a piecewise smooth vector field or differential equation and, for consistent inverse problems, the convergence of non-negatively constrained solutions to a globally stable equilibrium is guaranteed by the Lyapunov theorem. Namely, we can prove theoretically that a weighted Kullback-Leibler divergence measure can be a common Lyapunov function for the switched system. We show that discretizing the differential equation by using the first-order approximation (Euler's method) based on the geometric multiplicative calculus leads to the same iterative formula of the BI-MART with the scaling parameter as a time-step of numerical discretization. The present paper is the first to reveal that a kind of iterative image reconstruction algorithm is constructed by the discretization of a continuous-time dynamical system for solving tomographic inverse problems. Iterative algorithms with not only the Euler method but also the Runge-Kutta methods of lower-orders applied for discretizing the continuous-time system can be used for image reconstruction. A numerical example showing the characteristics of the discretized iterative methods is presented.

  5. Shape estimation in computer tomography from minimal data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Henry; Peng, Hui

    1988-03-01

    In computerized tomography, line integrals of the absorptivity are used to reconstruct the object. In some applications only the locations, sizes, and shapes of internal opacities or near-opacities are needed. For these applications it is unnecessary to reconstruct an image by convolution backprojection O(N3) or by direct Fourier methods O(n2 log N). An algorithm suitable for this problem is proposed that requires only O(N) operations (N is of the order of the number of views). The high performance of the algorithm is demonstrated, and it is shown that the performance depends strongly on an appropriate choice of system parameters. These parameters, the number of views and the detector spacing, are shown to be linked, and a choice of the detector-spacing strongly constrains the choice of the number of views. It is shown how an optimum number of views can be determined for a fixed detector-spacing. A series of experiments that reinforce the theory is simulated on a computer.

  6. Clinical significance of computed tomography assessment for third molar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nakamori, Kenji; Tomihara, Kei; Noguchi, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Surgical extraction of the third molar is the most commonly performed surgical procedure in the clinical practice of oral surgery. Third molar surgery is warranted when there is inadequate space for eruption, malpositioning, or risk for cyst or odontogenic tumor formation. Preoperative assessment should include a detailed morphologic analysis of the third molar and its relationship to adjacent structures and surrounding tissues. Due to developments in medical engineering technology, computed tomography (CT) now plays a critical role in providing the clear images required for adequate assessment prior to third molar surgery. Removal of the maxillary third molar is associated with a risk for maxillary sinus perforation, whereas removal of the mandibular third molar can put patients at risk for a neurosensory deficit from damage to the lingual nerve or inferior alveolar nerve. Multiple factors, including demographic, anatomic, and treatment-related factors, influence the incidence of nerve injury during or following removal of the third molar. CT assessment of the third molar prior to surgery can identify some of these risk factors, such as the absence of cortication between the mandibular third molar and the inferior alveolar canal, prior to surgery to reduce the risk for nerve damage. This topic highlight presents an overview of the clinical significance of CT assessment in third molar surgery. PMID:25071882

  7. Sex estimation using computed tomography of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Tunis, Tanya Sella; Sarig, Rachel; Cohen, Haim; Medlej, Bahaa; Peled, Nathan; May, Hila

    2017-02-20

    Sex estimation of skeletal parts is of great value even in the DNA era. When computed tomography (CT) facilities were introduced to forensic institutes, new possibilities for sex estimation emerged. The aim of this study was to develop a CT-based method for sex estimation using the mandible. Twenty-five CT-based measurements of the mandible were developed and carried out on 3D reconstructions (volume rendering) and cross sections of the lower jaw of 438 adult individuals (214 males and 224 females). Intraobserver and interobserver variances of the measurements were examined using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) analysis. Five discriminant functions were developed using different states of completeness of the mandible. The success rates of these equations were cross validated twice. The measurements were found to be highly reliable (for intraobserver 0.838 < ICC < 0.995 and for interobserver 0.71 < ICC < 0.996). For a complete mandible, the correct classification rate was 90.8%. For incomplete mandibles, the correct classification rates varied from 72.9 to 85.6%. Cross-validation tests yielded similar success rates, for the complete mandible 89% and for the incomplete mandible 67.5 to 89%. We concluded that CT techniques are appropriate for estimating sex based on the mandible size and shape characteristics. Suggested discriminant functions for sex estimation are given with data on the correct classification rates.

  8. Corrosion monitoring with tangential radiography and limited view computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewert, Uwe; Tschaikner, Martin; Hohendorf, Stefan; Bellon, Carsten; Haith, Misty I.; Huthwaite, Peter; Lowe, Michael J. S.

    2016-02-01

    Accurate and reliable detection of subsea pipeline corrosion is required in order to verify the integrity of the pipeline. A laboratory trial was conducted with a representative pipe sample. The accurate measurement of the wall thickness and corrosion was performed with high energy X-rays and a digital detector array. A 7.5 MV betatron was used to penetrate a stepped pipe and a welded test pipe of 3 m length and 327 mm outer diameter, with different artificial corrosion areas in the 24 mm thick steel wall. The radiographs were taken with a 40 x 40 cm² digital detector array, which was not large enough to cover the complete pipe diameter after magnification. A C-arm based geometry was tested to evaluate the potential for automated inspection in field. The primary goal was the accurate measurement of wall thickness conforming to the standard. The same geometry was used to explore the ability of a C-arm based scanner in asymmetric mode for computed tomography (CT) measurement, taking projections covering only two thirds of the pipe diameter. The technique was optimized with the modelling software aRTist. A full volume of the pipe was reconstructed and the CT data set was used for reverse engineering, providing a CAD file for further aRTist simulations to explore the technique for subsea inspections.

  9. Frontal sinus parameters in computed tomography and sex determination.

    PubMed

    Akhlaghi, Mitra; Bakhtavar, Khadijeh; Moarefdoost, Jhale; Kamali, Artin; Rafeifar, Shahram

    2016-03-01

    The frontal sinus is a sturdy part of the skull that is likely to be retrieved for forensic investigations. We evaluated frontal sinus parameters in paranasal sinus computed tomography (CT) images for sex determination. The study was conducted on 200 normal paranasal sinus CT images of 100 men and 100 women of Persian origin. We categorized the studied population into three age groups of 20-34, 35-49 and ⩾ 50 years. The number of partial septa in the right frontal sinus and the maximum height and width were significantly different between the two sexes. The highest precision for sex determination was for the maximum height of the left frontal sinus (61.3%). In the 20-34 years age-group, height and width of the frontal sinus were significantly different between the two sexes and the height of the left sinus had the highest precision (60.8%). In the 35-49 years age-group, right anterior-posterior diameter had a sex determination precision of 52.3%. No frontal sinus parameter reached a statistically significant level for sex determination in the ⩾ 50 years age-group. The number of septa and scallopings were not useful in sex determination. Frontal sinus parameters did not have a high precision in sex determination among Persian adults.

  10. Quantitative computed tomography imaging of airway remodeling in severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Philippe A; Fetita, Catalin I; Brillet, Pierre-Yves

    2016-02-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous condition and approximately 5-10% of asthmatic subjects have severe disease associated with structure changes of the airways (airway remodeling) that may develop over time or shortly after onset of disease. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) imaging of the tracheobronchial tree and lung parenchyma has improved during the last 10 years, and has enabled investigators to study the large airway architecture in detail and assess indirectly the small airway structure. In severe asthmatics, morphologic changes in large airways, quantitatively assessed using 2D-3D airway registration and recent algorithms, are characterized by airway wall thickening, luminal narrowing and bronchial stenoses. Extent of expiratory gas trapping, quantitatively assessed using lung densitometry, may be used to assess indirectly small airway remodeling. Investigators have used these quantitative imaging techniques in order to attempt severity grading of asthma, and to identify clusters of asthmatic patients that differ in morphologic and functional characteristics. Although standardization of image analysis procedures needs to be improved, the identification of remodeling pattern in various phenotypes of severe asthma and the ability to relate airway structures to important clinical outcomes should help target treatment more effectively.

  11. Potential of Computed Tomography for inspection of aircraft components

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, S.G.; Martz, H.E.; Schneberk, D.J.

    1993-08-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) using penetrating radiation (x- or gamma-rays) can be used in a number of aircraft applications. This technique results in 3D volumetric attenuation data that is related to density and effective atomic number. CT is a transmission scanning method that must allow complete access to both sides of the object under inspection; the radiation source and detection systems must surround the object. This normally precludes the inspection of some large or planar (large aspect ratio) parts of the aircraft. However, we are pursuing recent limited-data techniques using object model information to obtain useful data from the partial information acquired. As illustrative examples, we describe how CT was instrumental in the analysis of particular aircraft components. These include fuselage panels, single crystal turbine blades, and aluminumlithium composites. These tests were performed by the members of the Nondestructive Evaluation Section at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) where we have been actively working in CT research and development. The aerospace applications can represent various phases of the design, manufacture, assembly, test, and retirement of various components and assemblies.

  12. Artifact reduction in industrial computed tomography via data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrapp, Michael; Goldammer, Matthias; Stephan, Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    As the most stressed part of a gas turbine the first row of turbine blades is not only a challenge for the materials used. Also the testing of these parts have to meet the highest standards. Computed tomography (CT) as the technique which could reveal the most details also provides the biggest challenges [1]: A full penetration of large sized turbine blades is often only possible at high X-ray voltages causing disproportional high costs. A reduction of the X-ray voltage is able to reduce these arising costs but yields non penetration artifacts in the reconstructed CT image. In most instances, these artifacts manifests itself as blurred and smeared regions at concave edges due to a reduced signal to noise ratio. In order to complement the missing information and to increase the overall image quality of our reconstruction, we use further imaging modalities such as a 3-D Scanner and ultrasonic imaging. A 3-D scanner is easy and cost effective to implement and is able to acquire all relevant data simultaneously with the CT projections. If, however, the interior structure is of supplemental interest, an ultrasonic imaging method is additionally used. We consider this data as a priori knowledge to employ them in an iterative reconstruction. To do so, standard iterative reconstruction methods are modified to incorporate the a priori data in a regularization approach in combination with minimizing the total variation of our image. Applying this procedure on turbine blades, we are able to reduce the apparent artifacts almost completely.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography of respiratory mechanics.

    PubMed

    Biederer, Jürgen; Hintze, Christian; Fabel, Michael; Dinkel, Julien

    2010-12-01

    Radiotherapy for organs with respiratory motion has motivated the development of dynamic volume lung imaging with computed tomography (4D-CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI). 4D-CT can be realized in helical (continuous couch translation during image acquisition) or cine mode (translation step-by-step), either acquired prospectively or reconstructed retrospectively with temporal resolutions of up to 250 msec. Long exposure times result in high radiation dose and restrict 4D-CT to specific indications (ie, radiotherapy planning). Dynamic MRI accelerated by parallel imaging and echo sharing reaches temporal resolutions of up to 10 images/sec (2D+t) or 1 volume/s (3D+t) that allow analyzing respiratory motion of the lung and its tumors. Near isotropic 4D-MRI can be used to assess tumor displacement, chest wall invasion, and segmental respiratory mechanics. Limited temporal resolution of dynamic volume acquisitions (in their current implementation) may lead to an overestimation of tumor size, as the mass is volume averaged into many voxels during motion. Nevertheless, 4D-MRI allows for repeated and prolonged measurements without radiation exposure and therefore appears to be appropriate for patient selection in motion-adapted radiotherapy as well as for a broad spectrum of scientific applications.

  14. X-ray computed tomography for additive manufacturing: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A.; Maskery, I.; Leach, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    In this review, the use of x-ray computed tomography (XCT) is examined, identifying the requirement for volumetric dimensional measurements in industrial verification of additively manufactured (AM) parts. The XCT technology and AM processes are summarised, and their historical use is documented. The use of XCT and AM as tools for medical reverse engineering is discussed, and the transition of XCT from a tool used solely for imaging to a vital metrological instrument is documented. The current states of the combined technologies are then examined in detail, separated into porosity measurements and general dimensional measurements. In the conclusions of this review, the limitation of resolution on improvement of porosity measurements and the lack of research regarding the measurement of surface texture are identified as the primary barriers to ongoing adoption of XCT in AM. The limitations of both AM and XCT regarding slow speeds and high costs, when compared to other manufacturing and measurement techniques, are also noted as general barriers to continued adoption of XCT and AM.

  15. Direct reconstruction of enhanced signal in computed tomography perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Lyu, Qingwen; Ma, Jianhua; Wang, Jing

    2016-04-01

    High imaging dose has been a concern in computed tomography perfusion (CTP) as repeated scans are performed at the same location of a patient. On the other hand, signal changes only occur at limited regions in CT acquired at different time points. In this work, we propose a new reconstruction strategy by effectively utilizing the initial phase high-quality CT to reconstruct the later phase CT acquired with a low-dose protocol. In the proposed strategy, initial high-quality CT is considered as a base image and enhanced signal (ES) is reconstructed directly by minimizing the penalized weighted least-square (PWLS) criterion. The proposed PWLS-ES strategy converts the conventional CT reconstruction into a sparse signal reconstruction problem. Digital and anthropomorphic phantom studies were performed to evaluate the performance of the proposed PWLS-ES strategy. Both phantom studies show that the proposed PWLS-ES method outperforms the standard iterative CT reconstruction algorithm based on the same PWLS criterion according to various quantitative metrics including root mean squared error (RMSE) and the universal quality index (UQI).

  16. Computed Tomography Findings of Pulmonary Mycobacterium simiae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Baghizadeh, Ayeh; Farnia, Poopak

    2017-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) pulmonary infections can be quite similar to tuberculosis, both clinically and radiologically. However, the treatment protocol is not similar. Mycobacterium simiae is a rare cause of NTM pulmonary infection. Herein, we aimed to evaluate and compare the computed tomography (CT) scan findings of M. simiae infection in lungs. For this reason, thirty-four patients (n = 34) with M. simiae lung infection were retrospectively evaluated. Diagnosis was confirmed by American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines and CT scans were reviewed in both lung and mediastinal windows. The average age of patients was 63 ± 14.54 years and 52.9% were male. The majority of patients had cough (91.2%) and sputum production (76.5%). Clinically, 41.2% of patients had previous history of TB (14/34), 38.2% had cardiac diseases (13/34), and 35.3% had diabetes mellitus (12/34). The most common CT findings in our study were nodular lesions (100%) and bronchiectasis (85.29%). Regarding the severity, grade I bronchiectasis was the most prevalent. Other prominent findings were tree-in-bud sign (88.2%), consolidation (52.94%), and lobar fibrosis and volume loss (67.6%). There was no significant zonal distribution of findings. In conclusion, nodular lesions and bronchiectasis are the most frequent features in CT scan of M. simiae pulmonary infection. PMID:28127232

  17. Considerations on an automatic computed tomography tube current modulation system.

    PubMed

    Moro, Luca; Panizza, Denis; D'Ambrosio, Daniela; Carne, Irene

    2013-10-01

    The scope of this study was to evaluate the effects on radiation output and image noise varying the acquisition parameters with an automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) system in computed tomography (CT). Chest CT examinations of an anthropomorphic phantom were acquired using a GE LightSpeed VCT 64-slice tomograph. Acquisitions were performed using different pitch, slice thickness and noise index (NI) values and varying the orientation of the scanned projection radiograph (SPR). The radiation output was determined by the CT dose index (CTDIvol). Image noise was evaluated measuring the standard deviation of CT numbers in several regions of interest. The radiation output was lower if the SPR was acquired in the anterior-posterior projection. The radiation dose with the posterior-anterior SPR was higher, because the divergence of the X-ray beam magnifies the anatomical structures closest to the tube, especially the spinal column, and this leads the ATCM system to estimate higher patient attenuation values and, therefore, to select higher tube current values. The NI was inversely proportional to the square root of the CTDIvol and, with fixed NI, the CTDIvol increased as the slice thickness decreased. This study suggests some important issues to use the GE ATCM system efficiently.

  18. Use of dentomaxillofacial cone beam computed tomography in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Kamburoğlu, Kıvanç

    2015-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was developed and introduced specifically for dento-maxillofacial imaging. CBCT possesses a number of advantages over medical CT in clinical practice, such as lower effective radiation doses, lower costs, fewer space requirements, easier image acquisition, and interactive display modes such as mutiplanar reconstruction that are applicable to maxillofacial imaging. However, the disadvantages of CBCT include higher doses than two-dimensional imaging; the inability to accurately represent the internal structure of soft tissues and soft-tissue lesions; a limited correlation with Hounsfield Units for standardized quantification of bone density; and the presence of various types of image artifacts, mainly those produced by metal restorations. CBCT is now commonly used for a variety of purposes in oral implantology, dento-maxillofacial surgery, image-guided surgical procedures, endodontics, periodontics and orthodontics. CBCT applications provide obvious benefits in the assessment of dentomaxillofacial region, however; it should be used only in correct indications considering the necessity and the potential hazards of the examination. PMID:26120381

  19. The application of computed tomography in wound ballistics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiatis, Nick; Moraitis, Konstantinos; Papadodima, Stavroula; Spiliopoulou, Chara; Kelekis, Alexis; Kelesis, Christos; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios; Kordolaimi, Sofia; Ploussi, Agapi

    2015-09-01

    In wound ballistics research there is a relationship between the data that characterize a bullet and the injury resulted after shooting when it perforates the human body. The bullet path in the human body following skin perforation as well as the damaging effect cannot always be predictable as they depend on various factors such as the bullet's characteristics (velocity, distance, type of firearm and so on) and the tissue types that the bullet passes through. The purpose of this presentation is to highlight the contribution of Computed Tomography (CT) in wound ballistics research. Using CT technology and studying virtual “slices” of specific areas on scanned human bodies, allows the evaluation of density and thickness of the skin, the subcutaneous tissue, the muscles, the vital organs and the bones. Density data taken from Hounsfield units can be converted in g/ml by using the appropriate software. By evaluating the results of this study, the anatomy of the human body utilizing ballistic gel will be reproduced in order to simulate the path that a bullet follows. The biophysical analysis in wound ballistics provides another application of CT technology, which is commonly used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in various medical disciplines.

  20. Computed tomography and patient risk: Facts, perceptions and uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Power, Stephen P; Moloney, Fiachra; Twomey, Maria; James, Karl; O'Connor, Owen J; Maher, Michael M

    2016-12-28

    Since its introduction in the 1970s, computed tomography (CT) has revolutionized diagnostic decision-making. One of the major concerns associated with the widespread use of CT is the associated increased radiation exposure incurred by patients. The link between ionizing radiation and the subsequent development of neoplasia has been largely based on extrapolating data from studies of survivors of the atomic bombs dropped in Japan in 1945 and on assessments of the increased relative risk of neoplasia in those occupationally exposed to radiation within the nuclear industry. However, the association between exposure to low-dose radiation from diagnostic imaging examinations and oncogenesis remains unclear. With improved technology, significant advances have already been achieved with regards to radiation dose reduction. There are several dose optimization strategies available that may be readily employed including omitting unnecessary images at the ends of acquired series, minimizing the number of phases acquired, and the use of automated exposure control as opposed to fixed tube current techniques. In addition, new image reconstruction techniques that reduce radiation dose have been developed in recent years with promising results. These techniques use iterative reconstruction algorithms to attain diagnostic quality images with reduced image noise at lower radiation doses.

  1. Determination of dosimetric quantities in pediatric abdominal computed tomography scans*

    PubMed Central

    Jornada, Tiago da Silva; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aiming at contributing to the knowledge on doses in computed tomography (CT), this study has the objective of determining dosimetric quantities associated with pediatric abdominal CT scans, comparing the data with diagnostic reference levels (DRL). Materials and methods The study was developed with a Toshiba Asteion single-slice CT scanner and a GE BrightSpeed multi-slice CT unit in two hospitals. Measurements were performed with a pencil-type ionization chamber and a 16 cm-diameter polymethylmethacrylate trunk phantom. Results No significant difference was observed in the values for weighted air kerma index (CW), but the differences were relevant in values for volumetric air kerma index (CVOL), air kerma-length product (PKL,CT) and effective dose. Conclusion Only the CW values were lower than the DRL, suggesting that dose optimization might not be necessary. However, PKL,CT and effective dose values stressed that there still is room for reducing pediatric radiation doses. The present study emphasizes the importance of determining all dosimetric quantities associated with CT scans. PMID:25741103

  2. A constrained conjugate gradient algorithm for computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, S.G.; Goodman, D.M.

    1994-11-15

    Image reconstruction from projections of x-ray, gamma-ray, protons and other penetrating radiation is a well-known problem in a variety of fields, and is commonly referred to as computed tomography (CT). Various analytical and series expansion methods of reconstruction and been used in the past to provide three-dimensional (3D) views of some interior quantity. The difficulties of these approaches lie in the cases where (a) the number of views attainable is limited, (b) the Poisson (or other) uncertainties are significant, (c) quantifiable knowledge of the object is available, but not implementable, or (d) other limitations of the data exist. We have adapted a novel nonlinear optimization procedure developed at LLNL to address limited-data image reconstruction problems. The technique, known as nonlinear least squares with general constraints or constrained conjugate gradients (CCG), has been successfully applied to a number of signal and image processing problems, and is now of great interest to the image reconstruction community. Previous applications of this algorithm to deconvolution problems and x-ray diffraction images for crystallography have shown the great promise.

  3. The transesophageal echocardiography simulator based on computed tomography images.

    PubMed

    Piórkowski, Adam; Kempny, Aleksander

    2013-02-01

    Simulators are a new tool in education in many fields, including medicine, where they greatly improve familiarity with medical procedures, reduce costs, and, importantly, cause no harm to patients. This is so in the case of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), in which the use of a simulator facilitates spatial orientation and helps in case studies. The aim of the project described in this paper is to simulate an examination by TEE. This research makes use of available computed tomography data to simulate the corresponding echocardiographic view. This paper describes the essential characteristics that distinguish these two modalities and the key principles of the wave phenomena that should be considered in the simulation process, taking into account the conditions specific to the echocardiography. The construction of the CT2TEE (Web-based TEE simulator) is also presented. The considerations include ray-tracing and ray-casting techniques in the context of ultrasound beam and artifact simulation. An important aspect of the interaction with the user is raised.

  4. Noninvasive coronary artery angiography using electron beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumberger, John A.; Rensing, Benno J.; Reed, Judd E.; Ritman, Erik L.; Sheedy, Patrick F., II

    1996-04-01

    Electron beam computed tomography (EBCT), also known as ultrafast-CT or cine-CT, uses a unique scanning architecture which allows for multiple high spatial resolution electrocardiographic triggered images of the beating heart. A recent study has demonstrated the feasibility of qualitative comparisons between EBCT derived 3D coronary angiograms and invasive angiography. Stenoses of the proximal portions of the left anterior descending and right coronary arteries were readily identified, but description of atherosclerotic narrowing in the left circumflex artery (and distal epicardial disease) was not possible with any degree of confidence. Although these preliminary studies support the notion that this approach has potential, the images overall were suboptimal for clinical application as an adjunct to invasive angiography. Furthermore, these studies did not examine different methods of EBCT scan acquisition, tomographic slice thicknesses, extent of scan overlap, or other segmentation, thresholding, and interpolation algorithms. Our laboratory has initiated investigation of these aspects and limitations of EBCT coronary angiography. Specific areas of research include defining effects of cardiac orientation; defining the effects of tomographic slice thickness and intensity (gradient) versus positional (shaped based) interpolation; and defining applicability of imaging each of the major epicardial coronary arteries for quantitative definition of vessel size, cross-sectional area, taper, and discrete vessel narrowing.

  5. Proceedings of clinical SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    It has been five years since the last in-depth American College of Nuclear Physicians/Society of Nuclear Medicine Symposium on the subject of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was held. Because this subject was nominated as the single most desired topic we have selected SPECT imaging as the basis for this year's program. The objectives of this symposium are to survey the progress of SPECT clinical applications that have taken place over the last five years and to provide practical and timely guidelines to users of SPECT so that this exciting imaging modality can be fully integrated into the evaluation of pathologic processes. The first half was devoted to a consideration of technical factors important in SPECT acquisition and the second half was devoted to those organ systems about which sufficient clinical SPECT imaging data are available. With respect to the technical aspect of the program we have selected the key areas which demand awareness and attention in order to make SPECT operational in clinical practice. These include selection of equipment, details of uniformity correction, utilization of phantoms for equipment acceptance and quality assurance, the major aspect of algorithms, an understanding of filtered back projection and appropriate choice of filters and an awareness of the most commonly generated artifacts and how to recognize them. With respect to the acquisition and interpretation of organ images, the faculty will present information on the major aspects of hepatic, brain, cardiac, skeletal, and immunologic imaging techniques. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base. (TEM)

  6. Spatial smoothing coherence factor for ultrasound computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Cuijuan; Xu, Mengling; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, many research studies have been carried out on ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) for its application prospect in early diagnosis of breast cancer. This paper applies four kinds of coherence-factor-like beamforming methods to improve the image quality of synthetic aperture focusing method for USCT, including the coherence-factor (CF), the phase coherence factor (PCF), the sign coherence factor (SCF) and the spatial smoothing coherence factor (SSCF) (proposed in our previous work). The performance of these methods was tested with simulated raw data which were generated by the ultrasound simulation software PZFlex 2014. The simulated phantom was set to be water of 4cm diameter with three nylon objects of different diameters inside. The ring-type transducer had 72 elements with a center frequency of 1MHz. The results show that all the methods can reveal the biggest nylon circle with the radius of 2.5mm. SSCF gets the highest SNR among the proposed methods and provides a more homogenous background. None of these methods can reveal the two smaller nylon circles with the radius of 0.75mm and 0.25mm. This may be due to the small number of elements.

  7. Dimensional Control of Micro Components with Synchrotron Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrig, Karsten; Goebbels, Juergen; Staude, Andreas; Bartscher, Markus; Haertig, Frank; Kniel, Karin; Neukamm, Marko; Neuschaefer-Rube, Ulrich

    2010-04-06

    An advantage of Computed Tomography (CT) is the coordinate measurement capability of small inner structures, which are not accessible with classical measurement techniques. Using the advantages of synchrotron radiation CT measurements of parts with sizes of a few millimeters are performed at BAMline of BESSY II and are expected to be used as references for further dimensional measurements with micro CT. Previous investigations were focused on external gears, which are accessible with standard Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMMs). To obtain information about the accuracy of dimensional measurements of internal gears with CT, reference data have been measured by a tactile-optical CMM. This information is used to evaluate the performance of the CT. In addition to the first results for the evaluation of internal gear flanks, new measurements of different gear materials (steel and zirconium dioxide) will be presented. For functional evaluation, gear flanks are a matter of particular interest. Form deviations are analyzed with respect to the different gear materials to establish CT measurements as technology in the field of quality assurance and to compare the different manufacturing processes.

  8. Incidental Breast Lesions Detected on Computed Thorax Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Poyraz, Necdet; Emlik, Ganime Dilek; Keskin, Suat; Kalkan, Havva

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although mammography is the primary imaging method of the breast, incidental benign and malignant breast lesions are increasingly being detected on computed tomographies (CTs) performed to detect different pathologies. Therefore, the detection and accurate identification of these lesions is important. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the frequency, morphological features, and results of incidental breast lesions on CTs performed for the detection of extramammarian pathologies. Materials and Methods Incidental breast lesions on CTs performed in our department between 2011 and 2013 were evaluated. Patients who had previously diagnosed breast lesions were excluded from the study. The inclusion criteria were histopathologic diagnose and being followed-up for at least 2 years. Results The study population consisted of 33 women whose mean age was 55±1.38 (37–78) years. Of the 33 women, 12 (36%) had malignant and 21 (64%) had benign or normal findings. The most common malignant lesion was invasive ductal carcinoma, and the most common benign lesion was fibroadenoma. Ill-defined contour and lymphadenopathy in malignant lesions and well-defined contour in benign lesions were the most important CT findings. Conclusion Breast must be carefully evaluated if it is included in the scans. An accurate report of breast lesions gives an opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment.

  9. Atypical gunshot wound: Bullet trajectory analyzed by computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Tae; Murray, Richard; Galvan, Dan; Nazim, Muhammad H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gunshot injuries are a result of a bullet or projectile fired from a weapon that penetrates the body. Homicide, suicide, and occasionally, accidental events are a significant cause of firearm-related injuries. In rare cases, the damage from the gunshot injury can be masked due to an atypical bullet trajectory. Presentation of case A 63-year-old male was found with a gunshot wound to the anterior left knee. Computed tomography (CT) scans revealed a bullet track extending from the anterior aspect of the left knee that traveled cephalad subcutaneously and entered into the peritoneal cavity, perforating the distal descending colon. The bullet was found to be at rest adjacent to the spleen and posterior chest wall, with no injury to the lungs, kidneys or the spleen. The patient required a sigmoid colectomy with descending colostomy and was subsequently discharged home without any complications. Discussion Intra-abdominal organ damage from a gunshot wound to the distal limb is a rare occurrence. Atypical gun shot wounds, such as this case, have the potential for multiple issues including: delayed diagnostic tests, inaccurate radiological readings, and inappropriate medical management. Conclusion If an abnormal trajectory is maintained, it is possible for a bullet to traverse half the length of the body without the patient realizing it. Accurate CT analysis and quick decisions in surgical and medical management are critical takeaways to provide quality care to patients with these injuries. PMID:26263447

  10. Computed tomography and patient risk: Facts, perceptions and uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Power, Stephen P; Moloney, Fiachra; Twomey, Maria; James, Karl; O’Connor, Owen J; Maher, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    Since its introduction in the 1970s, computed tomography (CT) has revolutionized diagnostic decision-making. One of the major concerns associated with the widespread use of CT is the associated increased radiation exposure incurred by patients. The link between ionizing radiation and the subsequent development of neoplasia has been largely based on extrapolating data from studies of survivors of the atomic bombs dropped in Japan in 1945 and on assessments of the increased relative risk of neoplasia in those occupationally exposed to radiation within the nuclear industry. However, the association between exposure to low-dose radiation from diagnostic imaging examinations and oncogenesis remains unclear. With improved technology, significant advances have already been achieved with regards to radiation dose reduction. There are several dose optimization strategies available that may be readily employed including omitting unnecessary images at the ends of acquired series, minimizing the number of phases acquired, and the use of automated exposure control as opposed to fixed tube current techniques. In addition, new image reconstruction techniques that reduce radiation dose have been developed in recent years with promising results. These techniques use iterative reconstruction algorithms to attain diagnostic quality images with reduced image noise at lower radiation doses. PMID:28070242

  11. Numerical observer for atherosclerotic plaque classification in spectral computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lorsakul, Auranuch; Fakhri, Georges El; Worstell, William; Ouyang, Jinsong; Rakvongthai, Yothin; Laine, Andrew F; Li, Quanzheng

    2016-07-01

    Spectral computed tomography (SCT) generates better image quality than conventional computed tomography (CT). It has overcome several limitations for imaging atherosclerotic plaque. However, the literature evaluating the performance of SCT based on objective image assessment is very limited for the task of discriminating plaques. We developed a numerical-observer method and used it to assess performance on discrimination vulnerable-plaque features and compared the performance among multienergy CT (MECT), dual-energy CT (DECT), and conventional CT methods. Our numerical observer was designed to incorporate all spectral information and comprised two-processing stages. First, each energy-window domain was preprocessed by a set of localized channelized Hotelling observers (CHO). In this step, the spectral image in each energy bin was decorrelated using localized prewhitening and matched filtering with a set of Laguerre-Gaussian channel functions. Second, the series of the intermediate scores computed from all the CHOs were integrated by a Hotelling observer with an additional prewhitening and matched filter. The overall signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) were obtained, yielding an overall discrimination performance metric. The performance of our new observer was evaluated for the particular binary classification task of differentiating between alternative plaque characterizations in carotid arteries. A clinically realistic model of signal variability was also included in our simulation of the discrimination tasks. The inclusion of signal variation is a key to applying the proposed observer method to spectral CT data. Hence, the task-based approaches based on the signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly (SKE/BKE) framework and the clinical-relevant signal-known-statistically/background-known-exactly (SKS/BKE) framework were applied for analytical computation of figures of merit (FOM). Simulated data of a

  12. Characterization of pulmonary lesions in patients with suspected lung cancer: computed tomography versus [¹⁸F] fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Harders, Stefan Walbom; Madsen, Hans Henrik; Hjorthaug, Karin; Arveschoug, Anne Kirstine; Rasmussen, Torben Riis; Meldgaard, Peter; Andersen, Johanne Bach; Pilegaard, Hans Kristian; Hager, Henrik; Rehling, Michael; Rasmussen, Finn

    2012-10-16

    Pulmonary nodules are of high clinical importance, given they may prove to be an early manifestation of lung cancer. Pulmonary nodules are small, focal, radiographic opacities that may be solitary or multiple. A solitary pulmonary nodule is a single, small (<-30 mm in diameter) opacity. Larger opacities are called masses and are often malignant. As imaging techniques improve and more nodules are detected, the optimal management of pulmonary nodules remains unclear. However, the question of malignancy of any given nodule remains the same. A standard contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan is often the first examination, followed by a number of other examinations. The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical feasibility of CT versus integrated [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET)/low-dose CT scan in patients with suspected lung cancer and pulmonary lesions on CT. All results were controlled for reproducibility. We found that when used early in the work-up of the lesions, CT raised the prevalence of lung cancer in the population to the point where further diagnostic imaging examination could be considered futile. We also found that the overall diagnostic accuracy, as well as the classification probabilities and predictive values of the two modalities were not significantly different; the reproducibility of these results was substantial.

  13. NDA via gamma-ray active and passive computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Decman, D.J.; Martz, H.E.; Roberson, G.P.; Johansson, E.

    1996-10-01

    Gamma-ray-based computed tomography (CT) requires that two different measurements be made on a closed waste container. [MAR92 and ROB94] When the results from these two measurements are combined, it becomes possible to identify and quantify all detectable gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes within a container. All measurements are made in a tomographic manner, i.e., the container is moved sequentially through well- known and accurately reproducible translation, rotation, and elevation positions in order to obtain gamma-ray data that is reconstructed by computer into images that represent waste contents. [ROB94] The two measurements modes are called active (A) and passive (P) CT. In the ACT mode, a collimated gamma-ray source external to the waste container emits multiple, mono-energetic gamma rays that pass through the container and are detected on the opposite side. The attenuated gamma-rays transmitted are measured as a function of both energy and position of the container. Thus, container contents are `mapped` via the measured amount of attenuation suffered at each gamma-ray energy. In effect, a three dimensional (3D) image of gamma- ray attenuation versus waste content is obtained. In the PCT measurement mode, the external radioactive source is shuttered turned- off, and the waste container, is moved through similar positions used for the ACT measurements. However, this time the radiation detectors record any gamma-rays emitted by radioactive sources on the inside of the waste container. Thus, internal radioactive content is mapped or 3D-imaged in the same tomographic manner as the attenuating matrix materials were in the ACT measurement mode.

  14. Cyst-based measurements for assessing lymphangioleiomyomatosis in computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, P. Brown, M. S.; Kim, H.; Kim, H.; Goldin, J. G.; Argula, R.; Strange, C.

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of a new family of measurements made on individual pulmonary cysts extracted from computed tomography (CT) for assessing the severity of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM). Methods: CT images were analyzed using thresholding to identify a cystic region of interest from chest CT of LAM patients. Individual cysts were then extracted from the cystic region by the watershed algorithm, which separates individual cysts based on subtle edges within the cystic regions. A family of measurements were then computed, which quantify the amount, distribution, and boundary appearance of the cysts. Sequential floating feature selection was used to select a small subset of features for quantification of the severity of LAM. Adjusted R{sup 2} from multiple linear regression and R{sup 2} from linear regression against measurements from spirometry were used to compare the performance of our proposed measurements with currently used density based CT measurements in the literature, namely, the relative area measure and the D measure. Results: Volumetric CT data, performed at total lung capacity and residual volume, from a total of 49 subjects enrolled in the MILES trial were used in our study. Our proposed measures had adjusted R{sup 2} ranging from 0.42 to 0.59 when regressing against the spirometry measures, with p < 0.05. For previously used density based CT measurements in the literature, the best R{sup 2} was 0.46 (for only one instance), with the majority being lower than 0.3 or p > 0.05. Conclusions: The proposed family of CT-based cyst measurements have better correlation with spirometric measures than previously used density based CT measurements. They show potential as a sensitive tool for quantitatively assessing the severity of LAM.

  15. Multidetector Computed Tomography for Congenital Anomalies of the Aortic Arch: Vascular Rings.

    PubMed

    García-Guereta, Luis; García-Cerro, Estefanía; Bret-Zurita, Montserrat

    2016-07-01

    The development of multidetector computed tomography has triggered a revolution in the study of the aorta and other large vessels and has replaced angiography in the diagnosis of congenital anomalies of the aortic arch, particularly vascular rings. The major advantage of multidetector computed tomography is that it permits clear 3-dimensional assessment of not only vascular structures, but also airway and esophageal compression. The current update aims to summarize the embryonic development of the aortic arch and the developmental anomalies leading to vascular ring formation and to discuss the current diagnostic and therapeutic role of multidetector computed tomography in this field.

  16. Phased attenuation correction in respiration correlated computed tomography/positron emitted tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, C. C. A.; Bosmans, G.; Dekker, A. L. A. J.; Oellers, M. C.; De Ruysscher, D. K. M.; Lambin, P.; Minken, A. W. H.; Lang, N.; Schaefers, K. P.

    2006-06-15

    The motion of lung tumors with respiration causes difficulties in the imaging with computed tomography (CT) and positron emitted tomography (PET). Since an accurate knowledge of the position of the tumor and the surrounding tissues is needed for radiation treatment planning, it is important to improve CT/PET image acquisition. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential to improve image acquisition using phased attenuation correction in respiration correlated CT/PET, where data of both modalities were binned retrospectively. Respiration correlated scans were made on a Siemens Biograph Sensation 16 CT/PET scanner which was modified to make a low pitch CT scan and list mode PET scan possible. A lollipop phantom was used in the experiments. The sphere with a diameter of 3.1 cm was filled with approximately 20 MBq {sup 18}F-FDG. Three longitudinal movement amplitudes were tested: 2.5, 3.9, and 4.8 cm. After collection of the raw CT data, list mode PET data, and the respiratory signal CT/PET images were binned to ten phases with the help of in-house-built software. Each PET phase was corrected for attenuation with CT data of the corresponding phase. For comparison, the attenuation correction was also performed with nonrespiration correlated (non-RC) CT data. The volume and the amplitude of the movement were calculated for every phase of both the CT and PET data (with phased attenuation correction). Maximum and average activity concentrations were compared between the phased and nonphased attenuation corrected PET. With a standard non-RC CT/PET scan, the volume was underestimated by as much as 46% in CT and the PET volume was overestimated to 370%. The volumes found with RC-CT/PET scanning had average deviations of 1.9% ({+-}4.8%) and 1.5% ({+-}3.4%) from the actual volume, for the CT and PET volumes, respectively. Evaluation of the maximum activity concentration showed a clear displacement in the images with non-RC attenuation correction, and activity values

  17. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emisson Tomography/Computed Tomography Guided Conformal Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Heerim; Huh, Seung Jae; Ju, Sang Gyu; Park, Won; Lee, Jeong Eun; Choi, Joon Young; Kim, Byung-Tae; Kim, Chan Kyo; Park, Byung Kwan

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT)-guided conformal brachytherapy treatment planning in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment FDG-PET/CT was performed for 12 patients with cervical cancer. Brachytherapy simulation was performed after an external-beam radiation therapy median dose of 4140 cGy. Patients underwent FDG-PET/CT scans with placement of tandem and ovoid applicators. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was determined by adjusting the window and level to a reasonable value and outlining the edge of the enhancing area, which was done in consultation with a nuclear medicine physician. A standardized uptake value profile of the tumor margin was taken for each patient relative to the maximum uptake value of each tumor and analyzed. The plan was designed to deliver 400 cGy to point A (point A plan) or to cover the clinical target volume (CTV) (PET/CT plan). Results: The median dose that encompassed 95% of the target volume (D95) of the CTV was 323.0 cGy for the point A plan vs 399.0 cGy for the PET/CT plan (P=.001). The maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) of the tumors were reduced by a median of 57% (range, 13%-80%). All but 1 patient presented with discernable residual uptake within the tumors. The median value of the thresholds of the tumors contoured by simple visual analysis was 41% (range, 23%-71%). Conclusions: In this study, the PET/CT plan was better than the conventional point A plan in terms of target coverage without increasing the dose to the normal tissue, making optimized 3-dimensional brachytherapy treatment planning possible. In comparison with the previously reported study with PET or CT alone, we found that visual target localization was facilitated by PET fusion on indeterminate CT masses. Further studies are needed to characterize the metabolic activity detected during radiation therapy for more reliable targeting.

  18. Phased attenuation correction in respiration correlated computed tomography/positron emitted tomography.

    PubMed

    Nagel, C C A; Bosmans, G; Dekker, A L A J; Ollers, M C; De Ruysscher, D K M; Lambin, P; Minken, A W H; Lang, N; Schäfers, K P

    2006-06-01

    The motion of lung tumors with respiration causes difficulties in the imaging with computed tomography (CT) and positronemitted tomography (PET). Since an accurate knowledge of the position of the tumor and the surrounding tissues is needed for radiation treatment planning, it is important to improve CT/PET image acquisition. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential to improve image acquisition using phased attenuation correction in respiration correlated CT/PET, where data of both modalities were binned retrospectively. Respiration correlated scans were made on a Siemens Biograph Sensation 16 CT/PET scanner which was modified to make a low pitch CT scan and list mode PET scan possible. A lollipop phantom was used in the experiments. The sphere with a diameter of 3.1 cm was filled with approximately 20 MBq 18F-FDG. Three longitudinal movement amplitudes were tested: 2.5, 3.9, and 4.8 cm. After collection of the raw CT data, list mode PET data, and the respiratory signal CT/PET images were binned to ten phases with the help of in-house-built software. Each PET phase was corrected for attenuation with CT data of the corresponding phase. For comparison, the attenuation correction was also performed with nonrespiration correlated (non-RC) CT data. The volume and the amplitude of the movement were calculated for every phaseof both the CT and PET data (with phased attenuation correction). Maximum and average activity concentrations were compared between the phased and nonphased attenuation corrected PET. With a standard non-RC CT/PET scan, the volume was underestimated by as much as 46% in CT and the PET volume was overestimated to 370%. The volumes found with RC-CT/PET scanning had average deviations of 1.9% (+/- 4.8%) and 1.5% (+/- 3.4%) from the actual volume, for the CT and PET volumes, respectively. Evaluation of the maximum activity concentration showed a clear displacement in the images with non-RC attenuation correction, and activity values were on

  19. Budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomographycomputed tomography for staging lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    Biz, Aline Navega; Caetano, Rosângela

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomography (PET) in mediastinal and distant staging of non-small cell lung cancer. METHODS The estimates were calculated by the epidemiological method for years 2014 to 2018. Nation-wide data were used about the incidence; data on distribution of the disease´s prevalence and on the technologies’ accuracy were from the literature; data regarding involved costs were taken from a micro-costing study and from Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) database. Two strategies for using PET were analyzed: the offer to all newly-diagnosed patients, and the restricted offer to the ones who had negative results in previous computed tomography (CT) exams. Univariate and extreme scenarios sensitivity analyses were conducted to evaluate the influence from sources of uncertainties in the parameters used. RESULTS The incorporation of PET-CT in SUS would imply the need for additional resources of 158.1 BRL (98.2 USD) million for the restricted offer and 202.7 BRL (125.9 USD) million for the inclusive offer in five years, with a difference of 44.6 BRL (27.7 USD) million between the two offer strategies within that period. In absolute terms, the total budget impact from its incorporation in SUS, in five years, would be 555 BRL (345 USD) and 600 BRL (372.8 USD) million, respectively. The costs from the PET-CT procedure were the most influential parameter in the results. In the most optimistic scenario, the additional budget impact would be reduced to 86.9 BRL (54 USD) and 103.8 BRL (64.5 USD) million, considering PET-CT for negative CT and PET-CT for all, respectively. CONCLUSIONS The incorporation of PET in the clinical staging of non-small cell lung cancer seems to be financially feasible considering the high budget of the Brazilian Ministry of Health. The potential reduction in the number of unnecessary surgeries may cause the available resources to be more efficiently allocated. PMID:26274871

  20. Ceramic and polymeric dental onlays evaluated by photo-elasticity, optical coherence tomography, and micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Topala, Florin; Ionita, Ciprian; Negru, Radu; Fabriky, Mihai; Marcauteanu, Corina; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Marsavina, Liviu; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    Dental onlays are restorations used to repair rear teeth that have a mild to moderate amount of decay. They can also be used to restore teeth that are cracked or fractured if the damage is not severe enough to require a dental crown. The use of onlays requires less tooth reduction than does the use of metal fillings. This allows dentists to conserve more of a patient's natural tooth structure in the treatment process. The aims of this study are to evaluate the biomechanical comportment of the dental onlays, by using the 3D photo elasticity method and to investigate the integrity of the structures and their fitting to the dental support. For this optical coherence tomography and micro-computed tomography were employed. Both methods were used to investigate 37 dental onlays, 17 integral polymeric and 20 integral ceramic. The results permit to observe materials defects inside the ceramic or polymeric onlays situate in the biomechanically tensioned areas that could lead to fracture of the prosthetic structure. Marginal fitting problems of the onlays related to the teeth preparations were presented in order to observe the possibility of secondary cavities. The resulted images from the optical coherence tomography were verified by the micro-computed tomography. In conclusion, the optical coherence tomography can be used as a clinical method in order to evaluate the integrity of the dental ceramic and polymeric onlays and to investigate the quality of the marginal fitting to the teeth preparations.

  1. Physical-space refraction-corrected transmission ultrasound computed tomography made computationally practical.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengying; Mueller, Klaus; Jackowski, Marcel; Dione, Donald; Staib, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    Transmission Ultrasound Computed Tomography (CT) is strongly affected by the acoustic refraction properties of the imaged tissue, and proper modeling and correction of these effects is crucial to achieving high-quality image reconstructions. A method that can account for these refractive effects solves the governing Eikonal equation within an iterative reconstruction framework, using a wave-front tracking approach. Excellent results can be obtained, but at considerable computational expense. Here, we report on the acceleration of three Eikonal solvers (Fast Marching Method (FMM), Fast Sweeping Method (FSM), Fast Iterative Method (FIM)) on three computational platforms (commodity graphics hardware (GPUs), multi-core and cluster CPUs), within this refractive Transmission Ultrasound CT framework. Our efforts provide insight into the capabilities of the various architectures for acoustic wave-front tracking, and they also yield a framework that meets the interactive demands of clinical practice, without a loss in reconstruction quality.

  2. Neutron Computed Tomography Using Real-Time Neutron Radiography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulcoski, Mark Francis

    Conventional neutron radiography of an object records a two-dimensional distribution of the neutron beam intensity after it has passed through an object. The neutron radiograph, whether static film or real-time, may be considered a "shadow graph" of the object. In a shadow graph, internal structures in an object may mask one another making it difficult or impossible to precisely define the internals of the object. This problem can be solved by tomographic imaging. A real-time neutron radiography facility was constructed including the capability of neutron tomography. The neutron beam was measured for total neutron flux ((1.0 (+OR-) 0.2) x 10('11) n/(m('2)-sec)), gold cadmium ratio (52 (+OR-) 3) and effective neutron temperature (83(DEGREES)C (+OR -) 8(DEGREES)C). The angular divergence or nonparallelism of the neutron beam was measured to be \\2.3(DEGREES) (+OR -) 0.1(DEGREES) thereby providing a means of quantifying the collimator effectiveness. The resolution capabilities of both static film and real-time neutron radiographs were quantified using a Fourier transform algorithm to calculate the modulation transfer function of both types of radiographs. The contrast sensitivity of both types of radiographs was measured as 3.1% for film and 4.0% for real-time radiographs. Two tomography algorithms, the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) and the convolution method, were programmed on an Intellect 100 Image Processing System. The SIRT algorithm was found to be too large and slow on the Intellect 100 to produce useful tomographs. The convolution method produced results near the theoretical resolution limits for a given number of projections. A tomographic resolution of at least 1.3 mm was demonstrated using 200 projections. Computer running time for the convolution method was found to be (TURN)30 seconds for each projection used. A series of experiments were conducted using the convolution method investigating the effect of high and low pass

  3. Dental cone beam computed tomography: justification for use in planning oral implant placement.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Reinhilde; Quirynen, Marc

    2014-10-01

    Intra-oral and panoramic radiographs are most frequently used in oral health care. Yet, the inherent nature of jaws and teeth renders three-dimensional diagnosis essential, especially in relation to oral surgery. Nowadays, this can be accomplished by dental cone beam computed tomography, which provides high-quality images at low radiation doses and low costs. Nonetheless, the effective dose ranges of cone beam computed tomography machines may easily vary from 10 to 1000 μSv, this being equivalent to two to 200 panoramic radiographs, even for similar presurgical indications. Moreover, the diagnostic image quality varies massively among available machines and parameter settings. Apart from the radiodiagnostic possibilities, dental cone beam computed tomography may offer a vast therapeutic potential, including opportunities for surgical guidance and further prosthetic rehabilitation via computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing solutions. These additional options may definitely explain part of the success of cone beam computed tomography for oral implant placement. In conclusion, dental cone beam computed tomography imaging could be justified for oral implant-related diagnosis, planning and transfer to surgical and further prosthetic treatment, but guidelines for justification and cone beam computed tomography optimization remain mandatory.

  4. Dual-Modality Imaging of the Human Finger Joint Systems by Using Combined Multispectral Photoacoustic Computed Tomography and Ultrasound Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yubin; Wang, Yating

    2016-01-01

    We developed a homemade dual-modality imaging system that combines multispectral photoacoustic computed tomography and ultrasound computed tomography for reconstructing the structural and functional information of human finger joint systems. The fused multispectral photoacoustic-ultrasound computed tomography (MPAUCT) system was examined by the phantom and in vivo experimental tests. The imaging results indicate that the hard tissues such as the bones and the soft tissues including the blood vessels, the tendon, the skins, and the subcutaneous tissues in the finger joints systems can be effectively recovered by using our multimodality MPAUCT system. The developed MPAUCT system is able to provide us with more comprehensive information of the human finger joints, which shows its potential for characterization and diagnosis of bone or joint diseases. PMID:27774453

  5. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Other Thyroid Cancers: Medullary, Anaplastic, Lymphoma and So Forth

    PubMed Central

    Araz, Mine; Çayır, Derya

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is used in staging, restaging, and evaluation of therapy response in many cancers as well as differentiated thyroid carcinomas especially in non-iodine avid variants. Its potential in less frequent thyroid tumors like medullary, anaplastic thyroid cancers, thyroid lymphoma and metastatic tumors of the thyroid however, is not well established yet. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the recent applications and indications of 18F-FDG PET/CT in these tumors and to focus on the controversies in the clinical setting. PMID:28291004

  6. Metastatic superscan in prostate carcinoma on gallium-68-prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Tripathi, Madhavi; Kumar, Rajeev; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    We describe the imaging features of a metastatic superscan on gallium-68 Glu-NH-CO-NH-Lys-(Ahx)-[Ga-68(HBED-CC)], abbreviated as gallium-68-prostate-specific membrane antigen ((68)Ga-PSMA) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging. (68)Ga-PSMA is novel radiotracer undergoing evaluation for PET/CT imaging of prostate carcinoma. This patient had a superscan of metastases on conventional bone scintigraphy and was referred for (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT to evaluate the feasibility of (177)Lu-PSMA therapy.

  7. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in a rare case of carcinoma stomach with concomitant silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Unni, Madhavan; Madhavan, Jayaprakash

    2016-01-01

    The role of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose. (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography. (PET)/computed tomography. (CT) in the initial staging of various malignancies is now well established. However, nonspecificity of FDG occasionally results in tracer uptake in benign lung lesions. The authors describe a complicated case of carcinoma stomach with multiple nodules and a cavitary lesion in lungs where 18F-FDG PET CT done for initial staging revealed FDG avid mass in stomach, FDG avid multiple mediastinal lymph nodes and multiple intensely FDG avid bilateral lung lesions. The FDG avid lung lesions turned out to be due to silicosis as confirmed by histopathology. PMID:27833322

  8. Role of F18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography in the management of Askin's tumor.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sampath; Kashyap, Raghava; Bhattacharya, Anish; Kumar Jindal, Surinder; Rai Mittal, Bhagwant

    2013-07-01

    A primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) of the thoraco-abdominal region is one of a group of small round cell tumors usually found in children and young adults, originally described by Askin et al. Most cases arise in the soft-tissues of the thorax, but may rarely occur within the lung with the symptoms of chest wall pain, pleural effusion and dyspnea. The authors present two cases demonstrating the utility of F18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography in the staging and prognosis of PNET of the chest wall.

  9. Thoracic computed tomography, angiographic computed tomography, and pathology findings in six cats experimentally infected with Aelurostrongylus abstrusus.

    PubMed

    Dennler, Matthias; Bass, Danielle A; Gutierrez-Crespo, Beatriz; Schnyder, Manuela; Guscetti, Franco; Di Cesare, Angela; Deplazes, Peter; Kircher, Patrick R; Glaus, Tony M

    2013-01-01

    Aelurostrongylus abstrusus infection is common in endemic areas and may cause severe respiratory clinical signs. Computed tomography (CT) is an important tool to diagnose pulmonary disease, because it allows detection of small lesions and discrimination of superimposed structures. The purpose of this study was to characterize by CT and angiographic CT the pulmonary lesions in six cats before, and 48 and 81 days after inoculation with 100 or 800 A. abstrusus infective larvae. Histological examination of the accessory lung lobe was performed to determine the microscopic, pathomorphologic correlate of the CT findings. The predominant CT lesion consisted of multiple nodules of varying size distributed throughout the lungs, severity depending on infectious dose. The histological correlate of the nodular lesions was multifocal dense granulomatous to mixed inflammatory cell infiltrates, including eosinophils distributed in the parenchyma and obliterating the alveoli. Marked, multifocal, dose-dependent thickening of the bronchi and adjacent interstitial changes blurred the margins of the outer serosal surface of the bronchi and vessels. Histologically, this was due to peribronchial mixed cell inflammation. During the course of infection some of the nodular and peribronchial changes were replaced by areas of ground-glass opacity. In addition to providing detailed depiction of pulmonary lesions resulting from an infectious cause and clearly defining lesions with respect to time and severity of infection, CT allowed quantitative assessment of bronchial thickness and lymph node size during the course of disease. Findings indicated that CT characteristics of this disease are consistent with pathologic findings.

  10. Tc-99m Sulfur Colloid Lymphoscintigraphy with Single-photon Emission Computed Tomography/Computed Tomography in a Case of Acquired Vulval Lymphangiomas

    PubMed Central

    Tulsyan, Shruti; Tripathi, Madhavi; Das, Kalpa; Yadav, Divya; Shamim, Shamim Ahmed; Damle, Nishikant; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2017-01-01

    We describe the lymphoscintigraphy findings of a 25-year-old female patient who was undergoing presurgical workup for lymphangiomas of the vulva. She had a history of treatment for disseminated tuberculosis 6 years back and presented with herpetiform oozing vesicles in the external genitalia. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) confirmed cutaneous tracer accumulation in the vulval lesions and demonstrated the presence of densely calcified inguinal nodes secondary to healed tuberculosis as the etiology of secondary lymphangioma. PMID:28242996

  11. Multiscale and multimodality computed tomography for cortical bone analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostertag, A.; Peyrin, F.; Gouttenoire, P. J.; Laredo, J. D.; DeVernejoul, M. C.; Cohen Solal, M.; Chappard, C.

    2016-12-01

    In clinical studies, high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) is used to separately evaluate cortical bone and trabecular bone with an isotropic voxel of 82 µm3, and typical cortical parameters are cortical density (D.comp), thickness (Ct.Th), and porosity (Ct.Po). In vitro, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is used to explore the internal cortical bone micro-structure with isotropic voxels and high resolution synchrotron radiation (SR); micro-CT is considered the ‘gold standard’. In 16 tibias and 8 femurs, HR-pQCT measurements were compared to conventional micro-CT measurements. To test modality effects, conventional micro-CT measurements were compared to SR micro-CT measurements at 7.5 µm3 SR micro-CT measurements were also tested at different voxel sizes for the femurs, specifically, 7.5 µm3 versus 2.8 µm3. D.comp (r  =  -0.88, p  <  10-3) was the parameter best correlated with porosity (Po.V/TV). The correlation was not affected by the removal of pores under 130 µm. Ct.Th was also significantly highly correlated (r  =  -0.89 p  <  10-3), while Ct.Po was correlated with its counterpart Po.V/TV (r  =  0.74, p  <  10-3). From SR micro-CT and conventional micro-CT at 7.5 µm3 in matching areas, Po.V/TV and pore diameter were underestimated in conventional micro-CT with mean  ±  standard deviation (SD) biases of  -2.5  ±  1.9% and  -0.08  ±  0.08 mm, respectively. In contrast, pore number (Po.N) and pore separation (Po.Sp) were overestimated with mean  ±  SD biases of  +0.03  ±  0.04 mm-1 and  +0.02  ±  0.04 mm, respectively. The results from the tibia and femur were similar when the results of SR micro-CT at 7.5 µm3 and 2.8 µm3 were compared. Po.V/TV, specific surface of pores (Po.S/Po.V), and Po.N were underestimated with mean biases of  -1.7  ±  0.9%, -4.6  ±  4.4 mm-1, and

  12. Use of cone beam computed tomography in identifying postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Brasileiro, C B; Chalub, L L F H; Abreu, M H N G; Barreiros, I D; Amaral, T M P; Kakehasi, A M; Mesquita, R A

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to correlate radiometric indices from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images and bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women. Quantitative CBCT indices can be used to screen for women with low BMD.

  13. APPLICATION OF COMPUTER AIDED TOMOGRAPHY (CAT) TO THE STUDY OF MARINE BENTIC COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment cores were imaged using a Computer-Aided Tomography (CT) scanner at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States. Procedures were developed, using the attenuation of X-rays, to differentiate between sediment and the water contained in macrobenthic...

  14. Differences between postmortem computed tomography and conventional autopsy in a stabbing murder case

    PubMed Central

    Zerbini, Talita; da Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Ferro, Antonio Carlos Gonçalves; Kay, Fernando Uliana; Junior, Edson Amaro; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto Gonçalves; do Nascimento Saldiva, Paulo Hilario

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present work is to analyze the differences and similarities between the elements of a conventional autopsy and images obtained from postmortem computed tomography in a case of a homicide stab wound. METHOD: Comparison between the findings of different methods: autopsy and postmortem computed tomography. RESULTS: In some aspects, autopsy is still superior to imaging, especially in relation to external examination and the description of lesion vitality. However, the findings of gas embolism, pneumothorax and pulmonary emphysema and the relationship between the internal path of the instrument of aggression and the entry wound are better demonstrated by postmortem computed tomography. CONCLUSIONS: Although multislice computed tomography has greater accuracy than autopsy, we believe that the conventional autopsy method is fundamental for providing evidence in criminal investigations. PMID:25518020

  15. Monte Carlo calculation of patient organ doses from computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Oono, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Tsuduki, Shoya; Kawasaki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate quantitatively the patient organ dose from computed tomography (CT) using Monte Carlo calculations. A multidetector CT unit (Aquilion 16, TOSHIBA Medical Systems) was modeled with the GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. The X-ray spectrum and the configuration of the bowtie filter for the Monte Carlo modeling were determined from the chamber measurements for the half-value layer (HVL) of aluminum and the dose profile (off-center ratio, OCR) in air. The calculated HVL and OCR were compared with measured values for body irradiation with 120 kVp. The Monte Carlo-calculated patient dose distribution was converted to the absorbed dose measured by a Farmer chamber with a (60)Co calibration factor at the center of a CT water phantom. The patient dose was evaluated from dose-volume histograms for the internal organs in the pelvis. The calculated Al HVL was in agreement within 0.3% with the measured value of 5.2 mm. The calculated dose profile in air matched the measured value within 5% in a range of 15 cm from the central axis. The mean doses for soft tissues were 23.5, 23.8, and 27.9 mGy for the prostate, rectum, and bladder, respectively, under exposure conditions of 120 kVp, 200 mA, a beam pitch of 0.938, and beam collimation of 32 mm. For bones of the femur and pelvis, the mean doses were 56.1 and 63.6 mGy, respectively. The doses for bone increased by up to 2-3 times that of soft tissue, corresponding to the ratio of their mass-energy absorption coefficients.

  16. The role of computed tomography in terminal ballistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rutty, G N; Boyce, P; Robinson, C E; Jeffery, A J; Morgan, B

    2008-01-01

    Terminal ballistics concerns the science of projectile behaviour within a target and includes wound ballistics that considers what happens when a projectile strikes a living being. A number of soft tissue ballistic simulants have been used to assess the damage to tissue caused by projectiles. Standard assessment of these materials, such as ballistic soap or ordnance gelatine, requires the block to be opened or that a mould to be made to visualize the wound track. This is time consuming and may affect the accuracy of the findings especially if the block dries and alters shape during the process. Therefore, accurate numerical analysis of the permanent or temporary cavity is limited. Computed tomography (CT) potentially offers a quicker non-invasive analysis tool for this task. Four commercially purchased ballistic glycerine soap blocks were used. Each had a single firearm discharged into it from a distance of approximately 15 cm using both gunshot and shotgun projectiles. After discharge, each block was imaged by a modern 16 slice multi-detector CT scanner and analysed using 3-D reconstruction software. Using the anterior-posterior and lateral scout views and the multi-plane reconstructed images, it was possible to visualize the temporary cavity, as well as the fragmentation and dispersal pattern of the projectiles, the distance travelled and angle of dispersal within the block of each projectile or fragment. A virtual cast of the temporary cavity can be also be made. Multi-detector CT with 3-D analysis software is shown to create a reliable permanent record of the projectile path allowing rapid analysis of different firearms and projectiles.

  17. Image quality of mixed convolution kernel in thoracic computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Jakob; Spira, Eva Maria; Strube, Juliane; Langer, Mathias; Voss, Christian; Kotter, Elmar

    2016-11-01

    The mixed convolution kernel alters his properties geographically according to the depicted organ structure, especially for the lung. Therefore, we compared the image quality of the mixed convolution kernel to standard soft and hard kernel reconstructions for different organ structures in thoracic computed tomography (CT) images.Our Ethics Committee approved this prospective study. In total, 31 patients who underwent contrast-enhanced thoracic CT studies were included after informed consent. Axial reconstructions were performed with hard, soft, and mixed convolution kernel. Three independent and blinded observers rated the image quality according to the European Guidelines for Quality Criteria of Thoracic CT for 13 organ structures. The observers rated the depiction of the structures in all reconstructions on a 5-point Likert scale. Statistical analysis was performed with the Friedman Test and post hoc analysis with the Wilcoxon rank-sum test.Compared to the soft convolution kernel, the mixed convolution kernel was rated with a higher image quality for lung parenchyma, segmental bronchi, and the border between the pleura and the thoracic wall (P < 0.03). Compared to the hard convolution kernel, the mixed convolution kernel was rated with a higher image quality for aorta, anterior mediastinal structures, paratracheal soft tissue, hilar lymph nodes, esophagus, pleuromediastinal border, large and medium sized pulmonary vessels and abdomen (P < 0.004) but a lower image quality for trachea, segmental bronchi, lung parenchyma, and skeleton (P < 0.001).The mixed convolution kernel cannot fully substitute the standard CT reconstructions. Hard and soft convolution kernel reconstructions still seem to be mandatory for thoracic CT.

  18. Dictionary-based image denoising for dual energy computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechlem, Korbinian; Allner, Sebastian; Mei, Kai; Pfeiffer, Franz; Noël, Peter B.

    2016-03-01

    Compared to conventional computed tomography (CT), dual energy CT allows for improved material decomposition by conducting measurements at two distinct energy spectra. Since radiation exposure is a major concern in clinical CT, there is a need for tools to reduce the noise level in images while preserving diagnostic information. One way to achieve this goal is the application of image-based denoising algorithms after an analytical reconstruction has been performed. We have developed a modified dictionary denoising algorithm for dual energy CT aimed at exploiting the high spatial correlation between between images obtained from different energy spectra. Both the low-and high energy image are partitioned into small patches which are subsequently normalized. Combined patches with improved signal-to-noise ratio are formed by a weighted addition of corresponding normalized patches from both images. Assuming that corresponding low-and high energy image patches are related by a linear transformation, the signal in both patches is added coherently while noise is neglected. Conventional dictionary denoising is then performed on the combined patches. Compared to conventional dictionary denoising and bilateral filtering, our algorithm achieved superior performance in terms of qualitative and quantitative image quality measures. We demonstrate, in simulation studies, that this approach can produce 2d-histograms of the high- and low-energy reconstruction which are characterized by significantly improved material features and separation. Moreover, in comparison to other approaches that attempt denoising without simultaneously using both energy signals, superior similarity to the ground truth can be found with our proposed algorithm.

  19. Semiautomated four-dimensional computed tomography segmentation using deformable models

    SciTech Connect

    Ragan, Dustin; Starkschall, George; McNutt, Todd; Kaus, Michael; Guerrero, Thomas; Stevens, Craig W.

    2005-07-15

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate a proof of feasibility of the application of a commercial prototype deformable model algorithm to the problem of delineation of anatomic structures on four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) image data sets. We acquired a 4D CT image data set of a patient's thorax that consisted of three-dimensional (3D) image data sets from eight phases in the respiratory cycle. The contours of the right and left lungs, cord, heart, and esophagus were manually delineated on the end inspiration data set. An interactive deformable model algorithm, originally intended for deforming an atlas-based model surface to a 3D CT image data set, was applied in an automated fashion. Triangulations based on the contours generated on each phase were deformed to the CT data set on the succeeding phase to generate the contours on that phase. Deformation was propagated through the eight phases, and the contours obtained on the end inspiration data set were compared with the original manually delineated contours. Structures defined by high-density gradients, such as lungs, cord, and heart, were accurately reproduced, except in regions where other gradient boundaries may have confused the algorithm, such as near bronchi. The algorithm failed to accurately contour the esophagus, a soft-tissue structure completely surrounded by tissue of similar density, without manual interaction. This technique has the potential to facilitate contour delineation in 4D CT image data sets; and future evolution of the software is expected to improve the process.

  20. Variability of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Patient Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To quantify the interfractional variability in lung tumor trajectory and mean position during the course of radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Repeat four-dimensional (4D) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans (median, nine scans/patient) routinely acquired during the course of treatment were analyzed for 56 patients with lung cancer. Tumor motion was assessed by using local rigid registration of a region of interest in the 3D planning CT to each phase in the 4D CBCT. Displacements of the mean tumor position relative to the planned position (baseline variations) were obtained by using time-weighted averaging of the motion curve. Results: The tumor trajectory shape was found to be stable interfractionally, with mean variability not exceeding 1 mm (1 SD) in each direction for the inhale and exhale phases. Interfractional baseline variations, however, were large, with 1.6- (left-right), 3.9- (cranial-caudal), and 2.8-mm (anterior-posterior) systematic variations (1 SD) and 1.2- (left-right), 2.4- (cranial-caudal) and 2.2-mm (anterior-posterior) random variations. Eliminating baseline variations by using soft-tissue guidance decreases planning target volume margins by approximately 50% compared with bony anatomy-driven protocols for conventional fractionation schemes. Conclusions: Systematic and random baseline variations constitute a substantial portion of the geometric variability present in the treatment of patients with lung cancer and require generous safety margins when relying on accurate setup/immobilization or bony anatomy-driven correction strategies. The 4D-CBCT has the ability to accurately monitor tumor trajectory shape and baseline variations and drive image-guided correction strategies that allows safe margin reduction.

  1. Bone morphometry and mineral density measurement using quantitative computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    Application of computed tomography (CT) to the study of bone structure and density was explored and developed. A review of bone mineral densitometry (BMD) methodology and general principles of quantitative CT (QCT) are presented. A method for QCT of the spine was developed using a flexible tissue equivalent reference placed adjacent to the patient. A methodology for the development and production of tissue equivalent materials is also presented. Patient equivalent phantoms were used to characterize the method, and phantom studies were performed at five clinical sites. A protocol is defined for measuring the inside diameter of the lumbar pedicular canal. Data generated from this study has proven invaluable in the planning for lumbar fusion surgery when screws are to be used for immobilization. Pedicular canal data from 33 patients is presented. QCT was also used to quantify several parameters of the femoral shaft for use in hip replacement surgical planning. Parameters studied include inside diameter, BMD, endosteal BMD and proximal shaft morphology. The structure and trabecular BMD of the proximal femur was extensively studied using QCT. A large variation was found in the fat content of marrow within the proximal femur, and phantom studies were performed to quantify the effect of fat on trabecular QCT BMD. Cadaveric trabecular bone samples with marrow were analyzed physically to determine water, fat, non-fat soft tissue, and ash content. Multiple thin-slice CT studies were performed on cadaveric femurs. A structural model of the proximal femur was developed in which the structural support is provided primarily by trabecular bone. This model may have profound implications in the study of femoral fractures and prosthetic hardware design.

  2. Postmortem computed tomography lung findings in fatal of hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Hyodoh, Hideki; Watanabe, Satoshi; Katada, Ryuichi; Hyodoh, Kazusa; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    2013-09-10

    To identify lung findings specific to fatal hypothermia on postmortem computed tomography (CT) imaging. Whole body CT scans were performed followed by full autopsy to investigate causes of death. There were 13 fatal hypothermia cases (group A) and 118 with other causes of death (group B). The chest cavity (CC), dead space including fluid/pneumothorax (DS), aerated lung volume (ALV), percentage aerated lung (%ALV), and tracheal aerated volume (ATV) were measured. Autopsy findings of groups A and B were compared. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were used to identify factors specific to fatal hypothermia. There were no differences in age, sex, number with emphysema, or time from death to CT examination between the 2 groups. CC, DS, ALV, %ALV, and ATV were 2601.0±247.4 (mL), 281.1±136.5 (mL), 1564.5±281.1 (mL), 62.1±6.2(%), and 21.8±2.7 (mL) in group A and 2339.2±67.7 (mL), 241.1±38.0 (mL), 739.9±67.0 (mL), 31.4±2.3(%), and 15.9±0.8 (mL) in group B, respectively. There were statistically significant differences between groups A and B in ALV, %ALV and ATV. The multiple comparison procedure revealed that ALV and %ALV differed significantly between fatal hypothermia and other causes of death (p<0.05). Using ROC evaluation, %ALV had the largest area under the curve (0.819). This study demonstrates that the %ALV is greater in fatal hypothermia cases than in those with other causes of death on postmortem CT chest imaging. Based on CT, hypothermia is very likely to be the cause of death if the %ALV is >70%.

  3. Quantitative ultrasonic computed tomography using phase-insensitive pyroelectric detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeqiri, Bajram; Baker, Christian; Alosa, Giuseppe; Wells, Peter N. T.; Liang, Hai-Dong

    2013-08-01

    The principle of using ultrasonic computed tomography (UCT) clinically for mapping tissue acoustic properties was suggested almost 40 years ago. Despite strong research activity, UCT been unable to rival its x-ray counterpart in terms of the ability to distinguish tissue pathologies. Conventional piezoelectric detectors deployed in UCT are termed phase-sensitive (PS) and it is well established that this property can lead to artefacts related to refraction and phase-cancellation that mask true tissue structure, particularly for reconstructions involving attenuation. Equally, it has long been known that phase-insensitive (PI) detectors are more immune to this effect, although sufficiently sensitive devices for clinical use have not been available. This paper explores the application of novel PI detectors to UCT. Their operating principle is based on exploiting the pyroelectric properties of the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene difluoride. An important detector performance characteristic which makes it particularly suited to UCT, is the lack of directionality of the PI response, relative to the PS detector mode of operation. The performance of the detectors is compared to conventional PS detection methods, for quantitatively assessing the attenuation distribution within various test objects, including a two-phase polyurethane phantom. UCT images are presented for a range of single detector apertures; tomographic reconstruction images being compared with the known structure of phantoms containing inserts as small as 3 mm, which were readily imaged. For larger diameter inserts (>10 mm), the transmitter-detector combination was able to establish the attenuation coefficient of the insert to within ±10% of values determined separately from plane-wave measurements on representative material plaques. The research has demonstrated that the new PI detectors are significantly less susceptible to refraction and phase-cancellation artefacts, generating realistic images in

  4. Effectiveness of Computed Tomography for Blow-out Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Seup; Song, Jae-Min; Shin, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Jae-Yeol

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study assessed the association between eye symptoms (enophthalmos or diplopia) and site of damage, volume, deviated inferior rectus muscle (IRM) and type of fracture with computed tomography (CT). The intent is to anticipate the prognosis of orbital trauma at initial diagnosis. Methods: Forty-five patients were diagnosed with fractures of the inferior wall of one orbit. Fracture area, volume of displaced tissue, deviated IRM, and type of fracture were evaluated from coronal CT by one investigator. The association of those variables with the occurrence of eye symptoms (diplopia and enophthalmos) was assessed. Results: Of 45 patients, 27 were symptom-free (Group A) and 18 had symptoms (Group B) of enophthalmos and/or diplopia. In Group B, 12 had diplopia, one was enophthalmos, and five had both. By CT measurement, group A mean area was 192.6 mm2 and the mean volume was 673.2 mm3. Group B area was 316.2 mm2 and volume was 1,710.6 mm3. The volume was more influential on symptom occurrence. Each patient was categorized into four grades depending on the location of IRM. Symptom occurrence and higher grade were associated. Twenty-six patients had trap-door fracture (one side, attached to the fracture), and 19 had punched-out fracture (both sides detached). The punched-out fracture was more strongly associated with symptoms and had statistically significantly higher area and volume. Conclusion: In orbital trauma, measurement of fracture area and volume, evaluation of the deviated IRM and classification of the fracture type by coronal CT can effectively predict prognosis and surgical indication. PMID:27489846

  5. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy

    SciTech Connect

    Moehlenbruch, Markus; Nelles, Michael; Thomas, Daniel; Willinek, Winfried; Gerstner, Andreas; Schild, Hans H.; Wilhelm, Kai

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a flat-detector C-arm-guided radiographic technique (cone-beam computed tomography [CBCT]) for percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG) insertion. Eighteen patients (13 men and 5 women; mean age 62 years) in whom percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) had failed underwent CBCT-guided PRG insertion. PEG failure or unsuitability was caused by upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction in all cases. Indications for gastrostomy were esophageal and head and neck malignancies, respectively. Before the PRG procedure, initial C-arm CBCT scans were acquired. Three- and 2-dimensional soft-tissue reconstructions of the epigastrium region were generated on a dedicated workstation. Subsequently, gastropexy was performed with T-fasteners after CBCT-guided puncture of the stomach bubble, followed by insertion of an 14F balloon-retained catheter through a peel-away introducer. Puncture of the stomach bubble and PRG insertion was technically successful in all patients without alteration of the epigastric region. There was no malpositioning of the tube or other major periprocedural complications. In 2 patients, minor complications occurred during the first 30 days of follow-up (PRG malfunction: n = 1; slight infection: n = 1). Late complications, which were mainly tube disturbances, were observed in 2 patients. The mean follow-up time was 212 days. CBCT-guided PRG is a safe, well-tolerated, and successful method of gastrostomy insertion in patients in whom endoscopic gastrostomy is not feasible. CBCT provides detailed imaging of the soft tissue and surrounding structures of the epigastric region in one diagnostic tour and thus significantly improves the planning of PRG procedures.

  6. Comparison of denture models by means of micro computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vögtlin, Christoph; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Jäger, Kurt; Liebrich, Thomas; Weikert, Sascha; Müller, Bert

    2012-10-01

    The production of dental inlays and crowns requires precise information on patients' teeth morphology. The conventional method is the preparation of impressions using mold materials, e.g. a silicone impression material. The disadvantage of this technique is the human choke impulse and the flavor of the material. These discomforts can be avoided by methods where a three-dimensional scanner is used for recording the teeth morphology. The present study reveals the accuracy of three model types, namely conventional impression, rapid prototyping using an oral scanner C.O.S., 3M (Schweiz) AG and milling from a proprietary resin using the oral scanner iTero, Straumann Holding AG. For each method five models were fabricated from a steel reference (standard). Using a nanotom m (phoenixǀx-ray, GE Sensing and Inspection Technologies GmbH), three-dimensional micro computed tomography data sets of the standard and the 15 models were recorded and landmark distances within the data sets were measured with sub-pixel accuracy. To verify these results a coordinate measuring machine (Leitz PMM 864, Hexagon Metrology GmbH) based on tactile detection was used for the measurement of the landmark distances, and a correction of the distances measured by the nanotom m was arranged. The nanotom data sets of the 15 models were also compared to the standard by means of a non-rigid registration algorithm. The calculated deformation field exhibited mean pixel displacement values of (0.19 +/- 0.09) mm for the C.O.S. models, (0.12 +/- 0.07) mm for the gypsum models and (0.19 +/- 0.12) mm for the i-Tero models.

  7. Stratified computed tomography findings improve diagnostic accuracy for appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Geon; Lee, Sang Chul; Choi, Byung-Jo; Kim, Say-June

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To improve the diagnostic accuracy in patients with symptoms and signs of appendicitis, but without confirmative computed tomography (CT) findings. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the database of 224 patients who had been operated on for the suspicion of appendicitis, but whose CT findings were negative or equivocal for appendicitis. The patient population was divided into two groups: a pathologically proven appendicitis group (n = 177) and a non-appendicitis group (n = 47). The CT images of these patients were re-evaluated according to the characteristic CT features as described in the literature. The re-evaluations and baseline characteristics of the two groups were compared. RESULTS: The two groups showed significant differences with respect to appendiceal diameter, and the presence of periappendiceal fat stranding and intraluminal air in the appendix. A larger proportion of patients in the appendicitis group showed distended appendices larger than 6.0 mm (66.3% vs 37.0%; P < 0.001), periappendiceal fat stranding (34.1% vs 8.9%; P = 0.001), and the absence of intraluminal air (67.6% vs 48.9%; P = 0.024) compared to the non-appendicitis group. Furthermore, the presence of two or more of these factors increased the odds ratio to 6.8 times higher than baseline (95%CI: 3.013-15.454; P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Appendiceal diameter and wall thickening, fat stranding, and absence of intraluminal air can be used to increased diagnostic accuracy for appendicitis with equivocal CT findings. PMID:25320531

  8. Prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) in computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Heußer, Thorsten Brehm, Marcus; Ritschl, Ludwig; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Image quality in computed tomography (CT) often suffers from artifacts which may reduce the diagnostic value of the image. In many cases, these artifacts result from missing or corrupt regions in the projection data, e.g., in the case of metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts. The authors propose a generalized correction method for different kinds of artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data by making use of available prior knowledge to perform data completion. Methods: The proposed prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) method requires prior knowledge in form of a planning CT of the same patient or in form of a CT scan of a different patient showing the same body region. In both cases, the prior image is registered to the patient image using a deformable transformation. The registered prior is forward projected and data completion of the patient projections is performed using smooth sinogram inpainting. The obtained projection data are used to reconstruct the corrected image. Results: The authors investigate metal and truncation artifacts in patient data sets acquired with a clinical CT and limited angle artifacts in an anthropomorphic head phantom data set acquired with a gantry-based flat detector CT device. In all cases, the corrected images obtained by PBAC are nearly artifact-free. Compared to conventional correction methods, PBAC achieves better artifact suppression while preserving the patient-specific anatomy at the same time. Further, the authors show that prominent anatomical details in the prior image seem to have only minor impact on the correction result. Conclusions: The results show that PBAC has the potential to effectively correct for metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts if adequate prior data are available. Since the proposed method makes use of a generalized algorithm, PBAC may also be applicable to other artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data.

  9. Computed tomography-enhanced anatomy course using enterprise visualization.

    PubMed

    May, Hila; Cohen, Haim; Medlej, Bahaa; Kornreich, Liora; Peled, Nathan; Hershkovitz, Israel

    2013-01-01

    Rapid changes in medical knowledge are forcing continuous adaptation of the basic science courses in medical schools. This article discusses a three-year experience developing a new Computed Tomography (CT)-based anatomy curriculum at the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, including describing the motivations and reasoning for the new curriculum, the CT-based learning system itself, practical examples of visual dissections, and student assessments of the new curriculum. At the heart of this new curriculum is the emphasis on studying anatomy by navigating inside the bodies of various living individuals utilizing a CT viewer. To assess the students' experience with the new CT-based learning method, an anonymous questionnaire was administered at the end of the course for three consecutive academic years: 2008/2009, 2009/2010, 2010/2011. Based upon the results, modifications were made to the curriculum in the summers of 2009 and 2010. Results showed that: (1) during these three years the number of students extensively using the CT system quadrupled (from 11% to 46%); (2) students' satisfaction from radiologists involvement increased by 150%; and (3) student appreciation of the CT-based learning method significantly increased (from 13% to 68%). It was concluded that discouraging results (mainly negative feedback from students) during the first years and a priori opposition from the teaching staff should not weaken efforts to develop new teaching methods in the field of anatomy. Incorporating a new curriculum requires time and patience. Student and staff satisfaction, along with utilization of the new system, will increase with the improvement of impeding factors.

  10. Computed tomography perfusion imaging in spectacular shrinking deficit.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivien H; John, Sayona; Mohammad, Yousef; Prabhakaran, Shyam

    2012-02-01

    Spectacular shrinking deficit (SSD) is characterized by abrupt onset of a major hemispheric stroke syndrome, followed by dramatic and rapid improvement. We retrospectively identified patients with SSD diagnosed at our institution between December 1, 2007, and June 30, 2009. We reviewed computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging to determine perfusion defect as a measure of initial ischemic penumbra, and magnetic resonance imaging diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to determine the final infarct core. Among the 472 consecutive ischemic stroke patients, 126 (27%) presented with major hemispheric ischemic stroke syndrome, defined as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (NIHSS) ≥8 in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) or internal carotid artery (ICA). Out of these patients, we identified 8 SSD patients with available CTP data. In these 8 patients, the mean time to dramatic recovery was 3.4 hours (range, 0.75-7 hours), and the mean time from onset to CTP was 12.7 hours (range, 3-30 hours). All 8 patients had perfusion abnormalities in portions of the MCA territory (partial MCA territory in 5 patients and complete MCA territory in 3 patients). The mean time from onset to MRI DWI was 15.5 hours (range, 7.9-34 hours). Restricted diffusion was present in all patients in the corresponding MCA distribution. Vascular imaging revealed MCA occlusion in 2 patients. Cervical vascular imaging revealed carotid occlusion in 2 patients and high-grade carotid stenosis in 2 patients. The stroke mechanisms were cardioembolism in 2 patients, large artery in 4 patients, and unknown in 2 patients. Four patients had repeat CTP imaging available that demonstrated eventual resolution of the perfusion defect. SSD is associated with a "shrinking" clinical syndrome and a "shrinking" perfusion pattern on CTP that lags behind clinical recovery. CTP imaging corroborates that a larger territory is at risk in SSD and contributes to better understanding of SSD.

  11. Patient radiation biological risk in computed tomography angiography procedure.

    PubMed

    Alkhorayef, M; Babikir, E; Alrushoud, A; Al-Mohammed, H; Sulieman, A

    2017-02-01

    Computed tomography angiography (CTA) has become the most valuable imaging modality for the diagnosis of blood vessel diseases; however, patients are exposed to high radiation doses and the probability of cancer and other biological effects is increased. The objectives of this study were to measure the patient radiation dose during a CTA procedure and to estimate the radiation dose and biological effects. The study was conducted in two radiology departments equipped with 64-slice CT machines (Aquilion) calibrated according to international protocols. A total of 152 patients underwent brain, lower limb, chest, abdomen, and pelvis examinations. The effective radiation dose was estimated using ImPACT scan software. Cancer and biological risks were estimated using the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) conversion factors. The mean patient dose value per procedure (dose length product [DLP], mGy·cm) for all examinations was 437.8 ± 166, 568.8 ± 194, 516.0 ± 228, 581.8 ± 175, and 1082.9 ± 290 for the lower limbs, pelvis, abdomen, chest, and cerebral, respectively. The lens of the eye, uterus, and ovaries received high radiation doses compared to thyroid and testis. The overall patient risk per CTA procedure ranged between 15 and 36 cancer risks per 1 million procedures. Patient risk from CTA procedures is high during neck and abdomen procedures. Special concern should be provided to the lens of the eye and thyroid during brain CTA procedures. Patient dose reduction is an important consideration; thus, staff should optimize the radiation dose during CTA procedures.

  12. Percutaneous vertebroplasty guided by preoperative computed tomography measurements

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhongbao; Di, Zhenhai; Mao, Xuequn; Zhang, Jian; Zou, Rong; Wang, Qingqing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is now widely performed to treat painful vertebral compression fractures. Previous researches have reported numerous advantages. However, it rarely reported that how to determine the feasibility of the unilateral or bilateral approach and how to decide the puncture angle, the skin insertion site before the procedure. The aim of this study was to discuss the feasibility of PVP using unilateral pedicular approach by the three-dimensional positioning of computed tomography (CT) image. Materials and Methods: Under fluoroscopic guidance, 108 patients with 115 diseased vertebral bodies underwent PVP. The study was divided in two groups. Group A, fifty patients with 52 vertebrae received PVP without using preoperative CT measurements and puncture simulation. Group B, 58 patients with 63 vertebrae received PVP using preoperative CT measurements and puncture simulation. The skin needle entry point and puncture angle of the transverse plane and sagittal plane were determined by the software of PACS on preoperative CT image. The choice of unilateral or bilateral pedicular approach was decided based on the CT image before the procedure. PVP was carried out according to the measurement result above. The average time for a single vertebra operation, the success rate of single puncture and complications was evaluated and compared between Group A and Group B. Results: In Group A, technical success of unilateral PVP was 63.5% (33/52 vertebrae), and 92% (58/63 vertebrae) in Group B. The average time of operation in Groups A and B were (37.5 ± 5.5) and (28.5 ± 5.5) min, respectively. There was a significant difference in the time of single-vertebra operation and the success rates of unilateral PVP between Groups A and B. No serious complications developed during the followup period. Conclusions: The CT three-dimensional positioning measurement for PVP can increase the success rate of unilateral PVP. PMID:27904217

  13. Primary care access to computed tomography for chronic headache

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ralph; Cook, Alan; Main, Gavin; Taylor, Tom; Caruana, Elizabeth Galizia; Swingler, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Background The diagnostic yield of neuroimaging in chronic headache is low, but can reduce the use of health services. Aim To determine whether primary care access to brain computed tomography (CT) referral for chronic headache reduces referral to secondary care. Design of study Prospective observational analysis of GP referrals to an open access CT brain scanning service. Setting Primary care, and outpatient radiology and neurology departments. Method GPs in Tayside and North East Fife, Scotland were given access to brain CT for patients with chronic headache. All referrals were analysed prospectively over 1 year, and questionnaires were sent to referrers to establish whether imaging had resulted in or stopped a referral to secondary care. The Tayside outpatient clinic database identified scanned patients referred to the neurology clinic for headache from the start of the study period to at least 1 year after their scan. Results There were 232 referrals (55.1/100 000/year, 95% confidence interval = 50.4 to 59.9) from GPs in 59 (82%) of 72 primary care practices. CT was performed on 215 patients. Significant abnormalities were noted in 3 (1.4%) patients; there were 22 (10.2%) non-significant findings, and 190 (88.4%) normal scans. Questionnaires of the referring GPs reported that 167 (88%) scans stopped a referral to secondary care. GPs referred 30 (14%) scanned patients to a neurologist because of headache. It is estimated that imaging reduced referrals to secondary care by 86% in the follow-up period. Conclusion An open access brain CT service for patients with chronic headache was used by most GP practices in Tayside, and reduced the number of referrals to secondary care. PMID:20529496

  14. Visceral scalloping on abdominal computed tomography due to abdominal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal; Bhatia, Anmol; Malik, Sarthak; Singh, Navjeet; Rana, Surinder S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Scalloping of visceral organs is described in pseudomyxoma peritonei, malignant ascites, among other conditions, but not tuberculosis. Methods: We report findings from a retrospective study of patients with abdominal tuberculosis who had visceral scalloping on abdominal computed tomography (CT). Diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis was made on the basis of combination of clinical, biochemical, radiological and microbiological criteria. The clinical data, hematological and biochemical parameters, and findings of chest X-ray, CT, Mantoux test, and HIV serology were recorded. Results: Of 72 patients with abdominal tuberculosis whose CT scans were included, seven patients had visceral scalloping. The mean age of these patients was 32.14 ± 8.43 years and four were men. While six patients had scalloping of liver, one had splenic scalloping. The patients presented with abdominal pain (all), abdominal distension (five patients), loss of weight or appetite (all), and fever (four patients). Mantoux test was positive in five, while none had HIV infection. The diagnosis was based on fluid (ascitic or collections) evaluation in four patients, ileo-cecal biopsy in one patient, fine needle aspiration from omental thickening in one patient, and sputum positivity for acid fast bacilli (AFB) in one patient. On CT examination, four patients had ascites, five had collections, one had lymphadenopathy, four had peritoneal involvement, three had pleural effusion, and two had ileo-cecal thickening. All except one patient received standard ATT for 6 months or 9 months (one patient). Pigtail drainage for collections was needed for two patients. Discussion: This report is the first description of visceral scalloping of liver and spleen in patients with abdominal tuberculosis. Previously, this finding has been reported primarily with pseudomyxoma peritonei and peritoneal carcinomatosis. Conclusion: Visceral scalloping may not conclusively distinguish peritoneal

  15. Evaluation of posterior clinoid process pneumatization by multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Burulday, Veysel; Akgül, Mehmet Hüseyin; Muluk, Nuray Bayar; Ozveren, Mehmet Faik; Kaya, Ahmet

    2016-10-21

    In the present study, we investigated the types and ratio of posterior clinoid process (PCP) pneumatization in paranasal sinus multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Paranasal MDCT images of 541 subjects (227 males, 314 females), between 15 and 65 years old, were included into the study. Pneumatization of anterior clinoid process and pneumatization types (I, II, or III) were evaluated in the males and females. PCP pneumatization was detected in 20.7 % of the males and 11.5 % of the females. Right, left, and bilateral PCP pneumatizations were detected in 7.9, 5.7, and 7.0 % of the males and 2.9, 3.2, and 4.5 % of the females, respectively. PCP pneumatization of the males is significantly higher than the females. The most detected type of pneumatization was type I (61.2 %) for all groups. In right, left, and bilateral pneumatizations separately, type I pneumatization was the most detected pneumatization type with the ratio of the 70.4, 65.2, and 50.0 %, respectively. In males, type I (61.7 %), and similarly in females, type I (60.6 %) pneumatization were detected more. Type II and type III pneumatizations were detected in decreasing order in both groups. In younger subjects, pneumatization of posterior clinoid process was found as higher, and in older subjects, PCP pneumatization was found as lower. Sclerosis process related to the aging may be responsible for the lower pneumatization ratios in older subjects. Structure of the surrounding regions of PCP is important for surgical procedures related to cavernous sinus, basilar apex aneurysms, and mass lesions. Preoperative radiological examinations are useful for operative planning. Any anomalies to PCP can cause unnecessary injury to the neurovascular complex structure around the cavernous sinus or postclinoidectomy CSF fistulas. Posterior clinoidectomies should be avoided in patients with type III PCP pneumatization to prevent CSF fistulas.

  16. Computed tomography of ball pythons (Python regius) in curled recumbency.

    PubMed

    Hedley, Joanna; Eatwell, Kevin; Schwarz, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Anesthesia and tube restraint methods are often required for computed tomography (CT) of snakes due to their natural tendency to curl up. However, these restraint methods may cause animal stress. The aim of this study was to determine whether the CT appearance of the lungs differs for ball pythons in a curled position vs. tube restraint. Whole body CT was performed on ten clinically healthy ball pythons, first in curled and then in straight positions restrained in a tube. Curved multiplanar reformatted (MPR) lung images from curled position scans were compared with standard MPR lung images from straight position scans. Lung attenuation and thickness were measured at three locations for each scan. Time for positioning and scanning was 12 ± 5 min shorter for curled snakes compared to tube restraint. Lung parenchyma thickness and attenuation declined from cranial to caudal on both straight and curled position images. Mean lung parenchyma thickness was greater in curled images at locations 1 (P = 0.048) and 3 (P = 0.044). Mean lung parenchyma thickness decreased between location 1 and 2 by 86-87% (straight: curled) and between location 1 and 3 by 51-50% (straight: curled). Mean lung attenuation at location 1 was significantly greater on curled position images than tube restraint images (P = 0.043). Findings indicated that CT evaluation of the lungs is feasible for ball pythons positioned in curled recumbency if curved MPR is available. However, lung parenchyma thickness and attenuation in some locations may vary from those acquired using tube restraint.

  17. X-ray Computed Tomography of coal: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maylotte, D.H.; Spiro, C.L.; Kosky, P.G.; Lamby, E.J.

    1986-12-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a method of mapping with x-rays the internal structures of coal. The technique normally produces 2-D images of the internal structures of an object. These images can be recast to create pseudo 3-D representations. CT of coal has been explored for a variety of different applications to coal and coal processing technology. In a comparison of CT data with conventional coal analyses and petrography, CT was found to offer a good indication of the total ash content of the coal. The spatial distribution of the coal mineral matter as seen with CT has been suggested as an indicator of coal washability. Studies of gas flow through coal using xenon gas as a tracer have shown the extremely complicated nature of the modes of penetration of gas through coal, with significant differences in the rates at which the gas can pass along and across the bedding planes of coal. In a special furnace designed to allow CT images to be taken while the coal was being heated, the pyrolysis and gasification of coal have been studied. Gasification rates with steam and CO/sub 2/ for a range of coal ranks have been obtained, and the location of the gasification reactions within the piece of coal can be seen. Coal drying and the progress of the pyrolysis wave into coal have been examined when the coal was subjected to the kind of sudden temperature jump that it might experience in fixed bed gasifier applications. CT has also been used to examine stable flow structures within model fluidized beds and the accessibility of lump coal to microbial desulfurization. 53 refs., 242 figs., 26 tabs.

  18. Multiple pinhole collimator based X-ray luminescence computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Lun, Michael; Li, Changqing

    2016-07-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) is an emerging hybrid imaging modality, which is able to improve the spatial resolution of optical imaging to hundreds of micrometers for deep targets by using superfine X-ray pencil beams. However, due to the low X-ray photon utilization efficiency in a single pinhole collimator based XLCT, it takes a long time to acquire measurement data. Herein, we propose a multiple pinhole collimator based XLCT, in which multiple X-ray beams are generated to scan a sample at multiple positions simultaneously. Compared with the single pinhole based XLCT, the multiple X-ray beam scanning method requires much less measurement time. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the multiple X-ray beam scanning method. In one numerical simulation, we used four X-ray beams to scan a cylindrical object with 6 deeply embedded targets. With measurements from 6 angular projections, all 6 targets have been reconstructed successfully. In the phantom experiment, we generated two X-ray pencil beams with a collimator manufactured in-house. Two capillary targets with 0.6 mm edge-to-edge distance embedded in a cylindrical phantom have been reconstructed successfully. With the two beam scanning, we reduced the data acquisition time by 50%. From the reconstructed XLCT images, we found that the Dice similarity of targets is 85.11% and the distance error between two targets is less than 3%. We have measured the radiation dose during XLCT scan and found that the radiation dose, 1.475 mSv, is in the range of a typical CT scan. We have measured the changes of the collimated X-ray beam size and intensity at different distances from the collimator. We have also studied the effects of beam size and intensity in the reconstruction of XLCT.

  19. Ultrasonic computed tomography imaging of iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlman, Or; Azhari, Haim

    2017-02-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are becoming increasingly used and intensively investigated in the field of medical imaging. They are currently FDA approved for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and it would be highly desirable to visualize them by ultrasound as well. Previous reports using the conventional ultrasound B-scan (pulse-echo) imaging technique have shown very limited detectability of these particles. The aim of this study is to explore the feasibility of imaging IONPs using the through-transmission ultrasound methodology and demonstrate their detectability using ultrasonic computed tomography (UCT). Commercially available IONPs were acoustically analysed to quantify their effect on the speed of sound (SOS) and acoustic attenuation as a function of concentration. Next, through-transmission projection and UCT imaging were performed on a breast mimicking phantom and on an ex vivo tissue model, to which IONPs were injected. Finally, an MRI scan was performed to verify that the same particles examined in the ultrasound experiment can be imaged by magnetic resonance, using the same clinically relevant concentrations. The results have shown a consistent concentration dependent speed of sound increase (1.86 \\text{m}{{\\text{s}}^{-1}} rise per 100 µg · ml-1 IONPs). Imaging based on this property has shown a substantial contrast-to-noise ratio improvement (up to 5 fold, p  <  0.01). The SOS-related effect generated a well discernible image contrast and allowed the detection of the particles existence and location, in both raster-scan projection and UCT imaging. Conversely, no significant change in the acoustic attenuation coefficient was noted. Based on these findings, it is concluded that IONPs can be used as an effective SOS-based contrast agent, potentially useful for ultrasonic breast imaging. Furthermore, the particle offers the capacity of significantly enhancing diagnosis accuracy using multimodal MRI-ultrasound imaging capabilities.

  20. Radiation Exposure of Abdominal Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Sailer, Anna M.; Schurink, Geert Willem H.; Wildberger, Joachim E. Graaf, Rick de Zwam, Willem H. van Haan, Michiel W. de Kemerink, Gerrit J. Jeukens, Cécile R. L. P. N.

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate patients radiation exposure of abdominal C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CBCT).MethodsThis prospective study was approved by the institutional review board; written, informed consent was waived. Radiation exposure of abdominal CBCT was evaluated in 40 patients who underwent CBCT during endovascular interventions. Dose area product (DAP) of CBCT was documented and effective dose (ED) was estimated based on organ doses using dedicated Monte Carlo simulation software with consideration of X-ray field location and patients’ individual body weight and height. Weight-dependent ED per DAP conversion factors were calculated. CBCT radiation dose was compared to radiation dose of procedural fluoroscopy. CBCT dose-related risk for cancer was assessed.ResultsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv (95 % confidence interval [CI] 3.9; 4.8 mSv, range 1.1–7.4 mSv). ED was significantly higher in the upper than in the lower abdomen (p = 0.003) and increased with patients’ weight (r = 0.55, slope = 0.045 mSv/kg, p < 0.001). Radiation exposure of CBCT corresponded to the radiation exposure of on average 7.2 fluoroscopy minutes (95 % CI 5.5; 8.8 min) in the same region of interest. Lifetime risk of exposure related cancer death was 0.033 % or less depending on age and weight.ConclusionsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv depending on X-ray field location and body weight.

  1. A computed tomography phantom study of foam earplugs

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Li-Sheng; Yen, Ju-Bei; Wang, Shie-Shan; Liao, Chien-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ingestion of a foreign body is common among children. However, ingestion of foam earplugs (FEPs) has not been reported previously. A 7-month-old female infant presented with small bowel obstruction, which was finally proved to be a case of FEP ingestion. Computed tomography (CT) phantom study was performed to examine the imaging features of FEPs. We studied the following dry and fully wet FEPs, FEPs squeezed in pure water to varying degrees, and FEPs with different degrees of compression in the dry and wet states from day 0 to 6 and all scanned with a CT scanner. The density of a dry FEP is −843.5 ± 4.5 Hounsfield units (HU) and it increases to 0.76 ± 9.3 HU when fully wet. The densities of FEPs ranged from −844.2 to 1.0 HU with different water/air ratios, and some showed a heterogeneous geographic pattern. The densities of FEPs increase due to compression and gradual water absorption. FEPs can be potentially hazardous objects to children. Owing to the special foam structure of the FEP, it can mimic a fatty lesion if the density ranges from −100 to −50 HU; moreover, it can hide in the water if fully wet. However, it should not be mistaken as air, as the density of a dry FEP is −843.5 HU, and the contour can be observed if the window level is set appropriately. Because of its soft texture, the surgeon should be careful not to miss an FEP during the operation. Moreover, radiologists should be familiar with the CT features of FEPs so that they can be identified before surgery. PMID:27583901

  2. Analysis of Sacrococcygeal Morphology in Koreans Using Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Min Geun; Moon, Myung-Sang; Park, Bong Keun; Kim, Dong-Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    Background The sacrococcygeal morphology of Arabs and Europeans has been studied using computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging to determine the cause of coccydynia. Studies have suggested differences in sacrococcygeal morphology among ethnic groups. However, there are no data on the sacrococcygeal anatomy of Koreans. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of 606 pelvic CT scans that were taken at Cheju Halla General Hospital between 2008 and 2014. Fractures of the sacrum or coccyx were excluded. Differences in the sacrococcygeal morphology among age groups stratified by decade of life and between genders were analyzed using sagittal plane pelvic CT scans. The morphological parameters studied were the sacral and coccygeal curved indexes, sacrococcygeal angle, intercoccygeal angle, coccygeal type, coccygeal segmental number, and sacrococcygeal fusion. Results The average sacral and coccygeal curved indexes were 6.15 and 7.41, respectively. The average sacrococcygeal and intercoccygeal angles were 110° and 49°, respectively. Type II coccyx was most common, and the rate of sacrococcygeal fusion was 34%. There was a moderate positive correlation between age and the sacral curved index (r = 0.493, p = 0.000) and a weak negative correlation between age and the coccyx curved index (r = −0.257, p = 0.000). There was a weak negative correlation between age and the intercoccygeal angle (r = −0.187, p = 0.000). The average intercoccygeal angle in males and females was 53.9° and 44.7°, respectively. Conclusions The sacrum tended to be more curved and the coccyx straighter with age. The coccyx was straighter in females than males. Knowledge of the sacrococcygeal anatomy of Koreans will promote better understanding of anatomical differences among ethnicities and future studies on coccydynia. PMID:27904724

  3. Utility of Computed Tomography following Anterior Cervical Diskectomy and Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Derakhshan, Adeeb; Lubelski, Daniel; Steinmetz, Michael P.; Benzel, Edward C.; Mroz, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective To assess the utility of postoperative computed tomography (CT) following anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF) and to determine the clinical circumstances most likely to lead to an abnormal CT scan. Methods Patients who underwent ACDF at a tertiary center over a span of 5 years were investigated. Only patients who had a minimum of 6 months' postoperative follow-up and a CT within 2 years after the surgery were included in the study group. All the postoperative notes were reviewed to determine indications for the CT, abnormalities identified, and whether the scan led to an alteration in the treatment course. Results The charts of 690 patients who underwent ACDF were reviewed. Of the 690 patients, 45 (7%) had postoperative CTs. These patients accounted for 53 postoperative CT scans, 45 (85%) of which were taken for patients who expressed persistent postoperative symptoms and/or had abnormal imaging. There were no indications for 8 (15%) of the CTs. Patients who had a CT for persistent symptoms and/or abnormal preliminary imaging were significantly more likely to have an abnormal CT (p = 0.03) and/or an alteration in treatment course (p = 0.04) compared with those with no symptomatic or radiologic indication for CT. Conclusions CT is associated with minimal utility regarding the alteration of treatment course when employed in asymptomatic patients. Postoperative CT should be ordered solely for symptomatic patients or those with other abnormal preliminary imaging. Judicious use of postoperative CT will limit the radiation exposure and cost. PMID:26430596

  4. X-ray Computed Tomography Observation of Methane Hydrate Dissociation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomutsa, L.; Freifeld, B.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Stern, L.A.

    2002-01-01

    Deposits of naturally occurring methane hydrate have been identified in permafrost and deep oceanic environments with global reserves estimated to be twice the total amount of energy stored in fossil fuels. The fundamental behavior of methane hydrate in natural formations, while poorly understood, is of critical importance if the economic recovery of methane from hydrates is to be accomplished. In this study, computed X-ray tomography (CT) scanning is used to image an advancing dissociation front in a heterogeneous gas hydrate/sand sample at 0.1 MPa. The cylindrical methane hydrate and sand aggregate, 2.54 cm in diameter and 6.3 cm long, was contained in a PVC sample holder that was insulated on all but one end. At the uninsulated end, the dissociated gas was captured and the volume of gas monitored. The sample was initially imaged axially using X-ray CT scanning within the methane hydrate stability zone by keeping the sample temperature at 77??K. Subsequently, as the sample warmed through the methane hydrate dissociation point at 194??K and room pressure, gas was produced and the temperature at the bottom of the sample plug was monitored while CT images were acquired. The experiment showed that CT imaging can resolve the reduction in density (as seen by a reduction in beam attenuation) of the hydrate/sand aggregate due to the dissociation of methane hydrate. In addition, a comparison of CT images with gas flow and temperature measurements reveals that the CT scanner is able to resolve accurately and spatially the advancing dissociation front. Future experiments designed to better understand the thermodynamics of hydrate dissociation are planned to take advantage of the temporal and spatial resolution that the CT scanner provides.

  5. SU-E-I-12: Flexible Geometry Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The concept separates the mechanical connection between the radiation source and detector. This design allows the trajectory and orientation of the radiation source/detector to be customized to the object that is being imaged. This is in contrast to the formulaic rotation-translation image acquisition of conventional computed tomography(CT).Background/significance:CT devices that image a full range of: anatomy, patient populations, and imaging procedures are large. The root cause of the expanding size of comprehensive CT is due to the commitment to helical geometry that is hardwired into the image reconstruction. FGCT extends the application of alternative reconstruction techniques, i.e. tomosynthesis, by separating the two main components— radiation source and detector— and allow for 6 degrees of freedom motion for radiation source, detector, or both. The image acquisition geometry is then tailored to how the patient/object is positioned. This provides greater flexibility on the position and location that the patient/object is being imaged. Additionally, removing the need of a rotating gantry reduces the footprint so that CT is more mobile and more available to move to where the patient/object is at, instead of the other way around. Methods: As proof-of-principle, a reconstruction algorithm is designed to produce FGCT images. Using simulated detector data, voxels intersecting a line drawn between the radiation source and an individual detector are traced and modified using the detector signal. The detector signal is modified to compensate for changes in the source to detector distance. Adjacent voxels are modified in proportion to the detector signal, providing a simple image filter. Results: Image-quality from the proposed FGCT reconstruction technique is proving to be a challenge, producing hardily recognizable images from limited projections angles. Conclusion: Preliminary assessment of the reconstruction technique demonstrates the inevitable

  6. Noninvasive photoacoustic computed tomography of mouse brain metabolism in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Xia, Jun; Maslov, Konstantin; Avanaki, Mohammadreza R. N.; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    To control the overall action of the body, brain consumes a large amount of energy in proportion to its volume. In humans and many other species, the brain gets most of its energy from oxygen-dependent metabolism of glucose. An abnormal metabolic rate of glucose and/or oxygen usually reflects a diseased status of brain, such as cancer or Alzheimer's disease. We have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging mouse brain metabolism using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a fast, noninvasive and functional imaging modality with optical contrast and acoustic resolution. Brain responses to forepaw stimulations were imaged transdermally and transcranially. 2-NBDG, which diffuses well across the blood-brain-barrier, provided exogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of glucose response. Concurrently, hemoglobin provided endogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of hemodynamic response. Glucose and hemodynamic responses were quantitatively unmixed by using two-wavelength measurements. We found that glucose uptake and blood perfusion around the somatosensory region of the contralateral hemisphere were both increased by stimulations, indicating elevated neuron activity. The glucose response amplitude was about half that of the hemodynamic response. While the glucose response area was more homogenous and confined within the somatosensory region, the hemodynamic response area showed a clear vascular pattern and spread about twice as wide as that of the glucose response. The PACT of mouse brain metabolism was validated by high-resolution open-scalp OR-PAM and fluorescence imaging. Our results demonstrate that 2-NBDG-enhanced PACT is a promising tool for noninvasive studies of brain metabolism.

  7. Flat-detector computed tomography (FD-CT).

    PubMed

    Kalender, Willi A; Kyriakou, Yiannis

    2007-11-01

    Flat-panel detectors or, synonymously, flat detectors (FDs) have been developed for use in radiography and fluoroscopy with the defined goal to replace standard X-ray film, film-screen combinations and image intensifiers by an advanced sensor system. FD technology in comparison to X-ray film and image intensifiers offers higher dynamic range, dose reduction, fast digital readout and the possibility for dynamic acquisitions of image series, yet keeping to a compact design. It appeared logical to employ FD designs also for computed tomography (CT) imaging. Respective efforts date back a few years only, but FD-CT has meanwhile become widely accepted for interventional and intra-operative imaging using C-arm systems. FD-CT provides a very efficient way of combining two-dimensional (2D) radiographic or fluoroscopic and 3D CT imaging. In addition, FD technology made its way into a number of dedicated CT scanner developments, such as scanners for the maxillo-facial region or for micro-CT applications. This review focuses on technical and performance issues of FD technology and its full range of applications for CT imaging. A comparison with standard clinical CT is of primary interest. It reveals that FD-CT provides higher spatial resolution, but encompasses a number of disadvantages, such as lower dose efficiency, smaller field of view and lower temporal resolution. FD-CT is not aimed at challenging standard clinical CT as regards to the typical diagnostic examinations; but it has already proven unique for a number of dedicated CT applications, offering distinct practical advantages, above all the availability of immediate CT imaging in the interventional suite or the operating room.

  8. Sinonasal Angiomatous Polyp: Evaluation With 2-Phase Helical Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Changwei; Wang, Qiushi; Guo, Qiyong; Wang, Zhenhai; Lu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sinonasal angiomatous polyp (SAP) is a rare benign nontumorous lesion and previously considered lack of characteristic computed tomography (CT) findings. This study aimed to evaluate 2-phase helical CT for characterization of SAP. Twelve patients with pathologically confirmed SAP underwent 2-phase helical CT preoperatively. After injection of 80 mL contrast material at a rate of 3 mL/s, early and delayed phases were obtained with delays of 30 and 120 s, respectively. The degree and pattern of enhancement were visually analyzed. The attenuation changes were also analyzed quantitatively by measuring CT values and compared with those of the internal maxillary artery (IMA). All 12 cases showed vessel-like marked heterogeneous enhancement at both early and delayed phases. An irregular linear, nodular, and patchy enhancement pattern was found at the early phase, and enlarged and fused together, that is, progressive enhancement pattern was found at the delayed phase. There was no significant difference between the CT values of SAP and those of the IMA at the plain, arterial phase, and delayed phase (53 ± 6 Hounsfield units [HU] vs 56 ± 7 HU, 187 ± 56 HU vs 209 ± 71 HU, and 143 ± 22 HU vs 139 ± 19 HU, respectively, P = 0.361, 0.429, and 0.613, respectively). Vessel-like marked heterogeneous enhancement was a characteristic CT feature of SAP, and progressive enhancement on 2-phase helical CT could further convince the diagnosis. PMID:26200632

  9. Fast X-ray luminescence computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Liao, Qimei; Wang, Hongkai

    2014-06-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) opens new possibilities to perform molecular imaging with X-ray. However, challenges remain in dynamic XLCT imaging, where short scan time, good spatial resolution, and whole-body field of view should be considered simultaneously. In this paper, by the use of a single-view XLCT reconstruction method based on a compressive sensing (CS) technique, incorporating a cone beam XLCT imaging system, we implement fast 3-D XLCT imaging. To evaluate the performance of the method, two types of phantom experiments were performed based on a cone beam XLCT imaging system. In Case 1, one tube filled with the X-ray-excitable nanophosphor (Gd 2O 3 :Eu (3+)) was immerged in different positions in the phantom to evaluate the effect of the source position on single-view XLCT reconstruction accuracy. In Case 2, two tubes filled with Gd 2O 3 :Eu (3+) were immerged in different heights in the phantom to evaluate the whole-body imaging performance of single-view XLCT reconstruction. The experimental results indicated that the tubes used in previous phantom experiments can be resolved from single-view XCLT reconstruction images. The location error is less than 1.2 mm. In addition, since only one view data are needed to implement 3-D XLCT imaging, the acquisition time can be greatly reduced (∼1 frame/s) compared with previous XLCT systems. Hence, the technique is suited for imaging the fast distribution of the X-ray-excitable nanophosphors within a biological object.

  10. Dosimetric characterization of a dedicated breast computed tomography clinical prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Feng, Steve Si Jia; D'Orsi, Carl J.

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To investigate the glandular dose magnitudes and characteristics resulting from image acquisition using a dedicated breast computed tomography (BCT) clinical prototype imaging system. Methods: The x-ray spectrum and output characteristics of a BCT clinical prototype (Koning Corporation, West Henrietta, NY) were determined using empirical measurements, breast phantoms, and an established spectrum model. The geometry of the BCT system was replicated in a Monte Carlo-based computer simulation using the GEANT4 toolkit and was validated by comparing the simulated results for exposure distribution in a standard 16 cm CT head phantom with those empirically determined using a 10 cm CT pencil ionization chamber and dosimeter. The computer simulation was further validated by replicating the results of a previous BCT dosimetry study. Upon validation, the computer simulation was modified to include breasts of varying sizes and homogeneous compositions spanning those encountered clinically, and the normalized mean glandular dose resulting from BCT was determined. Using the system's measured exposure output determined automatically for breasts of different size and density, the mean glandular dose for these breasts was computed and compared to the glandular dose resulting from mammography. Finally, additional Monte Carlo simulations were performed to study how the glandular dose values vary within the breast tissue during acquisition with both this BCT prototype and a typical craniocaudal (CC) mammographic acquisition. Results: This BCT prototype uses an x-ray spectrum with a first half-value layer of 1.39 mm Al and a mean x-ray energy of 30.3 keV. The normalized mean glandular dose for breasts of varying size and composition during BCT acquisition with this system ranges from 0.278 to 0.582 mGy/mGy air kerma with the reference air kerma measured in air at the center of rotation. Using the measured exposure outputs for the tube currents automatically selected by the

  11. Computed tomography evaluation of local and extraintestinal complications of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Kerber, G W; Greenberg, M; Rubin, J M

    1984-01-01

    Complications of Crohn's disease were demonstrated by computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis in 7 patients. Four patients had developed abscesses, 2 located in the psoas region and 2 involving the retroperitoneum or the liver. Other abnormalities documented on CT included inflammatory masses, fistulae, carcinoma, mesenteric thickening, and extraintestinal complications such as gallstones, renal calculi, and sacroileitis. Computed tomography was found to be useful in the detection and follow-up of abdominal complications of Crohn's disease.

  12. Quantifying Consolidation and Reordering in Natural Granular Media from Computed Tomography Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    fluid flow and sediment compressibility. X - ray microfocus computed tomography (XMCT) images with high-resolution (-12 •rm) were evaluated using a grain...directly evaluate packing in real systems remains high. X - ray microfocus computed tomography (XMCT) imaging enables evaluations of complex processes in...media is an extremely important determinant in reservoir rock evolution, sound speed propagation, fluid flow and sediment compressibility. X - ray

  13. Digital Radiography and X-ray Computed Tomography Slice Inspection of an Aluminum Truss Section

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    3. Results The DR and XCT scans of the specimen were done using the 225-keV microfocus x - ray tube and II/CCD camera setup in centered rotate-only...Digital Radiography and X - ray Computed Tomography Slice Inspection of an Aluminum Truss Section by William H. Green ARL-MR-791 September...Digital Radiography and X - ray Computed Tomography Slice Inspection of an Aluminum Truss Section William H. Green Weapons and Materials

  14. Contrast-enhanced fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/contrast-enhanced computed tomography in mediastinal T-cell lymphoma with superior vena cava syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Santhosh, Sampath; Gorla, Arun Kumar Reddy; Bhattacharya, Anish; Varma, Subhash Chander; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) is a routine investigation for the staging of lymphomas. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is mandatory whenever parenchymal lesions, especially in the liver and spleen are suspected. We report a rare case of primary mediastinal T-cell lymphoma evaluated with contrast-enhanced PET/CT that showed features of superior vena cava syndrome. PMID:26917907

  15. AUTOMATED AGATSTON SCORE COMPUTATION IN A LARGE DATASET OF NON ECG-GATED CHEST COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY.

    PubMed

    González, Germán; Washko, George R; Estépar, Raúl San José

    2016-04-01

    The Agatston score, computed from ECG-gated computed tomography (CT), is a well established metric of coronary artery disease. It has been recently shown that the Agatston score computed from chest CT (non ECG-gated) studies is highly correlated with the Agatston score computed from cardiac CT scans. In this work we present an automated method to compute the Agatston score from chest CT images. Coronary arteries calcifications (CACs) are defined as voxels contained within the coronary arteries with a value greater or equal to 130 Hounsfield Units (HU). CACs are automatically detected in chest CT studies by locating the heart, generating a region of interest around it, thresholding the image in such region and applying a set of rules to discriminate CACs from calcifications in the main vessels or from metallic implants. We evaluate the methodology in a large cohort of 1500 patients for whom manual reference standard is available. Our results show that the Pearson correlation coefficient between manual and automated Agatston score is ρ = 0.86 (p < 0.0001).

  16. Computed tomography perfusion and computed tomography angiography for prediction of clinical outcomes in ischemic stroke patients after thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jia-wei; Yu, Xiang-rong; Zhou, Shu-yi; Wang, Jian-hong; Zhang, Jun; Geng, Dao-ying; Zhang, Tian-yu; Cheng, Xin; Ling, Yi-feng; Dong, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral blood perfusion and cerebrovascular lesions are important factors that can affect the therapeutic efficacy of thrombolysis. At present, the majority of studies focus on assessing the accuracy of lesion location using imaging methods before treatment, with less attention to predictions of outcomes after thrombolysis. Thus, in the present study, we assessed the efficacy of combined computed tomography (CT) perfusion and CT angiography in predicting clinical outcomes after thrombolysis in ischemic stroke patients. The study included 52 patients who received both CT perfusion and CT angiography. Patients were grouped based on the following criteria to compare clinical outcomes: (1) thrombolytic and non-thrombolytic patients, (2) thrombolytic patients with CT angiography showing the presence or absence of a vascular stenosis, (3) thrombolytic patients with CT perfusion showing the presence or absence of hemodynamic mismatch, and (4) different CT angiography and CT perfusion results. Short-term outcome was assessed by the 24-hour National Institution of Health Stroke Scale score change. Long-term outcome was assessed by the 3-month modified Rankin Scale score. Of 52 ischemic stroke patients, 29 were treated with thrombolysis and exhibited improved short-term outcomes compared with those without thrombolysis treatment (23 patients). Patients with both vascular stenosis and blood flow mismatch (13 patients) exhibited the best short-term outcome, while there was no correlation of long-term outcome with CT angiography or CT perfusion findings. These data suggest that combined CT perfusion and CT angiography are useful for predicting short-term outcome, but not long-term outcome, after thrombolysis. PMID:28250755

  17. Heart Wall Is Thicker on Postmortem Computed Tomography Than on Ante Mortem Computed Tomography: The First Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Okuma, Hidemi; Gonoi, Wataru; Ishida, Masanori; Shintani, Yukako; Takazawa, Yutaka; Fukayama, Masashi; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the postmortem changes of the heart wall on postmortem (PM) computed tomography (CT) in comparison with those on ante mortem CT (AMCT), and in comparison with the pathological findings, obtained in the same patients. Materials and Methods We studied 57 consecutive patients who had undergone AMCT, PMCT, and pathological autopsy in our tertiary care hospital between April 2009 and December 2010. PMCT was performed within 20 hours after death, followed by pathological autopsy. The cardiac chambers were measured at five sites on both AMCT and PMCT by two board-certified radiologists who were not provided with clinical information. The differences in heart wall thickness between AMCT with and without contrast medium, between AMCT and PMCT, and between PMCT and pathological anatomy were evaluated statistically. Confounding factors of postmortem change such as gender, presence of arteriosclerosis, the organ related to cause of death, age, and elapsed time since death were examined statistically. Results No significant differences were observed on AMCT in comparison of contrasted and non-contrasted images. The heart wall was significantly thicker on PMCT than on AMCT (p < 0.0001) at all five measurement sites. The heart wall was significantly thicker on PMCT than on pathology specimens when measured in accordance with pathological standard mensuration. However, no significant difference was observed between PMCT measurements and those of pathology specimens at any site when the papillary muscles and epicardial fat were included. No significant association was found between postmortem change in heart wall thickness and gender, presence of arteriosclerosis, the organ related to cause of death, age, or elapsed time since death. Conclusion This is the first longitudinal study to confirm greater thickness of heart wall on postmortem images compared with ante mortem images, in the same patients. Furthermore, the postmortem changes on CT were supported by

  18. Image Quality of Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography with 320-Row Area Detector Computed Tomography in Children with Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Tada, Akihiro; Sato, Shuhei; Kanie, Yuichiro; Tanaka, Takashi; Inai, Ryota; Akagi, Noriaki; Morimitsu, Yusuke; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess factors affecting image quality of 320-row computed tomography angiography (CTA) of coronary arteries in children with congenital heart disease (CHD). We retrospectively reviewed 28 children up to 3 years of age with CHD who underwent prospective electrocardiography (ECG)-gated 320-row CTA with iterative reconstruction. We assessed image quality of proximal coronary artery segments using a five-point scale. Age, body weight, average heart rate, and heart rate variability were recorded and compared between two groups: patients with good diagnostic image quality in all four coronary artery segments and patients with at least one coronary artery segment with nondiagnostic image quality. Altogether, 96 of 112 segments (85.7 %) had diagnostic-quality images. Patients with nondiagnostic segments were significantly younger (10.0 ± 11.6 months) and had lower body weight (5.9 ± 2.9 kg) (each p < 0.05) than patients with diagnostic image quality of all four segments (20.6 ± 13.8 months and 8.4 ± 2.5 kg, respectively; each p < 0.05). Differences in heart rate and heart rate variability between the two imaging groups were not significant. Receiver operating characteristic analyses for predicting patients with nondiagnostic image quality revealed an optimal body weight cutoff of ≤5.6 kg and an optimal age cutoff of ≤12.5 months. Prospective ECG-gated 320-row CTA with iterative reconstruction provided feasible image quality of coronary arteries in children with CHD. Younger age and lower body weight were factors that led to poorer image quality of coronary arteries.

  19. Rotational artifacts in on-board cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ali, E S M; Webb, R; Nyiri, B J

    2015-02-21

    Rotational artifacts in image guidance systems lead to registration errors that affect non-isocentric treatments and dose to off-axis organs-at-risk. This study investigates a rotational artifact in the images acquired with the on-board cone beam computed tomography system XVI (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden). The goals of the study are to identify the cause of the artifact, to characterize its dependence on other quantities, and to investigate possible solutions. A 30 cm diameter cylindrical phantom is used to acquire clockwise and counterclockwise scans at five speeds (120 to 360 deg min(-1)) on six Elekta linear accelerators from three generations (MLCi, MLCi2 and Agility). Additional scans are acquired with different pulse widths and focal spot sizes for the same mAs. Image quality is evaluated using a common phantom with an in-house three dimensional contrast transfer function attachment. A robust, operator-independent analysis is developed which quantifies rotational artifacts with 0.02° accuracy and imaging system delays with 3 ms accuracy. Results show that the artifact is caused by mislabelling of the projections with a lagging angle due to various imaging system delays. For the most clinically used scan speed (360 deg min(-1)), the artifact is ∼0.5°, which corresponds to ∼0.25° error per scan direction with the standard Elekta procedure for angle calibration. This leads to a 0.5 mm registration error at 11 cm off-center. The artifact increases linearly with scan speed, indicating that the system delay is independent of scan speed. For the most commonly used pulse width of 40 ms, this delay is 34 ± 1 ms, part of which is half the pulse width. Results are consistent among the three linac generations. A software solution that corrects the angles of individual projections is shown to eliminate the rotational error for all scan speeds and directions. Until such a solution is available from the manufacturer, three clinical solutions are presented, which

  20. A stoichiometric calibration method for dual energy computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, Alexandra E.; Carrier, Jean-François; Bouchard, Hugo

    2014-04-01

    The accuracy of radiotherapy dose calculation relies crucially on patient composition data. The computed tomography (CT) calibration methods based on the stoichiometric calibration of Schneider et al (1996 Phys. Med. Biol. 41 111-24) are the most reliable to determine electron density (ED) with commercial single energy CT scanners. Along with the recent developments in dual energy CT (DECT) commercial scanners, several methods were published to determine ED and the effective atomic number (EAN) for polyenergetic beams without the need for CT calibration curves. This paper intends to show that with a rigorous definition of the EAN, the stoichiometric calibration method can be successfully adapted to DECT with significant accuracy improvements with respect to the literature without the need for spectrum measurements or empirical beam hardening corrections. Using a theoretical framework of ICRP human tissue compositions and the XCOM photon cross sections database, the revised stoichiometric calibration method yields Hounsfield unit (HU) predictions within less than ±1.3 HU of the theoretical HU calculated from XCOM data averaged over the spectra used (e.g., 80 kVp, 100 kVp, 140 kVp and 140/Sn kVp). A fit of mean excitation energy (I-value) data as a function of EAN is provided in order to determine the ion stopping power of human tissues from ED-EAN measurements. Analysis of the calibration phantom measurements with the Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash dual source CT scanner shows that the present formalism yields mean absolute errors of (0.3 ± 0.4)% and (1.6 ± 2.0)% on ED and EAN, respectively. For ion therapy, the mean absolute errors for calibrated I-values and proton stopping powers (216 MeV) are (4.1 ± 2.7)% and (0.5 ± 0.4)%, respectively. In all clinical situations studied, the uncertainties in ion ranges in water for therapeutic energies are found to be less than 1.3 mm, 0.7 mm and 0.5 mm for protons, helium and carbon ions respectively, using a generic