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Sample records for computer cathode ray

  1. Leaching of lead from computer printed wire boards and cathode ray tubes by municipal solid waste landfill leachates.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yong-Chul; Townsend, Timothy G

    2003-10-15

    The proper management of discarded electronic devices (E-waste) is an important issue for solid waste professionals because of the magnitude of the waste stream and because these devices often contain a variety of toxic metals (e.g., lead). While recycling of E-waste is developing, much of this waste stream is disposed in landfills. Leaching tests are frequently used to characterize the potential of a solid waste to leach when disposed in a landfill. In the United States, the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) is used to determine whether a solid waste is a hazardous waste by the toxicity characteristic. The TCLP is designed to simulate worse-case leaching in a landfill environment where the waste is co-disposed with municipal solid waste (MSW). While the TCLP is a required analysis from a regulatory perspective, the leachate concentrations measured may not accurately reflect the concentrations observed under typical landfill conditions. Another method that can be performed to assess the degree a pollutant might leach from a waste in a landfill is to use actual landfill leachate as the leaching solution. In this study, two lead-containing components found in electronic devices (printed wire boards from computers and cathode ray tubes from computers and televisions) were leached using the TCLP and leachates from 11 Florida landfills. California's Waste Extraction Test (WET) and the Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure were also performed. The results indicated that the extractions using MSW landfill leachates resulted in lower lead concentrations than those by the TCLP. The pH of the leaching solution and the ability of the organic acids in the TCLP and WET to complex with the lead are factors that regulate the amount of lead leached.

  2. Depression cathode structure for cathode ray tubes having surface smoothness and method for producing same

    SciTech Connect

    Rychlewski, T.V.

    1984-10-23

    Depression cathode structures for cathode ray tubes are produced by dispensing liquid cathode material into the depression of a metallic supporting substrate, removing excess cathode material by passing a doctor blade across the substrate surface and over the depression, and drying the cathode layer to a substantially immobile state. The cathode layer may optionally be further shaped prior to substantially complete drying thereof.

  3. Companies Exporting Cathode Ray Tubes for Reuse

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Companies listed in the table below have submitted written notifications to EPA Headquarters to inform EPA of their intention to export used, intact cathode ray tubes (CRTs) for reuse as required under the CRT rule.

  4. Direct Simulations of Coupled Transport and Reaction on Nano-Scale X-Ray Computed Tomography Images of Platinum Group Metal-Free Catalyst Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, S.; Komini Babu, S.; Chung, H. T.; Zelenay, P.; Litster, S.

    2016-08-22

    The nano/micro-scale geometry of polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) catalyst layers critically affects cell performance. The small length scales and complex structure of these composite layers make it challenging to analyze cell performance and physics at the particle scale by experiment. We present a computational method to simulate transport and chemical reaction phenomena at the pore/particle-scale and apply it to a PEFC cathode with platinum group metal free (PGM-free) catalyst. Here, we numerically solve the governing equations for the physics with heterogeneous oxygen diffusion coefficient and proton conductivity evaluated using the actual electrode structure and ionomer distribution obtained using nano-scale resolution X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT). Using this approach, the oxygen concentration and electrolyte potential distributions imposed by the oxygen reduction reaction are solved and the impact of the catalyst layer structure on performance is evaluated.

  5. Direct Simulations of Coupled Transport and Reaction on Nano-Scale X-Ray Computed Tomography Images of Platinum Group Metal-Free Catalyst Cathodes

    DOE PAGES

    Ogawa, S.; Komini Babu, S.; Chung, H. T.; ...

    2016-08-22

    The nano/micro-scale geometry of polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) catalyst layers critically affects cell performance. The small length scales and complex structure of these composite layers make it challenging to analyze cell performance and physics at the particle scale by experiment. We present a computational method to simulate transport and chemical reaction phenomena at the pore/particle-scale and apply it to a PEFC cathode with platinum group metal free (PGM-free) catalyst. Here, we numerically solve the governing equations for the physics with heterogeneous oxygen diffusion coefficient and proton conductivity evaluated using the actual electrode structure and ionomer distribution obtained using nano-scalemore » resolution X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT). Using this approach, the oxygen concentration and electrolyte potential distributions imposed by the oxygen reduction reaction are solved and the impact of the catalyst layer structure on performance is evaluated.« less

  6. Cathode Ray Research Leading to J.J. Thomson's Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Joseph

    1997-04-01

    This paper reviews the research on the properties and nature of cathode rays that led to the discovery of the electron by J. J. Thomson in the years 1897 - 1899. During the period from about 1870 to 1897 important research on cathode rays was carried out by William Crookes and Arthur Schuster in England, by Eugen Goldstein, Heinrich Hertz, Philipp Lenard, Emil Wiechert and Walter Kaufman in Germany, and by Jean Perrin in France. This research was always tedious and often inexact because fast vacuum pumps and convenient vacuum gauges did not yet exist. Still a few of these earlier researchers narrowly missed beating J. J. Thomson to the discover of the electron.

  7. Cathodes for medical purpose X-ray tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubin, M. L.; Chesnokov, D. A.; Pavlov, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    Results of own works of the authors and works of the Russian, Japanese, Korean and American experts in creation nanocomposites of refractory metals with increased strength characteristics for cathodes are analyzed in this report. It is shown, that though monocrystals have shown the better characteristics in comparison with traditional polycrystals as cathodes, more radical way of increase of operational characteristics of the X-ray tubes is application refractory nanostructural materials. Some results of investigations in which the work function electrons of nanocrystal tungsten is lower by 0.8 eV than that of traditional tungsten are given. This effect is able to increase the intensity of X-radiation considerably (by a factor of more than 5) at the same cathode temperatures or decrease the temperature of a cathode by 400 °C at the same intensity of X-radiation.

  8. Multilayer screen gives cathode ray tube high contrast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullinger, H.; Hilborn, E. H.

    1970-01-01

    Fabrication method for cathode ray tubes uses low-cost siloxane resin formulations. The resins contain sufficient methyl or phenyl groups for solubility in organic solvents. After vaporization and baking, the polymerized material is stable under vacuum and under temperatures required for tube fabrication.

  9. Management practices for end-of-life cathode ray tube glass: Review of advances in recycling and best available technologies.

    PubMed

    Iniaghe, Paschal O; Adie, Gilbert U

    2015-11-01

    Cathode ray tubes are image display units found in computer monitors and televisions. In recent years, cathode ray tubes have been generated as waste owing to the introduction of newer and advanced technologies in image displays, such as liquid crystal displays and high definition televisions, among others. Generation and subsequent disposal of end-of-life cathode ray tubes presents a challenge owing to increasing volumes and high lead content embedded in the funnel and neck sections of the glass. Disposal in landfills and open dumping are anti-environmental practices considering the large-scale contamination of environmental media by the potential of toxic metals leaching from glass. Mitigating such environmental contamination will require sound management strategies that are environmentally friendly and economically feasible. This review covers existing and emerging management practices for end-of-life cathode ray tubes. An in-depth analysis of available technologies (glass smelting, detoxification of cathode ray tube glass, lead extraction from cathode ray tube glass) revealed that most of the techniques are environmentally friendly, but are largely confined to either laboratory scale, or are often limited owing to high cost to mount, or generate secondary pollutants, while a closed-looped method is antiquated. However, recycling in cementitious systems (cement mortar and concrete) gives an added advantage in terms of quantity of recyclable cathode ray tube glass at a given time, with minimal environmental and economic implications. With significant quantity of waste cathode ray tube glass being generated globally, cementitious systems could be economically and environmentally acceptable as a sound management practice for cathode ray tube glass, where other technologies may not be applicable. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. 21 CFR 870.2450 - Medical cathode-ray tube display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical cathode-ray tube display. 870.2450 Section 870.2450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cathode-ray tube display. (a) Identification. A medical cathode-ray tube display is a device...

  11. 21 CFR 870.2450 - Medical cathode-ray tube display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical cathode-ray tube display. 870.2450 Section 870.2450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cathode-ray tube display. (a) Identification. A medical cathode-ray tube display is a device...

  12. 21 CFR 870.2450 - Medical cathode-ray tube display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical cathode-ray tube display. 870.2450 Section 870.2450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cathode-ray tube display. (a) Identification. A medical cathode-ray tube display is a device...

  13. 21 CFR 870.2450 - Medical cathode-ray tube display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical cathode-ray tube display. 870.2450 Section 870.2450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cathode-ray tube display. (a) Identification. A medical cathode-ray tube display is a device...

  14. 21 CFR 870.2450 - Medical cathode-ray tube display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical cathode-ray tube display. 870.2450 Section 870.2450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cathode-ray tube display. (a) Identification. A medical cathode-ray tube display is a device...

  15. Cathode ray tube glass recycling: an example of clean technology.

    PubMed

    Andreola, Fernanda; Barbieri, Luisa; Corradi, Anna; Lancellotti, Isabella

    2005-08-01

    In this study the use of 'cleaned' end of life (EOL) cathode ray tube (CRT) glass as a raw material in ceramic glazes is described. At present, the recycling and industrial utilization of CRT, a glass material from TV and computer sets, is a subject of intense research with particular regard to the so-called open-loop recycling, namely cycles different from that of the origin. However, the use of CRT glass as a secondary raw material is strictly related to the demand of high-quality raw material. The good preliminary results reached by introducing clean TV and PC monitor panel and cone glass into ceramic glaze formulations pushed research toward the setting-up of a base glaze that is exploitable for the production of pigmented, silk-screened and flame-hardened glazes (products used industrially for coating floor tiles). The aesthetic and chemical characterization of the tiles glazed by this product showed an extremely similar behaviour to originals that did not contain CRT glass. The good technical results achieved have been supported by the life cycle assessment analysis, which has demonstrated a reduction of the environmental impact of the CRT glass-containing ceramic glaze with respect to the standard one.

  16. Schematic displays for the Space Shuttle Orbiter multifunction cathode-ray-tube display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, W.

    1979-01-01

    A standardized procedure for developing cathode ray tube displayed schematic diagrams. The displaying of Spacelab information on the space shuttle orbiter multifunction cathode ray tube display system is used to illustrate this procedure. Schematic displays with the equivalent tabular displays are compared.

  17. Development of multi-pixel x-ray source using oxide-coated cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandlakunta, Praneeth; Pham, Richard; Khan, Rao; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2017-07-01

    Multiple pixel x-ray sources facilitate new designs of imaging modalities that may result in faster imaging speed, improved image quality, and more compact geometry. We are developing a high-brightness multiple-pixel thermionic emission x-ray (MPTEX) source based on oxide-coated cathodes. Oxide cathodes have high emission efficiency and, thereby, produce high emission current density at low temperature when compared to traditional tungsten filaments. Indirectly heated micro-rectangular oxide cathodes were developed using carbonates, which were converted to semiconductor oxides of barium, strontium, and calcium after activation. Each cathode produces a focal spot on an elongated fixed anode. The x-ray beam ON and OFF control is performed by source-switching electronics, which supplies bias voltage to the cathode emitters. In this paper, we report the initial performance of the oxide-coated cathodes and the MPTEX source.

  18. Determining optical and radiation characteristics of cathode ray tubes' glass to be reused as radiation shielding glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zughbi, A.; Kharita, M. H.; Shehada, A. M.

    2017-07-01

    A new method of recycling glass of Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) has been presented in this paper. The glass from CRTs suggested being used as raw materials for the production of radiation shielding glass. Cathode ray tubes glass contains considerable amounts of environmentally hazardous toxic wastes, namely heavy metal oxides such as lead oxide (PbO). This method makes CRTs glass a favorable choice to be used as raw material for Radiation Shielding Glass and concrete. The heavy metal oxides increase its density, which make this type of glass nearly equivalent to commercially available shielding glass. CRTs glass have been characterized to determine heavy oxides content, density, refractive index, and radiation shielding properties for different Gamma-Ray energies. Empirical methods have been used by using the Gamma-Ray source cobalt-60 and computational method by using the code XCOM. Measured and calculated values were in a good compatibility. The effects of irradiation by gamma rays of cobalt-60 on the optical transparency for each part of the CRTs glass have been studied. The Results had shown that some parts of CRTs glass have more resistant to Gamma radiation than others. The study had shown that the glass of cathode ray tubes could be recycled to be used as radiation shielding glass. This proposed use of CRT glass is only limited to the available quantity of CRT world-wide.

  19. Fabrication, characterization and integration of carbon nanotube cathodes for field emission X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon-Colon, Xiomara

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters are now being evaluated for a wide range of vacuum electronic applications. Our laboratory pioneer in the development of CNT based field emission X-ray source technology, which has the potential to fundamentally change how X-ray radiation is generated and utilized. Applications of the CNT field emission X-ray source technology in a wide range of applications including biomedical imaging, radiation therapy, and homeland security are being actively pursued. However, problems with the performance of the CNT cathodes for X-ray generation including short lifetime at high current density, instability under high voltage, poor emission uniformity, and cathode-to-cathode inconsistency are still major obstacles for device applications. The goal of this thesis work is the development and optimization of an electrophoretic process to fabricate composite CNT films with controlled nanotube orientation and surface density, and enhanced adhesion. The CNT cathode fabrication process consist in a combination of photolithography and electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method where parameters such as SU-8 photoresist thickness, deposition time, and deposition voltage were varied to fabricate CNT cathodes with the required properties for X-ray generation. Also the development of CNT alcohol-based suspensions in context of the EPD method requirements with excellent long term stability has been accomplished. The CNT cathodes fabricated by EPD have significantly enhanced macroscopic field emission current density and long-term stability under high operating voltages. Also these CNT cathodes compared to others reported previously show significant improved field emission properties with small cathode-to-cathode variation. The integration, characterization, and evaluation of these CNT cathodes into a micro focus field emission X-ray source has been achieved with excellent X-ray source characteristics and performance including X-ray flux and stability at the

  20. High-dose-rate stroboscopic x-ray generator with a hot-cathode triode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Ichimaru, Toshio; Sakamaki, Kimio; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu

    1997-12-01

    The construction and the fundamental studies of a high-dose- rate stroboscopic x-ray generator utilizing a hot-cathode radiation tube for high-speed radiography are described. This generator consists of the following essential components: a constant high-voltage power supply, an energy-storage oil condenser of about 0.1 (mu) F, a grid pulser, a dc power supply for the filament, and an x-ray tube. The x-ray tube is a glass-enclosed hot-cathode triode and is composed of the following major parts: an anode rod made of copper, a tungsten plate target, an iron focusing electrode, a tungsten hot- cathode (filament), a tungsten grid, and a glass tube body. The electron beams from the cathode are accelerated by both the grid and anode electrodes and are roughly converged to the target by the focusing electrode. In the present work, the storage condenser is charged up to 70 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser are discharged repetitively to the x-ray tube by the grid pulser. Because the cathode current is increased by increasing the positive grid voltage, high-dose-rate repetitive x-rays are then produced. In this generator, the cathode current which is almost equivalent to the tube current is primarily regulated by the filament temperature (fulminate voltage). The pulse widths of x-rays were about 600 ns, and the maximum repetition rate was about 50 kHz. The cathode current was less than 3.1 angstrom, and the x-ray intensity had a value of 35.2 nC/kg at 0.5 m per pulse with a charging voltage of 70 kV and a filament voltage of 12 V.

  1. Investigation on emission characteristics of metal-ceramic cathode applied to industrial X-ray diode.

    PubMed

    Xun, Ma; Jianqiang, Yuan; Hongwei, Liu; Hongtao, Li; Lingyun, Wang; Ping, Jiang

    2016-06-01

    The industrial x-ray diode with high impedance configuration is usually adopted to generate repetitive x-ray, but its performance would be worsened due to lower electric field on the cathode of diode when a voltage of several hundreds of kV is applied. To improve its performance, a novel metal-ceramic cathode is proposed in this paper. Key factors (width, relative permittivity of ceramic, and so on) affecting electric field distribution on triple points are analyzed by electrostatic field calculation program, so as to optimize the design of this novel cathode. Experiments are done to study the characteristics including emission current of cathode, diode voltage duration, diode mean dynamic impedance, and diode impedance drop velocity within diode power duration. The results show that metal-ceramic cathode could improve diode performance by enhancing emission current and stabling impedance; the impedance drop velocity of diode with spoke-shaped metal-ceramic cathode was reduced to -5 Ω ns(-1) within diode power duration, comparing to -15 Ω ns(-1) with metal foil cathode.

  2. Computer Simulation of Intense Electron Beam Generation in a Hollow Cathode Diode.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-05

    impedance diode.1 The experimental arrangement is depicted in Fig. 1. A simple carbon hollow cathode opposed a flat plate porous graphite anode...Availability Codeas B 1!Avail and/or OCT 2___isSeca V B COMPUTER SIMULATION OF INTENSE ELECTRON BEAM GENERATION IN A HOLLOW CATHODE DIODE Introduction...relatively easy to see. Figure 2 provides a scale drawing of the actual geometry of the diode modeled. The hollow -cathode projects into the

  3. Rigid indented cylindrical cathode for X-ray tube

    DOEpatents

    Hudgens, Claude R.

    1985-01-01

    A cathode assembly for a vacuum tube includes a wire filament, a straight bular anode parallel to and surrounding the wire filament, and insulating spacers for rigidly fastening the filament with respect to the anode, and with one side of the anode indented or flattened such that only one portion of the anode is heated to emitting temperatures by the filament.

  4. X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-05-01

    The primary advantage of the X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) NDE method is that features are not superposed in the image, thereby rendering them easier to interpret than radiographic projection images. Industrial XRCT systems, unlike medical diagnostic systems, have no size and dosage constraints; they are accordingly used for systems from the scale of gas turbine blades, with hundreds-of-kV energies, to those of the scale of ICBMs, requiring MV-level X-ray energies.

  5. Utilization of recycled glass derived from cathode ray tube glass as fine aggregate in cement mortar.

    PubMed

    Ling, Tung-Chai; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2011-08-30

    Rapid advances in the electronic industry led to an excessive amount of early disposal of older electronic devices such as computer monitors and old televisions (TV) before the end of their useful life. The management of cathode ray tubes (CRT), which have been a key component in computer monitors and TV sets, has become a major environmental problem worldwide. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop sustainable alternative methods to manage hazardous CRT glass waste. This study assesses the feasibility of utilizing CRT glass as a substitute for natural aggregates in cement mortar. The CRT glass investigated was an acid-washed funnel glass of dismantled CRT from computer monitors and old TV sets. The mechanical properties of mortar mixes containing 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of CRT glass were investigated. The potential of the alkali-silica reaction (ASR) and leachability of lead were also evaluated. The results confirmed that the properties of the mortar mixes prepared with CRT glass was similar to that of the control mortar using sand as fine aggregate, and displayed innocuous behaviour in the ASR expansion test. Incorporating CRT glass in cement mortar successfully prevented the leaching of lead. We conclude that it is feasible to utilize CRT glass in cement mortar production.

  6. Modeling Hierarchical Non-Precious Metal Catalyst Cathodes for PEFCs Using Multi-Scale X-ray CT Imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Komini Babu, S.; Chung, H. T.; Wu, G.; ...

    2014-08-18

    This paper reports the development of a model for simulating polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) with non-precious metal catalyst (NPMC) cathodes. NPMCs present an opportunity to dramatically reduce the cost of PEFC electrodes by removing the costly Pt catalyst. To address the significant transport losses in thick NPMC cathodes (ca. >60 µm), we developed a hierarchical electrode model that resolves the unique structure of the NPMCs we studied. A unique feature of the approach is the integration of the model with morphology data extracted from nano-scale resolution X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT) imaging of the electrodes. A notable finding is themore » impact of the liquid water accumulation in the electrode and the significant performance improvement possible if electrode flooding is mitigated.« less

  7. Modeling Hierarchical Non-Precious Metal Catalyst Cathodes for PEFCs Using Multi-Scale X-ray CT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Komini Babu, S.; Chung, H. T.; Wu, G.; Zelenay, P.; Litster, S.

    2014-08-18

    This paper reports the development of a model for simulating polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) with non-precious metal catalyst (NPMC) cathodes. NPMCs present an opportunity to dramatically reduce the cost of PEFC electrodes by removing the costly Pt catalyst. To address the significant transport losses in thick NPMC cathodes (ca. >60 µm), we developed a hierarchical electrode model that resolves the unique structure of the NPMCs we studied. A unique feature of the approach is the integration of the model with morphology data extracted from nano-scale resolution X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT) imaging of the electrodes. A notable finding is the impact of the liquid water accumulation in the electrode and the significant performance improvement possible if electrode flooding is mitigated.

  8. Hollow cathodes as electron emitting plasma contactors Theory and computer modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.; Parks, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested using hollow cathodes as plasma contactors for electrodynamic tethers, particularly to prevent the Shuttle Orbiter from charging to large negative potentials. Previous studies have shown that fluid models with anomalous scattering can describe the electron transport in hollow cathode generated plasmas. An improved theory of the hollow cathode plasmas is developed and computational results using the theory are compared with laboratory experiments. Numerical predictions for a hollow cathode plasma source of the type considered for use on the Shuttle are presented, as are three-dimensional NASCAP/LEO calculations of the emitted ion trajectories and the resulting potentials in the vicinity of the Orbiter. The computer calculations show that the hollow cathode plasma source makes vastly superior contact with the ionospheric plasma compared with either an electron gun or passive ion collection by the Orbiter.

  9. 40 CFR 261.41 - Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. 261.41 Section 261.41 Protection of... Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. (a) Persons who export used, intact CRTs for reuse must send a one-time... forth as follows: § 261.41 Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes...

  10. A Century-Old Question: Does a Crookes Paddle Wheel Cathode Ray Tube Demonstrate That Electrons Carry Momentum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, T. E.; Calisa, Vaishnavi

    2014-01-01

    In 1879, in the midst of the debate between English and continental scientists about the nature of cathode rays, William Crookes conducted an experiment in which a small mill or "paddle wheel" was pushed along tracks inside a cathode ray tube (CRT) (similar to that shown in Fig. 1) when connected to a high-voltage induction coil. Crookes…

  11. A Century-Old Question: Does a Crookes Paddle Wheel Cathode Ray Tube Demonstrate That Electrons Carry Momentum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, T. E.; Calisa, Vaishnavi

    2014-01-01

    In 1879, in the midst of the debate between English and continental scientists about the nature of cathode rays, William Crookes conducted an experiment in which a small mill or "paddle wheel" was pushed along tracks inside a cathode ray tube (CRT) (similar to that shown in Fig. 1) when connected to a high-voltage induction coil. Crookes…

  12. 40 CFR 261.40 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling. 261.40 Section 261.40 Protection of Environment... WASTE Exclusions/Exemptions § 261.40 Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling. Used, intact CRTs exported for recycling are not solid wastes if they meet...

  13. Field emission behavior of carbon nanotube yarn for micro-resolution X-ray tube cathode.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Won; Mo, Chan Bin; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Ryu, Seongwoo; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) has excellent electrical and thermal conductivity and high aspect ratio for X-ray tube cathode. However, CNT field emission cathode has been shown unstable field emission and short life time due to field evaporation by high current density and detachment by electrostatic force. An alternative approach in this direction is the introduction of CNT yarn, which is a one dimensional assembly of individual carbon nanotubes bonded by the Van der Waals force. Because CNT yarn is composed with many CNTs, CNT yarns are expected to increase current density and life time for X-ray tube applications. In this research, CNT yarn was fabricated by spinning of a super-aligned CNT forest and was characterized for application to an X-ray tube cathode. CNT yarn showed a high field emission current density and a long lifetime of over 450 hours. Applying the CNT yarn field emitter to the X-ray tube cathode, it was possible to obtain micro-scale resolution images. The relationship between the field emission properties and the microstructure evolution was investigated and the unraveling effect of the CNT yarn was discussed.

  14. The Fine-Beam Cathode-Ray Tube and the Observant and Enquiring Student - Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, John le P.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the fine-beam cathode-ray tube, explaining observed phenomena from a visual, qualitative viewpoint. Discusses the reason for the fineness of the beam and provides the theoretical basis for the observed circular shape of the beam when the Helmholtz field is applied. (JM)

  15. Comparison of electromechanical and cathode-ray-tube display mediums for an instrument approach display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, T. S.

    1979-01-01

    The effect on pilot performance of replacing a single electromechanical display with similar cathode-ray-tube displays was studied. The effects of dimensionality, color, and shading were evaluated with respect to the pilot's ability to interpret and respond to displayed information.

  16. Computer controlled techniques for high emission density mapping of thermionic cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. W.; Thomas, R. E.

    1985-12-01

    Some of the techniques commonly used (e.g. SLEEP and thermionic emission microscope) for measuring emission or work function uniformity of thermionic cathode surfaces require the use of very low or near zero current densities, thus the cathode is characterized at current densities and temperatures much lower than that of a normally operating cathode. The system reported on here uses a high voltage pulse technique and is capable of measuring emission densities in the range 1 to 80 A/cm 2 at normal cathode operating temperatures. The cathode surface is scanned with an anode having a 0.025 mm aperture whose position is controlled by computer operated stepping motors. The current through the aperture to a collector electrode is measured using a sample-and-hold amplifier. Pulsing and sampling are computer synchronized with the scanning, and data for each pulse are accumulated and can be processed and displayed in several ways using the computer, including a detailed "three-dimensional" map of either the electron emission density or work function variations. The entire surface of the cathode or any portion of it can be mapped in steps as small as 0.001 mm (1μm), but typically steps of 5-100 μm were used. Measurements are presented illustrating the uniformity or nonuniformity of the electron emission densities and work functions for type-B and type-M cathodes.

  17. Cathode Rays in Imaging: From Nipkow Disks to Flat Panel Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardsley, J. Norman

    1997-04-01

    The two essential elements in electronic recording and display of images were discovered before 1897. In 1873 Willoughby Smith and Joseph May, working on the Atlantic telegraph cable, noted that the resistance of selenium changes when light falls on it. In 1884 Paul Nipkow patented a scanning disk, consisting of a flat circular plate with small holes arranged along spiral lines, to be spun between the scene to be scanned and a light sensitive cell. The foundation for the development of more efficient electronic detection of light was laid in the 1880's by the discovery of the photoelectric effect. Meanwhile, in 1879 Crookes had shown that the fluorescence caused by cathode rays on the tube walls could be used to create images through the use of shadow masks. The elucidation of the properties of cathode rays and confirmation that they could be deflected by electrostatic and electromagnetic forces led to the invention by Frederick Braun in 1897 of the cathode ray tube, with its electron gun and fluorescent screen. High resolution television sets capable of displaying moving pictures appeared in laboratories in the 1920's. The cathode ray tube has continued to dominate display technology, but its supremacy is now being challenged by various forms of flat panel displays. The extent to which these new technologies rely on electron dynamics and electron-induced fluorescence will be outlined and the need for further research and development will be discussed. In particular, the ways in which cathode rays are harnessed to produce images in Field-Emission Displays and Plasma Display Panels will be described.

  18. X-ray dose estimation from cathode ray tube monitors by Monte Carlo calculation.

    PubMed

    Khaledi, Navid; Arbabi, Azim; Dabaghi, Moloud

    2015-04-01

    Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) monitors are associated with the possible emission of bremsstrahlung radiation produced by electrons striking the monitor screen. Because of the low dose rate, accurate dosimetry is difficult. In this study, the dose equivalent (DE) and effective dose (ED) to an operator working in front of the monitor have been calculated using the Monte Carlo (MC) method by employing the MCNP code. The mean energy of photons reaching the operator was above 17 keV. The phantom ED was 454 μSv y (348 nSv h), which was reduced to 16 μSv y (12 nSv h) after adding a conventional leaded glass sheet. The ambient dose equivalent (ADE) and personal dose equivalent (PDE) for the head, neck, and thorax of the phantom were also calculated. The uncertainty of calculated ED, ADE, and PDE ranged from 3.3% to 10.7% and 4.2% to 14.6% without and with the leaded glass, respectively.

  19. Exposure to hazardous substances in Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) recycling sites in France

    SciTech Connect

    Lecler, Marie-Thérèse Zimmermann, François; Silvente, Eric; Clerc, Frédéric; Chollot, Alain; Grosjean, Jérôme

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Chemical risks were assessed in the nine cathode ray tube screens recycling facilities. • The main hazardous agents are dust containing lead, cadmium, barium and yttrium. • Exposure and pollutant levels are described for different operations and processes. • All the operations and processes are concerned by significant levels of pollutants. • We suggest recommendations to reduce chemical risk. - Abstract: The Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) or e-waste recycling sector has grown considerably in the last fifteen years due to the ever shorter life cycles of consumables and an increasingly restrictive policy context. Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) from used television and computer screens represent one of the main sources of e-waste. CRTs contain toxic materials such as lead, cadmium, barium, and fluorescent powders which can be released if recycling of CRTs is not appropriate. Exposure to these harmful substances was assessed in nine workshops where CRT screens are treated. Particulate exposure levels were measured using a gravimetric method and metals were analysed by plasma emission spectrometry. The maximum levels of worker exposure were 8.8 mg/m{sup 3}, 1504.3 μg/m{sup 3}, 434.9 μg/m{sup 3}, 576.3 μg/m{sup 3} and 2894.3 μg/m{sup 3} respectively for inhalable dust, barium, cadmium, lead and yttrium. The maximum levels of airborne pollutants in static samples were 39.0 mg/m{sup 3}, 848.2 μg/m{sup 3}, 698.4 μg/m{sup 3}, 549.3 μg/m{sup 3} and 3437.9 μg/m{sup 3} for inhalable dust, barium, cadmium, lead and yttrium. The most harmful operations were identified, and preventive measures for reducing the chemical risk associated with screen recycling were proposed. Workplace measurements were used to define recommendations for reducing the chemical risks in CRT screens recycling facilities and for promoting the design and development of “clean and safe” processes in emerging recycling channels.

  20. Cathode ray tube (CRT) recycling: current capabilities in China and research progress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingbo; Li, Guangming; He, Wenzhi; Huang, Juwen; Shi, Xiang

    2012-08-01

    It is estimated that approximately 6,000,000 scrap TVs and 10,000,000 personal computers are generated each year in China. Cathode ray tubes (CRTs) from these machines consist of 85% glass (65% panel, 30% funnel and 5% neck glass). The leaded glass (funnel-24%, neck-30%) may seriously pollute the environment if it is not properly disposed of. In this paper, the past, current and future status of CRT dismantling technologies as well as the CRT glass recycling situation in China are presented and discussed. Recycling technology for waste CRTs in China is still immature. While the conventional CRT dismantling technologies have disadvantages from both economic and environmental viewpoints, some of the new and emerging treatments such as automatic optical sorting facilities that have been applied in developed countries offer advantages, and therefore should be transferred to China in the next few years to solve the CRT pre-processing problem. Meanwhile, because the demand for CRT glass closed-loop recycling is extremely limited, the authorities should take effective measures to improve CRT glass recycling rates and to facilitate a match to local conditions. Moreover, we also provide a broad review of the research developments in recycling techniques for CRT cullet. The challenge for the future is to transfer these environmentally friendly and energy-saving technologies into practice.

  1. Calibration of medium-resolution monochrome cathode ray tube displays for the purpose of board examinations.

    PubMed

    Evanoff, M G; Roehrig, H; Giffords, R S; Capp, M P; Rovinelli, R J; Hartmann, W H; Merritt, C

    2001-06-01

    This report discusses calibration and set-up procedures for medium-resolution monochrome cathode ray tubes (CRTs) taken in preparation of the oral portion of the board examination of the American Board of Radiology (ABR). The board examinations took place in more than 100 rooms of a hotel. There was one display-station (a computer and the associated CRT display) in each of the hotel rooms used for the examinations. The examinations covered the radiologic specialties cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, vascular, pediatric, and genitourinary. The software used for set-up and calibration was the VeriLUM 4.0 package from Image Smiths in Germantown, MD. The set-up included setting minimum luminance and maximum luminance, as well as positioning of the CRT in each examination room with respect to reflections of roomlights. The calibration for the grey scale rendition was done meeting the Digital Imaging and communication in Medicine (DICOM) 14 Standard Display Function. We describe these procedures, and present the calibration data in. tables and graphs, listing initial values of minimum luminance, maximum luminance, and grey scale rendition (DICOM 14 standard display function). Changes of these parameters over the duration of the examination were observed and recorded on 11 monitors in a particular room. These changes strongly suggest that all calibrated CRTs be monitored over the duration of the examination. In addition, other CRT performance data affecting image quality such as spatial resolution should be included in set-up and image quality-control procedures.

  2. The effects of the cathode array on emitted hard x-ray from a small plasma focus device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piriaei, D.; Mahabadi, T. D.; Javadi, S.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, the effects of the cathode array variations on emitted hard x-rays from a small Mather type plasma focus device (450 J) were investigated. The gradual elimination of the cathode rods inside the cathode array of the device lowered the quality and quantity of the emitted hard x-rays at different pressure values of argon gas. We theorized that the variations of the cathode array were able to change some discharge parameters that could vary the number of the energetic runaway electrons generated during the pinch phase which were responsible for the created features of the emitted hard x-rays. On the other hand, we hypothesized that the removal of the cathode rods could influence the current sheath dynamics during all the phases of a shot including its average axial velocity which was demonstrated by using two axial magnetic probes. We also theorized that cathode rod omission from the cathode array could also increase the initial inductance and the impedance of the system, and the impurities inside the plasma during the pinch phase which could lead to the growth of the instabilities. Moreover, by using the wavelet technique and studying the Mirnov signals, it was shown that the decrease of the cathode rod number increased the plasma magnetic field fluctuations or instabilities (MHD activities) that adversely affected the pinch quality, and reduced the emitted hard x-rays.

  3. Lead recovery from scrap cathode ray tube funnel glass by hydrothermal sulphidisation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wenyi; Meng, Wen; Li, Jinhui; Zhang, Chenglong; Song, Qingbin; Bai, Jianfeng; Wang, Jingwei; Li, Yingshun

    2015-10-01

    This research focused on the application of the hydrothermal sulphidisation method to separate lead from scrap cathode ray tube funnel glass. Prior to hydrothermal treatment, the cathode ray tube funnel glass was pretreated by mechanical activation. Under hydrothermal conditions, hydroxyl ions (OH(-)) were generated through an ion exchange reaction between metal ions in mechanically activated funnel glass and water, to accelerate sulphur disproportionation; no additional alkaline compound was needed. Lead contained in funnel glass was converted to lead sulphide with high efficiency. Temperature had a significant effect on the sulphidisation rate of lead in funnel glass, which increased from 25% to 90% as the temperature increased from 100 °C to 300 °C. A sulphidisation rate of 100% was achieved at a duration of 8 h at 300 °C. This process of mechanical activation and hydrothermal sulphidisation is efficient and promising for the treatment of leaded glass. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Exposure to hazardous substances in Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) recycling sites in France.

    PubMed

    Lecler, Marie-Thérèse; Zimmermann, François; Silvente, Eric; Clerc, Frédéric; Chollot, Alain; Grosjean, Jérôme

    2015-05-01

    The Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) or e-waste recycling sector has grown considerably in the last fifteen years due to the ever shorter life cycles of consumables and an increasingly restrictive policy context. Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) from used television and computer screens represent one of the main sources of e-waste. CRTs contain toxic materials such as lead, cadmium, barium, and fluorescent powders which can be released if recycling of CRTs is not appropriate. Exposure to these harmful substances was assessed in nine workshops where CRT screens are treated. Particulate exposure levels were measured using a gravimetric method and metals were analysed by plasma emission spectrometry. The maximum levels of worker exposure were 8.8mg/m(3), 1504.3μg/m(3), 434.9μg/m(3), 576.3μg/m(3) and 2894.3μg/m(3) respectively for inhalable dust, barium, cadmium, lead and yttrium. The maximum levels of airborne pollutants in static samples were 39.0mg/m(3), 848.2μg/m(3), 698.4μg/m(3), 549.3μg/m(3) and 3437.9μg/m(3) for inhalable dust, barium, cadmium, lead and yttrium. The most harmful operations were identified, and preventive measures for reducing the chemical risk associated with screen recycling were proposed. Workplace measurements were used to define recommendations for reducing the chemical risks in CRT screens recycling facilities and for promoting the design and development of "clean and safe" processes in emerging recycling channels.

  5. What monitor can replace the cathode-ray tube for visual stimulation to elicit multifocal electroretinograms?

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Celso Soiti; Shinoda, Kei; Matsumoto, Harue; Seki, Keisuke; Nagasaka, Eiichiro; Iwata, Takeshi; Mizota, Atsushi

    2014-08-05

    To compare a conventional cathode-ray tube (CRT) screen to organic light-emitting diode (OLED) and liquid crystal display (LCD) screens as visual stimulators to elicit multifocal electroretinograms (mfERGs), mfERGs were recorded from seven eyes of seven healthy volunteers (21 ± 2 years). The mfERGs elicited by a conventional CRT screen (S710, Compaq Computer Co.) were compared to those elicited by a studio-grade master OLED monitor (PVM-1741, Sony, Japan) and a conventional LCD (S1721, Flexscan, Eizo Nanao Corp., Japan). The luminance changes of each monitor were measured with a photodiode. CRT, OLED, and LCD screens with a frame frequency of 60 Hz were studied. A hexagonal stimulus array with 61 stimulus elements was created on each monitor. The serial white stimuli of the OLED screen at 60 Hz did not fuse, and that of the LCD screens fused. The amplitudes of P1 and P2 of the first-order kernels of the mfERGs were not significantly different from those elicited by the CRT and OLED screens, and the P1 amplitude of the first-order kernel elicited by the LCD stimuli was significantly smaller than that elicited by the CRT in all the groups of the averaged hexagonal elements. The implicit times were approximately 10 ms longer in almost all components elicited by the LCD screen compared to those elicited by the CRT screen. The mfERGs elicited by monitors other than the CRT should be carefully interpreted, especially those elicited by LCD screens. The OLED had good performance, and we conclude that it can replace the CRT as a stimulator for mfERGs; however, a collection of normative data is recommended. © 2014 ARVO.

  6. Evaluation of biopolymer-modified concrete systems for disposal of cathode ray tube glass.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daeik; Petrisor, loana G; Yen, Teh Fu

    2005-07-01

    Cathode ray tubes (CRTs) from computer monitors and television sets, which contain significantly high percentage of lead (Pb) by weight, represent an enormous and growing hazardous waste problem in the United States and worldwide. As a result, new technologies are needed to cope with current CRT waste stream and increased hazard and build new markets for its recycled components, developing commercially viable concrete composites, as well as minimizing CRT disposal problems. In this study, commercially available biopolymers, such as xanthan gum, guar gum, and chitosan, were used to encapsulate CRT glass waste, reducing the Pb leachability. The biopolymers utilized contain a number of useful functional groups, such as carboxyl (xanthan), hydroxyl (guar), and amino groups (chitosan), which play important roles in binding and stabilizing Pb onto concrete structures. The use of biopolymers in concrete systems can create a stable interpenetrating cross-linking composite that will last for many years. Results from these new composites show 30% higher compressive strength than standard concrete and a sharp decrease in lead leachability from several thousand milligrams per liter initially to an amount of three-tenths milligrams per liter or lower values (much lower than the U.S. Environment Protection Agency standard for hazardous waste of 5 mg/L by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure test), and for some of the composites leachability is below even the standard for drinking water. This efficient and cost-effective CRT-biopolymer-concrete composite is a new class of biopolymer-modified material that can potentially perform a significant role in relieving the current CRT issue.

  7. Comparison of SOFC Cathode Microstructure Quantified using X-ray Nanotomography and Focused Ion Beam - Scanning Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, George J.; Harris, William H.; Lombardo, Jeffrey J.; Izzo, Jr., John R.; Chiu, W. K. S.; Tanasini, Pietro; Cantoni, Marco; Van herle, Jan; Comninellis, Christos; Andrews, Joy C.; Liu, Yijin; Pianetta, Piero; Chu, Yong

    2011-03-24

    X-ray nanotomography and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) have been applied to investigate the complex 3D microstructure of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes at spatial resolutions of 45 nm and below. The application of near edge differential absorption for x-ray nanotomography and energy selected backscatter detection for FIB–SEM enable elemental mapping within the microstructure. Using these methods, non-destructive 3D x-ray imaging and FIB–SEM serial sectioning have been applied to compare three-dimensional elemental mapping of the LSM, YSZ, and pore phases in the SOFC cathode microstructure. The microstructural characterization of an SOFC cathode is reported based on these measurements. The results presented demonstrate the viability of x-ray nanotomography as a quantitative characterization technique and provide key insights into the SOFC cathode microstructure.

  8. Comparison of SOFC Cathode Microstructure Quantified using X-ray Nanotomography and Focused Ioni Beam-scanning Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    G Nelson; W Harris; J Lombardo; J Izzo Jr.; W Chiu; P Tanasini; M Cantoni; J Van herle; C Comninellis; et al.

    2011-12-31

    X-ray nanotomography and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) have been applied to investigate the complex 3D microstructure of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes at spatial resolutions of 45 nm and below. The application of near edge differential absorption for x-ray nanotomography and energy selected backscatter detection for FIB-SEM enable elemental mapping within the microstructure. Using these methods, non-destructive 3D x-ray imaging and FIB-SEM serial sectioning have been applied to compare three-dimensional elemental mapping of the LSM, YSZ, and pore phases in the SOFC cathode microstructure. The microstructural characterization of an SOFC cathode is reported based on these measurements. The results presented demonstrate the viability of x-ray nanotomography as a quantitative characterization technique and provide key insights into the SOFC cathode microstructure.

  9. Application Of Cathode-Ray Tube Technology To The Clinical Evaluation Of Visual Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernier, Francoise; Charlier, Jacques; Nguyen, Duc D.

    1988-02-01

    Cathode-ray tubes (CRTs) have many applications in the clinical evaluation of visual functions. They have been used to test visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, visual fields, and early development of vision in preverbal children. Because CRTs provide considerable flexibility for the definition of spatial and temporal components of the stimulus, their use provides an attractive solution to many visual stimulation problems. However, there are some limitations due to the scanning of the picture frame by the electron beam and also to the electron-photon conversion process. The spatial, photometric, spectral, and temporal characteristics of a specifically designed monochromatic television system are evaluated with reference to the physiological requirements of visual tests.

  10. Upgrade of X-band thermionic cathode RF gun for Compton scattering X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Fumito; Natsui, Takuya; Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Hashimoto, Eiko; Lee, KiWoo; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Higo, Toshiyasu; Fukuda, Shigeki; Akemoto, Mitsuo

    2009-09-01

    A Compton scattering X-ray source consisting of an X-band (11.424 GHz) electron linear accelerator (linac) and Q-switched Nd: YAG laser is currently under development at the University of Tokyo. Monochromatic X-rays are required for a variety of medical and biological applications. The X-ray source produces monochromatic X-rays via collision between a 35-MeV multi-bunch (104 bunches in a 1 μs RF pulse) electron beam and 1.4 J/10 ns (532 nm) Nd: YAG laser pulse. The linac uses an X-band 3.5-cell thermionic cathode RF gun and an alpha magnet as an injector. Until now, electron beam generation (2 MeV, 1 pC/bunch at the exit of the injector), beam acceleration, and X-ray generation have been verified. In order to increase X-ray energy and intensity, we have completed the design and construction of a new RF gun with relevant modifications in some structures. In this paper, we describe the details of the concepts of designing a new RF gun and discuss future works.

  11. A New Electrocardiograph Employing the Cathode Ray Oscillograph as the Recording Device

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Douglas

    1934-01-01

    The advantages of the cathode ray tube as an electrical recording instrument are unique. It has no inherent inertia, so that there is no distortion from this source as there is in every known electro-mechanical recorder. The workings of the cathode ray oscillograph are explained and discussed. Immediate visual observation of the electrocardiogram is obtained by the use of a new fluorescent screen, which is described, and the mechanism of a suitable “time base” circuit for this purpose is explained. Some of the problems associated with the design of an amplifier, distortionless as far as electrocardiography is concerned, are dealt with, including the use of long “time constants” and the employment of a suitable filter circuit. The design of a suitable camera unit (for photographic recording) is discussed. A method of neutralizing interference picked up from alternating current electric light mains is explained and illustrated. The apparatus consists of four easily portable, and mechanically robust, units. The Recorder Unit, the Amplifier Unit, the H.T. (high tension) Supply Unit, and the Camera Unit. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:19989971

  12. Novel Low-Cost, Low-Power Miniature Thermionic Cathode Developed for Microwave/Millimeter Wave Tube and Cathode Ray Tube Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.

    1999-01-01

    A low cost, small size and mass, low heater power, durable high-performance barium dispenser thermionic cathode has been developed that offers significant advancements in the design, manufacture, and performance of the electron sources used in vacuum electronic devices--such as microwave (and millimeter wave) traveling-wave tubes (TWT's)--and in display devices such as high-brightness, high-resolution cathode ray tubes (CRT's). The lower cathode heater power and the reduced size and mass of the new cathode are expected to be especially beneficial in TWT's for deep space communications, where future missions are requiring smaller spacecraft, higher data transfer rates (higher frequencies and radiofrequency output power), and greater electrical efficiency. Also expected to benefit are TWT's for commercial and government communication satellites, for both low and geosynchronous Earth orbit, with additional benefits offered by lower cost and potentially higher cathode current loading. A particularly important TWT application is in the microwave power module (MPM), which is a hybrid microwave (or millimeter wave) amplifier consisting of a low-noise solid state driver, a vacuum power booster (small TWT), and an electronic power conditioner integrated into a single compact package. The attributes of compactness and potentially high electrical efficiency make the MPM very attractive for many commercial and government (civilian and defense) applications in communication and radar systems. The MPM is already finding application in defense electronic systems and is under development by NASA for deep space communications. However, for the MPM to become competitive and commercially successful, a major reduction in cost must be achieved.

  13. Interlaced X-ray diffraction computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakeros, Antonios; Jacques, Simon D. M.; Di Michiel, Marco; Senecal, Pierre; Middelkoop, Vesna; Cernik, Robert J.; Beale, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction computed tomography data-collection strategy that allows, post experiment, a choice between temporal and spatial resolution is reported. This strategy enables time-resolved studies on comparatively short timescales, or alternatively allows for improved spatial resolution if the system under study, or components within it, appear to be unchanging. The application of the method for studying an Mn–Na–W/SiO2 fixed-bed reactor in situ is demonstrated. Additionally, the opportunities to improve the data-collection strategy further, enabling post-collection tuning between statistical, temporal and spatial resolutions, are discussed. In principle, the interlaced scanning approach can also be applied to other pencil-beam tomographic techniques, like X-ray fluorescence computed tomography, X-ray absorption fine structure computed tomography, pair distribution function computed tomography and tomographic scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. PMID:27047305

  14. Interlaced X-ray diffraction computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Vamvakeros, Antonios; Jacques, Simon D M; Di Michiel, Marco; Senecal, Pierre; Middelkoop, Vesna; Cernik, Robert J; Beale, Andrew M

    2016-04-01

    An X-ray diffraction computed tomography data-collection strategy that allows, post experiment, a choice between temporal and spatial resolution is reported. This strategy enables time-resolved studies on comparatively short timescales, or alternatively allows for improved spatial resolution if the system under study, or components within it, appear to be unchanging. The application of the method for studying an Mn-Na-W/SiO2 fixed-bed reactor in situ is demonstrated. Additionally, the opportunities to improve the data-collection strategy further, enabling post-collection tuning between statistical, temporal and spatial resolutions, are discussed. In principle, the interlaced scanning approach can also be applied to other pencil-beam tomographic techniques, like X-ray fluorescence computed tomography, X-ray absorption fine structure computed tomography, pair distribution function computed tomography and tomographic scanning transmission X-ray microscopy.

  15. Full-color laser cathode ray tube (L-CRT) projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskiy, Vladimir; Nasibov, Alexander S.; Popov, Yuri M.; Reznikov, Parvel V.; Skasyrsky, Yan K.

    1995-04-01

    A full color TV projector based on three laser cathode-ray tubes (L-CRT) is described. A water-cooled laser screen (LS) is the radiation element of the L-CRT. We have produced three main colors (blue, green and red) by using the LS made of three II-VI compounds: ZnSe ((lambda) equals 475 nm), CdS ((lambda) equals 530 nm) and ZnCdSe (630 nm). The total light flow reaches 1500 Lm, and the number of elements per line is not less than 1000. The LS efficiency may be about 10 Lm/W. In our experiments we have tested new electron optics: - (30 - 37) kV are applied to the cathode unit of the electron gun; the anode of the e-gun and the e-beam intensity modulator are under low potential; the LS has a potential + (30 - 37) kV. The accelerating voltage is divided into two parts, and this enables us to diminish the size and weight of the projector.

  16. Innovated application of mechanical activation to separate lead from scrap cathode ray tube funnel glass.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wenyi; Li, Jinhui; Zhang, Qiwu; Saito, Fumio

    2012-04-03

    The disposal of scrap cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass has become a global environmental problem due to the rapid shrinkage of new CRT monitor demand, which greatly reduces the reuse for remanufacturing. To detoxificate CRT funnel glass by lead recovery with traditional metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the funnel glass. As a result, substantial physicochemical changes have been observed after mechanical activation including chemical breakage and defects formation in glass inner structure. These changes contribute to the easy dissolution of the activated sample in solution. High yield of 92.5% of lead from activated CRT funnel glass by diluted nitric acid leaching and successful formation of lead sulfide by sulfur sulfidization in water have also been achieved. All the results indicate that the application of mechanical activation on recovering lead from CRT funnel glass is efficient and promising, which is also probably appropriate to detoxificate any other kind of leaded glass.

  17. Study on the mechanical and environmental properties of concrete containing cathode ray tube glass aggregate.

    PubMed

    Romero, Diego; James, Jacqueline; Mora, Rodrigo; Hays, Carol D

    2013-07-01

    Cathode ray tube (CRT) glass is considered a hazardous material due to its lead toxicity. In addition, current disposal practices are being phased out due to their adverse environmental impacts. In this project, CRT glass was used as a fine aggregate replacement in concrete. Life-cycle material characterization was conducted by evaluating the durability and strength of the CRT-Concrete. Leaching tests were also conducted to investigate whether the material meets drinking water limits for Pb. Test results show that the plastic state of the CRT-Concrete was affected by the angularity of the glass particles. Moreover, the compressive strength of CRT-Concrete met and exceeded that of the control specimen. However, CRT-Concrete was susceptible to expansive alkali-silica reactions when more than 10% CRT replacement was used. Environmental leaching results show that lead concentrations from CRT-Concrete are below the drinking water limits depending on the CRT volume replacement and if biopolymers are used.

  18. In Situ X-ray Diffraction Studies of Cathode Materials in Lithium Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X. Q.; Sun, X.; McBreen, J.; Mukerjee, S.; Gao, Yuan; Yakovleva, M. V.; Xing, X. K.; Daroux, M. L.

    1998-11-01

    There is an increasing interest in lithiated transition metal oxides because of their use as cathodes in lithium batteries. LiCoO{sub 2}, LiNiO{sub 2} and LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} are the three most widely used and studied materials, At present, although it is relative expensive and toxic, LiCoO{sub 2} is the material of choice in commercial lithium ion batteries because of its ease of manufacture, better thermal stability and cycle life. However, the potential use of lithium ion batteries with larger capacity for power tools and electric vehicles in the future will demand new cathode materials with higher energy density, lower cost and better thermal stability. LiNiO{sub 2} is isostructural with LiCoO{sub 2}. It offers lower cost and high energy density than LiCoO{sub 2}. However, it has much poorer thermal stability than LiCoO{sub 2}, in the charged (delithiated) state. Co, Al, and other elements have been used to partially replace Ni in LiNiO{sub 2} system in order to increase the thermal stability. LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} has the highest thermal stability and lowest cost and toxicity. However, the low energy density and poor cycle life at elevated temperature are the major obstacles for this material. In order to develop safer, cheaper, and better performance cathode materials, the in-depth understanding of the relationships between the thermal stability and structure, performance and structure are very important. The performance here includes energy density and cycle life of the cathode materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is one of the most powerful tools to study these relationships. The pioneer ex situ XRD work on cathode materials for lithium batteries was done by Ohzuku. His XRD studies on LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, LiCoO{sub 2}, LiNiO{sub 2}, LiNi{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}O{sub 2}, and LiAl{sub x}Ni{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} cathodes at different states of charge have provided important guidelines for the development of these new materials. However, the kinetic nature of the battery

  19. High Power Experiment of X-Band Thermionic Cathode RF Gun for Compton Scattering X-ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Fumito; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Dobashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Meng, De; Urakawa, Junji; Higo, Toshiyasu; Akemoto, Mitsuo; Matsuo, Kenichi; Sakae, Hisaharu; Yamamoto, Masashi

    2006-11-01

    We are currently developing a compact monochromatic X-ray source based on laser-electron collision. To realize remarkably compact-, high-intensity- and highly-stable-system, we adopt an X-band multi-bunch liner accelerator (linac) and reliable Q-switch laser. The X-ray yields by the multi-bunch electron beam and Q-switch Nd: YAG laser of 1.4 J/10 ns (FWHM) (532 nm, second harmonic) is 107 photons/RF-pulse (108 photons/sec for 10 Hz operation). The injector of the system consists of a 3.5-cell X-band thermionic cathode RF gun and an alpha magnet. So far we have achieved beam generation from the X-band thermionic cathode RF gun. The peak beam energy is 2 MeV. This experimental high energy (˜2 MeV) beam generation from the X-band thermionic cathode RF gun is the first in the world. In this paper, we describe the system of the Compton scattering X-ray source based on the X-band linac, experimental results of X-band thermionic cathode RF gun and the details of the experimental setup for Compton scattering X-ray generation that are under construction.

  20. 40 CFR 261.41 - Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. 261.41 Section 261.41 Protection of... Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. (a) Persons who export used, intact CRTs for reuse must send a...

  1. 40 CFR 261.41 - Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. 261.41 Section 261.41 Protection of... Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. (a) Persons who export used, intact CRTs for reuse must send a...

  2. 40 CFR 261.41 - Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. 261.41 Section 261.41 Protection of... Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. (a) Persons who export used, intact CRTs for reuse must send a...

  3. X-ray Absorption Measurements on Nickel Cathode of Sodium-beta Alumina batteries: Fe-Ni-CI Chemical Associations

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, Mark E.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Fulton, John L.; Lemmon, John P.; Lu, Xiaochuan; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Heald, Steve M.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Mortensen, Devon R.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Hess, Nancy J.

    2014-02-01

    Sections of Na-Al-NiCl2 cathodes from sodium-beta alumina ZEBRA batteries have been characterized with X-ray fluorescence mapping, and XANES measurements to probe the microstructure, elemental correlation, and chemical speciation after voltage cycling. Cycling was performed under identical load conditions at either 240 or 280 °C operating temperature and subsequently quenched in either the charged or discharged state. X-ray fluorescence mapping and XANES measurements were made adjacent to the current collector and β"-Al2O3 solid electrolyte interfaces to detect possible gradients in chemical properties across the cathode. An FeS additive, introduced during battery synthesis, was found to be present as either Fe metal or an Fe(II) chloride in all cathode samples. X-ray fluorescence mapping reveals an operating temperature and charge-state dependent spatial correlation between Fe, Ni, and Cl concentration. XANES measurements indicate that both Ni and Fe are chemically reactive and shift between metallic and chloride phases in the charged and discharged states, respectively. However the percentage of chemically active Ni and Fe is significantly less in the cell operated at lower temperature. Additionally, the cathode appeared chemically homogeneous at the scale of our X-ray measurements.

  4. 40 CFR 261.40 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling. 261.40 Section 261.40 Protection of Environment...) Exported for Recycling. Used, intact CRTs exported for recycling are not solid wastes if they meet the...

  5. 40 CFR 261.39 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Broken Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. 261.39 Section 261.39 Protection of... (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. Used, broken CRTs are not solid wastes if they meet... destined for recycling and if they meet the following requirements: (1) Storage. The broken CRTs must be...

  6. 40 CFR 261.40 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling. 261.40 Section 261.40 Protection of Environment...) Exported for Recycling. Used, intact CRTs exported for recycling are not solid wastes if they meet the...

  7. 40 CFR 261.39 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Broken Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. 261.39 Section 261.39 Protection of... (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. Used, broken CRTs are not solid wastes if they meet... destined for recycling and if they meet the following requirements: (1) Storage. The broken CRTs must be...

  8. 40 CFR 261.39 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Broken Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. 261.39 Section 261.39 Protection of... (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. Used, broken CRTs are not solid wastes if they meet... destined for recycling and if they meet the following requirements: (1) Storage. The broken CRTs must be...

  9. 40 CFR 261.40 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling. 261.40 Section 261.40 Protection of Environment...) Exported for Recycling. Used, intact CRTs exported for recycling are not solid wastes if they meet the...

  10. 40 CFR 261.40 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling. 261.40 Section 261.40 Protection of Environment...) Exported for Recycling. Used, intact CRTs exported for recycling are not solid wastes if they meet the...

  11. 40 CFR 261.39 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Broken Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. 261.39 Section 261.39 Protection of... (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. Used, broken CRTs are not solid wastes if they meet... destined for recycling and if they meet the following requirements: (1) Storage. The broken CRTs must be...

  12. X-ray absorption measurements on nickel cathode of sodium-beta alumina batteries: Fe-Ni-Cl chemical associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Mark E.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Fulton, John L.; Lemmon, John P.; Lu, Xiaochuan; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Heald, Steve M.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Mortensen, Devon. R.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Hess, Nancy J.

    2014-02-01

    Sections of Na-Al-NiCl2 cathodes from sodium-beta alumina ZEBRA batteries have been characterized with X-ray fluorescence mapping, and XANES measurements to probe the microstructure, elemental correlation, and chemical speciation after voltage cycling. Cycling was performed under identical load conditions at either 240 or 280 °C operating temperature and subsequently quenched in either the charged or discharged state. X-ray fluorescence mapping and XANES measurements were made adjacent to the current collector and β″-Al2O3 solid electrolyte interfaces to detect possible gradients in chemical properties across the cathode. An FeS additive, introduced during battery synthesis, was found to be present as either Fe metal or an Fe(II) chloride in all cathode samples. X-ray fluorescence mapping reveals an operating temperature and charge-state dependent spatial correlation between Fe, Ni, and Cl concentration. XANES measurements indicate that both Ni and Fe are chemically reactive and shift between metallic and chloride phases in the charged and discharged states, respectively. However the percentage of chemically active Ni and Fe is significantly less in the cell operated at lower temperature. Additionally, the cathode appeared chemically homogeneous at the scale of our X-ray measurements.

  13. The Fine-Beam Cathode-Ray Tube and the Observant and Enquiring Student--Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, John le P.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses use of the fine-beam cathode-ray tube to investigate strength and direction of the earth's magnetic field, simulating discussion between student and teacher as the equipment is set up and the experiment done. Provides diagrams and illustrative photographs to aid in equipment set-up and measurement. (JM)

  14. The Fine-Beam Cathode-Ray Tube and the Observant and Enquiring Student--Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, John le P.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses use of the fine-beam cathode-ray tube to investigate strength and direction of the earth's magnetic field, simulating discussion between student and teacher as the equipment is set up and the experiment done. Provides diagrams and illustrative photographs to aid in equipment set-up and measurement. (JM)

  15. 40 CFR 261.39 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Broken Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. 261.39 Section 261.39 Protection of... (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. Used, broken CRTs are not solid wastes if they meet... destined for recycling and if they meet the following requirements: (1) Storage. The broken CRTs must...

  16. 40 CFR 261.41 - Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. 261.41 Section 261.41 Protection of... Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. (a) Persons who export used, intact CRTs for reuse must send a one-time... to export used, intact CRTs for reuse, the notifier's name, address, and EPA ID number (if...

  17. Utilization of recycled cathode ray tubes glass in cement mortar for X-ray radiation-shielding applications.

    PubMed

    Ling, Tung-Chai; Poon, Chi-Sun; Lam, Wai-Shung; Chan, Tai-Po; Fung, Karl Ka-Lok

    2012-01-15

    Recycled glass derived from cathode ray tubes (CRT) glass with a specific gravity of approximately 3.0 g/cm(3) can be potentially suitable to be used as fine aggregate for preparing cement mortars for X-ray radiation-shielding applications. In this work, the effects of using crushed glass derived from crushed CRT funnel glass (both acid washed and unwashed) and crushed ordinary beverage container glass at different replacement levels (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% by volume) of sand on the mechanical properties (strength and density) and radiation-shielding performance of the cement-sand mortars were studied. The results show that all the prepared mortars had compressive strength values greater than 30 MPa which are suitable for most building applications based on ASTM C 270. The density and shielding performance of the mortar prepared with ordinary crushed (lead-free) glass was similar to the control mortar. However, a significant enhancement of radiation-shielding was achieved when the CRT glasses were used due to the presence of lead in the glass. In addition, the radiation shielding contribution of CRT glasses was more pronounced when the mortar was subject to a higher level of X-ray energy.

  18. Recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube, CRT: Zn removal by sulphide precipitation.

    PubMed

    Innocenzi, Valentina; De Michelis, Ida; Ferella, Francesco; Beolchini, Francesca; Kopacek, Bernd; Vegliò, Francesco

    2013-11-01

    This work is focused on the recovery of yttrium and zinc from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube (CRT). Metals are extracted by sulphuric acid in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Leaching tests are carried out according to a 2(2) full factorial plan and the highest extraction yields for yttrium and zinc equal to 100% are observed under the following conditions: 3M of sulphuric acid, 10% v/v of H2O2 concentrated solution at 30% v/v, 10% w/w pulp density, 70°C and 3h of reaction. Two series of precipitation tests for zinc are carried out: a 2(2) full factorial design and a completely randomized factorial design. In these series the factors investigated are pH of solution during the precipitation and the amount of sodium sulphide added to precipitate zinc sulphide. The data of these tests are used to describe two empirical mathematical models for zinc and yttrium precipitation yields by regression analysis. The highest precipitation yields for zinc are obtained under the following conditions: pH equal to 2-2.5% and 10-12%v/v of Na2S concentrated solution at 10%w/v. In these conditions the coprecipitation of yttrium is of 15-20%. Finally further yttrium precipitation experiments by oxalic acid on the residual solutions, after removing of zinc, show that yttrium could be recovered and calcined to obtain the final product as yttrium oxide. The achieved results allow to propose a CRT recycling process based on leaching of fluorescent powder from cathode ray tube and recovery of yttrium oxide after removing of zinc by precipitation. The final recovery of yttrium is 75-80%.

  19. Recovery of yttrium from cathode ray tubes and lamps’ fluorescent powders: experimental results and economic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Innocenzi, V. De Michelis, I.; Ferella, F.; Vegliò, F.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Fluorescent powder of lamps. • Fluorescent powder of cathode ray rubes. • Recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powders. • Economic simulation for the processes to recover yttrium from WEEE. - Abstract: In this paper, yttrium recovery from fluorescent powder of lamps and cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is described. The process for treating these materials includes the following: (a) acid leaching, (b) purification of the leach liquors using sodium hydroxide and sodium sulfide, (c) precipitation of yttrium using oxalic acid, and (d) calcinations of oxalates for production of yttrium oxides. Experimental results have shown that process conditions necessary to purify the solutions and recover yttrium strongly depend on composition of the leach liquor, in other words, whether the powder comes from treatment of CRTs or lamp. In the optimal experimental conditions, the recoveries of yttrium oxide are about 95%, 55%, and 65% for CRT, lamps, and CRT/lamp mixture (called MIX) powders, respectively. The lower yields obtained during treatments of MIX and lamp powders are probably due to the co-precipitation of yttrium together with other metals contained in the lamps powder only. Yttrium loss can be reduced to minimum changing the experimental conditions with respect to the case of the CRT process. In any case, the purity of final products from CRT, lamps, and MIX is greater than 95%. Moreover, the possibility to treat simultaneously both CRT and lamp powders is very important and interesting from an industrial point of view since it could be possible to run a single plant treating fluorescent powder coming from two different electronic wastes.

  20. X-ray Diffraction Studies of the Structure and Thermochemistry of Alkaline-Earth Oxide-Coated Thermionic Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karikari, E. K.; Bassey, E.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    1998-01-01

    NASA LeRC has a broad, active cathode technology development program in which both experimental and theoretical studies are being employed to further development of thermionic cathodes for use as electron sources in vacuum devices for communications and other space applications. One important type of thermionic cathode under development is the alkaline-earth oxide-coated (BaO, SrO, CaO) cathode. Significant improvements in the emission characteristics of this cathode have been obtained through modification of the chemical composition and morphology of the oxide coating, with the best result thus far coming from the addition of In2O3 and Sc2O3. Whereas the In2O3 produces a finer, more uniform particle structure, the exact chemical state and role of the Sc2O3 in the emission enhancement is unknown. The purpose of this cooperative agreement is to combine the studies of the surface chemistry and electron emission at NASA LeRC of chemically modified oxide coatings with a study of the thermochemistry and crystal structure using X-ray diffraction equipment and expertise at Clark Atlanta University (CAU). The study at CAU is intended to provide the description and understanding of the structure and thermochemistry needed for further improvement and optimization of the modified coatings. A description of the experimental procedure, preliminary X-ray diffraction test results, together with the design of an ultrahigh vacuum chamber necessary for high temperature thermochemistry studies will be presented.

  1. X-ray Computed Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Greg

    2001-01-01

    Describes computed tomography (CT), a medical imaging technique that produces images of transaxial planes through the human body. A CT image is reconstructed mathematically from a large number of one-dimensional projections of a plane. The technique is used in radiological examinations and radiotherapy treatment planning. (Author/MM)

  2. Lead extraction from cathode ray tube funnel glass melted under different oxidizing conditions.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi

    2015-07-15

    Lead was extracted into hydrochloric acid from cathode ray tube funnel glass melted under reducing atmosphere, oxidizing atmosphere, or a sequential combination of both to mechanistically investigate effects of the melting atmosphere on lead extraction. Melting funnel glass in a reductive atmosphere led to the generation of metallic lead particles that were readily soluble in the acid, increasing the quantity of lead extracted into the acid. Meanwhile, the glass product obtained after melting funnel glass in an oxidative atmosphere exhibited higher corrosion resistance in the acid, and the quantity of lead extracted from the treated glass decreased. However, Na2CO3 addition to the glass during melting hindered the enhancement of corrosion resistance and the immobilization of lead in the acid. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis of the treated glass samples showed that the positions of the peak or the profiles of the spectra attributed to Pb 4f, Si 2p, and O 1s signals were modified by oxidative melting, an indication that oxidative melting results in structural changes in the SiO2 framework of the glass. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Use of limestone powder during incorporation of Pb-containing cathode ray tube waste in self-compacting concrete.

    PubMed

    Sua-iam, Gritsada; Makul, Natt

    2013-10-15

    For several decades, cathode ray tubes (CRTs) were the primary display component of televisions and computers. The CRT glass envelope contains sufficient levels of lead oxide (PbO) to be considered hazardous, and there is a need for effective methods of permanently encapsulating this material during waste disposal. We examined the effect of adding limestone powder (LS) on the fresh and cured properties of self-compacting concrete (SCC) mixtures containing waste CRT glass. The SCC mixtures were prepared using Type 1 Portland cement at a constant cement content of 600 kg/m(3) and a water-to-cement ratio (w/c) of 0.38. CRT glass waste cullet was blended with river sand in proportions of 20 or 40% by weight. To suppress potential viscosity effects limestone powder was added at levels of 5, 10, or 15% by weight. The slump flow time, slump flow diameter, V-funnel flow time, Marsh cone flow time, and setting time of the fresh concrete were tested, as well as the compressive strength and ultrasonic pulse velocity of the hardened concrete. Addition of limestone powder improved the fresh and hardened properties. Pb leaching levels from the cured concrete were within US EPA allowable limits.

  4. Recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube, CRT: Zn removal by sulphide precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Innocenzi, Valentina; De Michelis, Ida; Ferella, Francesco; Beolchini, Francesca; Kopacek, Bernd

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Treatment of fluorescent powder of CRT waste. • Factorial experimental designs to study acid leaching of fluorescent powder and the purification of leach liquors. • Recover of yttrium by precipitation using oxalic acid. • Suitable flowsheet to recover yttrium from fluorescent powder. - Abstract: This work is focused on the recovery of yttrium and zinc from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube (CRT). Metals are extracted by sulphuric acid in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Leaching tests are carried out according to a 2{sup 2} full factorial plan and the highest extraction yields for yttrium and zinc equal to 100% are observed under the following conditions: 3 M of sulphuric acid, 10% v/v of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrated solution at 30% v/v, 10% w/w pulp density, 70 °C and 3 h of reaction. Two series of precipitation tests for zinc are carried out: a 2{sup 2} full factorial design and a completely randomized factorial design. In these series the factors investigated are pH of solution during the precipitation and the amount of sodium sulphide added to precipitate zinc sulphide. The data of these tests are used to describe two empirical mathematical models for zinc and yttrium precipitation yields by regression analysis. The highest precipitation yields for zinc are obtained under the following conditions: pH equal to 2–2.5% and 10–12% v/v of Na{sub 2}S concentrated solution at 10% w/v. In these conditions the coprecipitation of yttrium is of 15–20%. Finally further yttrium precipitation experiments by oxalic acid on the residual solutions, after removing of zinc, show that yttrium could be recovered and calcined to obtain the final product as yttrium oxide. The achieved results allow to propose a CRT recycling process based on leaching of fluorescent powder from cathode ray tube and recovery of yttrium oxide after removing of zinc by precipitation. The final recovery of yttrium is 75–80%.

  5. Nano-lead particle synthesis from waste cathode ray-tube funnel glass.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mingfei; Zhang, Fu-Shen

    2011-10-30

    Waste cathode ray-tube (CRT) funnel glass is classified as hazardous waste since it contains high amount of lead. In the present study, a novel process for lead nanopowder synthesis from this type of glass was developed by combining vacuum carbon-thermal reduction and inert-gas consolidation procedures. The key trait of the process was to evaporate lead out of the glass to obtain harmless glass powder and synchronously produce lead nanoparticles. In the synthesis process, lead oxide in the funnel glass was firstly reduced to elemental lead, and evaporated rapidly in vacuum circumstance, then quenched and formed nano-size particles on the surface of the cooling device. Experimental results showed that temperature, pressure and argon gas flow rate were the major parameters controlling lead evaporation ratio and the morphology of lead nanoparticles. The maximum lead evaporation ratio was 96.8% and particles of 4-34 nm were successfully obtained by controlling the temperature, holding time, process pressure, argon gas flow rate at 1000°C, 2-4h, 500-2000 Pa, 50-200 ml/min, respectively. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that lead leaching from the residue glass met the USEPA threshold. Accordingly, this study developed a practical and environmental-friendly process for detoxification and reclamation of waste lead-containing glass. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Recovery of yttrium from cathode ray tubes and lamps' fluorescent powders: experimental results and economic simulation.

    PubMed

    Innocenzi, V; De Michelis, I; Ferella, F; Vegliò, F

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, yttrium recovery from fluorescent powder of lamps and cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is described. The process for treating these materials includes the following: (a) acid leaching, (b) purification of the leach liquors using sodium hydroxide and sodium sulfide, (c) precipitation of yttrium using oxalic acid, and (d) calcinations of oxalates for production of yttrium oxides. Experimental results have shown that process conditions necessary to purify the solutions and recover yttrium strongly depend on composition of the leach liquor, in other words, whether the powder comes from treatment of CRTs or lamp. In the optimal experimental conditions, the recoveries of yttrium oxide are about 95%, 55%, and 65% for CRT, lamps, and CRT/lamp mixture (called MIX) powders, respectively. The lower yields obtained during treatments of MIX and lamp powders are probably due to the co-precipitation of yttrium together with other metals contained in the lamps powder only. Yttrium loss can be reduced to minimum changing the experimental conditions with respect to the case of the CRT process. In any case, the purity of final products from CRT, lamps, and MIX is greater than 95%. Moreover, the possibility to treat simultaneously both CRT and lamp powders is very important and interesting from an industrial point of view since it could be possible to run a single plant treating fluorescent powder coming from two different electronic wastes.

  7. Visual Evoked Potential Using Head-Mounted Display Versus Cathode Ray Tube: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyo Seon; Im, Sang Hee; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To present a new stimulation method based on the use of a head-mounted display (HMD) during pattern reversal visual evoked potential (PR-VEP) testing and to compare variables of HMD to those of conventional cathode ray tube (CRT). Methods Twenty-three normal subjects without visual problems were recruited. PR-VEPs were generated using CRT or HMD stimuli. VEP outcome measures included latencies (N75, P100, and N145) and peak-to-peak amplitudes (N75–P100 and P100–N145). Subjective discomfort associated with HMD was determined using a self-administered questionnaire. Results PR-VEPs generated by HMD stimuli showed typical triphasic waveforms, the components of which were found to be correlated with those obtained using conventional CRT stimuli. Self-administered discomfort questionnaires revealed that HMD was more comfortable in some aspects. It allowed subjects to concentrate better than CRT. Conclusion The described HMD stimulation can be used as an alternative to the standard CRT stimulation for PR-VEPs. PR-VEP testing using HMD has potential applications in clinical practice and visual system research because HMD can be used on a wider range of subjects compared to CRT. PMID:27152285

  8. Water-soluble lead in cathode ray tube funnel glass melted in a reductive atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi

    2016-10-05

    In the reduction-melting process, lead can be recovered from cathode ray tube funnel glass (PbO=25wt%); however, resulting glass residues still contain approximately 1-2wt% of unrecovered lead. For environmental protection in the residue disposal or recycling, it is important to evaluate the quantities of water-soluble species among the unrecovered lead. This study examined water-soluble lead species generated in the reduction-melting process of the funnel glass and factors determining their generation. In the reduction-melting, metallic lead was generated by reducing lead oxides in the glass, and a part of the metallic lead remained in the glass residue. Such unrecovered metallic lead can dissolve in water depending on its pH level and was regarded as water-soluble lead. When 10g Na2CO3 was added to 20g funnel glass during reduction-melting, the resulting glass contained high concentrations of sodium. In a water leaching of the glass, the obtained leachate was alkalized by the sodium-rich glass (pH=12.7-13.0). The unrecovered metallic lead in the glass was extracted in the alkalized leachate. The quantity of the unrecovered metallic lead (water-soluble lead) in the glass decreased when the melting time, melting temperature, and carbon dosage were controlled during reduction-melting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Beam characterization of a lab bench cold cathode ultra-soft X-ray generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ounoughi, N.; Mavon, C.; Belafrites, A.; Groetz, J.-E.; Fromm, M.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this work is to characterize the Ultra Soft X-ray (USX, 1.5 keV, Al Kα) photon beam of a customized lab bench cold cathode generator. Within this generator, the electron beam is slowed down in a thin aluminium foil (16 μm) supported by an easily exchangeable anode. It is shown that the thickness of the foil and the anode configuration determine the spatial distribution and the fluence rate of the photon beam, whereas accelerating voltage determines both fluence rate and energy spectrum feature. It is shown also that under specific operation parameters (i.e. accelerating voltage), a Gaussian energy distribution of the beam can be generated which is centred on the energy of the Al Kα line (1.5 keV). Dosimetric films of GAFCHROMIC® HD-810 were used to estimate the photon fluence rate distribution of the beam. Its variation, when the generator acts as a monoenergetic source, was characterized with the two different configurations of the anode assembly. Finally, it is verified that the anode assembly consisting in a flat washer, on which the aluminium foil is set, acts as a simple point-source.

  10. Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jacob N.; Miara, Lincoln J.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Gopalan, Srikanth; Pal, Uday B.; Woicik, Joseph C.; Basu, Soumendra N.; Ludwig, Karl F.

    2012-12-01

    Commonly, SOFCs are operated at high temperatures (above 800°C). At these temperatures expensive housing is needed to contain an operating stack as well as coatings to contain the oxidation of the metallic interconnects. Lowering the temperature of an operating device would allow for more conventional materials to be used, thus lowering overall cost. Understanding the surface chemical states of cations in the surface of the SOFC cathode is vital to designing a system that will perform well at lower temperatures. The samples studied were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). 20% strontium doped lanthanum manganite (LSM-20) was grown on YSZ and NGO (neodymium gallate). The films on YSZ have a fiber texture. LSM-20 on NGO is heteroepitaxial. Lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF-6428) films were grown on LAO and YSZ with a GDC barrier layer. Total X-ray Reflection Fluorescence (TXRF) was used to depth profile the samples. In a typical experiment, the angle of the incident beam is varied though the critical angle. Below the critical angle, the x-ray decays as an evanescent wave and will only penetrate the top few nanometers. TXRF experiments done on LSM films have suggested strontium segregates to the surface and form strontium enriched nanoparticles (1). It should be pointed out that past studies have focused on 30% strontium A-site doping, but this project uses 20% strontium doped lanthanum manganite. XANES and EXAFS data were taken as a function of incoming angle to probe composition as a function of depth. XANES spectra can be difficult to analyze fully. For other materials density functional theory calculations compared to near edge measurements have been a good way to understand the 3d valence electrons (2).

  11. Characterization of Cr poisoning in a solid oxide fuel cell cathode using a high-energy x-ray microbeam.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D. J.; Almer, J.; Cruse, T.

    2010-01-01

    A key feature of planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is the feasibility of using metallic interconnects made of high temperature ferritic stainless steels, which reduce system cost while providing excellent electric conductivity. Such interconnects, however, contain high levels of chromium, which has been found to be associated with SOFC cathode performance degradation at SOFC operating temperatures; a phenomenon known as Cr poisoning. Here, we demonstrate an accurate measurement of the phase and concentration distributions of Cr species in a degraded SOFC, as well as related properties including deviatoric strain, integrated porosity, and lattice parameter variation, using high energy microbeam X-ray diffraction and radiography. We unambiguously identify (MnCr){sub 3}O{sub 4} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} as the two main contaminant phases and find that their concentrations correlate strongly with the cathode layer composition. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposition within the active cathode region reduces porosity and produces compressive residual strains, which hinders the reactant gas percolation and can cause structural breakdown of the SOFC cathode. The information obtained through this study can be used to better understand the Cr-poisoning mechanism and improve SOFC design.

  12. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy analysis of N-containing carbon-based cathode catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwa, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Masaki; Horiba, Koji; Harada, Yoshihisa; Oshima, Masaharu; Terakura, Kiyoyuki; Ikeda, Takashi; Koshigoe, Yuka; Ozaki, Jun-ichi; Miyata, Seizo; Ueda, Shigenori; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Kobayashi, Keisuke

    We report on the electronic structure of three different types of N-containing carbon-based cathode catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells observed by hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Prepared samples are derived from: (1) melamine and poly(furfuryl alcohol), (2) nitrogen-doped carbon black and (3) cobalt phthalocyanine and phenolic resin. C 1 s spectra show the importance of sp 2 carbon network formation for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity. N 1 s spectra of the carbon-based cathode catalysts are decomposed into four components identified as pyridine-like, pyrrole- or cyanide-like, graphite-like, and oxide nitrogen. Samples having high oxygen reduction reaction activity in terms of oxygen reduction potential contain high concentration of graphite-like nitrogen. O 1 s spectra are similar among carbon-based cathode catalysts of different oxygen reduction reaction activity. There is no correlation between the ORR activity and oxygen content. Based on a quantitative analysis of our results, the oxygen reduction reaction activity of the carbon-based cathode catalysts will be improved by increasing concentration of graphite-like nitrogen in a developed sp 2 carbon network.

  13. Applied X-Ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Buynak, C.F.; Bossi, R.H.

    1994-12-31

    The application of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) for aircraft and aerospace structures and ancillary equipment has been investigated in the Advanced Development of X-ray Computed Tomography Applications demonstration (CTAD) program (F33615-88-C-5404) sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Wright Laboratory, Materials Directorate, Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Branch. The volumetric feature evaluation capability of X-Ray CT offers a quantitative measurement tool for material density/constituents and dimensions. This capability has economic value for improving the evaluation and control of materials and processes used in aircraft/aerospace structures. The CTAD effort has applied CT in a variety of areas such as electronics, closed systems, castings, organic composites and advanced materials and processes; using a wide range of X-ray sources from less than 150 kV to 9 MV. Applications of CT in these areas include configuration control, anomaly detection, geometry acquisition, failure analysis, non invasive micrography, product development support and engineering fitness for service.

  14. 81.114- University Reactor Infrastructure and Education Support / Prompt Gamma-ray Activation Analysis of Lithioum Ion Battery Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Manthiram, Arumugam; Landsberger, S.

    2006-11-11

    This project focuses on the use of the Prompt Gamma-ray Activation Analysis (PGAA) technique available at the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory of the University of Texas at Austin to precisely determine the hydrogen (proton) contents in layered oxide cathode samples obtained by chemical lithium extraction in order to obtain a better understanding of the factors limiting the practical capacities and overall performance of lithium ion battery cathodes. The project takes careful precautionary experimental measures to avoid proton contamination both from solvents used in chemical delithiation and from ambient moisture. The results obtained from PGAA are complemented by the data obtained from other techniques such as thermogravimetric analysis, redox titration, atomic absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and mass spectroscopic analysis of the evolved gas on heating. The research results broaden our understanding of the structure-property-performance relationships of lithium ion battery cathodes and could aid the design and development of new better performing lithium ion batteries for consumer (portable and electric vehicles), military, and space applications.

  15. Factors influencing leaching of PBDEs from waste cathode ray tube plastic housings.

    PubMed

    Stubbings, William A; Harrad, Stuart

    2016-11-01

    Samples of waste cathode ray tube (CRT) plastic housings were exposed to Milli-Q® water containing dissolved humic matter at concentrations of 0, 100 and 1000mgL(-1) as leaching fluid under laboratory conditions, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) determined in the resulting leachate. Despite the relatively hydrophobic physicochemical properties of PBDEs, concentrations of ƩPBDEs in the leachate from the leaching experiments in this study ranged from 14,000 to 200,000ngL(-1). PBDE leaching appears to be a second order process, whereby a period of initially intense dissolution of more labile PBDEs is followed by a slower stage corresponding to external diffusion of the soluble residue in the material. The bulk of transfer of PBDEs to the leaching fluid occurs within the first 6h of contact, during which time we suggest that the most labile PBDEs are "washed" off the surface of the CRT plastics. The predominant congeners in the chips were BDE-209 (2600mgkg(-1)) and BDE 183 (220mgkg(-1)). The impacts on PBDE leaching of leachate pH and temperature were also examined. Increasing the temperature of leaching fluids from 20 to 80°C, enhances the leachability of BDE-209 and BDE-99 from plastics. In all cases, the alkaline pH8.5 examined, resulted in the greatest PBDE concentrations in leachate. Agitation of the waste/leachate mixture enhances PBDE leaching from CRT plastics. Potential evidence for debromination of heavy congeners to the lower brominated and more bioavailable BDEs was observed. Specifically, BDEs-47, -85 and -100 were detected in the leachates, but were absent from the CRT plastics themselves. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Removal of lead from cathode ray tube funnel glass by generating the sodium silicate.

    PubMed

    Hu, Biao; Zhao, Shuangshuang; Zhang, Shuhao

    2015-01-01

    In the disposal of electronic waste, cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass is an environmental problem of old television sets. Removal of the lead from CRT funnel glass can prevent its release into the environment and allow its reuse. In this research, we reference the dry progress productive technology of sodium silicate, the waste CRT glass was dealt with sodium silicate frit melted and sodium silicate frit dissolved. Adding a certain amount of Na ₂CO₃to the waste CRT glass bases on the material composition and content of it, then the specific modulus of sodium silicate frit is obtained by melting progress. The silicon, potassium and sodium compounds of the sodium silicate frit are dissolved under the conditions of high temperature and pressure by using water as solvent, which shows the tendency that different temperature, pressure, liquid-solid ratio and dissolving time have effect on the result of dissolving. At 175°C(0.75MPa), liquid-solid ratio is 1.5:1, the dissolving time is 1h, the dissolution rate of sodium silicate frit is 44.725%. By using sodium sulfide to separate hydrolysis solution and to collect lead compounds in the solution, the recovery rate of lead in dissolving reached 100% and we can get clean sodium silicate and high purity of lead compounds. The method presented in this research can recycle not only the lead but also the sodium, potassium and other inorganic minerals in CRT glass and can obtain the comprehensive utilization of leaded glass.

  17. Determination of Optimal Parameters for Dual-Layer Cathode of Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Using Computational Intelligence-Aided Design

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Huang, Weina; Peng, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Because of the demands for sustainable and renewable energy, fuel cells have become increasingly popular, particularly the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). Among the various components, the cathode plays a key role in the operation of a PEFC. In this study, a quantitative dual-layer cathode model was proposed for determining the optimal parameters that minimize the over-potential difference and improve the efficiency using a newly developed bat swarm algorithm with a variable population embedded in the computational intelligence-aided design. The simulation results were in agreement with previously reported results, suggesting that the proposed technique has potential applications for automating and optimizing the design of PEFCs. PMID:25490761

  18. Determination of optimal parameters for dual-layer cathode of polymer electrolyte fuel cell using computational intelligence-aided design.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Huang, Weina; Peng, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Because of the demands for sustainable and renewable energy, fuel cells have become increasingly popular, particularly the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). Among the various components, the cathode plays a key role in the operation of a PEFC. In this study, a quantitative dual-layer cathode model was proposed for determining the optimal parameters that minimize the over-potential difference η and improve the efficiency using a newly developed bat swarm algorithm with a variable population embedded in the computational intelligence-aided design. The simulation results were in agreement with previously reported results, suggesting that the proposed technique has potential applications for automating and optimizing the design of PEFCs.

  19. Design of a High Field Stress, Velvet Cathode for the Flash X-Ray (FXR) Induction Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T; Brown, C; Fleming, D; Kreitzer, B; Lewis, K; Ong, M; Zentler, J

    2007-06-08

    A new cathode design has been proposed for the Flash X-Ray (FXR) induction linear accelerator with the goal of lowering the beam emittance. The original design uses a conventional Pierce geometry and applies a peak field of 134 kV/cm (no beam) to the velvet emission surface. Voltage/current measurements indicate that the velvet begins emitting near this peak field value and images of the cathode show a very non-uniform distribution of plasma light. The new design has a flat cathode/shroud profile that allows for a peak field stress of 230 kV/cm on the velvet. The emission area is reduced by about a factor of four to generate the same total current due to the greater field stress. The relatively fast acceleration of the beam, approximately 2.5 MeV in 10 cm, reduces space charge forces that tend to hollow the beam for a flat, non-Pierce geometry. The higher field stress achieved with the same rise time is expected to lead to an earlier and more uniform plasma formation over the velvet surface. Simulations and initial testing are presented.

  20. In-situ x-ray diffraction of layered LiCoO{sub 2}-Type cathode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, M.A.; Ingersoll, D.; Doughty, D.H.

    1999-12-09

    The authors have investigated LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} (Sumitomo) and LiNi{sub 5/8}Co{sub 1/4}Mn{sub 1/16}Al{sub 1/16}O{sub 2} (Sandia chemical preparation method) cathode powders via in-situ X-ray Diffraction and Cyclic Voltammetry using a coffee-bag type electrochemical cell. Both cathode materials did not show a monoclinic distortion during de-intercalation but sustained the hexagonal structure up to 4.3 V. The doping of Co into the LiNiO{sub 2} structure appears to stabilize this lattice as the hexagonal structure over the full range of charging (up to 4.3 V). The LiNi{sub 5/8}Co{sub 1/4}Mn{sub 1/16}Al{sub 1/16}O{sub 2} cathode material exhibited a 160 mAh/g capacity (to 4.1 V) on its 1{sup st} cycle, while displaying a much smaller volume change (as compared to LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2}) during de-intercalation. This reduced overall volume change (2.5 vol%) may have important implications for cycle life of this material.

  1. Study of Explosive Electron Emission from a Pin Cathode Using High Resolution Point-Projection X-Ray Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Parkevich, E. V.; Tilikin, I. N.; Mingaleev, A. R.; Agafonov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Most studies of Explosive Electron Emission (EEE) are based on the idea of cathode flares developing after explosion of metal whiskers (micron scale pins) on the cathode surface. The physical state of the pin material, the spatial structure of the explosion and its origin are still a matter of conjecture. In this work we used high-resolution point projection x-ray radiography to observe micron scale pin explosion in a high-current diode. Pin cathodes made from 10-25 micron Cu or Mo wires were placed in gaps in return current circuits of hybrid X-pinches on the XP and BIN pulsers. Pin lengths were varied over a range 1-4 mm and pin-anode gaps within 0.05-3 mm. The diode current and voltage were measured. In experiments with small pin-anode gap (0.1 - 1 mm) development of an expanded dense core of the pin was observed except the pin tip with length 100-200 microns indicating significant energy deposition in the wire material. In experiments with bigger gaps there was no visible wire core expansion within the spatial resolution of the experimental technique. Work at Cornell was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NA0001836 and at the Lebedev Institute by the RSF grant 142200273.

  2. Environmental burdens in the management of end-of-life cathode ray tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rocchetti, Laura; Beolchini, Francesca

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • The paper deals with different management options for end-of-life CRTs. • The environmental burdens for disposal and recycling are presented. • Recycling treatments allows to gain benefits for the environment. • Further treatments for fluorescent powders determine CO{sub 2} credits. • More efforts should be directed towards recycling. - Abstract: We compared the environmental burdens in the management of end-of life cathode ray tubes (CRTs) within two frameworks according to the different technologies of the production of televisions/monitors. In the first case, CRT recycling is addressed to the recovery of the panel and funnel glass for the manufacturing of new CRT screens. In the second case, where flat screen technology has replaced that of CRT, the recycling is addressed to the recovery of the glass cullet and lead for other applications. The impacts were evaluated according to the problem-oriented methodology of the Institute of Environmental Sciences, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands. Our data confirm that in both cases, the recycling treatment allows benefits to be gained for the environment through the recovery of the secondary raw materials. These benefits are higher for the “CRT technology” framework (1 kg CO{sub 2} saved per CRT) than for the “flat screen technology” (0.9 kg CO{sub 2} saved, per CRT, as the highest possible), mainly due to the high energy consumption for lead separation from the funnel glass. Furthermore, the recovery of yttrium from the fluorescent powders that are a residue of the recycling treatment would further improve the CO{sub 2} credit for both the frameworks considered, which would provide a further saving of about 0.75 kg CO{sub 2} per CRT, net of the energy and raw materials needed for the recovery. Overall, this study confirms that, even with a change in the destination of the recovered materials, the recycling processes provide a benefit for the environment: indeed the higher loads

  3. Optical profiles of cathode ray tube and liquid crystal display monitors: implication in cutaneous phototoxicity in photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Tim C.; Pendyala, Srinivas; Scherrer, Larry; Li, Buhong; Glazner, Gregory F.; Huang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Recent clinical reports suggest that overexposure to light emissions generated from cathode ray tube (CRT) and liquid crystal display (LCD) color monitors after topical or systemic administration of a photosensitizer could cause noticeable skin phototoxicity. In this study, we examined the light emission profiles (optical irradiance, spectral irradiance) of CRT and LCD monitors under simulated movie and video game modes. Results suggest that peak emissions and integrated fluence generated from monitors are clinically relevant and therefore prolonged exposure to these light sources at a close distance should be avoided after the administration of a photosensitizer or phototoxic drug. PMID:23669681

  4. A Century-Old Question: Does a Crookes Paddle Wheel Cathode Ray Tube Demonstrate that Electrons Carry Momentum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrey, T. E.; Calisa, Vaishnavi

    2014-03-01

    In 1879, in the midst of the debate between English and continental scientists about the nature of cathode rays, William Crookes conducted an experiment in which a small mill or "paddle wheel" was pushed along tracks inside a cathode ray tube (CRT) (similar to that shown in Fig. 1) when connected to a high-voltage induction coil. Crookes attributed the motion of the wheel to momentum transfer from the cathode rays (electrons) to the wheel, and interpreted the experiment as providing evidence that cathode rays were particles. In 1903 Thomson discounted Crookes' interpretation by calculating that the rate of momentum transfer (which he estimated at no more than 2×10-3 dyn, equivalent to 2×10-8 N) would be far too small to account for the observed motion of the wheel,2 instead attributing the motion to the radiometric effect. The misconception was not laid to rest, however, and despite an effort in 1961 to draw attention to Thomson's original work and so remove the error from textbooks,3 the notion that a Crookes paddle wheel CRT demonstrates that electrons carry momentum continues to be taught in high school physics courses4 and wheel. We then measured the actual acceleration of the wheel in the CRT by video analysis of its motion and determined the moment of inertia of the wheel along with its mass and dimensions. We could then compare the force, which really acts on the wheel to produce the observed motion to the maximum impulsive force that is supplied by the electrons. Our measurements yield a maximum impulsive force due to the electrons [ F e l = ( 1.1 ± 0.3 ) × 10 - 8 N ], which is within a factor of two of Thomson's estimate, and which is more than two orders of magnitude smaller than the force that is responsible for the observed acceleration of the paddle wheel [ F W = ( 6 ± 2 ) × 10 - 6 N ]. This means that the rotation of the wheel is certainly not due to transferred momentum from the electron beam, and the results of the experiment should not be

  5. Three-dimensional X-ray microcomputed tomography of carbonates and biofilm on operated cathode in single chamber microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Santini, Maurizio; Guilizzoni, Manfredo; Lorenzi, Massimo; Atanassov, Plamen; Marsili, Enrico; Fest-Santini, Stephanie; Cristiani, Pierangela; Santoro, Carlo

    2015-09-10

    Power output limitation is one of the main concerns that need to be addressed for full-scale applications of the microbial fuel cell technology. Fouling and biofilm growth on the cathode of single chamber microbial fuel cells (SCMFC) affects their performance in long-term operation with wastewater. In this study, the authors report the power output and cathode polarization curves of a membraneless SCMFC, fed with raw primary wastewater and sodium acetate for over 6 months. At the end of the experiment, the whole cathode surface is analyzed through X-ray microcomputed tomography (microCT), scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) to characterize the fouling layer and the biofilm. EDX shows the distribution of Ca, Na, K, P, S, and other elements on the two faces of the cathode. Na-carbonates and Ca-carbonates are predominant on the air (outer) side and the water (inner) side, respectively. The three-dimensional reconstruction by X-ray microCT shows biofilm spots unevenly distributed above the Ca-carbonate layer on the inner (water) side of the cathode. These results indicate that carbonates layer, rather than biofilm, might lower the oxygen reduction reaction rate at the cathode during long-term SCMFC operation.

  6. Operando soft X-ray absorption spectroscopic study on a solid oxide fuel cell cathode during electrochemical oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Oike, Ryo; Kimura, Yuta; Tamenori, Yusuke; Kawada, Tatsuya; Amezawa, Koji

    2017-03-16

    Operando soft X-ray absorption spectroscopic technique, which could analyze electronic structures of the electrode materials at elevated temperature and controlled atmosphere under electrochemical polarization, was established and its availability was demonstrated by investigating electronic structural changes of an La2NiO4+d dense film electrode during electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction. Clear O K-edge and Ni L-edge X-ray absorption spectra could be obtained below 773 K in fully atmospheric pressure of 100 ppm O2-He, 0.1% O2-He and 1% O2-He gas mixtures. By the PO2 change and the application of electrical potential, considerable spectral changes were observed in O K-edge X-ray absorption spectra while only small spectral changes were observed in Ni L-edge X-ray absorption spectra. Pre-edge peak of the O K-edge X-ray absorption spectra, which reflects the unoccupied pDOS of Ni3d-O2p hybridization, increased/deceased with cathodic/anodic polarization, respectively. The electronic structural changes of the outermost orbital of the electrode material due to electrochemical polarization were successfully confirmed by the operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy developed in this study.

  7. U-shape rotating anti-cathode compact X-ray generator: 20 times stronger than the commercially available X-ray source.

    PubMed

    Sakabe, N; Sakabe, K; Ohsawa, S; Sakai, T; Kobayakawa, H; Sugimura, T; Ikeda, M; Tawada, M; Watanabe, N; Sasaki, K; Wakatsuki, M

    2013-11-01

    A new type of U-shape anti-cathode X-ray generator in which the inner surface of a cylindrical target is irradiated by an electron beam has been made by modifying a conventional rotating anti-cathode X-ray generator whose brightness in the catalog is 12 kW mm(-2). The target material (Cu), target radius (50 mm) and rotating speed (6,000 r.p.m.) were not changed in this modification. A brightness of 52 kW mm(-2) was obtained by this U-shape-type X-ray generator. This means that the brightness of the new type is 4.3 times greater than that of the old unmodified one. Furthermore, the new-type X-ray generator yielded a brightness of 129 kW mm(-2) by adding a carbon coating on the Cu target. This means an overall increase of brightness of ten times. The original generator has the highest brightness in the generators of the same class (having a radius of 50 mm and rotation speed of 6,000 r.p.m.). Observations showed that Cu Kα counts at vertical incidence of the electron beam onto the surface of the new target, which is initially optically smooth, decrease as the surface is roughened by a severe thermal stress caused by strong electron beam exposure. Further observation reveals, however, that oblique incidence of the electron beam onto the roughened surface drastically increased the X-ray output and amounts to twice as much as that from a smooth surface at vertical incidence. Thus, at the present stage, an overall increase of brightness has been realised at a level 20 times stronger than that of the original commercially offered X-ray generator that we modified.

  8. Utilization of cathode ray tube waste: encapsulation of PbO-containing funnel glass in Portland cement clinker.

    PubMed

    Lairaksa, Nirut; Moon, Anthony R; Makul, Natt

    2013-03-15

    The disposal of cathode ray tube (CRT) generates large quantities of leaded glass waste. The encapsulation of glass from the funnel portion of CRT in cement clinker was investigated. Samples of cement raw material containing 0 (control), 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, or 0.5 wt% of CRT funnel glass ground to less than 75 μm were heated to 1480 °C in an electric furnace for 1.5 h at a heating rate of 5 °C/min to produce cement clinker. The Pb encapsulation and chemical composition of the clinkers were analysed using X-ray techniques and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The maximum PbO encapsulation occurred in mixtures containing 0.1 wt% funnel glass.

  9. Relating voltage and thermal safety in Li-ion battery cathodes: a high-throughput computational study.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anubhav; Hautier, Geoffroy; Ong, Shyue Ping; Dacek, Stephen; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2015-02-28

    High voltage and high thermal safety are desirable characteristics of cathode materials, but difficult to achieve simultaneously. This work uses high-throughput density functional theory computations to evaluate the link between voltage and safety (as estimated by thermodynamic O2 release temperatures) for over 1400 cathode materials. Our study indicates that a strong inverse relationship exists between voltage and safety: just over half the variance in O2 release temperature can be explained by voltage alone. We examine the effect of polyanion group, redox couple, and ratio of oxygen to counter-cation on both voltage and safety. As expected, our data demonstrates that polyanion groups improve safety when comparing compounds with similar voltages. However, a counterintuitive result of our study is that polyanion groups produce either no benefit or reduce safety when comparing compounds with the same redox couple. Using our data set, we tabulate voltages and oxidation potentials for over 105 combinations of redox couple/anion, which can be used towards the design and rationalization of new cathode materials. Overall, only a few compounds in our study, representing limited redox couple/polyanion combinations, exhibit both high voltage and high safety. We discuss these compounds in more detail as well as the opportunities for designing safe, high-voltage cathodes.

  10. Lightweight Cathodes For Nickel Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Doris L.

    1996-01-01

    Lightweight cathodes for rechargeable nickel-based electrochemical cells undergoing development. In cathodes, mats of nickel fibers are substrates providing structural support of, and electrical contact with, active cathode material. Offers specific energies greater than sintered nickel plaque cathodes. Electrodes used in rechargeable batteries for applications in which weight major concern, including laptop computers, cellular phones, flashlights, soldiers' backpacks, and electric vehicles.

  11. Electronic structure of the polymer-cathode interface of an organic electroluminescent device investigated using operando hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeuchi, J.; Hamamatsu, H.; Miyamoto, T.; Tanaka, S.; Yamashita, Y.; Yoshikawa, H.; Ueda, S.

    2015-08-28

    The electronic structure of a polymer-cathode interface of an operating organic light-emitting diode (OLED) was directly investigated using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES). The potential distribution profile of the light-emitting copolymer layer as a function of the depth under the Al/Ba cathode layer in the OLED depended on the bias voltage. We found that band bending occurred in the copolymer of 9,9-dioctylfluorene (50%) and N-(4-(2-butyl)-phenyl)diphenylamine (F8-PFB) layer near the cathode at 0 V bias, while a linear potential distribution formed in the F8-PFB when a bias voltage was applied to the OLED. Direct observation of the built-in potential and that band bending formed in the F8-PFB layer in the operating OLED suggested that charges moved in the F8-PFB layer before electron injection from the cathode.

  12. Proceedings of the workshop on X-ray computed microtomography

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This report consists of vugraphs from the nine presentations at the conference. Titles of the presentations are: CMT: Applications and Techniques; Computer Microtomography Using X-rays from Third Generation Synchrotron X-ray; Approaches to Soft-X-ray Nanotomography; Diffraction Enhanced Tomography; X-ray Computed Microtomography Applications at the NSLS; XCMT Applications in Forestry and Forest Products; 3DMA: Investigating Three Dimensional Pore Geometry from High Resolution Images; X-ray Computed Microtomography Studies of Volcanic Rock; and 3-D Visualization of Tomographic Volumes.

  13. Identifying a descriptor for d-orbital delocalization in cathodes of Li batteries based on x-ray Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Barbiellini, B. Wang, Yung Jui; Hafiz, H.; Bansil, A.; Suzuki, K.; Yamada, R.; Sakurai, H.; Orikasa, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Uchimoto, Y.; Kaprzyk, S.; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.

    2016-08-15

    We discuss how x-ray Compton scattering spectra can be used for investigating the evolution of electronic states in cathode materials of Li batteries under the lithiation/delithiation process. In particular, our analysis of the Compton spectra taken from polycrystalline Li{sub x}CoO{sub 2} samples shows that the spectra are dominated by the contribution of the O-2p redox orbital. We identify a distinct signature of d-orbital delocalization, which is tied directly to the conductivity of the material, providing a descriptor based on Compton spectra for monitoring the lithiation range with improved conductivity and kinetics for electrochemical operation. Our study demonstrates that Compton scattering spectroscopy can provide a window for probing complex electronic mechanisms underlying the charging and discharging processes in Li-battery materials.

  14. Energy-efficient modification of reduction-melting for lead recovery from cathode ray tube funnel glass

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Takashi Yonezawa, Susumu

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • We recovered Pb from cathode ray tube funnel glass using reduction melting process. • We modified the melting process to achieve Pb recovery with low energy consumption. • Pb in the funnel glass is efficiently recovered at 1000 °C by adding Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. • Pb remaining in the glass after reduction melting is extracted with 1 M HCl. • 98% of Pb in the funnel glass was recovered by reduction melting and HCl leaching. - Abstract: Lead can be recovered from funnel glass of waste cathode ray tubes via reduction melting. While low-temperature melting is necessary for reduced energy consumption, previously proposed methods required high melting temperatures (1400 °C) for the reduction melting. In this study, the reduction melting of the funnel glass was performed at 900–1000 °C using a lab-scale reactor with varying concentrations of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} at different melting temperatures and melting times. The optimum Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} dosage and melting temperature for efficient lead recovery was 0.5 g per 1 g of the funnel glass and 1000 °C respectively. By the reduction melting with the mentioned conditions, 92% of the lead in the funnel glass was recovered in 60 min. However, further lead recovery was difficult because the rate of the lead recovery decreased as with the recovery of increasing quantity of the lead from the glass. Thus, the lead remaining in the glass after the reduction melting was extracted with 1 M HCl, and the lead recovery improved to 98%.

  15. Dosimetry comparison and characterisation of an Al K ultrasoft x-ray beam from an MRC cold-cathode source.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, M; Goodhead, D T; Brenner, D J; Bance, D A; Chmielewski, J J; Paciotti, M A; Bradbury, J N

    1985-10-01

    Ultrasoft x-rays of 0.3-5 keV have provided a unique tool for the investigation of intracellular mechanisms of radiation action in biological organisms, including mammalian cells. However, their use presents unique practical problems in dosimetry and experimental design. Detailed interpretation of the biological results requires reliable dosimetry and well characterised monoenergetic beams. This paper presents a comparison between two fundamentally different dosimetric techniques, namely the ionisation current in an extrapolation chamber and photon counts in a proportional counter. Agreement within 7% was obtained when these two methods were applied to an Al K x-ray beam (1.5 keV) from an MRC cold-cathode transmission target discharge tube as previously used in many biological experiments. Photographic film was calibrated as a relative dosimetric technique and used for investigation of the intensity uniformity of the radiation field. These techniques provide a comprehensive characterisation of the beam in the position of the biological cells, including photon flux (or absorbed dose rate), spectral purity (showing much less than 1% bremsstrahlung relative to characteristic Al x-rays) and uniformity over the irradiation area (within about 5% for mammalian cell irradiations).

  16. A tetrahedron beam computed tomography benchtop system with a multiple pixel field emission x-ray tube.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaochao; Kim, Joshua; Laganis, Philip; Schulze, Derek; Liang, Yongguang; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2011-10-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT) using a carbon nanotube (CNT) multiple pixel field emission x-ray (MPFEX) tube. A multiple pixel x-ray source facilitates the creation of novel x-ray imaging modalities. In a previous publication, the authors proposed a Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT) imaging system which comprises a linear source array and a linear detector array that are orthogonal to each other. TBCT is expected to reduce scatter compared with Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and to have better detector performance. Therefore, it may produce improved image quality for image guided radiotherapy. In this study, a TBCT benchtop system has been developed with an MPFEX tube. The tube has 75 CNT cold cathodes, which generate 75 x-ray focal spots on an elongated anode, and has 4 mm pixel spacing. An in-house-developed, 5-row CT detector array using silicon photodiodes and CdWO(4) scintillators was employed in the system. Hardware and software were developed for tube control and detector data acquisition. The raw data were preprocessed for beam hardening and detector response linearity and were reconstructed with an FDK-based image reconstruction algorithm. The focal spots were measured at about 1 × 2 mm(2) using a star phantom. Each cathode generates around 3 mA cathode current with 2190 V gate voltage. The benchtop system is able to perform TBCT scans with a prolonged scanning time. Images of a commercial CT phantom were successfully acquired. A prototype system was developed, and preliminary phantom images were successfully acquired. MPFEX is a promising x-ray source for TBCT. Further improvement of tube output is needed in order for it to be used in clinical TBCT systems.

  17. A tetrahedron beam computed tomography benchtop system with a multiple pixel field emission x-ray tube

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiaochao; Kim, Joshua; Laganis, Philip; Schulze, Derek; Liang, Yongguang; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT) using a carbon nanotube (CNT) multiple pixel field emission x-ray (MPFEX) tube. Methods: A multiple pixel x-ray source facilitates the creation of novel x-ray imaging modalities. In a previous publication, the authors proposed a Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT) imaging system which comprises a linear source array and a linear detector array that are orthogonal to each other. TBCT is expected to reduce scatter compared with Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and to have better detector performance. Therefore, it may produce improved image quality for image guided radiotherapy. In this study, a TBCT benchtop system has been developed with an MPFEX tube. The tube has 75 CNT cold cathodes, which generate 75 x-ray focal spots on an elongated anode, and has 4 mm pixel spacing. An in-house-developed, 5-row CT detector array using silicon photodiodes and CdWO{sub 4} scintillators was employed in the system. Hardware and software were developed for tube control and detector data acquisition. The raw data were preprocessed for beam hardening and detector response linearity and were reconstructed with an FDK-based image reconstruction algorithm. Results: The focal spots were measured at about 1 x 2 mm{sup 2} using a star phantom. Each cathode generates around 3 mA cathode current with 2190 V gate voltage. The benchtop system is able to perform TBCT scans with a prolonged scanning time. Images of a commercial CT phantom were successfully acquired. Conclusions: A prototype system was developed, and preliminary phantom images were successfully acquired. MPFEX is a promising x-ray source for TBCT. Further improvement of tube output is needed in order for it to be used in clinical TBCT systems.

  18. A tetrahedron beam computed tomography benchtop system with a multiple pixel field emission x-ray tube

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaochao; Kim, Joshua; Laganis, Philip; Schulze, Derek; Liang, Yongguang; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT) using a carbon nanotube (CNT) multiple pixel field emission x-ray (MPFEX) tube. Methods: A multiple pixel x-ray source facilitates the creation of novel x-ray imaging modalities. In a previous publication, the authors proposed a Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT) imaging system which comprises a linear source array and a linear detector array that are orthogonal to each other. TBCT is expected to reduce scatter compared with Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and to have better detector performance. Therefore, it may produce improved image quality for image guided radiotherapy. In this study, a TBCT benchtop system has been developed with an MPFEX tube. The tube has 75 CNT cold cathodes, which generate 75 x-ray focal spots on an elongated anode, and has 4 mm pixel spacing. An in-house-developed, 5-row CT detector array using silicon photodiodes and CdWO4 scintillators was employed in the system. Hardware and software were developed for tube control and detector data acquisition. The raw data were preprocessed for beam hardening and detector response linearity and were reconstructed with an FDK-based image reconstruction algorithm. Results: The focal spots were measured at about 1 × 2 mm2 using a star phantom. Each cathode generates around 3 mA cathode current with 2190 V gate voltage. The benchtop system is able to perform TBCT scans with a prolonged scanning time. Images of a commercial CT phantom were successfully acquired. Conclusions: A prototype system was developed, and preliminary phantom images were successfully acquired. MPFEX is a promising x-ray source for TBCT. Further improvement of tube output is needed in order for it to be used in clinical TBCT systems. PMID:21992368

  19. Dose in x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kalender, Willi A

    2014-02-07

    Radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) has become a topic of high interest due to the increasing numbers of CT examinations performed worldwide. This review aims to present an overview of current concepts for both scanner output metrics and for patient dosimetry and will comment on their strengths and weaknesses. Controversial issues such as the appropriateness of the CT dose index (CTDI) are discussed in detail. A review of approaches to patient dose assessment presently in practice, of the dose levels encountered and options for further dose optimization are also given and discussed. Patient dose assessment remains a topic for further improvement and for international consensus. All approaches presently in use are based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Estimates for effective dose are established, but they are crude and not patient-specific; organ dose estimates are rarely available. Patient- and organ-specific dose estimates can be provided with adequate accuracy and independent of CTDI phantom measurements by fast MC simulations. Such information, in particular on 3D dose distributions, is important and helpful in optimization efforts. Dose optimization has been performed very successfully in recent years and even resulted in applications with effective dose values of below 1 mSv. In general, a trend towards lower dose values based on technical innovations has to be acknowledged. Effective dose values are down to clearly below 10 mSv on average, and there are a number of applications such as cardiac and pediatric CT which are performed routinely below 1 mSv on modern equipment.

  20. Computational Screening for Design of Optimal Coating Materials to Suppress Gas Evolution in Li-Ion Battery Cathodes.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyoungmin; Seo, Seung-Woo; Choi, Byungjin; Park, Kwangjin; Cho, Eunseog

    2017-05-31

    Ni-rich layered oxides are attractive materials owing to their potentially high capacity for cathode applications. However, when used as cathodes in Li-ion batteries, they contain a large amount of Li residues, which degrade the electrochemical properties because they are the source of gas generation inside the battery. Here, we propose a computational approach to designing optimal coating materials that prevent gas evolution by removing residual Li from the surface of the battery cathode. To discover promising coating materials, the reactions of 16 metal phosphates (MPs) and 45 metal oxides (MOs) with the Li residues, LiOH, and Li2CO3 are examined within a thermodynamic framework. A materials database is constructed according to density functional theory using a hybrid functional, and the reaction products are obtained according to the phases in thermodynamic equilibrium in the phase diagram. In addition, the gravimetric efficiency is calculated to identify coating materials that can eliminate Li residues with a minimal weight of the coating material. Overall, more MP and MO materials react with LiOH than with Li2CO3. Specifically, MPs exhibit better reactivity to both Li residues, whereas MOs react more with LiOH. The reaction products, such as Li-containing phosphates or oxides, are also obtained to identify the phases on the surface of a cathode after coating. On the basis of the Pareto-front analysis, P2O5 could be an optimal material for the reaction with both Li residuals. Finally, the reactivity of the coating materials containing 3d/4d transition metal elements is better than that of materials containing other types of elements.

  1. Solid Electrolyte/Electrode Interfaces: Atomistic Behavior Analyzed Via UHV-AFM, Surface Spectroscopies, and Computer Simulations Computational and Experimental Studies of the Cathode/Electrolyte Interface in Oxide Thin Film Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Garofalini, Stephen H

    2012-03-21

    The goals of the research were to understand the structural, dynamic, and chemical properties of solid electrolyte surfaces and the cathode/electrolyte interface at an atomistic and nanometer level using both computational and experimental techniques.

  2. PRELIMINARY IN-SITU X-RAY ABSORPTION FINE STRUCTURE EXAMINATION OF PT/C AND PTCO/C CATHODE CATALYSTS IN AN OPERATIONAL POLYMER ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, B.T.; Myers, D.J.; Smith, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    State-of-the-art polymer electrolyte fuel cells require a conditioning period to reach optimized cell performance. There is insuffi cient understanding about the behavior of catalysts during this period, especially with regard to the changing environment of the cathode electrocatalyst, which is typically Pt nanoparticles supported on high surface area Vulcan XC-72 carbon (Pt/C). The purpose of this research was to record preliminary observations of the changing environment during the conditioning phase using X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. XAFS was recorded for a Pt/C cathode at the Pt L3-edge and a PtCo/C cathode at both the Pt L3-edge and Co K-edge. Using precision machined graphite cell-blocks, both transmission and fl uorescence data were recorded at Sector 12-BM-B of Argonne National Laboratory’s Advanced Photon Source. The fl uorescence and transmission edge steps allow for a working description of the changing electrocatalyst environment, especially water concentration, at the anode and cathode as functions of operating parameters. These features are discussed in the context of how future analysis may correlate with potential, current and changing apparent thickness of the membrane electrode assembly through loss of catalyst materials (anode, cathode, carbon support). Such direct knowledge of the effect of the conditioning protocol on the electrocatalyst may lead to better catalyst design. In turn, this may lead to minimizing, or even eliminating, the conditioning period.

  3. Computational study of forced air-convection in open-cathode polymer electrolyte fuel cell stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasmito, A. P.; Lum, K. W.; Birgersson, E.; Mujumdar, A. S.

    A mathematical model for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) stack with an open-cathode manifold, where a fan provides the oxidant as well as cooling, is derived and studied. In short, the model considers two-phase flow and conservation of mass, momentum, species and energy in the ambient and PEFC stack, as well as conservation of charge and a phenomenological membrane and agglomerate model for the PEFC stack. The fan is resolved as an interfacial condition with a polynomial expression for the static pressure increase over the fan as a function of the fan velocity. The results suggest that there is strong correlation between fan power rating, the height of cathode flow-field and stack performance. Further, the placement of the fan - either in blowing or suction mode - does not give rise to a discernable difference in stack performance for the flow-field considered (metal mesh). Finally, it is noted that the model can be extended to incorporate other types of flow-fields and, most importantly, be employed for design and optimization of forced air-convection open-cathode PEFC stacks and adjacent fans.

  4. Computing approach of cathodic process within solid oxide electrolysis cell: Experiments and continuum model validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grondin, D.; Deseure, J.; Ozil, P.; Chabriat, J.-P.; Grondin-Perez, B.; Brisse, A.

    Classical solid oxide fuel cell anode (Ni-cermet) could be employed as solid oxide electrolysis cell cathode. Ni-cermet has been synthesized and tested as solid oxide electrolyzer cathode using three-electrode techniques between 700 °C and 900 °C. yttria stabilized zirconia was used as the electrolyte and Pt as the counter electrode. Polarization curves and impedance spectra have been analyzed for two gas compositions. The presented results demonstrated an influence of Ni-cermet electrode behavior upon gas composition and temperature. The present results highlight a mechanism changing on Ni-cermet electrode upon gas composition. In a second part, a one-dimensional steady state model is developed to predict the cathodic behavior of Ni-cermet. This model takes into account mass and charge conservation, transport of species and reaction kinetics. It considers the porous electrode to be a homogeneous medium characterized. The influence of varying chemical and electrochemical steps kinetic on the shape of polarization curves is discussed. At high overpotential values the model with two rate-limiting steps has been validated using numerical optimization method.

  5. Opportunities for X-ray Science in Future Computing Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Ian

    2011-02-09

    The world of computing continues to evolve rapidly. In just the past 10 years, we have seen the emergence of petascale supercomputing, cloud computing that provides on-demand computing and storage with considerable economies of scale, software-as-a-service methods that permit outsourcing of complex processes, and grid computing that enables federation of resources across institutional boundaries. These trends show no sign of slowing down. The next 10 years will surely see exascale, new cloud offerings, and other terabit networks. This talk reviews various of these developments and discusses their potential implications for x-ray science and x-ray facilities.

  6. Common Sense Initiative’s Recommendation on Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) Glass-to-Glass

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    From 1994 through 1998, EPA’s Common Sense Initiative (CSI) Computers and Electronics Subcommittee (CES) formed a workgroup to examine regulatory barriers to pollution prevention and electronic waste recycling.

  7. Computer Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Jeanne W.

    1970-01-01

    Computer graphics have been called the most exciting development in computer technology. At the University of Michigan, three kinds of graphics output equipment are now being used: symbolic printers, line plotters or drafting devices, and cathode-ray tubes (CRT). Six examples are given that demonstrate the range of graphics use at the University.…

  8. High-throughput computational design of cathode coatings for Li-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Aykol, Muratahan; Kim, Soo; Hegde, Vinay I.; Snydacker, David; Lu, Zhi; Hao, Shiqiang; Kirklin, Scott; Morgan, Dane; Wolverton, C.

    2016-01-01

    Cathode degradation is a key factor that limits the lifetime of Li-ion batteries. To identify functional coatings that can suppress this degradation, we present a high-throughput density functional theory based framework which consists of reaction models that describe thermodynamic and electrochemical stabilities, and acid-scavenging capabilities of materials. Screening more than 130,000 oxygen-bearing materials, we suggest physical and hydrofluoric-acid barrier coatings such as WO3, LiAl5O8 and ZrP2O7 and hydrofluoric-acid scavengers such as Sc2O3, Li2CaGeO4, LiBO2, Li3NbO4, Mg3(BO3)2 and Li2MgSiO4. Using a design strategy to find the thermodynamically optimal coatings for a cathode, we further present optimal hydrofluoric-acid scavengers such as Li2SrSiO4, Li2CaSiO4 and CaIn2O4 for the layered LiCoO2, and Li2GeO3, Li4NiTeO6 and Li2MnO3 for the spinel LiMn2O4 cathodes. These coating materials have the potential to prolong the cycle-life of Li-ion batteries and surpass the performance of common coatings based on conventional materials such as Al2O3, ZnO, MgO or ZrO2. PMID:27966537

  9. High-throughput computational design of cathode coatings for Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Aykol, Muratahan; Kim, Soo; Hegde, Vinay I; Snydacker, David; Lu, Zhi; Hao, Shiqiang; Kirklin, Scott; Morgan, Dane; Wolverton, C

    2016-12-14

    Cathode degradation is a key factor that limits the lifetime of Li-ion batteries. To identify functional coatings that can suppress this degradation, we present a high-throughput density functional theory based framework which consists of reaction models that describe thermodynamic and electrochemical stabilities, and acid-scavenging capabilities of materials. Screening more than 130,000 oxygen-bearing materials, we suggest physical and hydrofluoric-acid barrier coatings such as WO3, LiAl5O8 and ZrP2O7 and hydrofluoric-acid scavengers such as Sc2O3, Li2CaGeO4, LiBO2, Li3NbO4, Mg3(BO3)2 and Li2MgSiO4. Using a design strategy to find the thermodynamically optimal coatings for a cathode, we further present optimal hydrofluoric-acid scavengers such as Li2SrSiO4, Li2CaSiO4 and CaIn2O4 for the layered LiCoO2, and Li2GeO3, Li4NiTeO6 and Li2MnO3 for the spinel LiMn2O4 cathodes. These coating materials have the potential to prolong the cycle-life of Li-ion batteries and surpass the performance of common coatings based on conventional materials such as Al2O3, ZnO, MgO or ZrO2.

  10. High-throughput computational design of cathode coatings for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aykol, Muratahan; Kim, Soo; Hegde, Vinay I.; Snydacker, David; Lu, Zhi; Hao, Shiqiang; Kirklin, Scott; Morgan, Dane; Wolverton, C.

    2016-12-01

    Cathode degradation is a key factor that limits the lifetime of Li-ion batteries. To identify functional coatings that can suppress this degradation, we present a high-throughput density functional theory based framework which consists of reaction models that describe thermodynamic and electrochemical stabilities, and acid-scavenging capabilities of materials. Screening more than 130,000 oxygen-bearing materials, we suggest physical and hydrofluoric-acid barrier coatings such as WO3, LiAl5O8 and ZrP2O7 and hydrofluoric-acid scavengers such as Sc2O3, Li2CaGeO4, LiBO2, Li3NbO4, Mg3(BO3)2 and Li2MgSiO4. Using a design strategy to find the thermodynamically optimal coatings for a cathode, we further present optimal hydrofluoric-acid scavengers such as Li2SrSiO4, Li2CaSiO4 and CaIn2O4 for the layered LiCoO2, and Li2GeO3, Li4NiTeO6 and Li2MnO3 for the spinel LiMn2O4 cathodes. These coating materials have the potential to prolong the cycle-life of Li-ion batteries and surpass the performance of common coatings based on conventional materials such as Al2O3, ZnO, MgO or ZrO2.

  11. Feasibility of lead extraction from waste Cathode-Ray-Tubes (CRT) funnel glass through a lead smelting process.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jianfang; Yang, Hongying; Jin, Zhenan; Ma, Zhiyuan; Song, Yan

    2016-11-01

    A novel and effective process for extracting lead from the hazardous waste Cathode Ray Tubes (CRT) funnel glass is presented. The technological breakthrough of this process is introducing the discarded CRT funnel glass to traditional lead smelting. In this study, the influences of amount of carbon addition, calcium-silicate ratio, temperature, holding time and funnel glass addition on lead extraction efficiency were investigated to determine the optimal operational parameters. With a glass addition of less than 30wt%, a high extraction yield of 97.5% of lead from the mixture of funnel glass and lead slag was successfully obtained by controlling the C/PbO molar ratio, CaO/SiO2 ratio, temperature, treatment time at 0.9, 0.8, 1200°C, 60min, respectively. The main crystalline phases of the residues were calcium silicate slag, and an amorphous glass phase appears at a glass addition more than 30wt%. Thermodynamic calculation shows that the proportion of liquid phase in the slag first increased and then decreased, when the addition of glass is increased, while the viscosity of the slag exhibited a continuous decrease. Thus, based on all the results, it is concluded that the process proposed in this paper is an effective and promising approach for reutilization of obsolete CRT funnel glass. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Extraction of metallic lead from cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass by thermal reduction with metallic iron.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xingwen; Shih, Kaimin; Liu, Chengshuai; Wang, Fei

    2013-09-03

    A novel and effective process of thermal reduction treatment with the addition of metallic iron (Fe(0)) to recover lead from cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass is introduced. The key technological breakthrough of this process is the use of a relatively lower temperature and an inexpensive reducing agent to extract the metallic lead. The influences of temperature, the reducing agent content, and the holding time for lead reduction were examined to determine the optimal extraction efficiency. The lead extraction efficiency first increased and then decreased with increasing temperature. The maximum lead extraction efficiency occurred at 700 °C. The growth of crystalline lead first increased significantly with an increase in the Fe content, reaching maximum growth at an Fe addition of 50 wt %. The most effective treatment time was determined to be 30 min, as the vitrification of lead back to the glass matrix occurred under longer treatment times. The experimentally derived results indicate that a 58 wt % lead extraction can be achieved with the optimized operational parameters (50 wt % Fe addition, heating at 700 °C for 30 min) in a single extraction operation.

  13. Energy-efficient modification of reduction-melting for lead recovery from cathode ray tube funnel glass.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Yonezawa, Susumu

    2013-08-01

    Lead can be recovered from funnel glass of waste cathode ray tubes via reduction melting. While low-temperature melting is necessary for reduced energy consumption, previously proposed methods required high melting temperatures (1400 °C) for the reduction melting. In this study, the reduction melting of the funnel glass was performed at 900-1000 °C using a lab-scale reactor with varying concentrations of Na(2)CO(3) at different melting temperatures and melting times. The optimum Na(2)CO(3) dosage and melting temperature for efficient lead recovery was 0.5 g per 1g of the funnel glass and 1000 °C respectively. By the reduction melting with the mentioned conditions, 92% of the lead in the funnel glass was recovered in 60 min. However, further lead recovery was difficult because the rate of the lead recovery decreased as with the recovery of increasing quantity of the lead from the glass. Thus, the lead remaining in the glass after the reduction melting was extracted with 1M HCl, and the lead recovery improved to 98%.

  14. Characterization of lead, barium and strontium leachability from foam glasses elaborated using waste cathode ray-tube glasses.

    PubMed

    Yot, Pascal G; Méar, François O

    2011-01-15

    Foam glass manufacture is a promising mode for re-using cathode ray tube (CRT) glasses. Nevertheless, because CRTs employ glasses containing heavy metals such as lead, barium and strontium, the leaching behaviour of foam glasses fabricated from CRTs must be understood. Using the AFNOR X 31-210 leaching assessment procedure, the degree of element inertization in foam glasses synthesized from waste CRT glasses (funnel and panel glasses, containing lead and barium/strontium respectively) were determined. The amount of leached lead from foam glasses prepared from funnel glass depends on the nature and concentration of the reducing agent. The effects of the reducing agents on the generation of cellular structure in the fabrication of foam glass were studied. The fraction of lead released from foam glass was less than those extracted from funnel glass and was lower than the statutory limit. Leached concentrations of barium and strontium were found to be approximately constant in various tests and were also below regulatory limits.

  15. Determination of Te, Bi, Ni, Sb and Au by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry following electroenrichment on a copper cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawisza, Beata; Sitko, Rafał

    2007-10-01

    The electrodepositons of Te, Bi, Ni, Sb and Au from aqueous solution of pH = 1 on the cathode surface have been studied for X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF). A special holder for a copper electrode has been constructed to perform the electrodeposition process on only one side of the electrode. After electrolysis, the copper electrode can be easily removed from the holder; after rinsing it with water and drying it can be analyzed by XRF. The proposed method of sample preparation and preconcentration of Te, Bi, Ni, Sb, Au provides suitable samples which are devoid of the negative and undesirable effects of XRF analysis, such as particle size and matrix effects. The influence of time on the deposition yield has been examined. The method of preconcentration is efficient. The inhomogeneity of the prepared specimens has been studied using internal standard method. The calibration is based on using synthetic standards, certified reference materials and standard addition method. The best results are achieved by the standard addition method. The agreement between results obtained with XRF analysis and certified values is satisfactory and indicates the usefulness of the proposed method for determination of Te, Bi, Ni, Sb and Au in anode slime.

  16. Estimating γ-rays dose using computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rawi, Anis M.; Muslih, Raad M.; Al-Harithy, Rafila S.

    When gum arabic is exposed to γ-rays, a change in its reflection and absorption ability for the different wave lengths is obtained. This change is used for estimating the absorbed γ-rays directly. In the present work we are not concerned with the type of components that are chemically formed as emphasis will only be put on the physical changes. The physical state is taken as a potential chemical change since a molecular damage is accumulated as a result of the dose absorbed. The fortran IV data General (Nova 3) designed for estimating colour measurements was connected to a spectrophotometer that enables measuring the changes in both absorbing and reflecting or even diffusing of light through irradiated materials.

  17. X-ray reflectivity analysis of titanium dioxide thin films grown by cathodic arc deposition.

    PubMed

    Kleiman, A; Lamas, D G; Craievich, A F; Márquez, A

    2014-05-01

    TiO2 thin films deposited by a vacuum arc on a glass substrate were characterized by X-ray reflectivity (XRR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Several thin films with different amounts of deposited TiO2 mass and different deposition and annealing temperatures were studied. A qualitative analysis of the XRD patterns indicated the presence of the anatase and/or rutile crystalline phases in most of the studied samples. From the analysis of the experimental XRR curves--which exhibited a wide angular range of oscillatory behavior--the thickness, mass density and interface roughness were determined. All XRR patterns were well fitted by modeled curves that assume the presence of a single and homogeneous TiO2 layer over which a very thin H2O layer is adsorbed. The thickest H2O adsorption layers were developed in films with the highest anatase content. Our overall results of the XRR analyses are consistent with those derived from the imaging techniques (SEM and AFM).

  18. X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging as Multiscale Probes of Intercalation Phenomena in Cathode Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horrocks, Gregory A.; De Jesus, Luis R.; Andrews, Justin L.; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2017-09-01

    Intercalation phenomena are at the heart of modern electrochemical energy storage. Nevertheless, as out-of-equilibrium processes involving concomitant mass and charge transport, such phenomena can be difficult to engineer in a predictive manner. The rational design of electrode architectures requires mechanistic understanding of physical phenomena spanning multiple length scales, from atomistic distortions and electron localization at individual transition metal centers to phase inhomogeneities and intercalation gradients in individual particles and concentration variances across ensembles of particles. In this review article, we discuss the importance of the electronic structure in mediating electrochemical storage and mesoscale heterogeneity. In particular, we discuss x-ray spectroscopy and imaging probes of electronic and atomistic structure as well as statistical regression methods that allow for monitoring of the evolution of the electronic structure as a function of intercalation. The layered α-phase of V2O5 is used as a model system to develop fundamental ideas on the origins of mesoscale heterogeneity.

  19. X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging as Multiscale Probes of Intercalation Phenomena in Cathode Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horrocks, Gregory A.; De Jesus, Luis R.; Andrews, Justin L.; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2017-06-01

    Intercalation phenomena are at the heart of modern electrochemical energy storage. Nevertheless, as out-of-equilibrium processes involving concomitant mass and charge transport, such phenomena can be difficult to engineer in a predictive manner. The rational design of electrode architectures requires mechanistic understanding of physical phenomena spanning multiple length scales, from atomistic distortions and electron localization at individual transition metal centers to phase inhomogeneities and intercalation gradients in individual particles and concentration variances across ensembles of particles. In this review article, we discuss the importance of the electronic structure in mediating electrochemical storage and mesoscale heterogeneity. In particular, we discuss x-ray spectroscopy and imaging probes of electronic and atomistic structure as well as statistical regression methods that allow for monitoring of the evolution of the electronic structure as a function of intercalation. The layered α-phase of V2O5 is used as a model system to develop fundamental ideas on the origins of mesoscale heterogeneity.

  20. A novel surface-sensitive X-ray absorption spectroscopic detector to study the thermal decomposition of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Takamasa; Okuda, Chikaaki; Oka, Hideaki; Nishimura, Yusaku F.; Makimura, Yoshinari; Kondo, Yasuhito; Dohmae, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Yoji

    2016-09-01

    A surface-sensitive conversion-electron-yield X-ray absorption fine structure (CEY-XAFS) detector that operates at elevated temperatures is developed to investigate the thermal decomposition of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. The detector enables measurements with the sample temperature controlled from room temperature up to 450 °C. The detector is applied to the LiNi0.75Co0.15Al0.05Mg0.05O2 cathode material at 0% state of charge (SOC) and 50% SOC to examine the chemical changes that occur during heating in the absence of an electrolyte. The combination of surface-sensitive CEY-XAFS and bulk-sensitive transmission-mode XAFS shows that the reduction of Ni and Co ions begins at the surface of the cathode particles at around 150 °C, and propagates inside the particle upon further heating. These changes with heating are irreversible and are more obvious at 50% SOC than at 0% SOC. The fraction of reduced Ni ions is larger than that of reduced Co ions. These results demonstrate the capability of the developed detector to obtain important information for the safe employment of this cathode material in Li-ion batteries.

  1. Computer simulation of gamma-ray spectra from semiconductor detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Jim C.; Olschner, Fred; Shah, Kanai S.

    1992-12-01

    Traditionally, researchers developing improved gamma ray detectors have used analytical techniques or, rarely, computer simulations to predict the performance of new detectors. However, with the advent of inexpensive personal computers, it is now possible for virtually all detector researchers to perform some form of numerical computation to predict detector performance. Although general purpose code systems for semiconductor detector performance do not yet exist, it is possible to perform many useful calculations using commercially available, general purpose numerical software packages (such as `spreadsheet' programs intended for business use). With a knowledge of the rudimentary mechanics of detector simulation most researchers, including those with no programming skills, can effectively use numerical simulation methods to predict gamma ray detector performance. In this paper we discuss the details of the numerical simulation of gamma ray detectors with the hope of communicating the simplicity and effectiveness of these methods. In particular, we discuss the steps involved in simulating the pulse height spectrum produced by a semiconductor detector.

  2. Material/element-dependent fluorescence-yield modes on soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakura, Daisuke; Hosono, Eiji; Nanba, Yusuke; Zhou, Haoshen; Okabayashi, Jun; Ban, Chunmei; Glans, Per-Anders; Guo, Jinghua; Mizokawa, Takashi; Chen, Gang; Achkar, Andrew J.; Hawthron, David G.; Regier, Thomas Z.; Wadati, Hiroki

    2016-03-01

    We evaluate the utilities of fluorescence-yield (FY) modes in soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of several cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. In the case of total-FY (TFY) XAS for LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4, the line shape of the Mn L3-edge XAS was largely distorted by the self-absorption and saturation effects, while the distortions were less pronounced at the Ni L3 edge. The distortions were suppressed for the inverse-partial-FY (IPFY) spectra. We found that, in the cathode materials, the IPFY XAS is highly effective for the Cr, Mn, and Fe L edges and the TFY and PFY modes are useful enough for the Ni L edge which is far from the O K edge.

  3. Investigation of a near-infrared-ray computed tomography scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Satoi, Yuichi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Ishii, Tomotaka; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2016-10-01

    In the near-infrared-ray computed tomography (NIR-CT) scanner, NIR rays are produced from a light-emitting diode (LED) and detected using an NIR phototransistor (PT). The wavelengths of the LED peak intensity and the PT high sensitivity in the data table are both 940 nm. The photocurrents flowing through the PTR are converted into voltages using an emitter-follower circuit, and the output voltages are sent to a personal computer through an analog-digital converter. The NIR projection curves for tomography are obtained by repeated linear scans and rotations of the object, and the scanning is conducted in both directions of its movement.

  4. NDA via gamma-ray active and passive computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Decman, D.J.; Martz, H.E.; Roberson, G.P.; Johansson, E.

    1996-10-01

    Gamma-ray-based computed tomography (CT) requires that two different measurements be made on a closed waste container. [MAR92 and ROB94] When the results from these two measurements are combined, it becomes possible to identify and quantify all detectable gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes within a container. All measurements are made in a tomographic manner, i.e., the container is moved sequentially through well- known and accurately reproducible translation, rotation, and elevation positions in order to obtain gamma-ray data that is reconstructed by computer into images that represent waste contents. [ROB94] The two measurements modes are called active (A) and passive (P) CT. In the ACT mode, a collimated gamma-ray source external to the waste container emits multiple, mono-energetic gamma rays that pass through the container and are detected on the opposite side. The attenuated gamma-rays transmitted are measured as a function of both energy and position of the container. Thus, container contents are `mapped` via the measured amount of attenuation suffered at each gamma-ray energy. In effect, a three dimensional (3D) image of gamma- ray attenuation versus waste content is obtained. In the PCT measurement mode, the external radioactive source is shuttered turned- off, and the waste container, is moved through similar positions used for the ACT measurements. However, this time the radiation detectors record any gamma-rays emitted by radioactive sources on the inside of the waste container. Thus, internal radioactive content is mapped or 3D-imaged in the same tomographic manner as the attenuating matrix materials were in the ACT measurement mode.

  5. X-ray Crystallographic Computations Using a Programmable Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attard, Alfred E.; Lee, Henry C.

    1979-01-01

    Describes six crystallographic programs which have been developed to illustrate the range of usefulness of programmable calculators in providing computational assistance in chemical analysis. These programs are suitable for the analysis of x-ray diffraction data in the laboratory by students. (HM)

  6. X-ray Crystallographic Computations Using a Programmable Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attard, Alfred E.; Lee, Henry C.

    1979-01-01

    Describes six crystallographic programs which have been developed to illustrate the range of usefulness of programmable calculators in providing computational assistance in chemical analysis. These programs are suitable for the analysis of x-ray diffraction data in the laboratory by students. (HM)

  7. Multiple pinhole collimator based X-ray luminescence computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Lun, Michael; Li, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) is an emerging hybrid imaging modality, which is able to improve the spatial resolution of optical imaging to hundreds of micrometers for deep targets by using superfine X-ray pencil beams. However, due to the low X-ray photon utilization efficiency in a single pinhole collimator based XLCT, it takes a long time to acquire measurement data. Herein, we propose a multiple pinhole collimator based XLCT, in which multiple X-ray beams are generated to scan a sample at multiple positions simultaneously. Compared with the single pinhole based XLCT, the multiple X-ray beam scanning method requires much less measurement time. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the multiple X-ray beam scanning method. In one numerical simulation, we used four X-ray beams to scan a cylindrical object with 6 deeply embedded targets. With measurements from 6 angular projections, all 6 targets have been reconstructed successfully. In the phantom experiment, we generated two X-ray pencil beams with a collimator manufactured in-house. Two capillary targets with 0.6 mm edge-to-edge distance embedded in a cylindrical phantom have been reconstructed successfully. With the two beam scanning, we reduced the data acquisition time by 50%. From the reconstructed XLCT images, we found that the Dice similarity of targets is 85.11% and the distance error between two targets is less than 3%. We have measured the radiation dose during XLCT scan and found that the radiation dose, 1.475 mSv, is in the range of a typical CT scan. We have measured the changes of the collimated X-ray beam size and intensity at different distances from the collimator. We have also studied the effects of beam size and intensity in the reconstruction of XLCT. PMID:27446686

  8. Multiple pinhole collimator based X-ray luminescence computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Lun, Michael; Li, Changqing

    2016-07-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) is an emerging hybrid imaging modality, which is able to improve the spatial resolution of optical imaging to hundreds of micrometers for deep targets by using superfine X-ray pencil beams. However, due to the low X-ray photon utilization efficiency in a single pinhole collimator based XLCT, it takes a long time to acquire measurement data. Herein, we propose a multiple pinhole collimator based XLCT, in which multiple X-ray beams are generated to scan a sample at multiple positions simultaneously. Compared with the single pinhole based XLCT, the multiple X-ray beam scanning method requires much less measurement time. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the multiple X-ray beam scanning method. In one numerical simulation, we used four X-ray beams to scan a cylindrical object with 6 deeply embedded targets. With measurements from 6 angular projections, all 6 targets have been reconstructed successfully. In the phantom experiment, we generated two X-ray pencil beams with a collimator manufactured in-house. Two capillary targets with 0.6 mm edge-to-edge distance embedded in a cylindrical phantom have been reconstructed successfully. With the two beam scanning, we reduced the data acquisition time by 50%. From the reconstructed XLCT images, we found that the Dice similarity of targets is 85.11% and the distance error between two targets is less than 3%. We have measured the radiation dose during XLCT scan and found that the radiation dose, 1.475 mSv, is in the range of a typical CT scan. We have measured the changes of the collimated X-ray beam size and intensity at different distances from the collimator. We have also studied the effects of beam size and intensity in the reconstruction of XLCT.

  9. Multiscale modeling of lithium-ion battery electrodes based on nano-scale X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashkooli, Ali Ghorbani; Farhad, Siamak; Lee, Dong Un; Feng, Kun; Litster, Shawn; Babu, Siddharth Komini; Zhu, Likun; Chen, Zhongwei

    2016-03-01

    A multiscale platform has been developed to model lithium ion battery (LIB) electrodes based on the real microstructure morphology. This multiscale framework consists of a microscale level where the electrode microstructure architecture is modeled and a macroscale level where discharge/charge is simulated. The coupling between two scales are performed in real time unlike using common surrogate based models for microscale. For microscale geometry 3D microstructure is reconstructed based on the nano-scale X-ray computed tomography data replacing typical computer generated microstructure. It is shown that this model can predict the experimental performance of LiFePO4 (LFP) cathode at different discharge rates more accurate than the conventional homogenous models. The approach employed in this study provides valuable insight into the spatial distribution of lithium -ion inside the real microstructure of LIB electrodes. The inhomogenous microstructure of LFP causes a wider range of physical and electrochemical properties in microscale compared to homogenous models.

  10. Dual-Cathode Electron-Beam Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, James G.; Conley, Joseph M.; Wittry, David B.

    1988-01-01

    Beam from either cathode electromagnetically aligned with exit port. Electron beam from either of two cathodes deflected by magnetic and electric fields to central axis. Mechanical alignment of beam easy because cathode axes, anode apertures, and electron trajectories coplanar. Applications where uninterrupted service needed: scanning electron microscopes, transmission electron microscopes, electron-beam lithography equipment, Auger instruments, and microfocused x-ray sources.

  11. Data fusion in neutron and X-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schrapp, Michael J.; Goldammer, Matthias; Schulz, Michael; Issani, Siraj; Bhamidipati, Suryanarayana; Böni, Peter

    2014-10-28

    We present a fusion methodology between neutron and X-ray computed tomography (CT). On the one hand, the inspection by X-ray CT of a wide class of multimaterials in non-destructive testing applications suffers from limited information of object features. On the other hand, neutron imaging can provide complementary data in such a way that the combination of both data sets fully characterizes the object. In this contribution, a novel data fusion procedure, called Fusion Regularized Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique, is developed where the X-ray reconstruction is modified to fulfill the available data from the imaging with neutrons. The experiments, which were obtained from an aluminum profile containing a steel screw, and attached carbon fiber plates demonstrate that the image quality in CT can be significantly improved when the proposed fusion method is used.

  12. Recent advances in first principles computational research of cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ying Shirley; Arroyo-de Dompablo, M Elena

    2013-05-21

    To meet the increasing demands of energy storage, particularly for transportation applications such as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, researchers will need to develop improved lithium-ion battery electrode materials that exhibit high energy density, high power, better safety, and longer cycle life. The acceleration of materials discovery, synthesis, and optimization will benefit from the combination of both experimental and computational methods. First principles (ab Initio) computational methods have been widely used in materials science and can play an important role in accelerating the development and optimization of new energy storage materials. These methods can prescreen previously unknown compounds and can explain complex phenomena observed with these compounds. Intercalation compounds, where Li(+) ions insert into the host structure without causing significant rearrangement of the original structure, have served as the workhorse for lithium ion rechargeable battery electrodes. Intercalation compounds will also facilitate the development of new battery chemistries such as sodium-ion batteries. During the electrochemical discharge reaction process, the intercalating species travel from the negative to the positive electrode, driving the transition metal ion in the positive electrode to a lower oxidation state, which delivers useful current. Many materials properties change as a function of the intercalating species concentrations (at different state of charge). Therefore, researchers will need to understand and control these dynamic changes to optimize the electrochemical performance of the cell. In this Account, we focus on first-principles computational investigations toward understanding, controlling, and improving the intrinsic properties of five well known high energy density Li intercalation electrode materials: layered oxides (LiMO2), spinel oxides (LiM2O4), olivine phosphates (LiMPO4), silicates-Li2MSiO4, and the tavorite-LiM(XO4)F (M = 3d

  13. High-Performance Cathode Based on Microporous Mo-V-Bi Oxide for Li Battery and Investigation by Operando X-ray Absorption Fine Structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenxin; Ishikawa, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Masaki; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Lian, Qi; Wang, Heng; Ina, Toshiaki; Yoshida, Akihiro; Sadakane, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Futoshi; Ueda, Wataru

    2017-08-09

    The development of cathode-active material of Li battery is important for the current emerging energy transferring and saving problems. A stable crystalline microporous complex metal oxide based on Mo, V, and Bi is an active and suitable material for Li battery. High capacity (380 Ah/kg) and stable cycle performance are achieved. X-ray absorption near-edge structure analyses demonstrate that the original Mo(6+) and V(4+) ions are reduced to Mo(4+) and V(3+) in the discharging process, respectively, which results in a 70-electron reduction per formula. The reduced metal ions can be reoxidized reversibly in the next charging process. Furthermore, extended X-ray absorption fine structure analyses reveal that the Mo-O bonds in the material are lengthened in the discharging process probably due to interaction with Li(+) without change of the basic structure.

  14. In Situ X-ray Diffraction and Absorption Studies of the Li_xMn_2O4 Cathode Materials by Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. Q.; Mukerjee, S.; McBreen, J.; Daroux, M. L.; Xing, X. K.

    1998-03-01

    The structural and electronic states of the Li_xMn_2O4 cathode materials obtained from different commercial sources were studied in situ during charge-discharge cycle using synchrotron radiation. In x-ray diffraction studies, two or three cubic crystal phases with different lattice constants were observed during charge-discharge between 3V and 4.6V vs lithium metal anode. The number of cubic phases depends on the source of the material and the electrochemical history (the first or second cycle) of the cell. X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to study the electronic states of the Mn cations during charge-discharge cycles. The relationships between the structural properties of Li_xMn_2O4 and battery performance will be discussed.

  15. Computer Simulation Model of an X-ray Department

    PubMed Central

    Jeans, W. D.; Berger, S. R.; Gill, R.

    1972-01-01

    A computer simulation model has been designed to predict the effects of changes in the work load and resources of an x-ray department. The model has been used to produce histograms of patient waiting times and to show the effect on these of introducing changes in the speed of processing films and in the numbers of cubicles and radiographers available. The predicted benefit of using a faster film processor has been confirmed in practice. PMID:5015298

  16. Computing Composition/Depth Profiles From X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Unnam, J.

    1986-01-01

    Diffraction-intensity bands deconvolved relatively quickly. TIBAC constructs composition/depth profiles from X-ray diffraction-intensity bands. Intensity band extremely sensitive to shape of composition/depth profile. TIBAC incorporates straightforward transformation of intensity band that retains accuracy of earlier simulation models, but is several orders of magnitude faster in total computational time. TIBAC written in FORTRAN 77 for batch execution.

  17. X-Ray Computed Tomography Monitors Damage in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center recently codeveloped a state-of-the-art x-ray CT facility (designated SMS SMARTSCAN model 100-112 CITA by Scientific Measurement Systems, Inc., Austin, Texas). This multipurpose, modularized, digital x-ray facility includes an imaging system for digital radiography, CT, and computed laminography. The system consists of a 160-kV microfocus x-ray source, a solid-state charge-coupled device (CCD) area detector, a five-axis object-positioning subassembly, and a Sun SPARCstation-based computer system that controls data acquisition and image processing. The x-ray source provides a beam spot size down to 3 microns. The area detector system consists of a 50- by 50- by 3-mm-thick terbium-doped glass fiber-optic scintillation screen, a right-angle mirror, and a scientific-grade, digital CCD camera with a resolution of 1000 by 1018 pixels and 10-bit digitization at ambient cooling. The digital output is recorded with a high-speed, 16-bit frame grabber that allows data to be binned. The detector can be configured to provide a small field-of-view, approximately 45 by 45 mm in cross section, or a larger field-of-view, approximately 60 by 60 mm in cross section. Whenever the highest spatial resolution is desired, the small field-of-view is used, and for larger samples with some reduction in spatial resolution, the larger field-of-view is used.

  18. On the features of bursts of neutrons, hard x-rays and alpha-particles in the pulse vacuum discharge with a virtual cathode and self-organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurilenkov, Yu K.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Gus'kov, S. Yu; Samoylov, I. S.; Ostashev, V. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we continue the discussion of the experimental results on the yield of DD neutrons and hard x-rays in the nanosecond vacuum discharge (NVD) with a virtual cathode, which was started in the previous article of this issue, and previously (Kurilenkov Y K et al 2006 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 4375). We have considered here the regimes of very dense interelectrode aerosol ensembles, in which diffusion of even hard x-rays is found. The yield of DD neutrons in these regimes is conditioned not only by the head-on deuteron-deuteron collisions in the potential well of virtual cathode, but also by the channel of “deuteron-deuterium cluster” reaction, which exceeds overall yield of neutrons per a shot by more than an order of magnitude, bringing it up to ∼ 107/(4π). Very bright bursts of hard x-rays are also represented and discussed here. Presumably, their nature may be associated with the appearance in the NVD of some properties of random laser in the x-ray spectrum. Good preceding agreeing of the experiment on the DD fusion in the NVD with its particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations provides a basis to begin consideration of nuclear burning “proton-boron” in the NVD, which will be accompanied by the release of alpha particles only. With this objective in view, there has been started the PIC-simulation of aneutronic burning of p-B11, and its preliminary results are presented.

  19. X-ray luminescence computed tomography: a sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lun, Michael C.; Zhang, Wei; Li, Changqing

    2017-03-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) is a hybrid molecular imaging modality that uses high energy x-ray photons to excite nanophosphors (e.g. Europium doped Gadolinium Oxysulfide - GOS: Eu3+) emitting optical photons to be measured by a sensitive detector for image reconstruction. XLCT has potentials to combine both the merits of x-ray imaging (high spatial resolution) and optical imaging (high sensitivity), which makes XLCT an attractive imaging modality to image nanophosphor targets deeply embedded in turbid media. In this study, we have evaluated the sensitivity of XLCT with phantom experiments by scanning targets of different phosphor concentrations at different depths. Cylindrical phantoms embedded with a cylindrical target with varying concentrations of GOS: Eu3+ (27.6 mM, 2.76 mM, 276 μM, and 27.6 μM) were scanned inside our lab made XLCT imaging system for varying scanning depths (6, 11, 16, and 21 mm). We found that XLCT is capable of imaging targets of very low concentrations (27.6 μM or 0.01 mg/mL) at significant depths, such as 21 mm. Our results demonstrate that there is also little variation in the reconstructed target size for different imaging depths for XLCT. We have for the first time, compared the sensitivity of XLCT with that of traditional computed tomography (CT) for phosphor targets. We found that XLCT's use of x-ray induced photons provides much higher measurement sensitivity and contrast compared to CT which provides image contrast solely based on x-ray attenuation.

  20. Collimated superfine x-ray beam based x-ray luminescence computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Lun, Michael; Li, Changqing

    2017-06-03

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) is a hybrid imaging modality with the potential to achieve a spatial resolution up to several hundred micrometers for targets embedded in turbid media with a depth larger than several millimeters. In this paper, we report a high spatial resolution XLCT imaging system with a collimated superfine x-ray beam in imaging the deeply embedded targets. A collimator with a 100 micrometer pinhole was mounted in the front of a powerful x-ray tube to generate a superfine x-ray pencil beam with a beam diameter of 0.175 mm. For the phantom experiment of four capillary targets with an edge-to-edge distance of 400 micrometers, we were able to reconstruct the targets in a depth of 5 mm successfully, which were validated with microCT images. We have further investigated the effect of different x-ray beam diameters on the reconstructed XLCT images with numerical simulations. Our results indicate that XLCT has the ability to image successfully multiple deeply embedded targets when the collimated x-ray beam diameter is less than or equal to the target edge-to-edge distance. Our numerical simulations also demonstrate that XLCT can achieve a spatial resolution of 200 micrometers for targets embedded at a depth of 5 mm if the scanning beam has a diameter of 100 micrometers.

  1. Wolter X-Ray Microscope Computed Tomography Ray-Trace Model with Preliminary Simulation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J A

    2006-02-27

    It is proposed to build a Wolter X-ray Microscope Computed Tomography System in order to characterize objects to sub-micrometer resolution. Wolter Optics Systems use hyperbolic, elliptical, and/or parabolic mirrors to reflect x-rays in order to focus or magnify an image. Wolter Optics have been used as telescopes and as microscopes. As microscopes they have been used for a number of purposes such as measuring emission x-rays and x-ray fluoresce of thin biological samples. Standard Computed Tomography (CT) Systems use 2D radiographic images, from a series of rotational angles, acquired by passing x-rays through an object to reconstruct a 3D image of the object. The x-ray paths in a Wolter X-ray Microscope will be considerably different than those of a standard CT system. There is little information about the 2D radiographic images that can be expected from such a system. There are questions about the quality, resolution and focusing range of an image created with such a system. It is not known whether characterization information can be obtained from these images and whether these 2D images can be reconstructed to 3D images of the object. A code has been developed to model the 2D radiographic image created by an object in a Wolter X-ray Microscope. This code simply follows the x-ray through the object and optics. There is no modeling at this point of other effects, such as scattering, reflection losses etc. Any object, of appropriate size, can be used in the model code. A series of simulations using a number of different objects was run to study the effects of the optics. The next step will be to use this model to reconstruct an object from the simulated data. Funding for the project ended before this goal could be accomplished. The following documentation includes: (1) background information on current X-ray imaging systems, (2) background on Wolter Optics, (3) description of the Wolter System being used, (4) purpose, limitations and development of the modeling

  2. Quantifying intermediate-frequency heterogeneities of SOFC electrodes using X-ray computed tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Epting, William K.; Mansley, Zachary; Menasche, David B.; ...

    2017-03-03

    The electrodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) consist of three phases interconnected in three dimensions. The volume needed to describe quantitatively such microstructures depends on several lengths scales, which are functions of materials properties and fabrication methods. This work focuses on quantifying the volume needed to represent “intermediate frequency” heterogeneities in electrodes of a commercial SOFC using X-ray computed tomography (CT) over two different length scales. Electrode volumes of 150 x 150 x 9 μm3 were extracted from a synchrotron-based micro-CT data set, with 13 μm3 voxels. 13.6 x 19.8 x 19.4 μm3 of the cathode and 26.3 xmore » 24.8 x 15.7 μm3 of the anode were extracted from laboratory nano-CT data sets, both with 653 nm3 voxels. After comparing the variation across sub-regions for the greyscale values from the micro-CT, and for the phase fractions and triple phase boundary densities from the nano-CT, it was found that the sub-region length scales needed to yield statistically similar average values were an order of magnitude larger than those expected to capture the “high frequency” heterogeneity related to the discrete nature of the three phases in electrodes. In conclusion, the challenge of quantifying such electrodes using available experimental methods is discussed.« less

  3. Ptychographic X-ray computed tomography at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Dierolf, Martin; Menzel, Andreas; Thibault, Pierre; Schneider, Philipp; Kewish, Cameron M; Wepf, Roger; Bunk, Oliver; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2010-09-23

    X-ray tomography is an invaluable tool in biomedical imaging. It can deliver the three-dimensional internal structure of entire organisms as well as that of single cells, and even gives access to quantitative information, crucially important both for medical applications and for basic research. Most frequently such information is based on X-ray attenuation. Phase contrast is sometimes used for improved visibility but remains significantly harder to quantify. Here we describe an X-ray computed tomography technique that generates quantitative high-contrast three-dimensional electron density maps from phase contrast information without reverting to assumptions of a weak phase object or negligible absorption. This method uses a ptychographic coherent imaging approach to record tomographic data sets, exploiting both the high penetration power of hard X-rays and the high sensitivity of lensless imaging. As an example, we present images of a bone sample in which structures on the 100 nm length scale such as the osteocyte lacunae and the interconnective canalicular network are clearly resolved. The recovered electron density map provides a contrast high enough to estimate nanoscale bone density variations of less than one per cent. We expect this high-resolution tomography technique to provide invaluable information for both the life and materials sciences.

  4. A portable x-ray source with a nanostructured Pt-coated silicon field emission cathode for absorption imaging of low-Z materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Anirban; Swanwick, Michael E.; Fomani, Arash A.; Velásquez-García, Luis Fernando

    2015-06-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a portable x-ray generator for imaging of low-atomic number materials such as biological soft tissue. The system uses a self-aligned, gated, Pt-coated silicon field emitter cathode with two arrays of 62 500 nano-sharp tips arranged in a square grid with 10 μm emitter pitch, and a natural convection-cooled reflection anode composed of a Cu bar coated with a thin Mo film. Characterization of the field emitter array demonstrated continuous emission of 1 mA electron current (16 mA cm  -  2) with  >95% current transmission at a 150 V gate-emitter bias voltage for over 20 h with no degradation. The emission of the x-ray source was characterized across a range of anode bias voltages to maximize the fraction of photons from the characteristic K-shell peaks of the Mo film to produce a quasi-monochromatic photon beam, which enables capturing high-contrast images of low-atomic number materials. The x-ray source operating at the optimum anode bias voltage, i.e. 35 kV, was used to image ex vivo and nonorganic samples in x-ray fluoroscopic mode while varying the tube current; the images resolve feature sizes as small as ~160 µm.

  5. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin

    2014-11-10

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging.

  6. A General Computer Program for Ionospheric Ray-Tracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzales, Victor H.

    1961-01-01

    The study of the ionosphere using the Faraday rotation effect has been undertaken recently by means of rocket, satellite, and moon echo experiments. Different approximations have been used by different authors, resulting in methods with different degrees of complexity, and it is possible to say that the more accurate a method is, the more difficult its application becomes. However, the use of modern high-speed digital computers offers the possibility of using more complex methods in the solution of this problem, The program described in this report was written for the ILLIAC, the digital computer of the University of Illinois. Only the general features common to most digital computers will be mentioned. This program was prepared having in mind the analysis of the Faraday rotation effect, as recorded from artificial satellites. It is intended to be as general as possible in the conditions imposed on the assumed propagating medium: specifically there are no restrictions on the models of the electron density distribution and the earth's magnetic fields. long as the ray theory Ls valid. The program will trace separately the ordinary and the extraordinary mode, and it will find the virtual phase path length of a ray of each mode between the transmitter (satellite) and a receiver (station). The difference between respective phase path-lengths is related to the Faraday rotation through a constant which depends on the frequency.

  7. Computer-aided X-ray holographic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Morita, H.; Ando, K.; Sasaki, K.

    1981-07-01

    A computer-aided X-ray holographic imaging method is proposed. In this system a three-dimensional image of an object is reconstructed by extracting the hologram, which corresponds to the complete coherence, from the intensity signals obtained under temporally and spatially partial coherent illumination of the object. This method requires neither a priori information about the object's structures nor placement of a pointlike target near the object to obtain the reference waves. The coherence function is detected differentially from intensities of infinitesimal intervals on the hemispherical hologram plane so that it does not suffer from the short temporal coherence length of available X-ray sources. Two deconvolution processings to compensate the effects of the spatially and temporally partial coherency of the waves are also adopted. Principle, design conditions, and a few numerical results are given.

  8. X-Ray Computed Tomography of Tranquility Base Moon Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Justin S.; Garvin, Jim; Viens, Mike; Kent, Ryan; Munoz, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) was used for the first time on the Apollo 11 Lunar Sample number 10057.30, which had been previously maintained by the White House, then transferred back to NASA under the care of Goddard Space Flight Center. Results from this analysis show detailed images of the internal structure of the moon rock, including vesicles (pores), crystal needles, and crystal bundles. These crystals, possibly the common mineral ilmenite, are found in abundance and with random orientation. Future work, in particular a greater understanding of these crystals and their formation, may lead to a more in-depth understanding of the lunar surface evolution and mineral content.

  9. Failure analysis of fuel cell electrodes using three-dimensional multi-length scale X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, A.; El Hannach, M.; Orfino, F. P.; Dutta, M.; Kjeang, E.

    2016-10-01

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT), a non-destructive technique, is proposed for three-dimensional, multi-length scale characterization of complex failure modes in fuel cell electrodes. Comparative tomography data sets are acquired for a conditioned beginning of life (BOL) and a degraded end of life (EOL) membrane electrode assembly subjected to cathode degradation by voltage cycling. Micro length scale analysis shows a five-fold increase in crack size and 57% thickness reduction in the EOL cathode catalyst layer, indicating widespread action of carbon corrosion. Complementary nano length scale analysis shows a significant reduction in porosity, increased pore size, and dramatically reduced effective diffusivity within the remaining porous structure of the catalyst layer at EOL. Collapsing of the structure is evident from the combination of thinning and reduced porosity, as uniquely determined by the multi-length scale approach. Additionally, a novel image processing based technique developed for nano scale segregation of pore, ionomer, and Pt/C dominated voxels shows an increase in ionomer volume fraction, Pt/C agglomerates, and severe carbon corrosion at the catalyst layer/membrane interface at EOL. In summary, XCT based multi-length scale analysis enables detailed information needed for comprehensive understanding of the complex failure modes observed in fuel cell electrodes.

  10. Computational Simulations of High Intensity X-Ray Matter Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    London, R A; Rionta, R; Tatchyn, R; Roessler, S

    2001-08-02

    Free electron lasers have the promise of producing extremely high-intensity short pulses of coherent, monochromatic radiation in the 1-10 keV energy range. For example, the Linac Coherent Light Source at Stanford is being designed to produce an output intensity of 2 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} in a 230 fs pulse. These sources will open the door to many novel research studies. However, the intense x-ray pulses may damage the optical components necessary for studying and controlling the output. At the full output intensity, the dose to optical components at normal incidence ranges from 1-10 eV/atom for low-Z materials (Z < 14) at photon energies of 1 keV. It is important to have an understanding of the effects of such high doses in order to specify the composition, placement, and orientation of optical components, such as mirrors and monochromators. Doses of 10 eV/atom are certainly unacceptable since they will lead to ablation of the surface of the optical components. However, it is not precisely known what the damage thresholds are for the materials being considered for optical components for x-ray free electron lasers. In this paper, we present analytic estimates and computational simulations of the effects of high-intensity x-ray pulses on materials. We outline guidelines for the maximum dose to various materials and discuss implications for the design of optical components.

  11. Multi-Mounted X-Ray Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jian; Liu, Zhenzhong; Wang, Jingzheng

    2016-01-01

    Most existing X-ray computed tomography (CT) techniques work in single-mounted mode and need to scan the inspected objects one by one. It is time-consuming and not acceptable for the inspection in a large scale. In this paper, we report a multi-mounted CT method and its first engineering implementation. It consists of a multi-mounted scanning geometry and the corresponding algebraic iterative reconstruction algorithm. This approach permits the CT rotation scanning of multiple objects simultaneously without the increase of penetration thickness and the signal crosstalk. Compared with the conventional single-mounted methods, it has the potential to improve the imaging efficiency and suppress the artifacts from the beam hardening and the scatter. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a developed multi-mounted X-ray CT prototype system. We believe that this technique is of particular interest for pushing the engineering applications of X-ray CT. PMID:27073911

  12. X-ray computed tomography using curvelet sparse regularization

    SciTech Connect

    Wieczorek, Matthias Vogel, Jakob; Lasser, Tobias; Frikel, Jürgen; Demaret, Laurent; Eggl, Elena; Pfeiffer, Franz; Kopp, Felix; Noël, Peter B.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Reconstruction of x-ray computed tomography (CT) data remains a mathematically challenging problem in medical imaging. Complementing the standard analytical reconstruction methods, sparse regularization is growing in importance, as it allows inclusion of prior knowledge. The paper presents a method for sparse regularization based on the curvelet frame for the application to iterative reconstruction in x-ray computed tomography. Methods: In this work, the authors present an iterative reconstruction approach based on the alternating direction method of multipliers using curvelet sparse regularization. Results: Evaluation of the method is performed on a specifically crafted numerical phantom dataset to highlight the method’s strengths. Additional evaluation is performed on two real datasets from commercial scanners with different noise characteristics, a clinical bone sample acquired in a micro-CT and a human abdomen scanned in a diagnostic CT. The results clearly illustrate that curvelet sparse regularization has characteristic strengths. In particular, it improves the restoration and resolution of highly directional, high contrast features with smooth contrast variations. The authors also compare this approach to the popular technique of total variation and to traditional filtered backprojection. Conclusions: The authors conclude that curvelet sparse regularization is able to improve reconstruction quality by reducing noise while preserving highly directional features.

  13. Cathodic arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2003-10-29

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

  14. First-principles computation of electron transfer and reaction rate at a perovskite cathode for hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Liu, C T; Chu, J F; Lin, C K; Hong, C W

    2017-03-22

    The focus of this research is on the electron transfer and its reaction rate at the perovskite cathode of a photoelectrochemical cell for hydrogen production. By employing the density functional theory (DFT), the electron density, projected density of states (PDOS), electron distribution and electron transfer path between [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase and the perovskite cathode can be obtained. Simulation results show that the perovskite cathode is better than traditional cathodes for hydrogen production. Before transmission to the [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase, electron clouds mainly aggregate at the periphery of amine molecules. Simulations also show that the key to hydrogen production at the perovskite structure lies in the organic molecules. Electrons are transferred to the hydrocarbon structural chain before reaching the Fe atoms. The Rice, Ramsperger, Kassel and Marcus (RRKM) theory was used to predict the reaction rates at different temperatures. It was found that the reaction rates are in good agreement with the experimental results. This research provides more physical insight into the electron transfer mechanism during the hydrogen production process.

  15. Fast X-ray luminescence computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Liao, Qimei; Wang, Hongkai

    2014-06-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) opens new possibilities to perform molecular imaging with X-ray. However, challenges remain in dynamic XLCT imaging, where short scan time, good spatial resolution, and whole-body field of view should be considered simultaneously. In this paper, by the use of a single-view XLCT reconstruction method based on a compressive sensing (CS) technique, incorporating a cone beam XLCT imaging system, we implement fast 3-D XLCT imaging. To evaluate the performance of the method, two types of phantom experiments were performed based on a cone beam XLCT imaging system. In Case 1, one tube filled with the X-ray-excitable nanophosphor (Gd 2O 3 :Eu (3+)) was immerged in different positions in the phantom to evaluate the effect of the source position on single-view XLCT reconstruction accuracy. In Case 2, two tubes filled with Gd 2O 3 :Eu (3+) were immerged in different heights in the phantom to evaluate the whole-body imaging performance of single-view XLCT reconstruction. The experimental results indicated that the tubes used in previous phantom experiments can be resolved from single-view XCLT reconstruction images. The location error is less than 1.2 mm. In addition, since only one view data are needed to implement 3-D XLCT imaging, the acquisition time can be greatly reduced (∼1 frame/s) compared with previous XLCT systems. Hence, the technique is suited for imaging the fast distribution of the X-ray-excitable nanophosphors within a biological object.

  16. Visualization of x-ray computer tomography using computer-generated holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daibo, Masahiro; Tayama, Norio

    1998-09-01

    The theory converted from x-ray projection data to the hologram directly by combining the computer tomography (CT) with the computer generated hologram (CGH), is proposed. The purpose of this study is to offer the theory for realizing the all- electronic and high-speed seeing through 3D visualization system, which is for the application to medical diagnosis and non- destructive testing. First, the CT is expressed using the pseudo- inverse matrix which is obtained by the singular value decomposition. CGH is expressed in the matrix style. Next, `projection to hologram conversion' (PTHC) matrix is calculated by the multiplication of phase matrix of CGH with pseudo-inverse matrix of the CT. Finally, the projection vector is converted to the hologram vector directly, by multiplication of the PTHC matrix with the projection vector. Incorporating holographic analog computation into CT reconstruction, it becomes possible that the calculation amount is drastically reduced. We demonstrate the CT cross section which is reconstituted by He-Ne laser in the 3D space from the real x-ray projection data acquired by x-ray television equipment, using our direct conversion technique.

  17. Geoscience Applications of Synchrotron X-ray Computed Microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, M. L.

    2009-05-01

    Computed microtomography is the extension to micron spatial resolution of the CAT scanning technique developed for medical imaging. Synchrotron sources are ideal for the method, since they provide a monochromatic, parallel beam with high intensity. High energy storage rings such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory produce x-rays with high energy, high brilliance, and high coherence. All of these factors combine to produce an extremely powerful imaging tool for earth science research. Techniques that have been developed include: - Absorption and phase contrast computed tomography with spatial resolution approaching one micron - Differential contrast computed tomography, imaging above and below the absorption edge of a particular element - High-pressure tomography, imaging inside a pressure cell at pressures above 10GPa - High speed radiography, with 100 microsecond temporal resolution - Fluorescence tomography, imaging the 3-D distribution of elements present at ppm concentrations. - Radiographic strain measurements during deformation at high confining pressure, combined with precise x- ray diffraction measurements to determine stress. These techniques have been applied to important problems in earth and environmental sciences, including: - The 3-D distribution of aqueous and organic liquids in porous media, with applications in contaminated groundwater and petroleum recovery. - The kinetics of bubble formation in magma chambers, which control explosive volcanism. - Accurate crystal size distributions in volcanic systems, important for understanding the evolution of magma chambers. - The equation-of-state of amorphous materials at high pressure using both direct measurements of volume as a function of pressure and also by measuring the change x-ray absorption coefficient as a function of pressure. - The formation of frost flowers on Arctic sea-ice, which is important in controlling the atmospheric chemistry of mercury. - The distribution of

  18. ADVANCES IN X-RAY COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY AT THE NSLS.

    SciTech Connect

    DOWD,B.A.

    1998-08-07

    The X-Ray Computed Microtomography workstation at beamline X27A at the NSLS has been utilized by scientists from a broad range of disciplines from industrial materials processing to environmental science. The most recent applications are presented here as well as a description of the facility that has evolved to accommodate a wide variety of materials and sample sizes. One of the most exciting new developments reported here resulted from a pursuit of faster reconstruction techniques. A Fast Filtered Back Transform (FFBT) reconstruction program has been developed and implemented, that is based on a refinement of the ''gridding'' algorithm first developed for use with radio astronomical data. This program has reduced the reconstruction time to 8.5 sec for a 929 x 929 pixel{sup 2} slice on an R10,000 CPU, more than 8x reduction compared with the Filtered Back-Projection method.

  19. Advances in x-ray computed microtomography at the NSLS

    SciTech Connect

    Dowd, B.A.; Andrews, A.B.; Marr, R.B.; Siddons, D.P.; Jones, K.W.; Peskin, A.M.

    1998-08-01

    The X-Ray Computed Microtomography workstation at beamline X27A at the NSLS has been utilized by scientists from a broad range of disciplines from industrial materials processing to environmental science. The most recent applications are presented here as well as a description of the facility that has evolved to accommodate a wide variety of materials and sample sizes. One of the most exciting new developments reported here resulted from a pursuit of faster reconstruction techniques. A Fast Filtered Back Transform (FFBT) reconstruction program has been developed and implemented, that is based on a refinement of the gridding algorithm first developed for use with radio astronomical data. This program has reduced the reconstruction time to 8.5 sec for a 929 x 929 pixel{sup 2} slice on an R10,000 CPU, more than 8x reduction compared with the Filtered Back-Projection method.

  20. X- and {gamma}-ray computed tomography applications at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, G.P.; Martz, H.E.; Schneberk, D.J.; Azevedo, S.G.

    1993-04-01

    Members of the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Section at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have implemented the advanced three-dimensional imaging technique of x and {gamma}-ray computed tomography (CAT or CT) for industrial and scientific nondestructive evaluation. This technique provides internal and external views of materials, components, and assemblies nonintrusively. Our research and development includes building CT scanners as well as data preprocessing, image reconstruction, display and analysis algorithms. These capabilities have been applied for a variety of industrial and scientific NDE applications where objects can range in size from 1 mm{sup 3} to 1 m{sup 3}. Here we discuss the usefulness of Cr to evaluate: Ballistic target materials, high-explosives shape charges, missile nosetips, and reactor-fuel tubes.

  1. Broad Applications for X-Ray Micro-Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieb-Lappen, R.; Courville, Z.; Albert, D. G.; Taylor, S.; Lever, J.; Barbato, R.; Song, A.; Obbard, R. W.; Fegyveresi, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The use of x-ray micro-computed tomography (µCT) has exploded over the past decade due to rapid advances in instrumentation technology and accessibility. The primary advantage of μCT is that it provides a non-destructive three-dimensional visualization and characterization of the internal features of a material with spatial resolution down to several microns, or even submicron with x-ray magnification optics available on certain instruments and at some synchrotron beamlines. Commercially available and specially designed benchtop scanners have enabled users to expand the technology to a wide variety of applications. Here we used a Skyscan 1173 scanner housed in a -10 °C cold room to study the microstructure of natural and man-made specimens, including sea ice, snow, firn, ice, soils, leaf litter, permafrost, and explosives. Both qualitatively and quantitatively, we measured the material properties such as open and closed porosity, tortuosity, surface area, volume, degree of anisotropy, structural thickness, topology, and connectivity. Such data helped us answer questions such as: What is the topology and connectivity of brine channels in sea ice? What is the tortuosity of the pore structure in leaf litter? What is the spatial distribution of contaminants in a porous media? Do cracks in explosives aid dissolution of crystals and subsequent contaminant transport into the soil?

  2. TU-A-9A-07: X-Ray Acoustic Computed Tomography (XACT): 100% Sensitivity to X-Ray Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, L; Ahmad, M; Nikoozadeh, A; Pratx, G; Khuri-Yakub, B; Xing, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To assess whether X-ray acoustic computed tomography (XACT) is more sensitive to X-ray absorption than that of the conventional X-ray imaging. Methods: First, a theoretical model was built to analyze the X-ray absorption sensitivity of XACT imaging and conventional X-ray imaging. Second, an XACT imaging system was developed to evaluate the X-ray induced acoustic signal generation as well as the sensitivity improvement over transmission x-ray imaging. Ultra-short x-ray pulses (60-nanosecond) were generated from an X-ray source operated at the energy of 150 kVp with a 10-Hz repetition rate. The X-ray pulse was synchronized with the acoustic detection via a x-ray scintillation triggering to acquire the X-ray induced acoustic signal. Results: Theoretical analysis shows that X-ray induced acoustic signal is sensitive only to the X-ray absorption, while completely insensitive to out the X-ray scattering and fluorescence. XACT has reduced background and increased contrast-to-noise ratio, and therefore has increased sensitivity compared to transmission x-ray imaging. For a 50-μm size, gadolinium insertion in tissue exposed to 40 keV X-rays; the sensitivity of XACT imaging is about 28.9 times higher than that of conventional X-ray imaging. Conclusion: X-ray acoustic computer tomography (XACT) as a new imaging modality combines X-ray absorption contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. It is feasible to improve the imaging sensitivity with XACT imaging compared with conventional X-ray imaging. Taking advantage of the high ultrasonic resolution, it is possible to perform 3-D imaging with a single x-ray pulse with arrays of transducers without any mechanical motion of the imaging system. This single-shot capability offers the potential of reducing radiation dose by a factor of 1000, and imaging 100 times faster when compared to the conventional X-ray CT, and thus revolutionizing x-ray imaging applications in medicine and biology. The authors

  3. Computing elastic moduli on 3-D X-ray computed tomography image stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garboczi, E. J.; Kushch, V. I.

    2015-03-01

    A numerical task of current interest is to compute the effective elastic properties of a random composite material by operating on a 3D digital image of its microstructure obtained via X-ray computed tomography (CT). The 3-D image is usually sub-sampled since an X-ray CT image is typically of order 10003 voxels or larger, which is considered to be a very large finite element problem. Two main questions for the validity of any such study are then: can the sub-sample size be made sufficiently large to capture enough of the important details of the random microstructure so that the computed moduli can be thought of as accurate, and what boundary conditions should be chosen for these sub-samples? This paper contributes to the answer of both questions by studying a simulated X-ray CT cylindrical microstructure with three phases, cut from a random model system with known elastic properties. A new hybrid numerical method is introduced, which makes use of finite element solutions coupled with exact solutions for elastic moduli of square arrays of parallel cylindrical fibers. The new method allows, in principle, all of the microstructural data to be used when the X-ray CT image is in the form of a cylinder, which is often the case. Appendix A describes a similar algorithm for spherical sub-samples, which may be of use when examining the mechanical properties of particles. Cubic sub-samples are also taken from this simulated X-ray CT structure to investigate the effect of two different kinds of boundary conditions: forced periodic and fixed displacements. It is found that using forced periodic displacements on the non-geometrically periodic cubic sub-samples always gave more accurate results than using fixed displacements, although with about the same precision. The larger the cubic sub-sample, the more accurate and precise was the elastic computation, and using the complete cylindrical sample with the new method gave still more accurate and precise results. Fortran 90

  4. Note: Effect of photodiode aluminum cathode frame on spectral sensitivity in the soft x-ray energy band

    SciTech Connect

    McGarry, M. B. Den Hartog, D. J.; Goetz, J. A.; Johnson, J.; Franz, P.

    2014-09-15

    Silicon photodiodes used for soft x-ray detection typically have a thin metal electrode partially covering the active area of the photodiode, which subtly alters the spectral sensitivity of the photodiode. As a specific example, AXUV4BST photodiodes from International Radiation Detectors have a 1.0 μm thick aluminum frame covering 19% of the active area of the photodiode, which attenuates the measured x-ray signal below ∼6 keV. This effect has a small systematic impact on the electron temperature calculated from measurements of soft x-ray bremsstrahlung emission from a high-temperature plasma. Although the systematic error introduced by the aluminum frame is only a few percent in typical experimental conditions on the Madison Symmetric Torus, it may be more significant for other instruments that use similar detectors.

  5. Modeling Electrochemical Performance of the Hierarchical Morphology of Precious Group Metal-free Cathode for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    DOE PAGES

    Komini Babu, Siddharth; Chung, Hoon Taek; Zelenay, Piotr; ...

    2017-08-04

    Here, this paper presents a two-dimensional (2D) computational model of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) with a platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) catalyst cathode that can significantly reduce PEFC costs by eliminating the need for expensive platinum catalysts. Due to their comparatively low volumetric activity, PGM-free cathodes are an order of magnitude thicker than their Pt-based counterpart. The resulting need for greater electrode thickness to achieve sufficient power density requires careful attention to the transport losses across the thicker cathodes. The presented model is used to correlate the composition and morphology of the cathode to PEFC performance. The model ismore » a complete cell, continuum model that includes an advanced agglomerate model for a microstructurally consistent representation of the cathode. A unique feature of the approach is the integration of morphology and transport parameter statistics extracted from nano-scale resolution X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT) imaging of PGM-free cathodes. The model was validated with experimental results of PGM-free cathodes with varying Nafion loading. Lastly, our key findings are a need for increased cathode hydrophobicity and increased ionomer conductivity through either reduced tortuosity or increased bulk conductivity. We further use the model to evaluate targets for the volumetric activity and active site density for future catalysts.« less

  6. Revealing electronic structure changes in Chevrel phase cathodes upon Mg insertion using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Liwen F.; Wright, Joshua; Perdue, Brian R.; Fister, Timothy T.; Kim, Soojeong; Apblett, Christopher A.; Prendergast, David

    2016-06-10

    Following previous work predicting the electronic response of the Chevrel phase Mo6S8 upon Mg insertion (Thole et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, 17, 22548), we provide the experimental proof, evident in X-ray absorption spectroscopy, to illustrate the charge compensation mechanism of the Chevrel phase compound during Mg insertion and de-insertion processes.

  7. X-ray Computed Tomography of coal: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maylotte, D.H.; Spiro, C.L.; Kosky, P.G.; Lamby, E.J.

    1986-12-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a method of mapping with x-rays the internal structures of coal. The technique normally produces 2-D images of the internal structures of an object. These images can be recast to create pseudo 3-D representations. CT of coal has been explored for a variety of different applications to coal and coal processing technology. In a comparison of CT data with conventional coal analyses and petrography, CT was found to offer a good indication of the total ash content of the coal. The spatial distribution of the coal mineral matter as seen with CT has been suggested as an indicator of coal washability. Studies of gas flow through coal using xenon gas as a tracer have shown the extremely complicated nature of the modes of penetration of gas through coal, with significant differences in the rates at which the gas can pass along and across the bedding planes of coal. In a special furnace designed to allow CT images to be taken while the coal was being heated, the pyrolysis and gasification of coal have been studied. Gasification rates with steam and CO/sub 2/ for a range of coal ranks have been obtained, and the location of the gasification reactions within the piece of coal can be seen. Coal drying and the progress of the pyrolysis wave into coal have been examined when the coal was subjected to the kind of sudden temperature jump that it might experience in fixed bed gasifier applications. CT has also been used to examine stable flow structures within model fluidized beds and the accessibility of lump coal to microbial desulfurization. 53 refs., 242 figs., 26 tabs.

  8. X-ray Computed Tomography Observation of Methane Hydrate Dissociation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomutsa, L.; Freifeld, B.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Stern, L.A.

    2002-01-01

    Deposits of naturally occurring methane hydrate have been identified in permafrost and deep oceanic environments with global reserves estimated to be twice the total amount of energy stored in fossil fuels. The fundamental behavior of methane hydrate in natural formations, while poorly understood, is of critical importance if the economic recovery of methane from hydrates is to be accomplished. In this study, computed X-ray tomography (CT) scanning is used to image an advancing dissociation front in a heterogeneous gas hydrate/sand sample at 0.1 MPa. The cylindrical methane hydrate and sand aggregate, 2.54 cm in diameter and 6.3 cm long, was contained in a PVC sample holder that was insulated on all but one end. At the uninsulated end, the dissociated gas was captured and the volume of gas monitored. The sample was initially imaged axially using X-ray CT scanning within the methane hydrate stability zone by keeping the sample temperature at 77??K. Subsequently, as the sample warmed through the methane hydrate dissociation point at 194??K and room pressure, gas was produced and the temperature at the bottom of the sample plug was monitored while CT images were acquired. The experiment showed that CT imaging can resolve the reduction in density (as seen by a reduction in beam attenuation) of the hydrate/sand aggregate due to the dissociation of methane hydrate. In addition, a comparison of CT images with gas flow and temperature measurements reveals that the CT scanner is able to resolve accurately and spatially the advancing dissociation front. Future experiments designed to better understand the thermodynamics of hydrate dissociation are planned to take advantage of the temporal and spatial resolution that the CT scanner provides.

  9. Scale analysis using X-ray microfluorescence and computed radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candeias, J. P.; de Oliveira, D. F.; dos Anjos, M. J.; Lopes, R. T.

    2014-02-01

    Scale deposits are the most common and most troublesome damage problems in the oil field and can occur in both production and injection wells. They occur because the minerals in produced water exceed their saturation limit as temperatures and pressures change. Scale can vary in appearance from hard crystalline material to soft, friable material and the deposits can contain other minerals and impurities such as paraffin, salt and iron. In severe conditions, scale creates a significant restriction, or even a plug, in the production tubing. This study was conducted to qualify the elements present in scale samples and quantify the thickness of the scale layer using synchrotron radiation micro-X-ray fluorescence (SRμXRF) and computed radiography (CR) techniques. The SRμXRF results showed that the elements found in the scale samples were strontium, barium, calcium, chromium, sulfur and iron. The CR analysis showed that the thickness of the scale layer was identified and quantified with accuracy. These results can help in the decision making about removing the deposited scale.

  10. Investigating biomineralization using synchrotron based X-ray computed microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Ryan; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    2011-04-01

    This work presents the results of a study where synchrotron based x-ray computed microtomography (CMT) was used to investigate changes in pore morphology during calcium carbonate biomineralization. We simultaneously examine changes in pore microstructure and bulk permeability within glass bead columns during biogenic CaCO3 precipitation induced by Sporosarcina pasteurii. We observe a three order of magnitude reduction in permeability over relatively short time-scales (˜60 hrs) during the carbonate precipitation process. The resulting precipitates were a micro-porous composite of spherical and cubic CaCO3 precipitates. CMT images taken during precipitation were analyzed for effective pore radii, effective throat radii, and other pore-scale characteristics using 3DMA-ROCK. The Kozeny-Carman relation provided a poor fit to the raw permeability data, however, once this function was augmented with geometric information extracted from CMT imagery a better fit was provided suggesting that pore geometry should be considered temporally variable when modeling permeability change during biomineralization.

  11. Investigating biomineralization using synchrotron based X-ray computed microtomography

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Ryan; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of a study where synchrotron based x-ray computed microtomography (CMT) was used to investigate changes in pore morphology during calcium carbonate biomineralization. We simultaneously examine changes in pore microstructure and bulk permeability within glass bead columns during biogenic CaCO₃ precipitation induced by Sporosarcina pasteurii. We observe a three order of magnitude reduction in permeability over relatively short time-scales (~60 hrs) during the carbonate precipitation process. The resulting precipitates were a micro-porous composite of spherical and cubic CaCO₃ precipitates. CMT images taken during precipitation were analyzed for effective pore radii, effective throat radii, and other pore-scale characteristics using 3DMA-ROCK. The Kozeny-Carman relation provided a poor fit to the raw permeability data, however, once this function was augmented with geometric information extracted from CMT imagery a better fit was provided suggesting that pore geometry should be considered temporally variable when modeling permeability change during biomineralization.

  12. X-ray computed tomography for additive manufacturing: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A.; Maskery, I.; Leach, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    In this review, the use of x-ray computed tomography (XCT) is examined, identifying the requirement for volumetric dimensional measurements in industrial verification of additively manufactured (AM) parts. The XCT technology and AM processes are summarised, and their historical use is documented. The use of XCT and AM as tools for medical reverse engineering is discussed, and the transition of XCT from a tool used solely for imaging to a vital metrological instrument is documented. The current states of the combined technologies are then examined in detail, separated into porosity measurements and general dimensional measurements. In the conclusions of this review, the limitation of resolution on improvement of porosity measurements and the lack of research regarding the measurement of surface texture are identified as the primary barriers to ongoing adoption of XCT in AM. The limitations of both AM and XCT regarding slow speeds and high costs, when compared to other manufacturing and measurement techniques, are also noted as general barriers to continued adoption of XCT and AM.

  13. Dynamic study of sub-micro sized LiFePO4 cathodes by in-situ tender X-ray absorption near edge structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongniu; Wang, Huixin; Yang, Jinli; Zhou, Jigang; Hu, Yongfeng; Xiao, Qunfeng; Fang, Haitao; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2016-01-01

    Olivine-type phosphates (LiMPO4, M = Fe, Mn, Co) are promising cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries that are generally accepted to follow first order equilibrium phase transformations. Herein, the phase transformation dynamics of sub-micro sized LiFePO4 particles with limited rate capability at a low current density of 0.14 C was investigated. An in-situ X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) measurement was conducted at the Fe and P K-edge for the dynamic studies upon lithiation and delithiation. Fe K-edge XANES spectra demonstrate that not only lithium-rich intermediate phase LixFePO4 (x = 0.6-0.75), but also lithium-poor intermediate phase LiyFePO4 (y = 0.1-0.25) exist during the charge and discharge, respectively. Furthermore, during charge and discharge, a fluctuation of the FePO4 and LiFePO4 fractions obtained by liner combination fitting around the imaginary phase fractions followed Faraday's law and the equilibrium first-order two-phase transformation versus reaction time is present, respectively. The charging and discharging process has a reversible phase transformation dynamics with symmetric structural evolution routes. P K-edge XANES spectra reveal an enrichment of PF6-1 anions at the surface of the electrode during charging.

  14. Reduction-melting combined with a Na₂CO₃ flux recycling process for lead recovery from cathode ray tube funnel glass.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Yonezawa, Susumu

    2014-08-01

    With large quantity of flux (Na2CO3), lead can be recovered from the funnel glass of waste cathode-ray tubes via reduction-melting at 1000°C. To reduce flux cost, a technique to recover added flux from the generated oxide phase is also important in order to recycle the flux recovered from the reduction-melting process. In this study, the phase separation of sodium and the crystallization of water-soluble sodium silicates were induced after the reduction-melting process to enhance the leachability of sodium in the oxide phase and to extract the sodium from the phase for the recovery of Na2CO3 as flux. A reductive atmosphere promoted the phase separation and crystallization, and the leachability of sodium from the oxide phase was enhanced. The optimum temperature and treatment time for increasing the leachability were 700°C and 2h, respectively. After treatment, more than 90% of the sodium in the oxide phase was extracted in water. NaHCO3 can be recovered by carbonization of the solution containing sodium ions using carbon dioxide gas, decomposed to Na2CO3 at 50°C and recycled for use in the reduction-melting process.

  15. Mixed polyanion glass cathodes: Glass-state conversion reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Kercher, Andrew K.; Kolopus, James A.; Carroll, Kyler; ...

    2015-01-01

    Mixed polyanion (MP) glasses can undergo glass-state conversion (GSC) reactions to provide an alternate class of high-capacity cathode materials. GSC reactions have been demonstrated in phosphate/vanadate glasses with Ag, Co, Cu, Fe, and Ni cations. These MP glasses provided high capacity and good high power performance, but suffer from moderate voltages, large voltage hysteresis, and significant capacity fade with cycling. Details of the GSC reaction have been revealed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy of ex situ cathodes at key states of charge. Using the Open Quantum Materials Database (OQMD), a computational thermodynamic model hasmore » been developed to predict the near-equilibrium voltages of glass-state conversion reactions in MP glasses.« less

  16. Mixed polyanion glass cathodes: Glass-state conversion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kercher, Andrew K.; Kolopus, James A.; Carroll, Kyler; Unocic, Raymond R.; Kirklin, S.; Wolverton, C.; Stooksbury, Shelby L.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Dudney, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Mixed polyanion (MP) glasses can undergo glass-state conversion (GSC) reactions to provide an alternate class of high-capacity cathode materials. GSC reactions have been demonstrated in phosphate/vanadate glasses with Ag, Co, Cu, Fe, and Ni cations. These MP glasses provided high capacity and good high power performance, but suffer from moderate voltages, large voltage hysteresis, and significant capacity fade with cycling. Details of the GSC reaction have been revealed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy of ex situ cathodes at key states of charge. Using the Open Quantum Materials Database (OQMD), a computational thermodynamic model has been developed to predict the near-equilibrium voltages of glass-state conversion reactions in MP glasses.

  17. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section 892.1750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1750 Computed tomography x-ray...

  18. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section 892.1750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1750 Computed tomography x-ray...

  19. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section 892.1750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1750 Computed tomography x-ray...

  20. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section 892.1750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1750 Computed tomography x-ray...

  1. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section 892.1750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1750 Computed tomography x-ray...

  2. Digital Radiography and X-ray Computed Tomography Slice Inspection of an Aluminum Truss Section

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    3. Results The DR and XCT scans of the specimen were done using the 225-keV microfocus x - ray tube and II/CCD camera setup in centered rotate-only...Digital Radiography and X - ray Computed Tomography Slice Inspection of an Aluminum Truss Section by William H. Green ARL-MR-791 September...Digital Radiography and X - ray Computed Tomography Slice Inspection of an Aluminum Truss Section William H. Green Weapons and Materials

  3. Technical Note. The Concept of a Computer System for Interpretation of Tight Rocks Using X-Ray Computed Tomography Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habrat, Magdalena; Krakowska, Paulina; Puskarczyk, Edyta; Jędrychowski, Mariusz; Madejski, Paweł

    2017-03-01

    The article presents the concept of a computer system for interpreting unconventional oil and gas deposits with the use of X-ray computed tomography results. The functional principles of the solution proposed are presented in the article. The main goal is to design a product which is a complex and useful tool in a form of a specialist computer software for qualitative and quantitative interpretation of images obtained from X-ray computed tomography. It is devoted to the issues of prospecting and identification of unconventional hydrocarbon deposits. The article focuses on the idea of X-ray computed tomography use as a basis for the analysis of tight rocks, considering especially functional principles of the system, which will be developed by the authors. The functional principles include the issues of graphical visualization of rock structure, qualitative and quantitative interpretation of model for visualizing rock samples, interpretation and a description of the parameters within realizing the module of quantitative interpretation.

  4. Computer-controlled Cauchois-type x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, J. M.; Kefi, M.; Avila, A.; Couillaux, P.; Bonnelle, C.

    1987-03-01

    A laboratory x-ray spectrometer designed for routine analysis in the 15-60-keV spectral range is described. It consists of a 40-cm bent-crystal transmission spectrometer in the Cauchois geometry, controlled by a microcomputer. The choice of the crystal analyzer and of the detection system is discussed. The instrument is well suited for large spectral range x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy (XAS, XES) and x-ray source diagnostics.

  5. Lead extraction from waste funnel cathode-ray tubes glasses by reaction with silicon carbide and titanium nitride.

    PubMed

    Yot, Pascal G; Méar, François O

    2009-12-15

    As a possibility to clean waste CRT glass, treatment of lead-containing glass with a reducing agent, SiC or TiN, leads to a porous material containing metallic lead, Pb(0), located on the surface of the pore, and unreduced lead, Pb(II). The influences of reducing agent content, of the time, and at last of the temperature on lead reduction were analysed. Our investigations have pointed out significant differences as a function of the used reducing agent. CRT glass heat treated with SiC lead to less Pb(0), compared to TiN as shown by X-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It has been also evidenced that lead reduction occurs on randomized zones inside the sample leading to macroscopic lead beads inside glassy samples. XPS and XAS measurements were also carried out to investigate the local structure of lead and have evidenced a change of role of lead inside the glassy framework in function of the used conditions.

  6. Operando and in situ X-ray spectroscopies of degradation in La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O(3-δ) thin film cathodes in fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, Samson Y; Ding, Dong; Liu, Mingfei; Liu, Meilin; Alamgir, Faisal M

    2014-11-01

    Information from ex situ characterization can fall short in describing complex materials systems simultaneously exposed to multiple external stimuli. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to probe the local atomistic and electronic structure of specific elements in a La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O(3-δ) (LSCF) thin film cathode exposed to air contaminated with H2O and CO2 under operating conditions. While impedance spectroscopy showed that the polarization resistance of the LSCF cathode increased upon exposure to both contaminants at 750 °C, XAS near-edge and extended fine structure showed that the degree of oxidation for Fe and Co decreases with increasing temperature. Synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy tracked the formation and removal of a carbonate species, a Co phase, and different oxygen moieties as functions of temperature and gas. The combined information provides insight into the fundamental mechanism by which H2O and CO2 cause degradation in the cathode of solid oxide fuel cells.

  7. Structural integrity--Searching the key factor to suppress the voltage fade of Li-rich layered cathode materials through 3D X-ray imaging and spectroscopy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yahong; Hu, Enyuan; Yang, Feifei; Corbett, Jeff; Sun, Zhihong; Lyu, Yingchun; Yu, Xiqian; Liu, Yijin; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Li, Hong

    2016-10-24

    Li-rich layered materials are important cathode compounds used in commercial lithium ion batteries, which, however, suffers from some drawbacks including the so-called voltage fade upon electrochemical cycling. Here, our study employs novel transmission X-ray microscopy to investigate the electrochemical reaction induced morphological and chemical changes in the Li-rich Li2Ru0.5Mn0.5O3 cathode particles at the meso to nano scale. We performed combined X-ray spectroscopy, diffraction and microscopy experiments to systematically study this cathode material's evolution upon cycling as well as to establish a comprehensive understanding of the structural origin of capacity fade through 2D and 3D fine length scale morphology and heterogeneity change of this material. This work suggests that atomic manipulation (e.g. doping, substitution etc.) or nano engineering (e.g. nano-sizing, heterogeneous structure) are important strategies to mitigate the internal strain and defects induced by extensive lithium insertion/extraction. It also shows that maintaining the structural integrity is the key in designing and synthesizing lithium-rich layered materials with better cycle stability.

  8. Elucidating the degradation mechanism of the cathode catalyst of PEFCs by a combination of electrochemical methods and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Monzó, J; van der Vliet, D F; Yanson, A; Rodriguez, P

    2016-08-10

    In this study, we report a methodology which enables the determination of the degradation mechanisms responsible for catalyst deterioration under different accelerated stress protocols (ASPs) by combining measurements of the electrochemical surface area (ECSA) and Pt content (by X-ray fluorescence). The validation of this method was assessed on high surface area unsupported Pt nanoparticles (Pt-NPs), Pt nanoparticles supported on TaC (Pt/TaC) and Pt nanoparticles supported on Vulcan carbon (Pt/Vulcan). In the load cycle protocol, the degradation of Pt-NPs and Pt/Vulcan follows associative processes (e.g. agglomeration) in the first 2000 cycles, however, in successive cycles the degradation goes through dissociative processes such as Pt dissolution, as is evident from a similar decay of ECSA and Pt content. In contrast, the degradation mechanism for Pt nanoparticles dispersed on TaC occurs continuously through the dissociative processes (e.g. Pt dissolution or particle detachment), with similar decay rates of both Pt content and ECSA. In the start-up/shut-down protocol, high surface area Pt-NPs follow associative processes (e.g. Ostwald ripening) in the first 4000 cycles, after which the degradation continues through dissociative processes. On the other hand, dissociative mechanisms always govern the degradation of Pt/TaC under start-up/shut-down protocol conditions. Finally, we report that Pt nanoparticles supported on TaC exhibit the highest catalytic activity and long term durability of the three nanoparticle systems tested. This makes Pt/TaC a potentially valuable catalyst system for application in polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathodes.

  9. Digital computer processing of X-ray photos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, R.; Selzer, R. H.

    1967-01-01

    Digital computers correct various distortions in medical and biological photographs. One of the principal methods of computer enhancement involves the use of a two-dimensional digital filter to modify the frequency spectrum of the picture. Another computer processing method is image subtraction.

  10. TPASS: a gamma-ray spectrum analysis and isotope identification computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Dickens, J.K.

    1981-03-01

    The gamma-ray spectral data-reduction and analysis computer code TPASS is described. This computer code is used to analyze complex Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectra to obtain peak areas corrected for detector efficiencies, from which are determined gamma-ray yields. These yields are compared with an isotope gamma-ray data file to determine the contributions to the observed spectrum from decay of specific radionuclides. A complete FORTRAN listing of the code and a complex test case are given.

  11. Computers in Communications and Education at Coast Community College District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luskin, Bernard J.; Ruth, Monty W.

    Coast Community College District in Orange County, California is a leader among community colleges in the instructional use computers. The district's hardware consists of an IBM system 370 model 155 computer, over 80 typewriter terminals, 12 cathode ray tubes (CRT), and several microfiche image projection devices. Better than 700 computer-assisted…

  12. Quasimonochromatic x-ray computed tomography by the balanced filter method using a conventional x-ray source.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masatoshi

    2004-12-01

    A quasimonochromatic x-ray computed tomography (CT) system utilizing balanced filters has recently been developed for acquiring quantitative CT images. This system consisted of basic components such as a conventional x-ray generator for radiography, a stage for mounting and rotating objects, and an x-ray line sensor camera. Metallic sheets of Er and Yb were used as the balanced filters for obtaining quasimonochromatic incident x rays that include the characteristic lines of the W Kalpha doublet from a tungsten target. The mean energy and energy width of the quasimonochromatic x rays were determined to be 59.0 and 1.9 keV, respectively, from x-ray spectroscopic measurements using a high-purity Ge detector. The usefulness of the present x-ray CT system was demonstrated by obtaining spatial distributions of the linear attenuation coefficients of three selected samples--a 20 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom, a 3.5 cm diameter aluminum rod, and a human head phantom. The results clearly indicate that this apparatus is surprisingly effective for estimating the distribution of the linear attenuation coefficients without any correction of the beam-hardening effect. Thus, implementing the balanced filter method on an x-ray CT scanner has promise in producing highly quantitative CT images.

  13. X-Ray Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging of the Buzzard Coulee Chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melanson, D.; Samson, C.; Herd, R. K.; Fry, C.; McCausland, P. J. A.; Umoh, J.; Holdsworth, D. W.

    2012-03-01

    This abstract outlines research and some results of X-ray micro-computed tomography imaging of the Buzzard Coulee H4 chondrite. A comparison of bulk density results and an analysis of radio-density profile curves are discussed.

  14. Deterministic Computer-Controlled Polishing Process for High-Energy X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Gufran S.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Speegle, Chet; Ramsey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    A deterministic computer-controlled polishing process for large X-ray mirror mandrels is presented. Using tool s influence function and material removal rate extracted from polishing experiments, design considerations of polishing laps and optimized operating parameters are discussed

  15. Deterministic Computer-Controlled Polishing Process for High-Energy X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Gufran S.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Speegle, Chet; Ramsey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    A deterministic computer-controlled polishing process for large X-ray mirror mandrels is presented. Using tool s influence function and material removal rate extracted from polishing experiments, design considerations of polishing laps and optimized operating parameters are discussed

  16. Computational Astrophysics Consortium 3 - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, Stan

    2014-08-29

    Final project report for UCSC's participation in the Computational Astrophysics Consortium - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis. As an appendix, the report of the entire Consortium is also appended.

  17. Arbutin: Isolation, X-ray structure and computional studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nycz, Jacek E.; Malecki, Grzegorz; Morag, Monika; Nowak, Gerard; Ponikiewski, Lukasz; Kusz, Joachim; Switlicka, Anna

    2010-09-01

    Arbutin, an active component originated from Serratula quinquefolia for skin-whitening use and treating skin related allergic inflammation, was characterized by microanalysis, FTIR, UV-Vis, multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, and single crystal X-ray diffraction method. The geometries of the studied compound were optimized in singlet states using the density functional theory (DFT) method with B3LYP functional. Electronic spectra were calculated by TDDFT method. In general, the predicted bond lengths and angles are in a good agreement with the values based on the X-ray crystal structure data.

  18. Preliminary Results on Studying of Meteorites from Geological Museum of Kazan University by X-Ray Fluorescence and Computed X-Ray Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzina, D. M.; Nurgaliev, D. K.; Gareev, B. I.; Batalin, G. A.; Silantev, V. V.; Statsenko, E. O.

    2017-02-01

    Micro X-ray fluorescence and X-ray computed tomography used for studying meteorites (particularly chondrules and iron-nickel alloys) from Geological Museum (Kazan), their elemental composition, and distribution of these objects in the body of meteorite.

  19. Computer Automated Ultrasonic Inspection System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-06

    Microcomputer CRT Cathode Ray Tube SBC Single Board Computer xiii 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Background Standard ultrasonic inspection techniques used in industry...30 Microcomputer The heart of the bridge control microcomputer is an Intel single board computer using a high-speed 8085 HA-2 microprocessor chip ...subsystems (bridge, bridge drive electronics, bridge control microcomputer , ultrasonic unit, and master computer system), development of bridge control and

  20. Computer simulation of a backscattered X-ray fluorescence system.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghorabie, Fayez H H

    2015-01-01

    An EGSnrc user code is developed to simulate a backscattered geometry in vivo x-ray fluorescence system for the measurement of platinum concentration in head and neck tumours. The user code is fundamentally based on a previous study which used the EGS4 Monte Carlo code. The new user code, which we have developed in this study, has new improvements which made it able to simulate the process of photon transportation through the different components of the modelled x-ray fluorescence system. The simulation process included modelling of the photon source, collimators, phantoms and detector. Simulation results were compared and evaluated against x-ray fluorescence data obtained experimentally from an existing system developed by the Swansea In vivo Analysis and Cancer Research Group. In addition, simulation results of this study were also compared with our previous study in which the EGS4 user code was used. Comparison between results has shown that the new EGSnrc user code was able to reproduce the spectral shape obtained using the experimental x-ray fluorescence system. The area under the Compton peak differs by 2.5% between the experimental measurement and the EGSnrc simulation. Similarly, the area under the two Pt Kα peaks differs by 2.3% and 2.2%.

  1. Miniature, mobile X-ray computed radiography system

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Scott A; Rose, Evan A

    2017-03-07

    A miniature, portable x-ray system may be configured to scan images stored on a phosphor. A flash circuit may be configured to project red light onto a phosphor and receive blue light from the phosphor. A digital monochrome camera may be configured to receive the blue light to capture an article near the phosphor.

  2. Elastomeric Cathode Binder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, S. P. S.; Shen, D. S.; Somoano, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Soluble copolymer binder mixed with cathode material and solvent forms flexible porous cathode used in lithium and Ni/Cd batteries. Cathodes prepared by this process have lower density due to expanding rubbery binder and greater flexibility than conventional cathodes. Fabrication procedure readily adaptable to scaled-up processes.

  3. Human thyroid specimen imaging by fluorescent x-ray computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Yu, Quanwen; Yashiro, Toru; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Yasuo; Itai, Yuji; Akatsuka, Takao

    1999-09-01

    Fluorescent x-ray computed tomography (FXCT) is being developed to detect non-radioactive contrast materials in living specimens. The FXCT system consists of a silicon (111) channel cut monochromator, an x-ray slit and a collimator for fluorescent x ray detection, a scanning table for the target organ and an x-ray detector for fluorescent x-ray and transmission x-ray. To reduce Compton scattering overlapped on the fluorescent K(alpha) line, incident monochromatic x-ray was set at 37 keV. The FXCT clearly imaged a human thyroid gland and iodine content was estimated quantitatively. In a case of hyperthyroidism, the two-dimensional distribution of iodine content was not uniform, and thyroid cancer had a small amount of iodine. FXCT can be used to detect iodine within thyroid gland quantitatively and to delineate its distribution.

  4. PM10 and PM2.5 and health risk assessment for heavy metals in a typical factory for cathode ray tube television recycling.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wenxiong; Yang, Yichen; Xu, Zhenming

    2013-01-01

    The representative waste television recycling process was chosen as the object of this study, including manual dismantling and mechanical separation of printed circuit boards (PCBs) and cathode ray tubes (CRTs) in two independent workshops. During these recycling processes, fine particulate matter and heavy metals will be released into the air to impact the environment and the health of the workers. The mass concentrations of PM2.5 (particles below 2.5 μm diameter) in mechanical and dismantling workshops ranged from 252.6 to 290.8 μg/m(3) and from 112.7 to 169.4 μg/m(3), respectively. The average concentration of PM2.5 around the workshop was 98.5 μg/m(3). Meanwhile, the contents of PM10 (particles below 10 μm diameter) were all below the risk threshold, except that (360.4 μg/m(3)) monitored in the mechanical workshop. In two workshops, Pb (20.46 and 6.935 mg/g) was the most enriched metal in the PM2.5 samples, while in PM10, the concentration of Cu (27.76 and 31.80 mg/g) was the largest. The concentration of Cd was the least in both PM10 and PM2.5. Health risk assessment showed that the total hazard indexes for non-carcinogenic metal in PM2.5 monitored in mechanical and dismantling workshops and in the southeast of the workshops were 7.61, 3.01, and 1.57, respectively, all above the safety level. Furthermore, Pb (7.28 and 3.01) might possibly have a non-carcinogenic effect on the workers in two workshops, and the sequence of the hazard quotient (HQ) through the three exposure ways was ingestion > dermal contact > inhalation. The lifetime cancer risk of four targeted metals was Cr > Ni > Pb > Cd, which could be proven in all monitoring samples. This study aims to provide a large amount of valid data for the State Environmental Protection Department to develop relevant environmental standards and for companies to improve the waste television recycling system to be more efficiently and environmentally friendly.

  5. Hollow cathode apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A hollow cathode apparatus is described, which can be rapidly and reliably started. An ignitor positioned upstream from the hollow cathode, generates a puff of plasma that flows with the primary gas to be ionized through the cathode. The plasma puff creates a high voltage breakdown between the downstream end of the cathode and a keeper electrode, to heat the cathode to an electron-emitting temperature.

  6. Analysis of cathode geometry to minimize cathode erosion in direct current microplasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Causa, Federica; Ghezzi, Francesco; Caniello, Roberto; Grosso, Giovanni; Dellasega, David

    2012-12-15

    Microplasma jets are now widely used for deposition, etching, and materials processing. The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of cathode geometry on deposition quality, for microplasma jet deposition systems in low vacuum. The interest here is understanding the influence of hydrogen on sputtering and/or evaporation of the electrodes. Samples obtained with two cathode geometries with tapered and rectangular cross-sections have been investigated experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Samples obtained with a tapered-geometry cathode present heavy contamination, demonstrating cathode erosion, while samples obtained with a rectangular-cross-section cathode are free from contamination. These experimental characteristics were explained by modelling results showing a larger radial component of the electric field at the cathode inner wall of the tapered cathode. As a result, ion acceleration is larger, explaining the observed cathode erosion in this case. Results from the present investigation also show that the ratio of radial to axial field components is larger for the rectangular geometry case, thus, qualitatively explaining the presence of micro-hollow cathode discharge over a wide range of currents observed in this case. In the light of the above findings, the rectangular cathode geometry is considered to be more effective to achieve cleaner deposition.

  7. Analysis of cathode geometry to minimize cathode erosion in direct current microplasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Causa, Federica; Ghezzi, Francesco; Dellasega, David; Caniello, Roberto; Grosso, Giovanni

    2012-12-01

    Microplasma jets are now widely used for deposition, etching, and materials processing. The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of cathode geometry on deposition quality, for microplasma jet deposition systems in low vacuum. The interest here is understanding the influence of hydrogen on sputtering and/or evaporation of the electrodes. Samples obtained with two cathode geometries with tapered and rectangular cross-sections have been investigated experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Samples obtained with a tapered-geometry cathode present heavy contamination, demonstrating cathode erosion, while samples obtained with a rectangular-cross-section cathode are free from contamination. These experimental characteristics were explained by modelling results showing a larger radial component of the electric field at the cathode inner wall of the tapered cathode. As a result, ion acceleration is larger, explaining the observed cathode erosion in this case. Results from the present investigation also show that the ratio of radial to axial field components is larger for the rectangular geometry case, thus, qualitatively explaining the presence of micro-hollow cathode discharge over a wide range of currents observed in this case. In the light of the above findings, the rectangular cathode geometry is considered to be more effective to achieve cleaner deposition.

  8. The cathode plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suksila, Thada

    Since its invention at the University of Stuttgart, Germany in the mid-1960, scientists have been trying to understand and explain the mechanism of the plasma interaction inside the magnetoplasmadynamics (MPD) thruster. Because this thruster creates a larger level of efficiency than combustion thrusters, this MPD thruster is the primary cadidate thruster for a long duration (planetary) spacecraft. However, the complexity of this thruster make it difficult to fully understand the plasma interaction in an MPD thruster while operating the device. That is, there is a great deal of physics involved: the fluid dynamics, the electromagnetics, the plasma dynamics, and the thermodynamics. All of these physics must be included when an MPD thruster operates. In recent years, a computer simulation helped scientists to simulate the experiments by programing the physics theories and comparing the simulation results with the experimental data. Many MPD thruster simulations have been conducted: E. Niewood et al.[5], C. K. J. Hulston et al.[6], K. D. Goodfellow[3], J Rossignol et al.[7]. All of these MPD computer simulations helped the scientists to see how quickly the system responds to the new design parameters. For this work, a 1D MPD thruster simulation was developed to find the voltage drop between the cathode and the plasma regions. Also, the properties such as thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and heat capacity are temperature and pressure dependent. These two conductivity and heat capacity are usually definded as constant values in many other models. However, this 1D and 2D cylindrical symmetry MPD thruster simulations include both temperature and pressure effects to the electrical, thermal conductivities and heat capacity values interpolated from W. F. Ahtye [4]. Eventhough, the pressure effect is also significant; however, in this study the pressure at 66 Pa was set as a baseline. The 1D MPD thruster simulation includes the sheath region, which is the

  9. Nanotube cathodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  10. Cathodic protection

    SciTech Connect

    Pfalser, I.L.; Brannan, M.S.

    1991-08-20

    This patent describes a cathodic protection system for protecting a metallic structure in contact with the earth from corrosion. It comprises at least one electrically conductive member positioned in a borehole in the earth which is defined by an earthen sidewall: a quantity of a particulate mixture of a clay and a carbonaceous solid which at least partially fills the borehole around the at least one conductive member such that the mixture contacts the earthen sidewall and the at least one conductive member, wherein the mixture has a clay to carbonaceous solid weight ratio of at least about 0.1:1; means for applying a DC electrical voltage to the metallic structure and the at least one conductive member such that the metallic structure is at a negative polarity and the at least one conductive member is at a positive polarity, whereby a current is established between the metallic structure and the at least one conductive member through the earth and the mixture.

  11. X-ray computed tomography for virtually unrolling damaged papyri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegra, Dario; Ciliberto, Enrico; Ciliberto, Paolo; Petrillo, Giuseppe; Stanco, Filippo; Trombatore, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    The regular format for ancient works of literature was the papyrus roll. Recently many efforts to perform virtual restoration of this archeological artifact have been done. In fact the case of ancient rolled papyrus is very intriguing. Old papyruses are the substrates of very important historical information, probably being the use of papyrus dated to the Pre-Dynastic Period. Papyrus degradation is often very hard so that physical unrolling is sometime absolutely impossible. In this paper, authors describe their effort in setting a new virtual restoration methodology based on software manipulation of X-ray tomographic images. A realistic model, obtained by painting a hieroglyph inscription of Thutmosis III on a papyrus substrate made by the original method described by Plinius the Elder and by pigments and binders compatible with the Egyptian use (ochers with natural glue), was made for the X-ray investigation. A GE Optima 660 64 slice was used to obtain a stack of tomographic slices of the rolled model. Each slice appears as spiral. The intensity variations along the cross-sectional result from ink on the papyrus. The files were elaborated with original software, written by the use of MATLAB high-level language, and the final result was quite similar to the radiography of the physically unrolled sheet.

  12. HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING FOR THE STUDY OF EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE MATERIALS USING SYNCHROTRON X-RAY COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY.

    SciTech Connect

    FENG,H.; JONES,K.W.; MCGUIGAN,M.; SMITH,G.J.; SPILETIC,J.

    2001-10-12

    Synchrotron x-ray computed microtomography (CMT) is a non-destructive method for examination of rock, soil, and other types of samples studied in the earth and environmental sciences. The high x-ray intensities of the synchrotron source make possible the acquisition of tomographic volumes at a high rate that requires the application of high-performance computing techniques for data reconstruction to produce the three-dimensional volumes, for their visualization, and for data analysis. These problems are exacerbated by the need to share information between collaborators at widely separated locations over both local and tide-area networks. A summary of the CMT technique and examples of applications are given here together with a discussion of the applications of high-performance computing methods to improve the experimental techniques and analysis of the data.

  13. Computer program for diagnostic X-ray exposure conversion.

    PubMed

    Lewis, S

    1984-01-01

    Presented is a computer program designed to convert any given set of exposure factors sequentially into another, yielding either an equivalent photographic density or one increased or decreased by a specifiable proportion. In addition to containing the wherewithal with which to manipulate a set of exposure factors, the facility to print hard (paper) copy is included enabling the results to be pasted into a notebook and used at any time. This program was originally written as an investigative exercise into examining the potential use of computers for practical radiographic purposes as conventionally encountered. At the same time, its possible use as an educational tool was borne in mind. To these ends, the current version of this program may be used as a means whereby exposure factors used in a diagnostic department may be altered to suit a particular requirement or may be used in the school as a mathematical model to describe the behaviour of exposure factors under manipulation without patient exposure.

  14. Seven years of x-ray fluorescence computed microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simionovici, Alexandre S.; Golosio, Bruno; Chukalina, Marina V.; Somogyi, Andrea; Lemelle, Laurence

    2004-10-01

    Since 1998 we have developed X-Ray fluorescence tomography for microanalysis. All aspects were tackled starting with the reconstruction performed by FBP or ART methods. Self-absorption corrections were added and combined with Compton, transmission and fluorescence tomographies to obtain fully quantitative results. Automatic "smart scans" minimized overhead time scanning/aligning non-cylindrical objects. The scans were performed step-by-step or continuously with no overhead time. Focusing went from 5 to 1 micron range, using FZP or CRL lenses, and finally KB bent mirrors which yield sub-micron high intensity beams. Recently, we have performed the first quantitative 3D fluo-tomography by helical scanning. We are now studying energy dependent fluo-tomography for chemically-sensitive imaging of the internal structure of samples. This chronology yielded the present level of sophistication for both experiments and data treatment and finally a method ready for wide dissemination among scientists.

  15. X-ray luminescence computed tomography via selective excitation: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Pratx, Guillem; Carpenter, Colin M; Sun, Conroy; Xing, Lei

    2010-12-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) is proposed as a new molecular imaging modality based on the selective excitation and optical detection of X-ray-excitable phosphor nanoparticles. These nano-sized particles can be fabricated to emit near-infrared (NIR) light when excited with X-rays, and, because because both X-rays and NIR photons propagate long distances in tissue, they are particularly well suited for in vivo biomedical imaging. In XLCT, tomographic images are generated by irradiating the subject using a sequence of programmed X-ray beams, while sensitive photo-detectors measure the light diffusing out of the subject. By restricting the X-ray excitation to a single, narrow beam of radiation, the origin of the optical photons can be inferred regardless of where these photons were detected, and how many times they scattered in tissue. This study presents computer simulations exploring the feasibility of imaging small objects with XLCT, such as research animals. The accumulation of 50 nm phosphor nanoparticles in a 2-mm-diameter target can be detected and quantified with subpicomolar sensitivity using less than 1 cGy of radiation dose. Provided sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, the spatial resolution of the system can be made as high as needed by narrowing the beam aperture. In particular, 1 mm spatial resolution was achieved for a 1-mm-wide X-ray beam. By including an X-ray detector in the system, anatomical imaging is performed simultaneously with molecular imaging via standard X-ray computed tomography (CT). The molecular and anatomical images are spatially and temporally co-registered, and, if a single-pixel X-ray detector is used, they have matching spatial resolution.

  16. Temperature map computation for X-ray clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdin, H.; Sauvageot, J.-L.; Slezak, E.; Bijaoui, A.; Teyssier, R.

    2004-02-01

    Recent numerical simulations have shown that the variations of the gas temperature in clusters of galaxies are indicative of the dynamical state of these clusters. Maps of the temperature variation show complex structures with different shapes at different spatial scales, such as hot compression regions, filaments, cooling flows, or large-scale temperature profiles. A new multiscale spectro-imagery algorithm for restoring the spatial temperature variations within clusters of galaxies is presented here. It has been especially developed to work with the EPIC MOS1, MOS2 and PN spectro-imagers on board the XMM-Newton satellite. The temperature values are fitted to an emission model that includes the source, the cosmic X-ray background and cosmic-ray induced particle background. The spatial temperature variations are coded at different scales in the wavelet space using the Haar wavelet and denoised by thresholding the wavelet coefficients. Our local temperature estimator behaves asymptotically like an optimal mininum variance bound estimator. But it is highly sensitive to the instrumental and astrophysical backgrounds, so that a good knowledge of each component of the emission model is required. Our algorithm has been applied to a simulated 60 ks observation of a merging cluster at z =0.1. The cluster at different stages of merging has been provided by 3-D hydrodynamical simulations of structure formation (AMR). The multiscale approach has enabled us to restore the faint structures within the core of the merging subgroups where the gas emissivity is high, but also the temperature decrease at large scale in their external regions.

  17. X-ray acoustic computed tomography with pulsed x-ray beam from a medical linear accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Han, Bin; Carpenter, Colin; Pratx, Guillem; Kuang, Yu; Xing, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The feasibility of medical imaging using a medical linear accelerator to generate acoustic waves is investigated. This modality, x-ray acoustic computed tomography (XACT), has the potential to enable deeper tissue penetration in tissue than photoacoustic tomography via laser excitation. Methods: Short pulsed (μs-range) 10 MV x-ray beams with dose-rate of approximately 30 Gy/min were generated from a medical linear accelerator. The acoustic signals were collected with an ultrasound transducer (500 KHz central frequency) positioned around an object. The transducer, driven by a computer-controlled step motor to scan around the object, detected the resulting acoustic signals in the imaging plane at each scanning position. A pulse preamplifier, with a bandwidth of 20 KHz–2 MHz at −3 dB, and switchable gains of 40 and 60 dB, received the signals from the transducer and delivered the amplified signals to a secondary amplifier. The secondary amplifier had bandwidth of 20 KHz–30 MHz at −3 dB, and a gain range of 10–60 dB. Signals were recorded and averaged 128 times by an oscilloscope. A sampling rate of 100 MHz was used to record 2500 data points at each view angle. One set of data incorporated 200 positions as the receiver moved 360°. The x-ray generated acoustic image was then reconstructed with the filtered back projection algorithm. Results: The x-ray generated acoustic signals were detected from a lead rod embedded in a chicken breast tissue. The authors found that the acoustic signal was proportional to the x-ray dose deposition, with a correlation of 0.998. The two-dimensional XACT images of the lead rod embedded in chicken breast tissue were found to be in good agreement with the shape of the object. Conclusions: The first x-ray acoustic computed tomography image is presented. The new modality may be useful for a number of applications, such as providing the location of a fiducial, or monitoring x-ray dose distribution during radiation therapy

  18. Surface Characterization of the LCLS RF Gun Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Brachmann, Axel; Decker, Franz-Josef; Ding, Yuantao; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Frisch, Josef; Gilevich, Sasha; Hays, Gregory; Hering, Philippe; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Loos, Henrik; Miahnahri, Alan; Nordlund, Dennis; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Pianetta, Piero; Turner, James; Welch, James; White, William; Wu, Juhao; Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-06-25

    The first copper cathode installed in the LCLS RF gun was used during LCLS commissioning for more than a year. However, after high charge operation (> 500 pC), the cathode showed a decline of quantum efficiency within the area of drive laser illumination. They report results of SEM, XPS and XAS studies that were carried out on this cathode after it was removed from the gun. X-ray absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveal surface contamination by various hydrocarbon compounds. In addition they report on the performance of the second installed cathode with emphasis on the spatial distribution of electron emission.

  19. Analytical computation of the off-axis effective area of grazing incidence X-ray mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, D.; Cotroneo, V.; Basso, S.; Conconi, P.

    2009-10-01

    Aims: Focusing mirrors for X-ray telescopes in grazing incidence, introduced in the 70s, are characterized in terms of their performance by their imaging quality and effective area, which in turn determines their sensitivity. Even though the on-axis effective area is assumed in general to characterize the collecting power of an X-ray optic, the telescope capability of imaging extended X-ray sources is also determined by the variation in its effective area with the off-axis angle. The effective area, in general, decreases as the X-ray source moves off-axis, causing a loss of sensitivity in the peripheral regions of the telescope's field of view. Methods: The complex task of designing optics for future X-ray telescopes entails detailed computations of both imaging quality and effective area on- and off-axis. Because of their apparent complexity, both aspects have been, so far, treated by using ray-tracing routines aimed at simulating the interaction of X-ray photons with the reflecting surfaces of a given focusing system. Although this approach has been widely exploited and proven to be effective, it would also be attractive to regard the same problem from an analytical viewpoint, to assess an optical design of an X-ray optical module with a simpler calculation than a ray-tracing routine. This would also improve the efficiency of optimization tasks when designing the X-ray optical modules. In this paper, we thereby focused on developing analytical solutions to compute the off-axis effective area of double-reflection X-ray mirrors. Results: We have developed useful analytical formulae for the off-axis effective area of a double-reflection mirror in the double cone approximation, requiring only an integration and the standard routines to calculate the X-ray coating reflectivity for a given incidence angle. The computation is easily applicable also to Wolter-I mirrors (such as those of NeXT, NuSTAR, HEXIT-SAT, IXO) and the approximation improves as the f-number of the

  20. X-ray computed tomography for casting development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgeson, Gary E.; Crews, Alan R.; Bossi, Richard H.

    1992-09-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used to evaluate specific sand casting product examples for technical and economic benefits. The representative results are applicable to other casting technologies as well. CT has been shown to be cost effective in the development of new castings. The areas which would benefit include internal dimensional measurements (eliminating destructive sectioning), specific region inspections, flaw characterization in critical regions (to allow passing or informed repair of castings), and geometric acquisition for CAD/CAM. The quantitative capability of CT allows an engineering evaluation of castings based upon a correlation with performance. This quantitative measurement capability has also been used to measure the benefit of hot isostatic pressing in casting production. CT is also cost effective for engineering design and analysis by providing rapid geometry acquisition for input to computer aided design systems. This is particularly beneficial for components that do not have existing drawings or cannot be adequately defined until they are made for any reason. Presently CT can serve as an engineering aid to casting manufacturing. In order for CT evaluation to become routine in foundry applications, however, casting designers need to call it out as a measurement technique in the original casting design drawings, specifications on the application of CT must be written, contracts must include CT evaluation as a means for accepting casting quality, and lower cost CT systems must be available.

  1. A computer program to trace seismic ray distribution in complex two-dimensional geological models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yacoub, Nazieh K.; Scott, James H.

    1970-01-01

    A computer program has been developed to trace seismic rays and their amplitudes and energies through complex two-dimensional geological models, for which boundaries between elastic units are defined by a series of digitized X-, Y-coordinate values. Input data for the program includes problem identification, control parameters, model coordinates and elastic parameter for the elastic units. The program evaluates the partitioning of ray amplitude and energy at elastic boundaries, computes the total travel time, total travel distance and other parameters for rays arising at the earth's surface. Instructions are given for punching program control cards and data cards, and for arranging input card decks. An example of printer output for a simple problem is presented. The program is written in FORTRAN IV language. The listing of the program is shown in the Appendix, with an example output from a CDC-6600 computer.

  2. Optimization of X-ray tomography through a cooperative computing system in grid

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Moin Goraya, Major Singh

    2015-08-28

    Cooperative Computing implemented as Cooperative Computing System (CCS) in grid has been proved a considerably reliable technique to execute the tasks with real time constraints in a grid environment. This technique can be applied in many high performance distributed computing applications. HPC has a large number of applications in various fields of physics. One such application in radiation physics is X-ray tomography. X-Ray tomography contains numerous applications in various fields of science, technology and research. As the technology is changing from analog to digital in almost all the scenarios, this paper presents an idea towards the attachment of X-ray tomography assembly to HPC environment so as to obtain the highly reliable optimization.

  3. Recent Advances in Thermionic Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Miram, George; Collins, George; Falce, Louis R.

    2010-11-04

    The latest advances in thermionic cathodes, including scandate and controlled porosity reservoir cathodes, are reviewed. These new cathodes provide improved performance over conventional cathodes for many applications. Advantages and disadvantages are presented.

  4. Structure Determination Algorithms in Computational X-Ray Crystallography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Shi

    This dissertation focuses on the development and implementation of practical algorithms for solving the phase problem of X-ray crystallography. We based our strategies on the Shake-and-Bake method of structure determination which alternates phase refinement in reciprocal space with density modification in real space. The strategies we consider include variants of Shake-and-Bake which incorporate optimization techniques based on parameter shift, genetic algorithms, tangent formula, and one based on special properties of space group P1. These four approaches have been implemented on a variety of parallel and sequential machines, including a Thinking Machine Corporation CM-5, an Intel iPSC/860, and a network of SGI Indigo workstations. Experimental results show that the tangent formula approach is the most cost-effective means for solving structures of small size, while the parameter shift variant is better for medium -size or larger structures. The P1 approach appears to be promising for structures in certain space groups. We show that the tangent formula approach can be successfully applied to the CRAMBIN structure, which contains approximately 400 atoms in the asymmetric unit cell. This represents the first successful application of a tangent formula-based approach to solve the CRAMBIN structure.

  5. Spectrally resolving and scattering-compensated x-ray luminescence/fluorescence computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Wenxiang; Shen, Haiou; Wang, Ge

    2011-01-01

    The nanophosphors, or other similar materials, emit near-infrared (NIR) light upon x-ray excitation. They were designed as optical probes for in vivo visualization and analysis of molecular and cellular targets, pathways, and responses. Based on the previous work on x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) and x-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT), here we propose a spectrally-resolving and scattering-compensated x-ray luminescence/fluorescence computed tomography (SXLCT or SXFCT) approach to quantify a spatial distribution of nanophosphors (other similar materials or chemical elements) within a biological object. In this paper, the x-ray scattering is taken into account in the reconstruction algorithm. The NIR scattering is described in the diffusion approximation model. Then, x-ray excitations are applied with different spectra, and NIR signals are measured in a spectrally resolving fashion. Finally, a linear relationship is established between the nanophosphor distribution and measured NIR data using the finite element method and inverted using the compressive sensing technique. The numerical simulation results demonstrate the feasibility and merits of the proposed approach. PMID:21721815

  6. Realistic expression for full-parallax computer-generated holograms with the ray-tracing method.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Tsubasa; Yamaguchi, Kazuhiro; Sakamoto, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a calculation method of computer-generated holograms that involves removing the hidden surface and provides realistic rendering. The method was based on the ray-tracing method that simulates rays traveling paths. Rays are cast from every elementary hologram into virtual objects and then the traveling paths of the rays are determined. Since the method is considering intersection with objects, absorption, reflection, and refraction, the method is capable of rendering realistic images. Multiple reflections and refraction are expressed by casting additional rays into the reflection direction and the transmission direction and calculating the length of the light path. To express the quality of materials, the Phong reflection model and Cook-Torrance reflection model were used. Results of optical reconstructions show that the hidden surface removal was conducted. Moreover, the texture of material appeared as well as other effects by the proposed method.

  7. Cathodic protection -- Rectifier 46

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, W.M.

    1995-06-14

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the cathodic protection system functions as required by project criteria. The cathodic protection system is for the tank farms on the Hanford Reservation. The tank farms store radioactive waste.

  8. Cathodic protection -- Rectifier 47

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, W.M.

    1995-06-14

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the cathodic protection system functions as required by project criteria. The cathodic protection system is for the tank farms at the Hanford Reservation. The tank farms store radioactive waste.

  9. Sintered wire cathode

    DOEpatents

    Falce, Louis R.; Ives, R. Lawrence

    2009-06-09

    A porous cathode structure is fabricated from a plurality of wires which are placed in proximity to each other in elevated temperature and pressure for a sintering time. The sintering process produces the porous cathode structure which may be divided into a plurality of individual porous cathodes, one of which may be placed into a dispenser cathode support which includes a cavity for containing a work function reduction material such as BaO, CaO, and Al.sub.2O.sub.3. The work function reduction material migrates through the pores of the porous cathode from a work replenishment surface adjacent to the cavity of the dispenser cathode support to an emitting cathode surface, thereby providing a dispenser cathode which has a uniform work function and therefore a uniform electron emission.

  10. Computed radiography as a gamma ray detector—dose response and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, D. S.; McLeod, R. W.

    2004-08-01

    Computed radiography (CR) can be used for imaging the spatial distribution of photon emissions from radionuclides. Its wide dynamic range and good response to medium energy gamma rays reduces the need for long exposure times. Measurements of small doses can be performed without having to pre-sensitize the computed radiography plates via an x-ray exposure, as required with screen-film systems. Cassette-based Agfa MD30 and Kodak GP25 CR plates were used in applications involving the detection of gamma ray emissions from technetium-99m and iodine-131. Cassette entrance doses as small as 1 µGy (140 keV gamma rays) produce noisy images, but the images are suitable for applications such as the detection of breaks in radiation protection barriers. A consequence of the gamma ray sensitivity of CR plates is the possibility that some nuclear medicine patients may fog their x-rays if the x-ray is taken soon after their radiopharmaceutical injection. The investigation showed that such fogging is likely to be diffuse.

  11. Pressed boride cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolski, W.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental studies of emission cathodes made from lanthanum, yttrium, and gadolinium hexaborides are presented. Maximum thermal emission was obtained from lanthanum hexaboride electrodes. The hexaboride cathodes operated stably under conditions of large current density power draw, at high voltages and poor vacuum. A microtron electron gun with a lanthanum hexaboride cathode is described.

  12. Three-dimensional stereoscopic display using ray traced computer generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McOwan, P. W.; Hossack, W. J.; Burge, R. E.

    1991-04-01

    This paper presents a method of displaying a computer graphics rendered scence in three dimensions using the methods of computer generated holography. The display hologram is of the autostereoscopic type, comprising a series of perspective views of the scene concerned. The approach developed in this paper uses a ray tracing graphic rendering method to produce realistic shaded scenes. The scenes are encoded holographically and written at a directly usable size on a high resolution optical plotter.

  13. On Gamma Ray Instrument On-Board Data Processing Real-Time Computational Algorithm for Cosmic Ray Rejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Hunter, Stanley D.; Hanu, Andrei R.; Sheets, Teresa B.

    2016-01-01

    Richard O. Duda and Peter E. Hart of Stanford Research Institute in [1] described the recurring problem in computer image processing as the detection of straight lines in digitized images. The problem is to detect the presence of groups of collinear or almost collinear figure points. It is clear that the problem can be solved to any desired degree of accuracy by testing the lines formed by all pairs of points. However, the computation required for n=NxM points image is approximately proportional to n2 or O(n2), becoming prohibitive for large images or when data processing cadence time is in milliseconds. Rosenfeld in [2] described an ingenious method due to Hough [3] for replacing the original problem of finding collinear points by a mathematically equivalent problem of finding concurrent lines. This method involves transforming each of the figure points into a straight line in a parameter space. Hough chose to use the familiar slope-intercept parameters, and thus his parameter space was the two-dimensional slope-intercept plane. A parallel Hough transform running on multi-core processors was elaborated in [4]. There are many other proposed methods of solving a similar problem, such as sampling-up-the-ramp algorithm (SUTR) [5] and algorithms involving artificial swarm intelligence techniques [6]. However, all state-of-the-art algorithms lack in real time performance. Namely, they are slow for large images that require performance cadence of a few dozens of milliseconds (50ms). This problem arises in spaceflight applications such as near real-time analysis of gamma ray measurements contaminated by overwhelming amount of traces of cosmic rays (CR). Future spaceflight instruments such as the Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope instrument (AdEPT) [7-9] for cosmos gamma ray survey employ large detector readout planes registering multitudes of cosmic ray interference events and sparse science gamma ray event traces' projections. The AdEPT science of interest is in the

  14. Minimal-resource computer program for automatic generation of ocean wave ray or crest diagrams in shoaling waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.; Lecroy, S. R.; Morris, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program for studying linear ocean wave refraction is described. The program features random-access modular bathymetry data storage. Three bottom topography approximation techniques are available in the program which provide varying degrees of bathymetry data smoothing. Refraction diagrams are generated automatically and can be displayed graphically in three forms: Ray patterns with specified uniform deepwater ray density, ray patterns with controlled nearshore ray density, or crest patterns constructed by using a cubic polynomial to approximate crest segments between adjacent rays.

  15. Optimized Detector Angular Configuration Increases the Sensitivity of X-ray Fluorescence Computed Tomography (XFCT).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Moiz; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Fahrig, Rebecca; Xing, Lei

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we demonstrated that an optimized detector angular configuration based on the anisotropic energy distribution of background scattered X-rays improves X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) detection sensitivity. We built an XFCT imaging system composed of a bench-top fluoroscopy X-ray source, a CdTe X-ray detector, and a phantom motion stage. We imaged a 6.4-cm-diameter phantom containing different concentrations of gold solution and investigated the effect of detector angular configuration on XFCT image quality. Based on our previous theoretical study, three detector angles were considered. The X-ray fluorescence detector was first placed at 145 (°) (approximating back-scatter) to minimize scatter X-rays. XFCT image quality was compared to images acquired with the detector at 60 (°) (forward-scatter) and 90 (°) (side-scatter). The datasets for the three different detector positions were also combined to approximate an isotropically arranged detector. The sensitivity was optimized with detector in the 145 (°) back-scatter configuration counting the 78-keV gold Kβ1 X-rays. The improvement arose from the reduced energy of scattered X-ray at the 145 (°) position and the large energy separation from gold K β1 X-rays. The lowest detected concentration in this configuration was 2.5 mgAu/mL (or 0.25% Au with SNR = 4.3). This concentration could not be detected with the 60 (°) , 90 (°) , or isotropic configurations (SNRs = 1.3, 0, 2.3, respectively). XFCT imaging dose of 14 mGy was in the range of typical clinical X-ray CT imaging doses. To our knowledge, the sensitivity achieved in this experiment is the highest in any XFCT experiment using an ordinary bench-top X-ray source in a phantom larger than a mouse ( > 3 cm).

  16. Analytical computation of stray light in nested mirror modules for x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, Daniele

    2015-09-01

    Stray light in X-ray telescopes are a well-known issue. Unlike rays focused via a double reflection by usual grazing-incidence geometries such as the Wolter-I, stray rays coming from off-axis sources are reflected only once by either the parabolic or the hyperbolic segment. Although not focused, stray light may represent a major source of background and ghost images especially when observing a field of faint sources in the vicinities of another, more intense, just outside the field of view of the telescope. The stray light problem is faced by mounting a pre-collimator in front of the mirror module, in order to shade a part of the reflective surfaces that may give rise to singly-reflected rays. Studying the expected stray light impact, and consequently designing a pre-collimator, is a typical ray-tracing problem, usually time and computation consuming, especially if we consider that rays propagate throughout a densely nested structure. This in turn requires one to pay attention to all the possible obstructions, increasing the complexity of the simulation. In contrast, approaching the problems of stray light calculation from an analytical viewpoint largely simplifies the problem, and may also ease the task of designing an effective pre-collimator. In this work we expose an analytical formalism that can be used to compute the stray light in a nested optical module in a fast and effective way, accounting for obstruction effects.

  17. Computer-aided x-ray imaging system design and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Ciarcia, C.A.; Rupp, T.D.

    1988-01-01

    The use of x-ray imaging techniques, or radiography, as a diagnostic tool for scientific, industrial, and medical applications has increased appreciably in recent years. This increase is the result of new materials and state-of-the-art engineering techniques that have improved x-ray source design, shielding, and recording media. Radiography is now being used in many new applications where conventional optical photography traditionally has been limited or inappropriate. This new flexibility in x-ray imaging techniques has led to a broad latitude in the choice of radiographic system design that can be controlled to meet specific application needs. In many ways this design versatility is similar to that encountered when creating a specialized optical imaging system. Here image resolution and quality are optimized by undertaking analyses of geometrical parameters, ray-trace information, modulation transfer functions (MTFs), resolution grids, and image display or recording media, etc. This very flexibility in design, however, implies combining multiple components to create a complex system that contains many degrees of freedom. For conventional optical system design, this inherent complexity is overcome by using one of the computer design codes (for example, CODEV by Optical Research Associates). For the similar radiographic imaging problem, this paper discusses the x-ray image computer design code XRAD, which uses these same analysis techniques to optimize and predict the two-dimensional x-ray image of a three-dimensional object. 5 refs

  18. AXIS: A Computer’s Eye View of an X-Ray

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    accomplish this, the process of film reading is being automated. X-ray radiographs of actual shell are being analyzed and from this analysis computer ... algorithms are being developed to characterize both the digital image of the shell and anomalous points on the shell image. The system will be installed

  19. Computer simulations of the X-ray diffraction patterns of imperfect Al/Nb superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, J. R.; Liebemann, E.; Simon, M.; Bucher, E.

    In order to obtain more structural details from X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of metallic multilayers we developed a simulation program for XRD patterns of Al/Nb multilayers. We followed the theory of an imperfect one-dimensional superlattice described by Z. Mitura and P. Mikolajczak. Computer simulated patterns are compared with experimentally obtained XRD spectra.

  20. 3D chemical imaging in the laboratory by hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, C. K.; Jacques, S. D. M.; Wilson, M. D.; Veale, M. C.; Seller, P.; Beale, A. M.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Withers, P. J.; Cernik, R. J.

    2015-10-01

    We report the development of laboratory based hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography which allows the internal elemental chemistry of an object to be reconstructed and visualised in three dimensions. The method employs a spectroscopic X-ray imaging detector with sufficient energy resolution to distinguish individual elemental absorption edges. Elemental distributions can then be made by K-edge subtraction, or alternatively by voxel-wise spectral fitting to give relative atomic concentrations. We demonstrate its application to two material systems: studying the distribution of catalyst material on porous substrates for industrial scale chemical processing; and mapping of minerals and inclusion phases inside a mineralised ore sample. The method makes use of a standard laboratory X-ray source with measurement times similar to that required for conventional computed tomography.

  1. Simple load frame for in situ computed tomography and x-ray tomographic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Breunig, T.M. ); Stock, S.R.; Brown, R.C. )

    1993-05-01

    In many instances, the response of a sample to external stimuli must be observed repeatedly during the course of an experiment. The sequence in which features are formed is often critical to proper identification of the mechanisms operating, for example, in fatigue and fracture. Merely observing what is visible at the surface of the sample can be misleading or can provide inadequate information about what governs fatigue crack growth or about what controls the fracture process. X-ray imaging allows one to observe the interior of samples and is an attractive technique to use with in situ stressing of test specimens. Here, a simple compact, inexpensive load frame is described for in situ x-ray computed tomography and for very high resolution computed tomography, termed x-ray tomographic microscopy. The load frame is evaluated, and its use is illustrated by observations of crack closure as a function of load in a notched tensile sample of Al-Li-2090.

  2. 3D chemical imaging in the laboratory by hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Egan, C. K.; Jacques, S. D. M.; Wilson, M. D.; Veale, M. C.; Seller, P.; Beale, A. M.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Withers, P. J.; Cernik, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of laboratory based hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography which allows the internal elemental chemistry of an object to be reconstructed and visualised in three dimensions. The method employs a spectroscopic X-ray imaging detector with sufficient energy resolution to distinguish individual elemental absorption edges. Elemental distributions can then be made by K-edge subtraction, or alternatively by voxel-wise spectral fitting to give relative atomic concentrations. We demonstrate its application to two material systems: studying the distribution of catalyst material on porous substrates for industrial scale chemical processing; and mapping of minerals and inclusion phases inside a mineralised ore sample. The method makes use of a standard laboratory X-ray source with measurement times similar to that required for conventional computed tomography. PMID:26514938

  3. Lookup tables to compute high energy cosmic ray induced atmospheric ionization and changes in atmospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Atri, Dimitra; Melott, Adrian L.; Thomas, Brian C. E-mail: melott@ku.edu

    2010-05-01

    A variety of events such as gamma-ray bursts and supernovae may expose the Earth to an increased flux of high-energy cosmic rays, with potentially important effects on the biosphere. Existing atmospheric chemistry software does not have the capability of incorporating the effects of substantial cosmic ray flux above 10 GeV. An atmospheric code, the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (latitude, altitude) time-dependent atmospheric model (NGSFC), is used to study atmospheric chemistry changes. Using CORSIKA, we have created tables that can be used to compute high energy cosmic ray (10 GeV–1 PeV) induced atmospheric ionization and also, with the use of the NGSFC code, can be used to simulate the resulting atmospheric chemistry changes. We discuss the tables, their uses, weaknesses, and strengths.

  4. 4D in situ visualization of electrode morphology changes during accelerated degradation in fuel cells by X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Robin T.; Wu, Alex; Najm, Marina; Orfino, Francesco P.; Dutta, Monica; Kjeang, Erik

    2017-05-01

    A four-dimensional visualization approach, featuring three dimensions in space and one dimension in time, is proposed to study local electrode degradation effects during voltage cycling in fuel cells. Non-invasive in situ micro X-ray computed tomography (XCT) with a custom fuel cell fixture is utilized to track the same cathode catalyst layer domain throughout various degradation times from beginning-of-life (BOL) to end-of-life (EOL). With this unique approach, new information regarding damage features and trends are revealed, including crack propagation and catalyst layer thinning being quantified by means of image processing and analysis methods. Degradation heterogeneities as a result of local environmental variations under land and channel are also explored, with a higher structural degradation rate under channels being observed. Density and compositional changes resulting from carbon corrosion and catalyst layer collapse and thinning are observed by changes in relative X-ray attenuation from BOL to EOL, which also indicate possible vulnerable regions where crack initiation and propagation may occur. Electrochemical diagnostics and morphological features observed by micro-XCT are correlated by additionally collecting effective catalyst surface area, double layer capacitance, and polarization curves prior to imaging at various stages of degradation.

  5. Synchrotron Investigations of SOFC Cathode Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Idzerda, Yves

    2013-09-30

    The atomic variations occurring in cathode/electrolyte interface regions of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-δ} (LSCF) cathodes and other SOFC related materials have been investigated and characterized using soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and diffuse soft X-ray Resonant Scattering (XRS). X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in the soft X-ray region (soft XAS) is shown to be a sensitive technique to quantify the disruption that occurs and can be used to suggest a concrete mechanism for the degradation. For LSC, LSF, and LSCF films, a significant degradation mechanism is shown to be Sr out-diffusion. By using the XAS spectra of hexavalent Cr in SrCrO4 and trivalent Cr in Cr2O3, the driving factor for Sr segregation was identified to be the oxygen vacancy concentration at the anode and cathode side of of symmetric LSCF/GDC/LSCF heterostructures. This is direct evidence of vacancy induced cation diffusion and is shown to be a significant indicator of cathode/electrolyte interfacial degradation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to identify the occupation of the A-sites and B-sites for LSC, LSF, and LSCF cathodes doped with other transition metals, including doping induced migration of Sr to the anti-site for Sr, a significant cathode degradation indicator. By using spatially resolved valence mapping of Co, a complete picture of the surface electrochemistry can be determined. This is especially important in identifying degradation phenomena where the degradation is spatially localized to the extremities of the electrochemistry and not the average. For samples that have electrochemical parameters that are measured to be spatially uniform, the Co valence modifications were correlated to the effects of current density, overpotential, and humidity.

  6. [Hardware-software system for monitoring parameters and characteristics of X-ray computer tomographs under operation conditions].

    PubMed

    Blinov, N N; Zelikman, M I; Kruchinin, S A

    2007-01-01

    The results of testing of hardware and software for monitoring parameters (mean number of CT units, noise, field uniformity, high-contrast spatial resolution, layer width, dose) and characteristics (modulation transfer function) of X-ray computer tomographs are presented. The developed hardware and software are used to monitor the stability of X-ray computer tomograph parameters under operation conditions.

  7. Gold nanoparticles as contrast agents in x-ray imaging and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Cole, Lisa E; Ross, Ryan D; Tilley, Jennifer Mr; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Roeder, Ryan K

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography enables 3D anatomic imaging at a high spatial resolution, but requires delivery of an x-ray contrast agent to distinguish tissues with similar or low x-ray attenuation. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have gained recent attention as an x-ray contrast agent due to exhibiting a high x-ray attenuation, nontoxicity and facile synthesis and surface functionalization for colloidal stability and targeted delivery. Potential diagnostic applications include blood pool imaging, passive targeting and active targeting, where actively targeted AuNPs could enable molecular imaging by computed tomography. This article summarizes the current state of knowledge for AuNP x-ray contrast agents within a paradigm of key structure-property-function relationships in order to provide guidance for the design of AuNP contrast agents to meet the necessary functional requirements in a particular application. Functional requirements include delivery to the site of interest (e.g., blood, tumors or microcalcifications), nontoxicity during delivery and clearance, targeting or localization at the site of interest and contrast enhancement for the site of interest compared with surrounding tissues. Design is achieved by strategically controlling structural characteristics (composition, mass concentration, size, shape and surface functionalization) for optimized properties and functional performance. Examples from the literature are used to highlight current design trade-offs that exist between the different functional requirements.

  8. High Quality Image of Biomedical Object by X-ray Refraction Based Contrast Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, E.; Maksimenko, A.; Hirano, K.; Hyodo, K.; Sugiyama, H.; Shimao, D.; Nishino, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Yuasa, T.; Ichihara, S.; Arai, Y.; Ando, M.

    2007-01-19

    Recently we have developed a new Computed Tomography (CT) algorithm for refraction contrast that uses the optics of diffraction-enhanced imaging. We applied this new method to visualize soft tissue which is not visualized by the current absorption based contrast. The meaning of the contrast that appears in refraction-contrast X-ray CT images must be clarified from a biologic or anatomic point of view. It has been reported that the contrast is made with the specific gravity map with a range of approximately 10 {mu}arc sec. However, the relationship between the contrast and biologic or anatomic findings has not been investigated, to our knowledge. We compared refraction-contrast X-ray CT images with microscopic X-ray images, and we evaluated refractive indexes of pathologic lesions on phase-contrast X-ray CT images. We focused our attenuation of breast cancer and lung cancer as samples. X-ray refraction based Computed Tomography was appeared to be a pathological ability to depict the boundary between cancer nest and normal tissue, and inner structure of the disease.

  9. High Quality Image of Biomedical Object by X-ray Refraction Based Contrast Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, E.; Maksimenko, A.; Sugiyama, H.; Hirano, K.; Hyodo, K.; Shimao, D.; Nishino, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Yuasa, T.; Ichihara, S.; Arai, Y.; Ando, M.

    2007-01-01

    Recently we have developed a new Computed Tomography (CT) algorithm for refraction contrast that uses the optics of diffraction-enhanced imaging. We applied this new method to visualize soft tissue which is not visualized by the current absorption based contrast. The meaning of the contrast that appears in refraction-contrast X-ray CT images must be clarified from a biologic or anatomic point of view. It has been reported that the contrast is made with the specific gravity map with a range of approximately 10 μarc sec. However, the relationship between the contrast and biologic or anatomic findings has not been investigated, to our knowledge. We compared refraction-contrast X-ray CT images with microscopic X-ray images, and we evaluated refractive indexes of pathologic lesions on phase-contrast X-ray CT images. We focused our attenuation of breast cancer and lung cancer as samples. X-ray refraction based Computed Tomography was appeared to be a pathological ability to depict the boundary between cancer nest and normal tissue, and inner structure of the disease.

  10. BraX-Ray: an X-ray of the Brazilian computer science graduate programs.

    PubMed

    Digiampietri, Luciano A; Mena-Chalco, Jesús P; Vaz de Melo, Pedro O S; Malheiro, Ana P R; Meira, Dânia N O; Franco, Laryssa F; Oliveira, Leonardo B

    2014-01-01

    Research productivity assessment is increasingly relevant for allocation of research funds. On one hand, this assessment is challenging because it involves both qualitative and quantitative analysis of several characteristics, most of them subjective in nature. On the other hand, current tools and academic social networks make bibliometric data web-available to everyone for free. Those tools, especially when combined with other data, are able to create a rich environment from which information on research productivity can be extracted. In this context, our work aims at characterizing the Brazilian Computer Science graduate programs and the relationship among themselves. We (i) present views of the programs from different perspectives, (ii) rank the programs according to each perspective and a combination of them, (iii) show correlation between assessment metrics, (iv) discuss how programs relate to another, and (v) infer aspects that boost programs' research productivity. The results indicate that programs with a higher insertion in the coauthorship network topology also possess a higher research productivity between 2004 and 2009.

  11. Computational Methods for Nanoscale X-ray Computed Tomography Image Analysis of Fuel Cell and Battery Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arjun S.

    Over the last fifteen years, there has been a rapid growth in the use of high resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT) imaging in material science applications. We use it at nanoscale resolutions up to 50 nm (nano-CT) for key research problems in large scale operation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) and lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries in automotive applications. PEMFC are clean energy sources that electrochemically react with hydrogen gas to produce water and electricity. To reduce their costs, capturing their electrode nanostructure has become significant in modeling and optimizing their performance. For Li-ion batteries, a key challenge in increasing their scope for the automotive industry is Li metal dendrite growth. Li dendrites are structures of lithium with 100 nm features of interest that can grow chaotically within a battery and eventually lead to a short-circuit. HRXCT imaging is an effective diagnostics tool for such applications as it is a non-destructive method of capturing the 3D internal X-ray absorption coefficient of materials from a large series of 2D X-ray projections. Despite a recent push to use HRXCT for quantitative information on material samples, there is a relative dearth of computational tools in nano-CT image processing and analysis. Hence, we focus on developing computational methods for nano-CT image analysis of fuel cell and battery materials as required by the limitations in material samples and the imaging environment. The first problem we address is the segmentation of nano-CT Zernike phase contrast images. Nano-CT instruments are equipped with Zernike phase contrast optics to distinguish materials with a low difference in X-ray absorption coefficient by phase shifting the X-ray wave that is not diffracted by the sample. However, it creates image artifacts that hinder the use of traditional image segmentation techniques. To restore such images, we setup an inverse problem by modeling the X-ray phase contrast

  12. Hafnium-Based Contrast Agents for X-ray Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Berger, Markus; Bauser, Marcus; Frenzel, Thomas; Hilger, Christoph Stephan; Jost, Gregor; Lauria, Silvia; Morgenstern, Bernd; Neis, Christian; Pietsch, Hubertus; Sülzle, Detlev; Hegetschweiler, Kaspar

    2017-05-15

    Heavy-metal-based contrast agents (CAs) offer enhanced X-ray absorption for X-ray computed tomography (CT) compared to the currently used iodinated CAs. We report the discovery of new lanthanide and hafnium azainositol complexes and their optimization with respect to high water solubility and stability. Our efforts culminated in the synthesis of BAY-576, an uncharged hafnium complex with 3:2 stoichiometry and broken complex symmetry. The superior properties of this asymmetrically substituted hafnium CA were demonstrated by a CT angiography study in rabbits that revealed excellent signal contrast enhancement.

  13. Synchrotron-based X-ray computed tomography during compression loading of cellular materials

    DOE PAGES

    Cordes, Nikolaus L.; Henderson, Kevin; Stannard, Tyler; ...

    2015-04-29

    Three-dimensional X-ray computed tomography (CT) of in situ dynamic processes provides internal snapshot images as a function of time. Tomograms are mathematically reconstructed from a series of radiographs taken in rapid succession as the specimen is rotated in small angular increments. In addition to spatial resolution, temporal resolution is important. Thus temporal resolution indicates how close together in time two distinct tomograms can be acquired. Tomograms taken in rapid succession allow detailed analyses of internal processes that cannot be obtained by other means. This article describes the state-of-the-art for such measurements acquired using synchrotron radiation as the X-ray source.

  14. Synchrotron-based X-ray computed tomography during compression loading of cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, Nikolaus L.; Henderson, Kevin; Stannard, Tyler; Williams, Jason J.; Xiao, Xianghui; Robinson, Mathew W. C.; Schaedler, Tobias A.; Chawla, Nikhilesh; Patterson, Brian M.

    2015-04-29

    Three-dimensional X-ray computed tomography (CT) of in situ dynamic processes provides internal snapshot images as a function of time. Tomograms are mathematically reconstructed from a series of radiographs taken in rapid succession as the specimen is rotated in small angular increments. In addition to spatial resolution, temporal resolution is important. Thus temporal resolution indicates how close together in time two distinct tomograms can be acquired. Tomograms taken in rapid succession allow detailed analyses of internal processes that cannot be obtained by other means. This article describes the state-of-the-art for such measurements acquired using synchrotron radiation as the X-ray source.

  15. Nondestructive assay of TRU waste using gamma-ray active and passive computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, G.P.; Decman, D.; Martz, H.; Keto, E.R.; Johansson, E.M.

    1995-10-04

    The authors have developed an active and passive computed tomography (A and PCT) scanner for assaying radioactive waste drums. Here they describe the hardware components of their system and the software used for data acquisition, gamma-ray spectroscopy analysis, and image reconstruction. They have measured the performance of the system using ``mock`` waste drums and calibrated radioactive sources. They also describe the results of measurements using this system to assay a real TRU waste drum with relatively low Pu content. The results are compared with X-ray NDE studies of the same TRU waste drum as well as assay results from segmented gamma scanner (SGS) measurements.

  16. SAVLOC, computer program for automatic control and analysis of X-ray fluorescence experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    A program for a PDP-15 computer is presented which provides for control and analysis of trace element determinations by using X-ray fluorescence. The program simultaneously handles data accumulation for one sample and analysis of data from previous samples. Data accumulation consists of sample changing, timing, and data storage. Analysis requires the locating of peaks in X-ray spectra, determination of intensities of peaks, identification of origins of peaks, and determination of a real density of the element responsible for each peak. The program may be run in either a manual (supervised) mode or an automatic (unsupervised) mode.

  17. Measuring the efficacy of a root biobarrier with x-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Tollner, E.W.; Murphy, C.E. Jr. . Dept. of Agricultural Engineering)

    1990-08-16

    X-ray computed tomography is a useful tool for investigating soil physical properties nondestructively. There is a need to develop proper calibration relationships between soil properties and the x-ray absorption coefficient. The objective of the work was to evaluate soil factors affecting the x-ray absorption coefficient. Based on a theoretical analysis, experimental data from five soils and on results of several other investigators, it was concluded that for many applications, one calibration relationship is applicable to a wide range of soils. The montmorillinitic clay used in the study required special handling due to the extreme shrinkage of this soil upon drying. Knowledge of chemical composition enables approximations but not exact predictions of the x-ray absorption coefficient. The results suggested some reasonable alternative to exhaustive calibration for each anticipated soil condition. Quantification of root activity in terms of root growth and indirectly through water uptake is necessary for understanding plant growth dynamics. X-ray computed tomography (CT) enables qualitative as well as two quantitative outputs, one of which can lead to conclusions regarding root activity. A greenhouse study involving soil columns (Lakeland sand, bulk density 1.4 Mg/m{sup 3}) planted to soybean, Bahiagras, and control (no vegetation) was conducted in 1989. A treflan based on chemical barrier was placed in half of the soil column of each species. The mean x-ray absorption correlated to water content. Results suggested that root presence can also be indirectly inferred based on water content drawn down during planned stress events. It was concluded that x-ray CT may have a niche in soil-water-plant relation studies, particularly when plant species have large roots. 35 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Building a Unified Computational Model for the Resonant X-Ray Scattering of Strongly Correlated Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bansil, Arun

    2016-12-01

    Basic-Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy (BES/DOE) has made large investments in x-ray sources in the U.S. (NSLS-II, LCLS, NGLS, ALS, APS) as powerful enabling tools for opening up unprecedented new opportunities for exploring properties of matter at various length and time scales. The coming online of the pulsed photon source, literally allows us to see and follow the dynamics of processes in materials at their natural timescales. There is an urgent need therefore to develop theoretical methodologies and computational models for understanding how x-rays interact with matter and the related spectroscopies of materials. The present project addressed aspects of this grand challenge of X-ray science. In particular, our Collaborative Research Team (CRT) focused on understanding and modeling of elastic and inelastic resonant X-ray scattering processes. We worked to unify the three different computational approaches currently used for modeling X-ray scattering—density functional theory, dynamical mean-field theory, and small-cluster exact diagonalization—to achieve a more realistic material-specific picture of the interaction between X-rays and complex matter. To achieve a convergence in the interpretation and to maximize complementary aspects of different theoretical methods, we concentrated on the cuprates, where most experiments have been performed. Our team included both US and international researchers and it fostered new collaborations between researchers currently working with different approaches. In addition, we developed close relationships with experimental groups working in the area at various synchrotron facilities in the US. Our CRT thus helped toward enabling the US to assume a leadership role in the theoretical development of the field, and to create a global network and community of scholars dedicated to X-ray scattering research.

  19. Analysis of reservoir properties based on X-ray computed tomography of sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadyrov, Rail

    2017-04-01

    Modern methods of oil fields developing require drilling with coring, but the cost of such operations is very high. In contrast, sludge drilling allows reducing the cost of the work more than two times. Core is used for the standard geological and technical research, especially it is important for definition of porosity and permeability. However, the same result can be achieved using X-ray computed tomography of sludge. In the course of the research, experiments on the comparison of porosity achieved by standard method of liquid saturation and X-Ray computed tomography in different resolutions were done. The best porosity representation scales depends on rock type and its minimal permeable for liquid pore size. It is shown that the porosity of the sample is due to matrix porosity generally. Another problem solved in the research was a destruction of strongly fractured, friable and fine lithotypes in a well and crumbling of drilled rocks. Statistical analysis of geometrical properties of porous space, such as multifractal parameters, allowed distinguishing the samples from different levels. The same pores are responsible for permeability in the investigated range 100-10 μm, regardless to the observation scale. Permeability was computed using digital 3D models and correlated with data obtained by water permeability testing system. Thus, the technology of reservoir properties analysis based on X-Ray computed tomography of sludge was developed.

  20. Development of spray coated cathodes for RITS-6.

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Sean; Leckbee, Joshua J.; Miller, Stephen Samuel

    2013-09-01

    This report documents work conducted in FY13 to conduct a feasibility study on thermal spray coated cathodes to be used in the RITS-6 accelerator in an attempt to improve surface uniformity and repeatability. Currently, the cathodes are coated with colloidal silver by means of painting by hand. It is believed that improving the cathode coating process could simplify experimental setup and improve flash x-ray radiographic performance. This report documents the experimental setup and summarizes the results of our feasibility study. Lastly, it describes the path forward and potential challenges that must be overcome in order to improve the process for creating uniform and repeatable silver coatings for cathodes.

  1. Eigenvector decomposition of full-spectrum x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Brian J; Lalush, David S

    2012-03-07

    Energy-discriminated x-ray computed tomography (CT) data were projected onto a set of basis functions to suppress the noise in filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstructions. The x-ray CT data were acquired using a novel x-ray system which incorporated a single-pixel photon-counting x-ray detector to measure the x-ray spectrum for each projection ray. A matrix of the spectral response of different materials was decomposed using eigenvalue decomposition to form the basis functions. Projection of FBP onto basis functions created a de facto image segmentation of multiple contrast agents. Final reconstructions showed significant noise suppression while preserving important energy-axis data. The noise suppression was demonstrated by a marked improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) along the energy axis for multiple regions of interest in the reconstructed images. Basis functions used on a more coarsely sampled energy axis still showed an improved SNR. We conclude that the noise-resolution trade off along the energy axis was significantly improved using the eigenvalue decomposition basis functions.

  2. Energy-Discriminating Gadolinium K-Edge X-ray Computed Tomography System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Sato, Eiichi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Nagao, Jiro; Abderyim, Purkhet; AIzawa, Katsuo; Hitomi, Keitaro; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ogawa, Akira; Takahashi, Kiyomi; Sato, Shigehiro; Onagawa, Jun

    2010-02-01

    An energy-discriminating K-edge X-ray computed tomography (CT) system is useful for increasing the contrast resolution of a target region utilizing contrast media and for reducing the absorbed dose for patients. The CT system is of the first-generation type of detector using cadmium telluride (CdTe). CT is performed by repeated translations and rotations of an object. Penetrating X-ray photons from the object are detected by a CdTe detector, and event signals of X-ray photons are produced using charge-sensitive and shaping amplifiers. Both photon energy and energy width are selected out using a multichannel analyzer, and the number of photons is counted by a countercard. To perform energy discrimination, a low-dose-rate X-ray generator for photon counting was developed. Its maximum tube voltage and minimum tube current were 110 kV and 1 µA, respectively. In energy-discriminating CT, the tube voltage and tube current were 100 kV and 20 µA, respectively, and the X-ray intensity was 2.98 µGy/s at a distance of 1.0 m from the source and a tube voltage of 100 kV. The demonstration of enhanced gadolinium K-edge X-ray CT was carried out by selecting photons with energies just beyond the gadolinium K-edge energy of 50.3 keV.

  3. Energy-Discriminating Gadolinium K-Edge X-ray Computed Tomography System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroshi Matsukiyo,; Manabu Watanabe,; Eiichi Sato,; Akihiro Osawa,; Toshiyuki Enomoto,; Jiro Nagao,; Purkhet Abderyim,; Katsuo AIzawa,; Keitaro Hitomi,; Etsuro Tanaka,; Hidezo Mori,; Toshiaki Kawai,; Akira Ogawa,; Kiyomi Takahashi,; Shigehiro Sato,; Jun Onagawa,

    2010-02-01

    An energy-discriminating K-edge X-ray computed tomography (CT) system is useful for increasing the contrast resolution of a target region utilizing contrast media and for reducing the absorbed dose for patients. The CT system is of the first-generation type of detector using cadmium telluride (CdTe). CT is performed by repeated translations and rotations of an object. Penetrating X-ray photons from the object are detected by a CdTe detector, and event signals of X-ray photons are produced using charge-sensitive and shaping amplifiers. Both photon energy and energy width are selected out using a multichannel analyzer, and the number of photons is counted by a countercard. To perform energy discrimination, a low-dose-rate X-ray generator for photon counting was developed. Its maximum tube voltage and minimum tube current were 110 kV and 1 μA, respectively. In energy-discriminating CT, the tube voltage and tube current were 100 kV and 20 μA, respectively, and the X-ray intensity was 2.98 μGy/s at a distance of 1.0 m from the source and a tube voltage of 100 kV. The demonstration of enhanced gadolinium K-edge X-ray CT was carried out by selecting photons with energies just beyond the gadolinium K-edge energy of 50.3 keV.

  4. Full parallax computer generated hologram using GPU-accelerated ray tracing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Tsubasa; Sakamoto, Yuji

    2012-03-01

    In Computer Generated Hologram (CGH), the hidden surface removal is needed to display 3D objects. Some methods of the hidden surface removal for a CGH have been proposed. However, these methods are unsuitable to make realistic images that have the complicated reflection, refraction and shadowing. We propose a calculation method of CGH using the ray tracing method. In the ray tracing method, complicated descriptions are expressed with a simple algorithm. The ray tracing method is avoided ever in CGH having a very high resolution because of enormous calculation cost. In order to speed up, we attained improvement of the calculation time using a graphics processing unit (GPU). The ray tracing from one viewpoint is unable to express full parallax CGHs. In this study, a hologram plane is divided into elementary holograms, and the center of each elementary hologram is made the starting point of the ray. Then, sets of point light every elementary hologram are constructed by the ray tracing method. As a result of optical reconstruction, it was confirmed that hidden surface removal was conducted when plural objects were in one scene. Moreover the texture of material and shadows by a front object were expressed.

  5. Operando 3D Visualization of Migration and Degradation of a Platinum Cathode Catalyst in a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hirosuke; Ishiguro, Nozomu; Uruga, Tomoya; Sekizawa, Oki; Higashi, Kotaro; Maejima, Naoyuki; Tada, Mizuki

    2017-08-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) distribution and oxidation state of a Pt cathode catalyst in a practical membrane electrode assembly (MEA) were visualized in a practical polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) under fuel-cell operating conditions. Operando 3D computed-tomography imaging with X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy (CT-XANES) clearly revealed the heterogeneous migration and degradation of Pt cathode catalyst in an MEA during accelerated degradation test (ADT) of PEFC. The degradative Pt migration proceeded over the entire cathode catalyst layer and spread to MEA depth direction into the Nafion membrane. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Virtual Cathode Oscillator Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    emission region then con- sists of an array of fibers perpendicular to a conducting cathode surface . A surface flashover along the individual fibers...acts like the Corona electron source developed by Helionetics13 for laser pre-ioniza- tion. The axial surface flashover mechanism is more desirable than...the conventional cold cathode emission process, because production of plasma in this manner inhibits the formation of surface cathode spots. 7 75

  7. Accelerating statistical image reconstruction algorithms for fan-beam x-ray CT using cloud computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Somesh; Rao, A. Ravishankar; Sheinin, Vadim

    2011-03-01

    Statistical image reconstruction algorithms potentially offer many advantages to x-ray computed tomography (CT), e.g. lower radiation dose. But, their adoption in practical CT scanners requires extra computation power, which is traditionally provided by incorporating additional computing hardware (e.g. CPU-clusters, GPUs, FPGAs etc.) into a scanner. An alternative solution is to access the required computation power over the internet from a cloud computing service, which is orders-of-magnitude more cost-effective. This is because users only pay a small pay-as-you-go fee for the computation resources used (i.e. CPU time, storage etc.), and completely avoid purchase, maintenance and upgrade costs. In this paper, we investigate the benefits and shortcomings of using cloud computing for statistical image reconstruction. We parallelized the most time-consuming parts of our application, the forward and back projectors, using MapReduce, the standard parallelization library on clouds. From preliminary investigations, we found that a large speedup is possible at a very low cost. But, communication overheads inside MapReduce can limit the maximum speedup, and a better MapReduce implementation might become necessary in the future. All the experiments for this paper, including development and testing, were completed on the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) for less than $20.

  8. Toward robotic x-ray vision: new directions for computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.

    1985-12-01

    With the advent of industrial computed tomography (CT or reconstruction from projections), which is of much wider scope than medical CT, the basic mathematical and physical assumptions need to be reconsidered. This paper considers the ramifications of the indeterminacy theorem and the undetermined nature of the reconstruction equations. A search for truth rather than honesty in their solution is suggested. The use of steered microbeams, CT with few photons, multimedia CT, and the CT of soft (deformable) objects are discussed. The latter subject suggests that CT should become amalgamated with finite element analysis and computer-aided design. The computational load of 3-D robotic x-ray vision may require fifth-generation computers.

  9. A computation method of dual-energy x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Xuanqin; Tang, Shaojie; Hong, Wei

    2006-03-01

    Dual-energy X-ray imaging is an important method of medical imaging, capable of not only obtaining spatial information of imaging object but also disclosing its chemical components, and has many applications in clinic. The current computation methods of dual-energy imaging are still based on the model of mono-energy spectrum imaging with some linear calibration, while they are incapable to reflect correctly the physical characteristics of dual-energy imaging and obstruct deeper research in this field. The article presents a new medical X-ray imaging model in accordance with physics of imaging and its corresponding computational method. The computation process includes two steps: first, to compute two attenuation parameters that have clear physical meaning: equivalent electron density and attenuation parameter of photoemission; then to compute the components of high- and low-density mass through a group of simple equation with two variables. Experiments showed that such method has quite a satisfactory precision in theory, that is, the solutions of parameters under different exposure voltages and thickness of tissue for several main tissues of human body are much low in deviations, whose quotient of standard deviation divided by mean are mostly under 0.1%, and at most 0.32%. The method provides not only a new computational way for dual-energy X-ray imaging, but also a feasible analysis for its nature. In addition, the method can be used to linearly rectify data of dual-energy CT and analyze the chemical component of reconstructed object by means of parameters clear in physics.

  10. Monochromatic x-ray generator utilizing angle dependence of bremsstrahlung x-ray distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Inoue, Takashi; Ogawa, Akira; Ichimaru, Toshio; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki

    2005-08-01

    This generator consists of the following components: a constant high-voltage power supply, a filament power supply, a turbomolecular pump, and an x-ray tube. The x-ray tube is a demountable diode which is connected to the turbomolecular pump and consists of the following major devices: a molybdenum rod target, a tungsten hairpin cathode (filament), a focusing (Wehnelt) electrode, a polyethylene terephthalate x-ray window 0.25 mm in thickness, and a stainless-steel tube body. In the x-ray tube, the positive high voltage is applied to the anode (target) electrode, and the cathode is connected to the tube body (ground potential). In this experiment, the tube voltage applied was from 22 to 36 kV, and the tube current was regulated to within 100 μA by the filament temperature. The exposure time is controlled in order to obtain optimum x-ray intensity. The electron beams from the cathode are converged to the target by the focusing electrode, and clean Kα rays are produced through the focusing electrode using a 20-μm-thick zirconium filter. The x-ray intensity was 12.1 μGy/s at 1.0 m from the x-ray source with a tube voltage of 30 kV and a tube current of 100 μA, and monochromatic radiography was performed using a computed radiography system.

  11. Characteristic X-ray Generator Utilizing Angle Dependence of Bremsstrahlung X-ray Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Inoue, Takashi; Ogawa, Akira; Sato, Shigehiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Onagawa, Jun

    2006-04-01

    This generator consists of the following components: a constant high-voltage power supply, a filament power supply, a turbomolecular pump, and an X-ray tube. The X-ray tube is a demountable diode which is connected to the turbomolecular pump and consists of the following major devices: a molybdenum rod target, a tungsten hairpin cathode (filament), a focusing (Wehnelt) electrode, a polyethylene terephthalate X-ray window 0.25 mm in thickness, and a stainless-steel tube body. In the X-ray tube, the positive high voltage is applied to the anode (target) electrode, and the cathode is connected to the tube body (ground potential). In this experiment, the tube voltage applied was from 22 to 36 kV, and the tube current was regulated to within 100 μA by the filament temperature. The exposure time is controlled in order to obtain optimum X-ray intensity. The electron beams from the cathode are converged to the target by the focusing electrode, and clean K-series characteristic X-rays are produced through the focusing electrode without using a filter. The X-ray intensity was 26.6 μGy/s at 1.0 m from the X-ray source with a tube voltage of 30 kV and a tube current of 100 μA, and quasi-monochromatic radiography was performed using a computed radiography system.

  12. Composition and growth behavior of the surface and electrolyte decomposition layer of/on a commercial lithium ion battery LixNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 cathode determined by sputter depth profile X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Niehoff, Philip; Winter, Martin

    2013-12-23

    A detailed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of the surface and electrolyte decomposition layer of a LixNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 (NMC) cathode from commercial NMC/graphite cells by intense sputter depth profiling (SDP) using a polyatomic ion gun is provided. Cathodes of a cell after electrochemical formation and a cell at a state of initial capacity (SOIC) of 80%, which was reached after 2500 full cycles at 30 °C, are investigated.

  13. Optimized blind gamma-ray pulsar searches at fixed computing budget

    SciTech Connect

    Pletsch, Holger J.; Clark, Colin J.

    2014-11-01

    The sensitivity of blind gamma-ray pulsar searches in multiple years worth of photon data, as from the Fermi LAT, is primarily limited by the finite computational resources available. Addressing this 'needle in a haystack' problem, here we present methods for optimizing blind searches to achieve the highest sensitivity at fixed computing cost. For both coherent and semicoherent methods, we consider their statistical properties and study their search sensitivity under computational constraints. The results validate a multistage strategy, where the first stage scans the entire parameter space using an efficient semicoherent method and promising candidates are then refined through a fully coherent analysis. We also find that for the first stage of a blind search incoherent harmonic summing of powers is not worthwhile at fixed computing cost for typical gamma-ray pulsars. Further enhancing sensitivity, we present efficiency-improved interpolation techniques for the semicoherent search stage. Via realistic simulations we demonstrate that overall these optimizations can significantly lower the minimum detectable pulsed fraction by almost 50% at the same computational expense.

  14. Intrinsic Efficiency Calibration Considering Geometric Factors in Gamma-ray Computed Tomography for Radioactive Waste Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhe; Zhang, Li

    2015-07-01

    In radioactive waste assay with gamma-ray computed tomography, calibration for intrinsic efficiency of the system is important to the reconstruction of radioactivity distribution. Due to the geometric characteristics of the system, the non-uniformity of intrinsic efficiency for gamma-rays with different incident positions and directions are often un-negligible. Intrinsic efficiency curves versus geometric parameters of incident gamma-ray are obtained by Monte-Carlo simulation, and two intrinsic efficiency models are suggested to characterize the intrinsic efficiency determined by relative source-detector position and system geometry in the system matrix. Monte-Carlo simulation is performed to compare the different intrinsic efficiency models. Better reconstruction results of radioactivity distribution are achieved by both suggested models than by the uniform intrinsic efficiency model. And compared to model based on detector position, model based on point response increases reconstruction accuracy as well as complexity and time of calculation. (authors)

  15. Observations on the Performance of X-Ray Computed Tomography for Dimensional Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, H. C.; Brown, S. B.; Robson, S.; Speller, R. D.; McCarthy, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT) is a rising technology within many industries and sectors with a demand for dimensional metrology, defect, void analysis and reverse engineering. There are many variables that can affect the dimensional metrology of objects imaged using XCT, this paper focusses on the effects of beam hardening due to the orientation of the workpiece, in this case a holeplate, and the volume of material the X-rays travel through. Measurements discussed include unidirectional and bidirectional dimensions, radii of cylinders, fit point deviations of the fitted shapes and cylindricity. Results indicate that accuracy and precision of these dimensional measurements are affected in varying amounts, both by the amount of material the X-rays have travelled through and the orientation of the object.

  16. Real time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials from HPGe gamma-ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Howard, Douglas E.; Wong, James L.; Jessup, James L.; Bianchini, Greg M.; Miller, Wayne O.

    2007-10-23

    A real-time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials which collects gamma count rates from a HPGe gamma-radiation detector to produce a high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum. A library of nuclear material definitions ("library definitions") is provided, with each uniquely associated with a nuclide or isotope material and each comprising at least one logic condition associated with a spectral parameter of a gamma-ray energy spectrum. The method determines whether the spectral parameters of said high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum satisfy all the logic conditions of any one of the library definitions, and subsequently uniquely identifies the material type as that nuclide or isotope material associated with the satisfied library definition. The method is iteratively repeated to update the spectrum and identification in real time.

  17. Metal artifact removal (MAR) analysis for the security inspections using the X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyo Sung; Woo, Tae Ho; Park, Chul Kyu

    2016-10-01

    Using the metal artifact property, it is analyzed for the X-ray computed tomography (CT) in the aspect of the security on the examined places like airport and surveillance areas. Since the importance of terror prevention strategy has been increased, the security application of X-ray CT has the significant remark. One shot X-ray image has the limitation to find out the exact shape to property in the closed box, which could be solved by the CT scanning without the tearing off the box in this work. Cleaner images can be obtained by the advanced technology if the CT scanning is utilized in the security purposes on the secured areas. A metal sample is treated by the metal artifact removal (MAR) method for the enhanced image. The mimicked explosive is experimented for the imaging processing application where the cleaner one is obtained. The procedure is explained and the further study is discussed.

  18. The analysis of high spatial resolution UV and X-ray images by computational modeling. [coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesecky, J. F.; Antiochos, S. K.; Underwood, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Very high resolution stereoscopic images of high temperature loop structures observed at UV and X-ray wavelengths in the solar corona can be used to understand physical processes in the corona. An existing computational model is described and sample results are given to demonstrate that computational modeling of coronal structures can indeed take advantage of very high resolution images. The sample results include the run of temperature and number density along a typical loop and the variation of the differential emission measure with temperature. The integration of the differential emission measure with temperature along a column commensurate with an instrument's spatial resolution is the relevant parameter obtained from UV and X-ray observations. The effects of loop geometry and energy input are examined.

  19. Design, development and characterization of a novel neutron and x-ray combined computed tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Vaibhav

    Visualizing the three dimensional structure of objects (e.g. nuclear fuel, nuclear materials, explosives and bio materials) and phenomena (e.g. particle tracking) can be very important in nondestructive testing applications. Computed tomography systems are indispensable tools for these types of applications because they provide a versatile non-destructive technique for analysis. A novel neutron and X-ray combined computed tomography (NXCT) system has been designed and developed at the Missouri University of Science & Technology. The neutron and X-ray combined computed tomography system holds much promise for non-destructive material detection and analysis where multiple materials having similar atomic number and differing thermal cross section or vice versa may be present within an object, exclusive neutron or X-ray analysis may exhibit shortcomings in distinguishing interfaces. However, fusing neutron image and X-ray image offers the strengths of both and may provide a superior method of analysis. In addition, a feasible design of a sample positioning system which allows the user to remotely and automatically manipulate the objects makes the NXCT system viable for commercial applications. Moreover, characterization of the newly developed digital imaging system is imperative to the performance evaluation, as well as for describing the associated parameters. The performance of a combined neutron/X-ray digital imaging system was evaluated in terms of modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). This dissertation is a complete overview of the design of the NXCT system, operation, algorithms, performance evaluation and results.

  20. X-ray solution scattering combined with computation characterizing protein folds and multiple conformational states : computation and application.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.; Park, S.; Makowski, L.; Roux, B.

    2009-02-01

    Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is an increasingly powerful technique to characterize the structure of biomolecules in solution. We present a computational method for accurately and efficiently computing the solution scattering curve from a protein with dynamical fluctuations. The method is built upon a coarse-grained (CG) representation of the protein. This CG approach takes advantage of the low-resolution character of solution scattering. It allows rapid determination of the scattering pattern from conformations extracted from CG simulations to obtain scattering characterization of the protein conformational landscapes. Important elements incorporated in the method include an effective residue-based structure factor for each amino acid, an explicit treatment of the hydration layer at the surface of the protein, and an ensemble average of scattering from all accessible conformations to account for macromolecular flexibility. The CG model is calibrated and illustrated to accurately reproduce the experimental scattering curve of Hen egg white lysozyme. We then illustrate the computational method by calculating the solution scattering pattern of several representative protein folds and multiple conformational states. The results suggest that solution scattering data, when combined with a reliable computational method, have great potential for a better structural description of multi-domain complexes in different functional states, and for recognizing structural folds when sequence similarity to a protein of known structure is low. Possible applications of the method are discussed.

  1. X-ray computed tomography studies of gas storage and transport in Devonian shales

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, X.; Miao, P.; Watson, A.T. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Pepin, G.P.; Moss, R.M. ); Semmelbeck, M. )

    1994-07-01

    Devonian shales and other unconventional resources can be highly fractured and may have significant amounts of gas stored by adsorption. Conventional experiments are not well suited for characterizing the properties important for describing gas storage and transport in these media. Here, X-ray computed tomography scanning is used to determine gas storage in dynamic gas flow experiments on Devonian shale samples. Several important properties are obtained from these experiments, including fracture widths, adsorption isotherms, and matrix porosities and permeabilities.

  2. Microscale electromagnetic heating in heterogeneous energetic materials based on x-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kort-Kamp, W. J. M.; Cordes, N. L.; Ionita, A.; Glover, B. B.; Duque, A. L. Higginbotham; Perry, W. L.; Patterson, B. M.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Moore, D. S.

    2016-04-01

    Electromagnetic stimulation of energetic materials provides a noninvasive and nondestructive tool for detecting and identifying explosives. We combine structural information based on x-ray computed tomography, experimental dielectric data, and electromagnetic full-wave simulations to study microscale electromagnetic heating of realistic three-dimensional heterogeneous explosives. In conclusion, we analyze the formation of electromagnetic hot spots and thermal gradients in the explosive-binder mesostructures and compare the heating rate for various binder systems.

  3. X-Ray Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography Characterization of Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sain, J D; Brown, W D; Chinn, D J; Martz Jr., H E; Morales, K E; Schneberk, D J; Updike, E O

    2008-04-16

    The summary of this report is: (1) The Xradia Micro XCT and LLNL CCAT x-ray systems are used to nondestructively characterize a variety of materials, assemblies, and reference standard components; (2) The digital radiograph (DR) and computed tomography (CT) image data may be used for metrology, quality control, and defect detection; and (3) The ability to detect and characterize imperfections leads to improvements in the manufacturing processes for assemblies.

  4. Computational modelling of pixelated CdZnTe detectors for x- and γ- ray imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myronakis, M. E.; Zvelebil, M.; Darambara, D. G.

    2012-03-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors are currently used in medical imaging systems employing γ-ray photons. As new imaging techniques such as photon-counting and energy-weighted x-ray imaging are gaining research interest, CdZnTe is seen under a new light for potential use in computed tomography, tomosynthesis and other x-ray imaging applications. However, being relatively expensive, CdZnTe could be favoured by advanced computational modelling to assist in detector and imaging system optimisation. In this work, pixelated CdZnTe detectors are computationally modelled using an integrated framework that combines the Finite Element and Monte Carlo numerical methods to obtain realistic detector models.Various detector thickness and pixel sizes are designed and their performance is investigated in terms of charge induction efficiency, detection efficiency and energy resolution. Detection efficiency and energy resolution are assessed for monoenegergetic photon beams within the energy range used in medical x-ray imaging applications such as mammography and computed tomography. Some of the capabilities of the framework are demonstrated. Small pixel sizes, below 100μm are prone to charge transport effects such as diffusion, especially in larger thickness ( > 0.5 mm) and may have limited use in pixelated geometries. Detection efficiency is affected by fluorescence and photon escape as thickness and pixel size decrease. Energy resolution is affected by beam geometry and can vary from ~ 3% to 11% depending on the beam width. The framework provides a generic platform and a powerful tool that can be used in the design and optimisation of semiconductor detectors made from any semiconductor material, imaging systems and signal correction techniques.

  5. Accuracy and reproducibility in x-ray computed tomography polymer gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, E.; Hilts, M.; Heath, E.; Jirasek, A.

    2017-05-01

    This work assesses the overall reproducibility and accuracy of an x-ray computed tomography (CT) polymer gel dosimetry (PGD) system using a N-isopropyl-acrylamide (NIPAM) based polymer gel and investigated what effects the use of generic, inter-batch, and intra-batch gel calibration have on dosimetric and spatial accuracy. Overall excellent spatial and dosimetric accuracy was found with this system for generic, inter-batch calibration methods.

  6. Application of gamma-ray active and passive computed tomography to nondestructively assay TRU waste

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H.E.; Decman, D.J.; Roberson, G.P.; Johansson, E.M.; Keto, E.R.

    1996-05-01

    The authors have developed an active and passive computed tomography scanner for assaying radioactive waste drums. They describe the hardware and software components of the system used for data acquisition, gamma-ray spectroscopy analysis, and image reconstruction. They have measured the performance of the system using mock waste drums and calibrated radioactive sources. They describe the results of measurements using this system to assay a real TRU waste drum with relatively low Pu content.

  7. Microscale electromagnetic heating in heterogeneous energetic materials based on x-ray computed tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Kort-Kamp, W. J. M.; Cordes, N. L.; Ionita, A.; ...

    2016-04-01

    Electromagnetic stimulation of energetic materials provides a noninvasive and nondestructive tool for detecting and identifying explosives. We combine structural information based on x-ray computed tomography, experimental dielectric data, and electromagnetic full-wave simulations to study microscale electromagnetic heating of realistic three-dimensional heterogeneous explosives. In conclusion, we analyze the formation of electromagnetic hot spots and thermal gradients in the explosive-binder mesostructures and compare the heating rate for various binder systems.

  8. Monochromatic computed tomography with a compact laser-driven X-ray source

    PubMed Central

    Achterhold, K.; Bech, M.; Schleede, S.; Potdevin, G.; Ruth, R.; Loewen, R.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2013-01-01

    A laser-driven electron-storage ring can produce nearly monochromatic, tunable X-rays in the keV energy regime by inverse Compton scattering. The small footprint, relative low cost and excellent beam quality provide the prospect for valuable preclinical use in radiography and tomography. The monochromaticity of the beam prevents beam hardening effects that are a serious problem in quantitative determination of absorption coefficients. These values are important e.g. for osteoporosis risk assessment. Here, we report quantitative computed tomography (CT) measurements using a laser-driven compact electron-storage ring X-ray source. The experimental results obtained for quantitative CT measurements on mass absorption coefficients in a phantom sample are compared to results from a rotating anode X-ray tube generator at various peak voltages. The findings confirm that a laser-driven electron-storage ring X-ray source can indeed yield much higher CT image quality, particularly if quantitative aspects of computed tomographic imaging are considered. PMID:23425949

  9. X-ray computed tomography of packed bed chromatography columns for three dimensional imaging and analysis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, T F; Levison, P R; Shearing, P R; Bracewell, D G

    2017-03-03

    Physical characteristics critical to chromatography including geometric porosity and tortuosity within the packed column were analysed based upon three dimensional reconstructions of bed structure in-situ. Image acquisition was performed using two X-ray computed tomography systems, with optimisation of column imaging performed for each sample in order to produce three dimensional representations of packed beds at 3μm resolution. Two bead materials, cellulose and ceramic, were studied using the same optimisation strategy but resulted in differing parameters required for X-ray computed tomography image generation. After image reconstruction and processing into a digital three dimensional format, physical characteristics of each packed bed were analysed, including geometric porosity, tortuosity, surface area to volume ratio as well as inter-bead void diameters. Average porosities of 34.0% and 36.1% were found for ceramic and cellulose samples and average tortuosity readings at 1.40 and 1.79 respectively, with greater porosity and reduced tortuosity overall values at the centre compared to the column edges found in each case. X-ray computed tomography is demonstrated to be a viable method for three dimensional imaging of packed bed chromatography systems, enabling geometry based analysis of column axial and radial heterogeneity that is not feasible using traditional techniques for packing quality which provide an ensemble measure. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Image segmentation of nanoscale Zernike phase contrast X-ray computed tomography images

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Arjun S.; Mandal, Pratiti; Zhang, Yongjie; Litster, Shawn

    2015-05-14

    Zernike phase contrast is a useful technique for nanoscale X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging of materials with a low X-ray absorption coefficient. It enhances the image contrast by phase shifting X-ray waves to create changes in amplitude. However, it creates artifacts that hinder the use of traditional image segmentation techniques. We propose an image restoration method that models the X-ray phase contrast optics and the three-dimensional image reconstruction method. We generate artifact-free images through an optimization problem that inverts this model. Though similar approaches have been used for Zernike phase contrast in visible light microscopy, this optimization employs an effective edge detection method tailored to handle Zernike phase contrast artifacts. We characterize this optics-based restoration method by removing the artifacts in and thresholding multiple Zernike phase contrast X-ray CT images to produce segmented results that are consistent with the physical specimens. We quantitatively evaluate and compare our method to other segmentation techniques to demonstrate its high accuracy.

  11. Experimental validation of L-shell x-ray fluorescence computed tomography imaging: phantom study

    PubMed Central

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Ahmad, Moiz; Xing, Lei; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Thanks to the current advances in nanoscience, molecular biochemistry, and x-ray detector technology, x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) has been considered for molecular imaging of probes containing high atomic number elements, such as gold nanoparticles. The commonly used XFCT imaging performed with K-shell x rays appears to have insufficient imaging sensitivity to detect the low gold concentrations observed in small animal studies. Low energy fluorescence L-shell x rays have exhibited higher signal-to-background ratio and appeared as a promising XFCT mode with greatly enhanced sensitivity. The aim of this work was to experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of L-shell XFCT imaging and to assess its achievable sensitivity. We built an experimental L-shell XFCT imaging system consisting of a miniature x-ray tube and two spectrometers, a silicon drift detector (SDD), and a CdTe detector placed at ±120  deg with respect to the excitation beam. We imaged a 28-mm-diameter water phantom with 4-mm-diameter Eppendorf tubes containing gold solutions with concentrations of 0.06 to 0.1% Au. While all Au vials were detectable in the SDD L-shell XFCT image, none of the vials were visible in the CdTe L-shell XFCT image. The detectability limit of the presented L-shell XFCT SDD imaging setup was 0.007% Au, a concentration observed in small animal studies. PMID:26839910

  12. Experimental validation of L-shell x-ray fluorescence computed tomography imaging: phantom study.

    PubMed

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Ahmad, Moiz; Xing, Lei; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-10-01

    Thanks to the current advances in nanoscience, molecular biochemistry, and x-ray detector technology, x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) has been considered for molecular imaging of probes containing high atomic number elements, such as gold nanoparticles. The commonly used XFCT imaging performed with K-shell x rays appears to have insufficient imaging sensitivity to detect the low gold concentrations observed in small animal studies. Low energy fluorescence L-shell x rays have exhibited higher signal-to-background ratio and appeared as a promising XFCT mode with greatly enhanced sensitivity. The aim of this work was to experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of L-shell XFCT imaging and to assess its achievable sensitivity. We built an experimental L-shell XFCT imaging system consisting of a miniature x-ray tube and two spectrometers, a silicon drift detector (SDD), and a CdTe detector placed at [Formula: see text] with respect to the excitation beam. We imaged a 28-mm-diameter water phantom with 4-mm-diameter Eppendorf tubes containing gold solutions with concentrations of 0.06 to 0.1% Au. While all Au vials were detectable in the SDD L-shell XFCT image, none of the vials were visible in the CdTe L-shell XFCT image. The detectability limit of the presented L-shell XFCT SDD imaging setup was 0.007% Au, a concentration observed in small animal studies.

  13. Osteosarcoma follow-up: chest X-ray or computed tomography?

    PubMed

    Paioli, Anna; Rocca, Michele; Cevolani, Luca; Rimondi, Eugenio; Vanel, Daniel; Palmerini, Emanuela; Cesari, Marilena; Longhi, Alessandra; Eraldo, Abate Massimo; Marchesi, Emanuela; Picci, Piero; Ferrari, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    In patients with relapsed osteosarcoma, the surgical excision of all metastases, defined as second complete remission (CR-2), is the factor that mainly influences post-relapse survival (PRS). Currently a validated follow-up policy for osteosarcoma is not available, both chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT) are suggested for lung surveillance. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether the type of imaging technique used for chest surveillance, chest X-ray or CT, influenced the rate of CR-2 and prognosis in patients with recurrent osteosarcoma. Patients up to 40 years with extremity osteosarcoma enrolled in consecutive clinical trials and treated at the Rizzoli Institute from 1986 to 2009 were identified. Only patients who had lung metastases alone as first pattern of recurrence were considered for the analysis. The rate of CR-2, overall survival (OS) and PRS were the end-points of the study. The median follow-up was 47 months (1-300), 215 patients were eligible. Lung metastases were detected by chest X-ray in 100 (47%) patients, by CT in 112 (52%) and by symptoms in 3 (1%). CR-2 rate was 60% for patients followed by X-rays and 88% for those followed by CT (p < .0001). 5-year PRS was 30% (95% CI 21-39) in the X-ray group and 49% (95% CI 39-59) in the CT group (p = .0004). 5-year OS was 35% (95% CI 26-44) in the X-ray group and 60% (95% CI 51-70) in the CT group (p = .004). A follow-up strategy with chest CT leads to a higher rate of CR-2 and significantly improves PRS and OS in osteosarcoma, compared to chest X-ray.

  14. Thermal stability in the blended lithium manganese oxide – Lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide cathode materials: An in situ time-resolved X-Ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Enyuan; Bak, Seong Min; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Zhang, Lulu; Shao, Minhua

    2015-03-01

    Thermal stabilities of a series of blended LiMn2O4(LMO)-LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM) cathode materials with different weight ratios were studied by in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) combined with mass spectroscopy in the temperature range of 25°C-580°C under helium atmosphere. Upon heating, the electrochemically delithiated LMO changed into Mn3O4 phase at around 250°C. Formation of MnO with rocksalt structure started at 520°C. This observation is in contrast to the previous report for chemically delithiate LMO in air, in which a process of λ-MnO2 transforming to β-MnO2 was observed. Oxygen peak was not observed in all cases, presumably as a result of either consumption by the carbon or detection limit. CO2 profile correlates well with the phase transition and indirectly suggests the oxygen release of the cathode. Introducing NCM into LMO has two effects: first, it makes the high temperature rock-salt phase formation more complicated with more peaks in CO2 profile due to different MO (M = Ni, Mn, Co) phases; secondly, the onset temperature of CO2 release is lowered, implying lowered oxygen release temperature. Upon heating, XRD patterns indicate the NCM part reacts first, followed by the LMO part. This confirms the better thermal stability of LMO over NCM.

  15. Thermal stability in the blended lithium manganese oxide – Lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide cathode materials: An in situ time-resolved X-Ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy study

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Enyuan; Bak, Seong Min; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; ...

    2015-03-01

    Thermal stabilities of a series of blended LiMn2O4(LMO)-LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM) cathode materials with different weight ratios were studied by in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) combined with mass spectroscopy in the temperature range of 25°C-580°C under helium atmosphere. Upon heating, the electrochemically delithiated LMO changed into Mn3O4 phase at around 250°C. Formation of MnO with rocksalt structure started at 520°C. This observation is in contrast to the previous report for chemically delithiate LMO in air, in which a process of λ-MnO2 transforming to β-MnO2 was observed. Oxygen peak was not observed in all cases, presumably as a result of either consumptionmore » by the carbon or detection limit. CO2 profile correlates well with the phase transition and indirectly suggests the oxygen release of the cathode. Introducing NCM into LMO has two effects: first, it makes the high temperature rock-salt phase formation more complicated with more peaks in CO2 profile due to different MO (M = Ni, Mn, Co) phases; secondly, the onset temperature of CO2 release is lowered, implying lowered oxygen release temperature. Upon heating, XRD patterns indicate the NCM part reacts first, followed by the LMO part. This confirms the better thermal stability of LMO over NCM.« less

  16. High Speed Data Acquisition System for Three-Dimensional X-Ray and Neutron Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.W.; Claytor, T.N.; Sheats, M.J.

    1999-07-01

    Computed tomography for nondestructive evaluation applications has been limited by system cost, resolution, and time requirements for three-dimensional data sets. FlashCT (Flat panel Amorphous Silicon High-Resolution Computed Tomography) is a system developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to address these three problems. Developed around a flat panel amorphous silicon detector array, FlashCT is suitable for low to medium energy x-ray and neutron computed tomography at 127-micron resolution. Overall system size is small, allowing rapid transportation to a variety of radiographic sources. System control software was developed in LabVIEW for Windows NT to allow multithreading of data acquisition, data correction, and staging motor control. The system control software simplifies data collection and allows fully automated control of the data acquisition process, leading toward remote or unattended operation. The first generation of the FlashCT Data Acquisition System was completed in Au gust 1998, and since that time the system has been tested using x-ray sources ranging in energy from 60 kV to 20MV. The system has also been used to collect data for thermal neutron computed tomography at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). System improvements have been proposed to provide faster data collection and greater dynamic range during data collection.

  17. High-speed data acquisition for three-dimensional x-ray and neutron computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Anthony W.; Claytor, Thomas N.; Sheats, Matthew J.

    1999-09-01

    Computed tomography for nondestructive evaluation applications has been limited by system cost, resolution, and time requirements for three-dimensional data sets. FlashCT (Flat panel Amorphous Silicon High-Resolution Computed Tomography) is a system developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to address these three problems. Developed around a flat panel amorphous silicon detector array, FlashCT is suitable for low to medium energy x-ray and neutron computed tomography at 127- micron resolution. Overall system size is small, allowing rapid transportation to a variety of radiographic sources. System control software was developed in LabVIEW for Windows NT to allow multithreading of data acquisition, data correction, and staging motor control. The system control software simplifies data collection and allows fully automated control of the data acquisition process, leading toward remote or unattended operation. The first generation of the FlashCT Data Acquisition System was completed in August 1998, and since that time the system has been tested using x-ray sources ranging in energy from 60 kV to 20MV. The system has also been used to collect data for thermal neutron computed tomography at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). System improvements have been proposed to provide faster data collection and greater dynamic range during data collection.

  18. An Architectural Design System Based on Computer Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Stephen L.; Wehrli, Robert

    The recent developments in computer hardware and software are presented to inform architects of this design tool. Technical advancements in equipment include--(1) cathode ray tube displays, (2) light pens, (3) print-out and photo copying attachments, (4) controls for comparison and selection of images, (5) chording keyboards, (6) plotters, and (7)…

  19. It Is Worth Thoroughly Looking at the Computer Display

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Two useful observations are possible when thoroughly looking at the cathode-ray display of a computer. First, the structure of a color image is seen with a moderate magnification. Second, the decay of different phosphors corresponding to the red, green, and blue primary colors is observable with a photodiode and oscilloscope.

  20. It Is Worth Thoroughly Looking at the Computer Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-11-01

    Two useful observations are possible when thoroughly looking at the cathode-ray display of a computer. First, the structure of a color image is seen with a moderate magnification. Second, the decay of different phosphors corresponding to the red, green, and blue primary colors is observable with a photodiode and oscilloscope.

  1. It Is Worth Thoroughly Looking at the Computer Display

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Two useful observations are possible when thoroughly looking at the cathode-ray display of a computer. First, the structure of a color image is seen with a moderate magnification. Second, the decay of different phosphors corresponding to the red, green, and blue primary colors is observable with a photodiode and oscilloscope.

  2. High-resolution x-ray computed tomography to understand ruminant phylogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costeur, Loic; Schulz, Georg; Müller, Bert

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution X-ray computed tomography has become a vital technique to study fossils down to the true micrometer level. Paleontological research requires the non-destructive analysis of internal structures of fossil specimens. We show how X-ray computed tomography enables us to visualize the inner ear of extinct and extant ruminants without skull destruction. The inner ear, a sensory organ for hearing and balance has a rather complex three-dimensional morphology and thus provides relevant phylogenetical information what has been to date essentially shown in primates. We made visible the inner ears of a set of living and fossil ruminants using the phoenix x-ray nanotom®m (GE Sensing and Inspection Technologies GmbH). Because of the high absorbing objects a tungsten target was used and the experiments were performed with maximum accelerating voltage of 180 kV and a beam current of 30 μA. Possible stem ruminants of the living families are known in the fossil record but extreme morphological convergences in external structures such as teeth is a strong limitation to our understanding of the evolutionary history of this economically important group of animals. We thus investigate the inner ear to assess its phylogenetical potential for ruminants and our first results show strong family-level morphological differences.

  3. Computer simulations of X-ray six-beam diffraction in a perfect silicon crystal. II.

    PubMed

    Kohn, V G

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports computer simulations of X-ray six-beam (000, 220, 242, 044, -224, -202) diffraction in a perfect silicon crystal of large thickness where the super-transmission effect prevails, i.e. about 2 cm or more for an X-ray photon energy of 8 keV. Both the plane-wave angular dependence and the six-beam section topographs, which are obtained in experiments with a two-dimensional slit, are calculated. The angular dependence is computed by means of an eigenvalue problem in accordance with Ewald's theory. The section topographs are calculated by means of a fast Fourier transformation procedure from the angular to real space. It is shown that under the effect of X-ray super-transmission the quadrupole part of the photoelectric absorption as well as the Compton scattering give apparent contributions to the minimum absorption coefficient. Comparison of experimental and theoretical results by means of measuring the effective absorption coefficient is proposed. The section topographs for a thick crystal are asymmetric and polarization sensitive. These properties are explained through the angular dependence and the stationary phase method.

  4. Mcps-range photon-counting x-ray computed tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Abudurexiti, Abulajiang; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Sugimura, Shigeaki; Endo, Haruyuki; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2011-10-01

    10 Mcps photon counting was carried out using a detector consisting of a 2.0 mm-thick ZnO (zinc oxide) single-crystal scintillator and an MPPC (multipixel photon counter) module in an X-ray computed tomography (CT) system. The maximum count rate was 10 Mcps (mega counts per second) at a tube voltage of 70 kV and a tube current of 2.0 mA. Next, a photon-counting X-ray CT system consists of an X-ray generator, a turntable, a scan stage, a two-stage controller, the ZnO-MPPC detector, a counter card (CC), and a personal computer (PC). Tomography is accomplished by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object, and projection curves of the object are obtained by the linear scan with a scan velocity of 25 mm/s. The pulses of the event signal from the module are counted by the CC in conjunction with the PC. The exposure time for obtaining a tomogram was 600 s at a scan step of 0.5 mm and a rotation step of 1.0°, and photon-counting CT was accomplished using iodine-based contrast media.

  5. Optimal Contrast Agent Staining of Ligaments and Tendons for X-Ray Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Balint, Richard; Lowe, Tristan

    2016-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography has become an important tool for studying the microstructures of biological soft tissues, such as ligaments and tendons. Due to the low X-ray attenuation of such tissues, chemical contrast agents are often necessary to enhance contrast during scanning. In this article, the effects of using three different contrast agents—iodine potassium iodide solution, phosphotungstic acid and phosphomolybdic acid—are evaluated and compared. Porcine anterior cruciate ligaments, patellar tendons, medial collateral ligaments and lateral collateral ligaments were used as the basis of the study. Three samples of each of the four ligament/tendon types were each assigned a different contrast agent (giving a total of twelve samples), and the progression of that agent through the tissue was monitored by performing a scan every day for a total period of five days (giving a total of sixty scans). Since the samples were unstained on day one, they had been stained for a total of four days by the time of the final scans. The relative contrast enhancement and tissue deformation were measured. It was observed that the iodine potassium iodide solution penetrated the samples fastest and caused the least sample shrinkage on average (although significant deformation was observed by the time of the final scans), whereas the phosphomolybdic acid caused the greatest sample shrinkage. Equations describing the observed behaviour of the contrast agents, which can be used to predict optimal staining times for ligament and tendon X-ray computed tomography, are presented. PMID:27078030

  6. The CT Scanner Facility at Stellenbosch University: An open access X-ray computed tomography laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    du Plessis, Anton; le Roux, Stephan Gerhard; Guelpa, Anina

    2016-10-01

    The Stellenbosch University CT Scanner Facility is an open access laboratory providing non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) and a high performance image analysis services as part of the Central Analytical Facilities (CAF) of the university. Based in Stellenbosch, South Africa, this facility offers open access to the general user community, including local researchers, companies and also remote users (both local and international, via sample shipment and data transfer). The laboratory hosts two CT instruments, i.e. a micro-CT system, as well as a nano-CT system. A workstation-based Image Analysis Centre is equipped with numerous computers with data analysis software packages, which are to the disposal of the facility users, along with expert supervision, if required. All research disciplines are accommodated at the X-ray CT laboratory, provided that non-destructive analysis will be beneficial. During its first four years, the facility has accommodated more than 400 unique users (33 in 2012; 86 in 2013; 154 in 2014; 140 in 2015; 75 in first half of 2016), with diverse industrial and research applications using X-ray CT as means. This paper summarises the existence of the laboratory's first four years by way of selected examples, both from published and unpublished projects. In the process a detailed description of the capabilities and facilities available to users is presented.

  7. Modelling cathode spots in glow discharges in the cathode boundary layer geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieniek, M. S.; Almeida, P. G. C.; Benilov, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    Self-organized patterns of cathode spots in glow discharges are computed in the cathode boundary layer geometry, which is the one employed in most of the experiments reported in the literature. The model comprises conservation and transport equations of electrons and a single ion species, written in the drift-diffusion and local-field approximations, and Poisson’s equation. Multiple solutions existing for the same value of the discharge current and describing modes with different configurations of cathode spots are computed by means of a stationary solver. The computed solutions are compared to their counterparts for plane-parallel electrodes, and experiments. All of the computed spot patterns have been observed in the experiment.

  8. Resolving Heterogeneous 3D Microstructures in Commercial Solid Oxide Fuel Cells using Micro- and Nano-scale X-ray Computed Tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Epting, William K; Mansley, Zachary; Menasche, David B; ...

    2017-05-01

    The electrodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) consist of three phases interconnected in three dimensions. The volume needed to describe quantitatively such microstructures depends on several lengths scales, which are functions of materials properties and fabrication methods. This work focuses on quantifying the volume needed to represent “intermediate frequency” heterogeneities in electrodes of a commercial SOFC using X-ray computed tomography (CT) over two different length scales. Electrode volumes of 150 x 150 x 9 μm3 were extracted from a synchrotron-based micro-CT data set, with 13 μm3 voxels. 13.6 x 19.8 x 19.4 μm3 of the cathode and 26.3 xmore » 24.8 x 15.7 μm3 of the anode were extracted from laboratory nano-CT data sets, both with 653 nm3 voxels. After comparing the variation across sub-regions for the greyscale values from the micro-CT, and for the phase fractions and triple phase boundary densities from the nano-CT, it was found that the sub-region length scales needed to yield statistically similar average values were an order of magnitude larger than those expected to capture the “high frequency” heterogeneity related to the discrete nature of the three phases in electrodes. The challenge of quantifying such electrodes using available experimental methods is discussed.« less

  9. X-ray Computed Tomographic Investigation of the Porosity and Morphology of Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation Coatings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xun; Aliasghari, Sepideh; Němcová, Aneta; Burnett, Timothy L; Kuběna, Ivo; Šmíd, Miroslav; Thompson, George E; Skeldon, Peter; Withers, Philip J

    2016-04-06

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is of increasing interest for the formation of ceramic coatings on metals for applications that require diverse coating properties, such as wear and corrosion resistance, low thermal conductivity, and biocompatibility. Porosity in the coatings can have an important impact on the coating performance. However, the quantification of the porosity in coatings can be difficult due to the wide range of pore sizes and the complexity of the coating morphology. In this work, a PEO coating formed on titanium is examined using high resolution X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT). The observations are validated by comparisons of surface views and cross-sectional views of specific coating features obtained using X-ray CT and scanning electron microscopy. The X-ray CT technique is shown to be capable of resolving pores with volumes of at least 6 μm(3). Furthermore, the shapes of large pores are revealed and a correlation is demonstrated between the locations of the pores, nodules on the coating surface, and depressions in the titanium substrate. The locations and morphologies of the pores, which constitute 5.7% of the coating volume, indicate that they are generated by release of oxygen gas from the molten coating.

  10. Progress in Cell Marking for Synchrotron X-ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Christopher; Sturm, Erica; Schultke, Elisabeth; Arfelli, Fulvia; Menk, Ralf-Hendrik; Astolfo, Alberto; Juurlink, Bernhard H. J.

    2010-07-01

    Recently there has been an increase in research activity into finding ways of marking cells in live animals for pre-clinical trials. Development of certain drugs and other therapies crucially depend on tracking particular cells or cell types in living systems. Therefore cell marking techniques are required which will enable longitudinal studies, where individuals can be examined several times over the course of a therapy or study. The benefits of being able to study both disease and therapy progression in individuals, rather than cohorts are clear. The need for high contrast 3-D imaging, without harming or altering the biological system requires a non-invasive yet penetrating imaging technique. The technique will also have to provide an appropriate spatial and contrast resolution. X-ray computed tomography offers rapid acquisition of 3-D images and is set to become one of the principal imaging techniques in this area. Work by our group over the last few years has shown that marking cells with gold nano-particles (GNP) is an effective means of visualising marked cells in-vivo using x-ray CT. Here we report the latest results from these studies. Synchrotron X-ray CT images of brain lesions in rats taken using the SYRMEP facility at the Elettra synchrotron in 2009 have been compared with histological examination of the tissues. Some deductions are drawn about the visibility of the gold loaded cells in both light microscopy and x-ray imaging.

  11. A hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography system for enhanced material identification.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaomei; Wang, Qian; Ma, Jinlei; Zhang, Wei; Li, Po; Fang, Zheng

    2017-08-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) can distinguish different materials according to their absorption characteristics. The hyperspectral X-ray CT (HXCT) system proposed in the present work reconstructs each voxel according to its X-ray absorption spectral characteristics. In contrast to a dual-energy or multi-energy CT system, HXCT employs cadmium telluride (CdTe) as the x-ray detector, which provides higher spectral resolution and separate spectral lines according to the material's photon-counter working principle. In this paper, a specimen containing ten different polymer materials randomly arranged was adopted for material identification by HXCT. The filtered back-projection algorithm was applied for image and spectral reconstruction. The first step was to sort the individual material components of the specimen according to their cross-sectional image intensity. The second step was to classify materials with similar intensities according to their reconstructed spectral characteristics. The results demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed material identification process and indicated that the proposed HXCT system has good prospects for a wide range of biomedical and industrial nondestructive testing applications.

  12. A new approach to synchrotron energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lazzari, Olivier; Egan, Christopher K; Jacques, Simon D M; Sochi, Taha; Di Michiel, Marco; Cernik, Robert J; Barnes, Paul

    2012-07-01

    A new data collection strategy for performing synchrotron energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction computed tomography has been devised. This method is analogous to angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction whose diffraction signal originates from a line formed by intersection of the incident X-ray beam and the sample. Energy resolution is preserved by using a collimator which defines a small sampling voxel. This voxel is translated in a series of parallel straight lines covering the whole sample and the operation is repeated at different rotation angles, thus generating one diffraction pattern per translation and rotation step. The method has been tested by imaging a specially designed phantom object, devised to be a demanding validator for X-ray diffraction imaging. The relative strengths and weaknesses of the method have been analysed with respect to the classic angle-dispersive technique. The reconstruction accuracy of the method is good, although an absorption correction is required for lower energy diffraction because of the large path lengths involved. The spatial resolution is only limited to the width of the scanning beam owing to the novel collection strategy. The current temporal resolution is poor, with a scan taking several hours. The method is best suited to studying large objects (e.g. for engineering and materials science applications) because it does not suffer from diffraction peak broadening effects irrespective of the sample size, in contrast to the angle-dispersive case.

  13. Characteristics of a ceramic-substrate x-ray diode and its application to computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Manabu; Sato, Eiichi; Kodama, Hajime; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Kusachi, Shinya; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira

    2013-09-01

    X-ray photon counting was performed using a silicon X-ray diode (Si-XD) at a tube current of 2.0 mA and tube voltages ranging from 50 to 70 kV. The Si-XD is a high-sensitivity Si photodiode selected for detecting X-ray photons, and Xray photons are directly detected using the Si-XD without a scintillator. Photocurrent from the diode is amplified using charge-sensitive and shaping amplifiers. To investigate the X-ray-electric conversion, we performed the event-pulseheight (EPH) analysis using a multichannel analyzer. Photon-counting computed tomography (PC-CT) is accomplished by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object, and projection curves of the object are obtained by the linear scan. The exposure time for obtaining a tomogram was 10 min at a scan step of 0.5 mm and a rotation step of 1.0°. In PC-CT at a tube voltage of 70 kV, the image contrast of iodine media fell with increasing lower-level voltage of the event pulse using a comparator.

  14. Energy-discriminating X-ray computed tomography system utilizing a cadmium telluride detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Abderyim, Purkhet; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Hitomi, Keitaro; Takahasi, Kiyomi; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawae, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2010-07-01

    An energy-discriminating K-edge X-ray computed tomography (CT) system is useful for increasing contrast resolution of a target region utilizing contrast media and for reducing the absorbed dose for patients. The CT system is of the first-generation type with a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector, and a projection curve is obtained by translation scanning using the CdTe detector in conjunction with an x-stage. An object is rotated by the rotation step angle using a turntable between the translation scans. Thus, CT is carried out by repeating the translation scanning and the rotation of an object. Penetrating X-ray photons from the object are detected by the CdTe detector, and event signals of X-ray photons are produced using charge-sensitive and shaping amplifiers. Both the photon energy and the energy width are selected by use of a multi-channel analyzer, and the number of photons is counted by a counter card. Demonstration of enhanced iodine K-edge X-ray CT was carried out by selecting photons with energies just beyond the iodine K-edge energy of 33.2 keV.

  15. Advances in X-ray detectors for clinical and preclinical Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, Daniele

    2016-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a non-invasive X-ray diagnostic technique that allows reconstructing cross sections of a patient's body, providing detailed information about structure and anatomy of organs and, in some extent, also about their functionality. Since the development of the first CT scanner for clinical use in the '70s, several improvements especially in solid-state X-ray detector technology with growing detection efficiency and fast response have led to the current configuration of modern ultra-fast, low dose whole body CT scanners. Such developments brought great advantages in the clinical settings in terms of image quality, dose effectiveness, imaging throughput, but also extending considerably the field of clinical application that were initially foreseen. Parallel to the roadmap of clinical CT technology, dedicated systems for high-resolution preclinical CT (or micro-CT) have seen a considerable growth in the last two decades, taking advantage of the modern technology of high granularity flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPD). This article aims at reviewing the milestones of the evolution of X-ray detector technology that have traced the roadmap of development of CT and micro-CT. An outlook of the current and future trends on energy resolved clinical and preclinical CT with photon counting detectors will be also given.

  16. A hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography system for enhanced material identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaomei; Wang, Qian; Ma, Jinlei; Zhang, Wei; Li, Po; Fang, Zheng

    2017-08-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) can distinguish different materials according to their absorption characteristics. The hyperspectral X-ray CT (HXCT) system proposed in the present work reconstructs each voxel according to its X-ray absorption spectral characteristics. In contrast to a dual-energy or multi-energy CT system, HXCT employs cadmium telluride (CdTe) as the x-ray detector, which provides higher spectral resolution and separate spectral lines according to the material's photon-counter working principle. In this paper, a specimen containing ten different polymer materials randomly arranged was adopted for material identification by HXCT. The filtered back-projection algorithm was applied for image and spectral reconstruction. The first step was to sort the individual material components of the specimen according to their cross-sectional image intensity. The second step was to classify materials with similar intensities according to their reconstructed spectral characteristics. The results demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed material identification process and indicated that the proposed HXCT system has good prospects for a wide range of biomedical and industrial nondestructive testing applications.

  17. Evaluation of a Fluorochlorozirconate Glass-Ceramic Storage Phosphor Plate for Gamma-Ray Computed Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Russell L.; Gray, Sharon K.; Alvarez, Carlos J.; Moses, Alex K.; Arrowood, Lloyd F.; Lubinsky, Anthony R.; Petford-Long, Amanda K.; Johnson, Jacqueline A.

    2015-05-21

    In this paper, a fluorochlorozirconate (FCZ) glass-ceramic containing orthorhombic barium chloride crystals doped with divalent europium was evaluated for use as a storage phosphor in gamma-ray imaging. X-ray diffraction and phosphorimetry of the glass-ceramic sample showed the presence of a significant amount of orthorhombic barium chloride crystals in the glass matrix. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to identify crystal size, structure, and morphology. The size of the orthorhombic barium chloride crystals in the FCZ glass matrix was very large, ~0.5–0.7 μm, which can limit image resolution. The FCZ glass-ceramic sample was exposed to 1 MeV gamma rays to determine its photostimulated emission characteristics at high energies, which were found to be suitable for imaging applications. Test images were made at 2 MeV energies using gap and step wedge phantoms. Gaps as small as 101.6 μm in a 440 stainless steel phantom were imaged using the sample imaging plate. Analysis of an image created using a depleted uranium step wedge phantom showed that emission is proportional to incident energy at the sample and the estimated absorbed dose. Finally, the results showed that the sample imaging plate has potential for gamma-ray-computed radiography and dosimetry applications.

  18. Evaluation of a Fluorochlorozirconate Glass-Ceramic Storage Phosphor Plate for Gamma-Ray Computed Radiography

    DOE PAGES

    Leonard, Russell L.; Gray, Sharon K.; Alvarez, Carlos J.; ...

    2015-05-21

    In this paper, a fluorochlorozirconate (FCZ) glass-ceramic containing orthorhombic barium chloride crystals doped with divalent europium was evaluated for use as a storage phosphor in gamma-ray imaging. X-ray diffraction and phosphorimetry of the glass-ceramic sample showed the presence of a significant amount of orthorhombic barium chloride crystals in the glass matrix. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to identify crystal size, structure, and morphology. The size of the orthorhombic barium chloride crystals in the FCZ glass matrix was very large, ~0.5–0.7 μm, which can limit image resolution. The FCZ glass-ceramic sample was exposed to 1 MeV gammamore » rays to determine its photostimulated emission characteristics at high energies, which were found to be suitable for imaging applications. Test images were made at 2 MeV energies using gap and step wedge phantoms. Gaps as small as 101.6 μm in a 440 stainless steel phantom were imaged using the sample imaging plate. Analysis of an image created using a depleted uranium step wedge phantom showed that emission is proportional to incident energy at the sample and the estimated absorbed dose. Finally, the results showed that the sample imaging plate has potential for gamma-ray-computed radiography and dosimetry applications.« less

  19. Progress in Cell Marking for Synchrotron X-ray Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Christopher; Sturm, Erica; Schultke, Elisabeth; Arfelli, Fulvia; Astolfo, Alberto; Menk, Ralf-Hendrik; Juurlink, Bernhard H. J.

    2010-07-23

    Recently there has been an increase in research activity into finding ways of marking cells in live animals for pre-clinical trials. Development of certain drugs and other therapies crucially depend on tracking particular cells or cell types in living systems. Therefore cell marking techniques are required which will enable longitudinal studies, where individuals can be examined several times over the course of a therapy or study. The benefits of being able to study both disease and therapy progression in individuals, rather than cohorts are clear. The need for high contrast 3-D imaging, without harming or altering the biological system requires a non-invasive yet penetrating imaging technique. The technique will also have to provide an appropriate spatial and contrast resolution. X-ray computed tomography offers rapid acquisition of 3-D images and is set to become one of the principal imaging techniques in this area. Work by our group over the last few years has shown that marking cells with gold nano-particles (GNP) is an effective means of visualising marked cells in-vivo using x-ray CT. Here we report the latest results from these studies. Synchrotron X-ray CT images of brain lesions in rats taken using the SYRMEP facility at the Elettra synchrotron in 2009 have been compared with histological examination of the tissues. Some deductions are drawn about the visibility of the gold loaded cells in both light microscopy and x-ray imaging.

  20. Cone Beam X-ray Luminescence Computed Tomography Based on Bayesian Method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanglei; Liu, Fei; Liu, Jie; Luo, Jianwen; Xie, Yaoqin; Bai, Jing; Xing, Lei

    2017-01-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT), which aims to achieve molecular and functional imaging by X-rays, has recently been proposed as a new imaging modality. Combining the principles of X-ray excitation of luminescence-based probes and optical signal detection, XLCT naturally fuses functional and anatomical images and provides complementary information for a wide range of applications in biomedical research. In order to improve the data acquisition efficiency of previously developed narrow-beam XLCT, a cone beam XLCT (CB-XLCT) mode is adopted here to take advantage of the useful geometric features of cone beam excitation. Practically, a major hurdle in using cone beam X-ray for XLCT is that the inverse problem here is seriously ill-conditioned, hindering us to achieve good image quality. In this paper, we propose a novel Bayesian method to tackle the bottleneck in CB-XLCT reconstruction. The method utilizes a local regularization strategy based on Gaussian Markov random field to mitigate the ill-conditioness of CB-XLCT. An alternating optimization scheme is then used to automatically calculate all the unknown hyperparameters while an iterative coordinate descent algorithm is adopted to reconstruct the image with a voxel-based closed-form solution. Results of numerical simulations and mouse experiments show that the self-adaptive Bayesian method significantly improves the CB-XLCT image quality as compared with conventional methods.

  1. Cone Beam X-ray Luminescence Computed Tomography Based on Bayesian Method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanglei; Liu, Fei; Liu, Jie; Luo, Jianwen; Xie, Yaoqin; Xing, Lei

    2016-08-26

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT), which aims to achieve molecular and functional imaging by X-rays, has recently been proposed as a new imaging modality. Combining the principles of X-ray excitation of luminescence-based probes and optical signal detection, XLCT naturally fuses functional and anatomical images and provides complementary information for a wide range of applications in biomedical research. In order to improve the data acquisition efficiency of previously developed narrow-beam XLCT, a cone beam XLCT (CB-XLCT) mode is adopted here to take advantage of the useful geometric features of cone beam excitation. Practically, a major hurdle in using cone beam X-ray for XLCT is that the inverse problem here is seriously ill-conditioned, hindering us to achieve good image quality. In this paper, we propose a novel Bayesian method to tackle the bottleneck in CB-XLCT reconstruction. The method utilizes a local regularization strategy based on Gaussian Markov random field to mitigate the ill-conditioness of CB-XLCT. An alternating optimization scheme is then used to automatically calculate all the unknown hyperparameters while an iterative coordinate descent algorithm is adopted to reconstruct the image with a voxel-based closed-form solution. Results of numerical simulations and mouse experiments show that the self-adaptive Bayesian method significantly improves the CB-XLCT image quality as compared with conventional methods.

  2. Identifying unknown minerals and compounds from X-ray diffraction patterns using the Johnson and Vand FORTRAN 4 computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, F. T.

    1976-01-01

    Automated computer identification of minerals and compounds from unknown samples is provided along with detailed instructions and worked examples for use in graduate level courses in mineralogy and X-ray analysis applications.

  3. Effect of oblique X-ray incidence in flat-panel computed tomography of the breast.

    PubMed

    Badano, Aldo; Kyprianou, Iacovos S; Freed, Melanie; Jennings, Robert J; Sempau, Josep

    2009-05-01

    We quantify the variation in resolution due to anisotropy caused by oblique X-ray incidence in indirect flat-panel detectors for computed tomography breast imaging systems. We consider a geometry and detector type utilized in breast computed tomography (CT) systems currently being developed. Our methods rely on mantis, a combined X-ray, electron, and optical Monte Carlo transport open source code. The physics models are the most accurate available in general-purpose Monte Carlo packages in the diagnostic energy range. We consider maximum-obliquity angles of 10 ( degrees ) and 13 ( degrees ) at the centers of the 30 and 40 cm detector edges, respectively, and 16 ( degrees ) at the corner of the detector. Our results indicate that blur is asymmetric and that the resolution properties vary significantly with the angle (or location) of incidence. Our results suggest that the asymmetry can be as high as a factor of 2.6 between orthogonal directions. Anisotropy maps predicted by mantis provide an understanding of the effect that such variations have on the imaging system and allow more accurate modeling and optimization of breast CT systems. These maps of anisotropy across the detector could lead to improved reconstruction and help motivate physics-based strategies for computer detection of breast lesions.

  4. Compact high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography system for multiphase flow studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bieberle, A.; Nehring, H.; Berger, R.; Arlit, M.; Haerting, H.-U.; Schubert, M.; Hampel, U.

    2013-03-15

    In this paper, a compact high-resolution gamma-ray Computed Tomography (CompaCT) measurement system for multiphase flow studies and tomographic imaging of technical objects is presented. Its compact and robust design makes it particularly suitable for studies on industrial facilities and outdoor applications. Special care has been given to thermal ruggedness, shock resistance, and radiation protection. Main components of the system are a collimated {sup 137}Cs isotopic source, a thermally stabilised modular high-resolution gamma-ray detector arc with 112 scintillation detector elements, and a transportable rotary unit. The CompaCT allows full CT scans of objects with a diameter of up to 130 mm and can be operated with any tilting angle from 0 Degree-Sign (horizontal) to 90 Degree-Sign (vertical).

  5. X-ray refraction-contrast computed tomography images using dark-field imaging optics

    SciTech Connect

    Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Huo, Qingkai; Ichihara, Shu; Ando, Masami

    2010-10-11

    If an x-ray beam containing internal information derived from sample soft tissue is incident upon a Laue-case analyzer, the beam will subsequently split into a forwardly diffracted beam and a separate diffracted beam. Using these beams acquired simultaneously, a refraction-contrast computed tomography (CT) imaging system for biomedical use with lower radiation dose can be easily realized, and has a high depicting capability on the soft tissues compared with conventional x-ray CT based on absorption contrast principles. In this paper, we propose an imaging system using dark-field imaging for CT measurement based on a tandem system of Bragg- and Laue-case crystals with two two-dimensional detectors, along with a data-processing method to extract information on refraction from the measured entangled intensities by use of rocking curve fitting with polynomial functions. Reconstructed images of soft tissues are presented and described.

  6. Pseudomonoenergetic x-ray diffraction measurements using balanced filters for coherent-scatter computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Beath, S. R.; Cunningham, I. A.

    2009-05-15

    Coherent-scatter computed tomography (CSCT) is a method of ''composition'' imaging based on measurements of diffraction patterns from tissues. Use of an x-ray tube degrades scatter pattern angular resolution due to the x-ray spectral width, making it difficult to uniquely identify some materials. The use of two transmission filters with similar atomic numbers (balanced ''Ross filters'') to generate pseudomonoenergetic scatter patterns is described as it applies to CSCT. An analysis of angular-blur mechanisms reveals that focal spot size and beam width are the most important factors determining Bragg-peak width when Er-Tm filters are used. A relative RMS spectral width of 1% can be achieved in the difference spectrum and a Bragg-peak RMS angular width of approximately 0.14 deg. (relative width of 3% at 5 deg. scatter angle) can be achieved with an effective energy of 58 keV.

  7. Compact high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography system for multiphase flow studies.

    PubMed

    Bieberle, A; Nehring, H; Berger, R; Arlit, M; Härting, H-U; Schubert, M; Hampel, U

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a compact high-resolution gamma-ray Computed Tomography (CompaCT) measurement system for multiphase flow studies and tomographic imaging of technical objects is presented. Its compact and robust design makes it particularly suitable for studies on industrial facilities and outdoor applications. Special care has been given to thermal ruggedness, shock resistance, and radiation protection. Main components of the system are a collimated (137)Cs isotopic source, a thermally stabilised modular high-resolution gamma-ray detector arc with 112 scintillation detector elements, and a transportable rotary unit. The CompaCT allows full CT scans of objects with a diameter of up to 130 mm and can be operated with any tilting angle from 0° (horizontal) to 90° (vertical).

  8. Computational Models of X-Ray Burst Quenching Times and 12C Nucleosynthesis Following a Superburst

    SciTech Connect

    Fisker, J L

    2009-03-19

    Superbursts are energetic events on neutron stars that are a thousand times more powerful than ordinary type I X-ray bursts. They are believed to be powered by a thermonuclear explosion of accumulated {sup 12}C. However, the source of this {sup 12}C remains elusive to theoretical calculations and its concentration and ignition depth are both unknown. Here we present the first computational simulations of the nucleosynthesis during the thermal decay of a superbust, where X-ray bursts are quenched. Our calculations of the quenching time verify previous analytical calculations and shed new light on the physics of stable burning at low accretion rates. We show that concentrated (X{sub {sup 12}C} {approx}> 0.40), although insufficient, amounts of {sup 12}C are generated during the several weeks following the superburst where the decaying thermal flux of the superburst stabilizes the burning of the accreted material.

  9. X-ray refraction-contrast computed tomography images using dark-field imaging optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Huo, Qingkai; Ichihara, Shu; Ando, Masami

    2010-10-01

    If an x-ray beam containing internal information derived from sample soft tissue is incident upon a Laue-case analyzer, the beam will subsequently split into a forwardly diffracted beam and a separate diffracted beam. Using these beams acquired simultaneously, a refraction-contrast computed tomography (CT) imaging system for biomedical use with lower radiation dose can be easily realized, and has a high depicting capability on the soft tissues compared with conventional x-ray CT based on absorption contrast principles. In this paper, we propose an imaging system using dark-field imaging for CT measurement based on a tandem system of Bragg- and Laue-case crystals with two two-dimensional detectors, along with a data-processing method to extract information on refraction from the measured entangled intensities by use of rocking curve fitting with polynomial functions. Reconstructed images of soft tissues are presented and described.

  10. Development of X-ray Emission Computed Tomography for Laser-Plasma.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao'En, Jiang; Zhongli, Liu; Nan, Li; Zhijian, Zheng; Dao'Yuan, Tang; Yongkun, Ding; Xin, Hu

    1996-11-01

    A computed tomography (CT) technique has been developed to diagnose laser produced plasma using X-ray emission. The three dimensional X-ray distribution was reconstructed by using a multiplicate algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) from five pinhole camera images obtained along different sight directions. A three dimensional reconstruction program (CT3D) has been worked out, the accuracy of which reaches 92% and 86%, without and with noise (S/N-10), respectively. The experimental data, obtained from the ICF on the ``Xinguang-II'' facilities (λ = 0.35 μm, EL = 100J, τ = 700ps), are processed by using the CT3D program and good reconstruction results have been obtained.

  11. Chitosan coated tungsten trioxide nanoparticles as a contrast agent for X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Firouzi, Mehdi; Poursalehi, Reza; Delavari H, Hamid; Saba, Fakhredin; Oghabian, Mohammad A

    2017-05-01

    Recent advances have shown that inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) based on heavy elements are highly appropriate for X-ray computed tomography (CT). In this contribution, tungsten trioxide NPs are prepared by the electrical arc discharge (EAD) method in DI water. The effect of chitosan (CTS) and glutaraldehyde (GTA) as coating and cross-linking agent, respectively, on the hydrodynamic size and zeta potential of prepared tungsten trioxide NPs is investigated. It is found that zeta potential increases by increasing the amounts of CTS. Meanwhile, by increasing the volume of glutaraldehyde (GTA), the final particle size increases whereas the zeta potential deceases. Chitosan coated tungsten trioxide demonstrated no significant cytotoxicity at concentration up to 5mg/mL after 24h. Finally, the X-ray attenuation of prepared chitosan coated tungsten trioxide NPs are higher than Iohexol as the commercially available iodinated contrasting agent at the same concentrations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Gold nanotags for combined multi-colored Raman spectroscopy and x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ming; Nyagilo, James; Arora, Veera; Kulkarni, Padmakar; Xu, Dongsheng; Sun, Xiankai; Davé, Digant P

    2010-01-22

    Multi-color gold-nanoparticle-based tags (nanotags) are synthesized for combined surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and x-ray computed tomography (CT). The nanotags are synthesized with quasi-spherical gold nanoparticles encoded with a reporter dye (color), each with a unique Raman spectrum. A library of nanotags with six different colors were synthesized for a range of gold nanoparticle sizes and an optimum size has been established to yield the largest SERS intensity and x-ray attenuation that is higher than the iodinated CT contrast agents used in clinics. Proof-of-principle in vivo imaging results with nanotags are presented that, for the first time, demonstrates the combined in vivo dual modality imaging capability of SERS and CT with a single nanoparticle probe.

  13. Development of a Computer-Controlled Polishing Process for X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Gufran S.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Arnold, William; Ramsey, Brian

    2009-01-01

    The future X-ray observatory missions require grazing-incidence x-ray optics with angular resolution of < 5 arcsec half-power diameter. The achievable resolution depends ultimately on the quality of polished mandrels from which the shells are replicated. With an aim to fabricate better shells, and reduce the cost/time of mandrel production, a computer-controlled polishing machine is developed for deterministic and localized polishing of mandrels. Cylindrical polishing software is also developed that predicts the surface residual errors under a given set of operating parameters and lap configuration. Design considerations of the polishing lap are discussed and the effects of nonconformance of the lap and the mandrel are presented.

  14. 3D image reconstruction on x-ray micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louk, Andreas C.

    2015-03-01

    A model for 3D image reconstruction of x-ray micro-computed tomography scanner (micro-CTScan) has been developed. A small object has been put under inspection on an x-ray micro-CTScan. The object cross-section was assumed on the x-y plane, while its height was along the z-axis. Using a radiography plane detector, a set of digital radiographs represents multiple angle of views from 0º to 360º with an interval of 1º was obtained. Then, a set of crosssectional tomography, slice by slice was reconstructed. At the end, all image slices were stacked together sequentially to obtain a 3D image model of the object being inspected. From this development, lessons on the way to have better understanding on the internal structure of the object can be approached based on the cross-sectional image slice by slice and surface skin.

  15. Microphase-contrast x-ray computed tomography for basic biomedical study at SPring-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jin; Takeda, Tohoru; Lwin, Thet-Thet; Koyama, Ichiro; Momose, Atsushi; Fujii, Akiko; Hamaishi, Yoshitaka; Kuroe, Taichi; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Yoshio; Akatsuka, Takao

    2004-10-01

    Micro-phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography with an X-ray interferometer (micro-phase-contrast CT) is in operation to obtain high spatial resolution images of less than 0.01 mm at the undulator beam-line 20XU of SPring-8, Japan, and we applied micro-phase-contrast CT to observe the organs of rats and hamsters. The excised kidney and spleen fixed by formalin were imaged. The fine inner-structures such as vessels, glomeruli of kidney and white and red pulps of spleen were visualized clearly about 0.01-mm spatial resolutions without using contrast agent or staining procedure. The results were very similar to those by optical microscopic images with 20-fold magnification. These results suggest that the micro-phase tomography might be a useful tool for various biomedical researches.

  16. X-ray computed tomography of the anterior cruciate ligament and patellar tendon.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Tom; Rawson, Shelley; Castro, Simon Joseph; Balint, Richard; Bradley, Robert Stephen; Lowe, Tristan; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Lee, Peter David; Cartmell, Sarah Harriet

    2014-04-01

    The effect of phosphotungstic acid (PTA) and iodine solution (IKI) staining was investigated as a method of enhancing contrast in the X-ray computed tomography of porcine anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) and patellar tendons (PT). We show that PTA enhanced surface contrast, but was ineffective at penetrating samples, whereas IKI penetrated more effectively and enhanced contrast after 70 hours of staining. Contrast enhancement was compared when using laboratory and synchrotron based X-ray sources. Using the laboratory source, PT fascicles were tracked and their alignment was measured. Individual ACL fascicles could not be identified, but identifiable features were evident that were tracked. Higher resolution scans of fascicle bundles from the PT and ACL were obtained using synchrotron imaging techniques. These scans exhibited greater contrast between the fascicles and matrix in the PT sample, facilitating the identification of the fascicle edges; however, it was still not possible to detect individual fascicles in the ACL.

  17. Heterogeneous computing for vertebra detection and segmentation in x-ray images.

    PubMed

    Lecron, Fabian; Mahmoudi, Sidi Ahmed; Benjelloun, Mohammed; Mahmoudi, Saïd; Manneback, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The context of this work is related to the vertebra segmentation. The method we propose is based on the active shape model (ASM). An original approach taking advantage of the edge polygonal approximation was developed to locate the vertebra positions in a X-ray image. Despite the fact that segmentation results show good efficiency, the time is a key variable that has always to be optimized in a medical context. Therefore, we present how vertebra extraction can efficiently be performed in exploiting the full computing power of parallel (GPU) and heterogeneous (multi-CPU/multi-GPU) architectures. We propose a parallel hybrid implementation of the most intensive steps enabling to boost performance. Experimentations have been conducted using a set of high-resolution X-ray medical images, showing a global speedup ranging from 3 to 22, by comparison with the CPU implementation. Data transfer times between CPU and GPU memories were included in the execution times of our proposed implementation.

  18. Computational Assessment of the Impact of Gamma-ray Detector Material Properties on Spectroscopic Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Baciak, James E.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Hensley, Walter K.; Miller, Erin A.; Wittman, Richard S.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2011-09-01

    Abstract Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is performing a computational assessment of the impact of several important gamma-ray detector material properties (e.g. energy resolution and intrinsic detection efficiency) on the scenario-specific spectroscopic performance of these materials. The research approach combines 3D radiation transport calculations, detector response modeling, and spectroscopic analysis of simulated energy deposition spectra to map the functional dependence of detection performance on the underlying material properties. This assessment is intended to help guide formulation of performance goals for new detector materials within the context of materials discovery programs, with an emphasis on applications in the threat reduction, nonproliferation, and safeguards/ verification user communities. The research results will also provide guidance to the gamma-ray sensor design community in estimating relative spectroscopic performance merits of candidate materials for novel or notional detectors.

  19. Modelling of local ion nitriding in a glow discharge with hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budilov, V.; Ramazanov, K.; Khusainov, Yu

    2017-05-01

    The paper presents the results of computer calculations of glow discharge plasma parameters in a hollow cathode zone and modeling of thermal and diffusion processes at local ion nitriding with a hollow cathode. The proposed model of a glow discharge with a hollow cathode with sufficient accuracy allowed to describe the distribution of plasma parameters in a cathode void. Values of plasma parameters in a cathode void formed by a mesh screen and cathode surface were obtained via the probe method. It was found that the use of hollow cathode effect allows to increase the concentration of ions near the treated surface by 1.5 times. The suggested computer model allows to predict the distribution of the temperature field and depth of a diffusion layer at local ion nitriding with a hollow cathode for various configurations and sizes.

  20. Experimental validation of a kilovoltage x-ray source model for computing imaging dose

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, Yannick; Kouznetsov, Alexei; Koger, Brandon; Tambasco, Mauro

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To introduce and validate a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray source model and characterization method to compute absorbed dose accrued from kV x-rays. Methods: The authors propose a simplified virtual point source model and characterization method for a kV x-ray source. The source is modeled by: (1) characterizing the spatial spectral and fluence distributions of the photons at a plane at the isocenter, and (2) creating a virtual point source from which photons are generated to yield the derived spatial spectral and fluence distribution at isocenter of an imaging system. The spatial photon distribution is determined by in-air relative dose measurements along the transverse (x) and radial (y) directions. The spectrum is characterized using transverse axis half-value layer measurements and the nominal peak potential (kVp). This source modeling approach is used to characterize a Varian{sup ®} on-board-imager (OBI{sup ®}) for four default cone-beam CT beam qualities: beams using a half bowtie filter (HBT) with 110 and 125 kVp, and a full bowtie filter (FBT) with 100 and 125 kVp. The source model and characterization method was validated by comparing dose computed by the authors’ inhouse software (kVDoseCalc) to relative dose measurements in a homogeneous and a heterogeneous block phantom comprised of tissue, bone, and lung-equivalent materials. Results: The characterized beam qualities and spatial photon distributions are comparable to reported values in the literature. Agreement between computed and measured percent depth-dose curves is ⩽2% in the homogeneous block phantom and ⩽2.5% in the heterogeneous block phantom. Transverse axis profiles taken at depths of 2 and 6 cm in the homogeneous block phantom show an agreement within 4%. All transverse axis dose profiles in water, in bone, and lung-equivalent materials for beams using a HBT, have an agreement within 5%. Measured profiles of FBT beams in bone and lung-equivalent materials were higher than their

  1. Combined X-ray fluorescence and absorption computed tomography using a synchrotron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, C.

    2013-06-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) and fluorescence X-ray computed tomography (FXCT) using synchrotron sources are both useful tools in biomedical imaging research. Synchrotron CT (SRCT) in its various forms is considered an important technique for biomedical imaging since the phase coherence of SR beams can be exploited to obtain images with high contrast resolution. Using a synchrotron as the source for FXCT ensures a fluorescence signal that is optimally detectable by exploiting the beam monochromaticity and polarisation. The ability to combine these techniques so that SRCT and FXCT images are collected simultaneously, would bring distinct benefits to certain biomedical experiments. Simultaneous image acquisition would alleviate some of the registration difficulties which comes from collecting separate data, and it would provide increased information about the sample: functional X-ray images from the FXCT, with the morphological information from the SRCT. A method is presented for generating simultaneous SRCT and FXCT images. Proof of principle modelling has been used to show that it is possible to recover a fluorescence image of a point-like source from an SRCT apparatus by suitably modulating the illuminating planar X-ray beam. The projection image can be successfully used for reconstruction by removing the static modulation from the sinogram in the normal flat and dark field processing. Detection of the modulated fluorescence signal using an energy resolving detector allows the position of a fluorescent marker to be obtained using inverse reconstruction techniques. A discussion is made of particular reconstruction methods which might be applied by utilising both the CT and FXCT data.

  2. Patient size and x-ray technique factors in head computed tomography examinations. I. Radiation doses.

    PubMed

    Huda, Walter; Lieberman, Kristin A; Chang, Jack; Roskopf, Marsha L

    2004-03-01

    We investigated how patient age, size and composition, together with the choice of x-ray technique factors, affect radiation doses in head computed tomography (CT) examinations. Head size dimensions, cross-sectional areas, and mean Hounsfield unit (HU) values were obtained from head CT images of 127 patients. For radiation dosimetry purposes patients were modeled as uniform cylinders of water. Dose computations were performed for 18 x 7 mm sections, scanned at a constant 340 mAs, for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV. Values of mean section dose, energy imparted, and effective dose were computed for patients ranging from the newborn to adults. There was a rapid growth of head size over the first two years, followed by a more modest increase of head size until the age of 18 or so. Newborns have a mean HU value of about 50 that monotonically increases with age over the first two decades of life. Average adult A-P and lateral dimensions were 186+/-8 mm and 147+/-8 mm, respectively, with an average HU value of 209+/-40. An infant head was found to be equivalent to a water cylinder with a radius of approximately 60 mm, whereas an adult head had an equivalent radius 50% greater. Adult males head dimensions are about 5% larger than for females, and their average x-ray attenuation is approximately 20 HU greater. For adult examinations performed at 120 kV, typical values were 32 mGy for the mean section dose, 105 mJ for the total energy imparted, and 0.64 mSv for the effective dose. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increases patient doses by about a factor of 5. For the same technique factors, mean section doses in infants are 35% higher than in adults. Energy imparted for adults is 50% higher than for infants, but infant effective doses are four times higher than for adults. CT doses need to take into account patient age, head size, and composition as well as the selected x-ray technique factors.

  3. An improved reservoir oxide cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Liao, Xianheng; Luo, Jirun; Zhao, Qinglan

    2005-09-01

    A new type of reservoir oxide cathode has been developed in IECAS. The emission characteristics of the cathode are tested. The results show the new cathode has higher emission current density and better resistance to poisoning at same operating condition compared with those of conventional reservoir oxide cathode.

  4. Assessment of asthmatic inflammation using hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography-x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaopeng; Prakash, Jaya; Ruscitti, Francesca; Glasl, Sarah; Stellari, Fabio Franco; Villetti, Gino; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear imaging plays a critical role in asthma research but is limited in its readings of biology due to the short-lived signals of radio-isotopes. We employed hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and x-ray computed tomography (XCT) for the assessment of asthmatic inflammation based on resolving cathepsin activity and matrix metalloproteinase activity in dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillus species-challenged mice. The reconstructed multimodal fluorescence distribution showed good correspondence with ex vivo cryosection images and histological images, confirming FMT-XCT as an interesting alternative for asthma research.

  5. Development of Computer Tomography System for the Soft X-ray Microscope at Ritsumeikan University

    SciTech Connect

    Ohigashi, T.; Fujii, H.; Usui, K.; Namba, H.; Mizutani, H.; Takemoto, K.; Kihara, H.

    2011-09-09

    A synchrotron-based full-field imaging soft x-ray microscope was tuned appropriately to perform computer tomography. The contrast and focal depth of the optical system were evaluated by using a Fresnel zone plate as a test object of variable spatial frequency. A focal depth of 15 {mu}m was obtained at the spatial frequency of 4.3 {mu}m{sup -1} according to Rayleigh's criterion. As a first trial of three-dimensional observation using this system, the cerebral cortex of the brain of a mouse, trimmed to a columnar shape by focused ion beam milling, was studied using a wavelength of 1.87-nm.

  6. Improvement of Image Quality in Transmission Computed Tomography Using Synchrotron Monochromatic X-Ray Sheet Beam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    7] T. Takeda, M. Kazama, T. Zeniya, T. Yuasa, M. Akiba, A. Uchida, K. Hyodo, T. Akatsuka, M. Ando, and Y. Itai , “Development of a Mono- chromatic X...Uyama (Springer-Verlag, Tokyo), pp. 103-110 (1998). [8] Y. Itai , T. Takeda, T. Akatsuka, T. Maeda, K. Hyodo, A. Uchida, T. Yuasa, M. Kazama, J. Wu...T. Yuasa, K. Hyodo, M. Ando, T. Akatsuka, and Y. Itai , “Performance Study of Monochromatic Synchro- tron X-ray Computed Tomography using a Linear

  7. Inside marginal adaptation of crowns by X-ray micro-computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Dos Santos, T. M.; Lima, I.; Lopes, R. T.; Author, S. B. Jr.

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this work was to access dental arcade by using X-ray micro-computed tomography. For this purpose high resolution system was used and three groups were studied: Zirkonzahn CAD-CAM system, IPS e.max Press, and metal ceramic. The three systems assessed in this study showed results of marginal and discrepancy gaps clinically accepted. The great result of 2D and 3D evaluations showed that the used technique is a powerful method to investigate quantitative characteristics of dental arcade. (authors)

  8. Mechanisms of Porphyroblast Crystallization: Results from High-Resolution Computed X-ray Tomography.

    PubMed

    Carlson, W D; Denison, C

    1992-08-28

    Quantitative three-dimensional analysis of rock textures is now possible with the use of high-resolution computed x-ray tomography. When applied to metamorphic rocks, this technique provides data on the sizes and positions of minerals that allow mechanisms of porphyroblast crystallization to be identified. Statistical analysis of the sizes and spatial disposition of thousands of garnet crystals in three regionally metamorphosed rocks with diverse mineralogies, in conjunction with simple numerical models for crystallization, reveals in all cases the dominance of crystallization mechanisms whose kinetics are governed by rates of intergranular diffusion of nutrients.

  9. NDE x-ray computed tomography applications research. Final report, August 1989-September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Neel, S.T.; Yancey, R.N.; Eliasen, D.S.; Phillips, D.H.

    1994-11-01

    This report summarizes research efforts in X-ray computed tomography at Wright Laboratory. Attention is focused on applications development efforts that have been successful in coupling CT with engineering functions to provide new insight to materials and processing issues in a cost effective manner. A sampling of the myriad of applications to be covered in this report includes: tracking of densification during the processing of composite materials and ceramics, measuring the thickness of internal walls in castings, failure analysis of an aircraft landing gear actuator, and verification of modeling damage zones in slug impacted fiberglass armor. Extrapolation of specific studies to broader horizons are offered.

  10. Porosity characterization of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite using synchrotron X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, C.; Marrow, T. J.; Reinhard, C.; Li, B.; Zhang, C.; Wang, S.

    2016-03-01

    The pore structure and porosity of a continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composite has been characterized using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Segmentation of the reconstructed tomograph images reveals different types of pores within the composite, the inter-fiber bundle open pores displaying a "node-bond" geometry, and the intra-fiber bundle isolated micropores showing a piping shape. The 3D morphology of the pores is resolved and each pore is labeled. The quantitative filtering of the pores measures a total porosity 8.9% for the composite, amid which there is about 7.1~ 9.3% closed micropores.

  11. Some computational aspects of the hals (harmonic analysis of x-ray line shape) method

    SciTech Connect

    Moshkina, T.I.; Nakhmanson, M.S.

    1986-02-01

    This paper discusses the problem of distinguishing the analytical line from the background and approximates the background component. One of the constituent parts of the program package in the procedural-mathematical software for x-ray investigations of polycrystalline substances in application to the DRON-3, DRON-2 and ADP-1 diffractometers is the SSF system of programs, which is designed for determining the parameters of the substructure of materials. The SSF system is tailored not only to Unified Series (ES) computers, but also to the M-6000 and SM-1 minicomputers.

  12. The Effect of Experimental Variables on Industrial X-Ray Micro-Computed Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Rauser, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    A study was performed on the effect of experimental variables on radiographic sensitivity (image quality) in x-ray micro-computed tomography images for a high density thin wall metallic cylinder containing micro-EDM holes. Image quality was evaluated in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, flaw detectability, and feature sharpness. The variables included: day-to-day reproducibility, current, integration time, voltage, filtering, number of frame averages, number of projection views, beam width, effective object radius, binning, orientation of sample, acquisition angle range (180deg to 360deg), and directional versus transmission tube.

  13. Poly(iohexol) nanoparticles as contrast agents for in vivo X-ray computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qian; Yap, Felix Y; Yin, Lichen; Ma, Liang; Zhou, Qin; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Fan, Timothy M; Gaba, Ron C; Cheng, Jianjun

    2013-09-18

    Biocompatible poly(iohexol) nanoparticles, prepared through cross-linking of iohexol and hexamethylene diisocyanate followed by coprecipitation of the resulting cross-linked polymer with mPEG-polylactide, were utilized as contrast agents for in vivo X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. Compared to conventional small-molecule contrast agents, poly(iohexol) nanoparticles exhibited substantially protracted retention within the tumor bed and a 36-fold increase in CT contrast 4 h post injection, which makes it possible to acquire CT images with improved diagnosis accuracy over a broad time frame without multiple administrations.

  14. Numerical ray-tracing approach with laser intensity distribution for LIDAR signal power function computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guangyuan; Li, Song; Huang, Ke; Li, Zile; Zheng, Guoxing

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a new numerical ray-tracing approach for LIDAR signal power function computation, in which the light round-trip propagation is analyzed by geometrical optics and a simple experiment is employed to acquire the laser intensity distribution. It is relatively more accurate and flexible than previous methods. We emphatically discuss the relationship between the inclined angle and the dynamic range of detector output signal in biaxial LIDAR system. Results indicate that an appropriate negative angle can compress the signal dynamic range. This technique has been successfully proved by comparison with real measurements.

  15. Bayesian X-ray computed tomography using a three-level hierarchical prior model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali; Gac, Nicolas

    2017-06-01

    In recent decades X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) image reconstruction has been largely developed in both medical and industrial domain. In this paper, we propose using the Bayesian inference approach with a new hierarchical prior model. In the proposed model, a generalised Student-t distribution is used to enforce the Haar transformation of images to be sparse. Comparisons with some state of the art methods are presented. It is shown that by using the proposed model, the sparsity of sparse representation of images is enforced, so that edges of images are preserved. Simulation results are also provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new hierarchical model for reconstruction with fewer projections.

  16. High-sensitive computed tomography system using a silicon-PIN x-ray diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Sato, Yuich; Abudurexiti, Abulajiang; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2012-10-01

    A low-dose-rate X-ray computed tomography (CT) system is useful for reducing absorbed dose for patients. The CT system with a tube current of 1.91 mA was developed using a silicon-PIN X-ray diode (Si-PIN-XD). The Si-PIN-XD is a selected high-sensitive Si-PIN photodiode (PD) for detecting X-ray photons. X-ray photons are detected directly using the Si-PIN-XD without a scintillator, and the photocurrent from the diode is amplified using current-voltage and voltage-voltage amplifiers. The output voltage is converted into logical pulses using a voltage-frequency converter with maximum frequency of 500 kHz, and the frequency is proportional to the voltage. The pulses from the converter are sent to differentiator with a time constant of 1 μs to generate short positive pulses for counting, and the pulses are counted using a counter card. Tomography is accomplished by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object, and projection curves of the object are obtained by the linear scan. The exposure time for obtaining a tomogram was 5 min at a scan step of 0.5 mm and a rotation step of 3.0°. The tube current and voltage were 1.91 mA and 100 kV, respectively, and gadolinium K-edge CT was carried out using filtered X-ray spectra with a peak energy of 52 keV.

  17. X-ray streak camera cathode development and timing accuracy of the 4{omega} ultraviolet fiducial system at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Opachich, Y. P.; Palmer, N.; Homoelle, D.; Hatch, B.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D.; Kalantar, D.; Browning, D.; Landen, O.; Zuegel, J.

    2012-10-15

    The convergent ablator experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are designed to measure the peak velocity and remaining ablator mass of an indirectly driven imploding capsule. Such a measurement can be performed using an x-ray source to backlight the capsule and an x-ray streak camera to record the capsule as it implodes. The ultimate goal of this experiment is to achieve an accuracy of 2% in the velocity measurement, which translates to a {+-}2 ps temporal accuracy over any 300 ps interval for the streak camera. In order to achieve this, a 4{omega} (263 nm) temporal fiducial system has been implemented for the x-ray streak camera at NIF. Aluminum, titanium, gold, and silver photocathode materials have been tested. Aluminum showed the highest relative quantum efficiency, with five times more peak signal counts per fiducial pulse when compared to Gold. The fiducial pulse data were analyzed to determine the centroiding statistical accuracy for incident laser pulse energies of 1 and 10 nJ, showing an accuracy of {+-}1.6 ps and {+-}0.7 ps, respectively.

  18. X-ray Streak Camera Cathode Development and Timing Accuracy of the 4w UV Fiducial System at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Opachich, Y P; Palmer, N; Homoelle, D; Hatch, B W; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Kalantar, D; Browning, D; Landen, O

    2012-05-02

    The convergent ablator experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are designed to measure the peak velocity and remaining ablator mass of an indirectly driven imploding capsule. Such a measurement can be performed using an x-ray source to backlight the capsule and an x-ray streak camera to record the capsule as it implodes. The ultimate goal of this experiment is to achieve an accuracy of 2% in the velocity measurement, which translates to a {+-}2 ps temporal accuracy over any 300 ps interval for the streak camera. In order to achieve this, a 4-{omega} (263nm) temporal fiducial system has been implemented for the x-ray streak camera at NIF. Aluminum, Titanium, Gold and Silver photocathode materials have been tested. Aluminum showed the highest quantum efficiency, with five times more peak signal counts per fiducial pulse when compared to Gold. The fiducial pulse data was analyzed to determine the centroiding a statistical accuracy for incident laser pulse energies of 1 and 10 nJ, showing an accuracy of {+-}1.6 ps and {+-}0.7 ps respectively.

  19. Image recovery techniques for x-ray computed tomography in limited data environments

    SciTech Connect

    Aufderheide, M B; Goodman, D M; Jackson, J A; Johansson, E M

    1999-03-01

    There is an increasing requirement throughout LLNL for nondestructive evaluation using X-ray computed tomography (CT). In many cases, restrictions on data acquisition time, imaging geometry, and budgets make it unfeasible to acquire projection data over enough views to achieve desired spatial resolution using conventional CT methods. In particular, conventional CT methods are non-iterative algorithms that have the advantage of low computational effort, but they are not sufficiently adaptable to incorporate prior information or non-Gaussian statistics. Most currently existing iterative tomography algorithms are based on methods that are time consuming because they converge very flowingly, if at all. The goal of the work was to develop a set of limited data CT reconstruction tools and then demonstrate their usefulness by applying them to a variety of problems of interest to LLNL. In this project they continued their development of reconstruction tools and they have demonstrated their effectiveness on several important problems.

  20. Extragalactic gamma-ray signal from dark matter annihilation: a power spectrum based computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpico, P. D.; Sefusatti, E.; Gustafsson, M.; Zaharijas, G.

    2012-03-01

    We revisit the computation of the extragalactic gamma-ray signal from cosmological dark matter annihilations. The prediction of this signal is notoriously model-dependent, due to different descriptions of the clumpiness of the dark matter distribution at small scales, responsible for an enhancement with respect to the smoothly distributed case. We show how a direct computation of this 'flux multiplier' in terms of the non-linear power spectrum offers a conceptually simpler approach and may ease some problems, such as the extrapolation issue. In fact, very simple analytical recipes to construct the power spectrum yield results similar to the popular Halo Model expectations, with a straightforward alternative estimate of errors. For this specific application, one also obviates the need of identifying (often literature-dependent) concepts entering the Halo Model, to compare different simulations.

  1. Computational cost reduction by avoiding ray-linking iteration in bent-ray method for sound speed image reconstruction in ultrasound computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xiaolei; Azuma, Takashi; Lin, Hongxiang; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Tamano, Satoshi; Takagi, Shu; Umemura, Shin-ichiro; Sakuma, Ichiro; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2017-07-01

    Bent-ray reconstruction method can improve sound speed image quality, compared with straight-ray reconstruction. However, it suffers from time-consuming ray-linking iteration, because multiple rays with different launch angles have to be iteratively traced to find the ray linking the given emitter and receiver. In this study, a novel virtual receiver bent-ray method (VRBRM) was proposed to avoid the ray-linking iteration. In this method, the angle of the straight line connecting a given emitter and receiver is calculated as the launch angle, and only one ray with the calculated launch angle is traced and its arrival position at the ring transducer is recorded as the virtual receiver position. Then, the sound propagation time from the given emitter to the virtual receiver is interpolated. The results of simulation, phantom and ex vivo experiments demonstrate that the proposed method can reduce the reconstruction time to about 30% without reduction of the reconstruction quality.

  2. Industry-relevant magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc ultra-high vacuum deposition system for in situ x-ray diffraction studies of thin film growth using high energy synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, J L; Thomson, W; Howard, B; Schell, N; Näslund, L-Å; Rogström, L; Johansson-Jõesaar, M P; Ghafoor, N; Odén, M; Nothnagel, E; Shepard, A; Greer, J; Birch, J

    2015-09-01

    We present an industry-relevant, large-scale, ultra-high vacuum (UHV) magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc deposition system purposefully designed for time-resolved in situ thin film deposition/annealing studies using high-energy (>50 keV), high photon flux (>10(12) ph/s) synchrotron radiation. The high photon flux, combined with a fast-acquisition-time (<1 s) two-dimensional (2D) detector, permits time-resolved in situ structural analysis of thin film formation processes. The high-energy synchrotron-radiation based x-rays result in small scattering angles (<11°), allowing large areas of reciprocal space to be imaged with a 2D detector. The system has been designed for use on the 1-tonne, ultra-high load, high-resolution hexapod at the P07 High Energy Materials Science beamline at PETRA III at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron in Hamburg, Germany. The deposition system includes standard features of a typical UHV deposition system plus a range of special features suited for synchrotron radiation studies and industry-relevant processes. We openly encourage the materials research community to contact us for collaborative opportunities using this unique and versatile scientific instrument.

  3. Cathodes - Technological review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkouk, Charaf; Nestler, Tina

    2014-06-01

    Lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) was already used in the first commercialized Li-ion battery by SONY in 1990. Still, it is the most frequently used cathode material nowadays. However, LiCoO2 is intrinsically unstable in the charged state, especially at elevated temperatures and in the overcharged state causing volume changes and transport limitation for high power batteries. In this paper, some technological aspects with large impact on cell performance from the cathode material point of view will be reviewed. At first it will be focused on the degradation processes and life-time mechanisms of the cathode material LiCoO2. Electrochemical and structural results on commercial Li-ion batteries recorded during the cycling will be discussed. Thereafter, advanced nanomaterials for new cathode materials will be presented.

  4. Cathodes - Technological review

    SciTech Connect

    Cherkouk, Charaf; Nestler, Tina

    2014-06-16

    Lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO{sub 2}) was already used in the first commercialized Li-ion battery by SONY in 1990. Still, it is the most frequently used cathode material nowadays. However, LiCoO{sub 2} is intrinsically unstable in the charged state, especially at elevated temperatures and in the overcharged state causing volume changes and transport limitation for high power batteries. In this paper, some technological aspects with large impact on cell performance from the cathode material point of view will be reviewed. At first it will be focused on the degradation processes and life-time mechanisms of the cathode material LiCoO{sub 2}. Electrochemical and structural results on commercial Li-ion batteries recorded during the cycling will be discussed. Thereafter, advanced nanomaterials for new cathode materials will be presented.

  5. A 5,000 hour xenon hollow cathode life test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Garner, Charles E.

    1991-01-01

    A cathode life test voluntary terminated after 5024 hours of operation at 25 A is reported. The cathode including a 6.35-mm diameter by 57.12-mm long molybdenum tube with a nominal wall thickness of 0.38 mm is described along with a test facility and start-up procedure. It is shown that over the time of the experiment, the cathode-orifice diameter eroded from 1.80 mm to 2.08 mm, which corresponds to a ratio of the emission current to the orifice diameter at the end of the test of 12.0 A/mm. Tungsten deposits on the interior surface of the insert are detected in post-test analyses, and complete depletion of the original impregnate is suggested by X-ray diffraction analyses. A cathode-jet phenomenon in which energetic ions are produced during hollow-cathode operation at emission currents above 20 A is confirmed.

  6. Arcjet Cathode Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  7. Arcjet cathode phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  8. X-ray computed tomography of wood-adhesive bondlines: Attenuation and phase-contrast effects

    DOE PAGES

    Paris, Jesse L.; Kamke, Frederick A.; Xiao, Xianghui

    2015-07-29

    Microscale X-ray computed tomography (XCT) is discussed as a technique for identifying 3D adhesive distribution in wood-adhesive bondlines. Visualization and material segmentation of the adhesives from the surrounding cellular structures require sufficient gray-scale contrast in the reconstructed XCT data. Commercial wood-adhesive polymers have similar chemical characteristics and density to wood cell wall polymers and therefore do not provide good XCT attenuation contrast in their native form. Here, three different adhesive types, namely phenol formaldehyde, polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate, and a hybrid polyvinyl acetate, are tagged with iodine such that they yield sufficient X-ray attenuation contrast. However, phase-contrast effects at material edgesmore » complicate image quality and segmentation in XCT data reconstructed with conventional filtered backprojection absorption contrast algorithms. A quantitative phase retrieval algorithm, which isolates and removes the phase-contrast effect, was demonstrated. The paper discusses and illustrates the balance between material X-ray attenuation and phase-contrast effects in all quantitative XCT analyses of wood-adhesive bondlines.« less

  9. X-ray computed tomography of wood-adhesive bondlines: Attenuation and phase-contrast effects

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, Jesse L.; Kamke, Frederick A.; Xiao, Xianghui

    2015-07-29

    Microscale X-ray computed tomography (XCT) is discussed as a technique for identifying 3D adhesive distribution in wood-adhesive bondlines. Visualization and material segmentation of the adhesives from the surrounding cellular structures require sufficient gray-scale contrast in the reconstructed XCT data. Commercial wood-adhesive polymers have similar chemical characteristics and density to wood cell wall polymers and therefore do not provide good XCT attenuation contrast in their native form. Here, three different adhesive types, namely phenol formaldehyde, polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate, and a hybrid polyvinyl acetate, are tagged with iodine such that they yield sufficient X-ray attenuation contrast. However, phase-contrast effects at material edges complicate image quality and segmentation in XCT data reconstructed with conventional filtered backprojection absorption contrast algorithms. A quantitative phase retrieval algorithm, which isolates and removes the phase-contrast effect, was demonstrated. The paper discusses and illustrates the balance between material X-ray attenuation and phase-contrast effects in all quantitative XCT analyses of wood-adhesive bondlines.

  10. Fiber based fast sparse sampling x-ray luminescence computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Lun, Michael; Li, Changqing

    2017-02-01

    Super fine collimated x-ray beam based x-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) has the potential to reconstruct the deeply embedded targets with a spatial resolution of hundreds of micrometers. However, due to the low x-ray photon utilization efficiency and low optical signal sensitivity of the electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera, XLCT usually requires a long measurement time. To overcome this limitation, we propose a fiber based, fast XLCT design, in which optical fiber bundles are applied to collect the emitted optical photons on the phantom surface. Highly sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PMT) with a cooling unit and pre-amplifier are used to measure the photons from the fiber bundles. The PMT outputs are collected by a high-speed data acquisition board. A linear scan is estimated to take about 130 seconds, thus for an XLCT scan with 6 projections, we require 13 minutes for each section, which makes it feasible to have a whole body scan of XLCT. To validate our design, numerical simulations and phantom experiments have been performed. In numerical simulation studies, we have investigated the effect of the number of optical fiber bundle on the XLCT reconstruction. We found that one optical fiber bundle is sufficient to reconstruct the deeply embedded targets if measurements from 6 projections are used. Phantom experiments with multiple targets have been performed to validate the proposed fast XLCT imaging.

  11. Determination of half value layers of X-ray equipment using computed radiography imaging plates.

    PubMed

    Ariga, Eiji; Ito, Shigeki; Deji, Shizuhiko; Saze, Takuya; Nishizawa, Kunihide

    2012-01-01

    A method for determining half value layers (HVLs) of inverter-type X-ray equipment using a computed radiography (CR) systems was developed. This method is similar to the traditional method, where the air kerma (K) is measured using an ionization based dosimeter and increasing aluminum (Al) absorber thickness, but utilized an imaging plate (IP) and the sensitivity index (S number) of the CR system as the dosimeter and the dosimeter reading, respectively. The IP and the S number were calibrated using an ionization chamber having traceability to the National Standard Ionization Chamber. A modified version of the S number definition equation K=a × S(-b) was used to translate the S number to K values for X-ray beams produced using tube voltages ranging from 50 to 120 kV and additional Al filtration up to 2.5mm. The coefficient 'a' varied depending on the beam quality, while the coefficient 'b' showed a constant value of 0.991. The HVLs in the range from 1.8 to 5.5mm Al that were obtained with this method were in good agreement with those obtained with the traditional method, as uncertainties were between -7 and 4%. This method can be used to determine the HVLs of inverter-type X-ray equipment within an acceptable accuracy. Copyright © 2011 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Reverse projection retrieval in edge illumination x-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Charlotte K.; Endrizzi, Marco; Diemoz, Paul C.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) can provide three-dimensional distributions of the real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index (n=1-δ +\\text{i}β ) of the sample. Phase retrieval, i.e. the separation of attenuation and refraction data from projections that contain a combination of both, is a key step in the image reconstruction process. In EI-based x-ray phase contrast CT, this is conventionally performed on the basis of two projections acquired in opposite illumination configurations (i.e. with different positions of the pre-sample mask) at each CT angle. Displacing the pre-sample mask at each projection makes the scan susceptible to motor-induced misalignment and prevents a continuous sample rotation. We present an alternative method for the retrieval of attenuation and refraction data that does not require repositioning the pre-sample mask. The method is based on the reverse projection relation published by Zhu et al (2010 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 107 13576-81) for grating interferometry-based x-ray phase contrast CT. We use this relation to derive a simplified acquisition strategy that allows acquiring data with a continuous sample rotation, which can reduce scan time when combined with a fast read-out detector. Besides discussing the theory and the necessary alignment of the experimental setup, we present tomograms obtained with reverse projection retrieval and demonstrate their agreement with those obtained with the conventional EI retrieval.

  13. Grating-based X-ray Dark-field Computed Tomography of Living Mice

    PubMed Central

    Velroyen, A.; Yaroshenko, A.; Hahn, D.; Fehringer, A.; Tapfer, A.; Müller, M.; Noël, P.B.; Pauwels, B.; Sasov, A.; Yildirim, A.Ö.; Eickelberg, O.; Hellbach, K.; Auweter, S.D.; Meinel, F.G.; Reiser, M.F.; Bech, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in x-ray attenuating tissue caused by lung disorders like emphysema or fibrosis are subtle and thus only resolved by high-resolution computed tomography (CT). The structural reorganization, however, is of strong influence for lung function. Dark-field CT (DFCT), based on small-angle scattering of x-rays, reveals such structural changes even at resolutions coarser than the pulmonary network and thus provides access to their anatomical distribution. In this proof-of-concept study we present x-ray in vivo DFCTs of lungs of a healthy, an emphysematous and a fibrotic mouse. The tomographies show excellent depiction of the distribution of structural – and thus indirectly functional – changes in lung parenchyma, on single-modality slices in dark field as well as on multimodal fusion images. Therefore, we anticipate numerous applications of DFCT in diagnostic lung imaging. We introduce a scatter-based Hounsfield Unit (sHU) scale to facilitate comparability of scans. In this newly defined sHU scale, the pathophysiological changes by emphysema and fibrosis cause a shift towards lower numbers, compared to healthy lung tissue. PMID:26629545

  14. Three-dimensional analysis of high-resolution X-ray computed tomography data with Morpho+.

    PubMed

    Brabant, Loes; Vlassenbroeck, Jelle; De Witte, Yoni; Cnudde, Veerle; Boone, Matthieu N; Dewanckele, Jan; Van Hoorebeke, Luc

    2011-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) analysis is an essential tool to obtain quantitative results from 3D datasets. Considerable progress has been made in 3D imaging techniques, resulting in a growing need for more flexible, complete analysis packages containing advanced algorithms. At the Centre for X-ray Tomography of the Ghent University (UGCT), research is being done on the improvement of both hardware and software for high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT). UGCT collaborates with research groups from different disciplines, each having specific needs. To meet these requirements the analysis software package, Morpho+, was developed in-house. Morpho+ contains an extensive set of high-performance 3D operations to obtain object segmentation, separation, and parameterization (orientation, maximum opening, equivalent diameter, sphericity, connectivity, etc.), or to extract a 3D geometrical representation (surface mesh or skeleton) for further modeling. These algorithms have a relatively short processing time when analyzing large datasets. Additionally, Morpho+ is equipped with an interactive and intuitive user interface in which the results are visualized. The package allows scientists from various fields to obtain the necessary quantitative results when applying high-resolution X-ray CT as a research tool to the nondestructive investigation of the microstructure of materials.

  15. Investigation of I.C. samples using X-ray computer tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bord, S.; Clement, A.; Lecomte, J. C.; Marmeggi, J. C.

    2004-11-01

    Structure complexity combined with high integration level in microelectronic industry is making the analysis more and more difficult. Non Destructive Analysis of either new semiconductor generation (e.g BGA, Flipchip) or double-sided printed circuit boards, is becoming very difficult as most of the critical structure features are hidden. Although 2D-X-rays inspection is still the most popular non-destructive inspection technique (with acoustic tomography), we need advance inspection tools to improve our analysis capability. Micro 3-D tomography system, combining high-resolution microfocus X-rays technology with state of the art computer aided 3D-reconstruction possibilities provides an answer to technicians. After few minutes' data acquisition, the systems enables you to access to structure details, by using fast specimen non destructive slicing (layers analysis), and tomosynthesis 3D-reconstruction images. Test object can be visualized under arbitrary angles. As defect detectability is close to 20 microns with 3D mode, most of the critical features are detectable, without modifying specimen integrity. Several examples extracted from BGA, Flipchip, and PCB analysis show the advantage offered by this new tomography technique to microelectronic community. Key words. X-ray, radiography, inspection, Non-Destructive-Analysis, tomosynthesis, industrial application.

  16. Computer simulations of cosmic-ray diffusion near supernova remnant shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, C. E.; Zachary, A. L.; Arons, J.

    1989-01-01

    A plasma simulation model was used to study the resonant interactions between streaming cosmic-ray ions and a self-consistent spectrum of Alfven waves, such as might exist in the interstellar medium upstream of a supernova remnant shock wave. The computational model is a hybrid one, in which the background interstellar medium is an MHD fluid and the cosmic-rays are discrete kinetic particles. The particle sources for the electromagnetic fields are obtained by averaging over the fast cyclotron motions. When the perturbed magnetic field is larger than 10 percent of the background field, the macro- and microphysics are no longer correctly predicted by quasi-linear theory. The particles are trapped by the waves and show sharp jumps in their pitch-angles relative to the background magnetic field, and the effective ninety-degree scattering time for diffusion parallel to the background magnetic field is reduced to between 5 and 30 cyclotron periods. Simulation results suggest that Type 1 supernova remnants may be the principal sites of cosmic ray acceleration.

  17. Microstructural analysis using X-ray computed tomography (CT) in flax/epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersani, M.; Lomov, SV; Van Vuure, AW; Bouabdallah, A.; Verpoest, I.

    2016-07-01

    Among natural fibres which have recently become attractive to researchers, flax is probably the most commonly used bast-type fibre today. Due to its properties and availability, flax fibre has potential to substitute glass in polymer composites. A flax fibre has a complex structure; it can be classified into elementary fibres, which are grouped into so-called technical fibres. These technical fibres themselves are actually composite structures. Several works [1, 2, 3] were focussed on the study of damage behaviour in unidirectional flax fibres reinforced composites, where materials were subjected to tensile loading. At the microscopic level and at low stress, microcracks arise within the material and by growing they may lead to other forms of damage such as delamination, fibre breakage, interfacial debonding...etc. In order to better understand the damage phenomena and to better control the parameters which lead to the failure, several methods and techniques have been developed on natural fibre reinforced composites [2, 3]. In the present work, X-ray computed tomography (CT) technique has been used to observe damage in flax/epoxy quasi-unidirectional woven laminates, loaded in uniaxial tension. The tensile tests show that these composites offer good mechanical properties. X-ray computed tomography technique allowed us, on the one hand to determine the microstructure parameters of the studied composites and to observe the damage occurring during loading, on the other. The inspection of the several tomography images showed cracks on interface of the yarns and technical fibres.

  18. Monte Carlo tolerancing tool using nonsequential ray tracing on a computer cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, Christopher

    2010-08-01

    The development of a flexible tolerancing tool for illumination systems based on Matlab® and Zemax® is described in this paper. Two computationally intensive techniques are combined, Monte Carlo tolerancing and non-sequential ray tracing. Implementation of the tool on a computer cluster allows for relatively rapid tolerancing. This paper explores the tool structure, describing the splitting the task of tolerancing between Zemax and Matlab. An equation is derived that determines the number of simulated ray traces needed to accurately resolve illumination uniformity. Two examples of tolerancing illuminators are given. The first one is a projection system consisting of a pico-DLP, a light pipe, a TIR prism and the critical illumination relay optics. The second is a wide band, high performance Köhler illuminator, which includes a modified molded LED as the light source. As high performance illumination systems evolve, the practice of applying standard workshop tolerances to these systems may need to be re-examined.

  19. Photoelectronic radiology 1983; X-ray imaging with the computer-assisted technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalaqui, Jean; Sylvestre, Jacques; Robillard, Pierre; Dussault, Robert

    The development of the discipline of radiology has continued to progress from initial images depicting the structure of organs, to the exploration of dynamic and physiologic phenomena, improvements in the power of X-ray generators and with the refinement of non-toxic contrast media. Until the early part of the 1970s, radiology consisted in extrapolations from a two-dimensional image of a three-dimensional organ, and advances in diagnostic quality related chiefly to improvements in spatial resolution of the flat image. With the advent of cross-sectional imaging using computer reconstruction the emphasis has shifted to contrast resolution, to the acquisition of "pure" images in the XY plane and to an area-related approach in diagnosis, rather than to the traditional organ-oriented method. This new trend has only been made possible because of the influence of recent developments in the digital and electronics industry. This history of diagnostic radiology up to 1972 is reviewed, followed by a discussion of the major areas of interaction between X-rays and the computer, as represented by the major leading edge technologies that have already received broad acceptance by the health care profession.

  20. Optimal iodine staining of cardiac tissue for X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Butters, Timothy D; Castro, Simon J; Lowe, Tristan; Zhang, Yanmin; Lei, Ming; Withers, Philip J; Zhang, Henggui

    2014-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT) has been shown to be an effective imaging technique for a variety of materials. Due to the relatively low differential attenuation of X-rays in biological tissue, a high density contrast agent is often required to obtain optimal contrast. The contrast agent, iodine potassium iodide ([Formula: see text]), has been used in several biological studies to augment the use of XCT scanning. Recently I2KI was used in XCT scans of animal hearts to study cardiac structure and to generate 3D anatomical computer models. However, to date there has been no thorough study into the optimal use of I2KI as a contrast agent in cardiac muscle with respect to the staining times required, which has been shown to impact significantly upon the quality of results. In this study we address this issue by systematically scanning samples at various stages of the staining process. To achieve this, mouse hearts were stained for up to 58 hours and scanned at regular intervals of 6-7 hours throughout this process. Optimal staining was found to depend upon the thickness of the tissue; a simple empirical exponential relationship was derived to allow calculation of the required staining time for cardiac samples of an arbitrary size.

  1. X-Ray Computed Tomography Inspection of the Stardust Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, Karen M.; Schneberk, Daniel J.; Empey, Daniel M.; Koshti, Ajay; Pugel, D. Elizabeth; Cozmuta, Ioana; Stackpoole, Mairead; Ruffino, Norman P.; Pompa, Eddie C.; Oliveras, Ovidio; Kontinos, Dean A.

    2010-01-01

    The "Stardust" heat shield, composed of a PICA (Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator) Thermal Protection System (TPS), bonded to a composite aeroshell, contains important features which chronicle its time in space as well as re-entry. To guide the further study of the Stardust heat shield, NASA reviewed a number of techniques for inspection of the article. The goals of the inspection were: 1) to establish the material characteristics of the shield and shield components, 2) record the dimensions of shield components and assembly as compared with the pre-flight condition, 3) provide flight infonnation for validation and verification of the FIAT ablation code and PICA material property model and 4) through the evaluation of the shield material provide input to future missions which employ similar materials. Industrial X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a 3D inspection technology which can provide infonnation on material integrity, material properties (density) and dimensional measurements of the heat shield components. Computed tomographic volumetric inspections can generate a dimensionally correct, quantitatively accurate volume of the shield assembly. Because of the capabilities offered by X-ray CT, NASA chose to use this method to evaluate the Stardust heat shield. Personnel at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) and Lawrence Livermore National Labs (LLNL) recently performed a full scan of the Stardust heat shield using a newly installed X-ray CT system at JSC. This paper briefly discusses the technology used and then presents the following results: 1. CT scans derived dimensions and their comparisons with as-built dimensions anchored with data obtained from samples cut from the heat shield; 2. Measured density variation, char layer thickness, recession and bond line (the adhesive layer between the PICA and the aeroshell) integrity; 3. FIAT predicted recession, density and char layer profiles as well as bondline temperatures Finally suggestions are made as to future uses

  2. Laboratory manual: mineral X-ray diffraction data retrieval/plot computer program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hauff, Phoebe L.; VanTrump, George

    1976-01-01

    The Mineral X-Ray Diffraction Data Retrieval/Plot Computer Program--XRDPLT (VanTrump and Hauff, 1976a) is used to retrieve and plot mineral X-ray diffraction data. The program operates on a file of mineral powder diffraction data (VanTrump and Hauff, 1976b) which contains two-theta or 'd' values, and intensities, chemical formula, mineral name, identification number, and mineral group code. XRDPLT is a machine-independent Fortran program which operates in time-sharing mode on a DEC System i0 computer and the Gerber plotter (Evenden, 1974). The program prompts the user to respond from a time-sharing terminal in a conversational format with the required input information. The program offers two major options: retrieval only; retrieval and plot. The first option retrieves mineral names, formulas, and groups from the file by identification number, by the mineral group code (a classification by chemistry or structure), or by searches based on the formula components. For example, it enables the user to search for minerals by major groups (i.e., feldspars, micas, amphiboles, oxides, phosphates, carbonates) by elemental composition (i.e., Fe, Cu, AI, Zn), or by a combination of these (i.e., all copper-bearing arsenates). The second option retrieves as the first, but also plots the retrieved 2-theta and intensity values as diagrammatic X-ray powder patterns on mylar sheets or overlays. These plots can be made using scale combinations compatible with chart recorder diffractograms and 114.59 mm powder camera films. The overlays are then used to separate or sieve out unrelated minerals until unknowns are matched and identified.

  3. Gamma-ray spectrometry data collection and reduction by simple computing systems.

    PubMed

    Op de Beeck, J

    1975-12-01

    The review summarizes the present state of the involvement of relatively small computing devices in the collection and processing of gamma-ray spectrum data. An economic and utilitarian point of view has been chosen with regard to data collection in order to arrive at practically valuable conclusions in terms of feasibility of possible configurations with respect to their eventual application. A unified point of view has been adopted with regard to data processing by developing an information theoretical approach on a more or less intuitive level in an attempt to remove the largest part of the virtual disparity between the several processing methods described in the literature. A synoptical introduction to the most important mathematical methods has been incorporated, together with a detailed theoretical description of the concept gamma-ray spectrum. In accordance with modern requirements, the discussions are mainly oriented towards high-resolution semiconductor detector-type spectra. The critical evaluation of the processing methods reviewed is done with respect to a set of predefined criteria. Smoothing, peak detection, peak intensity determination, overlapping peak resolving and detection and upper limits are discussed in great detail. A preferred spectrum analysis method combining powerful data reduction properties with extreme simplicity and speed of operation is suggested. The general discussion is heavily oriented towards activation analysis application, but other disciplines making use of gamma-ray spectrometry will find the material presented equally useful. Final conclusions are given pointing to future developments and shifting their centre of gravity towards improving the quality of the measurements rather than expanding the use of tedious and sophisticated mathematical techniques requiring the limits of available computational power.

  4. Utilisation of X-Ray computed microtomography for evaluation of iron sulphide distribution in roofing slate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souček, Kamil; Daněk, Tomáš; Vavro, Martin; Botula, Jiří

    2016-04-01

    Roofing slate represents a traditional natural stone used for centuries for roofing and other construction applications in various types of buildings. Quality roofing slate must be primarily splittable into large, thin and waterproof tiles. In addition, it must be stable in colour and resistant against weathering. The abundance of mineral phases that weather easily or minerals that are long-term unstable has the effect of reducing the durability of slates in exterior conditions. One of the most problematic rock components, which are in a larger or smaller extent present in almost all slates, are iron sulphides, such as pyrite, marcasite or pyrrhotite. Under common atmospheric conditions, these minerals tend to oxidise, which leads to the formation of limonite and sulphuric acid. As a consequence of the origin of red-brown Fe oxyhydroxides, the undesirable colour changes of the slate may occur. But the most serious problem which occurs during this process is the changes in volume. This can cause disintegration of slate depending on the form of the iron sulphide occurrence. The content and size distribution of iron sulphides in roofing slate is normally determined using the microscopic analysis in transmitted light, combined with the observation in reflected light. For quantitative determination of iron sulphides in slate, the X-Ray powder diffraction is also often used. The results of the microscopic and X-Ray analyses need to be mutually compared and should not differ fundamentally. This paper is focused on the assessing the possibility of application of the X-Ray computed microtomography (CT) as a new complementary technique enabling the analysis of content and size (volume) distribution of iron sulphides in roofing slate. The X-Ray CT study was conducted using an XT H 225 ST industrial micro-tomographic system made by Nikon Metrology NV. Studied samples were reconstructed using the CT Pro 3D software (Nikon Metrology NV). The visualisation and analysis software

  5. Microanalysis of extended-test xenon hollow cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhey, Timothy R.; Patterson, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    Four hollow cathode electron sources were analyzed via boroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x ray analysis, and x ray diffraction analysis. These techniques were used to develop a preliminary understanding of the chemistry of the devices that arise from contamination due to inadequate feed-system integrity and improper insert activation. Two hollow cathodes were operated in an ion thruster simulator at an emission current of 23.0 A for approximately 500 hrs. The two tests differed in propellant-feed systems, discharge power supplies, and activation procedures. Tungsten deposition and barium tungstate formation on the internal cathode surfaces occurred during the first test, which were believed to result from oxygen contamination of the propellant feed-system. Consequently, the test facility was upgraded to reduce contamination, and the test was repeated. The second hollow cathode was found to have experienced significantly less tungsten deposition. A second pair of cathodes examined were the discharge and the neutralizer hollow cathodes used in a life-test of a 30-cm ring-cusp ion thruster at a 5.5 kW power level. The cathodes' test history was documented and the post-test microanalyses are described. The most significant change resulting from the life-test was substantial tungsten deposition on the internal cathode surfaces, as well as removal of material from the insert surface. In addition, barium tungstate and molybdate were found on insert surfaces. As a result of the cathode examinations, procedures and approaches were proposed for improved discharge ignition and cathode longevity.

  6. Computational time-resolved and resonant x-ray scattering of strongly correlated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bansil, Arun

    2016-11-09

    Basic-Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy (BES/DOE) has made large investments in x-ray sources in the U.S. (NSLS-II, LCLS, NGLS, ALS, APS) as powerful enabling tools for opening up unprecedented new opportunities for exploring properties of matter at various length and time scales. The coming online of the pulsed photon source, literally allows us to see and follow the dynamics of processes in materials at their natural timescales. There is an urgent need therefore to develop theoretical methodologies and computational models for understanding how x-rays interact with matter and the related spectroscopies of materials. The present project addressed aspects of this grand challenge of x-ray science. In particular, our Collaborative Research Team (CRT) focused on developing viable computational schemes for modeling x-ray scattering and photoemission spectra of strongly correlated materials in the time-domain. The vast arsenal of formal/numerical techniques and approaches encompassed by the members of our CRT were brought to bear through appropriate generalizations and extensions to model the pumped state and the dynamics of this non-equilibrium state, and how it can be probed via x-ray absorption (XAS), emission (XES), resonant and non-resonant x-ray scattering, and photoemission processes. We explored the conceptual connections between the time-domain problems and other second-order spectroscopies, such as resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) because RIXS may be effectively thought of as a pump-probe experiment in which the incoming photon acts as the pump, and the fluorescent decay is the probe. Alternatively, when the core-valence interactions are strong, one can view K-edge RIXS for example, as the dynamic response of the material to the transient presence of a strong core-hole potential. Unlike an actual pump-probe experiment, here there is no mechanism for adjusting the time-delay between the pump and the probe. However, the core hole

  7. Modular Low-Heater-Power Cathode/Electron Gun Assembly for Microwave and Millimeter Wave Traveling Wave Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2000-01-01

    A low-cost, low-mass, electrically efficient, modular cathode/electron gun assembly has been developed by FDE Inc. of Beaverton, Oregon, under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. This new assembly offers significant improvements in the design and manufacture of microwave and millimeter wave traveling-wave tubes (TWT's) used for radar and communications. It incorporates a novel, low-heater-power, reduced size and mass, high-performance barium dispenser type thermionic cathode and provides for easy integration of the cathode into a large variety of conventional TWT circuits. Among the applications are TWT's for Earth-orbiting communication satellites and for deep space communications, where future missions will require smaller spacecraft, higher data transfer rates (higher frequencies and radiofrequency output power), and greater electrical efficiency. A particularly important TWT application is in the microwave power module (a hybrid microwave/millimeter wave amplifier consisting of a low-noise solid-state driver, a small TWT, and an electronic power conditioner integrated into a single compact package), where electrical efficiency and thermal loading are critical factors and lower cost is needed for successful commercialization. The design and fabrication are based on practices used in producing cathode ray tubes (CRT's), which is one of the most competitive and efficient manufacturing operations in the world today. The approach used in the design and manufacture of thermionic cathodes and electron guns for CRT's has been optimized for fully automated production, standardization of parts, and minimization of costs. It is applicable to the production of similar components for microwave tubes, with the additional benefits of low mass and significantly lower cathode heater power (less than half that of dispenser cathodes presently used in TWT s). Modular cathode/electron gun assembly. The modular

  8. 3D printing of preclinical X-ray computed tomographic data sets.

    PubMed

    Doney, Evan; Krumdick, Lauren A; Diener, Justin M; Wathen, Connor A; Chapman, Sarah E; Stamile, Brian; Scott, Jeremiah E; Ravosa, Matthew J; Van Avermaete, Tony; Leevy, W Matthew

    2013-03-22

    Three-dimensional printing allows for the production of highly detailed objects through a process known as additive manufacturing. Traditional, mold-injection methods to create models or parts have several limitations, the most important of which is a difficulty in making highly complex products in a timely, cost-effective manner.(1) However, gradual improvements in three-dimensional printing technology have resulted in both high-end and economy instruments that are now available for the facile production of customized models.(2) These printers have the ability to extrude high-resolution objects with enough detail to accurately represent in vivo images generated from a preclinical X-ray CT scanner. With proper data collection, surface rendering, and stereolithographic editing, it is now possible and inexpensive to rapidly produce detailed skeletal and soft tissue structures from X-ray CT data. Even in the early stages of development, the anatomical models produced by three-dimensional printing appeal to both educators and researchers who can utilize the technology to improve visualization proficiency. (3, 4) The real benefits of this method result from the tangible experience a researcher can have with data that cannot be adequately conveyed through a computer screen. The translation of pre-clinical 3D data to a physical object that is an exact copy of the test subject is a powerful tool for visualization and communication, especially for relating imaging research to students, or those in other fields. Here, we provide a detailed method for printing plastic models of bone and organ structures derived from X-ray CT scans utilizing an Albira X-ray CT system in conjunction with PMOD, ImageJ, Meshlab, Netfabb, and ReplicatorG software packages.

  9. Experimental demonstration of novel imaging geometries for x-ray fluorescence computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Geng; Meng, Ling-Jian; Eng, Peter; Newville, Matt; Vargas, Phillip; Riviere, Patrick La

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) is an emerging imaging modality that maps the three-dimensional distribution of elements, generally metals, in ex vivo specimens and potentially in living animals and humans. At present, it is generally performed at synchrotrons, taking advantage of the high flux of monochromatic x rays, but recent work has demonstrated the feasibility of using laboratory-based x-ray tube sources. In this paper, the authors report the development and experimental implementation of two novel imaging geometries for mapping of trace metals in biological samples with ∼50–500 μm spatial resolution. Methods: One of the new imaging approaches involves illuminating and scanning a single slice of the object and imaging each slice's x-ray fluorescent emissions using a position-sensitive detector and a pinhole collimator. The other involves illuminating a single line through the object and imaging the emissions using a position-sensitive detector and a slit collimator. They have implemented both of these using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Photon Source. Results: The authors show that it is possible to achieve 250 eV energy resolution using an electron multiplying CCD operating in a quasiphoton-counting mode. Doing so allowed them to generate elemental images using both of the novel geometries for imaging of phantoms and, for the second geometry, an osmium-stained zebrafish. Conclusions: The authors have demonstrated the feasibility of these two novel approaches to XFCT imaging. While they use synchrotron radiation in this demonstration, the geometries could readily be translated to laboratory systems based on tube sources. PMID:23718594

  10. 3D Printing of Preclinical X-ray Computed Tomographic Data Sets

    PubMed Central

    Doney, Evan; Krumdick, Lauren A.; Diener, Justin M.; Wathen, Connor A.; Chapman, Sarah E.; Stamile, Brian; Scott, Jeremiah E.; Ravosa, Matthew J.; Van Avermaete, Tony; Leevy, W. Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional printing allows for the production of highly detailed objects through a process known as additive manufacturing. Traditional, mold-injection methods to create models or parts have several limitations, the most important of which is a difficulty in making highly complex products in a timely, cost-effective manner.1 However, gradual improvements in three-dimensional printing technology have resulted in both high-end and economy instruments that are now available for the facile production of customized models.2 These printers have the ability to extrude high-resolution objects with enough detail to accurately represent in vivo images generated from a preclinical X-ray CT scanner. With proper data collection, surface rendering, and stereolithographic editing, it is now possible and inexpensive to rapidly produce detailed skeletal and soft tissue structures from X-ray CT data. Even in the early stages of development, the anatomical models produced by three-dimensional printing appeal to both educators and researchers who can utilize the technology to improve visualization proficiency. 3, 4 The real benefits of this method result from the tangible experience a researcher can have with data that cannot be adequately conveyed through a computer screen. The translation of pre-clinical 3D data to a physical object that is an exact copy of the test subject is a powerful tool for visualization and communication, especially for relating imaging research to students, or those in other fields. Here, we provide a detailed method for printing plastic models of bone and organ structures derived from X-ray CT scans utilizing an Albira X-ray CT system in conjunction with PMOD, ImageJ, Meshlab, Netfabb, and ReplicatorG software packages. PMID:23542702

  11. L-shell x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) imaging of Cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Bazalova, Magdalena; Ahmad, Moiz; Pratx, Guillem; Xing, Lei

    2014-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) imaging has been focused on the detection of K-shell X-rays. The potential utility of L-shell x-ray XFCT is, however, not well studied. Here we report the first Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of preclinical L-shell XFCT imaging of Cisplatin. We built MC models for both L- and K-shell XFCT with different excitation energies (15 and 30 keV for L-shell and 80 keV for K-shell XFCT). Two small-animal sized imaging phantoms of 2-cm and 4-cm diameter containing a series of objects of 0.6 to 2.7 mm in diameter at 0.7 to 16 mm depths with 10 to 250 μg/mL concentrations of Pt are used in the study. Transmitted and scattered x-rays were collected with photon-integrating transmission detector and photon-counting detector arc, respectively. Collected data were rearranged into XFCT and transmission CT sinograms for image reconstruction. XFCT images were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP) and with iterative maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM) without and with attenuation correction. While K-shell XFCT was capable of providing accurate measurement of Cisplatin concentration, its sensitivity was 4.4 and 3.0 times lower than that of L-shell XFCT with 15 keV excitation beam for the 2-cm and 4-cm diameter phantom, respectively. With inclusion of excitation and fluorescence beam attenuation correction, we found that L-shell XFCT was capable of providing fairly accurate information of Cisplatin concentration distribution. With a dose of 29 and 58 mGy, clinically relevant Cisplatin Pt concentrations of 10 μg/mg could be imaged with L-shell XFCT inside a 2-cm and 4-cm diameter object, respectively. PMID:24334507

  12. Sensitivity of photon-counting based K-edge imaging in X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Roessl, Ewald; Brendel, Bernhard; Engel, Klaus-Jürgen; Schlomka, Jens-Peter; Thran, Axel; Proksa, Roland

    2011-09-01

    The feasibility of K-edge imaging using energy-resolved, photon-counting transmission measurements in X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been demonstrated by simulations and experiments. The method is based on probing the discontinuities of the attenuation coefficient of heavy elements above and below the K-edge energy by using energy-sensitive, photon counting X-ray detectors. In this paper, we investigate the dependence of the sensitivity of K-edge imaging on the atomic number Z of the contrast material, on the object diameter D , on the spectral response of the X-ray detector and on the X-ray tube voltage. We assume a photon-counting detector equipped with six adjustable energy thresholds. Physical effects leading to a degradation of the energy resolution of the detector are taken into account using the concept of a spectral response function R(E,U) for which we assume four different models. As a validation of our analytical considerations and in order to investigate the influence of elliptically shaped phantoms, we provide CT simulations of an anthropomorphic Forbild-Abdomen phantom containing a gold-contrast agent. The dependence on the values of the energy thresholds is taken into account by optimizing the achievable signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) with respect to the threshold values. We find that for a given X-ray spectrum and object size the SNR in the heavy element's basis material image peaks for a certain atomic number Z. The dependence of the SNR in the high- Z basis-material image on the object diameter is the natural, exponential decrease with particularly deteriorating effects in the case where the attenuation from the object itself causes a total signal loss below the K-edge. The influence of the energy-response of the detector is very important. We observed that the optimal SNR values obtained with an ideal detector and with a CdTe pixel detector whose response, showing significant tailing, has been determined at a synchrotron differ by factors of

  13. Material/element-dependent fluorescence-yield modes on soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Asakura, Daisuke; Hosono, Eiji; Nanba, Yusuke; ...

    2016-03-07

    Here, we evaluate the utilities of fluorescence-yield (FY) modes in soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of several cathodematerials for Li-ion batteries. In the case of total-FY (TFY) XAS for LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4, the line shape of the Mn L3-edge XAS was largely distorted by the self-absorption and saturation effects, while the distortions were less pronounced at the NiL3 edge. The distortions were suppressed for the inverse-partial-FY (IPFY) spectra. We found that, in the cathodematerials, the IPFY XAS is highly effective for the Cr, Mn, and Fe L edges and the TFY and PFY modes are useful enough for the NiL edge whichmore » is far from the O K edge.« less

  14. Wave propagation simulation based on the Fourier diffraction integral for X-ray refraction contrast imaging-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Won-Seok; Kim, Jong-Ki; Cho, Jin-Ho; Lim, Jae-Hong

    2016-09-01

    With the advent of coherent X-ray sources, X-ray refraction has begun to be utilized for X-ray imaging of unprecedented sensitivity. The aim of this study was to develop a wave propagation simulator that provides a map of X-ray refraction after passing through an object. We applied the Fresnel diffraction integral for calculating the propagated wave and then obtained the refraction map by differentiating the phase in the refraction-analyzing direction. The simulation was validated by comparing the computed tomography (CT) reconstruction of a virtual phantom with its map of refractive index: the deviations were below 0.7% for soft tissues under our test condition. The simulator can be used for testing and developing highly-sensitive X-ray imaging techniques based on X-ray refraction analysis prior to experimentation.

  15. Mixed polyanion glass cathodes: Iron phosphate vanadate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kercher, Andrew K; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Carroll, Kyler J; Kiggans Jr, James O; Veith, Gabriel M; Meisner, Roberta; Boatner, Lynn A; Dudney, Nancy J

    2014-01-01

    Mixed polyanion (MP) glasses have been investigated for use as cathodes in lithium ion batteries. MP glass cathodes are similar in composition to theoretically promising crystalline polyanionic (CP) cathodes (e.g., lithium cobalt phosphate, lithium manganese silicate), but with proper polyanion substitution, they can be designed to overcome the key shortcomings of CP cathodes, such as poor electrical conductivity and irreversible phase changes. Iron phosphate/vanadate glasses were chosen as a first demonstration of the MP glass concept. Polyanion substitution with vanadate was shown to improve the intercalation capacity of an iron phosphate glass from almost zero to full theoretical capacity. In addition, the MP glass cathodes also exhibited an unexpected second high-capacity electrochemical reaction. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) of cathodes from cells having different states of charge suggested that this second electrochemical reaction is a glass-state conversion reaction. With a first demonstration established, MP glass materials utilizing an intercalation and/or glass-state conversion reaction are promising candidates for future high-energy cathode research.

  16. A measurement-based X-ray source model characterization for CT dosimetry computations.

    PubMed

    Sommerville, Mitchell; Poirier, Yannick; Tambasco, Mauro

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to show that the nominal peak tube voltage potential (kVp) and measured half-value layer (HVL) can be used to generate energy spectra and fluence profiles for characterizing a computed tomography (CT) X-ray source, and to validate the source model and an in-house kV X-ray dose computation algorithm (kVDoseCalc) for computing machine- and patient-specific CT dose. Spatial variation of the X-ray source spectra of a Philips Brilliance and a GE Optima Big Bore CT scanner were found by measuring the HVL along the direction of the internal bow-tie filter axes. Third-party software, Spektr, and the nominal kVp settings were used to generate the energy spectra. Beam fluence was calculated by dividing the integral product of the spectra and the in-air NIST mass-energy attenuation coefficients by in-air dose measurements along the filter axis. The authors found the optimal number of photons to seed in kVDoseCalc to achieve dose convergence. The Philips Brilliance beams were modeled for 90, 120, and 140 kVp tube settings. The GE Optima beams were modeled for 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp tube settings. Relative doses measured using a Capintec Farmer-type ionization chamber (0.65 cc) placed in a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom and irradiated by the Philips Brilliance, were compared to those computed with kVDoseCalc. Relative doses in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom (E2E SBRT Phantom) irradiated by the GE Optima were measured using a (0.015 cc) PTW Freiburg ionization chamber and compared to computations from kVDoseCalc. The number of photons required to reduce the average statistical uncertainty in dose to <0.3% was 2×105. The average percent difference between calculation and measurement over all 12 PMMA phantom positions was found to be 1.44%, 1.47%, and 1.41% for 90, 120, and 140 kVp, respectively. The maximum percent difference between calculation and measurement for all energies, measurement positions, and phantoms was less

  17. A measurement-based X-ray source model characterization for CT dosimetry computations.

    PubMed

    Sommerville, Mitchell; Poirier, Yannick; Tambasco, Mauro

    2015-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to show that the nominal peak tube voltage potential (kVp) and measured half-value layer (HVL) can be used to generate energy spectra and fluence profiles for characterizing a computed tomography (CT) X-ray source, and to validate the source model and an in-house kV X-ray dose computation algorithm (kVDoseCalc) for computing machine- and patient-specific CT dose. Spatial variation of the X-ray source spectra of a Philips Brilliance and a GE Optima Big Bore CT scanner were found by measuring the HVL along the direction of the internal bow-tie filter axes. Third-party software, Spektr, and the nominal kVp settings were used to generate the energy spectra. Beam fluence was calculated by dividing the integral product of the spectra and the in-air NIST mass-energy attenuation coefficients by in-air dose measurements along the filter axis. The authors found the optimal number of photons to seed in kVDoseCalc to achieve dose convergence. The Philips Brilliance beams were modeled for 90, 120, and 140 kVp tube settings. The GE Optima beams were modeled for 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp tube settings. Relative doses measured using a Capintec Farmer-type ionization chamber (0.65 cc) placed in a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom and irradiated by the Philips Brilliance, were compared to those computed with kVDoseCalc. Relative doses in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom (E2E SBRT Phantom) irradiated by the GE Optima were measured using a (0.015 cc) PTW Freiburg ionization chamber and compared to computations from kVDoseCalc. The number of photons required to reduce the average statistical uncertainty in dose to < 0.3% was 2 × 105. The average percent difference between calculation and measurement over all 12 PMMA phantom positions was found to be 1.44%, 1.47%, and 1.41% for 90, 120, and 140 kVp, respectively. The maximum percent difference between calculation and measurement for all energies, measurement positions, and phantoms was

  18. Cathode materials review

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Claus Mohanty, Debasish Li, Jianlin Wood, David L.

    2014-06-16

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO{sub 2} cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  19. Cathode materials review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Claus; Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Wood, David L.

    2014-06-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  20. Recent developments in oxide cathode research for CRT applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barratt, D. S.; Gaertner, G.

    2003-06-01

    Most of the improvement trends of cathode ray tubes (CRTs), which are still unsurpassed in cost efficiency and in front of screen performance, also require improved cathodes. In this paper, some of the recent work published by CRT companies is reviewed and details of more recent studies undertaken within LG-Philips Displays are given, which are aimed at improving the performance of the oxide cathode. In particular, the focus is directed on two main areas, namely the interface between cap and spray layer, and the composition and modification of the spray layer itself.

  1. Cavity-hollow cathode-sputtering source for titanium films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrittwieser, R.; Ionita, C.; Murawski, A.; Maszl, C.; Asandulesa, M.; Nastuta, A.; Rusu, G.; Douat, C.; Olenici, S. B.; Vojvodic, I.; Dobromir, M.; Luca, D.; Jaksch, S.; Scheier, P.

    2010-08-01

    A cavity-hollow cathode was investigated as low-cost sputtering source for titanium. An argon discharge is produced inside a hollow cathode consisting of two specifically formed disks of titanium. An additional cavity further enhances the pendulum effect of the electrons. Measurements with small Langmuir probes yielded evidence for the formation of a space charge double layer above the cathode. The sputtered atoms form negatively charged clusters. After further acceleration by the double layer the clusters impinge on the substrates. Titanium thin films were produced on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. The films were investigated by a scanning tunnel microscope and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  2. Region of interest processing for iterative reconstruction in x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Felix K.; Nasirudin, Radin A.; Mei, Kai; Fehringer, Andreas; Pfeiffer, Franz; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Noël, Peter B.

    2015-03-01

    The recent advancements in the graphics card technology raised the performance of parallel computing and contributed to the introduction of iterative reconstruction methods for x-ray computed tomography in clinical CT scanners. Iterative maximum likelihood (ML) based reconstruction methods are known to reduce image noise and to improve the diagnostic quality of low-dose CT. However, iterative reconstruction of a region of interest (ROI), especially ML based, is challenging. But for some clinical procedures, like cardiac CT, only a ROI is needed for diagnostics. A high-resolution reconstruction of the full field of view (FOV) consumes unnecessary computation effort that results in a slower reconstruction than clinically acceptable. In this work, we present an extension and evaluation of an existing ROI processing algorithm. Especially improvements for the equalization between regions inside and outside of a ROI are proposed. The evaluation was done on data collected from a clinical CT scanner. The performance of the different algorithms is qualitatively and quantitatively assessed. Our solution to the ROI problem provides an increase in signal-to-noise ratio and leads to visually less noise in the final reconstruction. The reconstruction speed of our technique was observed to be comparable with other previous proposed techniques. The development of ROI processing algorithms in combination with iterative reconstruction will provide higher diagnostic quality in the near future.

  3. Analysis of iterative region-of-interest image reconstruction for x-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sidky, Emil Y.; Kraemer, David N.; Roth, Erin G.; Ullberg, Christer; Reiser, Ingrid S.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. One of the challenges for iterative image reconstruction (IIR) is that such algorithms solve an imaging model implicitly, requiring a complete representation of the scanned subject within the viewing domain of the scanner. This requirement can place a prohibitively high computational burden for IIR applied to x-ray computed tomography (CT), especially when high-resolution tomographic volumes are required. In this work, we aim to develop an IIR algorithm for direct region-of-interest (ROI) image reconstruction. The proposed class of IIR algorithms is based on an optimization problem that incorporates a data fidelity term, which compares a derivative of the estimated data with the available projection data. In order to characterize this optimization problem, we apply it to computer-simulated two-dimensional fan-beam CT data, using both ideal noiseless data and realistic data containing a level of noise comparable to that of the breast CT application. The proposed method is demonstrated for both complete field-of-view and ROI imaging. To demonstrate the potential utility of the proposed ROI imaging method, it is applied to actual CT scanner data. PMID:25685824

  4. Quantitative X-ray computed tomography peritoneography in malignant peritoneal mesothelioma patients receiving intraperitoneal chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Leinwand, Joshua C; Zhao, Binsheng; Guo, Xiaotao; Krishnamoorthy, Saravanan; Qi, Jing; Graziano, Joseph H; Slavkovic, Vesna N; Bates, Gleneara E; Lewin, Sharyn N; Allendorf, John D; Chabot, John A; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Taub, Robert N

    2013-12-01

    Intraperitoneal chemotherapy is used to treat peritoneal surface-spreading malignancies. We sought to determine whether volume and surface area of the intraperitoneal chemotherapy compartments are associated with overall survival and posttreatment glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) patients. Thirty-eight MPM patients underwent X-ray computed tomography peritoneograms during outpatient intraperitoneal chemotherapy. We calculated volume and surface area of contrast-filled compartments by semiautomated computer algorithm. We tested whether these were associated with overall survival and posttreatment GFR. Decreased likelihood of mortality was associated with larger surface areas (p = 0.0201) and smaller contrast-filled compartment volumes (p = 0.0341), controlling for age, sex, histologic subtype, and presence of residual disease >0.5 cm postoperatively. Larger volumes were associated with higher posttreatment GFR, controlling for pretreatment GFR, body surface area, surface area, and the interaction between body surface area and volume (p = 0.0167). Computed tomography peritoneography is an appropriate modality to assess for maldistribution of intraperitoneal chemotherapy. In addition to identifying catheter failure and frank loculation, quantitative analysis of the contrast-filled compartment's surface area and volume may predict overall survival and cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Prospective studies should be undertaken to confirm and extend these findings to other diseases, including advanced ovarian carcinoma.

  5. Material/element-dependent fluorescence-yield modes on soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Asakura, Daisuke; Hosono, Eiji; Nanba, Yusuke; Zhou, Haoshen; Okabayashi, Jun; Ban, Chunmei; Glans, Per -Anders; Guo, Jinghua; Mizokawa, Takashi; Chen, Gang; Achkar, Andrew J.; Hawthron, David G.; Regier, Thomas Z.; Wadati, Hiroki

    2016-03-07

    Here, we evaluate the utilities of fluorescence-yield (FY) modes in soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of several cathodematerials for Li-ion batteries. In the case of total-FY (TFY) XAS for LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4, the line shape of the Mn L3-edge XAS was largely distorted by the self-absorption and saturation effects, while the distortions were less pronounced at the NiL3 edge. The distortions were suppressed for the inverse-partial-FY (IPFY) spectra. We found that, in the cathodematerials, the IPFY XAS is highly effective for the Cr, Mn, and Fe L edges and the TFY and PFY modes are useful enough for the NiL edge which is far from the O K edge.

  6. X-ray computed tomography datasets for forensic analysis of vertebrate fossils

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Timothy B.; Luo, Zhe-Xi; Ketcham, Richard A.; Maisano, Jessica A.; Colbert, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    We describe X-ray computed tomography (CT) datasets from three specimens recovered from Early Cretaceous lakebeds of China that illustrate the forensic interpretation of CT imagery for paleontology. Fossil vertebrates from thinly bedded sediments often shatter upon discovery and are commonly repaired as amalgamated mosaics grouted to a solid backing slab of rock or plaster. Such methods are prone to inadvertent error and willful forgery, and once required potentially destructive methods to identify mistakes in reconstruction. CT is an efficient, nondestructive alternative that can disclose many clues about how a specimen was handled and repaired. These annotated datasets illustrate the power of CT in documenting specimen integrity and are intended as a reference in applying CT more broadly to evaluating the authenticity of comparable fossils. PMID:27272251

  7. Laboratory x-ray micro-computed tomography: a user guideline for biological samples

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Laboratory x-ray micro–computed tomography (micro-CT) is a fast-growing method in scientific research applications that allows for non-destructive imaging of morphological structures. This paper provides an easily operated “how to” guide for new potential users and describes the various steps required for successful planning of research projects that involve micro-CT. Background information on micro-CT is provided, followed by relevant setup, scanning, reconstructing, and visualization methods and considerations. Throughout the guide, a Jackson's chameleon specimen, which was scanned at different settings, is used as an interactive example. The ultimate aim of this paper is make new users familiar with the concepts and applications of micro-CT in an attempt to promote its use in future scientific studies. PMID:28419369

  8. Gorham disease of the craniocervical junction: X-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Kilicoglu, Z Gamze; Kizildemir Kis, Naciye; Vardar Aker, Fügen; Berkman, M Zafer; Simsek, M Masum

    2013-05-01

    Gorham disease of massive osteolysis is a spontaneous, idiopathic, and progressive form of primary osteolysis. It has no age, sex, or race predilection, and patients are mostly asymptomatic until severe deformity or pathological fracture becomes evident. A patient with craniocervical involvement is presented, describing imaging findings with a review of the literature to provide an insight into the disorder. Case report and review of the literature. X-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings of a patient with findings related to the site of involvement. All images demonstrate osteolysis typically described for the disease. Differential diagnosis and key features are indicated. Operative findings and pathological analysis were also consistent with the findings. Patient's follow-up is also reported. This benign appearing yet disabling disease may become fatal in relation to the site involved. Acknowledging imaging findings may provide early diagnosis for timely intervention or supportive management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Measurements of the density profile in oxidized graphite by X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioka, I.; Yoda, S.

    1988-01-01

    A computed tomography (CT) has been applied to the measurement of the density profile in nuclear-grade isotropic graphite (IG-11) having an oxidation gradient. The density profile of oxidized graphite was estimated from the CT number of oxidized graphite as the basis of the CT number and density of unoxidized graphite. On the other hand, the density profile of oxidized graphite was calculated from the weight loss and volume of the removed layer which were incrementally ground from the exterior surface. The agreement between the estimated and the measured results was good in regard to the density profile of oxidized graphite. Further, some tomograms of nuclear-grade graphites with artificial defects were tested using the X-ray CT scanner. The features of the defects in the graphite were also verified from the tomograms, but the accurate dimension of these defects could not be obtained.

  10. The X-ray system of crystallographic programs for any computer having a PIDGIN FORTRAN compiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, J. M.; Kruger, G. J.; Ammon, H. L.; Dickinson, C.; Hall, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    A manual is presented for the use of a library of crystallographic programs. This library, called the X-ray system, is designed to carry out the calculations required to solve the structure of crystals by diffraction techniques. It has been implemented at the University of Maryland on the Univac 1108. It has, however, been developed and run on a variety of machines under various operating systems. It is considered to be an essentially machine independent library of applications programs. The report includes definition of crystallographic computing terms, program descriptions, with some text to show their application to specific crystal problems, detailed card input descriptions, mass storage file structure and some example run streams.

  11. Analysis of detectability loss through fan-beam x-ray computed tomography reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Adrian A.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2013-03-01

    We consider detection of a small signal in fan-beam x-ray computed tomography (CT). In order to characterize the loss of intrinsic signal detectability from the projection data (sinogram) domain to the reconstructed image, we analyze the Hotelling observer SNR in each domain. Further, we characterize the loss of Hotelling observer SNR through decomposition into two components: loss of signal detectability which arises due to unequal variance in the noise of separate detector elements and loss of detectability arising from the fact that some noiseless signals have components which lie in the nullspace of a given reconstruction operator. The proposed methodology is investigated for the back-projection ltration (BPF) algorithm developed by our group [2].

  12. X-ray aided permeability computations inside compaction bands in sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, J.; Lenoir, N.; Sun, W.; Rudnicki, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    This work presents preliminary data on permeability calculations using 3D X-ray tomography images taken inside and outside compaction bands. Aztec sandstone samples are taken from the Valley of Fire in Nevada and are scanned using the synchrotron APS facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The 3D microstructures inside and outside the compaction bands, formed in situ, are then used to perform lattice Boltzmann computations to estimate the components of permeability in different principal directions. We show that i) the permeability component in the direction perpendicular to the compaction band is reduced by orders of magnitude in the presence of a compaction band, ii) inside the compaction band, there is a strong anisotropy manifested by the permeability tensor, and iii) the Kozeny-Carman relation does a pretty good job at estimating the permeability outside of the compaction band, but fails to estimate the reduction in permeability in the presence of compaction bands.

  13. Applied x-ray computed tomography with high resolution in paleontology using laboratory and synchrotron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidola, Pidassa; Pacheco, Mirian L. A. F.; Stockmar, Marco K.; Achterhold, Klaus; Pfeiffer, Franz; Beckmann, Felix; Tafforeau, Paul; Herzen, Julia

    2014-09-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has become an established technique in the biomedical imaging or materials science research. Its ability to non-destructively provide high-resolution images of samples makes it attractive for diverse fields of research especially the paleontology. Exceptionally, the Precambrian is a geological time of rocks deposition containing several fossilized early animals, which still need to be investigated in order to predict the origin and evolution of early life. Corumbella werneri is one of those fossils skeletonized in Corumbá (Brazil). Here, we present a study on selected specimens of Corumbella werneri using absorption-based contrast imaging at diverse tomographic setups. We investigated the potential of conventional laboratory-based device and synchrotron radiation sources to visualize internal structures of the fossils. The obtained results are discussed as well as the encountered limitations of those setups.

  14. SYNCHROTRON X-RAY MICROPROBE AND COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY FOR CHARACTERIZATION OF NANOCATALYSTS.

    SciTech Connect

    JONES, K.W.; FENG, H.; LANZIROTTI, A.; MAHAJAN, D.

    2004-06-01

    Gas-to-liquids (GTL) is a viable pathway for synthesis of clean fuels from natural gas. One of the attractive synthesis options is the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) method using an iron catalyst to yield a broad range of hydrocarbons. We collected catalyst samples during three separate F-T runs that utilized nanophase (mean particle diameter (MPD): 3 nm and 20-80 nm) and micrometer-sized (32.5 ? m) Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} that served as catalyst precursors. The collected samples were characterized with micro x-ray fluorescence and computed Microtomography at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Results found with two different measurement techniques indicated that there was heterogeneity on a spatial scale corresponding to volumes of roughly 10{sup 3} {micro}m{sup 3}.

  15. Determination of Diffusion Profiles in Altered Wellbore Cement Using X-ray Computed Tomography Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Harris E.; Walsh, Stuart D. C.; DuFrane, Wyatt L.; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-06-17

    The development of accurate, predictive models for use in determining wellbore integrity requires detailed information about the chemical and mechanical changes occurring in hardened Portland cements. X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) provides a method that can nondestructively probe these changes in three dimensions. Here, we describe a method for extracting subvoxel mineralogical and chemical information from synchrotron XRCT images by combining advanced image segmentation with geochemical models of cement alteration. The method relies on determining “effective linear activity coefficients” (ELAC) for the white light source to generate calibration curves that relate the image grayscales to material composition. The resulting data set supports the modeling of cement alteration by CO2-rich brine with discrete increases in calcium concentration at reaction boundaries. The results of these XRCT analyses can be used to further improve coupled geochemical and mechanical models of cement alteration in the wellbore environment.

  16. X-ray computed tomography library of shark anatomy and lower jaw surface models.

    PubMed

    Kamminga, Pepijn; De Bruin, Paul W; Geleijns, Jacob; Brazeau, Martin D

    2017-04-11

    The cranial diversity of sharks reflects disparate biomechanical adaptations to feeding. In order to be able to investigate and better understand the ecomorphology of extant shark feeding systems, we created a x-ray computed tomography (CT) library of shark cranial anatomy with three-dimensional (3D) lower jaw reconstructions. This is used to examine and quantify lower jaw disparity in extant shark species in a separate study. The library is divided in a dataset comprised of medical CT scans of 122 sharks (Selachimorpha, Chondrichthyes) representing 73 extant species, including digitized morphology of entire shark specimens. This CT dataset and additional data provided by other researchers was used to reconstruct a second dataset containing 3D models of the left lower jaw for 153 individuals representing 94 extant shark species. These datasets form an extensive anatomical record of shark skeletal anatomy, necessary for comparative morphological, biomechanical, ecological and phylogenetic studies.

  17. A convolutional neural network approach to calibrating the rotation axis for X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaogang; De Carlo, Francesco; Phatak, Charudatta; Gürsoy, Dogˇa

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents an algorithm to calibrate the center-of-rotation for X-ray tomography by using a machine learning approach, the Convolutional Neural Network (CNN). The algorithm shows excellent accuracy from the evaluation of synthetic data with various noise ratios. It is further validated with experimental data of four different shale samples measured at the Advanced Photon Source and at the Swiss Light Source. The results are as good as those determined by visual inspection and show better robustness than conventional methods. CNN has also great potential for reducing or removing other artifacts caused by instrument instability, detector non-linearity, etc. An open-source toolbox, which integrates the CNN methods described in this paper, is freely available through GitHub at tomography/xlearn and can be easily integrated into existing computational pipelines available at various synchrotron facilities. Source code, documentation and information on how to contribute are also provided.

  18. An evaluation of HgI/sub 2/ detectors for x-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Beinglass, I.; Kaufman, L.; Hoisier, K.; Hoenninger, J.

    1980-07-01

    Mercuric iodide (HgI/sub 2/) presents a set of attractive features as a semiconductor x-ray detector for computed tomography (CT). Its response is stable, it operates at room temperature, and thin detectors have a high detection efficiency. The properties of HgI/sub 2/ permit the assembly of high spatial resolution detectors in a compact configuration. On the other hand, HgI/sub 2/ exhibits a long memory, and some detectors also exhibit polarization effects, both of which are detrimental in CT. A pulse-shaping technique has been used to overcome these effects, thus demonstrating the suitability of HgI/sub 2/ for use in CT.

  19. Data Acquisition, Control, Communication and Computation System of Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Amish B.; Vadher, N. M.; Jain, Rajma; Dave, Hemant; Shah, Vishal; Manian, K. S. B.; Kayasth, Satish; Patel, Vinod; Ubale, Girish; Shah, Kirit; Solanki, Chirag; Deshpande, M. R.; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Umapathy, C. N.; Viswanath, N.; Kulkarni, Ravi; Kumar, P. S.

    2006-09-01

    The Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) mission onboardGSAT- 2 Indian Spacecraft was launched on 08 May 2003 using GSLV-D2 rocket by Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO). SOXS aims to study solar flares, which are the most violent and energetic phenomena in the solar system, in the energy range of 4-56 keV with high spectral and temporal resolution. SOXS employs state-of-the-art semiconductor devices, viz., Si-Pin and CZT detectors to achieve sub-keV energy resolution requirements. In this paper, we present an overview of data acquisition, control,communication and computation of low energy payload of the SOXS mission.

  20. Synchrotron X-ray microprobe and computed microtomography for characterization of nanocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. W.; Feng, H.; Lanzirotti, A.; Mahajan, D.

    2005-12-01

    Gas-to-liquids (GTL) is a viable pathway for synthesis of clean fuels from natural gas. One of the attractive synthesis options is the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) method using an iron catalyst to yield a broad range of hydrocarbons. We collected catalyst samples during three separate F-T runs that utilized nanophase (mean particle diameter (MPD): 3 nm and 20-80 nm) and micrometer-sized (32.5 μm) Fe2O3 that served as catalyst precursors. The collected samples were characterized with micro-X-ray fluorescence and computed microtomography at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Results found with two different measurement techniques indicated that there was heterogeneity on a spatial scale corresponding to volumes of roughly 103 μm3.

  1. X-ray computed tomography datasets for forensic analysis of vertebrate fossils.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Timothy B; Luo, Zhe-Xi; Ketcham, Richard A; Maisano, Jessica A; Colbert, Matthew W

    2016-06-07

    We describe X-ray computed tomography (CT) datasets from three specimens recovered from Early Cretaceous lakebeds of China that illustrate the forensic interpretation of CT imagery for paleontology. Fossil vertebrates from thinly bedded sediments often shatter upon discovery and are commonly repaired as amalgamated mosaics grouted to a solid backing slab of rock or plaster. Such methods are prone to inadvertent error and willful forgery, and once required potentially destructive methods to identify mistakes in reconstruction. CT is an efficient, nondestructive alternative that can disclose many clues about how a specimen was handled and repaired. These annotated datasets illustrate the power of CT in documenting specimen integrity and are intended as a reference in applying CT more broadly to evaluating the authenticity of comparable fossils.

  2. Imaging of sand production in a horizontal sand pack by X-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, B.; Sedgwick, G.; Forshner, K.

    1996-06-01

    A laboratory experiment was performed to better understand how sand production can increase heavy oil recovery. A horizontal sand pack with an orifice at one end modeled the production of oil and sand into a perforation in a vertical well. The sand pack was scanned using X-ray computed tomography (CT). The CT images revealed that a high-porosity channel (wormhole) formed in the pack while sand was produced. The wormhole followed regions within the pack where the porosity was higher, and, consequently, the unconfined compressive strength of the sand was lower. This experiment suggests that wormholes will form within the weaker sands of a formation. The development of these high-permeability channels increases the drainage of the reservoir, which leads to higher oil recovery.

  3. Prediction of intramuscular fat levels in Texel lamb loins using X-ray computed tomography scanning.

    PubMed

    Clelland, N; Bunger, L; McLean, K A; Conington, J; Maltin, C; Knott, S; Lambe, N R

    2014-10-01

    For the consumer, tenderness, juiciness and flavour are often described as the most important factors for meat eating quality, all of which have a close association with intramuscular fat (IMF). X-ray computed tomography (CT) can measure fat, muscle and bone volumes and weights, in vivo in sheep and CT predictions of carcass composition have been used in UK sheep breeding programmes over the last few decades. This study aimed to determine the most accurate combination of CT variables to predict IMF percentage of M. longissimus lumborum in Texel lambs. As expected, predicted carcass fat alone accounted for a moderate amount of the variation (R(2)=0.51) in IMF. Prediction accuracies were significantly improved (Adj R(2)>0.65) using information on fat and muscle densities measured from three CT reference scans, showing that CT can provide an accurate prediction of IMF in the loin of purebred Texel sheep. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Development of an X-ray Computed Tomography System for Non-Invasive Imaging of Industrial Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, J.; Sipaun, S. M.; Mustapha, I.; Zain, R. M.; Rahman, M. F. A.; Mustapha, M.; Shaari, M. R.; Hassan, H.; Said, M. K. M.; Mohamad, G. H. P.; Ibrahim, M. M.

    2008-05-20

    X-ray computed tomography is a powerful non-invasive imaging technique for viewing an object's inner structures in two-dimensional cross-section images without the need to physically section it. The invention of CT techniques revolutionised the field of medical diagnostic imaging because it provided more detailed and useful information than any previous non-invasive imaging techniques. The method is increasingly being used in industry, aerospace, geosciences and archaeology. This paper describes the development of an X-ray computed tomography system for imaging of industrial materials. The theoretical aspects of CT scanner, the system configurations and the adopted algorithm for image reconstruction are discussed. The penetrating rays from a 160 kV industrial X-ray machine were used to investigate structures that manifest in a manufactured component or product. Some results were presented in this paper.

  5. Cathode depth sensing in CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, JaeSub; Bellm, Eric C.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Narita, Tomohiko

    2004-02-01

    Measuring the depth of interaction in thick Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) detectors allows improved imaging and spectroscopy for hard X-ray imaging above 100 keV. The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) will employ relatively thick (5 - 10 mm) CZT detectors, which are required to perform the broad energy-band sky survey. Interaction depth information is needed to correct events to the detector "focal plane" for correct imaging and can be used to improve the energy resolution of the detector at high energies by allowing event-based corrections for incomplete charge collection. Background rejection is also improved by allowing low energy events from the rear and sides of the detector to be rejected. We present experimental results of intereaction depth sensing in a 5 mm thick pixellated Au-contact IMARAD CZT detector. The depth sensing was done by making simultaneous measurements of cathode and anode signals, where the interaction depth at a given energy is proportional to the ratio of cathode/anode signals. We demonstrate how a simple empirical formula describing the event distributions in the cathode/anode signal space can dramatically improve the energy resolution. We also estimate the energy and depth resolution of the detector as a function of the energy and the interaction depth. We also show a depth-sensing prototype system currently under development for EXIST in which cathode signals from 8, 16 or 32 crystals can be read-out by a small multi-channel ASIC board that is vertically edge-mounted on the cathode electrode along every second CZT crystal boundary. This allows CZT crystals to be tiled contiguously with minimum impact on throughput of incoming photons. The robust packaging is crucial in EXIST, which will employ very large area imaging CZT detector arrays.

  6. X-ray scatter correction method for dedicated breast computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To improve image quality and accuracy in dedicated breast computed tomography (BCT) by removing the x-ray scatter signal included in the BCT projections. Methods: The previously characterized magnitude and distribution of x-ray scatter in BCT results in both cupping artifacts and reduction of contrast and accuracy in the reconstructions. In this study, an image processing method is proposed that estimates and subtracts the low-frequency x-ray scatter signal included in each BCT projection postacquisition and prereconstruction. The estimation of this signal is performed using simple additional hardware, one additional BCT projection acquisition with negligible radiation dose, and simple image processing software algorithms. The high frequency quantum noise due to the scatter signal is reduced using a noise filter postreconstruction. The dosimetric consequences and validity of the assumptions of this algorithm were determined using Monte Carlo simulations. The feasibility of this method was determined by imaging a breast phantom on a BCT clinical prototype and comparing the corrected reconstructions to the unprocessed reconstructions and to reconstructions obtained from fan-beam acquisitions as a reference standard. One-dimensional profiles of the reconstructions and objective image quality metrics were used to determine the impact of the algorithm. Results: The proposed additional acquisition results in negligible additional radiation dose to the imaged breast (∼0.4% of the standard BCT acquisition). The processed phantom reconstruction showed substantially reduced cupping artifacts, increased contrast between adipose and glandular tissue equivalents, higher voxel value accuracy, and no discernible blurring of high frequency features. Conclusions: The proposed scatter correction method for dedicated breast CT is feasible and can result in highly improved image quality. Further optimization and testing, especially with patient images, is necessary to

  7. X-ray scatter correction method for dedicated breast computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To improve image quality and accuracy in dedicated breast computed tomography (BCT) by removing the x-ray scatter signal included in the BCT projections. Methods: The previously characterized magnitude and distribution of x-ray scatter in BCT results in both cupping artifacts and reduction of contrast and accuracy in the reconstructions. In this study, an image processing method is proposed that estimates and subtracts the low-frequency x-ray scatter signal included in each BCT projection postacquisition and prereconstruction. The estimation of this signal is performed using simple additional hardware, one additional BCT projection acquisition with negligible radiation dose, and simple image processing software algorithms. The high frequency quantum noise due to the scatter signal is reduced using a noise filter postreconstruction. The dosimetric consequences and validity of the assumptions of this algorithm were determined using Monte Carlo simulations. The feasibility of this method was determined by imaging a breast phantom on a BCT clinical prototype and comparing the corrected reconstructions to the unprocessed reconstructions and to reconstructions obtained from fan-beam acquisitions as a reference standard. One-dimensional profiles of the reconstructions and objective image quality metrics were used to determine the impact of the algorithm. Results: The proposed additional acquisition results in negligible additional radiation dose to the imaged breast ({approx}0.4% of the standard BCT acquisition). The processed phantom reconstruction showed substantially reduced cupping artifacts, increased contrast between adipose and glandular tissue equivalents, higher voxel value accuracy, and no discernible blurring of high frequency features. Conclusions: The proposed scatter correction method for dedicated breast CT is feasible and can result in highly improved image quality. Further optimization and testing, especially with patient images, is necessary to

  8. X-ray Computed Tomography Assessment of Air Void Distribution in Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haizhu

    Air void size and spatial distribution have long been regarded as critical parameters in the frost resistance of concrete. In cement-based materials, entrained air void systems play an important role in performance as related to durability, permeability, and heat transfer. Many efforts have been made to measure air void parameters in a more efficient and reliable manner in the past several decades. Standardized measurement techniques based on optical microscopy and stereology on flat cut and polished surfaces are widely used in research as well as in quality assurance and quality control applications. Other more automated methods using image processing have also been utilized, but still starting from flat cut and polished surfaces. The emergence of X-ray computed tomography (CT) techniques provides the capability of capturing the inner microstructure of materials at the micrometer and nanometer scale. X-ray CT's less demanding sample preparation and capability to measure 3D distributions of air voids directly provide ample prospects for its wider use in air void characterization in cement-based materials. However, due to the huge number of air voids that can exist within a limited volume, errors can easily arise in the absence of a formalized data processing procedure. In this study, air void parameters in selected types of cement-based materials (lightweight concrete, structural concrete elements, pavements, and laboratory mortars) have been measured using micro X-ray CT. The focus of this study is to propose a unified procedure for processing the data and to provide solutions to deal with common problems that arise when measuring air void parameters: primarily the reliable segmentation of objects of interest, uncertainty estimation of measured parameters, and the comparison of competing segmentation parameters.

  9. Clogging evaluation of porous asphalt concrete cores in conjunction with medical x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu-Min; Hsu, Chen-Yu; Lin, Jyh-Dong

    2014-03-01

    This study was to assess the porosity of Porous Asphalt Concrete (PAC) in conjunction with a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) facility. The PAC was designed as the surface course to achieve the target porosity 18%. There were graded aggregates, soils blended with 50% of coarse sand, and crushed gravel wrapped with geotextile compacted and served as the base, subbase, and infiltration layers underneath the PAC. The test site constructed in 2004 is located in Northern of Taiwan in which the daily traffic has been light and limited. The porosity of the test track was investigated. The permeability coefficient of PAC was found severely degraded from 2.2×10-1 to 1.2×10-3 -cm/sec, after nine-year service, while the permeability below the surface course remained intact. Several field PAC cores were drilled and brought to evaluate the distribution of air voids by a medical X-ray CT nondestructively. The helical mode was set to administrate the X-ray CT scan and two cross-sectional virtual slices were exported in seconds for analyzing air voids distribution. It shows that the clogging of voids occurred merely 20mm below the surface and the porosity can reduce as much about 3%. It was also found that the roller compaction can decrease the porosity by 4%. The permeability reduction in this test site can attribute to the voids of PAC that were compacted by roller during the construction and filled by the dusts on the surface during the service.

  10. Development of a prototype gantry system for preclinical x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pauwels, Bart; Liu Xuan; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Kenntner, Johannes; Mohr, Juergen; Walter, Marco; Schulz, Joachim; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To explore the potential of grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging for clinical applications, a first compact gantry system was developed. It is designed such that it can be implemented into an in-vivo small-animal phase-contrast computed tomography (PC-CT) scanner. The purpose of the present study is to assess the accuracy and quantitativeness of the described gantry in both absorption and phase-contrast. Methods: A phantom, containing six chemically well-defined liquids, was constructed. A tomography scan with cone-beam reconstruction of this phantom was performed yielding the spatial distribution of the linear attenuation coefficient {mu} and decrement {delta} of the complex refractive index. Theoretical values of {mu} and {delta} were calculated for each liquid from tabulated data and compared with the experimentally measured values. Additionally, a color-fused image representation is proposed to display the complementary absorption and phase-contrast information in a single image. Results: Experimental and calculated data of the phantom agree well confirming the quantitativeness and accuracy of the reconstructed spatial distributions of {mu} and {delta}. The proposed color-fused image representation, which combines the complementary absorption and phase information, considerably helps in distinguishing the individual substances. Conclusions: The concept of grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) can be implemented into a compact, cone-beam geometry gantry setup. The authors believe that this work represents an important milestone in translating phase-contrast x-ray imaging from previous proof-of-principle experiments to first preclinical biomedical imaging applications on small-animal models.

  11. Development of a prototype gantry system for preclinical x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pauwels, Bart; Liu, Xuan; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Kenntner, Johannes; Mohr, Jurgen; Walter, Marco; Schulz, Joachim; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2011-11-01

    To explore the potential of grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging for clinical applications, a first compact gantry system was developed. It is designed such that it can be implemented into an in-vivo small-animal phase-contrast computed tomography (PC-CT) scanner. The purpose of the present study is to assess the accuracy and quantitativeness of the described gantry in both absorption and phase-contrast. A phantom, containing six chemically well-defined liquids, was constructed. A tomography scan with cone-beam reconstruction of this phantom was performed yielding the spatial distribution of the linear attenuation coefficient μ and decrement δ of the complex refractive index. Theoretical values of μ and δ were calculated for each liquid from tabulated data and compared with the experimentally measured values. Additionally, a color-fused image representation is proposed to display the complementary absorption and phase-contrast information in a single image. Experimental and calculated data of the phantom agree well confirming the quantitativeness and accuracy of the reconstructed spatial distributions of μ and δ. The proposed color-fused image representation, which combines the complementary absorption and phase information, considerably helps in distinguishing the individual substances. The concept of grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) can be implemented into a compact, cone-beam geometry gantry setup. The authors believe that this work represents an important milestone in translating phase-contrast x-ray imaging from previous proof-of-principle experiments to first preclinical biomedical imaging applications on small-animal models.

  12. Searching for Narrow Emission Lines in X-ray Spectra: Computation and Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taeyoung; van Dyk, David A.; Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2008-12-01

    The detection and quantification of narrow emission lines in X-ray spectra is a challenging statistical task. The Poisson nature of the photon counts leads to local random fluctuations in the observed spectrum that often result in excess emission in a narrow band of energy resembling a weak narrow line. From a formal statistical perspective, this leads to a (sometimes highly) multimodal likelihood. Many standard statistical procedures are based on (asymptotic) Gaussian approximations to the likelihood and simply cannot be used in such settings. Bayesian methods offer a more direct paradigm for accounting for such complicated likelihood functions, but even here multimodal likelihoods pose significant computational challenges. The new Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods developed in 2008 by van Dyk and Park, however, are able to fully explore the complex posterior distribution of the location of a narrow line, and thus provide valid statistical inference. Even with these computational tools, standard statistical quantities such as means and standard deviations cannot adequately summarize inference and standard testing procedures cannot be used to test for emission lines. In this paper, we use new efficient MCMC algorithms to fit the location of narrow emission lines, we develop new statistical strategies for summarizing highly multimodal distributions and quantifying valid statistical inference, and we extend the method of posterior predictive p-values proposed by Protassov and coworkers to test for the presence of narrow emission lines in X-ray spectra. We illustrate and validate our methods using simulation studies and apply them to the Chandra observations of the high-redshift quasar PG 1634+706.

  13. Impurity precipitation in atomized particles evidenced by nano x-ray diffraction computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnin, Anne; Wright, Jonathan P.; Tucoulou, Rémi; Palancher, Hervé

    2014-08-25

    Performances and physical properties of high technology materials are influenced or even determined by their initial microstructure and by the behavior of impurity phases. Characterizing these impurities and their relations with the surrounding matrix is therefore of primary importance but it unfortunately often requires a destructive approach, with the risk of misinterpreting the observations. The improvement we have done in high resolution X-ray diffraction computed tomography combined with the use of an X-ray nanoprobe allows non-destructive crystallographic description of materials with microscopic heterogeneous microstructure (with a grain size between 10 nm and 10 μm). In this study, the grain localization in a 2D slice of a 20 μm solidified atomized γU-Mo particle is shown and a minority U(C,O) phase (1 wt. %) with sub-micrometer sized grains was characterized inside. Evidence is presented showing that the onset of U(C,O) grain crystallization can be described by a precipitation mechanism since one single U-Mo grain has direct orientation relationship with more than one surrounding U(C,O) grains.

  14. In situ ray tracing and computational steering for interactive blood flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzeo, Marco D.; Manos, Steven; Coveney, Peter V.

    2010-02-01

    Recent algorithm and hardware developments have significantly improved our capability to interactively visualise time-varying flow fields. However, when visualising very large dynamically varying datasets interactively there are still limitations in the scalability and efficiency of these methods. Here we present a rendering pipeline which employs an efficient in situ ray tracing technique to visualise flow fields as they are simulated. The ray casting approach is particularly well suited for the visualisation of large and sparse time-varying datasets, where it is capable of rendering fluid flow fields at high image resolutions and at interactive frame rates on a single multi-core processor using OpenMP. The parallel implementation of our in situ visualisation method relies on MPI, requires no specialised hardware support, and employs the same underlying spatial decomposition as the fluid simulator. The visualisation pipeline allows the user to operate on a commodity computer and explore the simulation output interactively. Our simulation environment incorporates numerous features that can be utilised in a wide variety of research contexts.

  15. Computer assisted gamma and X-ray tomography: Applications to multiphase flow systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.B.; Dudukovic, M.

    1998-01-01

    In process vessels, involving two or three phases it is often important not only to know the volume fraction (holdup) of each phase but also the spatial distribution of such holdups. This information is needed in control, trouble shooting and assessment of flow patterns and can be observed noninvasively by the application of Computed Tomography (CT). This report presents a complete overview of X-ray and gamma ray transmission tomography principles, equipment design to specific tasks and application in process industry. The fundamental principles of tomography, the algorithms for image reconstruction, the measurement method and the possible sources of error are discussed in detail. A case study highlights the methodology involved in designing a scanning system for the study of a given process unit, e.g., reactor, separations column etc. Results obtained in the authors` laboratory for the gas holdup distribution in bubble columns are also presented. Recommendations are made for the Advanced Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) in LaPorte, TX.

  16. Assessing potato tuber diel growth by means of X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Torres, Eduardo; Kirchgessner, Norbert; Pfeifer, Johannes; Walter, Achim

    2015-11-01

    The formation and development of belowground organs is difficult to study. X-ray computed tomography (CT) provides the possibility to analyse and interpret subtle volumetric changes of belowground organs such as tubers, storage roots and nodules. Here, we report on the establishment of a method based on a voxel dimension of 240 μm and precision (standard deviation) of 30 μL that allows interpreting growth differences among potato tubers happening within 3 h. Plants were not stressed by the application of X-ray radiation, which was shown both by morphological comparison with control plants and by analysis of lipid peroxidation as a measure of oxidative stress. Diel (24 h) tuber growth fluctuations of three potato genotypes were monitored in soil-filled pots of 10 L. In contrast to the results from previous reports, most tubers grew at similar rates during day and night. Tuber growth was not related to the developmental stage of plants and tubers. Pronounced differences were observed between average growth rates in different tubers within a plant. These results are discussed in the context of restrictions of past methods to study tuber growth and in the context of their potential for the characterization of the formation and development of other belowground plant organs.

  17. Cone beam x-ray luminescence computed tomography reconstruction with a priori anatomical information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Pei-An; Lin, Meng-Lung; Jin, Shih-Chun; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Lin, Syue-Liang; Chang, C. Allen; Chiang, Huihua Kenny

    2014-09-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) is a novel molecular imaging modality that reconstructs the optical distribution of x-ray-excited phosphor particles with prior informational of anatomical CT image. The prior information improves the accuracy of image reconstruction. The system can also present anatomical CT image. The optical system based on a high sensitive charge coupled device (CCD) is perpendicular with a CT system. In the XLCT system, the xray was adopted to excite the phosphor of the sample and CCD camera was utilized to acquire luminescence emitted from the sample in 360 degrees projection free-space. In this study, the fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT)-like algorithm was used for image reconstruction, the structural prior information was incorporated in the reconstruction by adding a penalty term to the minimization function. The phosphor used in this study is Gd2O2S:Tb. For the simulation and experiments, the data was collected from 16 projections. The cylinder phantom was 40 mm in diameter and contains 8 mm diameter inclusion; the phosphor in the in vivo study was 5 mm in diameter at a depth of 3 mm. Both the errors were no more than 5%. Based on the results from these simulation and experimental studies, the novel XLCT method has demonstrated the feasibility for in vivo animal model studies.

  18. High energy x-ray radiography and computed tomography of bridge pins

    SciTech Connect

    Green, R E; Logan, C M; Martz, H E; Updike, E; Waters, A M

    1999-05-01

    Bridge pins were used in the hanger assemblies for some multi-span steel bridges built prior to the 1980's, and are sometimes considered fracture critical elements of a bridge. During a test on a bridge conducted by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), ultrasonic field inspection results indicated that at least two pins contained cracks. Several pins were removed and selected for further examination. This provided an excellent opportunity to learn more about these pins and the application of x-ray systems at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), as well as to learn more about the application of different detectors recently obtained by LLNL. Digital radiographs and computed tomography (CT) were used to characterize the bridge pins, using a LINAC x-ray source with a 9-MV bremsstrahlung spectrum. We will describe the performance of two different digital radiographic detectors. One is a detector system frequently used at LLNL consisting of a scintillator glass optically coupled to a CCD camera. The other detector is a new amorphous silicon detector recently acquired by LLNL.

  19. In vivo visualization of gold-loaded cells in mice using x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Astolfo, Alberto; Schültke, Elisabeth; Menk, Ralf Hendrik; Kirch, Robert D; Juurlink, Bernhard H J; Hall, Christopher; Harsan, Laura-Adela; Stebel, Marco; Barbetta, Davide; Tromba, Giuliana; Arfelli, Fulvia

    2013-02-01

    The ability to perform cell tracking using x-ray computed tomography combined with gold nanoparticles has been demonstrated recently on ex vivo samples using different malignant and nonmalignant cell lines. Here we proved the concept of the method for in vivo assessment in a small-animal model of malignant brain tumors. The limitations of the method due to radiation dose constraints were investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. Taking into consideration different x-ray entrance doses and the spatial resolution, the visibility of the cell clusters was evaluated. The results of the experiments conducted on mice implanted with F98 tumor cells confirmed the prediction of the Monte Carlo calculations. Small clusters of cells exogenously loaded with gold nanoparticles could be visualized using our in vivo method. This article discusses the use of CT-based detection of gold nanoparticle loaded cells of interest in small-animal models of malignant brain tumors, where small clusters of cells loaded with gold nanoparticles could be visualized. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Visualization of subcutaneous insulin injections by x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, M.; Poulsen, M.; Bech, M.; Velroyen, A.; Herzen, J.; Beckmann, F.; Feidenhans'l, R.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2012-11-01

    We report how the three-dimensional structure of subcutaneous injections of soluble insulin can be visualized by x-ray computed tomography using an iodine based contrast agent. The injections investigated are performed ex vivo in porcine adipose tissue. Full tomography scans carried out at a laboratory x-ray source with a total acquisition time of about 1 min yield CT-images with an effective pixel size of 109 × 109 μm2. The depots are segmented using a modified Chan-Vese algorithm and we are able to observe differences in the shape of the injection depot and the position of the depot in the skin among equally performed injections. To overcome the beam hardening artefacts, which affect the quantitative prediction of the volume injected, we additionally present results concerning the visualization of two injections using synchrotron radiation. The spatial concentration distribution of iodine is calculated to show the dilution of the insulin drug inside the depot. Characterisation of the shape of the depot and the spatial concentration profile of the injected fluid is important knowledge when improving the clinical formulation of an insulin drug, the performance of injection devices and when predicting the effect of the drug through biomedical simulations.

  1. The exploration study of fire damage to concrete specimen using x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu-Min; Lee, Min-Gin; Chen, Guan-Ying

    2015-04-01

    Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) loses the evaporable water at about 100 °C, decomposes C-S-H at about 200 °C, and dehydrates CH at about 500 °C, and deconstruct C-S-H at about 900°C. The concrete degradation or cracks are caused by several possible parameters, such as vapor pressure in pores, thermal gradient, and varied expansion rates of cement pastes and aggregates. The objective of the exploration study was to assess the porosity before and after conditioning of high temperature in the laboratory with the medical X-ray computed tomography. The experimental program was determined to identify the mineral properties of the aggregates used and determine the consensus properties of compressive, splitting tensile, and flexural strengths. Concrete cylinders were subject with one temperature conditioning, namely 400°C, but two different heat conditioning time namely four and eight hours. The X-ray CT, before and after high temperature conditioning, was administrated on the concrete cylinders to inspect the depth of the damage zone, which shall consist of more porosity than undamaged one. The damage zone will be examined and identified through the changes in porosity of concrete paste and aggregates within a concrete cylinder. The significance of the exploration study was to provide an in-depth insight to define the damaged zone for a better understanding of the following repairing and reinforced work.

  2. A new x-ray computed tomography system for laboratory mouse imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Paulus, M.J.; Sari-Sarraf, H.; Gleason, S.S.; Bobrek, M.; Hicks, J.S.; Johnson, D.K.; Behel, J.K.; Thompson, L.H.; Allen, W.C.

    1999-06-01

    Two versions of a new high-resolution x-ray computed tomography system are being developed to screen mutagenized mice in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Mammalian Genetics Research Facility. The first prototype employs a single-pixel cadmium zinc telluride detector with a pinhole collimator operating in pulse counting mode. The second version employs a phosphor screen/CCD detector operating in current mode. The major system hardware includes a low-energy X-ray tube, two linear translation stages and a rotational stage. For the single-pixel detector, image resolution is determined by the step size of the detector stage; preliminary images have been acquired at 100 {micro}m and 250 {micro}m resolutions. The resolution of the phosphor screen detector is determined by the modulation transfer function of the phosphor screen; images with resolutions approaching 50 {micro}m have been acquired. The system performance with the two detectors is described and recent images are presented.

  3. Coded aperture x-ray diffraction imaging with transmission computed tomography side-information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odinaka, Ikenna; Greenberg, Joel A.; Kaganovsky, Yan; Holmgren, Andrew; Hassan, Mehadi; Politte, David G.; O'Sullivan, Joseph A.; Carin, Lawrence; Brady, David J.

    2016-03-01

    Coded aperture X-ray diffraction (coherent scatter spectral) imaging provides fast and dose-efficient measurements of the molecular structure of an object. The information provided is spatially-dependent and material-specific, and can be utilized in medical applications requiring material discrimination, such as tumor imaging. However, current coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging system assume a uniformly or weakly attenuating object, and are plagued by image degradation due to non-uniform self-attenuation. We propose accounting for such non-uniformities in the self-attenuation by utilizing an X-ray computed tomography (CT) image (reconstructed attenuation map). In particular, we present an iterative algorithm for coherent scatter spectral image reconstruction, which incorporates the attenuation map, at different stages, resulting in more accurate coherent scatter spectral images in comparison to their uncorrected counterpart. The algorithm is based on a spectrally grouped edge-preserving regularizer, where the neighborhood edge weights are determined by spatial distances and attenuation values.

  4. On-Site Geologic Core Analysis Using a Portable X-ray ComputedTomographic System

    SciTech Connect

    Freifeld, Barry M.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Rack, Frank

    2004-03-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is an established techniquefor nondestructively characterizing geologic cores. CT providesinformation on sediment structure, diagenetic alteration, fractures, flowchannels and barriers, porosity, and fluid-phase saturation. A portableCT imaging system has been developed specifically for imaging whole-roundcores at the drilling site. The new system relies upon carefully designedradiological shielding to minimize the size and weight of the resultinginstrument. Specialized x-ray beam collimators and filters maximizesystem sensitivity and performance. The system has been successfullydeployed on the research vessel Joides Resolution for Ocean DrillingProgram's Leg 204 and 210, within the Ocean Drilling Program'srefrigerated Gulf Coast Core Repository, as well as on the Hot Ice #1drilling platform located near the Kuparuk Field, Alaska. A methodologyfor performingsimple densiometry measurements, as well as scanning forgross structural features, will be presented using radiographs from ODPLeg 204. Reconstructed CT images from Hot Ice #1 will demonstrate the useof CT for discerning core textural features. To demonstrate the use of CTto quantitatively interpret dynamic processes, we calculate 95 percentconfidence intervals for density changes occurring during a laboratorymethane hydrate dissociation experiment. The field deployment of a CTrepresents a paradigm shift in core characterization, opening up thepossibility for rapid systematic characterization of three-dimensionalstructural features and leading to improved subsampling andcore-processing procedures.

  5. Deformulation of a solid pharmaceutical form using computed tomography and X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira Junior, J. M.; Balcão, V. M.; Vila, M. M. D. C.; Aranha, N.; Yoshida, V. M. H.; Chaud, M. V.; Mangine Filho, S.

    2015-07-01

    Deformulation of medicines is of undeniable importance, since it can be utilized both to unravel the chemical composition of the excipients integrating a pharmaceutical formulation of a specific medicine and as an important tool to conduct morphometric studies of the formulation under study. Such strategy may be utilized in analytical studies aiming at quantifying the components of reference drugs, or in the identification of putative counterfeit pharmaceuticals. Deformulation makes use of physicochemical analysis tools to characterize, from the chemical point of view, the components integrating medicine pharmaceutical formulations and from the physical point of view, the morphological part of the pharmaceutical formulation. The techniques of computer tomography (SkyScan 1174 - Bruker microCT) and X-ray fluorescence analyses (using an X-ray source with W-anode from Hammatsu Photonics and Silicon Drift detector from Amptek) were successfully used in performing a process of deformulation of a solid pharmaceutical formulation of tablets, utilized herein as a model medicine for controlled drug release. The analytical methods used in this work, proved their effectiveness for the main goal of this study, which aimed to characterize a pharmaceutical formulation via its deconstruction.

  6. Positioning Standardized Acupuncture Points on the Whole Body Based on X-Ray Computed Tomography Images

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungdae

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The goal of this research was to position all the standardized 361 acupuncture points on the entire human body based on a 3-dimensional (3D) virtual body. Materials and Methods: Digital data from a healthy Korean male with a normal body shape were obtained in the form of cross-sectional images generated by X-ray computed tomography (CT), and the 3D models for the bones and the skin's surface were created through the image-processing steps. Results: The reference points or the landmarks were positioned based on the standard descriptions of the acupoints, and the formulae for the proportionalities between the acupoints and the reference points were presented. About 37% of the 361 standardized acupoints were automatically linked with the reference points, the reference points accounted for 11% of the 361 acupoints, and the remaining acupoints (52%) were positioned point-by-point by using the OpenGL 3D graphics libraries. Based on the projective 2D descriptions of the standard acupuncture points, the volumetric 3D acupoint model was developed; it was extracted from the X-ray CT images. Conclusions: This modality for positioning acupoints may modernize acupuncture research and enable acupuncture treatments to be more personalized. PMID:24761187

  7. Positioning Standardized Acupuncture Points on the Whole Body Based on X-Ray Computed Tomography Images.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungdae; Kang, Dae-In

    2014-02-01

    Objective: The goal of this research was to position all the standardized 361 acupuncture points on the entire human body based on a 3-dimensional (3D) virtual body. Materials and Methods: Digital data from a healthy Korean male with a normal body shape were obtained in the form of cross-sectional images generated by X-ray computed tomography (CT), and the 3D models for the bones and the skin's surface were created through the image-processing steps. Results: The reference points or the landmarks were positioned based on the standard descriptions of the acupoints, and the formulae for the proportionalities between the acupoints and the reference points were presented. About 37% of the 361 standardized acupoints were automatically linked with the reference points, the reference points accounted for 11% of the 361 acupoints, and the remaining acupoints (52%) were positioned point-by-point by using the OpenGL 3D graphics libraries. Based on the projective 2D descriptions of the standard acupuncture points, the volumetric 3D acupoint model was developed; it was extracted from the X-ray CT images. Conclusions: This modality for positioning acupoints may modernize acupuncture research and enable acupuncture treatments to be more personalized.

  8. Chromatin structure revealed by X-ray scattering analysis and computational modeling.

    PubMed

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Imai, Ryosuke; Hikima, Takaaki; Joti, Yasumasa

    2014-12-01

    It remains unclear how the 2m of human genomic DNA is organized in each cell. The textbook model has long assumed that the 11-nm-diameter nucleosome fiber (beads-on-a-string), in which DNA is wrapped around core histones, is folded into a 30-nm chromatin fiber. One of the classical models assumes that the 30-nm chromatin fiber is further folded helically to form a larger fiber. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is a powerful method for investigating the bulk structure of interphase chromatin and mitotic chromosomes. SAXS can detect periodic structures in biological materials in solution. In our SAXS results, no structural feature larger than 11 nm was detected. Combining this with a computational analysis of "in silico condensed chromatin" made it possible to understand more about the X-ray scattering profiles and suggested that the chromatin in interphase nuclei and mitotic chromosomes essentially consists of irregularly folded nucleosome fibers lacking the 30-nm chromatin structure. In this article, we describe the experimental details of our SAXS and modeling systems. We also discuss other methods for investigating the chromatin structure in cells.

  9. Quantitative evaluation of the disintegration of orally rapid disintegrating tablets by X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Makoto; Yamanaka, Azusa; Uchino, Tomohiro; Otsuka, Kuniko; Sadamoto, Kiyomi; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    To measure the rapid disintegration of Oral Disintegrating Tablets (ODT), a new test (XCT) was developed using X-ray computing tomography (X-ray CT). Placebo ODT, rapid disintegration candy (RDC) and Gaster®-D-Tablets (GAS) were used as model samples. All these ODTs were used to measure oral disintegration time (DT) in distilled water at 37±2°C by XCT. DTs were affected by the width of mesh screens, and degree to which the tablet holder vibrated from air bubbles. An in-vivo tablet disintegration test was performed for RDC using 11 volunteers. DT by the in-vivo method was significantly longer than that using the conventional tester. The experimental conditions for XCT such as the width of the mesh screen and degree of vibration were adjusted to be consistent with human DT values. Since DTs by the XCT method were almost the same as the human data, this method was able to quantitatively evaluate the rapid disintegration of ODT under the same conditions as inside the oral cavity. The DTs of four commercially available ODTs were comparatively evaluated by the XCT method, conventional tablet disintegration test and in-vivo method.

  10. Investigation of soil structure development and properties of macropore networks with X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagenkemper, Sebastian; Uteau Puschmann, Daniel; Peth, Stephan; Horn, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    X-ray computed tomography provides a non-destructive method to visualize and quantify three-dimensional pore networks. Geometrical and morphological parameters of the complex pore system such as connectivity, tortuosity, porosity and pore surface area would be very useful for modeling and simulating of transport and exchange processes. Thus, quantitative data on relevant soil structural features and their modification by soil management could be provided. The scope of this study was to analyze and quantify the development of soil structure in the subsoil depending on three different precrop species (alfalfa, chicory and fescue), at three depths (45, 60 and 75 cm) and three cultivation periods (1, 2 and 3 yrs) on an experimental field trial (Germany) with a Haplic Luvisol as major soil type. Morphological (air-filled porosity, pore surface area) and geometrical (pore diameter, connectivity, continuity, tortuosity) parameters were gathered with X-ray CT and evaluated with image analysis. Furthermore, the results were linked with air-capacity data from laboratory measurements to validate the data and with tortuosity/connectivity data from diffusion-based measurements. Air-filled porosity was highest for alfalfa (3 yrs, 75 cm). Tortuosity values ranged between 1.3 and 4.38, while alfalfa (3 yrs) showed the highest value, which may indicate structural development due to crack formation by enhanced root water uptake. An increase in accessible surfaces may improve water and nutrient supply for plants, whereas the high tortuosity values may also assume that oxygen supply is limited.

  11. Investigation of X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) and K-edge imaging.

    PubMed

    Bazalova, Magdalena; Kuang, Yu; Pratx, Guillem; Xing, Lei

    2012-08-01

    This work provides a comprehensive Monte Carlo study of X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) and K-edge imaging system, including the system design, the influence of various imaging components, the sensitivity and resolution under various conditions. We modified the widely used EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc code to simulate XFCT images of two acrylic phantoms loaded with various concentrations of gold nanoparticles and Cisplatin for a number of XFCT geometries. In particular, reconstructed signal as a function of the width of the detector ring, its angular coverage and energy resolution were studied. We found that XFCT imaging sensitivity of the modeled systems consisting of a conventional X-ray tube and a full 2-cm-wide energy-resolving detector ring was 0.061% and 0.042% for gold nanoparticles and Cisplatin, respectively, for a dose of ∼ 10 cGy. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of XFCT images of the simulated acrylic phantoms was higher than that of transmission K-edge images for contrast concentrations below 0.4%.

  12. Iterative reconstruction for x-ray computed tomography using prior-image induced nonlocal regularization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Huang, Jing; Ma, Jianhua; Bian, Zhaoying; Feng, Qianjin; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong; Chen, Wufan

    2014-09-01

    Repeated X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans are often required in several specific applications such as perfusion imaging, image-guided biopsy needle, image-guided intervention, and radiotherapy with noticeable benefits. However, the associated cumulative radiation dose significantly increases as comparison with that used in the conventional CT scan, which has raised major concerns in patients. In this study, to realize radiation dose reduction by reducing the X-ray tube current and exposure time (mAs) in repeated CT scans, we propose a prior-image induced nonlocal (PINL) regularization for statistical iterative reconstruction via the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criteria, which we refer to as "PWLS-PINL". Specifically, the PINL regularization utilizes the redundant information in the prior image and the weighted least-squares term considers a data-dependent variance estimation, aiming to improve current low-dose image quality. Subsequently, a modified iterative successive overrelaxation algorithm is adopted to optimize the associative objective function. Experimental results on both phantom and patient data show that the present PWLS-PINL method can achieve promising gains over the other existing methods in terms of the noise reduction, low-contrast object detection, and edge detail preservation.

  13. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-18

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45[degree] to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures.

  14. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven; Sanders, David M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45.degree. to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  15. Cross-Disciplinary Geological Research Using High-Resolution X-ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketcham, R. A.; Carlson, W. D.; Rowe, T. B.

    2002-12-01

    High-resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) generates three-dimensional imagery of solid objects depicting X-ray attenuation, which is a function of density and atomic number. It is thus ideal for studying many features and quantities that are best observed, understood, and characterized in 3D, in objects from millimeter to decimeter scale. The High-resolution X-ray CT Facility at the University of Texas at Austin (UTCT) was established in the spring of 1997 to make this technology available to the geoscientific community. Since becoming an NSF-supported multi-user facility in 1999, UTCT has done scanning and data analysis for 31 NSF projects across 8 programs. The support of the EAR instrumentation and facilities program has been pivotal in the development of the technical expertise and computational tools that allow CT data to be utilized to their fullest potential. In particular, the stability provided by NSF has allowed us to initiate multi-year development projects while also responding to the immediate research needs and requests of our large and growing user community. Our largest software project, for efficiently identifying, separating, and measuring thousands of objects in a data volume, has been used to study vesicles in meteoritic basalts, crystals in metamorphic rocks, clasts in impact breccias, and troilite particles in meteorites. Because our facility is unique not only in geology but in the general natural science community as well, we have been a focal point for research on a wide range of problems. This has enabled us to accrue considerable advantages from being able to take lessons and techniques obtained from or developed for one field and apply them to entirely different research areas. In one example, a research project in paleoanthropology to investigate the link between trabecular (spongy) bone structure and joint usage resulted in the implementation and improvement of techniques developed by the material engineering and medical

  16. Feasibility study of a high-spatial resolution x-ray computed tomography using sub-pixel shift method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneyama, Akio; Baba, Rika; Sumitani, Kazushi; Hirai, Yasuharu

    2015-02-01

    A high-spatial resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) adopting a sub-pixel shift method has been developed. By calculating sectional images, using plural CT datasets obtained by scanning the X-ray imager, the spatial resolution can be reduced relative to the sub-pixel size of an X-ray imager. Feasibility observations of a biomedical sample were performed using 12-keV monochromatic synchrotron radiation and a photon-counting X-ray imager 174-μm pixels in size. Four CT measurements were performed to obtain datasets at different positions of the X-ray imager. Fine sectional images were obtained successfully, and the spatial resolution was estimated as 80-μm, which corresponds to just under half the pixel size of the imager. In addition, a fine 3D image was also obtained by scanning the imager two-dimensionally.

  17. Feasibility study of a high-spatial resolution x-ray computed tomography using sub-pixel shift method

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneyama, Akio Baba, Rika; Sumitani, Kazushi; Hirai, Yasuharu

    2015-02-23

    A high-spatial resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) adopting a sub-pixel shift method has been developed. By calculating sectional images, using plural CT datasets obtained by scanning the X-ray imager, the spatial resolution can be reduced relative to the sub-pixel size of an X-ray imager. Feasibility observations of a biomedical sample were performed using 12-keV monochromatic synchrotron radiation and a photon-counting X-ray imager 174-μm pixels in size. Four CT measurements were performed to obtain datasets at different positions of the X-ray imager. Fine sectional images were obtained successfully, and the spatial resolution was estimated as 80-μm, which corresponds to just under half the pixel size of the imager. In addition, a fine 3D image was also obtained by scanning the imager two-dimensionally.

  18. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  19. Spectral x-ray computed tomography scanner using a cadmium telluride detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2016-10-01

    To obtain four tomograms with four different photon energy ranges simultaneously, we have developed a quad-energy Xray photon counter with a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector and four sets of comparators and frequency-voltage converters (FVCs). X-ray photons are detected using the CdTe detector, and the event pulses from a shaping amplifier are sent to four comparators simultaneously to regulate four threshold energies of 20, 35, 50 and 65 keV. Using this counter, the energy ranges are 20-100, 35-100, 50-100 and 65-100 keV; the maximum energy corresponds to the tube voltage. Xray photons in the four ranges are counted using the comparators, and the logical pulses from the comparators are input to the FVCs. The outputs from the four FVCs are input to a personal computer through an analog-digital converter (ADC) to carry out quad-energy imaging. To observe contrast variations with changes in the threshold energy, we performed spectral computed tomography utilizing the quad-energy photon counter at a tube voltage of 100 kV and a current of 8.0 μA. In the spectral CT, four tomograms were obtained simultaneously with four energy ranges. The image contrast varied with changes in the threshold energy, and the exposure time for tomography was 9.8 min.

  20. [Beam hardening correction method for X-ray computed tomography based on subsection beam hardening curves].

    PubMed

    Huang, Kui-dong; Zhang, Ding-hua

    2009-09-01

    After researching the forming principle of X-ray beam hardening and analyzing the usual methods of beam hardening correction, a beam hardening correction model was established, in which the independent variable was the projection gray, and so the computing difficulties in beam hardening correction can be reduced. By considering the advantage and disadvantage of fitting beam hardening curve to polynomial, a new expression method of the subsection beam hardening curves based on polynomial was proposed. In the method, the beam hardening data were fitted firstly to a polynomial curve which traverses the coordinate origin, then whether the got polynomial curve surged in the fore-part or back-part of the fitting range was judged based on the polynomial curvature change. If the polynomial fitting curve surged, the power function curve was applied to replace the surging parts of the polynomial curve, and the C1 continuity was ensured at the joints of the segment curves. The experimental results of computed tomography (CT) simulation show that the method is well stable in the beam hardening correction for the ideal CT images and CT images with added noises, and can mostly remove the beam hardening artifact at the same time.

  1. Object Specific Trajectory Optimization for Industrial X-ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Andreas; Lasser, Tobias; Schrapp, Michael; Stephan, Jürgen; Noël, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    In industrial settings, X-ray computed tomography scans are a common tool for inspection of objects. Often the object can not be imaged using standard circular or helical trajectories because of constraints in space or time. Compared to medical applications the variance in size and materials is much larger. Adapting the acquisition trajectory to the object is beneficial and sometimes inevitable. There are currently no sophisticated methods for this adoption. Typically the operator places the object according to his best knowledge. We propose a detectability index based optimization algorithm which determines the scan trajectory on the basis of a CAD-model of the object. The detectability index is computed solely from simulated projections for multiple user defined features. By adapting the features the algorithm is adapted to different imaging tasks. Performance of simulated and measured data was qualitatively and quantitatively assessed.The results illustrate that our algorithm not only allows more accurate detection of features, but also delivers images with high overall quality in comparison to standard trajectory reconstructions. This work enables to reduce the number of projections and in consequence scan time by introducing an optimization algorithm to compose an object specific trajectory.

  2. Parallel computing methods for x-ray cone beam tomography with large array sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, D.A. ||; Flynn, M.J.; Sethi, I.K.

    1996-12-31

    Cone beam geometries are increasingly of interest for x-ray CT applications to improve imaging efficiency. In this paper, we describe our practical experience implementing circular orbit cone beam backprojection on workstation clusters. The reconstruction problem is computationally intensive, particularly for arrays of 512 voxels; in each direction. A voxel driven approach is described where the reconstruction volume is partitioned into variable width slabs and each slab given to a workstation. Each projection is filtered by one workstation and then sent to the others for backprojection. While most computation is done in the backprojection step, a significant amount of time must be spent in sending projectional data. A method is detailed to further reduce the communication overhead by restricting the amount of projection sent to only what is required by each backprojecting workstation. Furthermore, if the shape of the backprojection slabs is made as square as possible, the total communication requirement can be minimized. By the reduction of communication requirement, an overall improvement in processor utilization was observed, and the crossover point where communications dominates was improved.

  3. Breast tumor segmentation in high resolution x-ray phase contrast analyzer based computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, E.; Grandl, S.; Sztrókay-Gaul, A.; Gasilov, S.; Barbone, G.; Mittone, A.; Coan, P.; Bravin, A.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Phase contrast computed tomography has emerged as an imaging method, which is able to outperform present day clinical mammography in breast tumor visualization while maintaining an equivalent average dose. To this day, no segmentation technique takes into account the specificity of the phase contrast signal. In this study, the authors propose a new mathematical framework for human-guided breast tumor segmentation. This method has been applied to high-resolution images of excised human organs, each of several gigabytes. Methods: The authors present a segmentation procedure based on the viscous watershed transform and demonstrate the efficacy of this method on analyzer based phase contrast images. The segmentation of tumors inside two full human breasts is then shown as an example of this procedure’s possible applications. Results: A correct and precise identification of the tumor boundaries was obtained and confirmed by manual contouring performed independently by four experienced radiologists. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate that applying the watershed viscous transform allows them to perform the segmentation of tumors in high-resolution x-ray analyzer based phase contrast breast computed tomography images. Combining the additional information provided by the segmentation procedure with the already high definition of morphological details and tissue boundaries offered by phase contrast imaging techniques, will represent a valuable multistep procedure to be used in future medical diagnostic applications.

  4. Object Specific Trajectory Optimization for Industrial X-ray Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Andreas; Lasser, Tobias; Schrapp, Michael; Stephan, Jürgen; Noël, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    In industrial settings, X-ray computed tomography scans are a common tool for inspection of objects. Often the object can not be imaged using standard circular or helical trajectories because of constraints in space or time. Compared to medical applications the variance in size and materials is much larger. Adapting the acquisition trajectory to the object is beneficial and sometimes inevitable. There are currently no sophisticated methods for this adoption. Typically the operator places the object according to his best knowledge. We propose a detectability index based optimization algorithm which determines the scan trajectory on the basis of a CAD-model of the object. The detectability index is computed solely from simulated projections for multiple user defined features. By adapting the features the algorithm is adapted to different imaging tasks. Performance of simulated and measured data was qualitatively and quantitatively assessed.The results illustrate that our algorithm not only allows more accurate detection of features, but also delivers images with high overall quality in comparison to standard trajectory reconstructions. This work enables to reduce the number of projections and in consequence scan time by introducing an optimization algorithm to compose an object specific trajectory. PMID:26817435

  5. Analytical computation of prompt gamma ray emission and detection for proton range verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterpin, E.; Janssens, G.; Smeets, J.; Vander Stappen, François; Prieels, D.; Priegnitz, Marlen; Perali, Irene; Vynckier, S.

    2015-06-01

    A prompt gamma (PG) slit camera prototype recently demonstrated that Bragg Peak position in a clinical proton scanned beam could be measured with 1-2 mm accuracy by comparing an expected PG detection profile to a measured one. The computation of the expected PG detection profile in the context of a clinical framework is challenging but must be solved before clinical implementation. Obviously, Monte Carlo methods (MC) can simulate the expected PG profile but at prohibitively long calculation times. We implemented a much faster method that is based on analytical processing of precomputed MC data that would allow practical evaluation of this range monitoring approach in clinical conditions. Reference PG emission profiles were generated with MC simulations (PENH) in targets consisting of either 12C, 14N, 16O, 31P or 40Ca, with 10% of 1H. In a given geometry, the local PG emission can then be derived by adding the contribution of each element, according to the local energy of the proton obtained by continuous slowing down approximation and the local composition. The actual incident spot size is taken into account using an optical model fitted to measurements and by super sampling the spot with several rays (up to 113). PG transport in the patient/camera geometries and the detector response are modelled by convolving the PG production profile with a transfer function. The latter is interpolated from a database of transfer functions fitted to MC data (PENELOPE) generated for a photon source in a cylindrical phantom with various radiuses and a camera placed at various positions. As a benchmark, the analytical model was compared to MC and experiments in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. Comparisons with MC were also performed in a thoracic CT. For all cases, the analytical model reproduced the prediction of the position of the Bragg peak computed with MC within 1 mm for the camera in nominal configuration. When compared to measurements, the shape of the profiles

  6. Analytical computation of prompt gamma ray emission and detection for proton range verification.

    PubMed

    Sterpin, E; Janssens, G; Smeets, J; Vander Stappen, François; Prieels, D; Priegnitz, Marlen; Perali, Irene; Vynckier, S

    2015-06-21

    A prompt gamma (PG) slit camera prototype recently demonstrated that Bragg Peak position in a clinical proton scanned beam could be measured with 1-2 mm accuracy by comparing an expected PG detection profile to a measured one. The computation of the expected PG detection profile in the context of a clinical framework is challenging but must be solved before clinical implementation. Obviously, Monte Carlo methods (MC) can simulate the expected PG profile but at prohibitively long calculation times. We implemented a much faster method that is based on analytical processing of precomputed MC data that would allow practical evaluation of this range monitoring approach in clinical conditions. Reference PG emission profiles were generated with MC simulations (PENH) in targets consisting of either (12)C, (14)N, (16)O, (31)P or (40)Ca, with 10% of (1)H. In a given geometry, the local PG emission can then be derived by adding the contribution of each element, according to the local energy of the proton obtained by continuous slowing down approximation and the local composition. The actual incident spot size is taken into account using an optical model fitted to measurements and by super sampling the spot with several rays (up to 113). PG transport in the patient/camera geometries and the detector response are modelled by convolving the PG production profile with a transfer function. The latter is interpolated from a database of transfer functions fitted to MC data (PENELOPE) generated for a photon source in a cylindrical phantom with various radiuses and a camera placed at various positions. As a benchmark, the analytical model was compared to MC and experiments in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. Comparisons with MC were also performed in a thoracic CT. For all cases, the analytical model reproduced the prediction of the position of the Bragg peak computed with MC within 1 mm for the camera in nominal configuration. When compared to measurements, the shape of the

  7. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  8. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2015-01-13

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  9. FUNCTION GENERATOR FOR ANALOGUE COMPUTERS

    DOEpatents

    Skramstad, H.K.; Wright, J.H.; Taback, L.

    1961-12-12

    An improved analogue computer is designed which can be used to determine the final ground position of radioactive fallout particles in an atomic cloud. The computer determines the fallout pattern on the basis of known wind velocity and direction at various altitudes, and intensity of radioactivity in the mushroom cloud as a function of particle size and initial height in the cloud. The output is then displayed on a cathode-ray tube so that the average or total luminance of the tube screen at any point represents the intensity of radioactive fallout at the geographical location represented by that point. (AEC)

  10. Three-dimensional pore space quantification of apple tissue using X-ray computed microtomography.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Fernando; Verboven, Pieter; Mebatsion, Hibru K; Kerckhofs, Greet; Wevers, Martine; Nicolaï, Bart

    2007-08-01

    The microstructure and the connectivity of the pore space are important variables for better understanding of the complex gas transport phenomena that occur in plant tissues. In this study, we present an experimental procedure for image acquisition and image processing to quantitatively characterize in 3D the pore space of apple tissues (Malus domestica Borkh.) for two cultivars (Jonagold and Braeburn) taken from the fleshy part of the cortex using X-ray computer microtomography. Preliminary sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the effect of the resolution and the volume size (REV, representative elementary volume analysis) on the computed porosity of apple samples. For comparison among cultivars, geometrical properties such as porosity, specific surface area, number of disconnected pore volumes and their distribution parameters were extracted and analyzed in triplicate based on the 3D skeletonization of the pore space (medial axis analysis). The results showed that microtomography provides a resolution at the micrometer level to quantitatively analyze and characterize the 3D topology of the pore space in apple tissue. The computed porosity was confirmed to be highly dependent of the resolution used, and the minimum REV of the cortical flesh of apple fruit was estimated to be 1.3 mm(3). Comparisons among the two cultivars using a resolution of 8.5 mum with a minimum REV cube showed that in spite of the complexity and variability of the pore space network observed in Jonagold and Braeburn apples, the extracted parameters from the medial axis were significantly different (P-value < 0.05). Medial axis parameters showed potential to differentiate the microstructure between the two evaluated apple cultivars.

  11. Mirrors for X-ray telescopes: Fresnel diffraction-based computation of point spread functions from metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondi, L.; Spiga, D.

    2015-01-01

    Context. The imaging sharpness of an X-ray telescope is chiefly determined by the optical quality of its focusing optics, which in turn mostly depends on the shape accuracy and the surface finishing of the grazing-incidence X-ray mirrors that compose the optical modules. To ensure the imaging performance during the mirror manufacturing, a fundamental step is predicting the mirror point spread function (PSF) from the metrology of its surface. Traditionally, the PSF computation in X-rays is assumed to be different depending on whether the surface defects are classified as figure errors or roughness. This classical approach, however, requires setting a boundary between these two asymptotic regimes, which is not known a priori. Aims: The aim of this work is to overcome this limit by providing analytical formulae that are valid at any light wavelength, for computing the PSF of an X-ray mirror shell from the measured longitudinal profiles and the roughness power spectral density, without distinguishing spectral ranges with different treatments. Methods: The method we adopted is based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle for computing the diffracted intensity from measured or modeled profiles. In particular, we have simplified the computation of the surface integral to only one dimension, owing to the grazing incidence that reduces the influence of the azimuthal errors by orders of magnitude. The method can be extended to optical systems with an arbitrary number of reflections - in particular the Wolter-I, which is frequently used in X-ray astronomy - and can be used in both near- and far-field approximation. Finally, it accounts simultaneously for profile, roughness, and aperture diffraction. Results: We describe the formalism with which one can self-consistently compute the PSF of grazing-incidence mirrors, and we show some PSF simulations including the UV band, where the aperture diffraction dominates the PSF, and hard X-rays where the X-ray scattering has a major impact

  12. Comparison of x-ray computed tomography, through-transmission ultrasound, and low-kV x-ray imaging for characterizing green-state ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.A.; Ellingson, W.A.; Vannier, M.W.

    1985-06-01

    Green-state MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/ compact disk specimens have been studied by x-ray computed tomography (CT), through-transmission pulsed ultrasound, and low-kV x-ray imaging to compare the abilities of these nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods to detect flaws and density variations. X-ray computed tomographic images were obtained from a 125-kV (peak) imaging system with a 512 x 512 matrix and a pixel size of 100 ..mu..m. A 3- to 10- MHz focused-beam ultrasonic transducer was used, together with special immersion techniques, to obtain topographical maps of acoustic attenuation and phase velocity; a 30 x 30 matrix was used in the ultrasonic scans. A 35-kV x-ray system with high-resolution type RR film was used to obtain conventional radiographs. Large-scale nonuniform density gradients were detected with CT and ultrasonics in supposedly uniform ceramic disks. In addition, inclusions in the green-state samples were detected by all three methods, with each method providing certain advantages. The influence of grain structure and other ceramic powder characteristics will be examined in the future. 5 refs., 9 figs.

  13. Full-field fan-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography with a conventional x-ray tube and photon-counting detectors for fast nanoparticle bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Zhang, Siyuan; Li, Ruizhe; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2017-04-01

    X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) was performed on a high-intensity synchrotron radiation source or a pencil beam with a long exposure time due to the low emission and detection efficiency of x-ray fluorescence photons. For the first time, the feasibility and experimental results of a full-field fan-beam XFCT with a photon-counting detector array are presented. This full-field fan-beam XFCT consists of a conventional low-intensity x-ray tube, an energy-sensitive photon-counting detector array, and a tungsten pinhole collimator. A phantom containing gadolinium solution (Kα, 42.74 keV) was scanned for 30 min using a polychromatic x-ray fan beam with a third-generation computed tomography (CT) geometry. After scattering and attenuation corrections, experimental results showed that XFCT had better accuracy and performance than spectral CT. Full-field XFCT is a promising modality for biomedical imaging of exogenous molecular probes containing nanoparticles of high atomic number.

  14. A computational study of x-ray emission from high-Z x-ray sources on the National Ignition Facility laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, Jeffrey D.; Fournier, Kevin B.; Kane, Jave; Langer, Steven; May, Mark J.; Scott, Howard A.

    2011-12-01

    We have begun to use 350-500 kJ of 1/3-micron laser light from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser to create millimeter-scale, bright multi-keV x-ray sources. In the first set of shots we achieved 15%-18% x-ray conversion efficiency into Xe M-shell (˜1.5-2.5 keV), Ar K-shell (˜3 keV) and Xe L-shell (˜4-5.5 keV) emission (Fournier et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 082701, 2010), in good agreement with the emission modeled using a 2D radiation-hydrodynamics code incorporating a modern Detailed Configuration Accounting atomic model in non-LTE (Colvin et al., Phys. Plasmas, 17, 073111, 2010). In this paper we first briefly review details of the computational model and comparisons of the simulations with the Ar/Xe NIF data. We then discuss a computational study showing sensitivity of the x-ray emission to various beam illumination details (beam configuration, pointing, peak power, pulse shape, etc.) and target parameters (size, initial density, etc.), and finally make some predictions of how the x-ray conversion efficiency expected from NIF shots scales with atomic number of the emitting plasma.

  15. A Computational Study of X-ray Emissions from High-Z X-ray Sources on the National Ignition Facility Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, Jeffrey; Fournier, Kevin; Kane, Jave; May, Mark

    2010-11-01

    We have begun to use 350-500 kJ of 1/3-micron laser light from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser to create millimeter-scale, bright multi-keV x-ray sources. In the first set of shots we achieved 15% -18% x-ray conversion efficiency into Xe M-shell (˜1.5-2.5 keV), Ar K-shell (˜3 keV) and Xe L-shell (˜4-5.5 keV) emission (Fournier et al., Phys. Plasmas July 2010), in good agreement with the emission modeled using a 2D radiation-hydrodynamics code incorporating a modern Detailed Configuration Accounting atomic model in non-LTE (Colvin et al., Phys. Plasmas, July 2010). In this presentation we first briefly review details of the computational model and comparisons of the simulations with the Ar/Xe NIF data. We then discuss a computational study showing sensitivity of the x-ray emission to various beam illumination details (beam configuration, pointing, peak power, pulse shape, etc.) and target parameters (size, initial density, etc.), and finally make some predictions of how the x-ray conversion efficiency expected from NIF shots scales with atomic number of the emitting plasma.

  16. Model of the plasma jet originating from a cathode spot

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilov, V.N.; Litvinov, E.A.; Mesyats, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    The 2-D NM model of the vacuum-arc plasma jet presented here is in outgrowth of the 1-D hydrodynamic model discussed by us. The computation carried out in 1-D approximation have provided the principal characteristics of a cathode jet being in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. Nevertheless, there results cannot be considered completely adequate, since actually the plum parameters of a cathode jet are distributed highly nonuniformly over its cross section. Furthermore, a 1-D model falls to take in to account the effects related to the influence of the self-magnetic field of the cathode jet.

  17. Challenges in computational evaluation of redox and magnetic properties of Fe-based sulfate cathode materials of Li- and Na-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkin, Maxim; Sato, Hirofumi

    2017-06-01

    Several Fe-based sulfates have been proposed recently as cathode materials characterized by a high average operating voltage (i.e. Li2Fe(SO4)2 and Na2Fe2(SO4)3) or low fabrication temperature (e.g. Na2Fe(SO4)2·2H2O)). In this work, we apply three methods to evaluate the redox potentials and magnetic properties of these materials: (1) local density functional theory (DFT) in Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof parametrization; (2) rotationally invariant DFT  +  U and (3) DFT  +  U with magnetic exchange, suggested herein. The U parameters used for DFT  +  U calculations have been evaluated by using a linear response method (this applies to DFT  +  U as well as DFT  +  U calculations with a magnetic exchange term). Moreover, we have performed adjustments of U and, for the case of magnetic exchange, J parameters, to find better agreement with experimental measurements of redox and magnetic properties. We find that a self-consistent DFT  +  U/linear response approach yields quite overestimated redox potentials as compared to experiment. On the other hand, we also show that DFT  +  U calculations are not capable of providing a reasonably accurate description of both redox and magnetic properties for the case of Li2Fe(SO4)2, even when adjusted U parameters are employed. As a solution, we demonstrate that a DFT  +  U methodology augmented by a magnetic exchange term potentially provides more precise values for both the redox potentials and the magnetic moments of the Fe ions in the studied materials. Thus our work shows that for a more accurate description of redox and magnetic properties, further extensions of the DFT  +  U method, such as inclusion of the contribution of magnetic exchange, should be considered.

  18. Microstructural analysis of TRISO particles using multi-scale X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, T.; Bradley, R. S.; Yue, S.; Barii, K.; Gelb, J.; Rohbeck, N.; Turner, J.; Withers, P. J.

    2015-06-01

    TRISO particles, a composite nuclear fuel built up by ceramic and graphitic layers, have outstanding high temperature resistance. TRISO fuel is the key technology for High Temperature Reactors (HTRs) and the Generation IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) variant. TRISO offers unparalleled containment of fission products and is extremely robust during accident conditions. An understanding of the thermal performance and mechanical properties of TRISO fuel requires a detailed knowledge of pore sizes, their distribution and interconnectivity. Here 50 nm, nano-, and 1 μm resolution, micro-computed tomography (CT), have been used to quantify non-destructively porosity of a surrogate TRISO particle at the 0.3-10 μm and 3-100 μm scales respectively. This indicates that pore distributions can reliably be measured down to a size approximately 3 times the pixel size which is consistent with the segmentation process. Direct comparison with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) sections indicates that destructive sectioning can introduce significant levels of coarse damage, especially in the pyrolytic carbon layers. Further comparative work is required to identify means of minimizing such damage for SEM studies. Finally since it is non-destructive, multi-scale time-lapse X-ray CT opens the possibility of intermittently tracking the degradation of TRISO structure under thermal cycles or radiation conditions in order to validate models of degradation such as kernel movement. X-ray CT in-situ experimentation of TRISO particles under load and temperature could also be used to understand the internal changes that occur in the particles under accident conditions.

  19. Non-invasive classification of breast microcalcifications using x-ray coherent scatter computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ghammraoui, Bahaa; Popescu, Lucretiu M

    2017-02-07

    We investigate the use of energy dispersive x-ray coherent scatter computed tomography (ED-CSCT) as a non-invasive diagnostic method to differentiate between type I and type II breast calcifications. This approach is sensitive to the differences of composition and internal crystal structure of different types of microcalcifications. The study is carried out by simulating a CSCT system with a scanning pencil beam, considering a polychromatic x-ray source and an energy-resolving photon counting detector. In a first step, the multidimensional angle and energy distributed CSCT data is reduced to the projection-space distributions of only a few components, corresponding to the expected target composition: adipose, glandular tissue, weddellite (calcium oxalate) for type I calcifications, and hydroxyapatite for type II calcifications. The maximum-likelihood estimation of scatter components algorithm used, operating in the projection space, takes into account the polychromatic source, the detector response function and the energy dependent attenuation. In the second step, component images are reconstructed from the corresponding estimated component projections using filtered backprojection. In a preliminary step the coherent scatter differential cross sections for hydroxyapatite and weddellite minerals were determined experimentally. The classification of type I or II calcifications is done using the relative contrasts of their components as the criterion. Simulation tests were carried out for different doses and energy resolutions for multiple realizations. The results were analyzed using relative/receiver operating characteristic methodology and show good discrimination ability at medium and higher doses. The noninvasive CSCT technique shows potential to further improve the breast diagnostic accuracy and reduce the number of breast biopsies.

  20. Detection of freeze-thaw weathering effect using X-ray micro computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Hyun, C.; Park, H.

    2011-12-01

    Physical weathering caused by repeated freeze-thaw action of water inside rock pores or cracks was artificially simulated in laboratory. The tests were conducted on three rock types, i.e. diorite, basalt, and tuff, which are the major rock types around King Sejong Station of Korea located in Barton Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica. The temperature of freeze-thaw cycle was also set with simulated the air temperature of the station, i.e. the maximum temperature was + 10 °C and the minimum temperature was - 20 °C. Three cylindrical specimens composed of one for each rock type with 24.6 mm diameter and 14.5 ~ 17.7 mm length were prepared, and 2 mm diameter and 7 mm shallow depth hole was drilled on the center of the specimens. To exaggerate the effect of the freeze-thaw weathering, all tests were conducted under completely saturated condition. 50 cycles of the freeze-thaw test was carried, and X-ray micro computed tomography (CT) images of each rock specimen were obtained after every 10 cycles. Using X-ray micro CT images, 3D structure was rendered and pore and crack structures were extracted. The changes of porosity, absorption rate and pore and crack structure were detected. Porosity of all specimens was decreased linearly and absorption rate of all specimens was increased linearly as weathering processes; the pore connection and crack propagation was detected in 3D rendering pore and crack structure. The change of tuff specimen is the most remarkable among three rock types used in the research, because of its relatively high initial absorption rate and low strength. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) grant funded by the Korea government(MEST) (No. 2011-0027520).