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Sample records for computer controlled scanning

  1. Computer-controlled optical scanning tile microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Shumyatsky, P; Zeng, F; Zevallos, M; Alfano, R R

    2006-02-20

    A new type of computer-controlled optical scanning, high-magnification imaging system with a large field of view is described that overcomes the commonly believed incompatibility of achieving both high magnification and a large field of view. The new system incorporates galvanometer scanners, a CCD camera, and a high-brightness LED source for the fast acquisition of a large number of a high-resolution segmented tile images with a magnification of 800x for each tile. The captured segmented tile images are combined to create an effective enlarged view of a target totaling 1.6 mm x 1.2 mm in area. The speed and sensitivity of the system make it suitable for high-resolution imaging and monitoring of a small segmented area of 320 microm x 240 microm with 4 microm resolution. Each tile segment of the target can be zoomed up without loss of the high resolution. This new microscope imaging system gives both high magnification and a large field of view. This microscope can be utilized in medicine, biology, semiconductor inspection, device analysis, and quality control. PMID:16523776

  2. EVALUATION OF COMPUTER-CONTROLLED SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY APPLIED TO AN AMBIENT URBAN AEROSOL SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concerns about the environmental and public health effects of particulate matter (PM) have stimulated interest in analytical techniques capable of measuring the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSE...

  3. Scanning computed confocal imager

    DOEpatents

    George, John S.

    2000-03-14

    There is provided a confocal imager comprising a light source emitting a light, with a light modulator in optical communication with the light source for varying the spatial and temporal pattern of the light. A beam splitter receives the scanned light and direct the scanned light onto a target and pass light reflected from the target to a video capturing device for receiving the reflected light and transferring a digital image of the reflected light to a computer for creating a virtual aperture and outputting the digital image. In a transmissive mode of operation the invention omits the beam splitter means and captures light passed through the target.

  4. Characterization of combustion-derived individual fine particulates by computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Yu, D.X.; Yao, H.; Xu, M.H.; Wang, Q.Y.; Ninomiya, Y.

    2009-11-15

    Particulate matter (PM) emission from the combustion of solid fuels potentially poses a severe threat to the environment. In this article, a novel approach was developed to examine the properties of individual particles in PM. With this method, PM emitted from combustion was first size-segregated. Subsequently, each size was characterized by computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM) for both bulk property and single particle analysis. Combustion of bituminous coal, dried sewage sludge (DSS) and their mixture were conducted at 1200 {sup o}C in a laboratory-scale drop tube furnace. Three individual sizes smaller than 2.5 {mu}m were investigated. The results indicate that a prior size-segregation can greatly minimize the particle size contrast and phase contrast on the backscattered images during CCSEM analysis. Consequently, high accuracy can be achieved for quantifying the sub-micron particles and their inherent volatile metals. Regarding the PM properties as attained, concentrations of volatile metals including Na, K, and Zn have a negative relationship with particle size; they are enriched in the smallest particles around 0.11 {mu}m as studied here. Strong interactions can occur during the cofiring of coal and DSS, leading to the distinct properties of PM emitted from cofiring. The method developed here and results attained from it are helpful for management of the risks relating to PM emission during coal-fired boilers.

  5. Distinguishing respirable quartz in coal fly ash using computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Cprek; Naresh Shah; Frank E. Huggins; Gerald P. Huffman

    2007-05-15

    Determination and classification of quartz in coal fly ash (CFA) is a subject of interest because of the adverse health effects caused by inhalation of crystalline silica. Workers with prolonged exposure to this carcinogen can develop respiratory diseases over time. This obviously may include utility plant workers involved in the handling, loading, and hauling of CFA. In this investigation, computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to investigate Si-rich phases in CFA to develop a better approach for the determination of respirable quartz. Three CFA samples from utility boilers and a NIST glass standard CFA sample were investigated. The XRD measurements indicated that the four samples contained from 7.0 to 16.0 wt.% of quartz. The CCSEM measurements utilized both particle size distributions and a particle shape parameter, circularity, to classify the Si-rich phases in these ashes as either crystalline or amorphous (glass). The results indicated that the amount of free, respirable, quartz in these CFA samples ranged from only 0.1-1.0 vol % and showed little correlation with the XRD results for the bulk ash. These results are significant in view of the fact that XRD is the traditional method of measuring crystalline silica in dust collected from workplace atmospheres. The results provide a better understanding of studies that indicate very little evidence of a link between human exposure to CFA and silicosis and lung cancer. 24 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Computer control of a scanning electron microscope for digital image processing of thermal-wave images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Percy; Jones, Robert E.; Kramarchuk, Ihor; Williams, Wallace D.; Pouch, John J.

    1987-01-01

    Using a recently developed technology called thermal-wave microscopy, NASA Lewis Research Center has developed a computer controlled submicron thermal-wave microscope for the purpose of investigating III-V compound semiconductor devices and materials. This paper describes the system's design and configuration and discusses the hardware and software capabilities. Knowledge of the Concurrent 3200 series computers is needed for a complete understanding of the material presented. However, concepts and procedures are of general interest.

  7. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy: a computer controlled, scanning monochromator system for the rapid determination of the elements

    SciTech Connect

    Floyd, M.A.

    1980-03-01

    A computer controlled, scanning monochromator system specifically designed for the rapid, sequential determination of the elements is described. The monochromator is combined with an inductively coupled plasma excitation source so that elements at major, minor, trace, and ultratrace levels may be determined, in sequence, without changing experimental parameters other than the spectral line observed. A number of distinctive features not found in previously described versions are incorporated into the system here described. Performance characteristics of the entire system and several analytical applications are discussed.

  8. Data acquisition and control for gamma scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, B.K.; Murray, A.S.; Quintana, J.N.

    1980-01-01

    A new computer-based data acquisition and control unit has been installed in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) system for scanning irradiated reactor fuel pins. The scanning mechanism is controlled by a commercial multichannel analyzer via a CAMAC link with an intelligent crate controller. The scanning and control unit consists of three linked LSI-11 computers. The multitasking capability of the commercial operation system allows control decisions to be based upon currently acquiring data.

  9. EVALUATION OF COMPUTER-CONTROLLED SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY APPLIED TO AN AMBIENT URBAN AEROSOL SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory


    Recent interest in monitoring and speciation of particulate matter has led to increased application of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) to individual particle analysis. SEM/EDX provides information on the size, shape, co...

  10. Performance of Passive Samplers Analyzed by Computer-Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy to Measure PM10-2.5.

    PubMed

    Peters, Thomas M; Sawvel, Eric J; Willis, Robert; West, Roger R; Casuccio, Gary S

    2016-07-19

    We report on the precision and accuracy of measuring PM10-2.5 and its components with particles collected by passive aerosol samplers and analyzed by computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Passive samplers were deployed for week-long intervals in triplicate and colocated with a federal reference method sampler at three sites and for 5 weeks in summer 2009 and 5 weeks in winter 2010 in Cleveland, OH. The limit of detection of the passive method for PM10-2.5 determined from blank analysis was 2.8 μg m(-3). Overall precision expressed as root-mean-square coefficient of variation (CVRMS) improved with increasing concentrations (37% for all samples, n = 30; 19% for PM10-2.5 > 10 μg m(-3), n = 9; and 10% for PM10-2.5 > 15 μg m(-3), n = 4). The linear regression of PM10-2.5 measured passively on that measured with the reference sampler exhibited an intercept not statistically different than zero (p = 0.46) and a slope not statistically different from unity (p = 0.92). Triplicates with high CVs (CV > 40%, n = 5) were attributed to low particle counts (and mass concentrations), spurious counts attributed to salt particles, and Al-rich particles. This work provides important quantitative observations that can help guide future development and use of passive samplers for measuring atmospheric particulate matter. PMID:27300163

  11. Computer controlled antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raumann, N. A.

    1972-01-01

    The application of small computers using digital techniques for operating the servo and control system of large antennas is discussed. The advantages of the system are described. The techniques were evaluated with a forty foot antenna and the Sigma V computer. Programs have been completed which drive the antenna directly without the need for a servo amplifier, antenna position programmer or a scan generator.

  12. A microprocessor controlled pressure scanning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    A microprocessor-based controller and data logger for pressure scanning systems is described. The microcomputer positions and manages data from as many as four 48-port electro-mechanical pressure scanners. The maximum scanning rate is 80 pressure measurements per second (20 ports per second on each of four scanners). The system features on-line calibration, position-directed data storage, and once-per-scan display in engineering units of data from a selected port. The system is designed to be interfaced to a facility computer through a shared memory. System hardware and software are described. Factors affecting measurement error in this type of system are also discussed.

  13. Microprocessor-controlled scanning densitometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Shurtliff, R.W.

    1980-04-01

    An Automated Scanning Densitometer System has been developed by uniting a microprocessor with a low energy x-ray densitometer system. The microprocessor controls the detector movement, provides self-calibration, compensates raw readings to provide time-linear output, controls both data storage and the host computer interface, and provides measurement output in engineering units for immediate reading. The densitometer, when used in a scanning mode, is a precision reference instrument that provides chordal average density measurements over the cross section of a pipe under steady-state flow conditions. Results have shown an improvement over the original densitometer in reliability and repeatability of the system, an a factor-of-five improvement in accuracy.

  14. Quaternions for Galileo scan platform control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, W. G.; Man, G. K.

    1984-01-01

    The application of quaternions for the articulation control of the Galileo scan platform is presented in this paper. The purpose of selecting quaternions is to minimize onboard computation time and program size. Attention has been focused on performing inertial pointing while the spacecraft is in a dual spin configuration. Target quaternion and relative target quaternion are introduced and used to specify the target position of the scan platform for point-to-point absolute slews and mosaic relative slews, respectively. The pointing error of the platform is represented by an error quaternion which is converted into gimbal angular errors defining the attitude change. For path control, a moving target quaternion is generated; the corresponding tracking error quaternion and the related spacecraft motion compensation capability are also addressed. A sample slew case is used to demonstrate the implementation of these concepts.

  15. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope Control Program

    2005-08-05

    User Interface and control software or C++ to run on specifically equipped computer running Windows Operating Systems. Program performs specific control functions required to operate Interferometer controlled scanning transmission X-ray microscopes at ALS beamlines 532 and 11.0.2. Graphical user interface facilitates control, display images and spectra.

  16. Chemical Characterization of Outdoor and Subway Fine (PM2.5-1.0) and Coarse (PM10-2.5) Particulate Matter in Seoul (Korea) Computer-Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Outdoor and indoor (subway) samples were collected by passive sampling in urban Seoul and analyzed with computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM-EDX). Soil/road dust particles accounted for 42-60% (by weight) of fin...

  17. Postoperative myocardial infarction documented by technetium pyrophosphate scan using single-photon emission computed tomography: Significance of intraoperative myocardial ischemia and hemodynamic control

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, D.C.; Chung, F.; Burns, R.J.; Houston, P.L.; Feindel, C.M. )

    1989-12-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to document postoperative myocardial infarction (PMI) by technetium pyrophosphate scan using single-photon emission computed tomography (TcPPi-SPECT) in 28 patients undergoing elective coronary bypass grafting (CABG). The relationships of intraoperative electrocardiographic myocardial ischemia, hemodynamic responses, and pharmacological requirements to this incidence of PMI were correlated. Radionuclide cardioangiography and TcPPi-SPECT were performed 24 h preoperatively and 48 h postoperatively. A standard high-dose fentanyl anesthetic protocol was used. Twenty-five percent of elective CABG patients were complicated with PMI, as documented by TcPPi-SPECT with an infarcted mass of 38.0 +/- 5.5 g. No significant difference in demographic, preoperative right and left ventricular function, number of coronary vessels grafted, or aortic cross-clamp time was observed between the PMI and non-PMI groups. The distribution of patients using preoperative beta-adrenergic blocking drugs or calcium channel blocking drugs was found to have no correlation with the outcome of PMI. As well, no significant differences in hemodynamic changes or pharmacological requirements were observed in the PMI and non-PMI groups during prebypass or postbypass periods, indicating careful intraoperative control of hemodynamic indices did not prevent the outcome of PMI in these patients. However, the incidence of prebypass ischemia was 39.3% and significantly correlated with the outcome of positive TcPPi-SPECT, denoting a 3.9-fold increased risk of developing PMI. Prebypass ischemic changes in leads II and V5 were shown to correlate with increased CPK-MB release (P less than 0.05) and tends to occur more frequently with lateral myocardial infarction.

  18. Evolution of the Cranial Computed Tomography Scan in Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Kenneth W.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A retrospective review of medical charts for 34 children with a diagnosis of child abuse, who had cranial computed tomography scans performed, revealed that some scans initially interpreted as normal were subsequently reinterpreted as abnormal, and some children's repeat scannings were interpreted as abnormal, modifying the medical and legal…

  19. Tuning and scanning control system for high resolution alexandrite lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James C.; Schwemmer, Geary K.

    1988-01-01

    An alexandrite laser is spectrally narrowed and tuned by the use of three optical elements. Each element provides a successively higher degree of spectral resolution. The digitally controlled tuning and scanning control servo system simultaneously positions all three optical elements to provide continuous high resolution laser spectral tuning. The user may select manual, single, or continuous modes of automated scanning of ranges up to 3.00/cm and at scan rates up to 3.85/cm/min. Scanning over an extended range of up to 9.999/cm may be achieved if the highest resolution optic is removed from the system. The control system is also capable of being remotely operated by another computer or controller via standard RS-232 serial data link.

  20. SCAN+

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Krebs, John Svoboda

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determine the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.

  1. Artifacts in computed tomography scanning of moving objects.

    PubMed

    Chen, George T Y; Kung, Jong H; Beaudette, Kevin P

    2004-01-01

    Target volumes in the thorax and abdomen are commonly computed tomography (CT) scanned during light respiration. In this article, we analyze the distortions introduced in helical scanning of moving objects. Objects of known geometry are placed on a moving sled and scanned in a multirow helical CT scanner. The motion of the sled approximates the magnitude and velocity of organ movement in patients during light respiration (amplitude 1 cm, period 4 seconds). Scans of the phantom are obtained in high speed mode at incremental phases of respiration, and the resulting images are compared with scans obtained when the phantom is static. Computer simulations of the scan process are also performed to interpret the results and extend the analysis to a greater range of parameters in scanning, motion, and object size. Resulting scans show that spherical test objects can be shortened by as much as 2 cm or twice the periodic motion amplitude. Object shape was significantly distorted, and the geometric center of the object was displaced by as much as +/-0.8 cm. Computer simulation results qualitatively agree with the experimentally observed phantom images. These simulations predict that the effect is clearly observable even if the amplitude is decreased to 0.5 cm. Implications of scanning moving objects on treatment planning are discussed.

  2. Hardware for digitally controlled scanned probe microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S. M.; Baselt, D. R.; Spence, C. F.; Youngquist, M. G.; Baldeschwieler, J. D.

    1992-10-01

    The design and implementation of a flexible and modular digital control and data acquisition system for scanned probe microscopes (SPMs) is presented. The measured performance of the system shows it to be capable of 14-bit data acquisition at a 100-kHz rate and a full 18-bit output resolution resulting in less than 0.02-Å rms position noise while maintaining a scan range in excess of 1 μm in both the X and Y dimensions. This level of performance achieves the goal of making the noise of the microscope control system an insignificant factor for most experiments. The adaptation of the system to various types of SPM experiments is discussed. Advances in audio electronics and digital signal processors have made the construction of such high performance systems possible at low cost.

  3. SCAN+

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determinemore » the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.« less

  4. Computationally efficient control allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Wayne (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A computationally efficient method for calculating near-optimal solutions to the three-objective, linear control allocation problem is disclosed. The control allocation problem is that of distributing the effort of redundant control effectors to achieve some desired set of objectives. The problem is deemed linear if control effectiveness is affine with respect to the individual control effectors. The optimal solution is that which exploits the collective maximum capability of the effectors within their individual physical limits. Computational efficiency is measured by the number of floating-point operations required for solution. The method presented returned optimal solutions in more than 90% of the cases examined; non-optimal solutions returned by the method were typically much less than 1% different from optimal and the errors tended to become smaller than 0.01% as the number of controls was increased. The magnitude of the errors returned by the present method was much smaller than those that resulted from either pseudo inverse or cascaded generalized inverse solutions. The computational complexity of the method presented varied linearly with increasing numbers of controls; the number of required floating point operations increased from 5.5 i, to seven times faster than did the minimum-norm solution (the pseudoinverse), and at about the same rate as did the cascaded generalized inverse solution. The computational requirements of the method presented were much better than that of previously described facet-searching methods which increase in proportion to the square of the number of controls.

  5. Computational fluid dynamic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Tom T.; Deabreu-Garcia, Alex

    1989-01-01

    A general technique is presented for modeling fluid, or gas, dynamic systems specifically for the development of control systems. The numerical methods which are generally used in computational fluid dynamics are borrowed to create either continuous-time or discrete-time models of the particular fluid system. The resulting equations can be either left in a nonlinear form, or easily linearized about an operating point. As there are typically very many states in these systems, the usual linear model reduction methods can be used on them to allow a low-order controller to be designed. A simple example is given which typifies many internal flow control problems. The resulting control is termed computational fluid dynamic control.

  6. Optimal control computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, F.

    1992-01-01

    The solution of the optimal control problem, even with low order dynamical systems, can usually strain the analytical ability of most engineers. The understanding of this subject matter, therefore, would be greatly enhanced if a software package existed that could simulate simple generic problems. Surprisingly, despite a great abundance of commercially available control software, few, if any, address the part of optimal control in its most generic form. The purpose of this paper is, therefore, to present a simple computer program that will perform simulations of optimal control problems that arise from the first necessary condition and the Pontryagin's maximum principle.

  7. Spinal computed tomography scanning in the evaluation of metastatic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Spring, D.B.; Munderloh, S.H.; George, C.B.; Mansour, R.P.; Volk, S.A.

    1984-07-15

    Twenty patients with known metastatic cancer or high-risk primary cancer developed new lesions on Tc/sup 99m/ bone scans and had normal plain radiographs. Spinal computed tomography (CT) was performed on all new bone-scan-positive lesions in minimal examination time. Fifteen patients had extensive metastatic vertebral disease and received local radiotherapy. One patient with new metastatic vertebral disease on CT was treated only with chemotherapy and developed acute spinal cord compression. Four patients had discogenic disease or degenerative disease but no evidence of metastases. Radionuclide bone scans are more sensitive but less specific than plain radiographs in detecting early bone metastases. Early and accurate diagnosis of metastasis is particularly important in the axial spine to prevent epidural compression and fracture. Spinal CT is valuable for identifying the presence and extent of vertebral metastases, as well as the presence of benign disease in cancer patients.

  8. Serial computed tomography scanning in acute pancreatitis: a prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    London, N J; Neoptolemos, J P; Lavelle, J; Bailey, I; James, D

    1989-01-01

    One hundred and two patients with acute pancreatitis had abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans within 72 hours of admission, at one week and at six weeks. Twenty eight attacks were clinically severe, 74 clinically mild. Ninety three (91%) admission scans, 85 (84%) one week scans, and 52 (51%) six week scans were abnormal. The aetiology of the pancreatitis could be inferred from 28 (27%) of admission scans, the CT sign of fatty liver having a sensitivity of 21% and specificity of 100% for alcoholic aetiology. The sensitivity of CT for gall stone aetiology was 34%, specificity 100%. The pancreatic size indices (max anteroposterior measurement of head x max anteroposterior measurement of body) of those patients with severe attacks were significantly greater than those with mild attacks on admission, at one week and at six weeks (p less than 0.004). Fourteen pseudocysts were detected by CT, five (36%) of which were clinically apparent. The pseudocyst size indices (max anteroposterior x max transverse measurement) of the pseudocysts which were clinically apparent were significantly greater than those which were not apparent (p less than 0.01) and only those pseudocysts with a size index greater than or equal to 15 cm2 required treatment. PMID:2651228

  9. Propulsion controlled aircraft computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogan, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A low-cost, easily retrofit Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) system for use on a wide range of commercial and military aircraft consists of an propulsion controlled aircraft computer that reads in aircraft data including aircraft state, pilot commands and other related data, calculates aircraft throttle position for a given maneuver commanded by the pilot, and then displays both current and calculated throttle position on a cockpit display to show the pilot where to move throttles to achieve the commanded maneuver, or is automatically sent digitally to command the engines directly.

  10. Cosmetic and aesthetic skin photosurgery using a computer-assisted CO2 laser-scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutu, Doru C. A.; Dumitras, Dan C.; Nedelcu, Ioan; Ghetie, Sergiu D.

    1997-12-01

    Since the first application of CO2 laser in skin photosurgery, various techniques such as laser pulsing, beam scanning and computer-assisted laser pulse generator have been introduced for the purpose of reducing tissue carbonization and thermal necrosis. Using a quite simple XY optical scanner equipped with two galvanometric driven mirrors and an appropriate software to process the scanning data and control the interaction time and energy density in the scanned area, we have obtained a device which can improve CO2 laser application in cosmetic and aesthetic surgery. The opto-mechanical CO2 laser scanner based on two total reflecting flat mirrors placed at 90 degree(s) in respect to the XY scanning directions and independently driven through a magnetic field provides a linear movement of the incident laser beam in the operating field. A DA converter supplied with scanning data by the software enables a scanning with linearity better than 1% for a maximum angular deviation of 20 degree(s). Because the scanning quality of the laser beam in the operating field is given not only by the displacement function of the two mirrors, but also by the beam characteristics in the focal plane and the cross distribution in the laser beam, the surgeon can control through software either the scanning field dimensions or the distance between two consecutive points of the vertically and/or horizontally sweep line. The development of computer-assisted surgical scanning techniques will help control the surgical laser, to create either a reproducible incision with a controlled depth or a controlled incision pattern with minimal incision width, a long desired facility for plastic surgery, neurosurgery, ENT and dentistry.

  11. RTSPM: real-time Linux control software for scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, V; Mehta, M M

    2013-01-01

    Real time computer control is an essential feature of scanning probe microscopes, which have become important tools for the characterization and investigation of nanometer scale samples. Most commercial (and some open-source) scanning probe data acquisition software uses digital signal processors to handle the real time data processing and control, which adds to the expense and complexity of the control software. We describe here scan control software that uses a single computer and a data acquisition card to acquire scan data. The computer runs an open-source real time Linux kernel, which permits fast acquisition and control while maintaining a responsive graphical user interface. Images from a simulated tuning-fork based microscope as well as a standard topographical sample are also presented, showing some of the capabilities of the software.

  12. Apparatus for controlling the scan width of a scanning laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, G.W.

    1996-10-22

    Swept-wavelength lasers are often used in absorption spectroscopy applications. In experiments where high accuracy is required, it is desirable to continuously monitor and control the range of wavelengths scanned (the scan width). A system has been demonstrated whereby the scan width of a swept ring-dye laser, or semiconductor diode laser, can be measured and controlled in real-time with a resolution better than 0.1%. Scan linearity, or conformity to a nonlinear scan waveform, can be measured and controlled. The system of the invention consists of a Fabry-Perot interferometer, three CAMAC interface modules, and a microcomputer running a simple analysis and proportional-integral control algorithm. With additional modules, multiple lasers can be simultaneously controlled. The invention also includes an embodiment implemented on an ordinary PC with a multifunction plug-in board. 8 figs.

  13. Apparatus for controlling the scan width of a scanning laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Gary W.

    1996-01-01

    Swept-wavelength lasers are often used in absorption spectroscopy applications. In experiments where high accuracy is required, it is desirable to continuously monitor and control the range of wavelengths scanned (the scan width). A system has been demonstrated whereby the scan width of a swept ring-dye laser, or semiconductor diode laser, can be measured and controlled in real-time with a resolution better than 0.1%. Scan linearity, or conformity to a nonlinear scan waveform, can be measured and controlled. The system of the invention consists of a Fabry-Perot interferometer, three CAMAC interface modules, and a microcomputer running a simple analysis and proportional-integral control algorithm. With additional modules, multiple lasers can be simultaneously controlled. The invention also includes an embodiment implemented on an ordinary PC with a multifunction plug-in board.

  14. Additive Manufacturing of Anatomical Models from Computed Tomography Scan Data.

    PubMed

    Gür, Y

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study presented here was to investigate the manufacturability of human anatomical models from Computed Tomography (CT) scan data via a 3D desktop printer which uses fused deposition modelling (FDM) technology. First, Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) CT scan data were converted to 3D Standard Triangle Language (STL) format by using In Vaselius digital imaging program. Once this STL file is obtained, a 3D physical version of the anatomical model can be fabricated by a desktop 3D FDM printer. As a case study, a patient's skull CT scan data was considered, and a tangible version of the skull was manufactured by a 3D FDM desktop printer. During the 3D printing process, the skull was built using acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) co-polymer plastic. The printed model showed that the 3D FDM printing technology is able to fabricate anatomical models with high accuracy. As a result, the skull model can be used for preoperative surgical planning, medical training activities, implant design and simulation to show the potential of the FDM technology in medical field. It will also improve communication between medical stuff and patients. Current result indicates that a 3D desktop printer which uses FDM technology can be used to obtain accurate anatomical models.

  15. Additive Manufacturing of Anatomical Models from Computed Tomography Scan Data.

    PubMed

    Gür, Y

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study presented here was to investigate the manufacturability of human anatomical models from Computed Tomography (CT) scan data via a 3D desktop printer which uses fused deposition modelling (FDM) technology. First, Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) CT scan data were converted to 3D Standard Triangle Language (STL) format by using In Vaselius digital imaging program. Once this STL file is obtained, a 3D physical version of the anatomical model can be fabricated by a desktop 3D FDM printer. As a case study, a patient's skull CT scan data was considered, and a tangible version of the skull was manufactured by a 3D FDM desktop printer. During the 3D printing process, the skull was built using acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) co-polymer plastic. The printed model showed that the 3D FDM printing technology is able to fabricate anatomical models with high accuracy. As a result, the skull model can be used for preoperative surgical planning, medical training activities, implant design and simulation to show the potential of the FDM technology in medical field. It will also improve communication between medical stuff and patients. Current result indicates that a 3D desktop printer which uses FDM technology can be used to obtain accurate anatomical models. PMID:26336695

  16. High-speed Lissajous-scan atomic force microscopy: Scan pattern planning and control design issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazaei, A.; Yong, Yuen K.; Moheimani, S. O. Reza

    2012-06-01

    Tracking of triangular or sawtooth waveforms is a major difficulty for achieving high-speed operation in many scanning applications such as scanning probe microscopy. Such non-smooth waveforms contain high order harmonics of the scan frequency that can excite mechanical resonant modes of the positioning system, limiting the scan range and bandwidth. Hence, fast raster scanning often leads to image distortion. This paper proposes analysis and design methodologies for a nonlinear and smooth closed curve, known as Lissajous pattern, which allows much faster operations compared to the ordinary scan patterns. A simple closed-form measure is formulated for the image resolution of the Lissajous pattern. This enables us to systematically determine the scan parameters. Using internal model controllers (IMC), this non-raster scan method is implemented on a commercial atomic force microscope driven by a low resonance frequency positioning stage. To reduce the tracking errors due to actuator nonlinearities, higher order harmonic oscillators are included in the IMC controllers. This results in significant improvement compared to the traditional IMC method. It is shown that the proposed IMC controller achieves much better tracking performances compared to integral controllers when the noise rejection performances is a concern.

  17. Determination of dosimetric quantities in pediatric abdominal computed tomography scans*

    PubMed Central

    Jornada, Tiago da Silva; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aiming at contributing to the knowledge on doses in computed tomography (CT), this study has the objective of determining dosimetric quantities associated with pediatric abdominal CT scans, comparing the data with diagnostic reference levels (DRL). Materials and methods The study was developed with a Toshiba Asteion single-slice CT scanner and a GE BrightSpeed multi-slice CT unit in two hospitals. Measurements were performed with a pencil-type ionization chamber and a 16 cm-diameter polymethylmethacrylate trunk phantom. Results No significant difference was observed in the values for weighted air kerma index (CW), but the differences were relevant in values for volumetric air kerma index (CVOL), air kerma-length product (PKL,CT) and effective dose. Conclusion Only the CW values were lower than the DRL, suggesting that dose optimization might not be necessary. However, PKL,CT and effective dose values stressed that there still is room for reducing pediatric radiation doses. The present study emphasizes the importance of determining all dosimetric quantities associated with CT scans. PMID:25741103

  18. Computer Software for Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, Alfred Z.

    1984-01-01

    Computer software for process control has the primary function of communicating with and governing physical devices. The structure of such software, process-control systems, multitask systems, message passing, problems of deadlock, distributed computer systems, and protection against failure in process-control systems are among the areas examined.…

  19. Chemical Characterization of Outdoor and Subway Fine (PM2.5–1.0) and Coarse (PM10–2.5) Particulate Matter in Seoul (Korea) by Computer-Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM)

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Sang-Hoon; Willis, Robert; Peters, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor and indoor (subway) samples were collected by passive sampling in urban Seoul (Korea) and analyzed with computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM-EDX). Soil/road dust particles accounted for 42%–60% (by weight) of fine particulate matter larger than 1 µm (PM2.5–1.0) in outdoor samples and 18% of PM2.5–1.0 in subway samples. Iron-containing particles accounted for only 3%–6% in outdoor samples but 69% in subway samples. Qualitatively similar results were found for coarse particulate matter (PM10–2.5) with soil/road dust particles dominating outdoor samples (66%–83%) and iron-containing particles contributing most to subway PM10–2.5 (44%). As expected, soil/road dust particles comprised a greater mass fraction of PM10–2.5 than PM2.5–1.0. Also as expected, the mass fraction of iron-containing particles was substantially less in PM10–2.5 than in PM2.5–1.0. Results of this study are consistent with known emission sources in the area and with previous studies, which showed high concentrations of iron-containing particles in the subway compared to outdoor sites. Thus, passive sampling with CCSEM-EDX offers an inexpensive means to assess PM2.5–1.0 and PM10-2.5 simultaneously and by composition at multiple locations. PMID:25689348

  20. Control theory for scanning probe microscopy revisited.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Julian

    2014-01-01

    We derive a theoretical model for studying SPM feedback in the context of control theory. Previous models presented in the literature that apply standard models for proportional-integral-derivative controllers predict a highly unstable feedback environment. This model uses features specific to the SPM implementation of the proportional-integral controller to give realistic feedback behaviour. As such the stability of SPM feedback for a wide range of feedback gains can be understood. Further consideration of mechanical responses of the SPM system gives insight into the causes of exciting mechanical resonances of the scanner during feedback operation.

  1. Control theory for scanning probe microscopy revisited.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Julian

    2014-01-01

    We derive a theoretical model for studying SPM feedback in the context of control theory. Previous models presented in the literature that apply standard models for proportional-integral-derivative controllers predict a highly unstable feedback environment. This model uses features specific to the SPM implementation of the proportional-integral controller to give realistic feedback behaviour. As such the stability of SPM feedback for a wide range of feedback gains can be understood. Further consideration of mechanical responses of the SPM system gives insight into the causes of exciting mechanical resonances of the scanner during feedback operation. PMID:24778957

  2. Control theory for scanning probe microscopy revisited

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary We derive a theoretical model for studying SPM feedback in the context of control theory. Previous models presented in the literature that apply standard models for proportional-integral-derivative controllers predict a highly unstable feedback environment. This model uses features specific to the SPM implementation of the proportional-integral controller to give realistic feedback behaviour. As such the stability of SPM feedback for a wide range of feedback gains can be understood. Further consideration of mechanical responses of the SPM system gives insight into the causes of exciting mechanical resonances of the scanner during feedback operation. PMID:24778957

  3. Scanning ablation of root caries with acoustic feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Kenneth; Fried, Daniel

    2007-02-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that short λ=355-nm laser pulses can be used for the selective removal of caries lesions and composite restorative materials from occlusal surfaces with minimal damage to the peripheral sound tooth structure. One advantage of laser-systems is they can be integrated with acoustic and optical feedback systems for the automated discrimination of dental caries and restorative materials. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that root caries could be selectively removed from tooth surfaces using a computer controlled laserscanning system coupled with an acoustic feedback system. Dental root caries surfaces on extracted teeth were scanned with λ=355-nm laser pulses at irradiation intensities ranging from 0.6 to 0.8 J/cm2. Acoustic feedback signals were acquired and used to control the laser output and scanning stages were used to position the laser over carious dentin until all the caries were removed to a fixed depth. Polarization optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) was used to acquire images of the root caries lesions before and after removal by the laser in order to assess if ablation was selective. The amplitude of the acoustic waves generated during the ablation of carious dentin was higher than for sound dentin allowing the acoustic feedback system to discriminate between sound and carious dentin. PS-OCT showed that caries were removed to a depth of up to 1.5-mm with minimal peripheral damage to peripheral sound dentin. The acoustic feedback was successfully used to distinguish between root caries and sound dentin, enabling the selective removal of caries from dentin surfaces using a λ=355-nm, Nd:YAG Q-switched laser system.

  4. Scanning probe microscope simulator for the assessment of noise in scanning probe microscopy controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Wutscher, T.; Niebauer, J.; Giessibl, F. J.

    2013-07-15

    We present an electronic circuit that allows to calibrate and troubleshoot scanning probe microscopy (SPM) controllers with respect to their noise performance. The control signal in an SPM is typically highly nonlinear—the tunneling current in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) varies exponentially with distance. The exponential current-versus-voltage characteristics of diodes allow to model the current dependence in STM. Additional inputs allow to simulate the effects of external perturbations and the reactions of the control electronics. We characterized the noise performance of the feedback controller using the apparent topography roughness of recorded images. For a comparison of different STM controllers, an optimal gain parameter was determined by exploring settling times through a rectangular perturbation signal. We used the circuit to directly compare the performance of two types of SPM controllers used in our laboratory.

  5. Spacelab data analysis using the space plasma computer analysis network (SCAN) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    The Space-plasma Computer Analysis Network (SCAN) currently connects a large number of U.S. Spacelab investigators into a common computer network. Used primarily by plasma physics researchers at present, SCAN provides access to Spacelab investigators in other areas of space science, to Spacelab and non-Spacelab correlative data bases, and to large Class VI computational facilities for modeling. SCAN links computers together at remote institutions used by space researchers, utilizing commercially available software for computer-to-computer communications. Started by the NASA's Office of Space Science in mid 1980, SCAN presently contains ten system nodes located at major universities and space research laboratories, with fourteen new nodes projected for the near future. The Stanford University computer gateways allow SCAN users to connect onto the ARPANET and TELENET overseas networks.

  6. Low-dose computed tomography image restoration using previous normal-dose scan

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jianhua; Huang, Jing; Feng, Qianjin; Zhang, Hua; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong; Chen, Wufan

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: In current computed tomography (CT) examinations, the associated x-ray radiation dose is of a significant concern to patients and operators. A simple and cost-effective means to perform the examinations is to lower the milliampere-seconds (mAs) or kVp parameter (or delivering less x-ray energy to the body) as low as reasonably achievable in data acquisition. However, lowering the mAs parameter will unavoidably increase data noise and the noise would propagate into the CT image if no adequate noise control is applied during image reconstruction. Since a normal-dose high diagnostic CT image scanned previously may be available in some clinical applications, such as CT perfusion imaging and CT angiography (CTA), this paper presents an innovative way to utilize the normal-dose scan as a priori information to induce signal restoration of the current low-dose CT image series. Methods: Unlike conventional local operations on neighboring image voxels, nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm utilizes the redundancy of information across the whole image. This paper adapts the NLM to utilize the redundancy of information in the previous normal-dose scan and further exploits ways to optimize the nonlocal weights for low-dose image restoration in the NLM framework. The resulting algorithm is called the previous normal-dose scan induced nonlocal means (ndiNLM). Because of the optimized nature of nonlocal weights calculation, the ndiNLM algorithm does not depend heavily on image registration between the current low-dose and the previous normal-dose CT scans. Furthermore, the smoothing parameter involved in the ndiNLM algorithm can be adaptively estimated based on the image noise relationship between the current low-dose and the previous normal-dose scanning protocols. Results: Qualitative and quantitative evaluations were carried out on a physical phantom as well as clinical abdominal and brain perfusion CT scans in terms of accuracy and resolution properties. The gain by the use

  7. Galileo Spacecraft Scan Platform Celestial Pointing Cone Control Gain Redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    In, C-H. C.; Hilbert, K. B.

    1994-01-01

    During September and October 1991, pictures of the Gaspra asteroid and neighboring stars were taken by the Galileo Optical Navigation (OPNAV) Team for the purpose of navigation the spacecraft for a successful Gaspra encounter. The star tracks in these pictures showed that the scan platform celestial pointing cone controller performed poorly in compensating for wobble-induced cone offsets.

  8. Scanning Tunneling Microscope Data Acquistion and Control System

    1995-02-01

    SHOESCAN is a PC based code that acquires and displays data for Scanning Tunneling Microscopes (STM). SHOESCAN interfaces with the STM through external electronic feedback and raster control circuits that are controlled by I/O boards on the PC bus. Data is displayed on a separate color monitor that is interfaced to the PC through an additional frame-grabber board. SHOESCAN can acquire a wide range of surface topographic information as well as surface electronic structure information.

  9. Cone beam computed tomography scanning and diagnosis for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Alex M

    2015-05-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has become an important new technology for oral and maxillofacial surgery practitioners. CBCT provides improved office-based diagnostic capability and applications for surgical procedures, such as CT guidance through the use of computer-generated drill guides. A thorough knowledge of the basic science of CBCT as well as the ability to interpret the images correctly and thoroughly is essential to current practice.

  10. Computer-controlled warmup circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daeges, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    Filament of high-power radio transmitter is brought to operating temperature automatically. Pushbotton reduces operator's role to one-step command and is compatible with various forms of computer control. Filiament shutdown is initiated by "down" command from operator, failure of cooling systems, or power failure for more than few seconds.

  11. Digital signal processor control of scanned probe microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baselt, David R.; Clark, Steven M.; Youngquist, Michael G.; Spence, Charles F.; Baldeschwieler, John D.

    1993-07-01

    Digital signal processors have made it possible to control scanned probe microscopes using straightforward software emulations of analog circuits. Using a system consisting of a commercially available digital signal processor board interfaced to analog I/O, we have developed algorithms for self-optimizing feedback, raster generation (with hysteresis correction, sample tilt compensation, and scan rotation), lock-in detection, and automatic tip-sample approach. We also discuss an instruction parser that takes advantage of the digital architecture to allow automatic operation for extended periods.

  12. Analytical scanning evanescent microwave microscope and control stage

    DOEpatents

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Chen; Duewer, Fred; Yang, Hai Tao; Lu, Yalin

    2009-06-23

    A scanning evanescent microwave microscope (SEMM) that uses near-field evanescent electromagnetic waves to probe sample properties is disclosed. The SEMM is capable of high resolution imaging and quantitative measurements of the electrical properties of the sample. The SEMM has the ability to map dielectric constant, loss tangent, conductivity, electrical impedance, and other electrical parameters of materials. Such properties are then used to provide distance control over a wide range, from to microns to nanometers, over dielectric and conductive samples for a scanned evanescent microwave probe, which enable quantitative non-contact and submicron spatial resolution topographic and electrical impedance profiling of dielectric, nonlinear dielectric and conductive materials. The invention also allows quantitative estimation of microwave impedance using signals obtained by the scanned evanescent microwave probe and quasistatic approximation modeling. The SEMM can be used to measure electrical properties of both dielectric and electrically conducting materials.

  13. Analytical scanning evanescent microwave microscope and control stage

    DOEpatents

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Chen; Duewer, Fred; Yang, Hai Tao; Lu, Yalin

    2013-01-22

    A scanning evanescent microwave microscope (SEMM) that uses near-field evanescent electromagnetic waves to probe sample properties is disclosed. The SEMM is capable of high resolution imaging and quantitative measurements of the electrical properties of the sample. The SEMM has the ability to map dielectric constant, loss tangent, conductivity, electrical impedance, and other electrical parameters of materials. Such properties are then used to provide distance control over a wide range, from to microns to nanometers, over dielectric and conductive samples for a scanned evanescent microwave probe, which enable quantitative non-contact and submicron spatial resolution topographic and electrical impedance profiling of dielectric, nonlinear dielectric and conductive materials. The invention also allows quantitative estimation of microwave impedance using signals obtained by the scanned evanescent microwave probe and quasistatic approximation modeling. The SEMM can be used to measure electrical properties of both dielectric and electrically conducting materials.

  14. Computer control by hand gestures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemel, Intidhar; Ejbali, Ridha; Zaied, Mourad

    2015-12-01

    This work fits into the context of the interpretation of automatic gestures based on computer vision. The aim of our work is to transform a conventional screen in a surface that allows the user to use his hands as pointing devices. These can be summarized in three main steps. Hand detection in a video, monitoring detected hands and conversion paths made by the hands to computer commands. To realize this application, it is necessary to detect the hand to follow. A classification phase is essential, at the control part. For this reason, we resorted to the use of a neuro-fuzzy classifier for classification and a pattern matching method for detection.

  15. Scan Rate: A New Metric for the Analysis of Reading Behaviors in Asynchronous Computer Conferencing Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Jim; Brett, Clare; Peters, Vanessa

    2007-01-01

    This article introduces a new computer conferencing metric called Scan Rate, which is a measure of students' and instructors' online reading speed. The term "scan" refers to the practice of either skimming through a message at an unusually rapid pace or reading a message partially and then stopping before the end is reached. It is proposed that…

  16. Self port scanning tool : providing a more secure computing Environment through the use of proactive port scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocher, Joshua E; Gilliam, David P.

    2005-01-01

    Secure computing is a necessity in the hostile environment that the internet has become. Protection from nefarious individuals and organizations requires a solution that is more a methodology than a one time fix. One aspect of this methodology is having the knowledge of which network ports a computer has open to the world, These network ports are essentially the doorways from the internet into the computer. An assessment method which uses the nmap software to scan ports has been developed to aid System Administrators (SAs) with analysis of open ports on their system(s). Additionally, baselines for several operating systems have been developed so that SAs can compare their open ports to a baseline for a given operating system. Further, the tool is deployed on a website where SAs and Users can request a port scan of their computer. The results are then emailed to the requestor. This tool aids Users, SAs, and security professionals by providing an overall picture of what services are running, what ports are open, potential trojan programs or backdoors, and what ports can be closed.

  17. Characterization of Visual Scanning Patterns in Air Traffic Control.

    PubMed

    McClung, Sarah N; Kang, Ziho

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of air traffic controllers' (ATCs') visual scanning strategies is a challenging issue due to the dynamic movement of multiple aircraft and increasing complexity of scanpaths (order of eye fixations and saccades) over time. Additionally, terminologies and methods are lacking to accurately characterize the eye tracking data into simplified visual scanning strategies linguistically expressed by ATCs. As an intermediate step to automate the characterization classification process, we (1) defined and developed new concepts to systematically filter complex visual scanpaths into simpler and more manageable forms and (2) developed procedures to map visual scanpaths with linguistic inputs to reduce the human judgement bias during interrater agreement. The developed concepts and procedures were applied to investigating the visual scanpaths of expert ATCs using scenarios with different aircraft congestion levels. Furthermore, oculomotor trends were analyzed to identify the influence of aircraft congestion on scan time and number of comparisons among aircraft. The findings show that (1) the scanpaths filtered at the highest intensity led to more consistent mapping with the ATCs' linguistic inputs, (2) the pattern classification occurrences differed between scenarios, and (3) increasing aircraft congestion caused increased scan times and aircraft pairwise comparisons. The results provide a foundation for better characterizing complex scanpaths in a dynamic task and automating the analysis process. PMID:27239190

  18. Controller for the Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zomberg, Brian G.; Chren, William A., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A prototype controller for the ESTAR (electronically scanned thinned array radiometer) instrument has been designed and tested. It manages the operation of the digital data subsystem (DDS) and its communication with the Small Explorer data system (SEDS). Among the data processing tasks that it coordinates are FEM data acquisition, noise removal, phase alignment and correlation. Its control functions include instrument calibration and testing of two critical subsystems, the output data formatter and Walsh function generator. It is implemented in a Xilinx XC3064PC84-100 field programmable gate array (FPGA) and has a maximum clocking frequency of 10 MHz.

  19. Computer-aided quantitative bone scan assessment of prostate cancer treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Matthew S.; Chu, Gregory H.; Kim, Hyun J.; Allen-Auerbach, Martin; Poon, Cheryce; Bridges, Juliette; Vidovic, Adria; Ramakrishna, Bharath; Ho, Judy; Morris, Michael J.; Larson, Steven M.; Scher, Howard I.; Goldin, Jonathan G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The development and evaluation of a computer-aided bone scan analysis technique to quantify changes in tumor burden and assess treatment effects in prostate cancer clinical trials. Methods We have developed and report on a commercial fully automated computer-aided detection system. Using this system, scan images were intensity normalized, then lesions identified and segmented by anatomic region-specific intensity thresholding. Detected lesions were compared against expert markings to assess the accuracy of the computer-aided detection system. The metrics Bone Scan Lesion Area, Bone Scan Lesion Intensity, and Bone Scan Lesion Count were calculated from identified lesions, and their utility in assessing treatment effects was evaluated by analyzing before and after scans from metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients: 10 treated and 10 untreated. In this study, patients were treated with cabozantinib, a MET/VEGF inhibitor resulting in high rates of resolution of bone scan abnormalities. Results Our automated computer-aided detection system identified bone lesion pixels with 94% sensitivity, 89% specificity, and 89% accuracy. Significant differences in changes from baseline were found between treated and untreated groups in all assessed measurements derived by our system. The most significant measure, Bone Scan Lesion Area, showed a median (interquartile range) change from baseline at week 6 of 7.13% (27.61) in the untreated group compared with −73.76% (45.38) in the cabozantinib-treated group (P = 0.0003). Conclusions Our system accurately and objectively identified and quantified metastases in bone scans, allowing for interpatient and intrapatient comparison. It demonstrates potential as an objective measurement of treatment effects, laying the foundation for validation against other clinically relevant outcome measures. PMID:22367858

  20. New versatile computer-controlled direct reading emission spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasheim, A.; Thain, M. E.; Walters, N. M.; Claase, C.; Human, H. G. C.; Ferreira, N. P.

    This paper describes the design, implementation and evaluation of a 20-channel direct-reading 1.5 m Paschen Runge type vacuum spectrometer. Computer control allows the changing from one analytical programme to another in a relatively short time with ease and also allows the instrument to function as a dual scanning monochromator.

  1. Three-dimensional assessment of bone turnover using computed microtomography and laser-scanning confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevrhal, Sven; Jiang, Yebin; Zhao, Jenny; Genant, Harry K.

    2000-06-01

    Objective: Metabolic activity in trabecular bone is an important indicator in the therapy of bone diseases like osteoporosis. It is reflected by the amount of osteoid (young, not yet mineralized bone) and young calcified tissue (YCT). Our aim was to replace standard 2D histomorphometry with a 3D approach for osteoid and YCT measurement. Measurement Methods: Excised lumbar vertebrae of 5 ovariectomized (OVX) and 5 control rats were 3D-scanned with computed micro-tomography ((mu) CT, isotropic spatial resolution 20 micrometer3) and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM, 20X magnification, 1X1X2 micrometer3 spatial resolution). (mu) CT shows trabecular bone structure; LSCM shows osteoid and YCT by fluorescent light. Image Processing Methods: The fraction of bone to tissue volume (BV/TV) and the number of trabeculae (Tb.N) were calculated from globally thresholded (mu) CT images. LSCM images were enhanced using top-hat transform, globally thresholded and morphologically closed. Separate regions were labeled by volume growing. We measured feature volume to background volume ratio and number of features per unit volume. Results and Conclusions: In the specimens obtained from the OVX rats, a significant increase in the volume fractions of osteoid and YCT could be seen. The (mu) CT-LSCM approach presents a significant improvement over time-consuming, standard histomorphometry. The image processing for both modalities could be achieved automatically.

  2. The advantage of coronal scanning in cerebral computed angiotomography for diagnosis of moyamoya disease

    SciTech Connect

    Asari, S.; Satoh, T.; Sakurai, M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Sadamoto, K.

    1982-12-01

    The advantage of coronal scanning in cerebral computed angiotomography for diagnosis of and screening for moyamoya disease is demonstrated. Characteristic features on the coronal CT scan include (a) attenuation of and difficulty in following the supraclinoid internal carotid arteries and carotid fork and (b) abnormal ''nebula-like'' high-density areas consisting of irregular, tortuous, or patchy vessels arising in the basal cisterns and extending to the basal ganglia.

  3. Semi-automated method to measure pneumonia severity in mice through computed tomography (CT) scan analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johri, Ansh; Schimel, Daniel; Noguchi, Audrey; Hsu, Lewis L.

    2010-03-01

    Imaging is a crucial clinical tool for diagnosis and assessment of pneumonia, but quantitative methods are lacking. Micro-computed tomography (micro CT), designed for lab animals, provides opportunities for non-invasive radiographic endpoints for pneumonia studies. HYPOTHESIS: In vivo micro CT scans of mice with early bacterial pneumonia can be scored quantitatively by semiautomated imaging methods, with good reproducibility and correlation with bacterial dose inoculated, pneumonia survival outcome, and radiologists' scores. METHODS: Healthy mice had intratracheal inoculation of E. coli bacteria (n=24) or saline control (n=11). In vivo micro CT scans were performed 24 hours later with microCAT II (Siemens). Two independent radiologists scored the extent of airspace abnormality, on a scale of 0 (normal) to 24 (completely abnormal). Using the Amira 5.2 software (Mercury Computer Systems), a histogram distribution of voxel counts between the Hounsfield range of -510 to 0 was created and analyzed, and a segmentation procedure was devised. RESULTS: A t-test was performed to determine whether there was a significant difference in the mean voxel value of each mouse in the three experimental groups: Saline Survivors, Pneumonia Survivors, and Pneumonia Non-survivors. It was found that the voxel count method was able to statistically tell apart the Saline Survivors from the Pneumonia Survivors, the Saline Survivors from the Pneumonia Non-survivors, but not the Pneumonia Survivors vs. Pneumonia Non-survivors. The segmentation method, however, was successfully able to distinguish the two Pneumonia groups. CONCLUSION: We have pilot-tested an evaluation of early pneumonia in mice using micro CT and a semi-automated method for lung segmentation and scoring system. Statistical analysis indicates that the system is reliable and merits further evaluation.

  4. Review of P-scan computer-based ultrasonic inservice inspection system. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.V. Jr.; Angel, L.J.

    1995-12-01

    This Supplement reviews the P-scan system, a computer-based ultrasonic system used for inservice inspection of piping and other components in nuclear power plants. The Supplement was prepared using the methodology described in detail in Appendix A of NUREG/CR-5985, and is based on one month of using the system in a laboratory. This Supplement describes and characterizes: computer system, ultrasonic components, and mechanical components; scanning, detection, digitizing, imaging, data interpretation, operator interaction, data handling, and record-keeping. It includes a general description, a review checklist, and detailed results of all tests performed.

  5. Controlling false discoveries in genome scans for selection.

    PubMed

    François, Olivier; Martins, Helena; Caye, Kevin; Schoville, Sean D

    2016-01-01

    Population differentiation (PD) and ecological association (EA) tests have recently emerged as prominent statistical methods to investigate signatures of local adaptation using population genomic data. Based on statistical models, these genomewide testing procedures have attracted considerable attention as tools to identify loci potentially targeted by natural selection. An important issue with PD and EA tests is that incorrect model specification can generate large numbers of false-positive associations. Spurious association may indeed arise when shared demographic history, patterns of isolation by distance, cryptic relatedness or genetic background are ignored. Recent works on PD and EA tests have widely focused on improvements of test corrections for those confounding effects. Despite significant algorithmic improvements, there is still a number of open questions on how to check that false discoveries are under control and implement test corrections, or how to combine statistical tests from multiple genome scan methods. This tutorial study provides a detailed answer to these questions. It clarifies the relationships between traditional methods based on allele frequency differentiation and EA methods and provides a unified framework for their underlying statistical tests. We demonstrate how techniques developed in the area of genomewide association studies, such as inflation factors and linear mixed models, benefit genome scan methods and provide guidelines for good practice while conducting statistical tests in landscape and population genomic applications. Finally, we highlight how the combination of several well-calibrated statistical tests can increase the power to reject neutrality, improving our ability to infer patterns of local adaptation in large population genomic data sets.

  6. Micro-determination of iron in pharmaceutical preparations by image scanning and computational quantification.

    PubMed

    Anwar, J; Salman, M; Shafique, U; Waheed-uz-Zaman; Dar, A; Anzano, J M

    2010-01-01

    Iron has been quantified in pharmaceutical preparations by developing red spots pursuant to interaction of Fe(II) ions in the sample with 1, 10-phenanthroline on TLC plate. Soon after, TLC was scanned on a flatbed scanner and the image was transferred to the computer. Color intensity of the spot was computationally quantified with the help of native software developed for this purpose. The conditions were optimized and the results were compared with a reference method.

  7. Computer controlled thermal fatigue test system

    SciTech Connect

    Schmale, D.T.; Jones, W.B.

    1986-01-01

    A servo-controlled hydraulic mechanical test system has been configured to conduct computer-controlled thermal fatigue tests. The system uses induction heating, a digital temperature controller, infrared pyrometry, forced air cooling, and quartz rod extensometry. In addition, a digital computer controls the tests and allows precise data analysis and interpretation.

  8. Noninvasive determination of bone stiffness for distraction osteogenesis by quantitative computed tomography scans.

    PubMed

    Harp, J H; Aronson, J; Hollis, M

    1994-04-01

    Apparent density of canine tibial specimens was correlated to measured quantitative computed tomography (QCT) numbers, and a conversion equation was derived. Finite element analysis models of canine tibiae were constructed using spatial coordinates of converted QCT data. Two QCT-derived finite elemental analysis models were constructed for a pair of matched tibiae: one lengthened 15% by distraction osteogenesis and one contralateral control. Two equations relating the modulus of elasticity to apparent density were used. These models were then verified mechanically by measuring strains of the two specimens under applied load. Equation I correlated best with measured strains in the less-dense regenerate bone of the distracted tibia (R2 = 0.914, p = 0.0028, n = 6); Equation II performed best in the denser control tibia (R2 = 0.820, p = 0.0129, n = 6). These results demonstrate that the stiffness of tubular bones, including cortical and heterogenous cancellous structure, can be accurately predicted by a noninvasive QCT scan.

  9. To assess vascular calcification in the patients of hypoparathyroidism using multidetector computed tomography scan

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Pooja; Prakash, Mahesh; Singhal, Manphool; Bhadada, Sanjay Kumar; Gupta, Yashdeep; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Our pilot data showed an increased intima media thickness in the patients with sporadic idiopathic hypoparathyroidism (SIH). Alteration in homeostasis of calcium, phosphate, and parathyroid hormone (PTH) may predispose to increase the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The data on objective assessment of this increased risk is however lacking. Objective: To assess the effect of altered calcium, phosphate, and PTH homeostasis in the patients with SIH on coronary calcium score (a marker of increase vascular risk) by multidetector computed tomography scan (MDCT). Methods: In this case-control study, we measured coronary CT calcium score in 30 patients of SIH and compared with 40 age and sex matched healthy subjects. Correlation of coronary calcium score with biochemical parameters was evaluated. Results: Three of the 30 cases (10%) with SIH were found to have coronary artery calcification (CAC) of varying degree, whereas none of the control showed CAC (P = 0.07). The patients with CAC had significantly lower serum calcium levels (albumin corrected), as compared to the patients without CAC. Inverse correlation of CAC was found with serum calcium levels. No correlation was found with other biochemical parameters. Conclusion: The vascular risk is increased in the patients with SIH as assessed by coronary calcium score measured by MDCT. Low serum calcium levels might be a predisposing factor for this increased risk. PMID:26693429

  10. Utility of Computed Tomography Scans in Predicting Need for Surgery in Nasal Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Benjamin E.; Doerr, Timothy D.

    2013-01-01

    In many centers, computed tomography (CT) scan is preferred over plain film radiographs in the setting of acute nasal injury because CT scan is thought to be more sensitive in predicting nasal bone fracture. However, the usefulness of CT scans in predicting the need for surgery in acute nasal injury has not been well-studied. We conducted a retrospective review of 232 patients with known nasal bone fracture and found very similar rates of surgery in patients with a diagnosis of nasal fracture by CT scan as by nasal radiographs (41 and 37%, respectively). This suggests that experienced clinical examination remains the gold standard for determining the need for surgery in isolated nasal trauma, regardless of CT findings. PMID:24436764

  11. Micro computed tomography (CT) scanned anatomical gateway to insect pest bioinformatics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An international collaboration to establish an interactive Digital Video Library for a Systems Biology Approach to study the Asian citrus Psyllid and psyllid genomics/proteomics interactions is demonstrated. Advances in micro-CT, digital computed tomography (CT) scan uses X-rays to make detailed pic...

  12. Transmission of Hepatitis C Virus during Computed Tomography Scanning with Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Rius, Cristina; Caylà, Joan A.

    2008-01-01

    Six cases of acute hepatitis C related to computed tomography scanning with contrast were identified in 3 hospitals. A patient with chronic hepatitis C had been subjected to the same procedure immediately before each patient who developed acute infection. Viral molecular analysis showed identity between isolates from cases with acute and chronic hepatitis C. PMID:18258135

  13. Computer Instructional Aids for Undergraduate Control Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volz, Richard A.; And Others

    Engineering is coming to rely more and more heavily upon the computer for computations, analyses, and graphic displays which aid the design process. A general purpose simulation system, the Time-shared Automatic Control Laboratory (TACL), and a set of computer-aided design programs, Control Oriented Interactive Graphic Analysis and Design…

  14. Influence of phantom diameter, kVp and scan mode upon computed tomography dose index.

    PubMed

    Nickoloff, Edward L; Dutta, Ajoy K; Lu, Zheng F

    2003-03-01

    The computed tomography (CT) radiation dose to pediatric patients has received considerable attention recently. Moreover, it is important to be able to determine CT radiation doses for various patient sizes ranging from infants to large adults. The current AAPM protocol only measures CT radiation dose using a 16 cm acrylic phantom to represent an adult head and a 32 cm acrylic phantom to represent an adult body. The goal of this paper is to study the dependence of the computed tomography dose index (CTDI) upon the size of the phantom, the kVp selected and the scan mode employed. Our measurements were done on phantom sizes ranging from 6 cm to 32 cm. The x-ray tube potential ranged from 80 to 140 kVp. The scan modes utilized for the measurements included: consecutive axial scans, single-slice helical scans with variable pitch and multislice helical scans with variable pitch. The results were consolidated into simplified equations which related the phantom diameter and kVp to the measured CTDI. Some generalizations were made about the relationship between the scan modes of the various CT units to the measured radiation doses. The CTDI appears to be an exponential function of phantom diameter. For the same kVp and mAs, the radiation doses for smaller phantoms are much greater than for larger sizes. The derived relationship can be used to estimate the radiation doses for a variety of scan conditions and modes from measurements with the two standard reference phantoms. A method was also given for converting axial CT dose measurements to appropriate MSAD values for helical CT scans.

  15. Transition receptivity and control: Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Helen L.; Saric, William S.

    1994-03-01

    We modeled the receptivity of the laminar boundary layer on a semi-infinite flat plate with a modified super-elliptic leading edge using a spatial direct numerical simulation. The incompressible flow was simulated by solving the governing full Navier-Stokes equations in general curvilinear coordinates by a finite-difference method. First, the steady basic-state solution was obtained in a transient approach using spatially varying time steps. Then, time-harmonic oscillations of the freestream streamwise velocity, modeling sound or spanwise vorticity, were applied as unsteady boundary conditions, and the governing equations were solved to evaluate the spatial and temporal developments of the perturbation leading to instability waves in the boundary layer. The effects of leading-edge radius and geometry on receptivity were determined. The work was closely coordinated with the experimental program. The computational work was also extended to solve the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations for the evolution of Gortler vortices in the presence of concave and convex curvature. Experiments were conducted on the receptivity of T-S waves to freestream sound in four different cases: (1) two-dimensional roughness elements; (2) the interaction and control of T-S waves with 2-D roughness; (3) three-dimensional roughness clements; and (4) the leading edge. T-S wave amplitudes were measured as a function of freestream sound level and the roughness height for both 2-D and 3-D roughness elements.

  16. Complications in CT-guided Procedures: Do We Really Need Postinterventional CT Control Scans?

    SciTech Connect

    Nattenmüller, Johanna Filsinger, Matthias Bryant, Mark Stiller, Wolfram Radeleff, Boris Grenacher, Lars Kauczor, Hans-Ullrich Hosch, Waldemar

    2013-06-19

    PurposeThe aim of this study is twofold: to determine the complication rate in computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsies and drainages, and to evaluate the value of postinterventional CT control scans.MethodsRetrospective analysis of 1,067 CT-guided diagnostic biopsies (n = 476) and therapeutic drainages (n = 591) in thoracic (n = 37), abdominal (n = 866), and musculoskeletal (ms) (n = 164) locations. Severity of any complication was categorized as minor or major. To assess the need for postinterventional CT control scans, it was determined whether complications were detected clinically, on peri-procedural scans or on postinterventional scans only.ResultsThe complication rate was 2.5 % in all procedures (n = 27), 4.4 % in diagnostic punctures, and 1.0 % in drainages; 13.5 % in thoracic, 2.0 % in abdominal, and 3.0 % in musculoskeletal procedures. There was only 1 major complication (0.1 %). Pneumothorax (n = 14) was most frequent, followed by bleeding (n = 9), paresthesia (n = 2), material damage (n = 1), and bone fissure (n = 1). Postinterventional control acquisitions were performed in 65.7 % (701 of 1,067). Six complications were solely detectable in postinterventional control acquisitions (3 retroperitoneal bleeds, 3 pneumothoraces); all other complications were clinically detectable (n = 4) and/or visible in peri-interventional controls (n = 21).ConclusionComplications in CT-guided interventions are rare. Of these, thoracic interventions had the highest rate, while pneumothoraces and bleeding were most frequent. Most complications can be detected clinically or peri-interventionally. To reduce the radiation dose, postinterventional CT controls should not be performed routinely and should be restricted to complicated or retroperitoneal interventions only.

  17. THE INTEGRATED USE OF COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, SCANNING PROBE MICROSCOPY, AND VIRTUAL REALITY TO PREDICT THE CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the last decade three new techniques scanning probe microscopy (SPM), virtual reality (YR) and computational chemistry ave emerged with the combined capability of a priori predicting the chemically reactivity of environmental surfaces. Computational chemistry provides the cap...

  18. Use of abdominal computed tomography in blunt trauma: Do we scan too much?

    PubMed Central

    Garber, Bryan G.; Bigelow, Eric; Yelle, Jean-Denis; Pagliarello, Guiseppe

    2000-01-01

    Objectives To determine what proportion of abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans ordered after blunt trauma are positive and the applicability and accuracy of existing clinical prediction rules for obtaining a CT scan of the abdomen in this setting. Setting A leading trauma hospital, affiliated with the University of Ottawa. Design A retrospective cohort study. Patients and methods All patients with blunt trauma admitted to hospital over a 1-year period having an Injury Severity Score (ISS) greater than 12 who underwent CT of the abdomen during the initial assessment. Recorded data included age, sex, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, ISS, type of injuries, number of abdominal CT scans ordered, and scan results. Two clinical prediction rules were found in the literature that identify patients likely to have intra-abdominal injuries. These rules were applied retrospectively to the cohort. The predicted proportion of positive CT scans was compared with the observed proportion, and the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were estimated. Results Of the 297 patients entered in the study, 109 underwent abdominal CT. The median age was 32 years, 71% were male and the median ISS was 24. In only 36.7% (40 of 109) of scans were findings suggestive of intra-abdominal injuries. Application of one of the clinical prediction rules gave a sensitivity of 93.8% and specificity of 25.5% but excluded 23% of patients because of a GCS score less than 11. The second prediction rule tested could be applied to all patients and was highly sensitive (92.5%) and specific (100.0%). Conclusions The assessment of the abdomen in blunt trauma remains a challenge. Accuracy in predicting positive scans in equivocal cases is poor. Retrospective application of an existing clinical prediction rule was found to be highly accurate in identifying patients with positive CT findings. Prospective use of such a rule could reduce the number of CT scans ordered without missing significant injuries. PMID

  19. Ambient-controlled scanning spreading resistance microscopy measurement and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shu; Suo, Zhiyong; Fillmore, David; Lu, Shifeng; Jeff Hu, Y.; McTeer, Allen

    2013-12-01

    An ambient-controlled scanning spreading resistance microscopy (AC-SSRM) apparatus is utilized for one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional doping profiling measurement. 1D SSRM profiling on a blanket (vertical) B-doped Si wafer is conducted to obtain a spreading resistance profile SR(x). Modeling is used to convert SR(x) to carrier profile n(x). Replacing the average mobility (μ) with a calibration using μ(x), the carrier (hole) profile n(x) is more accurate. This is especially pronounced near the surface and junction depth (xj) and is consistent with the continuous anodic oxidation technique/differential Hall effect (CAOT/DHE) measured carrier profiles. The model based on AC-SSRM data obtained xj = 103.4 nm, which was consistent to secondary ion mass spectrometry results of xj = 104.0 nm. Calibrated hole dose using μ(x) is 9.6 × 1014/cm2 and is relatively closer to DHE hole dose 1.4 × 1015/cm2. In addition, a fairly good consistency of sheet resistance (RS) values among 4 point probe (4PP), CAOT/DHE, and AC-SSRM methods has been demonstrated.

  20. Proceedings of the 1st Space Plasma Computer Analysis Network (SCAN) Workshop. [space plasma computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.; Waite, J. H.; Johnson, J. F. E.; Doupnik, J. R.; Heelis, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to identify specific cooperative scientific study topics within the discipline of Ionosphere Magnetosphere Coupling processes and to develop methods and procedures to accomplish this cooperative research using SCAN facilities. Cooperative scientific research was initiated in the areas of polar cusp composition, O+ polar outflow, and magnetospheric boundary morphology studies and an approach using a common metafile structure was adopted to facilitate the exchange of data and plots between the various workshop participants. The advantages of in person versus remote workshops were discussed also.

  1. A History of Computer Numerical Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggen, Gilbert L.

    Computer numerical control (CNC) has evolved from the first significant counting method--the abacus. Babbage had perhaps the greatest impact on the development of modern day computers with his analytical engine. Hollerith's functioning machine with punched cards was used in tabulating the 1890 U.S. Census. In order for computers to become a…

  2. Micrometric precision of prosthetic dental crowns obtained by optical scanning and computer-aided designing/computer-aided manufacturing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    das Neves, Flávio Domingues; de Almeida Prado Naves Carneiro, Thiago; do Prado, Célio Jesus; Prudente, Marcel Santana; Zancopé, Karla; Davi, Letícia Resende; Mendonça, Gustavo; Soares, Carlos José

    2014-08-01

    The current study evaluated prosthetic dental crowns obtained by optical scanning and a computer-aided designing/computer-aided manufacturing system using micro-computed tomography to compare the marginal fit. The virtual models were obtained with four different scanning surfaces: typodont (T), regular impressions (RI), master casts (MC), and powdered master casts (PMC). Five virtual models were obtained for each group. For each model, a crown was designed on the software and milled from feldspathic ceramic blocks. Micro-CT images were obtained for marginal gap measurements and the data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test. The mean vertical misfit was T=62.6±65.2 μm; MC=60.4±38.4 μm; PMC=58.1±38.0 μm, and RI=89.8±62.8 μm. Considering a percentage of vertical marginal gap of up to 75 μm, the results were T=71.5%, RI=49.2%, MC=69.6%, and PMC=71.2%. The percentages of horizontal overextension were T=8.5%, RI=0%, MC=0.8%, and PMC=3.8%. Based on the results, virtual model acquisition by scanning the typodont (simulated mouth) or MC, with or without powder, showed acceptable values for the marginal gap. The higher result of marginal gap of the RI group suggests that it is preferable to scan this directly from the mouth or from MC.

  3. Detection of coronary calcifications from computed tomography scans for automated risk assessment of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Isgum, Ivana; Rutten, Annemarieke; Prokop, Mathias; Ginneken, Bram van

    2007-04-15

    A fully automated method for coronary calcification detection from non-contrast-enhanced, ECG-gated multi-slice computed tomography (CT) data is presented. Candidates for coronary calcifications are extracted by thresholding and component labeling. These candidates include coronary calcifications, calcifications in the aorta and in the heart, and other high-density structures such as noise and bone. A dedicated set of 64 features is calculated for each candidate object. They characterize the object's spatial position relative to the heart and the aorta, for which an automatic segmentation scheme was developed, its size and shape, and its appearance, which is described by a set of approximated Gaussian derivatives for which an efficient computational scheme is presented. Three classification strategies were designed. The first one tested direct classification without feature selection. The second approach also utilized direct classification, but with feature selection. Finally, the third scheme employed two-stage classification. In a computationally inexpensive first stage, the most easily recognizable false positives were discarded. The second stage discriminated between more difficult to separate coronary calcium and other candidates. Performance of linear, quadratic, nearest neighbor, and support vector machine classifiers was compared. The method was tested on 76 scans containing 275 calcifications in the coronary arteries and 335 calcifications in the heart and aorta. The best performance was obtained employing a two-stage classification system with a k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classifier and a feature selection scheme. The method detected 73.8% of coronary calcifications at the expense of on average 0.1 false positives per scan. A calcium score was computed for each scan and subjects were assigned one of four risk categories based on this score. The method assigned the correct risk category to 93.4% of all scans.

  4. Efficient computer-aided failure analysis of integrated circuits using scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Propst, R. H.; Oxford, W. V.

    1985-12-01

    A working, operational system for computer-aided failure analysis of integrated circuits using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) is described. Statistical data analysis and image-processing algorithms are applied to digitized SEM image data. Faults are automatically identified and characterized at the single transistor level. Data-storage requirements for locating and characterizing semiconductor device failures are evaluated. A working, operational methods is presented which minimizes these requirements, increases throughput, and permits a high degree of automation.

  5. A Large Scale Computer Terminal Output Controller.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Paul Thomas

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a large scale computer terminal output controller which supervises the transfer of information from a Control Data 6400 Computer to a PLATO IV data network. It discusses the cost considerations leading to the selection of educational television channels rather than telephone lines for…

  6. Open Source Scanning Probe Microscopy Control Software Package Gxsm

    SciTech Connect

    Zahl P.; Wagner, T.; Moller, R.; Klust, A.

    2009-08-10

    Gxsm is a full featured and modern scanning probe microscopy (SPM) software. It can be used for powerful multidimensional image/data processing, analysis, and visualization. Connected toan instrument, it is operating many different avors of SPM, e.g., scanning tunneling microscopy(STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) or in general two-dimensional multi channel data acquisition instruments. The Gxsm core can handle different data types, e.g., integer and oating point numbers. An easily extendable plug-in architecture provides many image analysis and manipulation functions. A digital signal processor (DSP) subsystem runs the feedback loop, generates the scanning signals and acquires the data during SPM measurements. The programmable Gxsm vector probe engine performs virtually any thinkable spectroscopy and manipulation task, such as scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) or tip formation. The Gxsm software is released under the GNU general public license (GPL) and can be obtained via the Internet.

  7. Computer control for remote wind turbine operation

    SciTech Connect

    Manwell, J.F.; Rogers, A.L.; Abdulwahid, U.; Driscoll, J.

    1997-12-31

    Light weight wind turbines located in harsh, remote sites require particularly capable controllers. Based on extensive operation of the original ESI-807 moved to such a location, a much more sophisticated controller than the original one has been developed. This paper describes the design, development and testing of that new controller. The complete control and monitoring system consists of sensor and control inputs, the control computer, control outputs, and additional equipment. The control code was written in Microsoft Visual Basic on a PC type computer. The control code monitors potential faults and allows the turbine to operate in one of eight states: off, start, run, freewheel, low wind shut down, normal wind shutdown, emergency shutdown, and blade parking. The controller also incorporates two {open_quotes}virtual wind turbines,{close_quotes} including a dynamic model of the machine, for code testing. The controller can handle numerous situations for which the original controller was unequipped.

  8. Using computed tomography scans to develop an ex-vivo gastric model

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Jerome A; O’Sullivan, Gerard; Pandit, Abhay S

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this research was to use abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans to non-invasively quantify anthropometrical data of the human stomach and to concomitantly create an anatomically correct and distensible ex-vivo gastric model. Thirty-three abdominal CT scans of human subjects were obtained and were imported into reconstruction software to generate 3D models of the stomachs. Anthropometrical data such as gastric wall thickness, gastric surface area and gastric volume were subsequently quantified. A representative 3D computer model was exported into a selective laser sintering (SLS) rapid prototyping machine to create an anatomically correct solid gastric model. Subsequently, a replica wax template of the SLS model was created. A negative mould was offset around the wax template such that the offset distance was equivalent to that of the gastric wall thickness. A silicone with similar mechanical properties to the human stomach was poured into the offset. The lost wax manufacturing technique was employed to create a hollow distensible stomach model. 3D computer gastric models were generated from the CT scans. A hollow distensible silicone ex-vivo gastric model with similar compliance to that of the human stomach was created. The anthropometrical data indicated that there is no significant relationship between BMI and gastric surface area or gastric volume. There were inter- and intra-group differences between groups with respect to gastric wall thickness. This study demonstrates that abdominal CT scans can be used to both non-invasively determine gastric anthropometrical data as well as create realistic ex-vivo stomach models. PMID:17457968

  9. The Diminishing Role of Pelvic Stability Evaluation in the Era of Computed Tomographic Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chih-Yuan; Teng, Lan-Hsuan; Liao, Chien-Hung; Hsu, Yu-Pao; Wang, Shang-Yu; Kuo, Ling-Wei; Yuan, Kuo-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pelvic fractures can result in life-threatening hemorrhages or other associated injuries. Therefore, computed tomography (CT) scanning plays a key role in the management of pelvic fracture patients. However, CT scanning is utilized as an adjunct in secondary survey according to traditional Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) guidelines, whereas pelvic x-ray is used as a primary tool to evaluate pelvic stability and the necessity of further CT scanning. In the current study, we attempted to evaluate the role of CT scanning in the era of advanced technology. The significance of pelvic stability was also analyzed. From January 2012 to December 2014, the trauma registry and medical records of pelvic fracture patients were retrospectively reviewed. A 64-slice multidetector CT scanner was used in our emergency department as a standard diagnostic tool for evaluating trauma patients. Pelvic x-ray was used as a primary tool for screening pelvic fractures, and pelvic stability was evaluated accordingly. CT scans were performed in patients with unstable pelvic fractures, suspected associated intra-abdominal injuries (IAIs), or other conditions based on the physicians’ clinical judgment. The clinical features of patients with stable and unstable pelvic fractures were compared. The patients with stable pelvic fractures were analyzed to determine the characteristics associated with retroperitoneal hemorrhage (RH) or IAIs. Patients with stable pelvic fractures were also compared based on whether they underwent a CT scan. A total of 716 patients were enrolled in this study. There were 533 (74.4%) patients with stable pelvic fractures. Of these patients, there were 66 (12.4%) and 50 (9.4%) patients with associated RH and IAI, respectively. There were no significant differences between the patients with associated RH based on their primary evaluation (vital signs, volume of blood transfusion, and hemoglobin level). Similarly, the demographics and the primary evaluation

  10. The Diminishing Role of Pelvic Stability Evaluation in the Era of Computed Tomographic Scanning.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chih-Yuan; Teng, Lan-Hsuan; Liao, Chien-Hung; Hsu, Yu-Pao; Wang, Shang-Yu; Kuo, Ling-Wei; Yuan, Kuo-Ching

    2016-04-01

    Pelvic fractures can result in life-threatening hemorrhages or other associated injuries. Therefore, computed tomography (CT) scanning plays a key role in the management of pelvic fracture patients. However, CT scanning is utilized as an adjunct in secondary survey according to traditional Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) guidelines, whereas pelvic x-ray is used as a primary tool to evaluate pelvic stability and the necessity of further CT scanning. In the current study, we attempted to evaluate the role of CT scanning in the era of advanced technology. The significance of pelvic stability was also analyzed. From January 2012 to December 2014, the trauma registry and medical records of pelvic fracture patients were retrospectively reviewed. A 64-slice multidetector CT scanner was used in our emergency department as a standard diagnostic tool for evaluating trauma patients. Pelvic x-ray was used as a primary tool for screening pelvic fractures, and pelvic stability was evaluated accordingly. CT scans were performed in patients with unstable pelvic fractures, suspected associated intra-abdominal injuries (IAIs), or other conditions based on the physicians' clinical judgment. The clinical features of patients with stable and unstable pelvic fractures were compared. The patients with stable pelvic fractures were analyzed to determine the characteristics associated with retroperitoneal hemorrhage (RH) or IAIs. Patients with stable pelvic fractures were also compared based on whether they underwent a CT scan. A total of 716 patients were enrolled in this study. There were 533 (74.4%) patients with stable pelvic fractures. Of these patients, there were 66 (12.4%) and 50 (9.4%) patients with associated RH and IAI, respectively. There were no significant differences between the patients with associated RH based on their primary evaluation (vital signs, volume of blood transfusion, and hemoglobin level). Similarly, the demographics and the primary evaluation results

  11. Computational Control Workstation: Users' perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roithmayr, Carlos M.; Straube, Timothy M.; Tave, Jeffrey S.

    1993-01-01

    A Workstation has been designed and constructed for rapidly simulating motions of rigid and elastic multibody systems. We examine the Workstation from the point of view of analysts who use the machine in an industrial setting. Two aspects of the device distinguish it from other simulation programs. First, one uses a series of windows and menus on a computer terminal, together with a keyboard and mouse, to provide a mathematical and geometrical description of the system under consideration. The second hallmark is a facility for animating simulation results. An assessment of the amount of effort required to numerically describe a system to the Workstation is made by comparing the process to that used with other multibody software. The apparatus for displaying results as a motion picture is critiqued as well. In an effort to establish confidence in the algorithms that derive, encode, and solve equations of motion, simulation results from the Workstation are compared to answers obtained with other multibody programs. Our study includes measurements of computational speed.

  12. Quantitative analysis of pulmonary ventilation scans with N-13 nitrogen gas and positron computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Senda, M.; Murata, K.; Itoh, H.; Yonekura, Y.; Saji, H.; Torizuka, K.

    1985-05-01

    The authors developed a quantitative method for the analysis of pulmonary ventilation studies using N-13 labeled nitrogen gas and positron computed tomography (PCT). The subject inhales N-13 nitrogen gas diluted with oxygen gas in a closed circuit. When the count rate comes up to the equilibrium in 2 or 4 minutes, the equilibrium phase scan (EQ) is performed for 3 min. Then the radioactive gas is washed out by the room air, during which the washout phase scan (WO) is performed for 5 min. Because nitrogen gas is almost insoluble in blood or tissue, the activity of the alveolus can be described with single compartment model if the dead space is ignored. The authors integrated the equation during the scanning period of EQ or WO, expressed the pixel count in each scan with V and T, and solved the equations simultaneously to obtain V and T. In clinical studies, poorly ventilated regions, which had decreased counts in EQ images, showed normal value in V images. Fibrotic regions showed normal T and decreased V. The authors method yields not only the distribution of alveolar volume which they cannot evaluate in EQ images, but also more accurate regional T values than Stewart-Hamilton method. Thus it is useful for the evaluation of regional pulmonary ventilatory function.

  13. Parallel computations and control of adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alvin, Kenneth F.; Belvin, W. Keith; Chong, K. P. (Editor); Liu, S. C. (Editor); Li, J. C. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The equations of motion for structures with adaptive elements for vibration control are presented for parallel computations to be used as a software package for real-time control of flexible space structures. A brief introduction of the state-of-the-art parallel computational capability is also presented. Time marching strategies are developed for an effective use of massive parallel mapping, partitioning, and the necessary arithmetic operations. An example is offered for the simulation of control-structure interaction on a parallel computer and the impact of the approach presented for applications in other disciplines than aerospace industry is assessed.

  14. Refurbishment program of HANARO control computer system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H. K.; Choe, Y. S.; Lee, M. W.; Doo, S. K.; Jung, H. S.

    2012-07-01

    HANARO, an open-tank-in-pool type research reactor with 30 MW thermal power, achieved its first criticality in 1995. The programmable controller system MLC (Multi Loop Controller) manufactured by MOORE has been used to control and regulate HANARO since 1995. We made a plan to replace the control computer because the system supplier no longer provided technical support and thus no spare parts were available. Aged and obsolete equipment and the shortage of spare parts supply could have caused great problems. The first consideration for a replacement of the control computer dates back to 2007. The supplier did not produce the components of MLC so that this system would no longer be guaranteed. We established the upgrade and refurbishment program in 2009 so as to keep HANARO up to date in terms of safety. We designed the new control computer system that would replace MLC. The new computer system is HCCS (HANARO Control Computer System). The refurbishing activity is in progress and will finish in 2013. The goal of the refurbishment program is a functional replacement of the reactor control system in consideration of suitable interfaces, compliance with no special outage for installation and commissioning, and no change of the well-proved operation philosophy. HCCS is a DCS (Discrete Control System) using PLC manufactured by RTP. To enhance the reliability, we adapt a triple processor system, double I/O system and hot swapping function. This paper describes the refurbishment program of the HANARO control system including the design requirements of HCCS. (authors)

  15. Dual-scan technique for the customization of zirconia computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Andreiuolo, Rafael Ferrone; Sabrosa, Carlos Eduardo; Dias, Katia Regina H. Cervantes

    2013-01-01

    The use of bi-layered all-ceramic crowns has continuously grown since the introduction of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) zirconia cores. Unfortunately, despite the outstanding mechanical properties of zirconia, problems related to porcelain cracking or chipping remain. One of the reasons for this is that ceramic copings are usually milled to uniform thicknesses of 0.3-0.6 mm around the whole tooth preparation. This may not provide uniform thickness or appropriate support for the veneering porcelain. To prevent these problems, the dual-scan technique demonstrates an alternative that allows the restorative team to customize zirconia CAD/CAM frameworks with adequate porcelain thickness and support in a simple manner. PMID:24966718

  16. Tetrahedron-based orthogonal simultaneous scan for cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ivan B; Wang, Ge

    2012-08-01

    In this article, a cone-beam computed tomography scanning mode is designed using four x-ray sources and a spherical sample. The x-ray sources are mounted at the vertices of a regular tetrahedron. On the circumsphere of the tetrahedron, four detection panels are mounted opposite of each vertex. To avoid x-ray interference, the largest half angle of each x-ray cone beam is 27°22', while the radius of the largest ball fully covered by all the cone beams is 0.460, when the radius of the circumsphere is 1. A proposed scanning scheme consists of two rotations about orthogonal axes, such that, each quarter turn provides sufficient data for theoretically exact and stable reconstruction. This design can be used in biomedical or industrial settings, such as when a sequence of reconstructions of an object is desired.

  17. Automotive emission control and computer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, D.

    1989-01-01

    This book provides information on automotive computer technology emission control. Special emphasis is placed on the service and diagnosis of on-board computers, making this work useful for service technicians. Many easy-to-follow diagnostic charts are provided to simplify procedures.

  18. NCICT: a computational solution to estimate organ doses for pediatric and adult patients undergoing CT scans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Bolch, Wesley E; Moroz, Brian E; Folio, Les

    2015-12-01

    We developed computational methods and tools to assess organ doses for pediatric and adult patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations. We used the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference pediatric and adult phantoms combined with the Monte Carlo simulation of a reference CT scanner to establish comprehensive organ dose coefficients (DC), organ absorbed dose per unit volumetric CT Dose Index (CTDIvol) (mGy/mGy). We also developed methods to estimate organ doses with tube current modulation techniques and size specific dose estimates. A graphical user interface was designed to obtain user input of patient- and scan-specific parameters, and to calculate and display organ doses. A batch calculation routine was also integrated into the program to automatically calculate organ doses for a large number of patients. We entitled the computer program, National Cancer Institute dosimetry system for CT(NCICT). We compared our dose coefficients with those from CT-Expo, and evaluated the performance of our program using CT patient data. Our pediatric DCs show good agreements of organ dose estimation with those from CT-Expo except for thyroid. Our results support that the adult phantom in CT-Expo seems to represent a pediatric individual between 10 and 15 years rather than an adult. The comparison of CTDIvol values between NCICT and dose pages from 10 selected CT scans shows good agreements less than 12% except for two cases (up to 20%). The organ dose comparison between mean and modulated mAs shows that mean mAs-based calculation significantly overestimates dose (up to 2.4-fold) to the organs in close proximity to lungs in chest and chest-abdomen-pelvis scans. Our program provides more realistic anatomy based on the ICRP reference phantoms, higher age resolution, the most up-to-date bone marrow dosimetry, and several convenient features compared to previous tools. The NCICT will be available for research purpose in the near future.

  19. Human/computer control of undersea teleoperators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, T. B.; Verplank, W. L.; Brooks, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    The potential of supervisory controlled teleoperators for accomplishment of manipulation and sensory tasks in deep ocean environments is discussed. Teleoperators and supervisory control are defined, the current problems of human divers are reviewed, and some assertions are made about why supervisory control has potential use to replace and extend human diver capabilities. The relative roles of man and computer and the variables involved in man-computer interaction are next discussed. Finally, a detailed description of a supervisory controlled teleoperator system, SUPERMAN, is presented.

  20. Exploring dinosaur neuropaleobiology: viewpoint computed tomography scanning and analysis of an Allosaurus fragilis endocast.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S W

    1998-10-01

    The unique opportunity to examine an exceptionally well-preserved natural endocranial cast (endocast) from a carnivorous dinosaur of the late Jurassic period, Allosaurus fragilis, was afforded this neurobiologist. The endocast exhibits numerous surface features including the complete vestibular apparatus. Spiral computed tomography scanning revealed multiple internal features including putative blood vessels, connective tissue-like arrays, and a prominent symmetrical density consistent with the putative brain or its cast. The evidence suggests that this organism's neurobiology resembled closely that of modern crocodylian species and should be included for consideration when examining ideas of Allosaurus evolution, behavior, and eventual extinction. PMID:9808455

  1. Exploring dinosaur neuropaleobiology: viewpoint computed tomography scanning and analysis of an Allosaurus fragilis endocast.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S W

    1998-10-01

    The unique opportunity to examine an exceptionally well-preserved natural endocranial cast (endocast) from a carnivorous dinosaur of the late Jurassic period, Allosaurus fragilis, was afforded this neurobiologist. The endocast exhibits numerous surface features including the complete vestibular apparatus. Spiral computed tomography scanning revealed multiple internal features including putative blood vessels, connective tissue-like arrays, and a prominent symmetrical density consistent with the putative brain or its cast. The evidence suggests that this organism's neurobiology resembled closely that of modern crocodylian species and should be included for consideration when examining ideas of Allosaurus evolution, behavior, and eventual extinction.

  2. N-isopropy(/sup 123/I)p-iodoamphetamine brain scans with single-photon emission tomagraphy: discordacne with transmission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.G.; Hill, T.C.; Holman, B.L.; Clouse, M.E.

    1982-12-01

    Transmission computed tomography (CT) brain scans were compared with N-isopropyl (/sup 123/I)-p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain scans to determine if there was a correlation between morphology, as seen on CT, and cerebral perfusion changes detected by IMP SPECT. In 12 patients with acute stroke, four showed no discordance between the edema seen on CT and perfusion deficits seen on IMP SPECT; five had positive IMP scans while initial CT scans were negative and follow-up CT scans demonstrated edema in the region of perfusion deficit seen on the IMP scans; and in four patients, the average perfusion deficit was 2.3 times greater than the edema shown on CT at 2 cm above the canthal-meatal line. In nine control patients, there was a 2.3% difference in IMP activity between the right and left hemispheres. The 12 stroke patients showed 30.3% less IMP activity in the abnormal hemisphere compared with the normal side. Three patients, one with temporal lobe seizure, one with hemiballismus, and the third with idiopathic intention tumor, had 54% greater IMP activity on the side of movement or seizure than on the normal side. The discordance between IMP and CT scans was clearly demonstrated in cases in which CT showed no abnormality but IMP provided information on function, reflected in increased or decreased cerebral perfusion.

  3. N-isopropyl(I-123)p-lodoamphetamine brain scans with single-photon emission tomography discordance with transmission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.G.; Hill, T.C.; Holman, B.L.; Clouse, M.E.

    1982-12-01

    Transmission computed tomography (CT) brain scans were compared with N-isopropyl (I-123)p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain scans to determine if there was a correlation between morphology, as seen on CT, and cerebral perfusion changes detected by IMP SPECT. In 12 patients with acute stroke, four showed no discordance between the edema seen on CT and perfusion deficits seen on IMP SPECT; five had positive IMP scans while initial CT scans were negative and follow-up CT scans demonstrated edema in the region of perfusion deficit seen on the IMP scans; and in four patients, the average perfusion deficit was 2.3 times greater than the edema shown on CT at 2 cm above the canthalmeatal line. In nine control patients, there was a 2.3% difference in IMP activity between the right and left hemispheres. The 12 stroke patients showed 30.3% less IMP activity in the abnormal hemisphere compared with the normal side. Three patients, one with temporal lobe seizure, one with hemiballismus, and the third with idiopathic intention tumor, had 54% greater IMP activity on the side of movement or seizure than on the normal side. The discordance between IMP and CT scans was clearly demonstrated in cases in which CT showed no abnormality but IMP provided information on function, reflected in increased or decreased cerebral perfusion.

  4. The Use of Computer Vision Algorithms for Automatic Orientation of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markiewicz, Jakub Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents analysis of the orientation of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data. In the proposed data processing methodology, point clouds are considered as panoramic images enriched by the depth map. Computer vision (CV) algorithms are used for orientation, which are applied for testing the correctness of the detection of tie points and time of computations, and for assessing difficulties in their implementation. The BRISK, FASRT, MSER, SIFT, SURF, ASIFT and CenSurE algorithms are used to search for key-points. The source data are point clouds acquired using a Z+F 5006h terrestrial laser scanner on the ruins of Iłża Castle, Poland. Algorithms allowing combination of the photogrammetric and CV approaches are also presented.

  5. Diagnosis of abdominal abscesses with computed tomography, ultrasound, and /sup 111/In leukocyte scans

    SciTech Connect

    Knochel, J.Q.; Koehler, P.R.; Lee, T.G.; Welch, D.M.

    1980-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte scans are all used in the evaluation of abdominal abscesses. In this study, 170 patients in whom one, two, or all three of these modalities were used were retrospectively reviewed. Diagnostic accuracy of 96% for CT, 90% for ultrasound, and 92% for /sup 111/In leukocyte scans was achieved. It was often necessary to use more than one modality to arrive at a correct diagnosis. The advantages and disadvantages as well as the causes for false positive or false negative interpretations of each of these modalities are reviewed. Analysis of the different examinations resulted in a suggested sequence by which patients can be examined, based upon their clinical condition. Patients who are not critically ill and/or who have no localizing signs should be studied first with /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte scans. If, however, localizing signs are present or the patient's condition necessitates prompt intervention, CT or ultrasound should be the first study performed.

  6. Nosocomial transmission of hepatitis C virus during contrast-enhanced computed tomography scanning.

    PubMed

    Quer, Josep; Esteban, Juan-Ignacio; Sánchez, Josep-Maria; Otero, Teresa; Rius, Cristina; Coll, Mar; Cubero, Maria; Moreno, Gina; Gonzalez, Antonio; Vaque, Josep; Esteban, Rafael; Campins, Magda; Pañella, Helena; Guardia, Jaume; Martell, Maria

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated two cases of acute hepatitis C that occurred in patients who underwent digestive endoscopy and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scanning at two different centers. Investigations to identify the sources of infection included an on-site review of diagnostic procedures, interview of the involved healthcare staff, serological testing of the patients who underwent the procedures before and after the index cases and a molecular analysis of viral isolates from the patients and from potential viremic sources. In both cases, the epidemiological investigation identified a chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) carrier who had been subjected to CT-scanning immediately before the index patient. Genetic distance and molecular phylogenetic analyzes of HCV sequences showed a close relationship between the isolates from these carriers and those from the acute-hepatitis patients, strongly suggesting that patient-to-patient transmission had occurred during CT. This is the first report describing two well documented cases of HCV nosocomial patient-to-patient transmission during contrast-enhanced CT scanning.

  7. Distributed computation of supremal conditionally controllable sublanguages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komenda, Jan; Masopust, Tomáš

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we further develop the coordination control framework for discrete-event systems with both complete and partial observations. First, a weaker sufficient condition for the computation of the supremal conditionally controllable sublanguage and conditionally normal sublanguage is presented. Then we show that this condition can be imposed by synthesising a-posteriori supervisors. The paper further generalises the previous study by considering general, non-prefix-closed languages. Moreover, we prove that for prefix-closed languages the supremal conditionally controllable sublanguage and conditionally normal sublanguage can always be computed in the distributed way without any restrictive conditions we have used in the past.

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) Scanning Facilitates Early Identification of Neonatal Cystic Fibrosis Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Guillon, Antoine; Chevaleyre, Claire; Barc, Celine; Berri, Mustapha; Adriaensen, Hans; Lecompte, François; Villemagne, Thierry; Pezant, Jérémy; Delaunay, Rémi; Moënne-Loccoz, Joseph; Berthon, Patricia; Bähr, Andrea; Wolf, Eckhard; Klymiuk, Nikolai; Attucci, Sylvie; Ramphal, Reuben; Sarradin, Pierre; Buzoni-Gatel, Dominique; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Caballero, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is the most prevalent autosomal recessive disease in the Caucasian population. A cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator knockout (CFTR-/-) pig that displays most of the features of the human CF disease has been recently developed. However, CFTR-/- pigs presents a 100% prevalence of meconium ileus that leads to death in the first hours after birth, requiring a rapid diagnosis and surgical intervention to relieve intestinal obstruction. Identification of CFTR-/- piglets is usually performed by PCR genotyping, a procedure that lasts between 4 to 6 h. Here, we aimed to develop a procedure for rapid identification of CFTR-/- piglets that will allow placing them under intensive care soon after birth and immediately proceeding with the surgical correction. Methods and Principal Findings Male and female CFTR+/- pigs were crossed and the progeny was examined by computed tomography (CT) scan to detect the presence of meconium ileus and facilitate a rapid post-natal surgical intervention. Genotype was confirmed by PCR. CT scan presented a 94.4% sensitivity to diagnose CFTR-/- piglets. Diagnosis by CT scan reduced the birth-to-surgery time from a minimum of 10 h down to a minimum of 2.5 h and increased the survival of CFTR-/- piglets to a maximum of 13 days post-surgery as opposed to just 66 h after later surgery. Conclusion CT scan imaging of meconium ileus is an accurate method for rapid identification of CFTR-/- piglets. Early CT detection of meconium ileus may help to extend the lifespan of CFTR-/- piglets and, thus, improve experimental research on CF, still an incurable disease. PMID:26600426

  9. Characterization of landslide ground surface kinematics from terrestrial laser scanning and strain field computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teza, Giordano; Pesci, Arianna; Genevois, Rinaldo; Galgaro, Antonio

    2008-05-01

    Assessment and mitigation of the risk induced by landslide activation need an appropriate phenomenon investigation, to obtain useful information about the failure processes. The first step is the complete kinematics characterization of the landslide ground surface, by evaluating the involved displacement and deformation patterns. A dense displacement field can be obtained from comparison of a series of multi-temporal observations performed by means of terrestrial laser scanning. Subsequently, the strain field can be computed from displacement vectors. In this paper, a modified least square technique is employed to compute the strain on the nodes of a regular grid (2D approach) or on the points of a digital terrain model (3D approach). Such a computation takes into account the displacements, their spatial distribution, as well as the measurement and modelling errors. A scale factor is introduced in order to emphasize the contributions of the experimental points on the basis of their distance from each computation point, and to recognize possible scale-depending behaviours. This method has been implemented in Matlab and applied on two landslides located in the northeastern Italian Alps (Lamosano and Perarolo di Cadore). The experiments show that different kinematics can be recognized, and the presence and influence of eventual discontinuities can be revealed.

  10. Computer-aided design provisionalization and implant insertion combined with optical scanning of plaster casts and computed tomography data

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Shingo; Mitsugi, Masaharu; Kanno, Takahiro; Tatemoto, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    The conventional implant prosthesis planning process currently involves confirmation of two-dimensional anatomical findings or the quantity and quality of bones using panoramic X-ray images. The introduction of computed tomography (CT) into the field has enabled the previously impossible confirmation of three-dimensional findings, making implant planning in precise locations possible. However, artifacts caused by the presence of metal prostheses can become problematic and can result in obstacles to diagnosis and implant planning. The most updated version of SimPlant® Pro has made it possible to integrate plaster cast images with CT data using optical scanning. Using this function, the obstacles created by metal prostheses are eliminated, facilitating implant planning at the actual intraoral location. Furthermore, a SurgiGuide® based on individual patient information can be created on plaster casts, resulting in easier and more precise implant insertion. PMID:24987602

  11. A universal computer control system for motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szakaly, Zoltan F. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A control system for a multi-motor system such as a space telerobot, having a remote computational node and a local computational node interconnected with one another by a high speed data link is described. A Universal Computer Control System (UCCS) for the telerobot is located at each node. Each node is provided with a multibus computer system which is characterized by a plurality of processors with all processors being connected to a common bus, and including at least one command processor. The command processor communicates over the bus with a plurality of joint controller cards. A plurality of direct current torque motors, of the type used in telerobot joints and telerobot hand-held controllers, are connected to the controller cards and responds to digital control signals from the command processor. Essential motor operating parameters are sensed by analog sensing circuits and the sensed analog signals are converted to digital signals for storage at the controller cards where such signals can be read during an address read/write cycle of the command processing processor.

  12. Control electronics for a multi-laser/multi-detector scanning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, W.

    1980-01-01

    The Mars Rover Laser Scanning system uses a precision laser pointing mechanism, a photodetector array, and the concept of triangulation to perform three dimensional scene analysis. The system is used for real time terrain sensing and vision. The Multi-Laser/Multi-Detector laser scanning system is controlled by a digital device called the ML/MD controller. A next generation laser scanning system, based on the Level 2 controller, is microprocessor based. The new controller capabilities far exceed those of the ML/MD device. The first draft circuit details and general software structure are presented.

  13. Validation of the Galileo scan platform control design using DISCOS. [Dynamic Interaction Simulation of COntrols and Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chodas, J. L.; Macala, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    The flexibility of the Galileo spacecraft's scan platform control system stator structure, which lies between the scan platform and one of the control actuators, has been a major design consideration. Tests have been conducted to verify the prevention of undesirable interactions between the structure and the control loop, by means of the Dynamic Interaction Simulation of Controls and Structure (DISCOS) program. The scan platform's control design has been validated for the achievement of 140-microradians maximum position deviation and 50 microradians of jitter over 1-sec intervals.

  14. Computer hardware and software for robotic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Virgil Leon

    1987-01-01

    The KSC has implemented an integrated system that coordinates state-of-the-art robotic subsystems. It is a sensor based real-time robotic control system performing operations beyond the capability of an off-the-shelf robot. The integrated system provides real-time closed loop adaptive path control of position and orientation of all six axes of a large robot; enables the implementation of a highly configurable, expandable testbed for sensor system development; and makes several smart distributed control subsystems (robot arm controller, process controller, graphics display, and vision tracking) appear as intelligent peripherals to a supervisory computer coordinating the overall systems.

  15. Modern control centers and computer networking

    SciTech Connect

    Dy-Liacco, T.E.

    1994-10-01

    The automation of power system operation is generally achieved with the implementation of two control centers, one for the operation of the generation-transmission system and the other for the operation of the distribution system. These control centers are referred to, respectively, as the energy management system (EMS) and the distribution management system (DMS). The EMS may consist of several control centers in a hierarchy. The DMS may be made up of several independent distribution control centers. This article features the fundamental design aspects of modern EMS and DMS control centers (computer networks, distributed processing, and distributed databases), the linking of computer networks, and the communications that support such internetworking. The extension of such networking beyond the confines of system operation to other corporate networks is now made practical by the maturing concepts of client-server architectures and by the availability of modern communication technologies.

  16. NIF Integrated Computer Controls System Description

    SciTech Connect

    VanArsdall, P.

    1998-01-26

    This System Description introduces the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS). The architecture is sufficiently abstract to allow the construction of many similar applications from a common framework. As discussed below, over twenty software applications derived from the framework comprise the NIF control system. This document lays the essential foundation for understanding the ICCS architecture. The NIF design effort is motivated by the magnitude of the task. Figure 1 shows a cut-away rendition of the coliseum-sized facility. The NIF requires integration of about 40,000 atypical control points, must be highly automated and robust, and will operate continuously around the clock. The control system coordinates several experimental cycles concurrently, each at different stages of completion. Furthermore, facilities such as the NIF represent major capital investments that will be operated, maintained, and upgraded for decades. The computers, control subsystems, and functionality must be relatively easy to extend or replace periodically with newer technology.

  17. A computer program for automated step edge motion analysis from scanning probe microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Brittany D.; Hu, Xiaoming; Higgins, Steven R.

    2009-04-01

    A computer algorithm was developed to automatically track the displacement of straight step edges between sequential scanning probe microscopy images of single-crystal surfaces. The program utilizes the Canny edge detection algorithm followed by the Hough Transform of the edge map to identify step edges according to their direction, relative to the image axes, and according to their displacement, relative to the image origin. The tracking of individual steps is facilitated by the fact that straight edges in general maintain their direction and therefore, steps of similar displacement but different direction can be sorted. The algorithm is based on the assumption that the rate of image acquisition is much greater than the rate of (mono)layer growth/dissolution, requiring that changes in step displacement are small in successive images. The change in step displacement in sequential images leads directly to the calculation of the step speed. By tabulating all changes in step displacement through a sequence of images, a statistical representation of the step edge data is produced. The program was evaluated using a sequence of 20 atomic force microscopy images from a calcite (104) surface growing from a supersaturated aqueous solution. The program required, in total, 5 CPU-minutes running on a Pentium 4 processor to compute the mean step speed with 60% precision whereas the equivalent number of measurements performed "by hand" required 6 person-hours at 70% precision. For comparable output, the computer program therefore represents a factor of about 100 decrease in required effort.

  18. Computed Tomography Scans as an Objective Measure of Disease Severity in Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Likness, Micah M.; Pallanch, John F.; Sherris, David A.; Kita, Hirohito; Mashtare, Terry L.; Ponikau, Jens U.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A truly objective method of measuring disease severity in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) has only recently existed. We evaluated computed tomography (CT) scans of CRS patients using this novel objective 3D computerized system and compared results with a novel 2D computerized analysis of a single coronal slice through the osteomeatal complex (OMC) and subjective methods including Lund-Mackay and Zinreich’s modified Lund-Mackay. Study Design Prospective multicenter study. Setting Two academic tertiary referral centers. Subjects and Methods Forty-six adults with a diagnosis of CRS underwent CT examination and received an intramuscular triamcinolone injection, dosage weight dependent, followed by CT scan 4 to 5 weeks later. Recruitment lasted 21 months. Scans were evaluated with all 4 scoring methods over 5 months. Results The Lin’s concordance class correlation (CCC) of the OMC method revealed the best correlation to the 3D volumetric computerized values (0.915), followed by the Zinreich (0.904) and Lund-Mackay methods (0.824). Posttreatment results demonstrated that both the OMC (0.824) and Zinreich’s (0.778) methods had strong agreement with the 3D volumetric methods and were very sensitive to change, whereas the Lund-Mackay (0.545) had only moderate agreement. Conclusion Computerized CT analysis provides the most comprehensive, objective, and reproducible method of measuring disease severity and is very sensitive to change induced by treatment intervention. A 2D coronal image through the OMC provides a valid, user-friendly method of assessing CRS and is representative of CRS severity in all sinuses. Zinreich’s subjective method correlated well overall, but the Lund-Mackay method lagged behind in disease representation and sensitivity to change. PMID:24301090

  19. Prediction of intramuscular fat levels in Texel lamb loins using X-ray computed tomography scanning.

    PubMed

    Clelland, N; Bunger, L; McLean, K A; Conington, J; Maltin, C; Knott, S; Lambe, N R

    2014-10-01

    For the consumer, tenderness, juiciness and flavour are often described as the most important factors for meat eating quality, all of which have a close association with intramuscular fat (IMF). X-ray computed tomography (CT) can measure fat, muscle and bone volumes and weights, in vivo in sheep and CT predictions of carcass composition have been used in UK sheep breeding programmes over the last few decades. This study aimed to determine the most accurate combination of CT variables to predict IMF percentage of M. longissimus lumborum in Texel lambs. As expected, predicted carcass fat alone accounted for a moderate amount of the variation (R(2)=0.51) in IMF. Prediction accuracies were significantly improved (Adj R(2)>0.65) using information on fat and muscle densities measured from three CT reference scans, showing that CT can provide an accurate prediction of IMF in the loin of purebred Texel sheep.

  20. Scanning protocol optimization and dose evaluation in coronary stenosis using multi-slices computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yung-hui; Chen, Chia-lin; Sheu, Chin-yin; Lee, Jason J. S.

    2007-02-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common incidence for premature death in developed countries. A major fraction is attributable to atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, which may result in sudden cardiac failure. A reduction of mortality caused by myocardial infarction may be achieved if coronary atherosclerosis can be detected and treated at an early stage before symptoms occur. Therefore, there is need for an effective tool that allows identification of patients at increased risk for future cardiac events. The current multi-detector CT has been widely used for detection and quantification of coronary calcifications as a sign of coronary atherosclerosis. The aim of this study is to optimize the diagnostic values and radiation exposure in coronary artery calcium-screening examination using multi-slice CT (MSCT) with different image scan protocols. The radiation exposure for all protocols is evaluated by using computed tomography dose index (CTDI) phantom measurements. We chose an optimal scanning protocol and evaluated patient radiation dose in the MSCT coronary artery screenings and preserved its expecting diagnostic accuracy. These changes make the MSCT have more operation flexibility and provide more diagnostic values in current practice.

  1. Examination of Scanning Electron Microscope and Computed Tomography Images of PICA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, John W.; Stackpoole, Margaret M.; Shklover, Valery

    2010-01-01

    Micrographs of PICA (Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator) taken using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and 3D images taken with a Computed Tomography (CT) system are examined. PICA is a carbon fiber based composite (Fiberform ) with a phenolic polymer matrix. The micrographs are taken at different surface depths and at different magnifications in a sample after arc jet testing and show different levels of oxidative removal of the charred matrix (Figs 1 though 13). CT scans, courtesy of Xradia, Inc. of Concord CA, were captured for samples of virgin PICA, charred PICA and raw Fiberform (Fig. 14). We use these images to calculate the thermal conductivity (TC) of these materials using correlation function (CF) methods. CF methods give a mathematical description of how one material is embedded in another and is thus ideally suited for modeling composites like PICA. We will evaluate how the TC of the materials changes as a function of surface depth. This work is in collaboration with ETH-Zurich, which has expertise in high temperature materials and TC modeling (including CF methods).

  2. Central control element expands computer capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easton, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Redundant processing and multiprocessing modes can be obtained from one computer by using logic configuration. Configuration serves as central control element which can automatically alternate between high-capacity multiprocessing mode and high-reliability redundant mode using dynamic mode switching in real time.

  3. Multiaxis Computer Numerical Control Internship Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouse, Sharon M.

    2012-01-01

    (Purpose) The purpose of this paper was to examine the issues associated with bringing new technology into the classroom, in particular, the vocational/technical classroom. (Methodology) A new Haas 5 axis vertical Computer Numerical Control machining center was purchased to update the CNC machining curriculum at a community college and the process…

  4. Computer-Controlled HVAC -- at Low Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1974

    1974-01-01

    By tying into a computerized building-automation network, Schaumburg High School, Illinois, slashed its energy consumption by one-third. The remotely connected computer controls the mechanical system for the high school as well as other buildings in the community, with the cost being shared by all. (Author)

  5. GMXPBSA 2.0: A GROMACS tool to perform MM/PBSA and computational alanine scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paissoni, C.; Spiliotopoulos, D.; Musco, G.; Spitaleri, A.

    2014-11-01

    GMXPBSA 2.0 is a user-friendly suite of Bash/Perl scripts for streamlining MM/PBSA calculations on structural ensembles derived from GROMACS trajectories, to automatically calculate binding free energies for protein-protein or ligand-protein complexes. GMXPBSA 2.0 is flexible and can easily be customized to specific needs. Additionally, it performs computational alanine scanning (CAS) to study the effects of ligand and/or receptor alanine mutations on the free energy of binding. Calculations require only for protein-protein or protein-ligand MD simulations. GMXPBSA 2.0 performs different comparative analysis, including a posteriori generation of alanine mutants of the wild-type complex, calculation of the binding free energy values of the mutant complexes and comparison of the results with the wild-type system. Moreover, it compares the binding free energy of different complexes trajectories, allowing the study the effects of non-alanine mutations, post-translational modifications or unnatural amino acids on the binding free energy of the system under investigation. Finally, it can calculate and rank relative affinity to the same receptor utilizing MD simulations of proteins in complex with different ligands. In order to dissect the different MM/PBSA energy contributions, including molecular mechanic (MM), electrostatic contribution to solvation (PB) and nonpolar contribution to solvation (SA), the tool combines two freely available programs: the MD simulations software GROMACS and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver APBS. All the calculations can be performed in single or distributed automatic fashion on a cluster facility in order to increase the calculation by dividing frames across the available processors. The program is freely available under the GPL license. Catalogue identifier: AETQ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETQ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing

  6. Intermittent control: a computational theory of human control.

    PubMed

    Gawthrop, Peter; Loram, Ian; Lakie, Martin; Gollee, Henrik

    2011-02-01

    The paradigm of continuous control using internal models has advanced understanding of human motor control. However, this paradigm ignores some aspects of human control, including intermittent feedback, serial ballistic control, triggered responses and refractory periods. It is shown that event-driven intermittent control provides a framework to explain the behaviour of the human operator under a wider range of conditions than continuous control. Continuous control is included as a special case, but sampling, system matched hold, an intermittent predictor and an event trigger allow serial open-loop trajectories using intermittent feedback. The implementation here may be described as "continuous observation, intermittent action". Beyond explaining unimodal regulation distributions in common with continuous control, these features naturally explain refractoriness and bimodal stabilisation distributions observed in double stimulus tracking experiments and quiet standing, respectively. Moreover, given that human control systems contain significant time delays, a biological-cybernetic rationale favours intermittent over continuous control: intermittent predictive control is computationally less demanding than continuous predictive control. A standard continuous-time predictive control model of the human operator is used as the underlying design method for an event-driven intermittent controller. It is shown that when event thresholds are small and sampling is regular, the intermittent controller can masquerade as the underlying continuous-time controller and thus, under these conditions, the continuous-time and intermittent controller cannot be distinguished. This explains why the intermittent control hypothesis is consistent with the continuous control hypothesis for certain experimental conditions.

  7. Three‐dimensional scanning with dual‐source computed tomography in patients with acute skeletal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Duzgun; Tamam, Cuneyt; Gumus, Terman

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of multiplanar reformatted images and three‐dimensional images created after multidetector computed tomography examination in detecting acute post‐traumatic osseous pathology of the skeletal system. METHOD: Between October 2006 and December 2008, 105 patients with a history of acute trauma were referred to our service. Patients were evaluated with multidetector computed tomography using multiplanary reconstructed images initially (R‐I), and six months after this initial evaluation, three‐dimensional images were assessed of each patient (R‐II). Axial images were used for guiding as a reference Data obtained was recorded and graded according to importance levels of the pathologies. RESULTS: The R‐II score was higher in the non‐articular and highest in periartricular fractures of the extremities, and thoracic and pelvic cage injuries. For the spinal column, while R‐I data was more significant In patients referred with polytrauma, R‐II data, was more statistically significant, for short processing and adaptation time to acquiring immediate critical information. For all cases it was seen that three dimensional scans were more efficient in providing the orientation, within a short time. CONCLUSION: By dual source multidedector tomography systems trauma patients may be evaluated by multiplanary and three dimensionally reconstructed images. When used correctly, three dimensional imaging is advantageous and can help determine the exact nature and extension and also importance of osseous injuries. PMID:21120300

  8. National Ignition Facility integrated computer control system

    SciTech Connect

    Van Arsdall, P.J., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    The NIF design team is developing the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS), which is based on an object-oriented software framework applicable to event-driven control systems. The framework provides an open, extensible architecture that is sufficiently abstract to construct future mission-critical control systems. The ICCS will become operational when the first 8 out of 192 beams are activated in mid 2000. The ICCS consists of 300 front-end processors attached to 60,000 control points coordinated by a supervisory system. Computers running either Solaris or VxWorks are networked over a hybrid configuration of switched fast Ethernet and asynchronous transfer mode (ATM). ATM carries digital motion video from sensors to operator consoles. Supervisory software is constructed by extending the reusable framework components for each specific application. The framework incorporates services for database persistence, system configuration, graphical user interface, status monitoring, event logging, scripting language, alert management, and access control. More than twenty collaborating software applications are derived from the common framework. The framework is interoperable among different kinds of computers and functions as a plug-in software bus by leveraging a common object request brokering architecture (CORBA). CORBA transparently distributes the software objects across the network. Because of the pivotal role played, CORBA was tested to ensure adequate performance.

  9. Computation and control with neural nets

    SciTech Connect

    Corneliusen, A.; Terdal, P.; Knight, T.; Spencer, J.

    1989-10-04

    As energies have increased exponentially with time so have the size and complexity of accelerators and control systems. NN may offer the kinds of improvements in computation and control that are needed to maintain acceptable functionality. For control their associative characteristics could provide signal conversion or data translation. Because they can do any computation such as least squares, they can close feedback loops autonomously to provide intelligent control at the point of action rather than at a central location that requires transfers, conversions, hand-shaking and other costly repetitions like input protection. Both computation and control can be integrated on a single chip, printed circuit or an optical equivalent that is also inherently faster through full parallel operation. For such reasons one expects lower costs and better results. Such systems could be optimized by integrating sensor and signal processing functions. Distributed nets of such hardware could communicate and provide global monitoring and multiprocessing in various ways e.g. via token, slotted or parallel rings (or Steiner trees) for compatibility with existing systems. Problems and advantages of this approach such as an optimal, real-time Turing machine are discussed. Simple examples are simulated and hardware implemented using discrete elements that demonstrate some basic characteristics of learning and parallelism. Future microprocessors' are predicted and requested on this basis. 19 refs., 18 figs.

  10. Computational Controls Workstation: Algorithms and hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venugopal, R.; Kumar, M.

    1993-01-01

    The Computational Controls Workstation provides an integrated environment for the modeling, simulation, and analysis of Space Station dynamics and control. Using highly efficient computational algorithms combined with a fast parallel processing architecture, the workstation makes real-time simulation of flexible body models of the Space Station possible. A consistent, user-friendly interface and state-of-the-art post-processing options are combined with powerful analysis tools and model databases to provide users with a complete environment for Space Station dynamics and control analysis. The software tools available include a solid modeler, graphical data entry tool, O(n) algorithm-based multi-flexible body simulation, and 2D/3D post-processors. This paper describes the architecture of the workstation while a companion paper describes performance and user perspectives.

  11. Pelvic CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - pelvis; Computed axial tomography scan - pelvis; Computed tomography scan - pelvis; CT scan - pelvis ... creates detailed pictures of the body, including the pelvis and areas near the pelvis. The test may ...

  12. Leg CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - leg; Computed axial tomography scan - leg; Computed tomography scan - leg; CT scan - leg ... on film. Three-dimensional (3D) models of the leg can be created by adding the slices together. ...

  13. Computer Interfaced Image Tube Intensified Self-Scanned Array Cameras And Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. B.; Blank, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Image tube intensified linear and area self-scanned array (SSA) readout detector assemblies are becoming increasingly important for automatic inspection systems and machine vision. Proximity focused diode and microchannel plate (MCP) image intensifier tubes are being used in conjunction with SSAs because they can be electronically gated, they are physically small, they do not introduce image distortion, and for several other reasons 11,12,30-33. Even single photon events can be detected by using high gain MCP image tubes. Image intensified linear SSA (IL/SSA) detector assemblies can now provide successive 100% duty cycle optical samples in time periods as short as 1 ms for up to 1024 linear array pixels with 8 or 12 bit parallel output. Image intensified area SSA (IA/SSA) detector assemblies with, for example, 488 x 380 pixels in the active image area, can be read out in 33 ms. Both IL/SSA and IA/SSA detector assemblies can be interfaced to computers directly, or through conventional data acquisition systems (DASs) 14,15,35,45,48,51. Depending upon the maximum input data rate to the computer, the DAS either operates in the continuous-mode or in the burst-mode. Virtually any type of linear or area SSA can be image tube intensified and computer interfaced using the methods described 38,42. A new 512 or 1024 pixel IL/SSA instrument detector assembly, the F4560, coupled to an HP-85 microcomputer through an HP-6942A DAS has been developed.

  14. Computer aided control of a mechanical arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derocher, W. L., Jr.; Zermuehlen, r. O.

    1979-01-01

    A method for computer-aided remote control of a six-degree-of-freedom manipulator arm involved in the on-orbit servicing of a spacecraft is presented. The control configuration features a supervisory type of control in which each of the segments of a module exchange trajectory is controlled automatically under human supervision, with manual commands to proceed to the next step and in the event of a failure or undesirable outcome. The implementation of the supervisory system is discussed in terms of necessary onboard and ground- or Orbiter-based hardware and software, and a one-g demonstration system built to allow further investigation of system operation is described. Possible applications of the system include the construction of satellite solar power systems, environmental testing and the control of heliostat solar power stations.

  15. Vibration Pattern Imager (VPI): A control and data acquisition system for scanning laser vibrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Brown, Donald E.; Shaffer, Thomas A.

    1993-01-01

    The Vibration Pattern Imager (VPI) system was designed to control and acquire data from scanning laser vibrometer sensors. The PC computer based system uses a digital signal processing (DSP) board and an analog I/O board to control the sensor and to process the data. The VPI system was originally developed for use with the Ometron VPI Sensor, but can be readily adapted to any commercially available sensor which provides an analog output signal and requires analog inputs for control of mirror positioning. The sensor itself is not part of the VPI system. A graphical interface program, which runs on a PC under the MS-DOS operating system, functions in an interactive mode and communicates with the DSP and I/O boards in a user-friendly fashion through the aid of pop-up menus. Two types of data may be acquired with the VPI system: single point or 'full field.' In the single point mode, time series data is sampled by the A/D converter on the I/O board (at a user-defined sampling rate for a selectable number of samples) and is stored by the PC. The position of the measuring point (adjusted by mirrors in the sensor) is controlled via a mouse input. The mouse input is translated to output voltages by the D/A converter on the I/O board to control the mirror servos. In the 'full field' mode, the measurement point is moved over a user-selectable rectangular area. The time series data is sampled by the A/D converter on the I/O board (at a user-defined sampling rate for a selectable number of samples) and converted to a root-mean-square (rms) value by the DSP board. The rms 'full field' velocity distribution is then uploaded for display and storage on the PC.

  16. High-resolution X-ray computed tomography scanning of primate copulatory plugs.

    PubMed

    Parga, Joyce A; Maga, Murat; Overdorff, Deborah J

    2006-04-01

    In this study, high-resolution computed tomography X-ray scanning was used to scan ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) copulatory plugs. This method produced accurate measures of plug volume and surface area, but was not useful for visualizing plug internal structure. Copulatory plug size was of interest because it may relate to male fertilization success. Copulatory plugs form from coagulated ejaculate, and are routinely displaced in this species by the penis of a subsequent mate during copulation (Parga [2003] Int. J. Primatol. 24:889-899). Because one potential function of these plugs may be to preclude or delay other males' successful insemination of females, we tested the hypothesis that larger plugs are more difficult for subsequent males to displace. Plugs were collected opportunistically upon displacement during data collection on L. catta mating behavior on St. Catherines Island, Georgia (USA) during two subsequent breeding seasons. Copulatory plugs exhibited a wide range of volumes: 1,758-5,013.6 mm3 (n = 9). Intraindividual differences in plug volume were sometimes greater than interindividual differences. Contrary to predictions, larger plugs were not more time-consuming for males to displace via penile intromission during copulation. Nor were plugs with longer vaginal residence times notably smaller than plugs with shorter residence times, as might be expected if plugs disintegrate while releasing sperm (Asdell [1946] Patterns of Mammalian Reproduction; Ithaca: Comstock). We found a significant inverse correlation between number of copulatory mounts leading to ejaculation and copulatory plug volume. This may indicate that if males are sufficiently sexually aroused to reach ejaculation in fewer mounts, they tend to produce ejaculates of greater volume. PMID:16345065

  17. Computational modeling and multilevel cancer control interventions.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Joseph P; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller; Price, Rebecca Anhang; Mandelblatt, Jeanne

    2012-05-01

    This chapter presents an overview of computational modeling as a tool for multilevel cancer care and intervention research. Model-based analyses have been conducted at various "beneath the skin" or biological scales as well as at various "above the skin" or socioecological levels of cancer care delivery. We review the basic elements of computational modeling and illustrate its applications in four cancer control intervention areas: tobacco use, colorectal cancer screening, cervical cancer screening, and racial disparities in access to breast cancer care. Most of these models have examined cancer processes and outcomes at only one or two levels. We suggest ways these models can be expanded to consider interactions involving three or more levels. Looking forward, a number of methodological, structural, and communication barriers must be overcome to create useful computational models of multilevel cancer interventions and population health.

  18. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  19. Cognitive control in majority search: a computational modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongbin; Liu, Xun; Fan, Jin

    2011-01-01

    Despite the importance of cognitive control in many cognitive tasks involving uncertainty, the computational mechanisms of cognitive control in response to uncertainty remain unclear. In this study, we develop biologically realistic neural network models to investigate the instantiation of cognitive control in a majority function task, where one determines the category to which the majority of items in a group belong. Two models are constructed, both of which include the same set of modules representing task-relevant brain functions and share the same model structure. However, with a critical change of a model parameter setting, the two models implement two different underlying algorithms: one for grouping search (where a subgroup of items are sampled and re-sampled until a congruent sample is found) and the other for self-terminating search (where the items are scanned and counted one-by-one until the majority is decided). The two algorithms hold distinct implications for the involvement of cognitive control. The modeling results show that while both models are able to perform the task, the grouping search model fit the human data better than the self-terminating search model. An examination of the dynamics underlying model performance reveals how cognitive control might be instantiated in the brain for computing the majority function.

  20. A voice coil motor based measuring force control system for tactile scanning profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shengdong; Liu, Xiaojun; Chen, Liangzhou; Zhou, Liping; Lu, Wenlong

    2015-02-01

    In tactile scanning profiler, the measuring force would change in a wide range when it was used for profile measurement in a large range, which could possibly destroy the measured surface. To solve the problem, measuring force control system for tactile scanning profiler was needed. In the paper, a voice coil motor-based measuring force control system for tactile scanning profiler was designed. In the design, a low stiffness coefficient spring was used to provide contact force, while a voice coil motor (VCM) to balance the spring force so that the contact force could be kept for constant measuring force. A VCM was designed specially, and for active measuring force control, a precision current source circuit under the control of a DSP unit was designed to drive the VCM. The performance of voice coil motor based measuring force control system had been tested, and its good characteristics were verified.

  1. Adapting Inspection Data for Computer Numerical Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchison, E. E.

    1986-01-01

    Machining time for repetitive tasks reduced. Program converts measurements of stub post locations by coordinate-measuring machine into form used by numerical-control computer. Work time thus reduced by 10 to 15 minutes for each post. Since there are 600 such posts on each injector, time saved per injector is 100 to 150 hours. With modifications this approach applicable to machining of many precise holes on large machine frames and similar objects.

  2. Computer control of rf at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, H.D.

    1985-03-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator is presently upgraded for the SLAC Linear Collider project. The energy is to be increased from approximately 31 GeV to 50 GeV. Two electron beams and one positron beam are to be accelerated with high demands on the quality of the beams. The beam specifications are shown. To meet these specifications, all parameters influencing the beams have to be under tight control and continuous surveillance. This task is accomplished by a new computer system implemented at SLAC which has, among many other functions, control over rf accelerating fields. 13 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Universal dephasing control during quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Goren; Kurizki, Gershon

    2007-10-15

    Dephasing is a ubiquitous phenomenon that leads to the loss of coherence in quantum systems and the corruption of quantum information. We present a universal dynamical control approach to combat dephasing during all stages of quantum computation, namely, storage and single- and two-qubit operators. We show that (a) tailoring multifrequency gate pulses to the dephasing dynamics can increase fidelity; (b) cross-dephasing, introduced by entanglement, can be eliminated by appropriate control fields; (c) counterintuitively and contrary to previous schemes, one can increase the gate duration, while simultaneously increasing the total gate fidelity.

  4. Comparison of computed tomography and radionuclide scanning for detection of brain metastases in small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, J.M.; Nelson, M.J.; Ihde, D.C.; Makuch, R.W.; Glatstein, E.; Zabell, A.; Johnston-Early, A.; Bates, H.R.; Saini, N.; Cohen, M.H.

    1984-09-01

    Neurologic history and examination, radionuclide brain scans (RN), and computed tomographic brain scans (CT) were performed at diagnosis and sequentially in 153 consecutive patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) to assess the sensitivity and accuracy of these screening methods and to determine whether the early detection of brain metastases influences survival. CT scans (sensitivity, 98%; positive predictive accuracy, 98%) were superior to RN scans (sensitivity, 71%; positive predictive accuracy, 86%) in patients with or without neurologic signs or symptoms. However, CT scans were positive in only 6% of asymptomatic patients at diagnosis and 13% of asymptomatic patients after systemic therapy. Brain metastases detected by CT scan were the sole site of extensive-stage disease in 6% of patients at diagnosis. Despite the enhanced ability of CT scans to detect asymptomatic lesions, survival after therapeutic cranial irradiation was similar for asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. The results suggest that CT brain scans should be used routinely in SCLC patients with neurologic signs or symptoms, at diagnosis (when treatment decisions are based on stage), and at six-month intervals in patients with prior brain metastases and in whom erratic follow-up is likely.

  5. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Gao, Linfeng; Ge, Chaoyong; Zheng, Junzheng; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli

    2014-09-01

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations.

  6. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Gao, Linfeng; Ge, Chaoyong; Zheng, Junzheng; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli

    2014-09-21

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations.

  7. Unveiling Stability Criteria of DNA-Carbon Nanotubes Constructs by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Computational Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kilina, Svetlana; Yarotski, Dzmitry A.; Talin, A. Alec; Tretiak, Sergei; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    We present a combined approach that relies on computational simulations and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements to reveal morphological properties and stability criteria of carbon nanotube-DNA (CNT-DNA) constructs. Application of STM allows direct observation of very stable CNT-DNA hybrid structures with the well-defined DNA wrapping angle of 63.4° and a coiling period of 3.3 nm. Using force field simulations, we determine how the DNA-CNT binding energy depends on the sequence and binding geometry of a single strand DNA. This dependence allows us to quantitatively characterize the stability of a hybrid structure with an optimal π-stacking between DNA nucleotides and the tube surface and better interpret STM data. Our simulations clearly demonstrate the existence of a very stable DNA binding geometry for (6,5) CNT as evidenced by the presence of a well-defined minimum in the binding energy as a function of an angle between DNA strand and the nanotube chiral vector. This novel approach demonstrates the feasibility of CNT-DNA geometry studies with subnanometer resolution and paves the way towards complete characterization of the structural and electronic properties of drug-delivering systems based on DNA-CNT hybrids as a function of DNA sequence and a nanotube chirality. PMID:21603210

  8. Unveiling Stability Criteria of DNA-Carbon Nanotubes Constructs by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Computational Modeling.

    PubMed

    Kilina, Svetlana; Yarotski, Dzmitry A; Talin, A Alec; Tretiak, Sergei; Taylor, Antoinette J; Balatsky, Alexander V

    2011-01-01

    We present a combined approach that relies on computational simulations and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements to reveal morphological properties and stability criteria of carbon nanotube-DNA (CNT-DNA) constructs. Application of STM allows direct observation of very stable CNT-DNA hybrid structures with the well-defined DNA wrapping angle of 63.4° and a coiling period of 3.3 nm. Using force field simulations, we determine how the DNA-CNT binding energy depends on the sequence and binding geometry of a single strand DNA. This dependence allows us to quantitatively characterize the stability of a hybrid structure with an optimal π-stacking between DNA nucleotides and the tube surface and better interpret STM data. Our simulations clearly demonstrate the existence of a very stable DNA binding geometry for (6,5) CNT as evidenced by the presence of a well-defined minimum in the binding energy as a function of an angle between DNA strand and the nanotube chiral vector. This novel approach demonstrates the feasibility of CNT-DNA geometry studies with subnanometer resolution and paves the way towards complete characterization of the structural and electronic properties of drug-delivering systems based on DNA-CNT hybrids as a function of DNA sequence and a nanotube chirality. PMID:21603210

  9. Cephalometric Angular Measurements of the Mandible Using Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Scans in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Hyun; Kang, Seok Joo

    2016-01-01

    Background We conducted this study to analyze the values of the key cephalometric angular measurements of the mandible using 3-dimensional (3D) computed tomography scans. Methods In the 106 enrolled patients, a 3D cephalometric analysis was performed to measure the angular variables of the mandible. These values were compared between the two sides and between the two sexes. Results The frontal measurements revealed that the mandibular body curve angle was larger on the left (Lt) side (right [Rt], 141.24±7.54; Lt, 142.68±6.94; P=0.002) and the gonial angle was larger on the right side (Rt, 134.37±8.44; Lt, 131.54±7.14; P<0.001). The sagittal measurements showed that the gonial angle was larger on the right side (Rt, 134.37±8.44; Lt, 131.54±7.14; P>0.05). Further, the transverse measurements revealed that the mandibular body curve angle was larger on the right side (Rt, 140.28±7.05; Lt, 137.56±6.23; P<0.001). Conclusions These results provide an average of the mandibular angular measurements for the Korean population, establishing a standard for determining surgical patient groups and outcome evaluations in the field of mandible contour surgery. PMID:26848443

  10. Unveiling Stability Criteria of DNA-Carbon Nanotubes Constructs by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Computational Modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kilina, Svetlana; Yarotski, Dzmitry A.; Talin, A. Alec; Tretiak, Sergei; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    We present a combined approach that relies on computational simulations and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements to reveal morphological properties and stability criteria of carbon nanotube-DNA (CNT-DNA) constructs. Application of STM allows direct observation of very stable CNT-DNA hybrid structures with the well-defined DNA wrapping angle of 63.4 ° and a coiling period of 3.3 nm. Using force field simulations, we determine how the DNA-CNT binding energy depends on the sequence and binding geometry of a single strand DNA. This dependence allows us to quantitatively characterize the stability of a hybrid structure with an optimal π-stacking between DNA nucleotides andmore » the tube surface and better interpret STM data. Our simulations clearly demonstrate the existence of a very stable DNA binding geometry for (6,5) CNT as evidenced by the presence of a well-defined minimum in the binding energy as a function of an angle between DNA strand and the nanotube chiral vector. This novel approach demonstrates the feasibility of CNT-DNA geometry studies with subnanometer resolution and paves the way towards complete characterization of the structural and electronic properties of drug-delivering systems based on DNA-CNT hybrids as a function of DNA sequence and a nanotube chirality.« less

  11. Computer simulation of RF liver ablation on an MRI scan data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosturski, N.; Margenov, S.; Vutov, Y.

    2012-10-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) ablation is a low invasive technique for treatment of liver tumors. An RF-probe is inserted in the patient's liver and a ground pad is applied to the skin. Then the tumor is heated with RF current. The heat causes the destruction of tumor cells. We use the finite element method (FEM) to simulate and analyze various aspects of the procedure. A 3D image of the patient's liver is obtained from a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Then, the geometry for the RFprobe and the ground pad is added. Our focus is on the influence of the position of the ground pads on the ablation process. Our simulation is based on an unstructured mesh. The size of the mesh is large due to the complexity of the domain. We discretize and solve the problem on a parallel computer using MPI for the parallelization. The presented numerical tests are performed on IBM Blue Gene/P machine at BGSC. The parallel efficiency of the incorporated Boomer AMG solver is demonstrated as well.

  12. Operator control of interneural computing machines.

    PubMed

    Shih, Mau-Hsiang; Tsai, Feng-Sheng

    2013-12-01

    A dynamic representation of neural population responses asserts that motor cortex is a flexible pattern generator sending rhythmic, oscillatory signals to generate multiphasic patterns of movement. This raises a question concerning the design and control of new computing machines that mimic the oscillatory patterns and multiphasic patterns seen in neural systems. To address this issue, we design an interneural computing machine (INCM) made of plastic random interneural connections. We develop a mechanical way to measure collective ensemble firing of neurons in INCM. Two sorts of plasticity operators are derived from the measure of synchronous neural activity and the measure of self-sustaining neural activity, respectively. Such plasticity operators conduct activity-dependent operation to modify the network structure of INCM. The activity-dependent operation meets the neurobiological perspective of Hebbian synaptic plasticity and displays the tendency toward circulation breaking aiming to control neural population dynamics. We call such operation operator control of INCM and develop a population analysis of operator control for measuring how well single neurons of INCM can produce rhythmic, oscillatory activity, but at the level of neural ensembles, generate multiphasic patterns of population responses.

  13. GMXPBSA 2.0: A GROMACS tool to perform MM/PBSA and computational alanine scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paissoni, C.; Spiliotopoulos, D.; Musco, G.; Spitaleri, A.

    2014-11-01

    GMXPBSA 2.0 is a user-friendly suite of Bash/Perl scripts for streamlining MM/PBSA calculations on structural ensembles derived from GROMACS trajectories, to automatically calculate binding free energies for protein-protein or ligand-protein complexes. GMXPBSA 2.0 is flexible and can easily be customized to specific needs. Additionally, it performs computational alanine scanning (CAS) to study the effects of ligand and/or receptor alanine mutations on the free energy of binding. Calculations require only for protein-protein or protein-ligand MD simulations. GMXPBSA 2.0 performs different comparative analysis, including a posteriori generation of alanine mutants of the wild-type complex, calculation of the binding free energy values of the mutant complexes and comparison of the results with the wild-type system. Moreover, it compares the binding free energy of different complexes trajectories, allowing the study the effects of non-alanine mutations, post-translational modifications or unnatural amino acids on the binding free energy of the system under investigation. Finally, it can calculate and rank relative affinity to the same receptor utilizing MD simulations of proteins in complex with different ligands. In order to dissect the different MM/PBSA energy contributions, including molecular mechanic (MM), electrostatic contribution to solvation (PB) and nonpolar contribution to solvation (SA), the tool combines two freely available programs: the MD simulations software GROMACS and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver APBS. All the calculations can be performed in single or distributed automatic fashion on a cluster facility in order to increase the calculation by dividing frames across the available processors. The program is freely available under the GPL license. Catalogue identifier: AETQ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETQ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing

  14. Superadiabatic Controlled Evolutions and Universal Quantum Computation

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Alan C.; Sarandy, Marcelo S.

    2015-01-01

    Adiabatic state engineering is a powerful technique in quantum information and quantum control. However, its performance is limited by the adiabatic theorem of quantum mechanics. In this scenario, shortcuts to adiabaticity, such as provided by the superadiabatic theory, constitute a valuable tool to speed up the adiabatic quantum behavior. Here, we propose a superadiabatic route to implement universal quantum computation. Our method is based on the realization of piecewise controlled superadiabatic evolutions. Remarkably, they can be obtained by simple time-independent counter-diabatic Hamiltonians. In particular, we discuss the implementation of fast rotation gates and arbitrary n-qubit controlled gates, which can be used to design different sets of universal quantum gates. Concerning the energy cost of the superadiabatic implementation, we show that it is dictated by the quantum speed limit, providing an upper bound for the corresponding adiabatic counterparts. PMID:26511064

  15. Multi-step process control and characterization of scanning probe lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, C. A.; Ruskell, T. G.; Pyle, J. L.; Workman, R. K.; Yao, X.; Hunt, J. P.; Sarid, D.; Parks, H. G.; Vermeire, B.

    An atomic force microscope with a conducting tip (CT-AFM) was used to fabricate and characterize nanometer scale lines of (1) silicon oxide and (2) silicon nitride on H-terminated n-type silicon (100) wafers. In process (1), a negative bias was applied to the tip of the CT-AFM system and the resulting electric field caused electrolysis of ambient water vapor and local oxidation of the silicon surface. In addition, the accompanying current was detected by a sub-pA current amplifier. In process (2), the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere containing a small partial pressure of ammonia resulted in the local nitridation of the surface. The CT-AFM system was also used to locate and study the dielectric properties of the silicon-oxide lines as well as copper islands buried under 20 nm of silicon dioxide. A computer-controlled feedback system and raster scanning of the sample produced simultaneous topographic and Fowler-Nordheim tunneling maps of the structures under study. Detailed aspects of nanolithography and local-probe Fowler-Nordheim characterization using a CT-AFM will be discussed.

  16. PREDICTING CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF HUMIC SUBSTANCES FOR MINERALS AND XENOBIOTICS: USE OF COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, SCANNING PROBE MICROSCOPY AND VIRTUAL REALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter we review the literature on scanning probe microscopy (SPM), virtual reality (VR), and computational chemistry and our earlier work dealing with modeling lignin, lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCC), humic substances (HSs) and non-bonded organo-mineral interactions...

  17. Tools for remote computing in accelerator control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderssen, Pal S.; Frammery, Veronique; Wilcke, Rainer

    1990-08-01

    In modern accelerator control systems, the intelligence of the equipment is distributed in the geographical and the logical sense. Control processes for a large variety of tasks reside in both the equipment and the control computers. Hence successful operation hinges on the availability and reliability of the communication infrastructure. The computers are interconnected by a communication system and use remote procedure calls and message passing for information exchange. These communication mechanisms need a well-defined convention, i.e. a protocol. They also require flexibility in both the setup and changes to the protocol specification. The Network Compiler is a tool which provides the programmer with a means of establising such a protocol for his application. Input to the Network Compiler is a single Interface Description File provided by the programmer. This file is written according to a grammar, and completely specifies the interprocess communication interfaces. Passed through the Network Compiler, the Interface Description File automatically produces the additional source code needed for the protocol. Hence the programmer does not have to be concerned about the details of the communication calls. Any further additions and modifications are made easy, because all the information about the interface is kept in a single file.

  18. Computer-controlled radiation monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Homann, S.G.

    1994-09-27

    A computer-controlled radiation monitoring system was designed and installed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s Multiuser Tandem Laboratory (10 MV tandem accelerator from High Voltage Engineering Corporation). The system continuously monitors the photon and neutron radiation environment associated with the facility and automatically suspends accelerator operation if preset radiation levels are exceeded. The system has proved reliable real-time radiation monitoring over the past five years, and has been a valuable tool for maintaining personnel exposure as low as reasonably achievable.

  19. Multiaxis, Lightweight, Computer-Controlled Exercise System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, Leonard; Bachrach, Benjamin; Harvey, William

    2006-01-01

    The multipurpose, multiaxial, isokinetic dynamometer (MMID) is a computer-controlled system of exercise machinery that can serve as a means for quantitatively assessing a subject s muscle coordination, range of motion, strength, and overall physical condition with respect to a wide variety of forces, motions, and exercise regimens. The MMID is easily reconfigurable and compactly stowable and, in comparison with prior computer-controlled exercise systems, it weighs less, costs less, and offers more capabilities. Whereas a typical prior isokinetic exercise machine is limited to operation in only one plane, the MMID can operate along any path. In addition, the MMID is not limited to the isokinetic (constant-speed) mode of operation. The MMID provides for control and/or measurement of position, force, and/or speed of exertion in as many as six degrees of freedom simultaneously; hence, it can accommodate more complex, more nearly natural combinations of motions and, in so doing, offers greater capabilities for physical conditioning and evaluation. The MMID (see figure) includes as many as eight active modules, each of which can be anchored to a floor, wall, ceiling, or other fixed object. A cable is payed out from a reel in each module to a bar or other suitable object that is gripped and manipulated by the subject. The reel is driven by a DC brushless motor or other suitable electric motor via a gear reduction unit. The motor can be made to function as either a driver or an electromagnetic brake, depending on the required nature of the interaction with the subject. The module includes a force and a displacement sensor for real-time monitoring of the tension in and displacement of the cable, respectively. In response to commands from a control computer, the motor can be operated to generate a required tension in the cable, to displace the cable a required distance, or to reel the cable in or out at a required speed. The computer can be programmed, either locally or via

  20. Assessment of cardiac single-photon emission computed tomography performance using a scanning linear observer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chih-Jie; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Volokh, Lana

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is widely used to detect myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction. It is important to assess and compare different SPECT system designs in order to achieve the highest detectability of cardiac defects. Methods: Whitaker et al.'s study ['Estimating random signal parameters from noisy images with nuisance parameters: linear and scanning-linear methods,' Opt. Express 16(11), 8150-8173 (2008)] on the scanning linear observer (SLO) shows that the SLO can be used to estimate the location and size of signals. One major advantage of the SLO is that it can be used with projection data rather than with reconstruction data. Thus, this observer model assesses the overall hardware performance independent of any reconstruction algorithm. In addition, the computation time of image quality studies is significantly reduced. In this study, three systems based on the design of the GE cadmium zinc telluride-based dedicated cardiac SPECT camera Discovery 530c were assessed. This design, which is officially named the Alcyone Technology: Discovery NM 530c, was commercialized in August, 2009. The three systems, GE27, GE19, and GE13, contain 27, 19, and 13 detectors, respectively. Clinically, a human heart can be virtually segmented into three coronary artery territories: the left-anterior descending artery, left-circumflex artery, and right coronary artery. One of the most important functions of a cardiac SPECT system is to produce images from which a radiologist can accurately predict in which territory the defect exists [http://www.asnc.org/media/PDFs/PPReporting081511.pdf, Guideline from American Society of Nuclear Cardiology]. A good estimation of the extent of the defect from the projection images is also very helpful for determining the seriousness of the myocardial ischemia. In this study, both the location and extent of defects were estimated by the SLO, and the system performance was assessed by localization

  1. GMXPBSA 2.1: A GROMACS tool to perform MM/PBSA and computational alanine scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paissoni, C.; Spiliotopoulos, D.; Musco, G.; Spitaleri, A.

    2015-01-01

    GMXPBSA 2.1 is a user-friendly suite of Bash/Perl scripts for streamlining MM/PBSA calculations on structural ensembles derived from GROMACS trajectories, to automatically calculate binding free energies for protein-protein or ligand-protein complexes [R.T. Bradshaw et al., Protein Eng. Des. Sel. 24 (2011) 197-207]. GMXPBSA 2.1 is flexible and can easily be customized to specific needs and it is an improvement of the previous GMXPBSA 2.0 [C. Paissoni et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. (2014), 185, 2920-2929]. Additionally, it performs computational alanine scanning (CAS) to study the effects of ligand and/or receptor alanine mutations on the free energy of binding. Calculations require only for protein-protein or protein-ligand MD simulations. GMXPBSA 2.1 performs different comparative analyses, including a posteriori generation of alanine mutants of the wild-type complex, calculation of the binding free energy values of the mutant complexes and comparison of the results with the wild-type system. Moreover, it compares the binding free energy of different complex trajectories, allowing the study of the effects of non-alanine mutations, post-translational modifications or unnatural amino acids on the binding free energy of the system under investigation. Finally, it can calculate and rank relative affinity to the same receptor utilizing MD simulations of proteins in complex with different ligands. In order to dissect the different MM/PBSA energy contributions, including molecular mechanic (MM), electrostatic contribution to solvation (PB) and nonpolar contribution to solvation (SA), the tool combines two freely available programs: the MD simulations software GROMACS [S. Pronk et al., Bioinformatics 29 (2013) 845-854] and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver APBS [N.A. Baker et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A 98 (2001) 10037-10041]. All the calculations can be performed in single or distributed automatic fashion on a cluster facility in order to increase the

  2. Feedback/feedforward control of hysteresis-compensated piezoelectric actuators for high-speed scanning applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanfang; Shan, Jinjun; Gabbert, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the control system design for a piezoelectric actuator (PEA) for a high-speed trajectory scanning application. First nonlinear hysteresis is compensated for by using the Maxwell resistive capacitor model. Then the linear dynamics of the hysteresis-compensated piezoelectric actuator are identified. A proportional plus integral (PI) controller is designed based on the linear system, enhanced by feedforward hysteresis compensation. It is found that the feedback controller does not always improve tracking accuracy. When the input frequency exceeds a certain value, feedforward control only may result in better control performance. Experiments are conducted, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control approach.

  3. Establishment of optimal scan delay for multi-phase computed tomography using bolus-tracking technique in canine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Young; Choi, Ho-Jung; Lee, Ki-Ja; Lee, Young-Won

    2015-09-01

    To establish a protocol for a multi-phase computed tomography (CT) of the canine pancreas using the bolus-tracking technique, dynamic scan and multi-phase CT were performed in six normal beagle dogs. The dynamic scan was performed for 60 sec at 1-sec intervals after the injection (4 ml/sec) of a contrast medium, and intervals from aortic enhancement appearance to aortic, pancreatic parenchymal and portal vein peaks were measured. The multi-phase CT with 3 phases was performed three times using a bolus-tracking technique. Scan delays were 0, 15 and 30 in first multi-phase scan; 5, 20 and 35 in second multi-phase scan; and 10, 25 and 40 sec in third multi-phase scan, respectively. Attenuation values and contrast enhancement pattern were analyzed from the aorta, pancreas and portal vein. The intervals from aortic enhancement appearance to aortic, pancreatic parenchymal and portal vein peaks were 3.8 ± 0.7, 8.7 ± 0.9 and 13.3 ± 1.5 sec, respectively. The maximum attenuation values of the aorta, pancreatic parenchyma and portal vein were present at scan sections with no scan delay, a 5-sec delay and a 10-sec delay, respectively. When a multi-phase CT of the canine pancreas is triggered at aortic enhancement appearance using a bolus-tracking technique, the recommended optimal delay times of the arterial and pancreatic parenchymal phases are no scan delay and 5 sec, respectively. PMID:25843155

  4. Piezoelectric energy harvesting computer controlled test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Rodriguez, M.; Jiménez, F. J.; de Frutos, J.; Alonso, D.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper a new computer controlled (C.C.) laboratory test bench is presented. The patented test bench is made up of a C.C. road traffic simulator, C.C. electronic hardware involved in automating measurements, and test bench control software interface programmed in LabVIEW™. Our research is focused on characterizing electronic energy harvesting piezoelectric-based elements in road traffic environments to extract (or "harvest") maximum power. In mechanical to electrical energy conversion, mechanical impacts or vibrational behavior are commonly used, and several major problems need to be solved to perform optimal harvesting systems including, but no limited to, primary energy source modeling, energy conversion, and energy storage. It is described a novel C.C. test bench that obtains, in an accurate and automatized process, a generalized linear equivalent electrical model of piezoelectric elements and piezoelectric based energy store harvesting circuits in order to scale energy generation with multiple devices integrated in different topologies.

  5. Computed tomography and radionuclide brain scanning. [/sup 99m/Tc-pertechnetate

    SciTech Connect

    Lusins, J.O.; Chayes, Z.; Nakagawa, H.

    1980-02-01

    A comparison o CT (computerized Tomography) and radionuclide brain scanning was performed; 30 patients with a total of 42 lesions were evaluated. Previous sreports have shown that CT and radionuclide scanning are equally useful in detecting metastatic disease. However, if contrast enhancement is used we find that computerized tomography is far more accurate than radionuclide scanning in detecting metastatic disease to the brain, 95.4 percent as compared to 62 percent. Our study also shows that radionuclide scanning falls off in accuracy when the the lesion is below 2 cm. in size. Also, the presence of brain edema in association with metastatic disease increases the probability of having a positive nuclear scan finding.

  6. A novel quality control procedure for the evaluation of laser scanning data segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lari, Z.; Al-Durgham, K.; Habib, A.

    2014-11-01

    Over the past few years, laser scanning systems have been acknowledged as the leading tools for the collection of high density 3D point cloud over physical surfaces for many different applications. However, no interpretation and scene classification is performed during the acquisition of these datasets. Consequently, the collected data must be processed to extract the required information. The segmentation procedure is usually considered as the fundamental step in information extraction from laser scanning data. So far, various approaches have been developed for the segmentation of 3D laser scanning data. However, none of them is exempted from possible anomalies due to disregarding the internal characteristics of laser scanning data, improper selection of the segmentation thresholds, or other problems during the segmentation procedure. Therefore, quality control procedures are required to evaluate the segmentation outcome and report the frequency of instances of expected problems. A few quality control techniques have been proposed for the evaluation of laser scanning segmentation. These approaches usually require reference data and user intervention for the assessment of segmentation results. In order to resolve these problems, a new quality control procedure is introduced in this paper. This procedure makes hypotheses regarding potential problems that might take place in the segmentation process, detects instances of such problems, quantifies the frequency of these problems, and suggests possible actions to remedy them. The feasibility of the proposed approach is verified through quantitative evaluation of planar and linear/cylindrical segmentation outcome from two recently-developed parameter-domain and spatial-domain segmentation techniques.

  7. A 4D dose computation method to investigate motion interplay effects in scanned ion beam prostate therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammazzalorso, F.; Jelen, U.

    2014-06-01

    In particle therapy, the interplay between beam scanning and target motion during treatment delivery may result in dose deterioration. Interplay effects have been studied for targets exhibiting periodic respiratory motion, however, they are not well understood for irregular motion patterns, such as those exhibited by the prostate. In this note, we propose and validate a 4D dose computation method, which enables estimation of effective dose delivered to the prostate by scanning ion beams in presence of intrafraction motion, as well as facilitates investigation of various motion interplay countermeasures.

  8. Unusual cause for recurrent Cushing syndrome and its diagnosis by computed tomography and NP-59 radiocholesterol scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.D.; Herwig, K.R. )

    1990-09-01

    Cushing syndrome can recur following an adrenalectomy. One of the primary causes is recurrence of adrenal carcinoma either locally or from metastases. Hyperplasia and hyperfunction of adrenal remnants may also occur if there is pituitary stimulation. We have a patient in whom recurrent Cushing syndrome developed from small nonmalignant deposits of adrenal tissue in the perirenal adipose tissue following adrenalectomy of a benign adenoma. These deposits were identifiable by computed tomography. A false-negative NP-59 iodocholesterol scan was instructive in pointing out some problems in the interpretation of this type of scan for adrenal tissue.

  9. Evaluation of post-mortem lateral cerebral ventricle changes using sequential scans during post-mortem computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Iwao; Shimizu, Akinobu; Saito, Atsushi; Suzuki, Hideto; Vogel, Hermann; Püschel, Klaus; Heinemann, Axel

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we evaluated post-mortem lateral cerebral ventricle (LCV) changes using computed tomography (CT). Subsequent periodical CT scans termed "sequential scans" were obtained for three cadavers. The first scan was performed immediately after the body was transferred from the emergency room to the institute of legal medicine. Sequential scans were obtained and evaluated for 24 h at maximum. The time of death had been determined in the emergency room. The sequential scans enabled us to observe periodical post-mortem changes in CT images. The series of continuous LCV images obtained up to 24 h (two cases)/16 h (1 case) after death was evaluated. The average Hounsfield units (HU) within the LCVs progressively increased, and LCV volume progressively decreased over time. The HU in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) increased at an individual rate proportional to the post-mortem interval (PMI). Thus, an early longitudinal radiodensity change in the CSF could be potential indicator of post-mortem interval (PMI). Sequential imaging scans reveal post-mortem changes in the CSF space which may reflect post-mortem brain alterations. Further studies are needed to evaluate the proposed CSF change markers in correlation with other validated PMI indicators.

  10. Digital computer control of a 30 cm mercury ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, C. A., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The major objective of this program was to define the exact role of an on-board spacecraft computer in the control of ion thrusters. An initial computer control system with accurate high speed capability was designed, programmed, and tested with the computer as the sole control element for an operating ion thruster. The command functions and a code format for a spacecraft digital control system were established. A second computer control system was constructed to operate with these functions and format. A throttle program sequence was established and tested. A two thruster array was tested with these computer control systems and the results reported.

  11. Digital computer control of a 30-cm mercury ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, C. A., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The major objective was to define the exact role of an onboard spacecraft computer in the control of ion thrusters. An initial computer control system with accurate high speed capability was designed, programmed, and tested with the computer as the sole control element for an operating ion thruster. The command functions and a code format for a spacecraft digital control system were established. A second computer control system was constructed to operate with these functions and format. A throttle program sequence was established and tested. A two thruster array was tested with these computer control systems and the results reported.

  12. Development of a computer-aided diagnostic scheme for detection of interval changes in successive whole-body bone scans

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Junji; Li Qiang; Appelbaum, Daniel; Pu Yonglin; Doi, Kunio

    2007-01-15

    Bone scintigraphy is the most frequent examination among various diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures. It is a well-established imaging modality for the diagnosis of osseous metastasis and for monitoring osseous tumor response to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Although the sensitivity of bone scan examinations for detection of bone abnormalities has been considered to be relatively high, it is time consuming to identify multiple lesions such as bone metastases of prostate and breast cancers. In addition, it is very difficult to detect subtle interval changes between two successive abnormal bone scans, because of variations in patient conditions, the accumulation of radioisotopes during each examination, and the image quality of gamma cameras. Therefore, we developed a new computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) scheme for the detection of interval changes in successive whole-body bone scans by use of a temporal subtraction image which was obtained with a nonlinear image-warping technique. We carried out 58 pairs of successive bone scans in which each scan included both posterior and anterior views. We determined 107 'gold-standard' interval changes among the 58 pairs based on the consensus of three radiologists. Our computerized scheme consisted of seven steps, i.e., initial image density normalization on each image, image matching for the paired images, temporal subtraction by use of the nonlinear image-warping technique, initial detection of interval changes by use of temporal-subtraction images, image feature extraction of candidates of interval changes, rule-based tests by use of 16 image features for removing some false positives, and display of the computer output for identified interval changes. One hundred seven gold standard interval changes included 71 hot lesions (uptake was increased compared with the previous scan, or there was new uptake in the current scan) and 36 cold lesions (uptake was decreased or disappeared) for anterior and posterior views. The

  13. Instrument scanning and controlling: Using eye movement data to understand pilot behavior and strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, A. O.

    1980-01-01

    Eye movement data and other parameters including instrument readings, aircraft state and position variables, and control maneuvers were recorded while pilots flew ILS simulations in a B 737. The experiment itself employed seven airline pilots, each of whom flew approximately 40 approach/landing sequences. The simulator was equipped with a night visual scene but the scene was fogged out down to approximately 60 meters (200 ft). The instrument scanning appeared to follow aircraft parameters not physical position of instruments. One important implication of the results is: pilots look for categories or packets of information. Control inputs were tabulated according to throttle, wheel position, column, and pitch trim changes. Three seconds of eye movements before and after the control input were then obtained. Analysis of the eye movement data for the controlling periods showed clear patterns. The results suggest a set of miniscan patterns which are used according to the specific details of the situation. A model is developed which integrates scanning and controlling. Differentiations are made between monitoring and controlling scans.

  14. From where they look to what they think: Determining controller cognitive strategies from oculometer scanning data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cushing, Steven

    1989-01-01

    The behavior and cognition of air traffic controllers from oculometer scanning data already obtained for another purpose was studied. There was very little work done to develop models of air traffic controllers, much of what was done was done at Langley. One aim of developing such models is to use them as the basis of decision-support or expert-system tools to assist controllers in their tasks. Such tools are more likely to be effective if they incorporate the strategies that controllers actually use, rather than steering them in what might be felt to be unnatural directions.

  15. Novel control scheme for a high-speed metrological scanning probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorbringer-Dorozhovets, N.; Hausotte, T.; Manske, E.; Shen, J. C.; Jäger, G.

    2011-09-01

    Some time ago, an interferometer-based metrological scanning probe microscope (SPM) was developed at the Institute of Process Measurement and Sensor Technology of the Ilmenau University of Technology, Germany. The specialty of this SPM is the combined deflection detection system that comprises an interferometer and a beam deflection. Due to this system it is possible to simultaneously measure the displacement, bending and torsion of the probe (cantilever). The SPM is integrated into a nanopositioning and nanomeasuring machine (NPM machine) and allows measurements with a resolution of 0.1 nm over a range of 25 mm × 25 mm × 5 mm. Excellent results were achieved for measurements of calibrated step height and lateral standards and these results are comparable to the calibration values from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) (Dorozhovets N et al 2007 Proc. SPIE 6616 661624-1-7). The disadvantage was a low attainable scanning speed and accordingly large expenditure of time. Control dynamics and scanning speed are limited because of the high masses of the stage and corner mirror of the machine. For the vertical axis an additional high-speed piezoelectric drive is integrated in the SPM in order to increase the measuring dynamics. The movement of the piezoelectric drive is controlled and traceable measured by the interferometer. Hence, nonlinearity and hysteresis in the actuator do not affect the measurement. The outcome of this is an improvement of the bending control of the cantilever and much higher scan speeds of up to 200 µm s-1.

  16. Autonomous Real-Time Interventional Scan Plane Control With a 3-D Shape-Sensing Needle

    PubMed Central

    Plata, Juan Camilo; Holbrook, Andrew B.; Park, Yong-Lae; Pauly, Kim Butts; Daniel, Bruce L.; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates real-time scan plane control dependent on three-dimensional needle bending, as measured from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible optical strain sensors. A biopsy needle with embedded fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors to measure surface strains is used to estimate its full 3-D shape and control the imaging plane of an MR scanner in real-time, based on the needle’s estimated profile. The needle and scanner coordinate frames are registered to each other via miniature radio-frequency (RF) tracking coils, and the scan planes autonomously track the needle as it is deflected, keeping its tip in view. A 3-D needle annotation is superimposed over MR-images presented in a 3-D environment with the scanner’s frame of reference. Scan planes calculated based on the FBG sensors successfully follow the tip of the needle. Experiments using the FBG sensors and RF coils to track the needle shape and location in real-time had an average root mean square error of 4.2 mm when comparing the estimated shape to the needle profile as seen in high resolution MR images. This positional variance is less than the image artifact caused by the needle in high resolution SPGR (spoiled gradient recalled) images. Optical fiber strain sensors can estimate a needle’s profile in real-time and be used for MRI scan plane control to potentially enable faster and more accurate physician response. PMID:24968093

  17. Role of Extracranial Carotid Duplex and Computed Tomography Perfusion Scanning in Evaluating Perfusion Status of Pericarotid Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Chang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Yu, Cheng-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Carotid stenting is an effective treatment of choice in terms of treating ischemic stroke patients with concomitant carotid stenosis. Though computed tomography perfusion scan has been recognized as a standard tool to monitor/follow up this group of patients, not everyone could endure due to underlying medical illness. In contrast, carotid duplex is a noninvasive assessment tool and could track patient clinical condition in real time. In this study we found that “resistance index” of the carotid ultrasound could detect flow changes before and after the stenting procedure, thus having great capacity to replace the role of computed tomography perfusion exam. PMID:27051669

  18. Frequency-controls of electromagnetic multi-beam scanning by metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun Bo; Wan, Xiang; Cai, Ben Geng; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2014-11-05

    We propose a method to control electromagnetic (EM) radiations by holographic metasurfaces, including to producing multi-beam scanning in one dimension (1D) and two dimensions (2D) with the change of frequency. The metasurfaces are composed of subwavelength metallic patches on grounded dielectric substrate. We present a combined theory of holography and leaky wave to realize the multi-beam radiations by exciting the surface interference patterns, which are generated by interference between the excitation source and required radiation waves. As the frequency changes, we show that the main lobes of EM radiation beams could accomplish 1D or 2D scans regularly by using the proposed holographic metasurfaces shaped with different interference patterns. This is the first time to realize 2D scans of antennas by changing the frequency. Full-wave simulations and experimental results validate the proposed theory and confirm the corresponding physical phenomena.

  19. Frequency-Controls of Electromagnetic Multi-Beam Scanning by Metasurfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun Bo; Wan, Xiang; Cai, Ben Geng; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method to control electromagnetic (EM) radiations by holographic metasurfaces, including to producing multi-beam scanning in one dimension (1D) and two dimensions (2D) with the change of frequency. The metasurfaces are composed of subwavelength metallic patches on grounded dielectric substrate. We present a combined theory of holography and leaky wave to realize the multi-beam radiations by exciting the surface interference patterns, which are generated by interference between the excitation source and required radiation waves. As the frequency changes, we show that the main lobes of EM radiation beams could accomplish 1D or 2D scans regularly by using the proposed holographic metasurfaces shaped with different interference patterns. This is the first time to realize 2D scans of antennas by changing the frequency. Full-wave simulations and experimental results validate the proposed theory and confirm the corresponding physical phenomena. PMID:25370447

  20. Detecting submerged bodies: controlled research using side-scan sonar to detect submerged proxy cadavers.

    PubMed

    Healy, Carrie A; Schultz, John J; Parker, Kenneth; Lowers, Bim

    2015-05-01

    Forensic investigators routinely deploy side-scan sonar for submerged body searches. This study adds to the limited body of literature by undertaking a controlled project to understand how variables affect detection of submerged bodies using side-scan sonar. Research consisted of two phases using small and medium-sized pig (Sus scrofa) carcasses as proxies for human bodies to investigate the effects of terrain, body size, frequency, swath width, and state of decomposition. Results demonstrated that a clear, flat, sandy pond floor terrain was optimal for detection of the target as irregular terrain and/or vegetation are major limitations that can obscure the target. A higher frequency towfish was preferred for small bodies, and a 20 m swath width allowed greater visibility and easier maneuverability of the boat in this environment. Also, the medium-sized carcasses were discernable throughout the 81-day study period, indicating that it is possible to detect bodies undergoing decomposition with side-scan sonar.

  1. Optically Controlled Signal Amplification for DNA Computation.

    PubMed

    Prokup, Alexander; Hemphill, James; Liu, Qingyang; Deiters, Alexander

    2015-10-16

    The hybridization chain reaction (HCR) and fuel-catalyst cycles have been applied to address the problem of signal amplification in DNA-based computation circuits. While they function efficiently, these signal amplifiers cannot be switched ON or OFF quickly and noninvasively. To overcome these limitations, a light-activated initiator strand for the HCR, which enabled fast optical OFF → ON switching, was developed. Similarly, when a light-activated version of the catalyst strand or the inhibitor strand of a fuel-catalyst cycle was applied, the cycle could be optically switched from OFF → ON or ON → OFF, respectively. To move the capabilities of these devices beyond solution-based operations, the components were embedded in agarose gels. Irradiation with customizable light patterns and at different time points demonstrated both spatial and temporal control. The addition of a translator gate enabled a spatially activated signal to travel along a predefined path, akin to a chemical wire. Overall, the addition of small light-cleavable photocaging groups to DNA signal amplification circuits enabled conditional control as well as fast photocontrol of signal amplification. PMID:25621535

  2. Synchronous control strategy of wafer and reticle stage of step and scan lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lanlan; Hu, Song; Zhao, Lixin; Ma, Ping

    2012-10-01

    For step and scan lithography systems, the synchronization of reticle stage and wafer stage during exposure is one of the most important factors that decides the image quality. In this paper, their principle is analyzed through investigating the structure of step and scan lithography systems. And the coarse and fine laminated model is built. Based on this model, three different kinds of synchronous control structures containing parallel, series and cross-coupled are proposed. Then, the reticle stage is used to compensate the error of the synchronous control system of wafer and reticle stage. Simulation results demonstrate that this control strategy has good synchronization performance, and the synchronous error of wafer stage and reticle stage is less than 0.5nm without disturbance.

  3. Computed tomography scanning can monitor the effects of soil medium on root system development: an example of salt stress in corn

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sowmyalakshmi; Han, Liwen; Dutilleul, Pierre; Smith, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    Seeds and young seedlings often encounter high soluble salt levels in the upmost soil layers, impeding vigorous growth by affecting root establishment. Computed tomography (CT) scanning used at low X-ray doses can help study root development in such conditions non-destructively, because plants are allowed to grow throughout the experiment. Using a high-resolution Toshiba XVision CT scanner, we studied corn (Zea mays L.) root growth under optimal and salt-stressed conditions in 3D and on a weekly basis over 3 weeks. Two groups of three corn plants were grown in the controlled environment of a growth chamber, in mid-sized plastic pots filled with sieved and autoclaved sand. Seedlings were subjected to first CT scanning 1 week after seed planting. Our main research objectives concerning root systems were: (i) to quantify structural complexity from fractal dimensions estimated on skeletal 3-D images built from CT scanning data; (ii) to measure growth from volumes and lengths and the derived relative rates and increments, after isolating primary and secondary roots from the soil medium in CT scanning data; and (iii) to assess differences in complexity and growth per week and over Weeks 1–3 for groups of corn plants. Differences between groups were present from Week 1; starting in Week 2 secondary roots were present and could be isolated, which refined the complexity and growth analyses of root systems. Besides expected Week main effects (P < 0.01 or 0.05), Week × Group interaction (P < 0.05 or 0.10), and Group main effects were observed. Graphical, quantitative, and statistical analyses of CT scanning data were thus completed at an unprecedented level, and provided new and important insights regarding root system development. Repeated CT scanning is the key to a better understanding of the establishment in the soil medium of crop plants such as corn and the assessment of salt stress effects on developing root systems, in complexity, volume, and length. PMID:25972876

  4. Computed tomography scanning can monitor the effects of soil medium on root system development: an example of salt stress in corn.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Sowmyalakshmi; Han, Liwen; Dutilleul, Pierre; Smith, Donald L

    2015-01-01

    Seeds and young seedlings often encounter high soluble salt levels in the upmost soil layers, impeding vigorous growth by affecting root establishment. Computed tomography (CT) scanning used at low X-ray doses can help study root development in such conditions non-destructively, because plants are allowed to grow throughout the experiment. Using a high-resolution Toshiba XVision CT scanner, we studied corn (Zea mays L.) root growth under optimal and salt-stressed conditions in 3D and on a weekly basis over 3 weeks. Two groups of three corn plants were grown in the controlled environment of a growth chamber, in mid-sized plastic pots filled with sieved and autoclaved sand. Seedlings were subjected to first CT scanning 1 week after seed planting. Our main research objectives concerning root systems were: (i) to quantify structural complexity from fractal dimensions estimated on skeletal 3-D images built from CT scanning data; (ii) to measure growth from volumes and lengths and the derived relative rates and increments, after isolating primary and secondary roots from the soil medium in CT scanning data; and (iii) to assess differences in complexity and growth per week and over Weeks 1-3 for groups of corn plants. Differences between groups were present from Week 1; starting in Week 2 secondary roots were present and could be isolated, which refined the complexity and growth analyses of root systems. Besides expected Week main effects (P < 0.01 or 0.05), Week × Group interaction (P < 0.05 or 0.10), and Group main effects were observed. Graphical, quantitative, and statistical analyses of CT scanning data were thus completed at an unprecedented level, and provided new and important insights regarding root system development. Repeated CT scanning is the key to a better understanding of the establishment in the soil medium of crop plants such as corn and the assessment of salt stress effects on developing root systems, in complexity, volume, and length. PMID:25972876

  5. Adaptive AFM scan speed control for high aspect ratio fast structure tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Ahmad; Schuh, Andreas; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2014-10-15

    Improved imaging rates in Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) are of high interest for disciplines such as life sciences and failure analysis of semiconductor wafers, where the sample topology shows high aspect ratios. Also, fast imaging is necessary to cover a large surface under investigation in reasonable times. Since AFMs are composed of mechanical components, they are associated with comparably low resonance frequencies that undermine the effort to increase the acquisition rates. In particular, high and steep structures are difficult to follow, which causes the cantilever to temporarily loose contact to or crash into the sample. Here, we report on a novel approach that does not affect the scanner dynamics, but adapts the lateral scanning speed of the scanner. The controller monitors the control error signal and, only when necessary, decreases the scan speed to allow the z-piezo more time to react to changes in the sample's topography. In this case, the overall imaging rate can be significantly increased, because a general scan speed trade-off decision is not needed and smooth areas are scanned fast. In contrast to methods trying to increase the z-piezo bandwidth, our method is a comparably simple approach that can be easily adapted to standard systems.

  6. Controlling data transfers from an origin compute node to a target compute node

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2011-06-21

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for controlling data transfers from an origin compute node to a target compute node that include: receiving, by an application messaging module on the target compute node, an indication of a data transfer from an origin compute node to the target compute node; and administering, by the application messaging module on the target compute node, the data transfer using one or more messaging primitives of a system messaging module in dependence upon the indication.

  7. The analysis of control trajectories using symbolic and database computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The research broadly concerned the symbolic computation, mixed numeric-symbolic computation, and data base computation of trajectories of dynamical systems, especially control systems. It was determined that trees can be used to compute symbolically series which approximate solutions to differential equations.

  8. COMSAC: Computational Methods for Stability and Control. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fremaux, C. Michael (Compiler); Hall, Robert M. (Compiler)

    2004-01-01

    Work on stability and control included the following reports:Introductory Remarks; Introduction to Computational Methods for Stability and Control (COMSAC); Stability & Control Challenges for COMSAC: a NASA Langley Perspective; Emerging CFD Capabilities and Outlook A NASA Langley Perspective; The Role for Computational Fluid Dynamics for Stability and Control:Is it Time?; Northrop Grumman Perspective on COMSAC; Boeing Integrated Defense Systems Perspective on COMSAC; Computational Methods in Stability and Control:WPAFB Perspective; Perspective: Raytheon Aircraft Company; A Greybeard's View of the State of Aerodynamic Prediction; Computational Methods for Stability and Control: A Perspective; Boeing TacAir Stability and Control Issues for Computational Fluid Dynamics; NAVAIR S&C Issues for CFD; An S&C Perspective on CFD; Issues, Challenges & Payoffs: A Boeing User s Perspective on CFD for S&C; and Stability and Control in Computational Simulations for Conceptual and Preliminary Design: the Past, Today, and Future?

  9. Reliable timing systems for computer controlled accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, Jürgen; Nettleton, Robert

    1986-06-01

    Over the past decade the use of computers has set new standards for control systems of accelerators with ever increasing complexity coupled with stringent reliability criteria. In fact, with very slow cycling machines or storage rings any erratic operation or timing pulse will cause the loss of precious particles and waste hours of time and effort of preparation. Thus, for the CERN linac and LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) timing system reliability becomes a crucial factor in the sense that all components must operate practically without fault for very long periods compared to the effective machine cycle. This has been achieved by careful selection of components and design well below thermal and electrical limits, using error detection and correction where possible, as well as developing "safe" decoding techniques for serial data trains. Further, consistent structuring had to be applied in order to obtain simple and flexible modular configurations with very few components on critical paths and to minimize the exchange of information to synchronize accelerators. In addition, this structuring allows the development of efficient strategies for on-line and off-line fault diagnostics. As a result, the timing system for Linac 2 has, so far, been operating without fault for three years, the one for LEAR more than one year since its final debugging.

  10. Just Scan It!-Weapon Reconstruction in Computed Tomography on Historical and Current Swiss Military Guns.

    PubMed

    Franckenberg, Sabine; Binder, Thomas; Bolliger, Stephan; Thali, Michael J; Ross, Steffen G

    2016-09-01

    Cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography, has been increasingly implemented in both historic and recent postmortem forensic investigations. It aids in determining cause and manner of death as well as in correlating injuries to possible weapons. This study illuminates the feasibility of reconstructing guns in computed tomography and gives a distinct overview of historic and recent Swiss Army guns. PMID:27454744

  11. Just Scan It!-Weapon Reconstruction in Computed Tomography on Historical and Current Swiss Military Guns.

    PubMed

    Franckenberg, Sabine; Binder, Thomas; Bolliger, Stephan; Thali, Michael J; Ross, Steffen G

    2016-09-01

    Cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography, has been increasingly implemented in both historic and recent postmortem forensic investigations. It aids in determining cause and manner of death as well as in correlating injuries to possible weapons. This study illuminates the feasibility of reconstructing guns in computed tomography and gives a distinct overview of historic and recent Swiss Army guns.

  12. Scanning transmission and computer-aided volumic electron microscopy: 3-D modeling of entire cells by electronic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bron, Christophe; Gremillet, Philip; Launay, D.; Jourlin, Michel; Gautschi, H. P.; Baechi, Thomas; Schuepbach, Joerg

    1990-05-01

    The digital processing of electron microscopic images from serial sections containing laser-induced topographical references allows a 3-D reconstruction at a depth resolution of 30 to 40 nm of entire cells by the use of image analysis methods, as already demonstrated for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) coupled with a video camera. We decided to use a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) to get higher contrast and better resolution at medium magnification. The scanning of our specimens at video frequencies is an attractive and easy way to link a STEM with an image processing system but the hysteresis of the electronic spools responsible for the magnetic deviation of the scanning electron beam induces deformations of images which have to be modelized and corrected before registration. Computer algorithms developed for image analysis and treatment correct the artifacts caused by the use of STEM and by serial sectioning to automatically reconstruct the third dimension of the cells. They permit the normalization of the images through logarithmic processing of the original grey level infonnation. The automatic extraction of cell limits allows to link the image analysis and treatments with image synthesis methods by minimal human intervention. The surface representation and the registered images provide an ultrastructural data base from which quantitative 3-D morphological parameters, as well as otherwise impossible visualizations, can be computed. This 3-D image processing named C.A.V.U.M. for Computer Aided Volumic Ultra-Microscopy offers a new tool for the documentation and analysis of cell ultrastructure and for 3-D morphometric studies at EM magnifications. Further, a virtual observer can be computed in such a way as to simulate a visit of the reconstructed object.

  13. Evaluation of digital dental models obtained from dental cone-beam computed tomography scan of alginate impressions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tingting; Lee, Sang-Mi; Hou, Yanan; Chang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models obtained from the dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan of alginate impressions according to the time elapse when the impressions are stored under ambient conditions. Methods Alginate impressions were obtained from 20 adults using 3 different alginate materials, 2 traditional alginate materials (Alginoplast and Cavex Impressional) and 1 extended-pour alginate material (Cavex ColorChange). The impressions were stored under ambient conditions, and scanned by CBCT immediately after the impressions were taken, and then at 1 hour intervals for 6 hours. After reconstructing three-dimensional digital dental models, the models were measured and the data were analyzed to determine dimensional changes according to the elapsed time. The changes within the measurement error were regarded as clinically acceptable in this study. Results All measurements showed a decreasing tendency with an increase in the elapsed time after the impressions. Although the extended-pour alginate exhibited a less decreasing tendency than the other 2 materials, there were no statistically significant differences between the materials. Changes above the measurement error occurred between the time points of 3 and 4 hours after the impressions. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that digital dental models can be obtained simply from a CBCT scan of alginate impressions without sending them to a remote laboratory. However, when the impressions are not stored under special conditions, they should be scanned immediately, or at least within 2 to 3 hours after the impressions are taken. PMID:27226958

  14. Robotic Automation in Computer Controlled Polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. D.; Yu, G.; Bibby, M.; Dunn, C.; Li, H.; Wu, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zhang, P.

    2016-02-01

    We first present a Case Study - the manufacture of 1.4 m prototype mirror-segments for the European Extremely Large Telescope, undertaken by the National Facility for Ultra Precision Surfaces, at the OpTIC facility operated by Glyndwr University. Scale-up to serial-manufacture demands delivery of a 1.4 m off-axis aspheric hexagonal segment with surface precision < 10 nm RMS every four days, compared with a typical year or more for an one-off part. This requires a radically-new approach to large optics fabrication, which will inevitably propagate into wider industrial optics. We report on how these ambitious requirements have stimulated an investigation into the synergy between robots and computer numerically controlled ('CNC') polishing machines for optical fabrication. The objective was not to assess which is superior. Rather, it was to understand for the first time their complementary properties, leading us to operate them together as a unit, integrated in hardware and software. Three key areas are reported. First is the novel use of robots to automate currently-manual operations on CNC polishing machines, to improve work-throughput, mitigate risk of damage to parts, and reduce dependence on highly-skilled staff. Second is the use of robots to pre-process surfaces prior to CNC polishing, to reduce total process time. The third draws the threads together, describing our vision of the automated manufacturing cell, where the operator interacts at cell rather than machine level. This promises to deliver a step-change in end-to-end manufacturing times and costs, compared with either platform used on its own or, indeed, the state-of-the-art used elsewhere.

  15. Early life exposure to diagnostic radiation and ultrasound scans and risk of childhood cancer: case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Jill; Neta, Gila; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Ansell, Pat; Linet, Martha S; Ron, Elaine; Roman, Eve

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine childhood cancer risks associated with exposure to diagnostic radiation and ultrasound scans in utero and in early infancy (age 0-100 days). Design Case-control study. Setting England and Wales. Participants 2690 childhood cancer cases and 4858 age, sex, and region matched controls from the United Kingdom Childhood Cancer Study (UKCCS), born 1976-96. Main outcome measures Risk of all childhood cancer, leukaemia, lymphoma, and central nervous system tumours, measured by odds ratios. Results Logistic regression models conditioned on matching factors, with adjustment for maternal age and child’s birth weight, showed no evidence of increased risk of childhood cancer with in utero exposure to ultrasound scans. Some indication existed of a slight increase in risk after in utero exposure to x rays for all cancers (odds ratio 1.l4, 95% confidence interval 0.90 to 1.45) and leukaemia (1.36, 0.91 to 2.02), but this was not statistically significant. Exposure to diagnostic x rays in early infancy (0-100 days) was associated with small, non-significant excess risks for all cancers and leukaemia, as well as increased risk of lymphoma (odds ratio 5.14, 1.27 to 20.78) on the basis of small numbers. Conclusions Although the results for lymphoma need to be replicated, all of the findings indicate possible risks of cancer from radiation at doses lower than those associated with commonly used procedures such as computed tomography scans, suggesting the need for cautious use of diagnostic radiation imaging procedures to the abdomen/pelvis of the mother during pregnancy and in children at very young ages. PMID:21310791

  16. Bilateral control-based compensation for rotation in imaging in scan imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Dapeng; Wang, Yutang; Wang, Fuchao; Zhang, Yupeng

    2015-12-01

    Scan imaging systems rely on the rotation of a mirror to scan an image. The rotation in the resulting image must be compensated to prevent information loss. Satisfactory performance of an imaging system is difficult to achieve when employing the methods of mechanical transmission and unilateral tracking control, especially when the system suffers from nonlinear factors, disturbances, and dynamic uncertainties. This paper proposes a compensation method based on bilateral control derived from the field of haptic robots. A two-loop disturbance observer was designed to guarantee that the dynamic characteristics of the motor are close to those of the nominal model. The controllers were designed on the basis of the small gain theorem. Experiments were conducted for a comparison with the traditional unilateral control-based compensation. The comparison showed a reduction of 99.83% in the L2 norm of error, which validates the method. The proposed method improves the accuracy of compensation for rotation in imaging, and demonstrates that bilateral control has feasibility for application in various fields, including photogrammetry.

  17. Computer-aided design of flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.; Sircar, Subrata

    1991-01-01

    A computer program is presented for facilitating the development and assessment of flight control systems, and application to a control design is discussed. The program is a computer-aided control-system design program based on direct digital synthesis of a proportional-integral-filter controller with scheduled linear-quadratic-Gaussian gains and command generator tracking of pilot inputs. The FlightCAD system concentrates on aircraft dynamics, flight-control systems, stability and performance, and has practical engineering applications.

  18. Physiologic variants, benign processes, and artifacts from 106 canine and feline FDG-PET/computed tomography scans.

    PubMed

    Randall, Elissa; Loeber, Samantha; Kraft, Susan

    2014-01-01

    18F-Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) is an emerging diagnostic imaging modality in veterinary medicine; however, little published information is available on physiologic variants, benign processes, and artifacts. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the number of occurrences of non-neoplastic disease-related FDG-PET/CT lesions in a group of dogs and cats. Archived FDG-PET/CT scans were retrieved and interpreted based on a consensus opinion of two board-certified veterinary radiologists. Non-neoplastic disease-related lesions were categorized as physiologic variant, benign activity, or equipment/technology related artifact. If the exact cause of hypermetabolic areas could not be determined, lesions were put into an indeterminate category. A total of 106 canine and feline FDG-PET/CT scans were included in the study. In 104 of the 106 scans, a total of 718 occurrences of physiologic variant, areas of incidental benign activity, and artifacts were identified. Twenty-two of 23 feline scans and 82 of 83 canine scans had at least one artifact. Previously unreported areas of increased radiopharmaceutical uptake included foci associated with the canine gall bladder, linear uptake along the canine mandible, and focal uptake in the gastrointestinal tract. Benign activity was often seen and related to healing, inflammation, and indwelling implants. Artifacts were most often related to injection or misregistration. Further experience in recognizing the common veterinary FDG physiologic variation, incidental radiopharmaceutical uptake, and artifacts is important to avoid misinterpretation and false-positive diagnoses.

  19. Automatic exposure control for a slot scanning full field digital mammography system

    SciTech Connect

    Elbakri, Idris A.; Lakshminarayanan, A.V.; Tesic, Mike M.

    2005-09-15

    Automatic exposure control (AEC) is an important feature in mammography. It enables consistently optimal image exposure despite variations in tissue density and thickness, and user skill level. Full field digital mammography systems cannot employ conventional AEC methods because digital receptors fully absorb the x-ray beam. In this paper we describe an AEC procedure for slot scanning mammography. With slot scanning detectors, our approach uses a fast low-resolution and low-exposure prescan to acquire an image of the breast. Tube potential depends on breast thickness, and the prescan histogram provides the necessary information to calculate the required tube current. We validate our approach with simulated prescan images and phantom measurements. We achieve accurate exposure tracking with thickness and density, and expect this method of AEC to reduce retakes and improve workflow.

  20. Controlling the transition of bright and dark states via scanning dressing field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peiying; Zheng, Huaibin; Zhang, Yiqi; Sun, Jia; Li, Changbiao; Huang, Gaoping; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2013-03-01

    We report the transitions between the bright and dark states of singly-dressed four-wave mixing (FWM) and doubly-dressed FWMs, and the corresponding probe transmissions by scanning the dressing field frequency detuning in a five-level atomic system. Moreover, doubly-dressed six-wave mixing with avoided-crossing plots and triple-dressed eight-wave mixing with the comparison of scanning probe field and dressing field are studied. Such controlled transitions of the nonlinear optical signals can be realizable not only in atomic vapors but also in solid medium. The investigations maybe have potential applications in optical communication, quantum information processing and optoelectronic devices, and maybe also provide a sensitive probe method to study the dressing effect.

  1. Image reconstruction based on total-variation minimization and alternating direction method in linear scan computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Han-Ming; Wang, Lin-Yuan; Yan, Bin; Li, Lei; Xi, Xiao-Qi; Lu, Li-Zhong

    2013-07-01

    Linear scan computed tomography (LCT) is of great benefit to online industrial scanning and security inspection due to its characteristics of straight-line source trajectory and high scanning speed. However, in practical applications of LCT, there are challenges to image reconstruction due to limited-angle and insufficient data. In this paper, a new reconstruction algorithm based on total-variation (TV) minimization is developed to reconstruct images from limited-angle and insufficient data in LCT. The main idea of our approach is to reformulate a TV problem as a linear equality constrained problem where the objective function is separable, and then minimize its augmented Lagrangian function by using alternating direction method (ADM) to solve subproblems. The proposed method is robust and efficient in the task of reconstruction by showing the convergence of ADM. The numerical simulations and real data reconstructions show that the proposed reconstruction method brings reasonable performance and outperforms some previous ones when applied to an LCT imaging problem.

  2. The challenge of coronary calcium on coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) scans: effect on interpretation and possible solutions.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Makmur; John, Hoe

    2015-12-01

    Coronary calcium seen on coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) scans is a common diagnostic challenge which can make interpretation difficult. It is the most common cause of false positive (FP) results from CCTA compared with invasive coronary angiography (ICA), and affects the positive predictive results. At the same time, coronary calcium can result in false negative (FN) results, and this again can affect the reported diagnostic accuracy of CCTA, as the high negative predictive value of CCTA compared to ICA is one of its strengths. This paper reviews the reasons that coronary calcium can cause FP and FN results, and the effects of the morphologies and sizes of the calcified plaques, with particular regard to their relationship with the visualization of the contrast-filled lumen of the coronary artery. Some possible solutions to overcome the limitations of reading CCTA scans with calcified plaques also are discussed, with a view to improving the accuracy of interpreting and reporting CCTA scans; these solutions include using the degree of residual visible contrast-filled lumen to help assess the likelihood of significant associated coronary stenosis, and applying newer technical developments such as dual-energy imaging and volume calcium subtraction.

  3. Serial cranial computed-tomography scans in children with leukemia given two different forms of central nervous system therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ochs, J.J.; Parvey, L.S.; Whitaker, J.N.; Bowman, W.P.; Ch'ien, L.; Campbell, M.; Coburn, T.

    1983-12-01

    Cranial computed tomography (CT) was used to estimate the frequency and permanence of brain abnormalities in 108 consecutive children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Fifty-five patients received cranial irradiation (1,800 rad) with intrathecal methotrexate (RT group) and 53 patients received intravenous and intrathecal methotrexate without irradiation (IVIT group). Continuation treatment included sequential drug pairs for the RT group and periodic IVIT methotrexate for the other group. After 12 to 24 months of serial evaluation, five (9%) of the 55 patients in the RT group have had CT scan abnormalities, compared to 10 (19%) of 52 in the IVIT group (p . 0.171). Fourteen of the 15 patients with CT scan abnormalities had focal or diffuse white-matter hypodensity; these have reverted to normal in most cases, reflecting a dynamic process. While such CT findings are of concern and may be an early indicator of central nervous system toxicity, this remains to be proven. Therapy should not be altered on the basis of abnormal CT scans alone but in the context of the entire clinical situation.

  4. Computer Control For Gas/Tungsten-Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, Kristinn; Springfield, James F.; Barnett, Robert J.; Cook, George E.

    1994-01-01

    Prototype computer-based feedback control system developed for use in gas/tungsten arc welding. Beyond improving welding technician's moment-to-moment general control of welding process, control system designed to assist technician in selecting appropriate welding-process parameters, and provide better automatic voltage control. Modular for ease of reconfiguration and upgrading. Modularity also reflected in software. Includes rack-mounted computer, based on VME bus, containing Intel 80286 and 80386 processors.

  5. Comparing algorithms for automated vessel segmentation in computed tomography scans of the lung: the VESSEL12 study.

    PubMed

    Rudyanto, Rina D; Kerkstra, Sjoerd; van Rikxoort, Eva M; Fetita, Catalin; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Lefevre, Christophe; Xue, Wenzhe; Zhu, Xiangjun; Liang, Jianming; Öksüz, Ilkay; Ünay, Devrim; Kadipaşaoğlu, Kamuran; Estépar, Raúl San José; Ross, James C; Washko, George R; Prieto, Juan-Carlos; Hoyos, Marcela Hernández; Orkisz, Maciej; Meine, Hans; Hüllebrand, Markus; Stöcker, Christina; Mir, Fernando Lopez; Naranjo, Valery; Villanueva, Eliseo; Staring, Marius; Xiao, Changyan; Stoel, Berend C; Fabijanska, Anna; Smistad, Erik; Elster, Anne C; Lindseth, Frank; Foruzan, Amir Hossein; Kiros, Ryan; Popuri, Karteek; Cobzas, Dana; Jimenez-Carretero, Daniel; Santos, Andres; Ledesma-Carbayo, Maria J; Helmberger, Michael; Urschler, Martin; Pienn, Michael; Bosboom, Dennis G H; Campo, Arantza; Prokop, Mathias; de Jong, Pim A; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos; Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate; van Ginneken, Bram

    2014-10-01

    The VESSEL12 (VESsel SEgmentation in the Lung) challenge objectively compares the performance of different algorithms to identify vessels in thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans. Vessel segmentation is fundamental in computer aided processing of data generated by 3D imaging modalities. As manual vessel segmentation is prohibitively time consuming, any real world application requires some form of automation. Several approaches exist for automated vessel segmentation, but judging their relative merits is difficult due to a lack of standardized evaluation. We present an annotated reference dataset containing 20 CT scans and propose nine categories to perform a comprehensive evaluation of vessel segmentation algorithms from both academia and industry. Twenty algorithms participated in the VESSEL12 challenge, held at International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) 2012. All results have been published at the VESSEL12 website http://vessel12.grand-challenge.org. The challenge remains ongoing and open to new participants. Our three contributions are: (1) an annotated reference dataset available online for evaluation of new algorithms; (2) a quantitative scoring system for objective comparison of algorithms; and (3) performance analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the various vessel segmentation methods in the presence of various lung diseases.

  6. Nanoscale control of individual proximal NV spins via a scanning magnetic field-gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinolds, Michael; Maletinsky, Patrick; Hong, Sungkun; Lukin, Mikhail; Walsworth, Ronald; Yacoby, Amir

    2011-03-01

    Nanoscale ensembles of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) spins have been proposed for implementing quantum information protocols as well as performing sensitive nanoscale magnetometry. However, it has proven experimentally difficult to control individual NV spins without affecting the state of other, proximal spins, as spins are read-out optically and are often collectively driven by applied radio-frequency fields. We demonstrate that single-spin control in NV-spin ensembles can be achieved via a scanning magnetic field-gradient, which locally splits the electron spin resonances of proximal NVs. With this method, we achieve 9 nm spatial resolutions in imaging, characterization, and simultaneous manipulation of individual NVs, roughly two orders of magnitude better than the optical diffraction limit. We discuss applications of this individual control such as generating entangled spin-states and performing sensitive magnetometry.

  7. Surface energy control techniques for photomask fabrication and their characterizations with scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Masaaki; Hatakeyama, Sho; Yoshida, Kouji; Abe, Makoto; Totsukawa, Daisuke; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya

    2008-05-01

    Most of photomask issues such as pattern collapse, HAZE, and cleaning damage relate to behavior of mask surfaces. Therefore it is coming to be important to control surface energy in photomask processes. Especially adhesion analysis in micro region is strongly desired to optimize material and process designs in photomask fabrication. Quantitative measurements of adhesive forces of resists on photomask blanks were realized with scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques. Then surface energy on photomask blanks was able to be controlled by modification with some silanization reagents. In addition, adhesive forces of resists on surfaces modified with some silanes were able to be also controlled. The SPM method is proved to be effective for measuring adhesive energy of micro patterns on photomask blanks.

  8. Modification and Development of a Control Mechanism for the Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Zach

    2011-01-01

    The scanning microwave limb sounder (SMLS) is the latest instrument to probe the Earth's atmosphere to come out of the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) team. Once deployed to the upper stratosphere, it will use microwave detection to measure geo-atmospheric variables such as temperature, pressure, and chemical composition. In addition to previous missions that used vertical limb scans to observe altitudinal variations, the SMLS will rotate laterally allowing it to establish two-dimensional variable dependencies with a single run. A program was originated by a previous intern that will automatically control the movement of the two rotational axes along with a switching mirror and chopper once the instrument is in flight. However, it lacked the code essential to control system's ability to function fully and reliably. By modifying and rewriting parts of the code I sought to have a finished ready-for-flight control system that would be easy to navigate. Three of the major alterations I made including instituting a gyroscope, implementing a restart button, and instigating the automatic creation of a file log with each run to record the position and orientation of the SMLS.

  9. Neurologic, neuropsychologic, and computed cranial tomography scan abnormalities in 2- to 10-year survivors of small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B E; Becker, B; Goff, W B; Petronas, N; Krehbiel, M A; Makuch, R W; McKenna, G; Glatstein, E; Ihde, D C

    1985-12-01

    In order to evaluate the relationship between neurologic function and cranial irradiation, 20 patients treated on National Cancer Institute (NCI) small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) trials who were alive and free of cancer 2.4 to 10.6 years (median, 6.2) from the start of therapy were studied. All were tested with a neurologic history and examination, mental status examination, neuropsychologic testing, and review of serial computed cranial tomography (CCT) scans. Fifteen patients had been treated with prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI), two patients with therapeutic cranial irradiation, and three received no cranial irradiation. All patients but one were ambulatory and none were institutionalized. Fifteen patients (75%) had neurologic complaints, 13 (65%) had abnormal neurologic examinations, 12 (60%) had abnormal mental status examinations, 13 (65%) had abnormal neuropsychologic testing, and 15 (75%) had abnormal CCT scans. Compared with those given low-dose maintenance chemotherapy during PCI using 200 to 300 rad per fraction, patients who were given high-dose induction chemotherapy during the time of cranial irradiation or large radiotherapy fractions (400 rad) were more likely to have abnormal mental status examinations (6/6 v 4/9) and abnormal neuropsychologic tests (6/6 v 4/9), but no major difference in CCT findings was present. CCT scans in the majority of cases (11/18) showed progressive ventricular dilatation or cerebral atrophy up to 8 years after stopping therapy. We conclude neurologic abnormalities are common in long-term survivors of SCLC, and may be more prominent in patients given high-dose chemotherapy during cranial irradiation or treated with large radiotherapy fractions. The CCT scan abnormalities are common and progressive years after prophylactic cranial irradiation and chemotherapy are stopped.

  10. Radiation Dose to the Lens of the Eye from Computed Tomography Scans of the Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januzis, Natalie Ann

    While it is well known that exposure to radiation can result in cataract formation, questions still remain about the presence of a dose threshold in radiation cataractogenesis. Since the exposure history from diagnostic CT exams is well documented in a patient's medical record, the population of patients chronically exposed to radiation from head CT exams may be an interesting area to explore for further research in this area. However, there are some challenges in estimating lens dose from head CT exams. An accurate lens dosimetry model would have to account for differences in imaging protocols, differences in head size, and the use of any dose reduction methods. The overall objective of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive method to estimate radiation dose to the lens of the eye for patients receiving CT scans of the head. This research is comprised of a physics component, in which a lens dosimetry model was derived for head CT, and a clinical component, which involved the application of that dosimetry model to patient data. The physics component includes experiments related to the physical measurement of the radiation dose to the lens by various types of dosimeters placed within anthropomorphic phantoms. These dosimeters include high-sensitivity MOSFETs, TLDs, and radiochromic film. The six anthropomorphic phantoms used in these experiments range in age from newborn to adult. First, the lens dose from five clinically relevant head CT protocols was measured in the anthropomorphic phantoms with MOSFET dosimeters on two state-of-the-art CT scanners. The volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), which is a standard CT output index, was compared to the measured lens doses. Phantom age-specific CTDIvol-to-lens dose conversion factors were derived using linear regression analysis. Since head size can vary among individuals of the same age, a method was derived to estimate the CTDIvol-to-lens dose conversion factor using the effective head diameter. These conversion

  11. Radiation Dose to the Lens of the Eye from Computed Tomography Scans of the Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januzis, Natalie Ann

    While it is well known that exposure to radiation can result in cataract formation, questions still remain about the presence of a dose threshold in radiation cataractogenesis. Since the exposure history from diagnostic CT exams is well documented in a patient's medical record, the population of patients chronically exposed to radiation from head CT exams may be an interesting area to explore for further research in this area. However, there are some challenges in estimating lens dose from head CT exams. An accurate lens dosimetry model would have to account for differences in imaging protocols, differences in head size, and the use of any dose reduction methods. The overall objective of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive method to estimate radiation dose to the lens of the eye for patients receiving CT scans of the head. This research is comprised of a physics component, in which a lens dosimetry model was derived for head CT, and a clinical component, which involved the application of that dosimetry model to patient data. The physics component includes experiments related to the physical measurement of the radiation dose to the lens by various types of dosimeters placed within anthropomorphic phantoms. These dosimeters include high-sensitivity MOSFETs, TLDs, and radiochromic film. The six anthropomorphic phantoms used in these experiments range in age from newborn to adult. First, the lens dose from five clinically relevant head CT protocols was measured in the anthropomorphic phantoms with MOSFET dosimeters on two state-of-the-art CT scanners. The volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), which is a standard CT output index, was compared to the measured lens doses. Phantom age-specific CTDIvol-to-lens dose conversion factors were derived using linear regression analysis. Since head size can vary among individuals of the same age, a method was derived to estimate the CTDIvol-to-lens dose conversion factor using the effective head diameter. These conversion

  12. Registration of central paths and colonic polyps between supine and prone scans in computed tomography colonography: Pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Li Ping; Napel, Sandy; Acar, Burak; Paik, David S.; Jeffrey, R. Brooke Jr.; Beaulieu, Christopher F.

    2004-10-01

    Computed tomography colonography (CTC) is a minimally invasive method that allows the evaluation of the colon wall from CT sections of the abdomen/pelvis. The primary goal of CTC is to detect colonic polyps, precursors to colorectal cancer. Because imperfect cleansing and distension can cause portions of the colon wall to be collapsed, covered with water, and/or covered with retained stool, patients are scanned in both prone and supine positions. We believe that both reading efficiency and computer aided detection (CAD) of CTC images can be improved by accurate registration of data from the supine and prone positions. We developed a two-stage approach that first registers the colonic central paths using a heuristic and automated algorithm and then matches polyps or polyp candidates (CAD hits) by a statistical approach. We evaluated the registration algorithm on 24 patient cases. After path registration, the mean misalignment distance between prone and supine identical anatomic landmarks was reduced from 47.08 to 12.66 mm, a 73% improvement. The polyp registration algorithm was specifically evaluated using eight patient cases for which radiologists identified polyps separately for both supine and prone data sets, and then manually registered corresponding pairs. The algorithm correctly matched 78% of these pairs without user input. The algorithm was also applied to the 30 highest-scoring CAD hits in the prone and supine scans and showed a success rate of 50% in automatically registering corresponding polyp pairs. Finally, we computed the average number of CAD hits that need to be manually compared in order to find the correct matches among the top 30 CAD hits. With polyp registration, the average number of comparisons was 1.78 per polyp, as opposed to 4.28 comparisons without polyp registration.

  13. Optimal control, geometry, and quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Michael A.; Dowling, Mark R.; Gu, Mile; Doherty, Andrew C.

    2006-06-01

    We prove upper and lower bounds relating the quantum gate complexity of a unitary operation, U , to the optimal control cost associated to the synthesis of U . These bounds apply for any optimal control problem, and can be used to show that the quantum gate complexity is essentially equivalent to the optimal control cost for a wide range of problems, including time-optimal control and finding minimal distances on certain Riemannian, sub-Riemannian, and Finslerian manifolds. These results generalize the results of [Nielsen, Dowling, Gu, and Doherty, Science 311, 1133 (2006)], which showed that the gate complexity can be related to distances on a Riemannian manifold.

  14. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... 2016:chap 133. Radiologyinfo.org. Computed tomography (CT) - abdomen and pelvis. Updated June 16, 2016. www.radiologyinfo. ...

  15. Controlled-Resonant Surface Tapping-Mode Scanning Probe Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the advancement of a controlled-resonance surface tapping-mode single capillary liquid junction extraction/ESI emitter for mass spectrometry imaging. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to spot sample, lane scan and chemically image in an automated and controlled fashion were demonstrated. Rapid, automated spot sampling was demonstrated for a variety of compound types including the cationic dye basic blue 7, the oligosaccharide cellopentaose, and the protein equine heart cytochrome c. The system was used for lane scanning and chemical imaging of the cationic dye crystal violet in inked lines on glass and for lipid distributions in mouse brain thin tissue sections. Imaging of the lipids in mouse brain tissue under optimized conditions provided a spatial resolution of approximately 35 m based on the ability to distinguish between features observed both in the optical and mass spectral chemical images. The sampling spatial resolution of this system was comparable to the best resolution that has been reported for other types of atmospheric pressure liquid extraction-based surface sampling/ionization techniques used for mass spectrometry imaging.

  16. Towards practical control design using neural computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troudet, Terry; Garg, Sanjay; Mattern, Duane; Merrill, Walter

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to develop neural network based control design techniques which address the issue of performance/control effort tradeoff. Additionally, the control design needs to address the important issue if achieving adequate performance in the presence of actuator nonlinearities such as position and rate limits. These issues are discussed using the example of aircraft flight control. Given a set of pilot input commands, a feedforward net is trained to control the vehicle within the constraints imposed by the actuators. This is achieved by minimizing an objective function which is the sum of the tracking errors, control input rates and control input deflections. A tradeoff between tracking performance and control smoothness is obtained by varying, adaptively, the weights of the objective function. The neurocontroller performance is evaluated in the presence of actuator dynamics using a simulation of the vehicle. Appropriate selection of the different weights in the objective function resulted in the good tracking of the pilot commands and smooth neurocontrol. An extension of the neurocontroller design approach is proposed to enhance its practicality.

  17. Nasal Anthropometry on Facial Computed Tomography Scans for Rhinoplasty in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyung Min; Cho, Geon; Sung, Ha Min; Jung, Min Su; Tak, Kyoung Seok; Jung, Sung-Won; Lee, Hoon-Bum

    2013-01-01

    Background Cephalometric analysis is essential for planning treatment in maxillofacial and aesthetic facial surgery. Although photometric analysis of the Korean nose has been attempted in the past, anthropometry of the deeper nasal structures in the same population based on computerized tomography (CT) has not been published. We therefore measured three anthropometric parameters of the nose on CT scans in our clinical series of patients. Methods We conducted the current retrospective study of a total of 100 patients (n=100) who underwent a CT-guided radiological measurement at our institution during a period ranging from January of 2008 to August of 2010. In these patients, we took three anthropometric measurements: the nasofrontal angle, the pyramidal angle, and the linear distance between the nasion and the tip of the nasal bone. Results The mean nasofrontal angle was 131.14° in the male patients and 140.70° in the female patients. The mean linear distance between the nasion and the tip of the nasal bone was 21.28 mm and 18.02 mm, respectively. The mean nasal pyramidal angle was 112.89° and 103.25° at the level of the nasal root, 117.49° and 115.60° at the middle level of the nasal bone, and 127.99° and 125.04° at the level of the tip of the nasal bone, respectively. Conclusions In conclusion, our data will be helpful in the preparation of silicone implants for augmentation and/or corrective rhinoplasty in ethnic Korean people. PMID:24086818

  18. Prospects for titanium alloy comparison control by electron beam scan frequency manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, A.; Pal, U.; Avyle, J.V.D.; Damkroger, B.

    1996-12-31

    Using mathematical modelling, the authors evaluate the prospects for using beam spot size and scan frequency to control titanium-aluminum alloy composition in electron beam melting and refining. Composition control is evaluated in terms of attainable steady-state extremes of composition, and the time scales required to change hearth and mold composition between those extremes. Mathematical models predict spot size-evaporation and frequency-evaporation relationships by simulating heat transfer in the surface of the melt, and predict overall composition change using simplifying assumptions about the fluid flow field in a melting hearth. Corroborating experiments were run on the electron beam furnace at Sandia National Laboratories in order to verify predicted relationships between frequency and evaporation and to calculate activity coefficients of aluminum and vanadium in titanium.

  19. Non-Uniform Dose Mapping Controlled by Modulated Vertical and Horizontal Scans

    SciTech Connect

    Ninomiya, S.; Kimura, Y.; Kudo, T.; Ochi, A.; Toda, R.; Tsukihara, M.; Sato, F.; Fuse, G.; Ueno, K.; Sugitani, M.

    2008-11-03

    Since geometries of semi-conductor devices continue to shrink, the requirement for each process becomes severer to keep uniformity of electrical parameters of the semi-conductor devices. A larger wafer also causes larger variations. Thus it has been strongly required for ion implantation process to compensate for the variations from other processes because of its good dose controllability. A newly developed mapping of intentional non-uniform dosage system, which is named 'MIND system', is implemented in SEN's single-wafer-type implanters. The MIND system controls both horizontal and vertical scan speed simultaneously. Intentional two-dimensional non-uniform profiles of sheet resistance, such as concentric and eccentric profiles, are obtained only by single-step ion implantation.

  20. Rare Root Canal Configuration of Bilateral Maxillary Second Molar Using Cone-beam Computed Tomographic Scanning.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chang; Shen, Ya; Guan, Xiaoyue; Wang, Xin; Fan, Mingwen; Li, Yuhong

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this article was to present a right maxillary second molar with an unusual root canal morphology of 4 roots and 5 canals as confirmed by cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging. The tooth had a C-shaped mesiobuccal root (CBCT imaging revealed that the root was closer to the palate than the buccal side) with 2 canals, 2 fused distobuccal roots with 2 separate canals, and 1 normal bulky palatal root with 1 canal. After thoroughly examining the rare anatomy, root canal treatment was applied on the tooth. This article shows the complexity of maxillary second molar variation and shows the significance of CBCT imaging in the confirmation of the 3-dimensional anatomy of teeth and endodontic treatment.

  1. Automated segmentation of pulmonary structures in thoracic computed tomography scans: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rikxoort, Eva M.; van Ginneken, Bram

    2013-09-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the modality of choice for imaging the lungs in vivo. Sub-millimeter isotropic images of the lungs can be obtained within seconds, allowing the detection of small lesions and detailed analysis of disease processes. The high resolution of thoracic CT and the high prevalence of lung diseases require a high degree of automation in the analysis pipeline. The automated segmentation of pulmonary structures in thoracic CT has been an important research topic for over a decade now. This systematic review provides an overview of current literature. We discuss segmentation methods for the lungs, the pulmonary vasculature, the airways, including airway tree construction and airway wall segmentation, the fissures, the lobes and the pulmonary segments. For each topic, the current state of the art is summarized, and topics for future research are identified.

  2. Scalable quantum computation via local control of only two qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Burgarth, Daniel; Maruyama, Koji; Murphy, Michael; Montangero, Simone; Calarco, Tommaso; Nori, Franco; Plenio, Martin B.

    2010-04-15

    We apply quantum control techniques to a long spin chain by acting only on two qubits at one of its ends, thereby implementing universal quantum computation by a combination of quantum gates on these qubits and indirect swap operations across the chain. It is shown that the control sequences can be computed and implemented efficiently. We discuss the application of these ideas to physical systems such as superconducting qubits in which full control of long chains is challenging.

  3. Dedicated EPROM-based computer for distributed instrumentation control

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, D.N.; O'Brien, D.W.

    1981-10-14

    The LLNL Nuclear Chemistry Counting Facility (NCCF) is being converted to a modern production facility. A computer network has been designed and built to implement this conversion. The outermost node of the computer network is a dedicated EPROM-based controller. The controller handles the details of driving the attached nuclear instrumentation, providing a standard interface to the remainder of the network. This paper addresses the design and the implementation of the dedicated instrumentation controller.

  4. Is computer-aided interpretation of 99Tcm-HMPAO leukocyte scans better than the naked eye?

    PubMed

    Almer, S; Peters, A M; Ekberg, S; Franzén, L; Granerus, G; Ström, M

    1995-04-01

    In order to compare visual interpretation of inflammation detected by leukocyte scintigraphy with that of different computer-aided quantification methods, 34 patients (25 with ulcerative colitis and 9 with endoscopically verified non-inflamed colonic mucosa), were investigated using 99Tcm-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (99Tcm-HMPAO) leukocyte scintigraphy and colonoscopy with biopsies. Scintigrams were obtained 45 min and 4 h after the injection of labelled cells. Computer-generated grading of seven colon segments using four different methods was performed on each scintigram for each patient. The same segments were graded independently using a 4-point visual scale. Endoscopic and histological inflammation were scored on 4-point scales. At 45 min, a positive correlation was found between endoscopic and scan gradings in individual colon segments when using visual grading and three of the four computer-aided methods (Spearman's rs = 0.30-0.64, P < 0.001). Histological grading correlated with visual grading and with two of the four computer-aided methods at 45 min (rs = 0.42-0.54, P < 0.001). At 4 h, all grading methods correlated positively with both endoscopic and histological assessment. The correlation coefficients were, in all but one instance, highest for the visual grading. As an inter-observer comparison to assess agreement between the visual gradings of two nuclear physicians, 14 additional patients (9 ulcerative colitis, 5 infectious enterocolitis) underwent leukocyte scintigraphy. Agreement assessed using kappa statistics was 0.54 at 45 min (P < 0.001). Separate data concerning the presence/absence of active inflammation showed a high kappa value (0.74, P < 0.001). Our results showed that a simple scintigraphic scoring system based on assessment using the human eye reflects colonic inflammation at least as well as computer-aided grading, and that highly correlated results can be achieved between different investigators.

  5. Role of optical computers in aeronautical control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The role that optical computers play in aircraft control is determined. The optical computer has the potential high speed capability required, especially for matrix/matrix operations. The optical computer also has the potential for handling nonlinear simulations in real time. They are also more compatible with fiber optic signal transmission. Optics also permit the use of passive sensors to measure process variables. No electrical energy need be supplied to the sensor. Complex interfacing between optical sensors and the optical computer is avoided if the optical sensor outputs can be directly processed by the optical computer.

  6. A forward view on reliable computers for flight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, J.; Wensley, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    The requirements for fault-tolerant computers for flight control of commercial aircraft are examined; it is concluded that the reliability requirements far exceed those typically quoted for space missions. Examination of circuit technology and alternative computer architectures indicates that the desired reliability can be achieved with several different computer structures, though there are obvious advantages to those that are more economic, more reliable, and, very importantly, more certifiable as to fault tolerance. Progress in this field is expected to bring about better computer systems that are more rigorously designed and analyzed even though computational requirements are expected to increase significantly.

  7. Robust semi-automatic segmentation of pulmonary subsolid nodules in chest computed tomography scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassen, B. C.; Jacobs, C.; Kuhnigk, J.-M.; van Ginneken, B.; van Rikxoort, E. M.

    2015-02-01

    The malignancy of lung nodules is most often detected by analyzing changes of the nodule diameter in follow-up scans. A recent study showed that comparing the volume or the mass of a nodule over time is much more significant than comparing the diameter. Since the survival rate is higher when the disease is still in an early stage it is important to detect the growth rate as soon as possible. However manual segmentation of a volume is time-consuming. Whereas there are several well evaluated methods for the segmentation of solid nodules, less work is done on subsolid nodules which actually show a higher malignancy rate than solid nodules. In this work we present a fast, semi-automatic method for segmentation of subsolid nodules. As minimal user interaction the method expects a user-drawn stroke on the largest diameter of the nodule. First, a threshold-based region growing is performed based on intensity analysis of the nodule region and surrounding parenchyma. In the next step the chest wall is removed by a combination of a connected component analyses and convex hull calculation. Finally, attached vessels are detached by morphological operations. The method was evaluated on all nodules of the publicly available LIDC/IDRI database that were manually segmented and rated as non-solid or part-solid by four radiologists (Dataset 1) and three radiologists (Dataset 2). For these 59 nodules the Jaccard index for the agreement of the proposed method with the manual reference segmentations was 0.52/0.50 (Dataset 1/Dataset 2) compared to an inter-observer agreement of the manual segmentations of 0.54/0.58 (Dataset 1/Dataset 2). Furthermore, the inter-observer agreement using the proposed method (i.e. different input strokes) was analyzed and gave a Jaccard index of 0.74/0.74 (Dataset 1/Dataset 2). The presented method provides satisfactory segmentation results with minimal observer effort in minimal time and can reduce the inter-observer variability for segmentation of

  8. Spontaneous Acute Mesenteroaxial Gastric Volvulus Diagnosed by Computed Tomography Scan in a Young Man

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Gaby; Afifi, Ibrahim; Ellabib, Mohamed; El-Menyar, Ayman; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 23 Final Diagnosis: Acute spontaneous gastric volvulus Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparotomy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Acute gastric volvulus is a surgical emergency that requires early recognition and treatment. Acute idiopathic mesenteroaxial gastric volvulus is a rare sub-type and there are few cases reported in children and there are even fewer reports in adults. Case Report: We report a rare case of a 23-year-old man who presented with a 1-day history of vomiting, epigastric pain, distention, and constipation. The diagnosis for mesenteroaxial type gastric volvulus was confirmed by abdominal radiography and computed tomography. The patient was successfully treated by laparotomy with resection of the ischemic stomach wall and anastomosis. Acute spontaneous mesenteroaxial gastric volvulus is rare in adults and early diagnosis is challenging due to non-specific symptoms. A missed or delayed diagnosis may result in serious complications due to gastric obstruction. Conclusions: A patient presenting with severe epigastric pain and clinical evidence of gastric outlet obstruction should be considered as a surgical emergency to rule out gastric volvulus. High index of suspicion, early diagnosis and prompt surgical management are important for favorable outcome in patients with acute spontaneous gastric volvulus. PMID:27112797

  9. Present and future utility of computed tomography scanning in the assessment and management of COPD.

    PubMed

    Ostridge, Kristoffer; Wilkinson, Tom M A

    2016-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the modality of choice for imaging the thorax and lung structure. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), it used to recognise the key morphological features of emphysema, bronchial wall thickening and gas trapping. Despite this, its place in the investigation and management of COPD is yet to be determined, and it is not routinely recommended. However, lung CT already has important clinical applications where it can be used to diagnose concomitant pathology and determine which patients with severe emphysema are appropriate for lung volume reduction procedures. Furthermore, novel quantitative analysis techniques permit objective measurements of pulmonary and extrapulmonary manifestations of the disease. These techniques can give important insights into COPD, and help explore the heterogeneity and underlying mechanisms of the condition. In time, it is hoped that these techniques can be used in clinical trials to help develop disease-specific therapy and, ultimately, as a clinical tool in identifying patients who would benefit most from new and existing treatments. This review discusses the current clinical applications for CT imaging in COPD and quantification techniques, and its potential future role in stratifying disease for optimal outcome. PMID:27230448

  10. Digit Ratios (2D:4D) Determined by Computer-Assisted Analysis are More Reliable than Those Using Physical Measurements, Photocopies, and Printed Scans

    PubMed Central

    ALLAWAY, HEATHER C.; BLOSKI, TERRI G.; PIERSON, ROGER A.; LUJAN, MARLA E.

    2010-01-01

    Prenatal androgens influence the second to fourth digit ratio (2D:4D) of hands with men having lower ratios than women. Numerous methods are used to assess 2D:4D including, physical measurements with calipers, and measurements made from photocopies, scanned images, digital photographs, radiographs, and scaled tubes. Although each method appears relatively reliable, agreement upon a gold standard is necessary to better explore the putative effects of prenatal androgens. Our objective was to assess the level of intra and interobserver reliability when evaluating 2D:4D using four techniques: (1) physical measurements, (2) photocopies, (3) printed scanned images, and (4) computer-assisted image analysis. Physical measurements, photocopies, and printed scanned images were measured with Vernier calipers. Scanned images were also measured with computer-based calipers. Measurements were made in 30 men and 30 women at two different time points, by three experienced observers. Intraclass correlation coefficients were used to assess the level of reliability. Intraobserver reliability was best for computer-assisted (0.957), followed by photocopies (0.939), physical measurements (0.925), and printed scans (0.842; P = 0.015). Interobserver reliability was also greatest for computer-assisted (0.892), followed by photocopies (0.858), physical measurements (0.795), and printed scans (0.761; P = 0.001). Mean 2D:4D from physical measurements were higher than all other techniques (P < 0.0001). Digit ratios determined from computer-assisted, physical measurements, and printed scans were more reliable in men than women (P = 0.009, P = 0.017, and P = 0.012, respectively). In summary, 2D:4D determined from computer-assisted analysis yielded the most accurate and consistent measurements among observers. Investigations of 2D:4D should use computer-assisted measurements over alternate methods whenever possible. PMID:19263413

  11. Quality and accuracy of cone beam computed tomography gated by active breathing control

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Bria P.; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2008-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality and accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) gated by active breathing control (ABC), which may be useful for image guidance in the presence of respiration. Comparisons were made between conventional ABC-CBCT (stop and go), fast ABC-CBCT (a method to speed up the acquisition by slowing the gantry instead of stopping during free breathing), and free breathing respiration correlated CBCT. Image quality was assessed in phantom. Accuracy of reconstructed voxel intensity, uniformity, and root mean square error were evaluated. Registration accuracy (bony and soft tissue) was quantified with both an anthropomorphic and a quality assurance phantom. Gantry angle accuracy was measured with respect to gantry speed modulation. Conventional ABC-CBCT scan time ranged from 2.3 to 5.8 min. Fast ABC-CBCT scan time ranged from 1.4 to 1.8 min, and respiratory correlated CBCT scans took 2.1 min to complete. Voxel intensity value for ABC gated scans was accurate relative to a normal clinical scan with all projections. Uniformity and root mean square error performance degraded as the number of projections used in the reconstruction of the fast ABC-CBCT scans decreased (shortest breath hold, longest free breathing segment). Registration accuracy for small, large, and rotational corrections was within 1 mm and 1 degree sign . Gantry angle accuracy was within 1 degree sign for all scans. For high-contrast targets, performance for image-guidance purposes was similar for fast and conventional ABC-CBCT scans and respiration correlated CBCT.

  12. Computed-tomography scan-based finite element analysis of stress distribution in premolars restored with composite resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantardžić, I.; Vasiljević, D.; Blažić, L.; Puškar, T.; Tasić, M.

    2012-05-01

    Mechanical properties of restorative material have an effect on stress distribution in the tooth structure and the restorative material during mastication. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of restorative materials with different moduli of elasticity on stress distribution in the three-dimensional (3D) solid tooth model. Computed tomography scan data of human maxillary second premolars were used for 3D solid model generation. Four composite resins with a modulus of elasticity of 6700, 9500, 14 100 and 21 000 MPa were considered to simulate four different clinical direct restoration types. Each model was subjected to a resulting force of 200 N directed to the occlusal surface, and stress distribution and maximal von Mises stresses were calculated using finite-element analysis. We found that the von Mises stress values and stress distribution in tooth structures did not vary considerably with changing the modulus of elasticity of restorative material.

  13. Universal computer control system (UCCS) for space telerobots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, Antal K.; Szakaly, Zoltan

    1987-01-01

    A universal computer control system (UCCS) is under development for all motor elements of a space telerobot. The basic hardware architecture and software design of UCCS are described, together with the rich motor sensing, control, and self-test capabilities of this all-computerized motor control system. UCCS is integrated into a multibus computer environment with direct interface to higher level control processors, uses pulsewidth multiplier power amplifiers, and one unit can control up to sixteen different motors simultaneously at a high I/O rate. UCCS performance capabilities are illustrated by a few data.

  14. Controller for computer control of brushless dc motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieda, L. S.

    1981-02-01

    A motor speed and torque controller for brushless d.c. motors provides an unusually smooth torque control arrangement. The controller provides a means for controlling a current waveform in each winding of a brushless dc motor by synchronization of an excitation pulse train from a programmable oscillator. Sensing of torque for synchronization is provided by a light beam chopper mounted on the motor rotor shaft. Speed and duty cycle are independently controlled by controlling the frequency and pulse width output of the programmable oscillator. A means is also provided so that current transitions from one motor winding to another is effected without abrupt changes in output torque.

  15. Controller for computer control of brushless dc motors. [automobile engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hieda, L. S. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A motor speed and torque controller for brushless d.c. motors provides an unusually smooth torque control arrangement. The controller provides a means for controlling a current waveform in each winding of a brushless dc motor by synchronization of an excitation pulse train from a programmable oscillator. Sensing of torque for synchronization is provided by a light beam chopper mounted on the motor rotor shaft. Speed and duty cycle are independently controlled by controlling the frequency and pulse width output of the programmable oscillator. A means is also provided so that current transitions from one motor winding to another is effected without abrupt changes in output torque.

  16. A computed tomographic scan assessment of endotracheal suctioning-induced bronchoconstriction in ventilated sheep.

    PubMed

    Lu, Q; Capderou, A; Cluzel, P; Mourgeon, E; Abdennour, L; Law-Koune, J D; Straus, C; Grenier, P; Zelter, M; Rouby, J J

    2000-11-01

    This study was directed at assessing changes in bronchial cross-sectional surface areas (BCSA) and in respiratory resistance induced by endotracheal suctioning in nine anesthetized sheep. Cardiorespiratory parameters (Swan-Ganz catheter), respiratory resistance (inspiratory occlusion technique), BCSA, and lung aeration (computed tomography) were studied at baseline, during endotracheal suctioning, and after 20 consecutive hyperinflations. Measurements performed initially at an inspired oxygen fraction (FI(O(2))) of 0.3 were repeated at an FI(O(2)) of 1.0. At an FI(O(2)) of 0.3, endotracheal suctioning resulted in atelectasis, a reduction in BCSA of 29 +/- 23% (mean +/- SD), a decrease in arterial oxygen saturation from 95 +/- 3% to 87 +/- 12% (p = 0.02), an increase in venous admixture from 19 +/- 10% to 31 +/- 19% (p = 0. 006), and an increase in lung tissue resistance (DR(rs)) (p = 0. 0003). At an FI(O(2)) of 1.0, despite an extension of atelectasis and an increase in pulmonary shunt from 19 +/- 5% to 36 +/- 2% (p < 0.0001), arterial O(2) desaturation was prevented and BCSA decreased by only 7 +/- 32%. A recruitment maneuver after endotracheal suctioning entirely reversed the suctioning-induced increase in DR(rs) and atelectasis. In three lidocaine-pretreated sheep, the endotracheal suctioning-induced reduction of BCSA was entirely prevented. These data suggest that the endotracheal suctioning-induced decrease in BCSA is related to atelectasis and bronchoconstriction. Both effects can be reversed by hyperoxygenation maneuver before suctioning in combination with recruitment maneuver after suctioning.

  17. Ultrasound-guided versus computed tomography-scan guided biopsy of pleural-based lung lesions

    PubMed Central

    Khosla, Rahul; McLean, Anna W; Smith, Jessica A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Computed tomography (CT) guided biopsies have long been the standard technique to obtain tissue from the thoracic cavity and is traditionally performed by interventional radiologists. Ultrasound (US) guided biopsy of pleural-based lesions, performed by pulmonologists is gaining popularity and has the advantage of multi-planar imaging, real-time technique, and the absence of radiation exposure to patients. In this study, we aim to determine the diagnostic accuracy, the time to diagnosis after the initial consult placement, and the complications rates between the two different modalities. Methods: A retrospective study of electronic medical records was done of patients who underwent CT-guided biopsies and US-guided biopsies for pleural-based lesions between 2005 and 2014 and the data collected were analyzed for comparing the two groups. Results: A total of 158 patients underwent 162 procedures during the study period. 86 patients underwent 89 procedures in the US group, and 72 patients underwent 73 procedures in the CT group. The overall yield in the US group was 82/89 (92.1%) versus 67/73 (91.8%) in the CT group (P = 1.0). Average days to the procedure was 7.2 versus 17.5 (P = 0.00001) in the US and CT group, respectively. Complication rate was higher in CT group 17/73 (23.3%) versus 1/89 (1.1%) in the US group (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: For pleural-based lesions the diagnostic accuracy of US guided biopsy is similar to that of CT-guided biopsy, with a lower complication rate and a significantly reduced time to the procedure. PMID:27625440

  18. Ultrasound-guided versus computed tomography-scan guided biopsy of pleural-based lung lesions

    PubMed Central

    Khosla, Rahul; McLean, Anna W; Smith, Jessica A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Computed tomography (CT) guided biopsies have long been the standard technique to obtain tissue from the thoracic cavity and is traditionally performed by interventional radiologists. Ultrasound (US) guided biopsy of pleural-based lesions, performed by pulmonologists is gaining popularity and has the advantage of multi-planar imaging, real-time technique, and the absence of radiation exposure to patients. In this study, we aim to determine the diagnostic accuracy, the time to diagnosis after the initial consult placement, and the complications rates between the two different modalities. Methods: A retrospective study of electronic medical records was done of patients who underwent CT-guided biopsies and US-guided biopsies for pleural-based lesions between 2005 and 2014 and the data collected were analyzed for comparing the two groups. Results: A total of 158 patients underwent 162 procedures during the study period. 86 patients underwent 89 procedures in the US group, and 72 patients underwent 73 procedures in the CT group. The overall yield in the US group was 82/89 (92.1%) versus 67/73 (91.8%) in the CT group (P = 1.0). Average days to the procedure was 7.2 versus 17.5 (P = 0.00001) in the US and CT group, respectively. Complication rate was higher in CT group 17/73 (23.3%) versus 1/89 (1.1%) in the US group (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: For pleural-based lesions the diagnostic accuracy of US guided biopsy is similar to that of CT-guided biopsy, with a lower complication rate and a significantly reduced time to the procedure.

  19. Computational methods to obtain time optimal jet engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basso, R. J.; Leake, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Dynamic Programming and the Fletcher-Reeves Conjugate Gradient Method are two existing methods which can be applied to solve a general class of unconstrained fixed time, free right end optimal control problems. New techniques are developed to adapt these methods to solve a time optimal control problem with state variable and control constraints. Specifically, they are applied to compute a time optimal control for a jet engine control problem.

  20. High-Speed Photography with Computer Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Loren M.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the use of a microcomputer as an intervalometer for the control and timing of several flash units to photograph high-speed events. Applies this technology to study the oscillations of a stretched rubber band, the deceleration of high-speed projectiles in water, the splashes of milk drops, and the bursts of popcorn kernels. (MDH)

  1. The Effects of Compensatory Scanning Training on Mobility in Patients with Homonymous Visual Field Defects: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    de Haan, Gera A.; Melis-Dankers, Bart J. M.; Brouwer, Wiebo H.; Tucha, Oliver; Heutink, Joost

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Homonymous visual field defects (HVFD) are a common consequence of postchiasmatic acquired brain injury and often lead to mobility-related difficulties. Different types of compensatory scanning training have been developed, aimed at decreasing consequences of the HVFD by changing visual scanning. Aim The aim of the present study is to examine the effects of a compensatory scanning training program using horizontal scanning on mobility-related activities and participation in daily life. Method The main interest of this study is to assess the effectiveness of training on mobility-related activities and participation in daily life. Visual scanning tests, such as dot counting and visual search, and control measures for visual functions and reading have been included as well. First, it is examined how performance on scanning and mobility-related measures is affected in patients with HVFD by comparing scores with scores of a healthy control group (n = 25). Second, the effect of training is assessed using an RCT design, in which performance of 26 patients before and after training is compared to performance of 23 patients in a waiting list control group. Results Self-reported improvements after training were found, accompanied by improvements in detecting peripheral stimuli and avoiding obstacles during walking, especially in dual task situations in which a second task limits the attentional capacity available for compensatory scanning. Training only improved mobility-related activities in which detection of peripheral stimuli is important, while no improvement was found on tests that require other visual skills, such as reading, visual counting and visual search. Conclusion This is the first RCT to evaluate the effects of a compensatory scanning training that is based on a systematic horizontal scanning rhythm. This training improved mobility-related activities. The results suggest that different types of compensatory scanning strategies are appropriate for

  2. High-stroke silicon-on-insulator MEMS nanopositioner: Control design for non-raster scan atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Maroufi, Mohammad Fowler, Anthony G. Bazaei, Ali Moheimani, S. O. Reza

    2015-02-15

    A 2-degree of freedom microelectromechanical systems nanopositioner designed for on-chip atomic force microscopy (AFM) is presented. The device is fabricated using a silicon-on-insulator-based process and is designed as a parallel kinematic mechanism. It contains a central scan table and two sets of electrostatic comb actuators along each orthogonal axis, which provides displacement ranges greater than ±10 μm. The first in-plane resonance modes are located at 1274 Hz and 1286 Hz for the X and Y axes, respectively. To measure lateral displacements of the stage, electrothermal position sensors are incorporated in the design. To facilitate high-speed scans, the highly resonant dynamics of the system are controlled using damping loops in conjunction with internal model controllers that enable accurate tracking of fast sinusoidal set-points. To cancel the effect of sensor drift on controlled displacements, washout controllers are used in the damping loops. The feedback controlled nanopositioner is successfully used to perform several AFM scans in contact mode via a Lissajous scan method with a large scan area of 20 μm × 20 μm. The maximum scan rate demonstrated is 1 kHz.

  3. High-stroke silicon-on-insulator MEMS nanopositioner: control design for non-raster scan atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Maroufi, Mohammad; Fowler, Anthony G; Bazaei, Ali; Moheimani, S O Reza

    2015-02-01

    A 2-degree of freedom microelectromechanical systems nanopositioner designed for on-chip atomic force microscopy (AFM) is presented. The device is fabricated using a silicon-on-insulator-based process and is designed as a parallel kinematic mechanism. It contains a central scan table and two sets of electrostatic comb actuators along each orthogonal axis, which provides displacement ranges greater than ±10 μm. The first in-plane resonance modes are located at 1274 Hz and 1286 Hz for the X and Y axes, respectively. To measure lateral displacements of the stage, electrothermal position sensors are incorporated in the design. To facilitate high-speed scans, the highly resonant dynamics of the system are controlled using damping loops in conjunction with internal model controllers that enable accurate tracking of fast sinusoidal set-points. To cancel the effect of sensor drift on controlled displacements, washout controllers are used in the damping loops. The feedback controlled nanopositioner is successfully used to perform several AFM scans in contact mode via a Lissajous scan method with a large scan area of 20 μm × 20 μm. The maximum scan rate demonstrated is 1 kHz.

  4. Establishment and implementation of an effective rule for the interpretation of computed tomography scans by emergency physicians in blunt trauma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Computed tomography (CT) can detect subtle organ injury and is applicable to many body regions. However, its interpretation requires significant skill. In our hospital, emergency physicians (EPs) must interpret emergency CT scans and formulate a plan for managing most trauma cases. CT misinterpretation should be avoided, but we were initially unable to completely accomplish this. In this study, we proposed and implemented a precautionary rule for our EPs to prevent misinterpretation of CT scans in blunt trauma cases. Methods We established a simple precautionary rule, which advises EPs to interpret CT scans with particular care when a complicated injury is suspected per the following criteria: 1) unstable physiological condition; 2) suspicion of injuries in multiple regions of the body (e.g., brain injury plus abdominal injury); 3) high energy injury mechanism; and 4) requirement for rapid movement to other rooms for invasive treatment. If a patient meets at least one of these criteria, the EP should exercise the precautions laid out in our newly established rule when interpreting the CT scan. Additionally, our rule specifies that the EP should request real-time interpretation by a radiologist in difficult cases. We compared the accuracy of EPs’ interpretations and resulting patient outcomes in blunt trauma cases before (January 2011, June 2012) and after (July 2012, January 2013) introduction of the rule to evaluate its efficacy. Results Before the rule’s introduction, emergency CT was performed 1606 times for 365 patients. We identified 44 cases (2.7%) of minor misinterpretation and 40 (2.5%) of major misinterpretation. After introduction, CT was performed 820 times for 177 patients. We identified 10 cases (1.2%) of minor misinterpretation and two (0.2%) of major misinterpretation. Real-time support by a radiologist was requested 104 times (12.7% of all cases) and was effective in preventing misinterpretation in every case. Our rule decreased

  5. Controlling High Power Devices with Computers or TTL Logic Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    Computers are routinely used to control experiments in modern science laboratories. This should be reflected in laboratories in an educational setting. There is a mismatch between the power that can be delivered by a computer interfacing card or a TTL logic circuit and that required by many practical pieces of laboratory equipment. One common way…

  6. Software For Computer-Aided Design Of Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wette, Matthew

    1994-01-01

    Computer Aided Engineering System (CAESY) software developed to provide means to evaluate methods for dealing with users' needs in computer-aided design of control systems. Interpreter program for performing engineering calculations. Incorporates features of both Ada and MATLAB. Designed to be flexible and powerful. Includes internally defined functions, procedures and provides for definition of functions and procedures by user. Written in C language.

  7. Students' Attitudes towards Control Methods in Computer-Assisted Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hintze, Hanne; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes study designed to investigate dental students' attitudes toward computer-assisted teaching as applied in programs for oral radiology in Denmark. Programs using personal computers and slide projectors with varying degrees of learner and teacher control are described, and differences in attitudes between male and female students are…

  8. Computer and control applications in a vegetable processing plant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are many advantages to the use of computers and control in food industry. Software in the food industry takes 2 forms - general purpose commercial computer software and software for specialized applications, such as drying and thermal processing of foods. Many applied simulation models for d...

  9. Computational Control of Flexible Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, Lonnie, Jr.; Shen, Ji Yao

    1994-01-01

    The main objective of this project is to establish a distributed parameter modeling technique for structural analysis, parameter estimation, vibration suppression and control synthesis of large flexible aerospace structures. This report concentrates on the research outputs produced in the last two years of the project. The main accomplishments can be summarized as follows. A new version of the PDEMOD Code had been completed. A theoretical investigation of the NASA MSFC two-dimensional ground-based manipulator facility by using distributed parameter modelling technique has been conducted. A new mathematical treatment for dynamic analysis and control of large flexible manipulator systems has been conceived, which may provide a embryonic form of a more sophisticated mathematical model for future modified versions of the PDEMOD Codes.

  10. Computational control of flexible aerospace systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, Lonnie, Jr.; Shen, Ji Yao

    1994-01-01

    The main objective of this project is to establish a distributed parameter modeling technique for structural analysis, parameter estimation, vibration suppression and control synthesis of large flexible aerospace structures. This report concentrates on the research outputs produced in the last two years. The main accomplishments can be summarized as follows. A new version of the PDEMOD Code had been completed based on several incomplete versions. The verification of the code had been conducted by comparing the results with those examples for which the exact theoretical solutions can be obtained. The theoretical background of the package and the verification examples has been reported in a technical paper submitted to the Joint Applied Mechanics & Material Conference, ASME. A brief USER'S MANUAL had been compiled, which includes three parts: (1) Input data preparation; (2) Explanation of the Subroutines; and (3) Specification of control variables. Meanwhile, a theoretical investigation of the NASA MSFC two-dimensional ground-based manipulator facility by using distributed parameter modeling technique has been conducted. A new mathematical treatment for dynamic analysis and control of large flexible manipulator systems has been conceived, which may provide an embryonic form of a more sophisticated mathematical model for future modified versions of the PDEMOD Codes.

  11. Computational control of flexible aerospace systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Lonnie, Jr.; Shen, Ji Yao

    1994-12-01

    The main objective of this project is to establish a distributed parameter modeling technique for structural analysis, parameter estimation, vibration suppression and control synthesis of large flexible aerospace structures. This report concentrates on the research outputs produced in the last two years. The main accomplishments can be summarized as follows. A new version of the PDEMOD Code had been completed based on several incomplete versions. The verification of the code had been conducted by comparing the results with those examples for which the exact theoretical solutions can be obtained. The theoretical background of the package and the verification examples has been reported in a technical paper submitted to the Joint Applied Mechanics & Material Conference, ASME. A brief USER'S MANUAL had been compiled, which includes three parts: (1) Input data preparation; (2) Explanation of the Subroutines; and (3) Specification of control variables. Meanwhile, a theoretical investigation of the NASA MSFC two-dimensional ground-based manipulator facility by using distributed parameter modeling technique has been conducted. A new mathematical treatment for dynamic analysis and control of large flexible manipulator systems has been conceived, which may provide an embryonic form of a more sophisticated mathematical model for future modified versions of the PDEMOD Codes.

  12. An autonomous molecular computer for logical control of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benenson, Yaakov; Gil, Binyamin; Ben-Dor, Uri; Adar, Rivka; Shapiro, Ehud

    2004-05-01

    Early biomolecular computer research focused on laboratory-scale, human-operated computers for complex computational problems. Recently, simple molecular-scale autonomous programmable computers were demonstrated allowing both input and output information to be in molecular form. Such computers, using biological molecules as input data and biologically active molecules as outputs, could produce a system for `logical' control of biological processes. Here we describe an autonomous biomolecular computer that, at least in vitro, logically analyses the levels of messenger RNA species, and in response produces a molecule capable of affecting levels of gene expression. The computer operates at a concentration of close to a trillion computers per microlitre and consists of three programmable modules: a computation module, that is, a stochastic molecular automaton; an input module, by which specific mRNA levels or point mutations regulate software molecule concentrations, and hence automaton transition probabilities; and an output module, capable of controlled release of a short single-stranded DNA molecule. This approach might be applied in vivo to biochemical sensing, genetic engineering and even medical diagnosis and treatment. As a proof of principle we programmed the computer to identify and analyse mRNA of disease-related genes associated with models of small-cell lung cancer and prostate cancer, and to produce a single-stranded DNA molecule modelled after an anticancer drug.

  13. 15. Interior view of unoccupied controlled computer room looking at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Interior view of unoccupied controlled computer room looking at exit door and office; northwest corner of unoccupied portion; view to south. - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Mess & Administration Building, 2279 Risner Drive, Blackhawk, Meade County, SD

  14. Integrated evolutionary computation neural network quality controller for automated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Patro, S.; Kolarik, W.J.

    1999-06-01

    With increasing competition in the global market, more and more stringent quality standards and specifications are being demands at lower costs. Manufacturing applications of computing power are becoming more common. The application of neural networks to identification and control of dynamic processes has been discussed. The limitations of using neural networks for control purposes has been pointed out and a different technique, evolutionary computation, has been discussed. The results of identifying and controlling an unstable, dynamic process using evolutionary computation methods has been presented. A framework for an integrated system, using both neural networks and evolutionary computation, has been proposed to identify the process and then control the product quality, in a dynamic, multivariable system, in real-time.

  15. Oxidation of GaSb(100) and its control studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mäkelä, J. E-mail: pekka.laukkanen@utu.fi Tuominen, M.; Yasir, M.; Dahl, J.; Punkkinen, M. P. J.; Laukkanen, P. E-mail: pekka.laukkanen@utu.fi Kokko, K.; Kuzmin, M.; Wallace, R. M. E-mail: pekka.laukkanen@utu.fi

    2015-08-10

    Atomic-scale knowledge and control of oxidation of GaSb(100), which is a potential interface for energy-efficient transistors, are still incomplete, largely due to an amorphous structure of GaSb(100) oxides. We elucidate these issues with scanning-tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The unveiled oxidation-induced building blocks cause defect states above Fermi level around the conduction-band edge. By interconnecting the results to previous photoemission findings, we suggest that the oxidation starts with substituting second-layer Sb sites by oxygen. Adding small amount of indium on GaSb(100), resulting in a (4 × 2)-In reconstruction, before oxidation produces a previously unreported, crystalline oxidized layer of (1 × 3)-O free of gap states.

  16. Oxidation of GaSb(100) and its control studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkelä, J.; Tuominen, M.; Yasir, M.; Kuzmin, M.; Dahl, J.; Punkkinen, M. P. J.; Laukkanen, P.; Kokko, K.; Wallace, R. M.

    2015-08-01

    Atomic-scale knowledge and control of oxidation of GaSb(100), which is a potential interface for energy-efficient transistors, are still incomplete, largely due to an amorphous structure of GaSb(100) oxides. We elucidate these issues with scanning-tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The unveiled oxidation-induced building blocks cause defect states above Fermi level around the conduction-band edge. By interconnecting the results to previous photoemission findings, we suggest that the oxidation starts with substituting second-layer Sb sites by oxygen. Adding small amount of indium on GaSb(100), resulting in a (4 × 2)-In reconstruction, before oxidation produces a previously unreported, crystalline oxidized layer of (1 × 3)-O free of gap states.

  17. Ku-Band Traveling Wave Slot Array Using Simple Scanning Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Host, Nicholas K.; Chen, Chi-Chih; Volakis, John L.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a feeding concept aimed at simplifying the backend (phase shifters) of traditional phased arrays. As an alternative to traditional phased arrays, we employ a traveling wave array (TWA) using a single feedline whose propagation constant is controlled via a single, small mechanical movement without a need for phase shifters to enable scanning. Specifically, a dielectric plunger is positioned within a parallel plate waveguide (PPW) transmission line (TL) that feeds the TWA. By adjusting the position of the dielectric plunger within the PPW feeding the TWA, beam steering is achieved. A 20 element array is designed at 13GHz shown to give stable realized gain across the angular range of -25 deg. less than or equal to theta less than or equal to 25 deg. A proof of concept array is fabricated and measured to demonstrate and validate the concept's operation.

  18. Ku-Band Traveling Wave Slot Array Using Simple Scanning Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Host, Nicholas K.; Chen, Chi-Chih; Volakis, John L.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    This poster introduces a feeding concept aimed at simplifying the backend (phase shifters) of traditional phased arrays. As an alternative to traditional phased arrays, we employ a traveling wave array (TWA) using a single feedline whose propagation constant is controlled via a single, small mechanical movement without a need for phase shifters to enable scanning. Specifically, a dielectric plunger is positioned within a parallel plate waveguide (PPW) transmission line (TL) that feeds the TWA. By adjusting the position of the dielectric plunger within the PPW feeding the TWA, beam steering is achieved. A 20-element array is designed at 13 gigaherz shown to give stable realized gain across the angular range of minus 25 degrees less than or equal to theta and less than or equal to 25 degrees. A proof of concept array is fabricated and measured to demonstrate and validate the concept's operation.

  19. SU-E-T-314: The Application of Cloud Computing in Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z; Gao, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulation plays an important role for proton Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS) technique. However, MC simulation demands high computing power and is limited to few large proton centers that can afford a computer cluster. We study the feasibility of utilizing cloud computing in the MC simulation of PBS beams. Methods: A GATE/GEANT4 based MC simulation software was installed on a commercial cloud computing virtual machine (Linux 64-bits, Amazon EC2). Single spot Integral Depth Dose (IDD) curves and in-air transverse profiles were used to tune the source parameters to simulate an IBA machine. With the use of StarCluster software developed at MIT, a Linux cluster with 2–100 nodes can be conveniently launched in the cloud. A proton PBS plan was then exported to the cloud where the MC simulation was run. Results: The simulated PBS plan has a field size of 10×10cm{sup 2}, 20cm range, 10cm modulation, and contains over 10,000 beam spots. EC2 instance type m1.medium was selected considering the CPU/memory requirement and 40 instances were used to form a Linux cluster. To minimize cost, master node was created with on-demand instance and worker nodes were created with spot-instance. The hourly cost for the 40-node cluster was $0.63 and the projected cost for a 100-node cluster was $1.41. Ten million events were simulated to plot PDD and profile, with each job containing 500k events. The simulation completed within 1 hour and an overall statistical uncertainty of < 2% was achieved. Good agreement between MC simulation and measurement was observed. Conclusion: Cloud computing is a cost-effective and easy to maintain platform to run proton PBS MC simulation. When proton MC packages such as GATE and TOPAS are combined with cloud computing, it will greatly facilitate the pursuing of PBS MC studies, especially for newly established proton centers or individual researchers.

  20. An Annotated and Cross-Referenced Bibliography on Computer Security and Access Control in Computer Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergart, Jeffrey G.; And Others

    This paper represents a careful study of published works on computer security and access control in computer systems. The study includes a selective annotated bibliography of some eighty-five important published results in the field and, based on these papers, analyzes the state of the art. In annotating these works, the authors try to be…

  1. Remote-Controlled Scanning and Automated Confocal Microscopy Through-Focusing using a Modified HRT Rostock Corneal Module

    PubMed Central

    Petroll, W. Matthew; Cavanagh, H. Dwight

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To modify the HRT-II Confocal Microscope with Rostock Corneal Module (HRT-RCM) to allow computerized control of the focal plane position (depth) within the cornea. Methods A threaded housing on the HRT-RCM microscope is normally rotated by hand to change the focal plane position within the cornea. This piece was removed to allow the front housing of the microscope to move freely. A linear actuator (Oriel Encoder Mike) was then attached to the side of the microscope, and coupled to a drive shaft which was connected to the front housing. The actuator was connected to an Oriel 18011 Encoder Mike controller, which was interfaced to a PC. Software was developed to allow control and display of the focal plane position using this PC, while image acquisition software was run on the HRT-RCM PC. The instrument was tested on one human volunteer. Results The modified instrument successfully allowed computer-controlled focusing throughout the entire cornea. Through-focus sequences could be collected on-line, and analyzed and reconstructed 3-dimensionally off-line using modified CMTF software. Conclusions Although this is only a prototype instrument, it significantly improves the examination proceedure by allowing completely “hands-free” operation of the HRT-RCM microscope. The data also demonstrates the feasibility of performing quantitative z-axis scans through the full thickness of the cornea with the HRT-RCM. Given the higher constrast images and improved optical sectioning of the HRT-RCM as compared to other instruments, these capabilities could have widespread application. PMID:19901584

  2. Numerical computer peripheral interactive device with manual controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zygielbaum, A. I.; Brokl, S. S. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A computer peripheral device is disclosed which includes a joystick whose displacement from a counter position along two axes X and Y in either a plus (+) or a minus (-) direction is sensed. The displacement magnitude in either direction controls the rate of clock pulses provided by a variable frequency clock. The clock pulses from the two clocks are accumulated in two separate counters, whose contents are displayed. The contents of the counters are suppliable to a computer to update the contents of specific cells which define the position of a cursor on a display which is under computer control.

  3. Shared resource control between human and computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendler, James; Wilson, Reid

    1989-01-01

    The advantages of an AI system of actively monitoring human control of a shared resource (such as a telerobotic manipulator) are presented. A system is described in which a simple AI planning program gains efficiency by monitoring human actions and recognizing when the actions cause a change in the system's assumed state of the world. This enables the planner to recognize when an interaction occurs between human actions and system goals, and allows maintenance of an up-to-date knowledge of the state of the world and thus informs the operator when human action would undo a goal achieved by the system, when an action would render a system goal unachievable, and efficiently replans the establishment of goals after human intervention.

  4. Safety Metrics for Human-Computer Controlled Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveson, Nancy G; Hatanaka, Iwao

    2000-01-01

    The rapid growth of computer technology and innovation has played a significant role in the rise of computer automation of human tasks in modem production systems across all industries. Although the rationale for automation has been to eliminate "human error" or to relieve humans from manual repetitive tasks, various computer-related hazards and accidents have emerged as a direct result of increased system complexity attributed to computer automation. The risk assessment techniques utilized for electromechanical systems are not suitable for today's software-intensive systems or complex human-computer controlled systems.This thesis will propose a new systemic model-based framework for analyzing risk in safety-critical systems where both computers and humans are controlling safety-critical functions. A new systems accident model will be developed based upon modem systems theory and human cognitive processes to better characterize system accidents, the role of human operators, and the influence of software in its direct control of significant system functions Better risk assessments will then be achievable through the application of this new framework to complex human-computer controlled systems.

  5. Parallel computation of geometry control in adaptive truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesh, A. V.; Utku, S.; Wada, B. K.

    1992-01-01

    The fast computation of geometry control in adaptive truss structures involves two distinct parts: the efficient integration of the inverse kinematic differential equations that govern the geometry control and the fast computation of the Jacobian, which appears on the right-hand-side of the inverse kinematic equations. This paper present an efficient parallel implementation of the Jacobian computation on an MIMD machine. Large speedup from the parallel implementation is obtained, which reduces the Jacobian computation to an O(M-squared/n) procedure on an n-processor machine, where M is the number of members in the adaptive truss. The parallel algorithm given here is a good candidate for on-line geometry control of adaptive structures using attached processors.

  6. 6 Mcps photon-counting X-ray computed tomography system using a 25 mm/s-scan linear LSO-MPPC detector and its application to gadolinium imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Abudurexiti, Abulajiang; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya; Sugimura, Shigeaki; Endo, Haruyuki; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2011-12-01

    6 Mcps photon counting was carried out using a detector consisting of a 1.0 mm-thick LSO [Lu 2(SiO 4)O] single-crystal scintillator and an MPPC (multipixel photon counter) module in an X-ray computed tomography (CT) system. The maximum count rate was 6 Mcps (mega counts per second) at a tube voltage of 100 kV and a tube current of 0.91 mA. Next, a photon-counting X-ray CT system consists of an X-ray generator, a turntable, a scan stage, a two-stage controller, the LSO-MPPC detector, a counter card (CC), and a personal computer (PC). Tomography is accomplished by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object, and projection curves of the object are obtained by the linear scan with a scan velocity of 25 mm/s. The pulses of the event signal from the module are counted by the CC in conjunction with the PC. The exposure time for obtaining a tomogram was 600 s at a scan step of 0.5 mm and a rotation step of 1.0°, and photon-counting CT was accomplished using gadolinium-based contrast media.

  7. Computer simulation of vasectomy for wolf control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haight, R.G.; Mech, L.D.

    1997-01-01

    Recovering gray wolf (Canis lupus) populations in the Lake Superior region of the United States are prompting state management agencies to consider strategies to control population growth. In addition to wolf removal, vasectomy has been proposed. To predict the population effects of different sterilization and removal strategies, we developed a simulation model of wolf dynamics using simple rules for demography and dispersal. Simulations suggested that the effects of vasectomy and removal in a disjunct population depend largely on the degree of annual immigration. With low immigration, periodic sterilization reduced pup production and resulted in lower rates of territory recolonization. Consequently, average pack size, number of packs, and population size were significantly less than those for an untreated population. Periodically removing a proportion of the population produced roughly the same trends as did sterilization; however, more than twice as many wolves had to be removed than sterilized. With high immigration, periodic sterilization reduced pup production but not territory recolonization and produced only moderate reductions in population size relative to an untreated population. Similar reductions in population size were obtained by periodically removing large numbers of wolves. Our analysis does not address the possible effects of vasectomy on larger wolf populations, but it suggests that the subject should be considered through modeling or field testing.

  8. The model of dynamics and control of modified optical scanning seeker in anti-aircraft rocket missile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gapinski, Daniel; Koruba, Zbigniew; Krzysztofik, Izabela

    2014-04-01

    The paper presents the concept of a modified optical scanning seeker. Programmed and tracking controls have been developed with the simultaneous influence of external interferences from the direction of self-guiding rocket missile. The numerical analysis for the proposed scanning seeker has been conducted. It appears from the conducted research that the seeker maintains accurately the set direction in space despite the occurrence of large angular accelerations of the missile. Moreover, the control of the seeker's axis is done with sufficient accuracy for self-guidance with the use of small control moments.

  9. Probing the structural and energetic basis of kinesin-microtubule binding using computational alanine-scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Zheng, Wenjun

    2011-10-11

    Kinesin-microtubule (MT) binding plays a critical role in facilitating and regulating the motor function of kinesins. To obtain a detailed structural and energetic picture of kinesin-MT binding, we performed large-scale computational alanine-scanning mutagenesis based on long-time molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the kinesin-MT complex in both ADP and ATP states. First, we built three all-atom kinesin-MT models: human conventional kinesin bound to ADP and mouse KIF1A bound to ADP and ATP. Then, we performed 30 ns MD simulations followed by kinesin-MT binding free energy calculations for both the wild type and mutants obtained after substitution of each charged residue of kinesin with alanine. We found that the kinesin-MT binding free energy is dominated by van der Waals interactions and further enhanced by electrostatic interactions. The calculated mutational changes in kinesin-MT binding free energy are in excellent agreement with results of an experimental alanine-scanning study with a root-mean-square error of ~0.32 kcal/mol [Woehlke, G., et al. (1997) Cell 90, 207-216]. We identified a set of important charged residues involved in the tuning of kinesin-MT binding, which are clustered on several secondary structural elements of kinesin (including well-studied loops L7, L8, L11, and L12, helices α4, α5, and α6, and less-explored loop L2). In particular, we found several key residues that make different contributions to kinesin-MT binding in ADP and ATP states. The mutations of these residues are predicted to fine-tune the motility of kinesin by modulating the conformational transition between the ADP state and the ATP state of kinesin. PMID:21910419

  10. Determination of Internal Target Volume From a Single Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Scan in Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Guoping; Chang Tingting; Pan Tinsu; Clark, John W.; Mawlawi, Osama R.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The use of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) to determine the tumor internal target volume (ITV) is usually characterized by high patient radiation exposure. The objective of this study was to propose and evaluate an approach that relies on a single static positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan to determine the ITV, thereby eliminating the need for 4D-CT and thus reduce patient radiation dose. Methods and Materials: The proposed approach is based on the concept that the observed PET image is the result of a joint convolution of an ideal PET image (free from motion and partial volume effect) with a motion-blurring kernel (MBK) and partial volume effect. In this regard, the MBK and tumor ITV are then estimated from the deconvolution of this joint model. To test this technique, phantom and patient studies were performed using different sphere/tumor sizes and motion trajectories. In all studies, a 4D-CT and a PET/CT image of the sphere/tumor were acquired. The ITV from the proposed technique was then compared to the maximum intensity projection (MIP) volume of the 4D-CT images. A Dice coefficient of the two volumes was calculated to represent the similarity between the two ITVs. Results: The average ITVs of the proposed technique were 97.2% {+-} 0.3% and 81.0% {+-} 16.7% similar to the MIP volume in the phantom and patient studies, respectively. The average dice coefficients were 0.87 {+-} 0.05 and 0.73 {+-} 0.16, respectively, for the two studies. Conclusion: Using the proposed approach, a single static PET/CT scan has the potential to replace a 4D-CT to determine the tumor ITV. This approach has the added advantage of reducing patient radiation exposure and determining the tumor MBK compared to 4D-CT/MIP-CT.

  11. Comparisons of Derived Metrics from Computed Tomography (CT) Scanned Images of Fluvial Sediment from Gravel-Bed Flume Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voepel, Hal; Ahmed, Sharif; Hodge, Rebecca; Leyland, Julian; Sear, David

    2016-04-01

    Uncertainty in bedload estimates for gravel bed rivers is largely driven by our inability to characterize arrangement, orientation and resultant forces of fluvial sediment in river beds. Water working of grains leads to structural differences between areas of the bed through particle sorting, packing, imbrication, mortaring and degree of bed armoring. In this study, non-destructive, micro-focus X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging in 3D is used to visualize, quantify and assess the internal geometry of sections of a flume bed that have been extracted keeping their fabric intact. Flume experiments were conducted at 1:1 scaling of our prototype river. From the volume, center of mass, points of contact, and protrusion of individual grains derived from 3D scan data we estimate 3D static force properties at the grain-scale such as pivoting angles, buoyancy and gravity forces, and local grain exposure. Here metrics are derived for images from two flume experiments: one with a bed of coarse grains (>4mm) and the other where sand and clay were incorporated into the coarse flume bed. In addition to deriving force networks, comparison of metrics such as critical shear stress, pivot angles, grain distributions, principle axis orientation, and pore space over depth are made. This is the first time bed stability has been studied in 3D using CT scanned images of sediment from the bed surface to depths well into the subsurface. The derived metrics, inter-granular relationships and characterization of bed structures will lead to improved bedload estimates with reduced uncertainty, as well as improved understanding of relationships between sediment structure, grain size distribution and channel topography.

  12. Effect of various environments and computed tomography scanning parameters on renal volume measurements in vitro: A phantom study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wangyan; Zhu, Yinsu; Tang, Lijun; Zhu, Xiaomei; Xu, Yi; Yang, Guanyu

    2016-01-01

    Kidney volume is an important parameter in clinical practice, and accurate assessment of kidney volume is vital. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of various environments, tube voltages, tube currents and slice thicknesses on the accuracy of a novel segmentation software in determining renal volume on computed tomography (CT) images. The volumes of potatoes and porcine kidneys were measured on CT images and compared with the actual volumes, which were determined by a water displacement method. CT scans were performed under various situations, including different environments (air or oil); tube voltages/tube currents (80 kVp/200 mAs, 120 kVp/200 mAs, 120 kVp/100 mAs); and reconstructed slice thicknesses (0.75 or 1.5 mm). Percentage errors (PEs) relative to the reference standards were calculated. In addition, attenuation and image noise under different CT scanning parameters were compared. Student's t-test was also used to analyze the effect of various conditions on image quality and volume measurements. The results indicated that the volumes measured in oil were closer to the actual volumes (P<0.05). Furthermore, attenuation and image noise significantly increased when using a tube voltage of 80 kVp, while the mean PEs between 120 and 80 kVp voltages were not significantly different. The mean PEs were greater when using a tube current of 100 mAs compared with a current of 200 mAs (P<0.05). In addition, the volumes measured on 1.5 mm slice thickness were closer to the actual volumes (P<0.05). In conclusion, different environments, tube currents and slice thicknesses may affect the volume measurements. In the present study, the most accurate volume measurements were obtained at 120 kVp/200 mAs and a slice thickness of 1.5 mm. PMID:27446271

  13. Design and Implementation of a Mechanical Control System for the Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, William

    2011-01-01

    The Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder (SMLS) will use technological improvements in low noise mixers to provide precise data on the Earth's atmospheric composition with high spatial resolution. This project focuses on the design and implementation of a real time control system needed for airborne engineering tests of the SMLS. The system must coordinate the actuation of optical components using four motors with encoder readback, while collecting synchronized telemetric data from a GPS receiver and 3-axis gyrometric system. A graphical user interface for testing the control system was also designed using Python. Although the system could have been implemented with a FPGA-based setup, we chose to use a low cost processor development kit manufactured by XMOS. The XMOS architecture allows parallel execution of multiple tasks on separate threads-making it ideal for this application and is easily programmed using XC (a subset of C). The necessary communication interfaces were implemented in software, including Ethernet, with significant cost and time reduction compared to an FPGA-based approach. For these reasons, the XMOS technology is an attractive, cost effective, alternative to FPGA-based technologies for this design and similar rapid prototyping projects.

  14. Virtual reality visual feedback for hand-controlled scanning probe microscopy manipulation of single molecules.

    PubMed

    Leinen, Philipp; Green, Matthew F B; Esat, Taner; Wagner, Christian; Tautz, F Stefan; Temirov, Ruslan

    2015-01-01

    Controlled manipulation of single molecules is an important step towards the fabrication of single molecule devices and nanoscale molecular machines. Currently, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is the only technique that facilitates direct imaging and manipulations of nanometer-sized molecular compounds on surfaces. The technique of hand-controlled manipulation (HCM) introduced recently in Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1926-1932 simplifies the identification of successful manipulation protocols in situations when the interaction pattern of the manipulated molecule with its environment is not fully known. Here we present a further technical development that substantially improves the effectiveness of HCM. By adding Oculus Rift virtual reality goggles to our HCM set-up we provide the experimentalist with 3D visual feedback that displays the currently executed trajectory and the position of the SPM tip during manipulation in real time, while simultaneously plotting the experimentally measured frequency shift (Δf) of the non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) tuning fork sensor as well as the magnitude of the electric current (I) flowing between the tip and the surface. The advantages of the set-up are demonstrated by applying it to the model problem of the extraction of an individual PTCDA molecule from its hydrogen-bonded monolayer grown on Ag(111) surface.

  15. Virtual reality visual feedback for hand-controlled scanning probe microscopy manipulation of single molecules

    PubMed Central

    Leinen, Philipp; Green, Matthew F B; Esat, Taner; Wagner, Christian; Tautz, F Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Controlled manipulation of single molecules is an important step towards the fabrication of single molecule devices and nanoscale molecular machines. Currently, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is the only technique that facilitates direct imaging and manipulations of nanometer-sized molecular compounds on surfaces. The technique of hand-controlled manipulation (HCM) introduced recently in Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1926–1932 simplifies the identification of successful manipulation protocols in situations when the interaction pattern of the manipulated molecule with its environment is not fully known. Here we present a further technical development that substantially improves the effectiveness of HCM. By adding Oculus Rift virtual reality goggles to our HCM set-up we provide the experimentalist with 3D visual feedback that displays the currently executed trajectory and the position of the SPM tip during manipulation in real time, while simultaneously plotting the experimentally measured frequency shift (Δf) of the non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) tuning fork sensor as well as the magnitude of the electric current (I) flowing between the tip and the surface. The advantages of the set-up are demonstrated by applying it to the model problem of the extraction of an individual PTCDA molecule from its hydrogen-bonded monolayer grown on Ag(111) surface. PMID:26665087

  16. Virtual reality visual feedback for hand-controlled scanning probe microscopy manipulation of single molecules.

    PubMed

    Leinen, Philipp; Green, Matthew F B; Esat, Taner; Wagner, Christian; Tautz, F Stefan; Temirov, Ruslan

    2015-01-01

    Controlled manipulation of single molecules is an important step towards the fabrication of single molecule devices and nanoscale molecular machines. Currently, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is the only technique that facilitates direct imaging and manipulations of nanometer-sized molecular compounds on surfaces. The technique of hand-controlled manipulation (HCM) introduced recently in Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1926-1932 simplifies the identification of successful manipulation protocols in situations when the interaction pattern of the manipulated molecule with its environment is not fully known. Here we present a further technical development that substantially improves the effectiveness of HCM. By adding Oculus Rift virtual reality goggles to our HCM set-up we provide the experimentalist with 3D visual feedback that displays the currently executed trajectory and the position of the SPM tip during manipulation in real time, while simultaneously plotting the experimentally measured frequency shift (Δf) of the non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) tuning fork sensor as well as the magnitude of the electric current (I) flowing between the tip and the surface. The advantages of the set-up are demonstrated by applying it to the model problem of the extraction of an individual PTCDA molecule from its hydrogen-bonded monolayer grown on Ag(111) surface. PMID:26665087

  17. A computer simulation approach to measurement of human control strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J.; Davenport, E. L.; Engler, H. F.; Sears, W. E., III

    1982-01-01

    Human control strategy is measured through use of a psychologically-based computer simulation which reflects a broader theory of control behavior. The simulation is called the human operator performance emulator, or HOPE. HOPE was designed to emulate control learning in a one-dimensional preview tracking task and to measure control strategy in that setting. When given a numerical representation of a track and information about current position in relation to that track, HOPE generates positions for a stick controlling the cursor to be moved along the track. In other words, HOPE generates control stick behavior corresponding to that which might be used by a person learning preview tracking.

  18. Control Law Design in a Computational Aeroelasticity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, Jerry R.; Robertshaw, Harry H.; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2003-01-01

    A methodology for designing active control laws in a computational aeroelasticity environment is given. The methodology involves employing a systems identification technique to develop an explicit state-space model for control law design from the output of a computational aeroelasticity code. The particular computational aeroelasticity code employed in this paper solves the transonic small disturbance aerodynamic equation using a time-accurate, finite-difference scheme. Linear structural dynamics equations are integrated simultaneously with the computational fluid dynamics equations to determine the time responses of the structure. These structural responses are employed as the input to a modern systems identification technique that determines the Markov parameters of an "equivalent linear system". The Eigensystem Realization Algorithm is then employed to develop an explicit state-space model of the equivalent linear system. The Linear Quadratic Guassian control law design technique is employed to design a control law. The computational aeroelasticity code is modified to accept control laws and perform closed-loop simulations. Flutter control of a rectangular wing model is chosen to demonstrate the methodology. Various cases are used to illustrate the usefulness of the methodology as the nonlinearity of the aeroelastic system is increased through increased angle-of-attack changes.

  19. Integration of 3D anatomical data obtained by CT imaging and 3D optical scanning for computer aided implant surgery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A precise placement of dental implants is a crucial step to optimize both prosthetic aspects and functional constraints. In this context, the use of virtual guiding systems has been recognized as a fundamental tool to control the ideal implant position. In particular, complex periodontal surgeries can be performed using preoperative planning based on CT data. The critical point of the procedure relies on the lack of accuracy in transferring CT planning information to surgical field through custom-made stereo-lithographic surgical guides. Methods In this work, a novel methodology is proposed for monitoring loss of accuracy in transferring CT dental information into periodontal surgical field. The methodology is based on integrating 3D data of anatomical (impression and cast) and preoperative (radiographic template) models, obtained by both CT and optical scanning processes. Results A clinical case, relative to a fully edentulous jaw patient, has been used as test case to assess the accuracy of the various steps concurring in manufacturing surgical guides. In particular, a surgical guide has been designed to place implants in the bone structure of the patient. The analysis of the results has allowed the clinician to monitor all the errors, which have been occurring step by step manufacturing the physical templates. Conclusions The use of an optical scanner, which has a higher resolution and accuracy than CT scanning, has demonstrated to be a valid support to control the precision of the various physical models adopted and to point out possible error sources. A case study regarding a fully edentulous patient has confirmed the feasibility of the proposed methodology. PMID:21338504

  20. Toward reliable characterization of functional homogeneity in the human brain: preprocessing, scan duration, imaging resolution and computational space.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Xi-Nian; Xu, Ting; Jiang, Lili; Yang, Zhi; Cao, Xiao-Yan; He, Yong; Zang, Yu-Feng; Castellanos, F Xavier; Milham, Michael P

    2013-01-15

    While researchers have extensively characterized functional connectivity between brain regions, the characterization of functional homogeneity within a region of the brain connectome is in early stages of development. Several functional homogeneity measures were proposed previously, among which regional homogeneity (ReHo) was most widely used as a measure to characterize functional homogeneity of resting state fMRI (R-fMRI) signals within a small region (Zang et al., 2004). Despite a burgeoning literature on ReHo in the field of neuroimaging brain disorders, its test-retest (TRT) reliability remains unestablished. Using two sets of public R-fMRI TRT data, we systematically evaluated the ReHo's TRT reliability and further investigated the various factors influencing its reliability and found: 1) nuisance (head motion, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid) correction of R-fMRI time series can significantly improve the TRT reliability of ReHo while additional removal of global brain signal reduces its reliability, 2) spatial smoothing of R-fMRI time series artificially enhances ReHo intensity and influences its reliability, 3) surface-based R-fMRI computation largely improves the TRT reliability of ReHo, 4) a scan duration of 5 min can achieve reliable estimates of ReHo, and 5) fast sampling rates of R-fMRI dramatically increase the reliability of ReHo. Inspired by these findings and seeking a highly reliable approach to exploratory analysis of the human functional connectome, we established an R-fMRI pipeline to conduct ReHo computations in both 3-dimensions (volume) and 2-dimensions (surface). PMID:23085497

  1. Toward reliable characterization of functional homogeneity in the human brain: Preprocessing, scan duration, imaging resolution and computational space

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Xi-Nian; Xu, Ting; Jiang, Lili; Yang, Zhi; Cao, Xiao-Yan; He, Yong; Zang, Yu-Feng; Castellanos, F. Xavier; Milham, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    While researchers have extensively characterized functional connectivity between brain regions, the characterization of functional homogeneity within a region of the brain connectome is in early stages of development. Several functional homogeneity measures were proposed previously, among which regional homogeneity (ReHo) was most widely used as a measure to characterize functional homogeneity of resting state fMRI (R-fMRI) signals within a small region (Zang et al., 2004). Despite a burgeoning literature on ReHo in the field of neuroimaging brain disorders, its test–retest (TRT) reliability remains unestablished. Using two sets of public R-fMRI TRT data, we systematically evaluated the ReHo’s TRT reliability and further investigated the various factors influencing its reliability and found: 1) nuisance (head motion, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid) correction of R-fMRI time series can significantly improve the TRT reliability of ReHo while additional removal of global brain signal reduces its reliability, 2) spatial smoothing of R-fMRI time series artificially enhances ReHo intensity and influences its reliability, 3) surface-based R-fMRI computation largely improves the TRT reliability of ReHo, 4) a scan duration of 5 min can achieve reliable estimates of ReHo, and 5) fast sampling rates of R-fMRI dramatically increase the reliability of ReHo. Inspired by these findings and seeking a highly reliable approach to exploratory analysis of the human functional connectome, we established an R-fMRI pipeline to conduct ReHo computations in both 3-dimensions (volume) and 2-dimensions (surface). PMID:23085497

  2. Arranging computer architectures to create higher-performance controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacklin, Stephen A.

    1988-01-01

    Techniques for integrating microprocessors, array processors, and other intelligent devices in control systems are reviewed, with an emphasis on the (re)arrangement of components to form distributed or parallel processing systems. Consideration is given to the selection of the host microprocessor, increasing the power and/or memory capacity of the host, multitasking software for the host, array processors to reduce computation time, the allocation of real-time and non-real-time events to different computer subsystems, intelligent devices to share the computational burden for real-time events, and intelligent interfaces to increase communication speeds. The case of a helicopter vibration-suppression and stabilization controller is analyzed as an example, and significant improvements in computation and throughput rates are demonstrated.

  3. Restricted diversity of antigen binding residues of antibodies revealed by computational alanine scanning of 227 antibody-antigen complexes.

    PubMed

    Robin, Gautier; Sato, Yoshiteru; Desplancq, Dominique; Rochel, Natacha; Weiss, Etienne; Martineau, Pierre

    2014-11-11

    Antibody molecules are able to recognize any antigen with high affinity and specificity. To get insight into the molecular diversity at the source of this functional diversity, we compiled and analyzed a non-redundant aligned collection of 227 structures of antibody-antigen complexes. Free energy of binding of all the residue side chains was quantified by computational alanine scanning, allowing the first large-scale quantitative description of antibody paratopes. This demonstrated that as few as 8 residues among 30 key positions are sufficient to explain 80% of the binding free energy in most complexes. At these positions, the residue distribution is not only different from that of other surface residues but also dependent on the role played by the side chain in the interaction, residues participating in the binding energy being mainly aromatic residues, and Gly or Ser otherwise. To question the generality of these binding characteristics, we isolated an antibody fragment by phage display using a biased synthetic repertoire with only two diversified complementarity-determining regions and solved its structure in complex with its antigen. Despite this restricted diversity, the structure demonstrated that all complementarity-determining regions were involved in the interaction with the antigen and that the rules derived from the natural antibody repertoire apply to this synthetic binder, thus demonstrating the robustness and universality of our results.

  4. Open Sinus Lift Surgery and the Importance of Preoperative Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Scan: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2015-01-01

    Open sinus lift surgery is a form of pre-prosthetic surgery for increasing the quality and quantity of bone in the posterior region of the maxilla. Pre-operative assessment of the maxillary sinus is essential for the success of this surgery. PubMed search was carried out in English language literature for open sinus lift surgery and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The results focused on anatomic variants, vascular anatomy, complications, osteotomy/ostectomy window dimensions and thickness of the Schneiderian Membrane. 59 articles were included in this review. Features other than the height and the width of the residual alveolar ridge that should be evaluated in preoperative CBCT scan include the thickness of the lateral maxillary sinus wall, the presence of the alveolar antral artery and its diameter, the maxillary sinus floor width and angulation, irregularity of sinus floor, intimate relation of Schneiderian membrane with the roots of the adjacent teeth, sinus septum, and the quality of subantral bone. Other conditions that occasionally may be observed in special situations are also explained. More than ten parameters should be checked in evaluating CBCT images of paranasal sinuses other than the width and the length of the residual ridge in the posterior region of the maxilla. Each of them may have a significant impact on the results of the open sinus lift surgery. PMID:26435632

  5. Monte-Carlo scatter correction for cone-beam computed tomography with limited scan field-of-view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, Matthias; Sattel, Timo; Hohmann, Steffen; Wiegert, Jens

    2008-03-01

    In flat detector cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), scattered radiation is a major source of image degradation, making accurate a posteriori scatter correction inevitable. A potential solution to this problem is provided by computerized scatter correction based on Monte-Carlo simulations. Using this technique, the detected distributions of X-ray scatter are estimated for various viewing directions using Monte-Carlo simulations of an intermediate reconstruction. However, as a major drawback, for standard CBCT geometries and with standard size flat detectors such as mounted on interventional C-arms, the scan field of view is too small to accommodate the human body without lateral truncations, and thus this technique cannot be readily applied. In this work, we present a novel method for constructing a model of the object in a laterally and possibly also axially extended field of view, which enables meaningful application of Monte-Carlo based scatter correction even in case of heavy truncations. Evaluation is based on simulations of a clinical CT data set of a human abdomen, which strongly exceeds the field of view of the simulated C-arm based CBCT imaging geometry. By using the proposed methodology, almost complete removal of scatter-caused inhomogeneities is demonstrated in reconstructed images.

  6. Segmentation of large periapical lesions toward dental computer-aided diagnosis in cone-beam CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rysavy, Steven; Flores, Arturo; Enciso, Reyes; Okada, Kazunori

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents an experimental study for assessing the applicability of general-purpose 3D segmentation algorithms for analyzing dental periapical lesions in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. In the field of Endodontics, clinical studies have been unable to determine if a periapical granuloma can heal with non-surgical methods. Addressing this issue, Simon et al. recently proposed a diagnostic technique which non-invasively classifies target lesions using CBCT. Manual segmentation exploited in their study, however, is too time consuming and unreliable for real world adoption. On the other hand, many technically advanced algorithms have been proposed to address segmentation problems in various biomedical and non-biomedical contexts, but they have not yet been applied to the field of dentistry. Presented in this paper is a novel application of such segmentation algorithms to the clinically-significant dental problem. This study evaluates three state-of-the-art graph-based algorithms: a normalized cut algorithm based on a generalized eigen-value problem, a graph cut algorithm implementing energy minimization techniques, and a random walks algorithm derived from discrete electrical potential theory. In this paper, we extend the original 2D formulation of the above algorithms to segment 3D images directly and apply the resulting algorithms to the dental CBCT images. We experimentally evaluate quality of the segmentation results for 3D CBCT images, as well as their 2D cross sections. The benefits and pitfalls of each algorithm are highlighted.

  7. The analysis of control trajectories using symbolic and database computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Robert

    1995-01-01

    This final report comprises the formal semi-annual status reports for this grant for the periods June 30-December 31, 1993, January 1-June 30, 1994, and June 1-December 31, 1994. The research supported by this grant is broadly concerned with the symbolic computation, mixed numeric-symbolic computation, and database computation of trajectories of dynamical systems, especially control systems. A review of work during the report period covers: trajectories and approximating series, the Cayley algebra of trees, actions of differential operators, geometrically stable integration algorithms, hybrid systems, trajectory stores, PTool, and other activities. A list of publications written during the report period is attached.

  8. Emotor control: computations underlying bodily resource allocation, emotions, and confidence

    PubMed Central

    Kepecs, Adam; Mensh, Brett D.

    2015-01-01

    Emotional processes are central to behavior, yet their deeply subjective nature has been a challenge for neuroscientific study as well as for psychiatric diagnosis. Here we explore the relationships between subjective feelings and their underlying brain circuits from a computational perspective. We apply recent insights from systems neuroscience—approaching subjective behavior as the result of mental computations instantiated in the brain—to the study of emotions. We develop the hypothesis that emotions are the product of neural computations whose motor role is to reallocate bodily resources mostly gated by smooth muscles. This “emotor” control system is analagous to the more familiar motor control computations that coordinate skeletal muscle movements. To illustrate this framework, we review recent research on “confidence.” Although familiar as a feeling, confidence is also an objective statistical quantity: an estimate of the probability that a hypothesis is correct. This model-based approach helped reveal the neural basis of decision confidence in mammals and provides a bridge to the subjective feeling of confidence in humans. These results have important implications for psychiatry, since disorders of confidence computations appear to contribute to a number of psychopathologies. More broadly, this computational approach to emotions resonates with the emerging view that psychiatric nosology may be best parameterized in terms of disorders of the cognitive computations underlying complex behavior. PMID:26869840

  9. Emotor control: computations underlying bodily resource allocation, emotions, and confidence.

    PubMed

    Kepecs, Adam; Mensh, Brett D

    2015-12-01

    Emotional processes are central to behavior, yet their deeply subjective nature has been a challenge for neuroscientific study as well as for psychiatric diagnosis. Here we explore the relationships between subjective feelings and their underlying brain circuits from a computational perspective. We apply recent insights from systems neuroscience-approaching subjective behavior as the result of mental computations instantiated in the brain-to the study of emotions. We develop the hypothesis that emotions are the product of neural computations whose motor role is to reallocate bodily resources mostly gated by smooth muscles. This "emotor" control system is analagous to the more familiar motor control computations that coordinate skeletal muscle movements. To illustrate this framework, we review recent research on "confidence." Although familiar as a feeling, confidence is also an objective statistical quantity: an estimate of the probability that a hypothesis is correct. This model-based approach helped reveal the neural basis of decision confidence in mammals and provides a bridge to the subjective feeling of confidence in humans. These results have important implications for psychiatry, since disorders of confidence computations appear to contribute to a number of psychopathologies. More broadly, this computational approach to emotions resonates with the emerging view that psychiatric nosology may be best parameterized in terms of disorders of the cognitive computations underlying complex behavior.

  10. A computer controlled signal preprocessor for laser fringe anemometer applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberle, Lawrence G.

    1987-01-01

    The operation of most commercially available laser fringe anemometer (LFA) counter-processors assumes that adjustments are made to the signal processing independent of the computer used for reducing the data acquired. Not only does the researcher desire a record of these parameters attached to the data acquired, but changes in flow conditions generally require that these settings be changed to improve data quality. Because of this limitation, on-line modification of the data acquisition parameters can be difficult and time consuming. A computer-controlled signal preprocessor has been developed which makes possible this optimization of the photomultiplier signal as a normal part of the data acquisition process. It allows computer control of the filter selection, signal gain, and photo-multiplier voltage. The raw signal from the photomultiplier tube is input to the preprocessor which, under the control of a digital computer, filters the signal and amplifies it to an acceptable level. The counter-processor used at Lewis Research Center generates the particle interarrival times, as well as the time-of-flight of the particle through the probe volume. The signal preprocessor allows computer control of the acquisition of these data.Through the preprocessor, the computer also can control the hand shaking signals for the interface between itself and the counter-processor. Finally, the signal preprocessor splits the pedestal from the signal before filtering, and monitors the photo-multiplier dc current, sends a signal proportional to this current to the computer through an analog to digital converter, and provides an alarm if the current exceeds a predefined maximum. Complete drawings and explanations are provided in the text as well as a sample interface program for use with the data acquisition software.

  11. Detection of urinary stones at reduced radiation exposure: a phantom study comparing computed radiography and a low-dose digital radiography linear slit scanning system

    PubMed Central

    Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Chakraborty, D. P.; Thoeny, Harriet C.; Loupatatzis, Christos; Vock, Peter; Harald, Bonel

    2010-01-01

    Objective In this experimental study we assessed the diagnostic performance of linear slit scanning radiography (LSSR) compared to conventional computed radiography (CR) in the detection of urinary calculi in an anthropomorphic phantom imitating patients weighing approximately 58 to 88 kg. Conclusion Compared to computed radiography, LSSR is superior in the detection of urinary stones and may be used for pretreatment localization and follow-up at a lower patient exposure. PMID:19457787

  12. Deconvolution of complex differential scanning calorimetry profiles for protein transitions under kinetic control.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Núñez, Citlali; Vera-Robles, L Iraís; Arroyo-Maya, Izlia J; Hernández-Arana, Andrés

    2016-09-15

    A frequent outcome in differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments carried out with large proteins is the irreversibility of the observed endothermic effects. In these cases, DSC profiles are analyzed according to methods developed for temperature-induced denaturation transitions occurring under kinetic control. In the one-step irreversible model (native → denatured) the characteristics of the observed single-peaked endotherm depend on the denaturation enthalpy and the temperature dependence of the reaction rate constant, k. Several procedures have been devised to obtain the parameters that determine the variation of k with temperature. Here, we have elaborated on one of these procedures in order to analyze more complex DSC profiles. Synthetic data for a heat capacity curve were generated according to a model with two sequential reactions; the temperature dependence of each of the two rate constants involved was determined, according to the Eyring's equation, by two fixed parameters. It was then shown that our deconvolution procedure, by making use of heat capacity data alone, permits to extract the parameter values that were initially used. Finally, experimental DSC traces showing two and three maxima were analyzed and reproduced with relative success according to two- and four-step sequential models. PMID:27402175

  13. Deconvolution of complex differential scanning calorimetry profiles for protein transitions under kinetic control.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Núñez, Citlali; Vera-Robles, L Iraís; Arroyo-Maya, Izlia J; Hernández-Arana, Andrés

    2016-09-15

    A frequent outcome in differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments carried out with large proteins is the irreversibility of the observed endothermic effects. In these cases, DSC profiles are analyzed according to methods developed for temperature-induced denaturation transitions occurring under kinetic control. In the one-step irreversible model (native → denatured) the characteristics of the observed single-peaked endotherm depend on the denaturation enthalpy and the temperature dependence of the reaction rate constant, k. Several procedures have been devised to obtain the parameters that determine the variation of k with temperature. Here, we have elaborated on one of these procedures in order to analyze more complex DSC profiles. Synthetic data for a heat capacity curve were generated according to a model with two sequential reactions; the temperature dependence of each of the two rate constants involved was determined, according to the Eyring's equation, by two fixed parameters. It was then shown that our deconvolution procedure, by making use of heat capacity data alone, permits to extract the parameter values that were initially used. Finally, experimental DSC traces showing two and three maxima were analyzed and reproduced with relative success according to two- and four-step sequential models.

  14. Computer controlled fluorometer device and method of operating same

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Zbigniew; Falkowski, Paul

    1990-01-01

    A computer controlled fluorometer device and method of operating same, said device being made to include a pump flash source and a probe flash source and one or more sample chambers in combination with a light condenser lens system and associated filters and reflectors and collimators, as well as signal conditioning and monitoring means and a programmable computer means and a software programmable source of background irradiance that is operable according to the method of the invention to rapidly, efficiently and accurately measure photosynthetic activity by precisely monitoring and recording changes in fluorescence yield produced by a controlled series of predetermined cycles of probe and pump flashes from the respective probe and pump sources that are controlled by the computer means.

  15. Computer controlled fluorometer device and method of operating same

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Z.; Falkowski, P.

    1990-07-17

    A computer controlled fluorometer device and method of operating same, said device being made to include a pump flash source and a probe flash source and one or more sample chambers in combination with a light condenser lens system and associated filters and reflectors and collimators, as well as signal conditioning and monitoring means and a programmable computer means and a software programmable source of background irradiance that is operable according to the method of the invention to rapidly, efficiently and accurately measure photosynthetic activity by precisely monitoring and recording changes in fluorescence yield produced by a controlled series of predetermined cycles of probe and pump flashes from the respective probe and pump sources that are controlled by the computer means. 13 figs.

  16. Progress Towards Computational Method for Circulation Control Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.; Rumsey, C. L.; Anders, S. G.

    2005-01-01

    The compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved for circulation control airfoil flows. Numerical solutions are computed with both structured and unstructured grid solvers. Several turbulence models are considered, including the Spalart-Allmaras model with and without curvature corrections, the shear stress transport model of Menter, and the k-enstrophy model. Circulation control flows with jet momentum coefficients of 0.03, 0.10, and 0.226 are considered. Comparisons are made between computed and experimental pressure distributions, velocity profiles, Reynolds stress profiles, and streamline patterns. Including curvature effects yields the closest agreement with the measured data.

  17. Human-computer interface controlled by the lip.

    PubMed

    Jose, Marcelo Archajo; de Deus Lopes, Roseli

    2015-01-01

    Lip control system is an innovative human-computer interface specially designed for people with tetraplegia. This paper presents an evaluation of the lower lip potential to control an input device, according to Fitts' law (ISO/TS 9241-411:2012 standard). The results show that the lower lip throughput is comparable with the thumb throughput using the same input device under the same conditions. These results establish the baseline for future research studies about the lower lip capacity to operate a computer input device. PMID:25561451

  18. Issues in human/computer control of dexterous remote hands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, K.

    1987-01-01

    Much research on dexterous robot hands has been aimed at the design and control problems associated with their autonomous operation, while relatively little research has addressed the problem of direct human control. It is likely that these two modes can be combined in a complementary manner yielding more capability than either alone could provide. While many of the issues in mixed computer/human control of dexterous hands parallel those found in supervisory control of traditional remote manipulators, the unique geometry and capabilities of dexterous hands pose many new problems. Among these are the control of redundant degrees of freedom, grasp stabilization and specification of non-anthropomorphic behavior. An overview is given of progress made at the MIT AI Laboratory in control of the Salisbury 3 finger hand, including experiments in grasp planning and manipulation via controlled slip. It is also suggested how we might introduce human control into the process at a variety of functional levels.

  19. Closed-loop control of a 2-D mems micromirror with sidewall electrodes for a laser scanning microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Chen, Albert; Jie Sun, Wei; Sun, Zhen Dong; Yeow, John TW

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the development and implementation of a robust nonlinear control scheme for a 2-D micromirror-based laser scanning microscope system. The presented control scheme, built around sliding mode control approach and augmented an adaptive algorithm, is proposed to improve the tracking accuracy in presence of cross-axis effect. The closed-loop controlled imaging system is developed through integrating a 2-D micromirror with sidewall electrodes (SW), a laser source, NI field-programmable gate array (FPGA) hardware, the optics, position sensing detector (PSD) and photo detector (PD). The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed scheme is able to achieve accurate tracking of a reference triangular signal. Compared with open-loop control, the scanning performance is significantly improved, and a better 2-D image is obtained using the micromirror with the proposed scheme.

  20. Computation of records of streamflow at control structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, Dannie L.

    1977-01-01

    Traditional methods of computing streamflow records on large, low-gradient streams require a continuous record of water-surface slope over a natural channel reach. This slope must be of sufficient magnitude to be accuratly measured with available stage measuring devices. On highly regulated streams, this slope approaches zero during periods of low flow and accurate measurement is difficult. Methods are described to calibrate multipurpose regulating control structures to more accurately compute streamflow records on highly-regulated streams. Hydraulic theory, assuming steady, uniform flow during a computational interval, is described for five different types of flow control. The controls are: Tainter gates, hydraulic turbines, fixed spillways, navigation locks, and crest gates. Detailed calibration procedures are described for the five different controls as well as for several flow regimes for some of the controls. The instrumentation package and computer programs necessary to collect and process the field data are discussed. Two typical calibration procedures and measurement data are presented to illustrate the accuracy of the methods. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Techniques used for the analysis of oculometer eye-scanning data obtained from an air traffic control display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Daniel J.; Burdette, Daniel W.; Capron, William R.

    1993-01-01

    The methodology and techniques used to collect and analyze look-point position data from a real-time ATC display-format comparison experiment are documented. That study compared the delivery precision and controller workload of three final approach spacing aid display formats. Using an oculometer, controller lookpoint position data were collected, associated with gaze objects (e.g., moving aircraft) on the ATC display, and analyzed to determine eye-scan behavior. The equipment involved and algorithms for saving, synchronizing with the ATC simulation output, and filtering the data are described. Target (gaze object) and cross-check scanning identification algorithms are also presented. Data tables are provided of total dwell times, average dwell times, and cross-check scans. Flow charts, block diagrams, file record descriptors, and source code are included. The techniques and data presented are intended to benefit researchers in other studies that incorporate non-stationary gaze objects and oculometer equipment.

  2. Frequency response modeling and control of flexible structures: Computational methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, William H.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of vibrations in flexible structures can be conventiently modeled in terms of frequency response models. For structural control such models capture the distributed parameter dynamics of the elastic structural response as an irrational transfer function. For most flexible structures arising in aerospace applications the irrational transfer functions which arise are of a special class of pseudo-meromorphic functions which have only a finite number of right half place poles. Computational algorithms are demonstrated for design of multiloop control laws for such models based on optimal Wiener-Hopf control of the frequency responses. The algorithms employ a sampled-data representation of irrational transfer functions which is particularly attractive for numerical computation. One key algorithm for the solution of the optimal control problem is the spectral factorization of an irrational transfer function. The basis for the spectral factorization algorithm is highlighted together with associated computational issues arising in optimal regulator design. Options for implementation of wide band vibration control for flexible structures based on the sampled-data frequency response models is also highlighted. A simple flexible structure control example is considered to demonstrate the combined frequency response modeling and control algorithms.

  3. Computation of robustly stabilizing PID controllers for interval systems.

    PubMed

    Matušů, Radek; Prokop, Roman

    2016-01-01

    The paper is focused on the computation of all possible robustly stabilizing Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controllers for plants with interval uncertainty. The main idea of the proposed method is based on Tan's (et al.) technique for calculation of (nominally) stabilizing PI and PID controllers or robustly stabilizing PI controllers by means of plotting the stability boundary locus in either P-I plane or P-I-D space. Refinement of the existing method by consideration of 16 segment plants instead of 16 Kharitonov plants provides an elegant and efficient tool for finding all robustly stabilizing PID controllers for an interval system. The validity and relatively effortless application of presented theoretical concepts are demonstrated through a computation and simulation example in which the uncertain mathematical model of an experimental oblique wing aircraft is robustly stabilized. PMID:27350931

  4. Computer program for automatic generation of BWR control rod patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Taner, M.S.; Levine, S.H.; Hsia, M.Y. )

    1990-01-01

    A computer program named OCTOPUS has been developed to automatically determine a control rod pattern that approximates some desired target power distribution as closely as possible without violating any thermal safety or reactor criticality constraints. The program OCTOPUS performs a semi-optimization task based on the method of approximation programming (MAP) to develop control rod patterns. The SIMULATE-E code is used to determine the nucleonic characteristics of the reactor core state.

  5. Are Prenatal Ultrasound Scans Associated with the Autism Phenotype? Follow-Up of a Randomised Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoch, Yonit K.; Williams, Cori J.; Granich, Joanna; Hunt, Anna M.; Landau, Lou I.; Newnham, John P.; Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.

    2012-01-01

    An existing randomised controlled trial was used to investigate whether multiple ultrasound scans may be associated with the autism phenotype. From 2,834 single pregnancies, 1,415 were selected at random to receive ultrasound imaging and continuous wave Doppler flow studies at five points throughout pregnancy (Intensive) and 1,419 to receive a…

  6. Computerized Automated Quantification of Subcutaneous and Visceral Adipose Tissue From Computed Tomography Scans: Development and Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Jae; Park, Ji Won; Kim, Jong Wan; Park, Chan-Soo; Gonzalez, John Paul S; Lee, Seung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) is often viewed as one of the most accurate methods for measuring visceral adipose tissue (VAT). However, measuring VAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) from CT is a time-consuming and tedious process. Thus, evaluating patients’ obesity levels during clinical trials using CT scans is both cumbersome and limiting. Objective To describe an image-processing-based and automated method for measuring adipose tissue in the entire abdominal region. Methods The method detects SAT and VAT levels using a separation mask based on muscles of the human body. The separation mask is the region that minimizes the unnecessary space between a closed path and muscle area. In addition, a correction mask, based on bones, corrects the error in VAT. Results To validate the method, the volume of total adipose tissue (TAT), SAT, and VAT were measured for a total of 100 CTs using the automated method, and the results compared with those from manual measurements obtained by 2 experts. Dice’s similarity coefficients (DSCs) between the first manual measurement and the automated result for TAT, SAT, and VAT are 0.99, 0.98, and 0.97, respectively. The DSCs between the second manual measurement and the automated result for TAT, SAT, and VAT are 0.98, 0.98, and 0.97, respectively. Moreover, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between the automated method and the results of the manual measurements indicate high reliability as the ICCs for the items are all .99 (P<.001). Conclusions The results described in this paper confirm the accuracy and reliability of the proposed method. The method is expected to be both convenient and useful in the clinical evaluation and study of obesity in patients who require SAT and VAT measurements. PMID:26846251

  7. Analysis of β-tricalcium phosphate granules prepared with different formulations by nano-computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Terranova, Lisa; Libouban, Hélène; Mallet, Romain; Chappard, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Among biomaterials used for filling bone defects, beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is suitable in non-bearing bones, particularly in dental implantology, oral and maxillofacial surgery. When β-TCP granules are placed in a bone defect, they occupy the void 3D volume. Little is known about the 3D arrangement of the granules, which depends on the nature and size of the granules. The aim of this study was to examine the 3D architecture of porous β-TCP granules. Granules were prepared with different concentrations of β-TCP powder in slurry (10, 11, 15, 18, 21, and 25 g of β-TCP powder in distilled water). Granules were prepared by the polyurethane foam method. They were analyzed by nano-computed tomography (nanoCT) and compared with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Commercial granules of hydroxyapatite-β-TCP prepared by the same methodology were also used. The outer and inner architectures of the granules were shown by nanoCT which evidenced macroporosity, internal porosity and microporosity between the sintered grains. Macroporosity was reduced at high concentration and conversely, numerous concave surfaces were observed. Internal porosity, related to the sublimation of the polyurethane foam, was present in all the granules. Microporosity at the grain joints was evidenced by SEM and on 2D nanoCT sections. Granules presented a heterogeneous aspect due to the different mineralization degree of the sintered powder grains in the β-TCP granules; the difference between hydroxyapatite and β-TCP was also evidenced. NanoCT is an interesting method to analyze the fine morphology of biomaterials with a resolution close to synchrotron and better than microcomputed tomography. PMID:25899237

  8. Control of Computer Room Air Conditioning using IT Equipment Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Geoffrey C.; Storey, Bill; Patterson, Michael K.

    2009-09-30

    The goal of this demonstration was to show how sensors in IT equipment could be accessed and used to directly control computer room air conditioning. The data provided from the sensors is available on the IT network and the challenge for this project was to connect this information to the computer room air handler's control system. A control strategy was developed to enable separate control of the chilled water flow and the fans in the computer room air handlers. By using these existing sensors in the IT equipment, an additional control system is eliminated (or could be redundant) and optimal cooling can be provided saving significant energy. Using onboard server temperature sensors will yield significant energy reductions in data centers. Intel hosted the demonstration in its Santa Clara, CA data center. Intel collaborated with IBM, HP, Emerson, Wunderlich-Malec Engineers, FieldServer Technologies, and LBNL to install the necessary components and develop the new control scheme. LBNL also validated the results of the demonstration.

  9. 8. DETAIL OF COMPUTER SCREEN AND CONTROL BOARDS: LEFT SCREEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. DETAIL OF COMPUTER SCREEN AND CONTROL BOARDS: LEFT SCREEN TRACKS RESIDUAL CHLORINE; INDICATES AMOUNT OF SUNLIGHT WHICH ENABLES OPERATOR TO ESTIMATE NEEDED CHLORINE; CENTER SCREEN SHOWS TURNOUT STRUCTURES; RIGHT SCREEN SHOWS INDICATORS OF ALUMINUM SULFATE TANK FARM. - F. E. Weymouth Filtration Plant, 700 North Moreno Avenue, La Verne, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. View southeast of computer controlled energy monitoring system. System replaced ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southeast of computer controlled energy monitoring system. System replaced strip chart recorders and other instruments under the direct observation of the load dispatcher. - Thirtieth Street Station, Load Dispatch Center, Thirtieth & Market Streets, Railroad Station, Amtrak (formerly Pennsylvania Railroad Station), Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  11. ANL computer controlled target storage system: Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Klimczak, G.W.; Nardi, B.G.; Travis, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Design and operation of an isotopic target storage system is described. Due to the cost and effort associated with nuclear target production, it is necessary to protect them. The storage system described was designed to protect up to 90 hydroscopic and readily oxidizing targets under vacuum of 10/sup -6/ torr. The computer controller maintains system integrity during normal use and emergency situations. (JDH)

  12. Computer numerical control grinding of spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, H. Wayne

    1991-01-01

    The development of Computer Numerical Control (CNC) spiral bevel gear grinding has paved the way for major improvement in the production of precision spiral bevel gears. The object of the program was to decrease the setup, maintenance of setup, and pattern development time by 50 percent of the time required on conventional spiral bevel gear grinders. Details of the process are explained.

  13. Computer-Numerical-Control and the EMCO Compact 5 Lathe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Frank M.

    This laboratory manual is intended for use in teaching computer-numerical-control (CNC) programming using the Emco Maier Compact 5 Lathe. Developed for use at the postsecondary level, this material contains a short introduction to CNC machine tools. This section covers CNC programs, CNC machine axes, and CNC coordinate systems. The following…

  14. Computer control of irrigation for electrical load management

    SciTech Connect

    Duke, H.R.; Blue, M.C.; Heermann, D.F.

    1983-06-01

    A radio telemetry system was interfaced between an on-farm microcomputer, each of fifteen center pivot sprinkler systems and a climatic station. The computer uses climatic data and operational history to calculate a soil water balance and determine shutoff priorities for automatic electrical load control.

  15. Computer codes for evaluation of control room habitability (HABIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Stage, S.A.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the Computer Codes for Evaluation of Control Room Habitability (HABIT). HABIT is a package of computer codes designed to be used for the evaluation of control room habitability in the event of an accidental release of toxic chemicals or radioactive materials. Given information about the design of a nuclear power plant, a scenario for the release of toxic chemicals or radionuclides, and information about the air flows and protection systems of the control room, HABIT can be used to estimate the chemical exposure or radiological dose to control room personnel. HABIT is an integrated package of several programs that previously needed to be run separately and required considerable user intervention. This report discusses the theoretical basis and physical assumptions made by each of the modules in HABIT and gives detailed information about the data entry windows. Sample runs are given for each of the modules. A brief section of programming notes is included. A set of computer disks will accompany this report if the report is ordered from the Energy Science and Technology Software Center. The disks contain the files needed to run HABIT on a personal computer running DOS. Source codes for the various HABIT routines are on the disks. Also included are input and output files for three demonstration runs.

  16. VPI - VIBRATION PATTERN IMAGER: A CONTROL AND DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM FOR SCANNING LASER VIBROMETERS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    The Vibration Pattern Imager (VPI) system was designed to control and acquire data from laser vibrometer sensors. The PC computer based system uses a digital signal processing (DSP) board and an analog I/O board to control the sensor and to process the data. The VPI system was originally developed for use with the Ometron VPI Sensor (Ometron Limited, Kelvin House, Worsley Bridge Road, London, SE26 5BX, England), but can be readily adapted to any commercially available sensor which provides an analog output signal and requires analog inputs for control of mirror positioning. VPI's graphical user interface allows the operation of the program to be controlled interactively through keyboard and mouse-selected menu options. The main menu controls all functions for setup, data acquisition, display, file operations, and exiting the program. Two types of data may be acquired with the VPI system: single point or "full field". In the single point mode, time series data is sampled by the A/D converter on the I/O board at a user-defined rate for the selected number of samples. The position of the measuring point, adjusted by mirrors in the sensor, is controlled via a mouse input. In the "full field" mode, the measurement point is moved over a user-selected rectangular area with up to 256 positions in both x and y directions. The time series data is sampled by the A/D converter on the I/O board and converted to a root-mean-square (rms) value by the DSP board. The rms "full field" velocity distribution is then uploaded for display and storage. VPI is written in C language and Texas Instruments' TMS320C30 assembly language for IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. The program requires 640K of RAM for execution, and a hard disk with 10Mb or more of disk space is recommended. The program also requires a mouse, a VGA graphics display, a Four Channel analog I/O board (Spectrum Signal Processing, Inc.; Westborough, MA), a break-out box and a Spirit-30 board (Sonitech

  17. Computer controlled techniques for high emission density mapping of thermionic cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. W.; Thomas, R. E.

    1985-12-01

    Some of the techniques commonly used (e.g. SLEEP and thermionic emission microscope) for measuring emission or work function uniformity of thermionic cathode surfaces require the use of very low or near zero current densities, thus the cathode is characterized at current densities and temperatures much lower than that of a normally operating cathode. The system reported on here uses a high voltage pulse technique and is capable of measuring emission densities in the range 1 to 80 A/cm 2 at normal cathode operating temperatures. The cathode surface is scanned with an anode having a 0.025 mm aperture whose position is controlled by computer operated stepping motors. The current through the aperture to a collector electrode is measured using a sample-and-hold amplifier. Pulsing and sampling are computer synchronized with the scanning, and data for each pulse are accumulated and can be processed and displayed in several ways using the computer, including a detailed "three-dimensional" map of either the electron emission density or work function variations. The entire surface of the cathode or any portion of it can be mapped in steps as small as 0.001 mm (1μm), but typically steps of 5-100 μm were used. Measurements are presented illustrating the uniformity or nonuniformity of the electron emission densities and work functions for type-B and type-M cathodes.

  18. EBR-II Cover Gas Cleanup System upgrade distributed control and front end computer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.B.

    1992-05-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) control system was upgraded in 1991 to improve control and provide a graphical operator interface. The upgrade consisted of a main control computer, a distributed control computer, a front end input/output computer, a main graphics interface terminal, and a remote graphics interface terminal. This paper briefly describes the Cover Gas Cleanup System and the overall control system; gives reasons behind the computer system structure; and then gives a detailed description of the distributed control computer, the front end computer, and how these computers interact with the main control computer. The descriptions cover both hardware and software.

  19. EBR-II Cover Gas Cleanup System upgrade distributed control and front end computer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) control system was upgraded in 1991 to improve control and provide a graphical operator interface. The upgrade consisted of a main control computer, a distributed control computer, a front end input/output computer, a main graphics interface terminal, and a remote graphics interface terminal. This paper briefly describes the Cover Gas Cleanup System and the overall control system; gives reasons behind the computer system structure; and then gives a detailed description of the distributed control computer, the front end computer, and how these computers interact with the main control computer. The descriptions cover both hardware and software.

  20. Human-computer interface including haptically controlled interactions

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Thomas G.

    2005-10-11

    The present invention provides a method of human-computer interfacing that provides haptic feedback to control interface interactions such as scrolling or zooming within an application. Haptic feedback in the present method allows the user more intuitive control of the interface interactions, and allows the user's visual focus to remain on the application. The method comprises providing a control domain within which the user can control interactions. For example, a haptic boundary can be provided corresponding to scrollable or scalable portions of the application domain. The user can position a cursor near such a boundary, feeling its presence haptically (reducing the requirement for visual attention for control of scrolling of the display). The user can then apply force relative to the boundary, causing the interface to scroll the domain. The rate of scrolling can be related to the magnitude of applied force, providing the user with additional intuitive, non-visual control of scrolling.

  1. Closed loop computer control for an automatic transmission

    DOEpatents

    Patil, Prabhakar B.

    1989-01-01

    In an automotive vehicle having an automatic transmission that driveably connects a power source to the driving wheels, a method to control the application of hydraulic pressure to a clutch, whose engagement produces an upshift and whose disengagement produces a downshift, the speed of the power source, and the output torque of the transmission. The transmission output shaft torque and the power source speed are the controlled variables. The commanded power source torque and commanded hydraulic pressure supplied to the clutch are the control variables. A mathematical model is formulated that describes the kinematics and dynamics of the powertrain before, during and after a gear shift. The model represents the operating characteristics of each component and the structural arrangement of the components within the transmission being controlled. Next, a close loop feedback control is developed to determine the proper control law or compensation strategy to achieve an acceptably smooth gear ratio change, one in which the output torque disturbance is kept to a minimum and the duration of the shift is minimized. Then a computer algorithm simulating the shift dynamics employing the mathematical model is used to study the effects of changes in the values of the parameters established from a closed loop control of the clutch hydraulic and the power source torque on the shift quality. This computer simulation is used also to establish possible shift control strategies. The shift strategies determined from the prior step are reduced to an algorithm executed by a computer to control the operation of the power source and the transmission.

  2. System for computer controlled shifting of an automatic transmission

    DOEpatents

    Patil, Prabhakar B.

    1989-01-01

    In an automotive vehicle having an automatic transmission that driveably connects a power source to the driving wheels, a method to control the application of hydraulic pressure to a clutch, whose engagement produces an upshift and whose disengagement produces a downshift, the speed of the power source, and the output torque of the transmission. The transmission output shaft torque and the power source speed are the controlled variables. The commanded power source torque and commanded hydraulic pressure supplied to the clutch are the control variables. A mathematical model is formulated that describes the kinematics and dynamics of the powertrain before, during and after a gear shift. The model represents the operating characteristics of each component and the structural arrangement of the components within the transmission being controlled. Next, a close loop feedback control is developed to determine the proper control law or compensation strategy to achieve an acceptably smooth gear ratio change, one in which the output torque disturbance is kept to a minimum and the duration of the shift is minimized. Then a computer algorithm simulating the shift dynamics employing the mathematical model is used to study the effects of changes in the values of the parameters established from a closed loop control of the clutch hydraulic and the power source torque on the shift quality. This computer simulation is used also to establish possible shift control strategies. The shift strategies determine from the prior step are reduced to an algorithm executed by a computer to control the operation of the power source and the transmission.

  3. Controlling Combinatorial Complexity in Software and Malware Behavior Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Pleszkoch, Mark G; Linger, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    Virtually all software is out of intellectual control in that no one knows its full behavior. Software Behavior Computation (SBC) is a new technology for understanding everything software does. SBC applies the mathematics of denotational semantics implemented by function composition in Functional Trace Tables (FTTs) to compute the behavior of programs, expressed as disjoint cases of conditional concurrent assignments. In some circumstances, combinatorial explosions in the number of cases can occur when calculating the behavior of sequences of multiple branching structures. This paper describes computational methods that avoid combinatorial explosions. The predicates that control branching structures such as ifthenelses can be organized into three categories: 1) Independent, resulting in no behavior case explosion, 2) Coordinated, resulting in two behavior cases, or 3) Goaloriented, with potential exponential growth in the number of cases. Traditional FTT-based behavior computation can be augmented by two additional computational methods, namely, Single-Value Function Abstractions (SVFAs) and, introduced in this paper, Relational Trace Tables (RTTs). These methods can be applied to the three predicate categories to avoid combinatorial growth in behavior cases while maintaining mathematical correctness.

  4. The Use of Passwords for Controlled Access to Computer Resources. Computer Science & Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Helen M.

    This paper considers the generation of passwords and their effective application to the problem of controlling access to computer resources. After describing the need for and uses of passwords, password schemes are categorized according to selection technique, lifetime, physical characteristics, and information content. Password protection, both…

  5. Soft Real-Time PID Control on a VME Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karayan, Vahag; Sander, Stanley; Cageao, Richard

    2007-01-01

    microPID (uPID) is a computer program for real-time proportional + integral + derivative (PID) control of a translation stage in a Fourier-transform ultraviolet spectrometer. microPID implements a PID control loop over a position profile at sampling rate of 8 kHz (sampling period 125microseconds). The software runs in a strippeddown Linux operating system on a VersaModule Eurocard (VME) computer operating in real-time priority queue using an embedded controller, a 16-bit digital-to-analog converter (D/A) board, and a laser-positioning board (LPB). microPID consists of three main parts: (1) VME device-driver routines, (2) software that administers a custom protocol for serial communication with a control computer, and (3) a loop section that obtains the current position from an LPB-driver routine, calculates the ideal position from the profile, and calculates a new voltage command by use of an embedded PID routine all within each sampling period. The voltage command is sent to the D/A board to control the stage. microPID uses special kernel headers to obtain microsecond timing resolution. Inasmuch as microPID implements a single-threaded process and all other processes are disabled, the Linux operating system acts as a soft real-time system.

  6. Note: Computer controlled rotation mount for large diameter optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakonjac, Ana; Roberts, Kris O.; Deb, Amita B.; Kjærgaard, Niels

    2013-02-01

    We describe the construction of a motorized optical rotation mount with a 40 mm clear aperture. The device is used to remotely control the power of large diameter laser beams for a magneto-optical trap. A piezo-electric ultrasonic motor on a printed circuit board provides rotation with a precision better than 0.03° and allows for a very compact design. The rotation unit is controlled from a computer via serial communication, making integration into most software control platforms straightforward.

  7. View northeast of a microchip based computer control system installed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View northeast of a microchip based computer control system installed in the early 1980's to replace Lamokin Tower, at center of photograph; panels 1 and 2 at right of photograph are part of main supervisory board; panel 1 controlled Allen Lane sub-station #7; responsiblity for this portion of the system was transferred to southeast Pennsylvania transit authority (septa) in 1985; panel 2 at extreme right controls catenary switches in a coach storage yard adjacent to the station - Thirtieth Street Station, Power Director Center, Thirtieth & Market Streets in Amtrak Railroad Station, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. Highlights of the GURI hydroelectric plant computer control system

    SciTech Connect

    Dal Monte, R.; Banakar, H.; Hoffman, R.; Lebeau, M.; Schroeder, R.

    1988-07-01

    The GURI power plant on the Caroni river in Venezuela has 20 generating units with a total capacity of 10,000 MW, the largest currently operating in the world. The GURI Computer Control System (GCS) provides for comprehensive operation management of the entire power plant and the adjacent switchyards. This article describes some highlights of the functions of the state-of-the-art system. The topics considered include the operating modes of the remote terminal units (RTUs), automatic start/stop of generating units, RTU closed-loop control, automatic generation and voltage control, unit commitment, operator training stimulator, and maintenance management.

  9. Automated quantification of pulmonary emphysema from computed tomography scans: comparison of variation and correlation of common measures in a large cohort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to retrospectively investigate the variation of standard indices of pulmonary emphysema from helical computed tomographic (CT) scans as related to inspiration differences over a 1 year interval and determine the strength of the relationship between these measures in a large cohort. 626 patients that had 2 scans taken at an interval of 9 months to 15 months (μ: 381 days, σ: 31 days) were selected for this work. All scans were acquired at a 1.25mm slice thickness using a low dose protocol. For each scan, the emphysema index (EI), fractal dimension (FD), mean lung density (MLD), and 15th percentile of the histogram (HIST) were computed. The absolute and relative changes for each measure were computed and the empirical 95% confidence interval was reported both in non-normalized and normalized scales. Spearman correlation coefficients are computed between the relative change in each measure and relative change in inspiration between each scan-pair, as well as between each pair-wise combination of the four measures. EI varied on a range of -10.5 to 10.5 on a non-normalized scale and -15 to 15 on a normalized scale, with FD and MLD showing slightly larger but comparable spreads, and HIST having a much larger variation. MLD was found to show the strongest correlation to inspiration change (r=0.85, p<0.001), and EI, FD, and HIST to have moderately strong correlation (r = 0.61-0.74, p<0.001). Finally, HIST showed very strong correlation to EI (r = 0.92, p<0.001), while FD showed the least strong relationship to EI (r = 0.82, p<0.001). This work shows that emphysema index and fractal dimension have the least variability overall of the commonly used measures of emphysema and that they offer the most unique quantification of emphysema relative to each other.

  10. Parallel and vector computation for stochastic optimal control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, F. B.

    1989-01-01

    A general method for parallel and vector numerical solutions of stochastic dynamic programming problems is described for optimal control of general nonlinear, continuous time, multibody dynamical systems, perturbed by Poisson as well as Gaussian random white noise. Possible applications include lumped flight dynamics models for uncertain environments, such as large scale and background random atmospheric fluctuations. The numerical formulation is highly suitable for a vector multiprocessor or vectorizing supercomputer, and results exhibit high processor efficiency and numerical stability. Advanced computing techniques, data structures, and hardware help alleviate Bellman's curse of dimensionality in dynamic programming computations.

  11. A raster scanning power supply system for controlling relativistic heavy ion beams at the Bevalac Biomedical Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Stover, G.; Nyman, M.; Halliwell, J.; Lutz, I.; Dwinell, R.

    1987-03-01

    A power supply system is currently being designed and constructed to sweep an 8.0 Tesla-meter relativistic heavy ion beam in a raster scanning mode for radiotherapy use. Two colinear dipole magnets with orthogonally oriented magnetic fields are driven by the system to produce a rectangular field (40 x 40 cm max.) with a uniform dose (+-2.5%) to a target volume 6 meters away. The ''fast'' horizontal scanning magnet is driven by a single power supply which in conjunction with a triac bridge network and a current regulated linear actuator will produce a 1200 cm/sec max. sweep rate. The ''slow'' (40 cm/sec) vertical scanning magnet will be controlled by dual current regulated linear actuators in a push-pull configuration. The scanner system can provide off-axis treatment profiles with large aspect ratios and unusual dimensions.

  12. Temporal Evolution of Spatial Computations for Visuomotor Control

    PubMed Central

    Reichenbach, Alexandra; Franklin, Sae; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Goal-directed reaching movements are guided by visual feedback from both target and hand. The classical view is that the brain extracts information about target and hand positions from a visual scene, calculates a difference vector between them, and uses this estimate to control the movement. Here we show that during fast feedback control, this computation is not immediate, but evolves dynamically over time. Immediately after a change in the visual scene, the motor system generates independent responses to the errors in hand and target location. Only about 200 ms later, the changes in target and hand positions are combined appropriately in the response, slowly converging to the true difference vector. Therefore, our results provide evidence for the temporal evolution of spatial computations in the human visuomotor system, in which the accurate difference vector computation is first estimated by a fast approximation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The dominant view regarding the neural control of reaching is that the visuomotor system controls movement based on the difference vector—the difference between the positions of the hand and target. We directly test this theory by measuring the responses to visual perturbations over a large range of possible variations in both target and hand displacements. By modeling the nonlinearity of the feedback response, we were able to reveal the temporal evolution of the underlying computations. The visuomotor system first uses an approximation to the difference vector computation, simply combining the nonlinear responses to cursor and target displacements, only arriving at the correct difference vector calculation 200 ms later. PMID:26911681

  13. Fault tolerant computer control for a Maglev transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.; Nagle, Gail A.; Anagnostopoulos, George

    1994-01-01

    Magnetically levitated (Maglev) vehicles operating on dedicated guideways at speeds of 500 km/hr are an emerging transportation alternative to short-haul air and high-speed rail. They have the potential to offer a service significantly more dependable than air and with less operating cost than both air and high-speed rail. Maglev transportation derives these benefits by using magnetic forces to suspend a vehicle 8 to 200 mm above the guideway. Magnetic forces are also used for propulsion and guidance. The combination of high speed, short headways, stringent ride quality requirements, and a distributed offboard propulsion system necessitates high levels of automation for the Maglev control and operation. Very high levels of safety and availability will be required for the Maglev control system. This paper describes the mission scenario, functional requirements, and dependability and performance requirements of the Maglev command, control, and communications system. A distributed hierarchical architecture consisting of vehicle on-board computers, wayside zone computers, a central computer facility, and communication links between these entities was synthesized to meet the functional and dependability requirements on the maglev. Two variations of the basic architecture are described: the Smart Vehicle Architecture (SVA) and the Zone Control Architecture (ZCA). Preliminary dependability modeling results are also presented.

  14. Fault tolerant computer control for a Maglev transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.; Nagle, Gail A.; Anagnostopoulos, George

    1994-05-01

    Magnetically levitated (Maglev) vehicles operating on dedicated guideways at speeds of 500 km/hr are an emerging transportation alternative to short-haul air and high-speed rail. They have the potential to offer a service significantly more dependable than air and with less operating cost than both air and high-speed rail. Maglev transportation derives these benefits by using magnetic forces to suspend a vehicle 8 to 200 mm above the guideway. Magnetic forces are also used for propulsion and guidance. The combination of high speed, short headways, stringent ride quality requirements, and a distributed offboard propulsion system necessitates high levels of automation for the Maglev control and operation. Very high levels of safety and availability will be required for the Maglev control system. This paper describes the mission scenario, functional requirements, and dependability and performance requirements of the Maglev command, control, and communications system. A distributed hierarchical architecture consisting of vehicle on-board computers, wayside zone computers, a central computer facility, and communication links between these entities was synthesized to meet the functional and dependability requirements on the maglev. Two variations of the basic architecture are described: the Smart Vehicle Architecture (SVA) and the Zone Control Architecture (ZCA). Preliminary dependability modeling results are also presented.

  15. Computer-aided diagnosis of pulmonary nodules on CT scans: Segmentation and classification using 3D active contours

    PubMed Central

    Way, Ted W.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Cascade, Philip N.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Bogot, Naama; Zhou, Chuan

    2009-01-01

    We are developing a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to classify malignant and benign lung nodules found on CT scans. A fully automated system was designed to segment the nodule from its surrounding structured background in a local volume of interest (VOI) and to extract image features for classification. Image segmentation was performed with a three-dimensional (3D) active contour (AC) method. A data set of 96 lung nodules (44 malignant, 52 benign) from 58 patients was used in this study. The 3D AC model is based on two-dimensional AC with the addition of three new energy components to take advantage of 3D information: (1) 3D gradient, which guides the active contour to seek the object surface, (2) 3D curvature, which imposes a smoothness constraint in the z direction, and (3) mask energy, which penalizes contours that grow beyond the pleura or thoracic wall. The search for the best energy weights in the 3D AC model was guided by a simplex optimization method. Morphological and gray-level features were extracted from the segmented nodule. The rubber band straightening transform (RBST) was applied to the shell of voxels surrounding the nodule. Texture features based on run-length statistics were extracted from the RBST image. A linear discriminant analysis classifier with stepwise feature selection was designed using a second simplex optimization to select the most effective features. Leave-one-case-out resampling was used to train and test the CAD system. The system achieved a test area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) of 0.83±0.04. Our preliminary results indicate that use of the 3D AC model and the 3D texture features surrounding the nodule is a promising approach to the segmentation and classification of lung nodules with CAD. The segmentation performance of the 3D AC model trained with our data set was evaluated with 23 nodules available in the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC). The lung nodule volumes segmented by the 3D AC

  16. Programmable scan/read circuitry for charge coupled device imaging detectors. [spcecraft attitude control and star trackers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomon, P. M.; Smilowitz, K.

    1984-01-01

    A circuit for scanning and outputting the induced charges in a solid state charge coupled device (CCD) image detector is disclosed in an image detection system for use in a spacecraft attitude control system. The image detection system includes timing control circuitry for selectively controlling the output of the CCD detector so that video outputs are provided only with respect to induced charges corresponding to predetermined sensing element lines of the CCD detector. The timing control circuit and the analog to digital converter are controlled by a programmed microprocessor which defines the video outputs to be converted and further controls the timing control circuit so that no video outputs are provided during the delay associated with analog to digital conversion.

  17. Correlation of spicule sign on computed tomography scans with peripheral lung cancers associated with interstitial lung disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Gao, L; Wu, W L

    2015-03-27

    The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between spicular signs on computed tomography (CT) scans and peripheral lung cancer (PLC) that is associated with interstitial lung disease (ILD) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We analyzed clinical data from 96 PLC cases and grouped patients based on whether they had interstitial pneumonia into either ILD/COPD group or non-ILD/COPD group. The occurrence rate of spicule sign was 90.3% in the ILD/COPD group and 61.8% in the non-ILD/COPD group, respectively. There was a significant difference between these groups (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the occurrence rate of spicular signs among patients with different pathological types of PLC. The severity of ILD affected the spicular morphology on CT scans directly. There was a significant correlation between the appearance of spicule sign on CT scans and PLC that was associated with ILD/COPD.

  18. Iterative learning control for synchronization of reticle stage and wafer stage in step-and-scan lithographic equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lan-lan; Hu, Song; Zhao, Li-xin; Ma, Ping

    2013-08-01

    Lithographic equipments are highly complex machines used to manufacture integrated circuits (ICs). To make larger ICs, a larger lens is required, which, however, is prohibitively expensive. The solution to this problem is to expose a chip not in one flash but in a scanning fashion. For step-and-scan lithographic equipment (wafer scanner), the image quality is decided by many factors, in which synchronization of reticle stage and wafer stage during exposure is a key one. In this paper, the principle of reticle stage and wafer stage was analyzed through investigating the structure of scanners, firstly. While scanning, the reticle stage and wafer stage should scan simultaneously at a high speed and the speed ratio is 1:4. Secondly, an iterative learning controller (ILC) for synchronization of reticle stage and wafer stage is presented. In the controller, a master-slave structure is used, with the wafer stage acting as the master, and the reticle stage as the slave. Since the scanning process of scanner is repetitive, ILC is used to improve tracking performance. A simple design procedure is presented which allows design of the ILC system for the reticle stage and wafer stage independently. Finally, performance of the algorithm is illustrated by simulated on the virtual stages (the reticle stage and wafer stage).The results of simulation experiments and theory analyzing demonstrate that using the proposed controller better synchronization performance can be obtained for the reticle stage and wafer stage in scanner. Theory analysis and experiment shows the method is reasonable and efficient.

  19. B190 computer controlled radiation monitoring and safety interlock system

    SciTech Connect

    Espinosa, D L; Fields, W F; Gittins, D E; Roberts, M L

    1998-08-01

    The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) in the Earth and Environmental Sciences Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operates two accelerators and is in the process of installing two new additional accelerators in support of a variety of basic and applied measurement programs. To monitor the radiation environment in the facility in which these accelerators are located and to terminate accelerator operations if predetermined radiation levels are exceeded, an updated computer controlled radiation monitoring system has been installed. This new system also monitors various machine safety interlocks and again terminates accelerator operations if machine interlocks are broken. This new system replaces an older system that was originally installed in 1988. This paper describes the updated B190 computer controlled radiation monitoring and safety interlock system.

  20. Control aspects of quantum computing using pure and mixed states.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Herbrüggen, Thomas; Marx, Raimund; Fahmy, Amr; Kauffman, Louis; Lomonaco, Samuel; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J

    2012-10-13

    Steering quantum dynamics such that the target states solve classically hard problems is paramount to quantum simulation and computation. And beyond, quantum control is also essential to pave the way to quantum technologies. Here, important control techniques are reviewed and presented in a unified frame covering quantum computational gate synthesis and spectroscopic state transfer alike. We emphasize that it does not matter whether the quantum states of interest are pure or not. While pure states underly the design of quantum circuits, ensemble mixtures of quantum states can be exploited in a more recent class of algorithms: it is illustrated by characterizing the Jones polynomial in order to distinguish between different (classes of) knots. Further applications include Josephson elements, cavity grids, ion traps and nitrogen vacancy centres in scenarios of closed as well as open quantum systems.

  1. COMSAC: Computational Methods for Stability and Control. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fremaux, C. Michael (Compiler); Hall, Robert M. (Compiler)

    2004-01-01

    The unprecedented advances being made in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technology have demonstrated the powerful capabilities of codes in applications to civil and military aircraft. Used in conjunction with wind-tunnel and flight investigations, many codes are now routinely used by designers in diverse applications such as aerodynamic performance predictions and propulsion integration. Typically, these codes are most reliable for attached, steady, and predominantly turbulent flows. As a result of increasing reliability and confidence in CFD, wind-tunnel testing for some new configurations has been substantially reduced in key areas, such as wing trade studies for mission performance guarantees. Interest is now growing in the application of computational methods to other critical design challenges. One of the most important disciplinary elements for civil and military aircraft is prediction of stability and control characteristics. CFD offers the potential for significantly increasing the basic understanding, prediction, and control of flow phenomena associated with requirements for satisfactory aircraft handling characteristics.

  2. Control aspects of quantum computing using pure and mixed states

    PubMed Central

    Schulte-Herbrüggen, Thomas; Marx, Raimund; Fahmy, Amr; Kauffman, Louis; Lomonaco, Samuel; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J.

    2012-01-01

    Steering quantum dynamics such that the target states solve classically hard problems is paramount to quantum simulation and computation. And beyond, quantum control is also essential to pave the way to quantum technologies. Here, important control techniques are reviewed and presented in a unified frame covering quantum computational gate synthesis and spectroscopic state transfer alike. We emphasize that it does not matter whether the quantum states of interest are pure or not. While pure states underly the design of quantum circuits, ensemble mixtures of quantum states can be exploited in a more recent class of algorithms: it is illustrated by characterizing the Jones polynomial in order to distinguish between different (classes of) knots. Further applications include Josephson elements, cavity grids, ion traps and nitrogen vacancy centres in scenarios of closed as well as open quantum systems. PMID:22946034

  3. Computer-assisted ground control management system. Information circular/1994

    SciTech Connect

    Conover, D.P.; McDonnell, J.P.; Hanna, K.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) has developed a computer-assisted Ground Control Management System (GCMS) for near real-time evaluation of underground coal mine ground conditions. The GCMS combines existing mine monitoring system and sensor technology with automated computer analysis techniques to enhance the acquisition, analysis, and display of geostructural data. The GCMS, which combines mine structure data with other information, such as geologic conditions and mine layout, has provided information on mining-induced stress transfer and pressure buildup associated with several ground control events. Real-time collection, processing, and analysis of mine structure and shield pressure information has proven to be an effective method for assessing near-face ground conditions while mining progresses. The GCMS provides the mine operator with information to rapidly identify and manage potentially hazardous ground conditions while mining is in progress.

  4. Computer-controlled cryogenic-temperature controller. Final report, September 1982-January 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin, R.E.

    1990-01-10

    In laboratories which do materials characterization it is necessary to have a temperature controller which can be computer controlled, is accurate to within .1-.2K, can control temperature from 15-350K with a drift of no more than .1, and is relatively unaffected by the presence of a magnetic field on the sample container. The subject controller uses two thermometers to meet these requirements. One is a commercially available calibrated silicon diode manufactured expressly for this type of application. The second thermometer is used for control. Once the sample has reached the setpoint according to the calibrated thermometer the control thermometer's value is sampled and used as the new setpoint. Since the control thermometer should be insensitive to a mag field the sample will remain at the desired temperature when the magnetic field is applied. Cryogenic, Computer control, Magnetic field, Cryogenics, Cryogenic storage devices.

  5. CRionScan: A stand-alone real time controller designed to perform ion beam imaging, dose controlled irradiation and proton beam writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daudin, L.; Barberet, Ph.; Serani, L.; Moretto, Ph.

    2013-07-01

    High resolution ion microbeams, usually used to perform elemental mapping, low dose targeted irradiation or ion beam lithography needs a very flexible beam control system. For this purpose, we have developed a dedicated system (called “CRionScan”), on the AIFIRA facility (Applications Interdisciplinaires des Faisceaux d'Ions en Région Aquitaine). It consists of a stand-alone real-time scanning and imaging instrument based on a Compact Reconfigurable Input/Output (Compact RIO) device from National Instruments™. It is based on a real-time controller, a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), input/output modules and Ethernet connectivity. We have implemented a fast and deterministic beam scanning system interfaced with our commercial data acquisition system without any hardware development. CRionScan is built under LabVIEW™ and has been used on AIFIRA's nanobeam line since 2009 (Barberet et al., 2009, 2011) [1,2]. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) embedded in the Compact RIO as a web page is used to control the scanning parameters. In addition, a fast electrostatic beam blanking trigger has been included in the FPGA and high speed counters (15 MHz) have been implemented to perform dose controlled irradiation and on-line images on the GUI. Analog to Digital converters are used for the beam current measurement and in the near future for secondary electrons imaging. Other functionalities have been integrated in this controller like LED lighting using Pulse Width Modulation and a “NIM Wilkinson ADC” data acquisition.

  6. Computer model of cardiovascular control system responses to exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croston, R. C.; Rummel, J. A.; Kay, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    Approaches of systems analysis and mathematical modeling together with computer simulation techniques are applied to the cardiovascular system in order to simulate dynamic responses of the system to a range of exercise work loads. A block diagram of the circulatory model is presented, taking into account arterial segments, venous segments, arterio-venous circulation branches, and the heart. A cardiovascular control system model is also discussed together with model test results.

  7. Computer simulation of a few common process control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Muncy, M.P.

    1986-06-01

    This paper shows how to simulate five common process control systems on an IBM PC with a commercially available software package named TUTSIM. All steps involved in producing and checking each simulation are described as clearly as possible. Complete computer listings and output line plots are included to fully document each simulation. Sufficient information is provided so that readers of this paper can duplicate each simulation if they desire to do so. 10 refs., 13 figs., 11 tbls.

  8. Introduction to Computational Methods for Stability and Control (COMSAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert M.; Fremaux, C. Michael; Chambers, Joseph R.

    2004-01-01

    This Symposium is intended to bring together the often distinct cultures of the Stability and Control (S&C) community and the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) community. The COMSAC program is itself a new effort by NASA Langley to accelerate the application of high end CFD methodologies to the demanding job of predicting stability and control characteristics of aircraft. This talk is intended to set the stage for needing a program like COMSAC. It is not intended to give details of the program itself. The topics include: 1) S&C Challenges; 2) Aero prediction methodology; 3) CFD applications; 4) NASA COMSAC planning; 5) Objectives of symposium; and 6) Closing remarks.

  9. A computer-controlled potentiometric/spectrophotometric titrator

    PubMed Central

    Stong, John D.

    1988-01-01

    A laboratory computer controlled potentiometric titrator interfaced to a diode array spectrophotometer is described. The titrator consists of widely used, commercially available components; therefore, major attention is given to modes of interconnection and software implementation in data format and system control. Replicate potentiometric titrations of glycines gave a relative standard deviation in titre of 1.035% and a relative standard deviation in pH of 0.745%. Replicate spectrophotometric titrations of bromophenol blue were analysed at three wavelengths to yield pKa= 3.898 ± 0.075 (1.9% rsd). Methods of data presentation and manipulation are presented. PMID:18925194

  10. Robot Control Through Brain Computer Interface For Patterns Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belluomo, P.; Bucolo, M.; Fortuna, L.; Frasca, M.

    2011-09-01

    A Brain Computer Interface (BCI) system processes and translates neuronal signals, that mainly comes from EEG instruments, into commands for controlling electronic devices. This system can allow people with motor disabilities to control external devices through the real-time modulation of their brain waves. In this context an EEG-based BCI system that allows creative luminous artistic representations is here presented. The system that has been designed and realized in our laboratory interfaces the BCI2000 platform performing real-time analysis of EEG signals with a couple of moving luminescent twin robots. Experiments are also presented.

  11. Computer simulation of multigrid body dynamics and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swaminadham, M.; Moon, Young I.; Venkayya, V. B.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to set up and analyze benchmark problems on multibody dynamics and to verify the predictions of two multibody computer simulation codes. TREETOPS and DISCOS have been used to run three example problems - one degree-of-freedom spring mass dashpot system, an inverted pendulum system, and a triple pendulum. To study the dynamics and control interaction, an inverted planar pendulum with an external body force and a torsional control spring was modeled as a hinge connected two-rigid body system. TREETOPS and DISCOS affected the time history simulation of this problem. System state space variables and their time derivatives from two simulation codes were compared.

  12. INVESTIGATION OF PRIMARY FINE PARTICULATE MATTER FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY COMPUTER-CONTROLLED SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The particle size distributions, morphologies, and chemical composition distributions of 14 coal fly ash (CFA) samples produced by the combustion of four western U.S. coals (two subbituminous, one lignite, and one bituminous) and three eastern U.S. coals (all bituminous) have bee...

  13. Computational Study on Temperature Control Systems for Thermoelectric Refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrain, D.; Martínez, A.; Gorraiz, J.; Rodríguez, A.; Pérez, G.

    2012-06-01

    Thermoelectric refrigeration has the outstanding advantage of allowing accurate temperature control. However, on the market there are thermoelectric refrigerators which include on/off temperature control systems, because of their simplicity and low cost. The major problem with this system is that, when the thermoelectric modules are switched off, the heat stored in the heat exchanger at the hot end of the modules goes back into the refrigerator, forming a thermal bridge. In this work, we use a computational model, presented and validated in previous papers, to study alternative control systems. A new system is introduced based on idling voltages; that is, once the temperature of the refrigerator reaches the lower limit, the thermoelectric modules are not switched off but supplied with minimum voltage. Computational results prove that this system reduces the electric power consumption of the refrigerator by at least 40% with respect to that obtained with on/off control systems, and the coefficient of performance increases close to the maximum provided by any other control system.

  14. Computation of a controlled store separation from a cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    Coupling of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, rigid-body dynamics, and a pitch attitude control law is demonstrated in two- and three-dimensions. The application problem was the separation of a canard-controlled store from an open-flow rectangular cavity bay at a freestream Mach number of 1.2. The transient flowfield was computed using a diagonal scheme in an overset mesh framework, with the resultant aerodynamic loads used as the forcing functions in the nonlinear dynamics equations. The proportional and rate gyro sensitivities were computed a priori using pole placement techniques for the linearized dynamical equations. These fixed gain values were used in the controller for the nonlinear simulation. Reasonable comparison between the full and linearized equations for a perturbed two-dimensional missile was found. Also in two-dimensions, a controlled store was found to possess improved separation characteristics over a canard-fixed store. In three-dimensions, trajectory comparisons with wind-tunnel data for the canard-fixed case will be made. In addition, it will be determined if a canard-controlled store is an effective means of improving cavity store separation characteristics.

  15. Intravenous Contrast Medium Administration for Computed Tomography Scan in Emergency: A Possible Cause of Contrast-Induced Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sonhaye, Lantam; Kolou, Bérésa; Tchaou, Mazamaesso; Amadou, Abdoulatif; Assih, Kouméabalo; N'Timon, Bidamin; Adambounou, Kokou; Agoda-Koussema, Lama; Adjenou, Komlavi; N'Dakena, Koffi

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess risk for CIN after CT Scan during an emergency and to identify risk factors for the patient. Prospective review of all patients admitted to the emergency room (ER) of the Teaching Hospital of Lomé (Togo) during a 2-year period. CIN was defined as an increase in serum creatinine by 0.5 mg/dL from admission after undergoing CT Scan with intravenous contrast. A total of 620 patients underwent a CT Scan in the emergency room using intravenous contrast and 672 patients took the CT Scan without intravenous contrast. Out of the patients who received intravenous contrast for CT Scan, three percent of them developed CIN during their admission. Moreover, upon discharge no patient had continued renal impairment. No patient required dialysis during their admission. The multivariate analysis of all patients who had serial creatinine levels (including those who did not receive any contrast load) shows no increased risk for acute kidney injury associated intravenous contrast (odds ratio = 0.619, p value = 0.886); only diabetes remains independent risk factor of acute kidney injury (odds ratio = 6.26, p value = 0.031). PMID:26576300

  16. Scanning ARM Cloud Radars. Part II: Data Quality Control and Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kollias, Pavlos; Jo, Ieng; Borque, Paloma; Tatarevic, Aleksandra; Lamer, Katia; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Widener, Kevin B.; Johnson, Karen L.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2014-03-01

    The Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACR’s) are the primary instruments for documenting the four-dimensional structure and evolution of clouds within a 20-30 km radius from the ARM fixed and mobile sites. Here, the post-processing of the calibrated SACR measurements is discussed. First, a feature mask algorithm that objectively determines the presence of significant radar returns is described. The feature mask algorithm is based on the statistical properties of radar receiver noise. It accounts for atmospheric emission and is applicable even for SACR profiles with few or no signal-free range gates. Using the nearest-in-time atmospheric sounding, the SACR radar reflectivities are corrected for gaseous attenuation (water vapor and oxygen) using a line-by-line absorption model. Despite having a high pulse repetition frequency, the SACR has a narrow Nyquist velocity limit and thus Doppler velocity folding is commonly observed. An unfolding algorithm that makes use of a first guess for the true Doppler velocity using horizontal wind measurements from the nearest sounding is described. The retrieval of the horizontal wind profile from the HS-RHI SACR scan observations and/or nearest sounding is described. The retrieved horizontal wind profile can be used to adaptively configure SACR scan strategies that depend on wind direction. Several remaining challenges are discussed, including the removal of insect and second-trip echoes. The described algorithms significantly enhance SACR data quality and constitute an important step towards the utilization of SACR measurements for cloud research.

  17. Computer simulation of residual stresses/distortion and structural change in the course of scanning induction hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Ikuta, F.; Arimoto, K.; Inoue, T.

    1996-12-31

    Simulated results of structural change, residual stresses and distortion are presented for carbon steel cylinder in the scanning-type induction hardening process by a CAE system {open_quotes}HEARTS (HEAt tReaTment Simulation system){close_quotes}. The system HEARTS has been developed to simulate heat treatment processes based on {open_quotes}metallo-thermo-mechanics{close_quotes} available for describing the coupling effect between metallurgical change due to phase transformation, temperature and inelastic stress/strain. A steel cylinder is treated as an axisymmetric model with scanning internal heat generation and convection boundary. The results under different scanning velocity and magnitude of the heat source from induction coil are compared with experimental data of distortions, volume fraction of metallic phases as well as residual stresses.

  18. Perceptions of Control and Use of Control Options in Computer-Assisted Video Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gay, Geri; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discussion of the effectiveness of learner control in computer assisted instruction focuses on a study of undergraduates at Cornell University using an interactive videodisc lesson on waterfowl identification. Opportunities for students to modify the delivery of the program are described, and the effects of student expectations of control on…

  19. Vibrational computing: simulation of a full adder by optimal control.

    PubMed

    Bomble, L; Lauvergnat, D; Remacle, F; Desouter-Lecomte, M

    2008-02-14

    Within the context of vibrational molecular quantum computing, we investigate the implementation of a full addition of two binary digits and a carry that provides the sum and the carry out. Four qubits are necessary and they are encoded into four different normal vibrational modes of a molecule. We choose the bromoacetyl chloride molecule because it possesses four bright infrared active modes. The ground and first excited states of each mode form the one-qubit computational basis set. Two approaches are proposed for the realization of the full addition. In the first one, we optimize a pulse that implements directly the entire addition by a single unitary transformation. In the second one, we decompose the full addition in elementary quantum gates, following a scheme proposed by Vedral et al. [Phys. Rev. A 54, 147 (1996)]. Four elementary quantum gates are necessary, two two-qubit CNOT gates (controlled NOT) and two three-qubit TOFFOLI gates (controlled-controlled NOT). All the logic operations consist in one-qubit flip. The logic implementation is therefore quasiclassical and the readout is based on a population analysis of the vibrational modes that does not take the phases into account. The fields are optimized by the multitarget extension of the optimal control theory involving all the transformations among the 2(4) qubit states. A single cycle of addition without considering the preparation or the measure or copy of the result can be carried out in a very competitive time, on a picosecond time scale. PMID:18282031

  20. A unified method for evaluating real-time computer controllers: A case study. [aircraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, K. G.; Krishna, C. M.; Lee, Y. H.

    1982-01-01

    A real time control system consists of a synergistic pair, that is, a controlled process and a controller computer. Performance measures for real time controller computers are defined on the basis of the nature of this synergistic pair. A case study of a typical critical controlled process is presented in the context of new performance measures that express the performance of both controlled processes and real time controllers (taken as a unit) on the basis of a single variable: controller response time. Controller response time is a function of current system state, system failure rate, electrical and/or magnetic interference, etc., and is therefore a random variable. Control overhead is expressed as a monotonically nondecreasing function of the response time and the system suffers catastrophic failure, or dynamic failure, if the response time for a control task exceeds the corresponding system hard deadline, if any. A rigorous probabilistic approach is used to estimate the performance measures. The controlled process chosen for study is an aircraft in the final stages of descent, just prior to landing. First, the performance measures for the controller are presented. Secondly, control algorithms for solving the landing problem are discussed and finally the impact of the performance measures on the problem is analyzed.

  1. A versatile computer-controlled biological stimulus sequencer.

    PubMed

    Boyechko, G; Bose, D

    1984-08-01

    A computer-controlled stimulus sequencer has been developed. This device can be controlled by several commonly available, inexpensive 8-bit microcomputers in which the address, data, and control lines are externally accessible. Although the Apple implementation has been described, a similar interface has also been devised for the Radio Shack Color Computer. The hardware relies on the Rockwell Versatile Interface Adapter (VIA) chip (which has two 16-bit timers capable of functioning as frequency dividers, event counters, or one-shots) and a 12-bit digital-to-analog converter (DAC) chip. This hardware combination, along with software written in Basic and machine language (stored in an EPROM for turn-key operation), allows creation of a large number of unique trains that can be chained together in any sequence. This is aided by storing the train characteristics economically in the computer memory and chaining different train parameters in a link-list. Several train parameters can be incremented or decremented manually by a pair of keys. The amplitude of the train can be changed manually or under program control. Once created, the trains can be edited on the run or deleted from the sequence. The device also generates a trigger pulse that can be referenced to any pulse in a train and can be used to pretrigger an oscilloscope. The software has provision for detecting an external signal, and this information can be used to modify train parameters. The interface is interrupt driven and therefore does not require continuous use of the Basic interpreter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. JPL control/structure interaction test bed real-time control computer architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    1989-01-01

    The Control/Structure Interaction Program is a technology development program for spacecraft that exhibit interactions between the control system and structural dynamics. The program objectives include development and verification of new design concepts - such as active structure - and new tools - such as combined structure and control optimization algorithm - and their verification in ground and possibly flight test. A focus mission spacecraft was designed based upon a space interferometer and is the basis for design of the ground test article. The ground test bed objectives include verification of the spacecraft design concepts, the active structure elements and certain design tools such as the new combined structures and controls optimization tool. In anticipation of CSI technology flight experiments, the test bed control electronics must emulate the computation capacity and control architectures of space qualifiable systems as well as the command and control networks that will be used to connect investigators with the flight experiment hardware. The Test Bed facility electronics were functionally partitioned into three units: a laboratory data acquisition system for structural parameter identification and performance verification; an experiment supervisory computer to oversee the experiment, monitor the environmental parameters and perform data logging; and a multilevel real-time control computing system. The design of the Test Bed electronics is presented along with hardware and software component descriptions. The system should break new ground in experimental control electronics and is of interest to anyone working in the verification of control concepts for large structures.

  3. Computer-controlled compression molding system for composite processing

    SciTech Connect

    Farouk, A.; Kwon, T.H. )

    1990-07-01

    A simple, inexpensive yet flexible compression molding and cure monitoring system has been developed and used in studying the processing of advanced polymer composites. Compression molding is a promising method for manufacturing thermoset polymer composites which find usage in aerospace applications. The processing history of these composites determines their final properties. To improve quality and enable mass production, the processing-property relations need to be studied in detail. Process control and process monitoring as well as provision for user intervention during processing is essential in studying such problems. The computer-controlled molding system together with the control and data acquisition software aims at demonstrating how such a system may be built from off-the-shelf components.

  4. Integrated command, control, communications and computation system functional architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooley, C. G.; Gilbert, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    The functional architecture for an integrated command, control, communications, and computation system applicable to the command and control portion of the NASA End-to-End Data. System is described including the downlink data processing and analysis functions required to support the uplink processes. The functional architecture is composed of four elements: (1) the functional hierarchy which provides the decomposition and allocation of the command and control functions to the system elements; (2) the key system features which summarize the major system capabilities; (3) the operational activity threads which illustrate the interrelationahip between the system elements; and (4) the interfaces which illustrate those elements that originate or generate data and those elements that use the data. The interfaces also provide a description of the data and the data utilization and access techniques.

  5. 3D light scanning macrography.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Keller, M; Robert, D

    2001-08-01

    The technique of 3D light scanning macrography permits the non-invasive surface scanning of small specimens at magnifications up to 200x. Obviating both the problem of limited depth of field inherent to conventional close-up macrophotography and the metallic coating required by scanning electron microscopy, 3D light scanning macrography provides three-dimensional digital images of intact specimens without the loss of colour, texture and transparency information. This newly developed technique offers a versatile, portable and cost-efficient method for the non-invasive digital and photographic documentation of small objects. Computer controlled device operation and digital image acquisition facilitate fast and accurate quantitative morphometric investigations, and the technique offers a broad field of research and educational applications in biological, medical and materials sciences. PMID:11489078

  6. [Computer-assisted control of a public health inventory].

    PubMed

    Beckmann, W; Dörr, M; Höhmann, J

    1989-04-01

    To cope with its tasks more efficiently, the Public Health Office of the "Märkische Kreis" in 1985 installed an information system on the basis of electronic data processing, the so-called "hygiene inventory". Initially, the introduction of this system into the local Public Health Office is described. The structure and organization of the programme and its performance are then discussed and exemplified by the control of drinking water supply plants. The disadvantages of computer use are by no means overlooked. The latter include the necessity to initially put in a considerable number of data and to constantly store new results, initial acceptance problems and the poor autonomy of the system. The most important advantages of computer-aided processing are optimum evaluation possibilities, centralised scheduling, automated production of letters, efficient drafting of the annual health report and the possibility of exchanging data media. PMID:2525684

  7. Image quality evaluation and control of computer-generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Uetake, Hiroki

    2016-03-01

    Image quality of the computer-generated holograms are usually evaluated subjectively. For example, the re- constructed image from the hologram is compared with other holograms, or evaluated by the double-stimulus impairment scale method to compare with the original image. This paper proposes an objective image quality evaluation of a computer-generated hologram by evaluating both diffraction efficiency and peak signal-to-noise ratio. Theory and numerical experimental results are shown on Fourier transform transmission hologram of both amplitude and phase modulation. Results without the optimized random phase show that the amplitude transmission hologram gives better peak signal-to noise ratio, but the phase transmission hologram provides about 10 times higher diffraction efficiency to the amplitude type. As an optimized phase hologram, Kinoform is evaluated. In addition, we investigate to control image quality by non-linear operation.

  8. Nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation with all-resonant control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zheng-Yuan; Zhou, Jian; Chu, Yao-Ming; Hu, Yong

    2016-08-01

    The implementation of holonomic quantum computation on superconducting quantum circuits is challenging due to the general requirement of controllable complicated coupling between multilevel systems. Here we solve this problem by proposing a scalable circuit QED lattice with simple realization of a universal set of nonadiabatic holonomic quantum gates. Compared with the existing proposals, we can achieve both the single and two logical qubit gates in a tunable and all-resonant way through a hybrid transmon-transmission-line encoding of the logical qubits in the decoherence-free subspaces. This distinct advantage thus leads to quantum gates with very fast speeds and consequently very high fidelities. Therefore, our scheme paves a promising way towards the practical realization of high-fidelity nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation.

  9. A comparison study of 11C-methionine and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans in evaluation of patients with recurrent brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rajnish; D’Souza, Maria; Jaimini, Abhinav; Hazari, Puja Panwar; Saw, Sanjeev; Pandey, Santosh; Singh, Dinesh; Solanki, Yachna; Kumar, Nitin; Mishra, Anil K.; Mondal, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: 11C-methonine ([11C]-MET) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is a well-established technique for evaluation of tumor for diagnosis and treatment planning in neurooncology. [11C]-MET reflects amino acid transport and has been shown to be more sensitive than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in stereotactic biopsy planning. This study compared fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET-CT and MET PET-CT in the detection of various brain tumors. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four subjects of brain tumor treated by surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiotherapy were subjected to [18F]-FDG, [11C]-MET, and MRI scan. The lesion was analyzed semiquantitatively using tumor to normal contralateral ratio. The diagnosis was confirmed by surgery, stereotactic biopsy, clinical follow-up, MRI, or CT scans. Results: Tumor recurrence was found in 5 out of 22 patients on [F-18] FDG scan while [11C]-MET was able to detect recurrence in 18 out of 22 patients in low-grade gliomas. Two of these patients were false positive for the presence of recurrence of tumor and later found to be harboring necrosis. Among oligodendroglioma, medulloblastoma and high-grade glioma out of 42 patients 39 were found to be concordant MET and FDG scans. On semiquantitative analysis, mean T/NT ratio was found to be 2.96 ± 0.94 for lesions positive for recurrence of tumors and 1.18 ± 0.74 for lesions negative for recurrence of tumor on [11C]-MET scan. While the ratio for FDG scan on semiquantitative analysis was found to be 2.05 ± 1.04 for lesions positive for recurrence of tumors and 0.52 ± 0.15 for lesions negative for recurrence of tumors. Conclusion: The study highlight that [11C]-MET is superior to [18F]-FDG PET scans to detect recurrence in low-grade glioma. A cut-off value of target to nontarget value of 1.47 is a useful parameter to distinguish benign from malignant lesion on an [11C]-MET Scan. Both [18F]-FDG and [11C]-MET scans were found to be useful in high-grade astrocytoma

  10. Scanning ARM Cloud Radars Part II. Data Quality Control and Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kollias, Pavlos; Jo, Ieng; Borque, Paloma; Tatarevic, Aleksandra; Lamer, Katia; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Widener, Kevin B.; Johnson, Karen; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2013-10-04

    The Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACR’s) are the primary instruments for documenting the four-dimensional structure and evolution of clouds within a 20-30 km radius from the ARM fixed and mobile sites. Here, the post-processing of the calibrated SACR measurements is discussed. First, a feature mask algorithm that objectively determines the presence of significant radar returns is described. The feature mask algorithm is based on the statistical properties of radar receiver noise. It accounts for atmospheric emission and is applicable even for SACR profiles with few or no signal-free range gates. Using the nearest-in-time atmospheric sounding, the SACR radar reflectivities are corrected for gaseous attenuation (water vapor and oxygen) using a line-by-line absorption model. Despite having a high pulse repetition frequency, the SACR has a narrow Nyquist velocity limit and thus Doppler velocity folding is commonly observed. An unfolding algorithm that makes use of a first guess for the true Doppler velocity using horizontal wind measurements from the nearest sounding is described. The retrieval of the horizontal wind profile from the Hemispherical Sky – Range Height Indicator SACR scan observations and/or nearest sounding is described. The retrieved horizontal wind profile can be used to adaptively configure SACR scan strategies that depend on wind direction. Several remaining challenges are discussed, including the removal of insect and second-trip echoes. The described algorithms significantly enhance SACR data quality and constitute an important step towards the utilization of SACR measurements for cloud research.

  11. Controlled manipulation of gadolinium-coordinated supramolecules by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Urgel, José I; Ecija, David; Auwärter, Willi; Barth, Johannes V

    2014-03-12

    Coordination bonding between para-quarterphenyl-dicarbonitrile linkers and gadolinium on Ag(111) has been exploited to construct pentameric mononuclear supramolecules, consisting of a rare-earth center surrounded by five molecular linkers. By employing a scanning tunneling microscope tip, a manipulation protocol was developed to position individual pentamers on the surface. In addition, the tip was used to extract and replace individual linkers yielding tetrameric, pentameric, nonameric, and dodecameric metallosupramolecular arrangements. These results open new avenues toward advanced nanofabrication methods and rare-earth nanochemistry by combining the versatility of metal-ligand interactions and atomistic manipulation capabilities.

  12. Upgrading NASA/DOSE laser ranging system control computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricklefs, Randall L.; Cheek, Jack; Seery, Paul J.; Emenheiser, Kenneth S.; Hanrahan, William P., III; Mcgarry, Jan F.

    1993-01-01

    Laser ranging systems now managed by the NASA Dynamics of the Solid Earth (DOSE) and operated by the Bendix Field Engineering Corporation, the University of Hawaii, and the University of Texas have produced a wealth on interdisciplinary scientific data over the last three decades. Despite upgrades to the most of the ranging station subsystems, the control computers remain a mix of 1970's vintage minicomputers. These encompass a wide range of vendors, operating systems, and languages, making hardware and software support increasingly difficult. Current technology allows replacement of controller computers at a relatively low cost while maintaining excellent processing power and a friendly operating environment. The new controller systems are now being designed using IBM-PC-compatible 80486-based microcomputers, a real-time Unix operating system (LynxOS), and X-windows/Motif IB, and serial interfaces have been chosen. This design supports minimizing short and long term costs by relying on proven standards for both hardware and software components. Currently, the project is in the design and prototyping stage with the first systems targeted for production in mid-1993.

  13. Computational motor control as a window to understanding schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Jun; Asai, Tomohisa; Imamizu, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    In addition to mental disorders such as attention, emotion, delusions, hallucinations, and difficulties in social skills, the patients with schizophrenia exhibits significant abnormality in sensorimotor perception and control. To seek a neurobiological cause of the heterogeneous symptoms in schizophrenia, we focused on the impaired inference mechanism of the self-agency of the schizophrenia's brain where the sensory outcome generated by the self-initiated action was misattributed to the other agent's action. By developing a novel computational model of agency experience using a Bayesian decision making framework, we united the computational mechanisms of agency and motor control via internal model: a model for one to predict the sensory consequence of action. Our theory based on optimal feedback control with Kalman filtering successfully predicted a variety of schizophrenia's motor abnormalities assuming a deformed internal model. To discuss the plausibility of these model predictions, we reviewed literature that might support these predictions. We further proposed some experiments that potentially examine the proposed model of schizophrenia. Our approach in investigating a problem of mind by projecting it on the coordinates system of the embodiment effectively shed light on a central neuropathology of this disease that had been latent behind the observed behaviors. PMID:26592778

  14. Characterization of a Recoverable Flight Control Computer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malekpour, Mahyar; Torres, Wilfredo

    1999-01-01

    The design and development of a Closed-Loop System to study and evaluate the performance of the Honeywell Recoverable Computer System (RCS) in electromagnetic environments (EME) is presented. The development of a Windows-based software package to handle the time-critical communication of data and commands between the RCS and flight simulation code in real-time while meeting the stringent hard deadlines is also submitted. The performance results of the RCS and characteristics of its upset recovery scheme while exercising flight control laws under ideal conditions as well as in the presence of electromagnetic fields are also discussed.

  15. Controllable coherent population transfers in superconducting qubits for quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Wei, L F; Johansson, J R; Cen, L X; Ashhab, S; Nori, Franco

    2008-03-21

    We propose an approach to coherently transfer populations between selected quantum states in one- and two-qubit systems by using controllable Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passages. These evolution-time insensitive transfers, assisted by easily implementable single-qubit phase-shift operations, could serve as elementary logic gates for quantum computing. Specifically, this proposal could be conveniently demonstrated with existing Josephson phase qubits. Our proposal can find an immediate application in the readout of these qubits. Indeed, the broken parity symmetries of the bound states in these artificial atoms provide an efficient approach to design the required adiabatic pulses.

  16. Computer model of one-dimensional equilibrium controlled sorption processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, D.B.; Stollenwerk, K.G.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical solution to the one-dimensional solute-transport equation with equilibrium-controlled sorption and a first-order irreversible-rate reaction is presented. The computer code is written in FORTRAN language, with a variety of options for input and output for user ease. Sorption reactions include Langmuir, Freundlich, and ion-exchange, with or without equal valance. General equations describing transport and reaction processes are solved by finite-difference methods, with nonlinearities accounted for by iteration. Complete documentation of the code, with examples, is included. (USGS)

  17. Cancer risk in 680 000 people exposed to computed tomography scans in childhood or adolescence: data linkage study of 11 million Australians

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Anna V; Brady, Zoe; Butler, Martin W; Goergen, Stacy K; Byrnes, Graham B; Giles, Graham G; Wallace, Anthony B; Anderson, Philip R; Guiver, Tenniel A; McGale, Paul; Cain, Timothy M; Dowty, James G; Bickerstaffe, Adrian C; Darby, Sarah C

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the cancer risk in children and adolescents following exposure to low dose ionising radiation from diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scans. Design Population based, cohort, data linkage study in Australia. Cohort members 10.9 million people identified from Australian Medicare records, aged 0-19 years on 1 January 1985 or born between 1 January 1985 and 31 December 2005; all exposures to CT scans funded by Medicare during 1985-2005 were identified for this cohort. Cancers diagnosed in cohort members up to 31 December 2007 were obtained through linkage to national cancer records. Main outcome Cancer incidence rates in individuals exposed to a CT scan more than one year before any cancer diagnosis, compared with cancer incidence rates in unexposed individuals. Results 60 674 cancers were recorded, including 3150 in 680 211 people exposed to a CT scan at least one year before any cancer diagnosis. The mean duration of follow-up after exposure was 9.5 years. Overall cancer incidence was 24% greater for exposed than for unexposed people, after accounting for age, sex, and year of birth (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.24 (95% confidence interval 1.20 to 1.29); P<0.001). We saw a dose-response relation, and the IRR increased by 0.16 (0.13 to 0.19) for each additional CT scan. The IRR was greater after exposure at younger ages (P<0.001 for trend). At 1-4, 5-9, 10-14, and 15 or more years since first exposure, IRRs were 1.35 (1.25 to 1.45), 1.25 (1.17 to 1.34), 1.14 (1.06 to 1.22), and 1.24 (1.14 to 1.34), respectively. The IRR increased significantly for many types of solid cancer (digestive organs, melanoma, soft tissue, female genital, urinary tract, brain, and thyroid); leukaemia, myelodysplasia, and some other lymphoid cancers. There was an excess of 608 cancers in people exposed to CT scans (147 brain, 356 other solid, 48 leukaemia or myelodysplasia, and 57 other lymphoid). The absolute excess incidence rate for all cancers combined was 9.38 per

  18. Region based Brain Computer Interface for a home control application.

    PubMed

    Akman Aydin, Eda; Bay, Omer Faruk; Guler, Inan

    2015-08-01

    Environment control is one of the important challenges for disabled people who suffer from neuromuscular diseases. Brain Computer Interface (BCI) provides a communication channel between the human brain and the environment without requiring any muscular activation. The most important expectation for a home control application is high accuracy and reliable control. Region-based paradigm is a stimulus paradigm based on oddball principle and requires selection of a target at two levels. This paper presents an application of region based paradigm for a smart home control application for people with neuromuscular diseases. In this study, a region based stimulus interface containing 49 commands was designed. Five non-disabled subjects were attended to the experiments. Offline analysis results of the experiments yielded 95% accuracy for five flashes. This result showed that region based paradigm can be used to select commands of a smart home control application with high accuracy in the low number of repetitions successfully. Furthermore, a statistically significant difference was not observed between the level accuracies.

  19. Effective Control of Computationally Simulated Wing Rock in Subsonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Menzies, Margaret A.

    1997-01-01

    The unsteady compressible, full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations and the Euler equations of rigid-body dynamics are sequentially solved to simulate the delta wing rock phenomenon. The NS equations are solved time accurately, using the implicit, upwind, Roe flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. The rigid-body dynamics equations are solved using a four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme. Once the wing reaches the limit-cycle response, an active control model using a mass injection system is applied from the wing surface to suppress the limit-cycle oscillation. The active control model is based on state feedback and the control law is established using pole placement techniques. The control law is based on the feedback of two states: the roll-angle and roll velocity. The primary model of the computational applications consists of a 80 deg swept, sharp edged, delta wing at 30 deg angle of attack in a freestream of Mach number 0.1 and Reynolds number of 0.4 x 10(exp 6). With a limit-cycle roll amplitude of 41.1 deg, the control model is applied, and the results show that within one and one half cycles of oscillation, the wing roll amplitude and velocity are brought to zero.

  20. (Man-machine interface of computer controlled reactors)

    SciTech Connect

    Knee, H.E.

    1989-11-10

    The traveler and Mr. J.D. White, also of ORNL, met with management and research personnel at the Halden Reactor Project (HRP) in Halden, Norway to assess the potential for future collaborative research between ORNL and the HRP in the areas of advanced controls and man-machine interface. The travelers were provided with two-and-a-half days of briefings and demonstrations that addressed a number of computer-oriented support systems (COSSs) and an integrated surveillance and control system (ISACS). The purpose of the ISACs is to integrate the various COSSs into a super'' support environment for the human operator of a nuclear power plant. The HRP has not only developed a number of COSSs over the past decade, it has also built an experimental environment in which to evaluate the emerging support systems, and to examine the impact on human performance. Most of their research has focused on nuclear-oriented informational displays for the operator, with little to no emphasis on control. The Halden experimental environment and expertise in displays, coupled with ORNL's recognized expertise in the area of advanced controls, could provide strong control system/room design support for DOE's Advanced Reactor Designs, especially the Advanced Liquid Metal Concept.

  1. Soft tissue-preserving computer-aided impression: a novel concept using ultrasonic 3D-scanning.

    PubMed

    Vollborn, Thorsten; Habor, Daniel; Pekam, Fabrice Chuembou; Heger, Stefan; Marotti, Juliana; Reich, Sven; Wolfart, Stefan; Tinschert, Joachim; Radermacher, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Subgingival preparations are often affected by blood and saliva during impression taking, regardless of whether one is using compound impression techniques or intraoral digital scanning methods. The latter are currently based on optical principles and therefore also need clean and dry surfaces. In contrast, ultrasonic waves are able to non-invasively penetrate gingiva, saliva, and blood, leading to decisive advantages, as cleaning and drying of the oral cavity becomes unnecessary. In addition, the application of ultrasound may facilitate the detection of subgingival structures without invasive manipulation, thereby reducing the risk of secondary infection and treatment time, and increasing patient comfort. Ultrasound devices commonly available for medical application and for the testing of materials are only suitable to a limited extent, as their resolution, precision, and design do not fulfill the requirements for intraoral scanning. The aim of this article is to describe the development of a novel ultrasound technology that enables soft tissue-preserving digital impressions of preparations for the CAD/CAM-based production of dental prostheses. The concept and development of the high-resolution ultrasound technique and the corresponding intraoral scanning system, as well as the integration into the CAD/CAM process chain, is presented.

  2. Applications of Computational Methods for Dynamic Stability and Control Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Spence, Angela M.

    2004-01-01

    Initial steps in the application o f a low-order panel method computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code to the calculation of aircraft dynamic stability and control (S&C) derivatives are documented. Several capabilities, unique to CFD but not unique to this particular demonstration, are identified and demonstrated in this paper. These unique capabilities complement conventional S&C techniques and they include the ability to: 1) perform maneuvers without the flow-kinematic restrictions and support interference commonly associated with experimental S&C facilities, 2) easily simulate advanced S&C testing techniques, 3) compute exact S&C derivatives with uncertainty propagation bounds, and 4) alter the flow physics associated with a particular testing technique from those observed in a wind or water tunnel test in order to isolate effects. Also presented are discussions about some computational issues associated with the simulation of S&C tests and selected results from numerous surface grid resolution studies performed during the course of the study.

  3. Growth Control and Disease Mechanisms in Computational Embryogeny

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Andrew A.; Yogev, Or; Antonsson, Erik K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents novel approach to applying growth control and diseases mechanisms in computational embryogeny. Our method, which mimics fundamental processes from biology, enables individuals to reach maturity in a controlled process through a stochastic environment. Three different mechanisms were implemented; disease mechanisms, gene suppression, and thermodynamic balancing. This approach was integrated as part of a structural evolutionary model. The model evolved continuum 3-D structures which support an external load. By using these mechanisms we were able to evolve individuals that reached a fixed size limit through the growth process. The growth process was an integral part of the complete development process. The size of the individuals was determined purely by the evolutionary process where different individuals matured to different sizes. Individuals which evolved with these characteristics have been found to be very robust for supporting a wide range of external loads.

  4. Computational models of signalling networks for non-linear control.

    PubMed

    Fuente, Luis A; Lones, Michael A; Turner, Alexander P; Stepney, Susan; Caves, Leo S; Tyrrell, Andy M

    2013-05-01

    Artificial signalling networks (ASNs) are a computational approach inspired by the signalling processes inside cells that decode outside environmental information. Using evolutionary algorithms to induce complex behaviours, we show how chaotic dynamics in a conservative dynamical system can be controlled. Such dynamics are of particular interest as they mimic the inherent complexity of non-linear physical systems in the real world. Considering the main biological interpretations of cellular signalling, in which complex behaviours and robust cellular responses emerge from the interaction of multiple pathways, we introduce two ASN representations: a stand-alone ASN and a coupled ASN. In particular we note how sophisticated cellular communication mechanisms can lead to effective controllers, where complicated problems can be divided into smaller and independent tasks.

  5. Mechanical gate control for atom-by-atom cluster assembly with scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Yurtsever, Ayhan; Hirayama, Naoki; Abe, Masayuki; Morita, Seizo

    2014-07-11

    Nanoclusters supported on substrates are of great importance in physics and chemistry as well as in technical applications, such as single-electron transistors and nanocatalysts. The properties of nanoclusters differ significantly from those of either the constituent atoms or the bulk solid, and are highly sensitive to size and chemical composition. Here we propose a novel atom gating technique to assemble various atom clusters composed of a defined number of atoms at room temperature. The present gating operation is based on the transfer of single diffusing atoms among nanospaces governed by gates, which can be opened in response to the chemical interaction force with a scanning probe microscope tip. This method provides an alternative way to create pre-designed atom clusters with different chemical compositions and to evaluate their chemical stabilities, thus enabling investigation into the influence that a single dopant atom incorporated into the host clusters has on a given cluster stability.

  6. Computational Analysis of the Hypothalamic Control of Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Tabe-Bordbar, Shayan; Anastasio, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Food-intake control is mediated by a heterogeneous network of different neural subtypes, distributed over various hypothalamic nuclei and other brain structures, in which each subtype can release more than one neurotransmitter or neurohormone. The complexity of the interactions of these subtypes poses a challenge to understanding their specific contributions to food-intake control, and apparent consistencies in the dataset can be contradicted by new findings. For example, the growing consensus that arcuate nucleus neurons expressing Agouti-related peptide (AgRP neurons) promote feeding, while those expressing pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC neurons) suppress feeding, is contradicted by findings that low AgRP neuron activity and high POMC neuron activity can be associated with high levels of food intake. Similarly, the growing consensus that GABAergic neurons in the lateral hypothalamus suppress feeding is contradicted by findings suggesting the opposite. Yet the complexity of the food-intake control network admits many different network behaviors. It is possible that anomalous associations between the responses of certain neural subtypes and feeding are actually consistent with known interactions, but their effect on feeding depends on the responses of the other neural subtypes in the network. We explored this possibility through computational analysis. We made a computer model of the interactions between the hypothalamic and other neural subtypes known to be involved in food-intake control, and optimized its parameters so that model behavior matched observed behavior over an extensive test battery. We then used specialized computational techniques to search the entire model state space, where each state represents a different configuration of the responses of the units (model neural subtypes) in the network. We found that the anomalous associations between the responses of certain hypothalamic neural subtypes and feeding are actually consistent with the known structure

  7. Computational Analysis of the Hypothalamic Control of Food Intake.

    PubMed

    Tabe-Bordbar, Shayan; Anastasio, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Food-intake control is mediated by a heterogeneous network of different neural subtypes, distributed over various hypothalamic nuclei and other brain structures, in which each subtype can release more than one neurotransmitter or neurohormone. The complexity of the interactions of these subtypes poses a challenge to understanding their specific contributions to food-intake control, and apparent consistencies in the dataset can be contradicted by new findings. For example, the growing consensus that arcuate nucleus neurons expressing Agouti-related peptide (AgRP neurons) promote feeding, while those expressing pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC neurons) suppress feeding, is contradicted by findings that low AgRP neuron activity and high POMC neuron activity can be associated with high levels of food intake. Similarly, the growing consensus that GABAergic neurons in the lateral hypothalamus suppress feeding is contradicted by findings suggesting the opposite. Yet the complexity of the food-intake control network admits many different network behaviors. It is possible that anomalous associations between the responses of certain neural subtypes and feeding are actually consistent with known interactions, but their effect on feeding depends on the responses of the other neural subtypes in the network. We explored this possibility through computational analysis. We made a computer model of the interactions between the hypothalamic and other neural subtypes known to be involved in food-intake control, and optimized its parameters so that model behavior matched observed behavior over an extensive test battery. We then used specialized computational techniques to search the entire model state space, where each state represents a different configuration of the responses of the units (model neural subtypes) in the network. We found that the anomalous associations between the responses of certain hypothalamic neural subtypes and feeding are actually consistent with the known structure

  8. Hydro- abrasive jet machining modeling for computer control and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groppetti, R.; Jovane, F.

    1993-06-01

    Use of hydro-abrasive jet machining (HAJM) for machining a wide variety of materials—metals, poly-mers, ceramics, fiber-reinforced composites, metal-matrix composites, and bonded or hybridized mate-rials—primarily for two- and three-dimensional cutting and also for drilling, turning, milling, and deburring, has been reported. However, the potential of this innovative process has not been explored fully. This article discusses process control, integration, and optimization of HAJM to establish a plat-form for the implementation of real-time adaptive control constraint (ACC), adaptive control optimiza-tion (ACO), and CAD/CAM integration. It presents the approach followed and the main results obtained during the development, implementation, automation, and integration of a HAJM cell and its computer-ized controller. After a critical analysis of the process variables and models reported in the literature to identify process variables and to define a process model suitable for HAJM real-time control and optimi-zation, to correlate process variables and parameters with machining results, and to avoid expensive and time-consuming experiments for determination of the optimal machining conditions, a process predic-tion and optimization model was identified and implemented. Then, the configuration of the HAJM cell, architecture, and multiprogramming operation of the controller in terms of monitoring, control, process result prediction, and process condition optimization were analyzed. This prediction and optimization model for selection of optimal machining conditions using multi-objective programming was analyzed. Based on the definition of an economy function and a productivity function, with suitable constraints relevant to required machining quality, required kerfing depth, and available resources, the model was applied to test cases based on experimental results.

  9. Status of the National Ignition Facility Integrated Computer Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Lagin, L; Bryant, R; Carey, R; Casavant, D; Edwards, O; Ferguson, W; Krammen, J; Larson, D; Lee, A; Ludwigsen, P; Miller, M; Moses, E; Nyholm, R; Reed, R; Shelton, R; Van Arsdall, P J; Wuest, C

    2003-10-13

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. When completed, NIF will be the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing an international center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's 192 energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS). ICCS is a layered architecture of 300 front-end processors attached to nearly 60,000 control points and coordinated by supervisor subsystems in the main control room. The functional subsystems--beam control including automatic beam alignment and wavefront correction, laser pulse generation and pre-amplification, diagnostics, pulse power, and timing--implement automated shot control, archive data, and support the actions of fourteen operators at graphic consoles. Object-oriented software development uses a mixed language environment of Ada (for functional controls) and Java (for user interface and database backend). The ICCS distributed software framework uses CORBA to communicate between languages and processors. ICCS software is approximately 3/4 complete with over 750 thousand source lines of code having undergone off-line verification tests and deployed to the facility. NIF has entered the first phases of its laser commissioning program. NIF has now demonstrated the highest energy 1{omega}, 2{omega}, and 3{omega} beamlines in the world. NIF

  10. Secure Dynamic access control scheme of PHR in cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tzer-Shyong; Liu, Chia-Hui; Chen, Tzer-Long; Chen, Chin-Sheng; Bau, Jian-Guo; Lin, Tzu-Ching

    2012-12-01

    With the development of information technology and medical technology, medical information has been developed from traditional paper records into electronic medical records, which have now been widely applied. The new-style medical information exchange system "personal health records (PHR)" is gradually developed. PHR is a kind of health records maintained and recorded by individuals. An ideal personal health record could integrate personal medical information from different sources and provide complete and correct personal health and medical summary through the Internet or portable media under the requirements of security and privacy. A lot of personal health records are being utilized. The patient-centered PHR information exchange system allows the public autonomously maintain and manage personal health records. Such management is convenient for storing, accessing, and sharing personal medical records. With the emergence of Cloud computing, PHR service has been transferred to storing data into Cloud servers that the resources could be flexibly utilized and the operation cost can be reduced. Nevertheless, patients would face privacy problem when storing PHR data into Cloud. Besides, it requires a secure protection scheme to encrypt the medical records of each patient for storing PHR into Cloud server. In the encryption process, it would be a challenge to achieve accurately accessing to medical records and corresponding to flexibility and efficiency. A new PHR access control scheme under Cloud computing environments is proposed in this study. With Lagrange interpolation polynomial to establish a secure and effective PHR information access scheme, it allows to accurately access to PHR with security and is suitable for enormous multi-users. Moreover, this scheme also dynamically supports multi-users in Cloud computing environments with personal privacy and offers legal authorities to access to PHR. From security and effectiveness analyses, the proposed PHR access

  11. The Effectiveness of Gaze-Contingent Control in Computer Games.

    PubMed

    Orlov, Paul A; Apraksin, Nikolay

    2015-01-01

    Eye-tracking technology and gaze-contingent control in human-computer interaction have become an objective reality. This article reports on a series of eye-tracking experiments, in which we concentrated on one aspect of gaze-contingent interaction: Its effectiveness compared with mouse-based control in a computer strategy game. We propose a measure for evaluating the effectiveness of interaction based on "the time of recognition" the game unit. In this article, we use this measure to compare gaze- and mouse-contingent systems, and we present the analysis of the differences as a function of the number of game units. Our results indicate that performance of gaze-contingent interaction is typically higher than mouse manipulation in a visual searching task. When tested on 60 subjects, the results showed that the effectiveness of gaze-contingent systems over 1.5 times higher. In addition, we obtained that eye behavior stays quite stabile with or without mouse interaction.

  12. Brain-computer interface control along instructed paths

    PubMed Central

    Sadtler, P T; Ryu, S I; Tyler-Kabara, E C; Yu, B M; Batista, A P

    2015-01-01

    Objective Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are being developed to assist paralyzed people and amputees by translating neural activity into movements of a computer cursor or prosthetic limb. Here we introduce a novel BCI task paradigm, intended to help accelerate improvements to BCI systems. Through this task, we can push the performance limits of BCI systems, we can quantify more accurately how well a BCI system captures the user’s intent, and we can increase the richness of the BCI movement repertoire. Approach We have implemented an instructed path task, wherein the user must drive a cursor along a visible path. The instructed path task provides a versatile framework to increase the difficulty of the task and thereby push the limits of performance. Relative to traditional point-to-point tasks, the instructed path task allows more thorough analysis of decoding performance and greater richness of movement kinematics. Main results We demonstrate that monkeys are able to perform the instructed path task in a closed-loop BCI setting. We further investigate how the performance under BCI control compares to native arm control, whether users can decrease their movement variability in the face of a more demanding task, and how the kinematic richness is enhanced in this task. Significance The use of the instructed path task has the potential to accelerate the development of BCI systems and their clinical translation. PMID:25605498

  13. Computer controlled pump unit cuts power, increases output

    SciTech Connect

    Rosman, A.; Nofal, M.

    1996-11-01

    OroNegro, Inc., a small, high-tech Southern California operating company with a stated mission to find and utilize innovations that lower production costs, adopted that philosophy in applying a new sucker rod pumping system in its shallow, heavy oil fields in Newhall and Bakersfield, California. Six new hydraulic, computer-controlled pumping (CCP) units developed and supplied by DynaPump, Inc., also of Southern California, have been installed, and are producing significant operating and economic benefits. Basic CCP unit features include a very long stroke with a charged gas (nitrogen) counterbalance and automatic computer-controlled speed, to maximize flow. In one case described, an industry-standard 456 (456,000 in. lb torque), 100-hp unit was replaced by a 60-hp CCP unit, nearly doubling pump output. Field installations and pumping systems in Newhall field, and tests in Kern Front field are described, along with the operator`s views on other CCP applications, including its use in deep wells.

  14. A Virtualized Computing Platform For Fusion Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, T; Adams, P; Fisher, J; Talbot, A

    2011-03-18

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for multiple experimental diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. 2,500 servers, 400 network devices and 700 terabytes of networked attached storage provide the foundation for NIF's Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) and Experimental Data Archive. This talk discusses the rationale & benefits for server virtualization in the context of an operational experimental facility, the requirements discovery process used by the NIF teams to establish evaluation criteria for virtualization alternatives, the processes and procedures defined to enable virtualization of servers in a timeframe that did not delay the execution of experimental campaigns and the lessons the NIF teams learned along the way. The virtualization architecture ultimately selected for ICCS is based on the Open Source Xen computing platform and 802.1Q open networking standards. The specific server and network configurations needed to ensure performance and high availability of the control system infrastructure will be discussed.

  15. Brain-computer interface control along instructed paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadtler, P. T.; Ryu, S. I.; Tyler-Kabara, E. C.; Yu, B. M.; Batista, A. P.

    2015-02-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are being developed to assist paralyzed people and amputees by translating neural activity into movements of a computer cursor or prosthetic limb. Here we introduce a novel BCI task paradigm, intended to help accelerate improvements to BCI systems. Through this task, we can push the performance limits of BCI systems, we can quantify more accurately how well a BCI system captures the user’s intent, and we can increase the richness of the BCI movement repertoire. Approach. We have implemented an instructed path task, wherein the user must drive a cursor along a visible path. The instructed path task provides a versatile framework to increase the difficulty of the task and thereby push the limits of performance. Relative to traditional point-to-point tasks, the instructed path task allows more thorough analysis of decoding performance and greater richness of movement kinematics. Main results. We demonstrate that monkeys are able to perform the instructed path task in a closed-loop BCI setting. We further investigate how the performance under BCI control compares to native arm control, whether users can decrease their movement variability in the face of a more demanding task, and how the kinematic richness is enhanced in this task. Significance. The use of the instructed path task has the potential to accelerate the development of BCI systems and their clinical translation.

  16. Flexible structure control experiments using a real-time workstation for computer-aided control engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stieber, Michael E.

    1989-01-01

    A Real-Time Workstation for Computer-Aided Control Engineering has been developed jointly by the Communications Research Centre (CRC) and Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (RUB), West Germany. The system is presently used for the development and experimental verification of control techniques for large space systems with significant structural flexibility. The Real-Time Workstation essentially is an implementation of RUB's extensive Computer-Aided Control Engineering package KEDDC on an INTEL micro-computer running under the RMS real-time operating system. The portable system supports system identification, analysis, control design and simulation, as well as the immediate implementation and test of control systems. The Real-Time Workstation is currently being used by CRC to study control/structure interaction on a ground-based structure called DAISY, whose design was inspired by a reflector antenna. DAISY emulates the dynamics of a large flexible spacecraft with the following characteristics: rigid body modes, many clustered vibration modes with low frequencies and extremely low damping. The Real-Time Workstation was found to be a very powerful tool for experimental studies, supporting control design and simulation, and conducting and evaluating tests withn one integrated environment.

  17. Simulation Analysis of Computer-Controlled pressurization for Mixture Ratio Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Leslie A.; Bishop-Behel, Karen; Benfield, Michael P. J.; Kelley, Anthony; Woodcock, Gordon R.

    2005-01-01

    A procedural code (C++) simulation was developed to investigate potentials for mixture ratio control of pressure-fed spacecraft rocket propulsion systems by measuring propellant flows, tank liquid quantities, or both, and using feedback from these measurements to adjust propellant tank pressures to set the correct operating mixture ratio for minimum propellant residuals. The pressurization system eliminated mechanical regulators in favor of a computer-controlled, servo- driven throttling valve. We found that a quasi-steady state simulation (pressure and flow transients in the pressurization systems resulting from changes in flow control valve position are ignored) is adequate for this purpose. Monte-Carlo methods are used to obtain simulated statistics on propellant depletion. Mixture ratio control algorithms based on proportional-integral-differential (PID) controller methods were developed. These algorithms actually set target tank pressures; the tank pressures are controlled by another PID controller. Simulation indicates this approach can provide reductions in residual propellants.

  18. Emulation of computer mouse control with a noninvasive brain computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Dennis J.; Krusienski, Dean J.; Sarnacki, William A.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2008-06-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) technology can provide nonmuscular communication and control to people who are severely paralyzed. BCIs can use noninvasive or invasive techniques for recording the brain signals that convey the user's commands. Although noninvasive BCIs are used for simple applications, it has frequently been assumed that only invasive BCIs, which use electrodes implanted in the brain, will be able to provide multidimensional sequential control of a robotic arm or a neuroprosthesis. The present study shows that a noninvasive BCI using scalp-recorded electroencephalographic (EEG) activity and an adaptive algorithm can provide people, including people with spinal cord injuries, with two-dimensional cursor movement and target selection. Multiple targets were presented around the periphery of a computer screen, with one designated as the correct target. The user's task was to use EEG to move a cursor from the center of the screen to the correct target and then to use an additional EEG feature to select the target. If the cursor reached an incorrect target, the user was instructed not to select it. Thus, this task emulated the key features of mouse operation. The results indicate that people with severe motor disabilities could use brain signals for sequential multidimensional movement and selection.

  19. Proceedings of the Workshop on Computational Aspects in the Control of Flexible Systems, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    Control/Structures Integration program software needs, computer aided control engineering for flexible spacecraft, computer aided design, computational efficiency and capability, modeling and parameter estimation, and control synthesis and optimization software for flexible structures and robots are among the topics discussed.

  20. Study on control strategy for coarse/fine dual-stage of step and scan lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi; Ma, Ping; Hu, Song; Li, Lanlan; Zhu, Jiangping; Sheng, Zhuang

    2012-10-01

    Lithography is one of the most important and complicated key equipments for the Integrated Circuit (IC) manufacture. The ultra-precision stage is the important subsystem of lithography and its motion performance impacts directly on the resolution and throughput of lithography. In this paper, a robust and high response speed control strategy for dual-stage manipulator is presented. The coarse/fine dual-stage uses the linear motor driven coarse (macro) positioning stage and the Lorenz plane motor driven fine (micro) positioning stage. By adopting merits of both coarse and fine actuator, a desirable system having the capacity of large workspace with high resolution of motion is enabled. The feedback controller is constructed so that the fine stage tracks the coarse stage errors. The controller is robustly designed as the master-slave control strategy. In addition, the position decoupling which translates fine stage's machine position command into its actual position command are discussed and, as a result, the overall coarse/fine dual-stage servo system exhibits robust and high response speed performance. Simulation shows that master-slave controller can much decrease positioning error and improve response speed of the coarse/fine dual-stage system.

  1. The operation of large computer-controlled manufacturing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Upton, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    This work examines methods for operation of large computer-controlled manufacturing systems, with more than 50 or so disparate CNC machines in congregation. The central theme is the development of a distributed control system, which requires minimal central supervision, and allows manufacturing system re-configuration without extensive control software re-writes. Provision is made for machines to learn from their experience and provide estimates of the time necessary to effect various tasks. Routing is opportunistic, with varying degrees of myopia depending on the prevailing situation. Necessary curtailments of opportunism are built in to the system, in order to provide a society of machines that operate in unison rather than in chaos. Negotiation and contention resolution are carried out using a UHF radio communications network, along with processing capability on both pallets and tools. Graceful and robust error recovery is facilitated by ensuring adequate pessimistic consideration of failure modes at each stage in the scheme. Theoretical models are developed and an examination is made of fundamental characteristics of auction-based scheduling methods.

  2. Thyroid scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid; Radioactive iodine uptake and scan test - thyroid; Nuclear scan - thyroid ... the test. Ask your provider or the radiology/nuclear medicine team performing the scan about taking precautions.

  3. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  4. Trace contaminant control simulation computer program, version 8.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Trace Contaminant Control Simulation computer program is a tool for assessing the performance of various process technologies for removing trace chemical contamination from a spacecraft cabin atmosphere. Included in the simulation are chemical and physical adsorption by activated charcoal, chemical adsorption by lithium hydroxide, absorption by humidity condensate, and low- and high-temperature catalytic oxidation. Means are provided for simulating regenerable as well as nonregenerable systems. The program provides an overall mass balance of chemical contaminants in a spacecraft cabin given specified generation rates. Removal rates are based on device flow rates specified by the user and calculated removal efficiencies based on cabin concentration and removal technology experimental data. Versions 1.0 through 8.0 are documented in NASA TM-108409. TM-108409 also contains a source file listing for version 8.0. Changes to version 8.0 are documented in this technical memorandum and a source file listing for the modified version, version 8.1, is provided. Detailed descriptions for the computer program subprograms are extracted from TM-108409 and modified as necessary to reflect version 8.1. Version 8.1 supersedes version 8.0. Information on a separate user's guide is available from the author.

  5. Commissioning dose computation models for spot scanning proton beams in water for a commercially available treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X. R.; Poenisch, F.; Lii, M.; Sawakuchi, G. O.; Titt, U.; Bues, M.; Song, X.; Zhang, X.; Li, Y.; Ciangaru, G.; Li, H.; Taylor, M. B.; Suzuki, K.; Mohan, R.; Gillin, M. T.; Sahoo, N.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To present our method and experience in commissioning dose models in water for spot scanning proton therapy in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: The input data required by the TPS included in-air transverse profiles and integral depth doses (IDDs). All input data were obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations that had been validated by measurements. MC-generated IDDs were converted to units of Gy mm{sup 2}/MU using the measured IDDs at a depth of 2 cm employing the largest commercially available parallel-plate ionization chamber. The sensitive area of the chamber was insufficient to fully encompass the entire lateral dose deposited at depth by a pencil beam (spot). To correct for the detector size, correction factors as a function of proton energy were defined and determined using MC. The fluence of individual spots was initially modeled as a single Gaussian (SG) function and later as a double Gaussian (DG) function. The DG fluence model was introduced to account for the spot fluence due to contributions of large angle scattering from the devices within the scanning nozzle, especially from the spot profile monitor. To validate the DG fluence model, we compared calculations and measurements, including doses at the center of spread out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) as a function of nominal field size, range, and SOBP width, lateral dose profiles, and depth doses for different widths of SOBP. Dose models were validated extensively with patient treatment field-specific measurements. Results: We demonstrated that the DG fluence model is necessary for predicting the field size dependence of dose distributions. With this model, the calculated doses at the center of SOBPs as a function of nominal field size, range, and SOBP width, lateral dose profiles and depth doses for rectangular target volumes agreed well with respective measured values. With the DG fluence model for our scanning proton beam line, we successfully treated more than 500 patients

  6. Commissioning dose computation models for spot scanning proton beams in water for a commercially available treatment planning system

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, X. R.; Poenisch, F.; Lii, M.; Sawakuchi, G. O.; Titt, U.; Bues, M.; Song, X.; Zhang, X.; Li, Y.; Ciangaru, G.; Li, H.; Taylor, M. B.; Suzuki, K.; Mohan, R.; Gillin, M. T.; Sahoo, N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To present our method and experience in commissioning dose models in water for spot scanning proton therapy in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: The input data required by the TPS included in-air transverse profiles and integral depth doses (IDDs). All input data were obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations that had been validated by measurements. MC-generated IDDs were converted to units of Gy mm2/MU using the measured IDDs at a depth of 2 cm employing the largest commercially available parallel-plate ionization chamber. The sensitive area of the chamber was insufficient to fully encompass the entire lateral dose deposited at depth by a pencil beam (spot). To correct for the detector size, correction factors as a function of proton energy were defined and determined using MC. The fluence of individual spots was initially modeled as a single Gaussian (SG) function and later as a double Gaussian (DG) function. The DG fluence model was introduced to account for the spot fluence due to contributions of large angle scattering from the devices within the scanning nozzle, especially from the spot profile monitor. To validate the DG fluence model, we compared calculations and measurements, including doses at the center of spread out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) as a function of nominal field size, range, and SOBP width, lateral dose profiles, and depth doses for different widths of SOBP. Dose models were validated extensively with patient treatment field-specific measurements. Results: We demonstrated that the DG fluence model is necessary for predicting the field size dependence of dose distributions. With this model, the calculated doses at the center of SOBPs as a function of nominal field size, range, and SOBP width, lateral dose profiles and depth doses for rectangular target volumes agreed well with respective measured values. With the DG fluence model for our scanning proton beam line, we successfully treated more than 500 patients from

  7. Computational Analysis of Cryogenic Flow Through a Control Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danes, Russell; Woods, Jody; Sulyma, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The initial efforts to develop the capability to model valves used in rocket engine component testing at Stennis Space Center are documented. An axisymmetric model of a control valve with LN2 as the working fluid was developed. The goal was to predict the effect of change in the plug/sear region of the valve prior to testing. The valve flow coefficient was predicted for a range of plug positions. Verification of the calculations was carried out to quantify the uncertainty in the numerical answer. The modeled results compared well qualitatively to experimental trends. Additionally, insights into the flow processes in the valve were obtained. Benefits from the verification process included the ability to use coarser grids and insight into ways to reduce computational time by using double precision accuracy and non-integer grid ratios. Future valve modeling activities will include shape optimization of the valve/seat region and dynamic grid modeling.

  8. Spin Models for Packet Routing Control in Computer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiguchi, T.

    We investigate packet flow in computer networks within the framework of statistical physics by using numerical simulations. As mathematical models for packet routing, we present a spin model with lattice gas spins and the one with Ising spins. Then we propose dynamic programming for optimal routing control of packet flow by using the two spin models. This is a kind of goal-directed learning for taking into account of time-dependent environment for the packets. Next we investigate a congestion problem by using the model with lattice gas spins when the packets are not sent to nodes at which their buffers are already full up with packets. Since we have found serious congestion in the packet flow, we then propose reinforcement learning for avoiding the congestion and have performed simulations on several networks including small world networks, scale free networks and so on.

  9. Differentiation of the ILO boundary chest roentgenograph (0/1 to 1/0) in asbestosis by high-resolution computed tomography scan, alveolitis, and respiratory impairment.

    PubMed

    Harkin, T J; McGuinness, G; Goldring, R; Cohen, H; Parker, J E; Crane, M; Naidich, D P; Rom, W N

    1996-01-01

    High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans have been advocated as providing greater sensitivity in detecting parenchymal opacities in asbestos-exposed individuals, especially in the presence of pleural fibrosis, and having excellent inter- and intraobserver reader interpretation. We compared the 1980 International Labor Organization (ILO) International Classification of the Radiographs of the Pneumoconioses for asbestosis with the high-resolution CT scan using a grid scoring system to better differentiate normal versus abnormal in the ILO boundary 0/1 to 1/0 chest roentgenograph. We studied 37 asbestos-exposed individuals using the ILO classification, HRCT grid scores, respiratory symptom questionnaires, pulmonary function tests, and bronchoalveolar lavage. We used Pearson correlation coefficients to evaluate the linear relationship between outcome variables and each roentgenographic method. The normal HRCT scan proved to be an excellent predictor of "normality," with pulmonary function values close to 100% for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), total lung capacity (TLC), and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO) and no increase in BAL inflammatory cells. Concordant HRCT/ILO abnormalities were associated with reduced FEV1/FVC ratio, reduced diffusing capacity, and alveolitis consistent with a definition of asbestosis. In our study, the ILO classification and HRCT grid scores were both excellent modalities for the assessment of asbestosis and its association with impaired physiology and alveolitis, with their combined use providing statistical associations with alveolitis and reduced diffusing capacity.

  10. High-speed assembly language (80386/80387) programming for laser spectra scan control and data acquisition providing improved resolution water vapor spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    An assembly language program using the Intel 80386 CPU and 80387 math co-processor chips was written to increase the speed of data gathering and processing, and provide control of a scanning CW ring dye laser system. This laser system is used in high resolution (better than 0.001 cm-1) water vapor spectroscopy experiments. Laser beam power is sensed at the input and output of white cells and the output of a Fabry-Perot. The assembly language subroutine is called from Basic, acquires the data and performs various calculations at rates greater than 150 faster than could be performed by the higher level language. The width of output control pulses generated in assembly language are 3 to 4 microsecs as compared to 2 to 3.7 millisecs for those generated in Basic (about 500 to 1000 times faster). Included are a block diagram and brief description of the spectroscopy experiment, a flow diagram of the Basic and assembly language programs, listing of the programs, scope photographs of the computer generated 5-volt pulses used for control and timing analysis, and representative water spectrum curves obtained using these programs.

  11. Single Cell Adhesion Assay Using Computer Controlled Micropipette

    PubMed Central

    Salánki, Rita; Hős, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today’s techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5–10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub

  12. Single cell adhesion assay using computer controlled micropipette.

    PubMed

    Salánki, Rita; Hős, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today's techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5-10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub-population of

  13. FibroScan (vibration-controlled transient elastography): where does it stand in the United States practice.

    PubMed

    Tapper, Elliot B; Castera, Laurent; Afdhal, Nezam H

    2015-01-01

    With widespread screening and increasingly effective treatments for patients with viral hepatitis as well as the increasing prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, the population presenting to the care of gastroenterologists and hepatologists is certain to increase. Assessment of advanced liver disease is traditionally invasive and expensive. Vibration-controlled transient elastography, commonly delivered by the FibroScan device, is an option recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the noninvasive assessment of liver disease at the point of care. Herein, we review the promise and pitfalls of vibration-controlled transient elastography with the aim of providing clinicians with a framework to interpret its results and apply this technology to the changing needs of our patients.

  14. Improve the efficiency of the inspection process via a thorough control of the scanning focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, Ernesto; Sartelli, Luca; Miyashita, Hiroyuki

    2011-11-01

    Requirements coming from the customer, as well as internal needs of improvements consequent to the increasing complexity of the layout of the newest devices, lead to the necessity of exploring all the potential improvements achievable at the mask manufacturing inspection process. A key point to manage for the better DB inspections is that of being able to achieve a proper matching between the images to be compared, tasks which is accomplished by the tool architecture by means of a pre-swath calibration process on which the quality of the focus is playing a relevant role. From here the decision to focus on this parameter aiming of working out and evaluate a different approach to be used to set the scanning focus on the inspection tool moving from the vendor theory based on the edge speed on a specific test plate to a new one based on intensity measurements into specific features on a purposely designed test vehicle. A matter of relevant importance for mask makers, either for the smoothness of the inspection process or for the homogeneity of the quality of the products being delivered, but on which any tool vendor likes providing official commitments, is that of correlating the overall performance of similar tools. This was accomplished with the new approach with two different tools achieving optical images with similar grey scale distributions into the most critical features. Moreover, the improvement of the matching of the images being compared allows extending the usage of the tool for products for which the complexity of the layout forced the inspection with different pixels or with more advanced tools, with a positive impact either on costs or on the cycle time of the masks being delivered. A careful assessment-verification of the shadowing limitation induced by the frame of the pellicle was another task successfully carried out with the new methodology, with some improvement regarding the inspectable area. The extended its usage the wider the field of

  15. Novel corrosion control coatings evaluated by scanning probe microscopy and electrochemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoliang

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM), accompanied by other electrochemical techniques, was used to characterize the corrosion protection of novel aircraft coatings and also used to study the electrodeposition of conducting polymer. The results showed that a combination of such techniques is very powerful in corrosion research and coating development. The first part of this dissertation is a comparison of two types of aircraft primer coatings: chromate-pigment-containing spray coat versus chromate-pigment-free E-coat. The results should prove useful in determining whether the E-coat should be considered as a replacement for the environmentally harmful primer coating currently used in the aircraft industry. The second part of this dissertation involves the systematic evaluation of plasma polymerized trimethylsilane (p-TMS) as an alternative chromate-free conversion coating for aluminum alloys. The evaluation was based on data from various techniques and different sources. We aimed to assess the anti-corrosion properties and to understand the anti-corrosion mechanism so that the optimum conditions and parameters to produce the most corrosion-resistant plasma p-TMS coatings could be predicted. The results revealed that a layer of aluminum oxide particles on the substrate may be very important to the plasma coating deposition and polymerization. Plasma poly TMS coating on clad Al 2024-T3 was very effective in protecting the alloy substrate in acidic media (0.1M HCl). Among various sample types, Al 2024-T3 alloy with a pure aluminum cladding plus a plasma O2+ pretreatment and a plasma TMS coating had the best corrosion resistance. The third part of this dissertation is about the corrosion protective properties of polyaniline. Our studies indicated that polyaniline exhibits some corrosion protection to a steel substrate. The probable mechanism of corrosion protection may originate from a newly formed passive oxide layer at the interface and not from any barrier property of the

  16. Computer Controlled Portable Greenhouse Climate Control System for Enhanced Energy Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datsenko, Anthony; Myer, Steve; Petties, Albert; Hustek, Ryan; Thompson, Mark

    2010-04-01

    This paper discusses a student project at Kettering University focusing on the design and construction of an energy efficient greenhouse climate control system. In order to maintain acceptable temperatures and stabilize temperature fluctuations in a portable plastic greenhouse economically, a computer controlled climate control system was developed to capture and store thermal energy incident on the structure during daylight periods and release the stored thermal energy during dark periods. The thermal storage mass for the greenhouse system consisted of a water filled base unit. The heat exchanger consisted of a system of PVC tubing. The control system used a programmable LabView computer interface to meet functional specifications that minimized temperature fluctuations and recorded data during operation. The greenhouse was a portable sized unit with a 5' x 5' footprint. Control input sensors were temperature, water level, and humidity sensors and output control devices were fan actuating relays and water fill solenoid valves. A Graphical User Interface was developed to monitor the system, set control parameters, and to provide programmable data recording times and intervals.

  17. Three-dimensional cephalometry: a method for the identification and for the orientation of the skull after cone-bean computed tomographic scan.

    PubMed

    Frongia, Gianluigi; Bracco, Pietro; Piancino, Maria Grazia

    2013-05-01

    The aims of this work were (1) to describe a method to identify new skeletal landmarks useful to define the reference system to orient the skull in a new position after cone-bean computed tomographic scan and (2) to demonstrate the reliability of this new method.Ten orthognathic patients (5 male, 5 female; mean [SD] age, 18.9 [1.2] years) underwent the cone-bean computed tomographic scan before surgery. Seven 3-dimensional skeletal measurements derived from 4 skeletal point of construction (C) (right, left, and median orbital C, and sella C) have been used for this study. Reliability has been calculated using Pearson correlation coefficient tests.Intraobserver reliability was 0.9999 for operator A (T1-T2) and 0.9999 for operator B (T1-T2); interobserver reliability was 0.9999 between the first (T1-T1) measurement and 0.9999 between the second (T2-T2).The original method is able to reduce the variability of landmark identification due to the variability of the human anatomy and the influence of the human error in cephalometric analysis. The innovation of this new method is the real possibility to use the anatomical structures in a 3-dimensional way, enhancing the reliability of the reference points.

  18. Injury depth control from combined wavelength and power tuning in scanned beam laser thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villiger, Martin; Soroka, Andrew; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Bouma, Brett E.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2011-11-01

    Laser thermal therapy represents a possible method to treat premalignant epithelial lesions of the esophagus. Dynamically conforming the thermal injury profile to a specific lesion boundary is expected to improve the efficacy of such a treatment and avoid complications. In this work, we investigated wavelength tuning as a mechanism to achieve this aimed control over injury depth by using the strong variation of water absorption close to 1900 nm. We developed a numerical model simulating in steps the photon propagation in the tissue, the diffusion of the absorbed heat, and the resulting tissue damage. The model was compared with experimental results on porcine esophageal specimens ex vivo and showed good agreement. Combined with power tuning, the wavelength agility in the range of 1860 to 1895 nm extends the injury range compared to a fixed wavelength source beyond 1 mm, while at the same time improving control over shallow depths and avoiding vaporization at the tissue surface. The combination of two or three discrete wavelengths combined at variable ratios provides similar control, and may provide an improved strategy for the treatment of endothelial lesions.

  19. Lung Texture in Serial Thoracic Computed Tomography Scans: Correlation of Radiomics-based Features With Radiation Therapy Dose and Radiation Pneumonitis Development

    SciTech Connect

    Cunliffe, Alexandra; Armato, Samuel G.; Castillo, Richard; Pham, Ngoc; Guerrero, Thomas; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between radiation dose and change in a set of mathematical intensity- and texture-based features and to determine the ability of texture analysis to identify patients who develop radiation pneumonitis (RP). Methods and Materials: A total of 106 patients who received radiation therapy (RT) for esophageal cancer were retrospectively identified under institutional review board approval. For each patient, diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired before (0-168 days) and after (5-120 days) RT, and a treatment planning CT scan with an associated dose map was obtained. 32- × 32-pixel regions of interest (ROIs) were randomly identified in the lungs of each pre-RT scan. ROIs were subsequently mapped to the post-RT scan and the planning scan dose map by using deformable image registration. The changes in 20 feature values (ΔFV) between pre- and post-RT scan ROIs were calculated. Regression modeling and analysis of variance were used to test the relationships between ΔFV, mean ROI dose, and development of grade ≥2 RP. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated to determine each feature's ability to distinguish between patients with and those without RP. A classifier was constructed to determine whether 2- or 3-feature combinations could improve RP distinction. Results: For all 20 features, a significant ΔFV was observed with increasing radiation dose. Twelve features changed significantly for patients with RP. Individual texture features could discriminate between patients with and those without RP with moderate performance (AUCs from 0.49 to 0.78). Using multiple features in a classifier, AUC increased significantly (0.59-0.84). Conclusions: A relationship between dose and change in a set of image-based features was observed. For 12 features, ΔFV was significantly related to RP development. This study demonstrated the ability of radiomics to provide a quantitative, individualized

  20. Synchronized computational architecture for generalized bilateral control of robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szakaly, Zoltan F. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A master six degree of freedom Force Reflecting Hand Controller (FRHC) is available at a master site where a received image displays, in essentially real time, a remote robotic manipulator which is being controlled in the corresponding six degree freedom by command signals which are transmitted to the remote site in accordance with the movement of the FRHC at the master site. Software is user-initiated at the master site in order to establish the basic system conditions, and then a physical movement of the FRHC in Cartesean space is reflected at the master site by six absolute numbers that are sensed, translated and computed as a difference signal relative to the earlier position. The change in position is then transmitted in that differential signal form over a high speed synchronized bilateral communication channel which simultaneously returns robot-sensed response information to the master site as forces applied to the FRHC so that the FRHC reflects the feel of what is taking place at the remote site. A system wide clock rate is selected at a sufficiently high rate that the operator at the master site experiences the Force Reflecting operation in real time.

  1. Realistic artificial DNA sequences as negative controls for computational genomics

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Juan; Smit, Arian F. A.; Hood, Leroy; Glusman, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    A common practice in computational genomic analysis is to use a set of ‘background’ sequences as negative controls for evaluating the false-positive rates of prediction tools, such as gene identification programs and algorithms for detection of cis-regulatory elements. Such ‘background’ sequences are generally taken from regions of the genome presumed to be intergenic, or generated synthetically by ‘shuffling’ real sequences. This last method can lead to underestimation of false-positive rates. We developed a new method for generating artificial sequences that are modeled after real intergenic sequences in terms of composition, complexity and interspersed repeat content. These artificial sequences can serve as an inexhaustible source of high-quality negative controls. We used artificial sequences to evaluate the false-positive rates of a set of programs for detecting interspersed repeats, ab initio prediction of coding genes, transcribed regions and non-coding genes. We found that RepeatMasker is more accurate than PClouds, Augustus has the lowest false-positive rate of the coding gene prediction programs tested, and Infernal has a low false-positive rate for non-coding gene detection. A web service, source code and the models for human and many other species are freely available at http://repeatmasker.org/garlic/. PMID:24803667

  2. A computer-controlled multi-electrode switch.

    PubMed

    Santos, F J; Santos, M S

    1999-01-01

    A computer-actuated switch was built to control, simultaneously, two automatic titration assemblies each consisting of an electrode pair and a burette, and using only one measuring device. This switch is modular, simple and versatile allowing easy adaptation and expansion; apart from its application in multiple-titration systems, this device can also be used for standard addition analysis and multi-component analysis using ion-selective electrodes (ISE). The repeatability as well as the accuracy of the measurements made with this switch were ensured using high-quality relays, and very high electrical insulation, attained through the use of two separate printed circuit boards (pcb) of good quality and careful design of these pcbs. This low-cost multi-electrode switch is controlled through the parallel port of a PC that collects the data via an inexpensive 12-bit ADC board (8-bit ISA type), and is easily programmable in any high-level language. This type of device allows the collection of a large amount of data in relatively short periods, which can be analysed later allowing the choice of the best compromise of time versus accuracy for the study of any particular system. PMID:18924850

  3. Brushless DC motor control system responsive to control signals generated by a computer or the like

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, Douglas T. (Inventor); Schmitt, Donald E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A control system for a brushless DC motor responsive to digital control signals is disclosed. The motor includes a multiphase wound stator and a permanent magnet rotor. The rotor is arranged so that each phase winding, when energized from a DC source, will drive the rotor through a predetermined angular position or step. A commutation signal generator responsive to the shaft position provides a commutation signal for each winding. A programmable control signal generator such as a computer or microprocessor produces individual digital control signals for each phase winding. The control signals and commutation signals associated with each winding are applied to an AND gate for that phase winding. Each gate controls a switch connected in series with the associated phase winding and the DC source so that each phase winding is energized only when the commutation signal and the control signal associated with that phase winding are present. The motor shaft may be advanced one step at a time to a desired position by applying a predetermined number of control signals in the proper sequence to the AND gates and the torque generated by the motor may be regulated by applying a separate control signal to each AND gate which is pulse width modulated to control the total time that each switch connects its associated winding to the DC source during each commutation period.

  4. Brushless DC motor control system responsive to control signals generated by a computer or the like

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, D. T. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A control system for a brushless DC motor responsive to digital control signals is disclosed. The motor includes a multiphase wound stator and a permanent magnet rotor. The motor is arranged so that each phase winding, when energized from a DC source, will drive the rotor through a predetermined angular position or step. A commutation signal generator responsive to the shaft position provides a commutation signal for each winding. A programmable control signal generator such as a computer or microprocessor produces individual digital control signals for each phase winding. The control signals and commutation signals associated with each winding are applied to an AND gate for that phase winding. Each gate controls a switch connected in series with the associated phase winding and the DC source so that each phase winding is energized only when the commutation signal and the control signal associated with that phase winding are present. The motor shaft may be advanced one step at a time to a desired position by applying a predetermined number of control signals in the proper sequence to the AND gates and the torque generated by the motor be regulated by applying a separate control signal and each AND gate which is pulse width modulated to control the total time that each switch connects its associated winding to the DC source during each commutation period.

  5. Brushless DC motor control system responsive to control signals generated by a computer or the like

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, D. T.

    1985-04-01

    A control system for a brushless DC motor responsive to digital control signals is disclosed. The motor includes a multiphase wound stator and a permanent magnet rotor. The motor is arranged so that each phase winding, when energized from a DC source, will drive the rotor through a predetermined angular position or step. A commutation signal generator responsive to the shaft position provides a commutation signal for each winding. A programmable control signal generator such as a computer or microprocessor produces individual digital control signals for each phase winding. The control signals and commutation signals associated with each winding are applied to an AND gate for that phase winding. Each gate controls a switch connected in series with the associated phase winding and the DC source so that each phase winding is energized only when the commutation signal and the control signal associated with that phase winding are present. The motor shaft may be advanced one step at a time to a desired position by applying a predetermined number of control signals in the proper sequence to the AND gates and the torque generated by the motor be regulated by applying a separate control signal and each AND gate which is pulse width modulated to control the total time that each switch connects its associated winding to the DC source during each commutation period.

  6. Measurement and Control of the Variability of Scanning Pressure Transducer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhl, David D.; Everhart, Joel L.; Hallissy, James B.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the new wall pressure measurement system and data-quality monitoring software installed at 14x22 Ft subsonic tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center. The monitoring software was developed to enable measurement and control of the variability of the reference pressures and approximately 400 tunnel wall pressure measurements. Variability of the system, based upon data acquired over a year of wind tunnel tests and calibrations, is presented. The level of variation of the wall pressure measurements is shown to be predictable.

  7. Classification Accuracy of Serum Apo A-I and S100B for the Diagnosis of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Prediction of Abnormal Initial Head Computed Tomography Scan

    PubMed Central

    Blyth, Brian J.; He, Hua; Mookerjee, Sohug; Jones, Courtney; Kiechle, Karin; Moynihan, Ryan; Wojcik, Susan M.; Grant, William D.; Secreti, LaLainia M.; Triner, Wayne; Moscati, Ronald; Leinhart, August; Ellis, George L.; Khan, Jawwad

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The objective of the current study was to determine the classification accuracy of serum S100B and apolipoprotein (apoA-I) for mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and abnormal initial head computed tomography (CT) scan, and to identify ethnic, racial, age, and sex variation in classification accuracy. We performed a prospective, multi-centered study of 787 patients with mTBI who presented to the emergency department within 6 h of injury and 467 controls who presented to the outpatient laboratory for routine blood work. Serum was analyzed for S100B and apoA-I. The outcomes were disease status (mTBI or control) and initial head CT scan. At cutoff values defined by 90% of controls, the specificity for mTBI using S100B (0.899 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.78–0.92]) was similar to that using apoA-I (0.902 [0.87–0.93]), and the sensitivity using S100B (0.252 [0.22–0.28]) was similar to that using apoA-I (0.249 [0.22–0.28]). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the combination of S100B and apoA-I (0.738, 95% CI: 0.71, 0.77), however, was significantly higher than the AUC for S100B alone (0.709, 95% CI: 0.68, 0.74, p=0.001) and higher than the AUC for apoA-I alone (0.645, 95% CI: 0.61, 0.68, p<0.0001). The AUC for prediction of abnormal initial head CT scan using S100B was 0.694 (95%CI: 0.62, 0.77) and not significant for apoA-I. At a S100B cutoff of <0.060 μg/L, the sensitivity for abnormal head CT was 98%, and 22.9% of CT scans could have been avoided. There was significant age and race-related variation in the accuracy of S100B for the diagnosis of mTBI. The combined use of serum S100B and apoA-I maximizes classification accuracy for mTBI, but only S100B is needed to classify abnormal head CT scan. Because of significant subgroup variation in classification accuracy, age and race need to be considered when using S100B to classify subjects for mTBI. PMID:23758329

  8. The Effects of Program Control, Learner Control, and Learner Control with Advisement Lesson Control Strategies on Anxiety and Learning from Computer-Assisted Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coorough, Randall P.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of three computer-assisted instruction (CAI) locus of instructional control strategies--learner control, learner control with advisement, and program control--on posttest performance and anxiety. The instructional content was a lesson addressing the effects of alcohol on the body. To examine the…

  9. Short-Range Six-Axis Interferometer Controlled Positioning for Scanning Probe Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Josef; Klapetek, Petr; Valtr, Miroslav; Hrabina, Jan; Buchta, Zdenek; Cip, Onrej; Cizek, Martin; Oulehla, Jindrich; Sery, Mojmir

    2014-01-01

    We present a design of a nanometrology measuring setup which is a part of the national standard instrumentation for nanometrology operated by the Czech Metrology Institute (CMI) in Brno, Czech Republic. The system employs a full six-axis interferometric position measurement of the sample holder consisting of six independent interferometers. Here we report on description of alignment issues and accurate adjustment of orthogonality of the measuring axes. Consequently, suppression of cosine errors and reduction of sensitivity to Abbe offset is achieved through full control in all six degrees of freedom. Due to the geometric configuration including a wide basis of the two units measuring in y-direction and the three measuring in z-direction the angle resolution of the whole setup is minimize to tens of nanoradians. Moreover, the servo-control of all six degrees of freedom allows to keep guidance errors below 100 nrad. This small range system is based on a commercial nanopositioning stage driven by piezoelectric transducers with the range (200 × 200 × 10) μm. Thermally compensated miniature interferometric units with fiber-optic light delivery and integrated homodyne detection system were developed especially for this system and serve as sensors for othogonality alignment. PMID:24451463

  10. Metastatic superscan in prostate carcinoma on gallium-68-prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Tripathi, Madhavi; Kumar, Rajeev; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    We describe the imaging features of a metastatic superscan on gallium-68 Glu-NH-CO-NH-Lys-(Ahx)-[Ga-68(HBED-CC)], abbreviated as gallium-68-prostate-specific membrane antigen (68Ga-PSMA) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging. 68Ga-PSMA is novel radiotracer undergoing evaluation for PET/CT imaging of prostate carcinoma. This patient had a superscan of metastases on conventional bone scintigraphy and was referred for 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT to evaluate the feasibility of 177Lu-PSMA therapy. PMID:27095868

  11. A digital computer propulsion control facility: Description of capabilities and summary of experimental program results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeller, J. R.; Arpasi, D. J.; Lehtinen, B.

    1976-01-01

    Flight weight digital computers are being used today to carry out many of the propulsion system control functions previously delegated exclusively to hydromechanical controllers. An operational digital computer facility for propulsion control mode studies has been used successfully in several experimental programs. This paper describes the system and some of the results concerned with engine control, inlet control, and inlet engine integrated control. Analytical designs for the digital propulsion control modes include both classical and modern/optimal techniques.

  12. Brain PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests, such as magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI ) and computed tomography ( CT ) scans only reveal the structure of the ... a PET/CT. Alternative Names ... PT, Rijntjes M, Weiller C. Neuroimaging: Functional neuroimaging. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic ...

  13. Analysis and control of computer cooling fan noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kam

    This thesis is divided into three parts: the study of the source mechanisms and their separation, passive noise control, and active noise control. The mechanisms of noise radiated by a typical computer cooling fan is investigated both theoretically and experimentally focusing on the dominant rotor-stator interaction. The unsteady force generated by the aerodynamic interaction between the rotor blades and struts is phase locked with the blade rotation and radiates tonal noise. Experimentally, synchronous averaging with the rotation signal extracts the tones made by the deterministic part of the rotor-strut interaction mechanism. This averaged signal is called the rotary noise. The difference between the overall noise and rotary noise is defined as random noise which is broadband in the spectrum. The deterministic tonal peaks are certainly more annoying than the broadband, so the suppression of the tones is the focus of this study. Based on the theoretical study of point force formulation, methods are devised to separate the noise radiated by the two components of drag and thrust forces on blades and struts. The source separation is also extended to the leading and higher order modes of the spinning pressure pattern. By using the original fan rotor and installing it in various casings, the noise sources of the original fan are decomposed into elementary sources through directivity measurements. Details of the acoustical directivity for the original fan and its various modifications are interpreted. For the sample fan, two common features account for most of the tonal noise radiated. The two features are the inlet flow distortion caused by the square fan casing, and the large strut carrying the electric wires for the motor. When the inlet bellmouth is installed and the large strut is trimmed down to size, a significant reduction of 12 dB in tonal sound power is achieved. These structural corrections constitute the passive noise control. However, the end product still

  14. A Command of PASCAL Will Help Kids Control Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    dePillis, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    Argues against using prepared computer programs for school instruction and proposes PASCAL as the most instructionally apt choice for a first computer language. Includes tips on resources for teacher training and textbooks in PASCAL. (JW)

  15. Reduced state feedback gain computation. [optimization and control theory for aircraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H.

    1976-01-01

    Because application of conventional optimal linear regulator theory to flight controller design requires the capability of measuring and/or estimating the entire state vector, it is of interest to consider procedures for computing controls which are restricted to be linear feedback functions of a lower dimensional output vector and which take into account the presence of measurement noise and process uncertainty. Therefore, a stochastic linear model that was developed is presented which accounts for aircraft parameter and initial uncertainty, measurement noise, turbulence, pilot command and a restricted number of measurable outputs. Optimization with respect to the corresponding output feedback gains was performed for both finite and infinite time performance indices without gradient computation by using Zangwill's modification of a procedure originally proposed by Powell. Results using a seventh order process show the proposed procedures to be very effective.

  16. When to perform positron emission tomography/computed tomography or radionuclide bone scan in patients with recently diagnosed prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Caldarella, Carmelo; Treglia, Giorgio; Giordano, Alessandro; Giovanella, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal metastases are very common in prostate cancer and represent the main metastatic site in about 80% of prostate cancer patients, with a significant impact in patients' prognosis. Early detection of bone metastases is critical in the management of patients with recently diagnosed high-risk prostate cancer: radical treatment is recommended in case of localized disease; systemic therapy should be preferred in patients with distant secondary disease. Bone scintigraphy using radiolabeled bisphosphonates is of great importance in the management of these patients; however, its main drawback is its low overall accuracy, due to the nonspecific uptake in sites of increased bone turnover. Positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals, such as fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose, choline-derived drugs (fluorine-18-fluorocholine and carbon-11-choline) and sodium fluorine-18-fluoride, are increasingly used in clinical practice to detect metastatic spread, and particularly bone involvement, in patients with prostate cancer, to reinforce or substitute information provided by bone scan. Each radiopharmaceutical has a specific mechanism of uptake; therefore, diagnostic performances may differ from one radiopharmaceutical to another on the same lesions, as demonstrated in the literature, with variable sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy values in the same patients. Whether bone scintigraphy can be substituted by these new methods is a matter of debate. However, greater radiobiological burden, higher costs, and the necessity of an in-site cyclotron limit the use of these positron emission tomography methods as first-line investigations in patients with prostate cancer: bone scintigraphy remains the mainstay for the detection of bone metastases in current clinical practice. PMID:23861598

  17. Confined water in controlled pore glass CPG-10-120 studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šauša, O.; Mat'ko, I.; Illeková, E.; Macová, E.; Berek, D.

    2015-06-01

    The solidification and melting of water confined in the controlled pore glass (CPG) with average pore size 12.6 nm has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The fully-filled sample of CPG by water as well as the samples of CPG with different content of water were used. The measurements show the presence of amorphous and crystalline phases of water in this type and size of pores, freezing point depression of a confined liquid and presence of certain transitions at lower temperatures, which could be detected only for cooling regime. The localization of confined water in the partially filled pores of CPG at room temperature was studied.

  18. Controlled polarity of sputter-deposited aluminum nitride on metals observed by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harumoto, T.; Sannomiya, T.; Matsukawa, Y.; Muraishi, S.; Shi, J.; Nakamura, Y.; Sawada, H.; Tanaka, T.; Tanishiro, Y.; Takayanagi, K.

    2013-02-01

    The polarity determination process of sputter-deposited aluminum nitride (AlN) on metals has been analyzed using aberration corrected atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscope. Direct growth of c-axis orientated AlN on face centered cubic metals (fcc) (111) with the local epitaxy has been observed, and the polarity was determined at the AlN/metal interface. We found that the AlN polarity can be controlled by the base metal layer: N-polarity AlN grows on Pt(111) while Al-polarity AlN forms on Al(111). Based on these results, the growth mechanism of AlN on metals is discussed.

  19. Controlled polarity of sputter-deposited aluminum nitride on metals observed by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harumoto, T.; Sannomiya, T.; Matsukawa, Y.; Muraishi, S.; Shi, J.; Nakamura, Y.; Sawada, H.; Tanaka, T.; Tanishiro, Y.; Takayanagi, K.

    2013-02-28

    The polarity determination process of sputter-deposited aluminum nitride (AlN) on metals has been analyzed using aberration corrected atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscope. Direct growth of c-axis orientated AlN on face centered cubic metals (fcc) (111) with the local epitaxy has been observed, and the polarity was determined at the AlN/metal interface. We found that the AlN polarity can be controlled by the base metal layer: N-polarity AlN grows on Pt(111) while Al-polarity AlN forms on Al(111). Based on these results, the growth mechanism of AlN on metals is discussed.

  20. The use of active noise control (ANC) to reduce acoustic noise generated during MRI scanning: some initial results.

    PubMed

    McJury, M; Stewart, R W; Crawford, D; Toma, E

    1997-01-01

    MRI scanning generates high levels of acoustic noise that cannot only pose a safety hazard, but also impair communication between staff and patient. In this article we present active noise control (ANC) techniques that introduce antiphase noise to destructively interfere with the MRI noise and with the aim of producing a zone of quiet around the patient's ears. Using noise recorded from a 1.0 Tesla midfield MR scanner the acoustic noise generated by three standard MR imaging sequences was replayed to a real time two channel ANC system. The results obtained show a useful attenuation of low-frequency periodic acoustic noise components. Therefore, in combination with standard passive ear protection, this suggests that MR generated acoustic noise can be effectively attenuated at both low and high frequencies leading to improved patient comfort.

  1. Distributed computing environments for future space control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viallefont, Pierre

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the results of a CNES research project on distributed computing systems. The purpose of this research was to study the impact of the use of new computer technologies in the design and development of future space applications. The first part of this study was a state-of-the-art review of distributed computing systems. One of the interesting ideas arising from this review is the concept of a 'virtual computer' allowing the distributed hardware architecture to be hidden from a software application. The 'virtual computer' can improve system performance by adapting the best architecture (addition of computers) to the software application without having to modify its source code. This concept can also decrease the cost and obsolescence of the hardware architecture. In order to verify the feasibility of the 'virtual computer' concept, a prototype representative of a distributed space application is being developed independently of the hardware architecture.

  2. Proceedings of the Workshop on Computational Aspects in the Control of Flexible Systems, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    The Control/Structures Integration Program, a survey of available software for control of flexible structures, computational efficiency and capability, modeling and parameter estimation, and control synthesis and optimization software are discussed.

  3. Digital dissection - using contrast-enhanced computed tomography scanning to elucidate hard- and soft-tissue anatomy in the Common Buzzard Buteo buteo.

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, Stephan; Bright, Jen A; Rayfield, Emily J

    2014-04-01

    Gross dissection has a long history as a tool for the study of human or animal soft- and hard-tissue anatomy. However, apart from being a time-consuming and invasive method, dissection is often unsuitable for very small specimens and often cannot capture spatial relationships of the individual soft-tissue structures. The handful of comprehensive studies on avian anatomy using traditional dissection techniques focus nearly exclusively on domestic birds, whereas raptorial birds, and in particular their cranial soft tissues, are essentially absent from the literature. Here, we digitally dissect, identify, and document the soft-tissue anatomy of the Common Buzzard (Buteo buteo) in detail, using the new approach of contrast-enhanced computed tomography using Lugol's iodine. The architecture of different muscle systems (adductor, depressor, ocular, hyoid, neck musculature), neurovascular, and other soft-tissue structures is three-dimensionally visualised and described in unprecedented detail. The three-dimensional model is further presented as an interactive PDF to facilitate the dissemination and accessibility of anatomical data. Due to the digital nature of the data derived from the computed tomography scanning and segmentation processes, these methods hold the potential for further computational analyses beyond descriptive and illustrative proposes.

  4. Digital dissection – using contrast-enhanced computed tomography scanning to elucidate hard-and soft-tissue anatomy in the Common Buzzard Buteo buteo

    PubMed Central

    Lautenschlager, Stephan; Bright, Jen A; Rayfield, Emily J

    2014-01-01

    Gross dissection has a long history as a tool for the study of human or animal soft-and hard-tissue anatomy. However, apart from being a time-consuming and invasive method, dissection is often unsuitable for very small specimens and often cannot capture spatial relationships of the individual soft-tissue structures. The handful of comprehensive studies on avian anatomy using traditional dissection techniques focus nearly exclusively on domestic birds, whereas raptorial birds, and in particular their cranial soft tissues, are essentially absent from the literature. Here, we digitally dissect, identify, and document the soft-tissue anatomy of the Common Buzzard (Buteo buteo) in detail, using the new approach of contrast-enhanced computed tomography using Lugol's iodine. The architecture of different muscle systems (adductor, depressor, ocular, hyoid, neck musculature), neurovascular, and other soft-tissue structures is three-dimensionally visualised and described in unprecedented detail. The three-dimensional model is further presented as an interactive PDF to facilitate the dissemination and accessibility of anatomical data. Due to the digital nature of the data derived from the computed tomography scanning and segmentation processes, these methods hold the potential for further computational analyses beyond descriptive and illustrative proposes. PMID:24350638

  5. Efficient computer algebra algorithms for polynomial matrices in control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baras, J. S.; Macenany, D. C.; Munach, R.

    1989-01-01

    The theory of polynomial matrices plays a key role in the design and analysis of multi-input multi-output control and communications systems using frequency domain methods. Examples include coprime factorizations of transfer functions, cannonical realizations from matrix fraction descriptions, and the transfer function design of feedback compensators. Typically, such problems abstract in a natural way to the need to solve systems of Diophantine equations or systems of linear equations over polynomials. These and other problems involving polynomial matrices can in turn be reduced to polynomial matrix triangularization procedures, a result which is not surprising given the importance of matrix triangularization techniques in numerical linear algebra. Matrices with entries from a field and Gaussian elimination play a fundamental role in understanding the triangularization process. In the case of polynomial matrices, matrices with entries from a ring for which Gaussian elimination is not defined and triangularization is accomplished by what is quite properly called Euclidean elimination. Unfortunately, the numerical stability and sensitivity issues which accompany floating point approaches to Euclidean elimination are not very well understood. New algorithms are presented which circumvent entirely such numerical issues through the use of exact, symbolic methods in computer algebra. The use of such error-free algorithms guarantees that the results are accurate to within the precision of the model data--the best that can be hoped for. Care must be taken in the design of such algorithms due to the phenomenon of intermediate expressions swell.

  6. Interfractional Prostate Shifts: Review of 1870 Computed Tomography (CT) Scans Obtained During Image-Guided Radiotherapy Using CT-on-Rails for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, James R. Gao Zhanrong; Uematsu, Minoru; Merrick, Scott; Machernis, Nolan P.; Chen, Timothy; Cheng, C.W.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To review 1870 CT scans of interfractional prostate shift obtained during image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 1870 pretreatment CT scans were acquired with CT-on-rails, and the corresponding shift data for 329 patients with prostate cancer were analyzed. Results: Of the 1870 scans reviewed, 44% required no setup adjustments in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction, 14% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 29% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 13% had shifts of >10 mm. In the superior-inferior direction, 81% had no adjustments, 2% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 15% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 2% had shifts of >10 mm. In the left-right direction, 65% had no adjustment, 13% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 17% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 5% had shifts of >10 mm. Further analysis of the first 66 consecutive patients divided into three groups according to body mass index indicates that the shift in the AP direction for the overweight subgroup was statistically larger than those for the control and obese subgroups (p < 0.05). The interfractional shift in the lateral direction for the obese group (1 SD, 5.5 mm) was significantly larger than those for the overweight and control groups (4.1 and 2.9 mm, respectively) (p < 0.001). Conclusions: These data demonstrate that there is a significantly greater shift in the AP direction than in the lateral and superior-inferior directions for the entire patient group. Overweight and obese patient groups show a significant difference from the control group in terms of prostate shift.

  7. The evolution of computed tomography from organ-selective to whole-body scanning in managing unconscious patients with multiple trauma: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhi-Jie; Chen, Cheng-Jueng; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chan, De-Chuan; Chou, Yu-Ching; Liang, Chia-Ming; Hsu, Sheng-Der

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to evaluate the benefit of whole-body computed tomography (WBCT) scanning for unconscious adult patients suffering from high-energy multiple trauma compared with the conventional stepwise approach of organ-selective CT.Totally, 144 unconscious patients with high-energy multiple trauma from single level I trauma center in North Taiwan were enrolled from January 2009 to December 2013. All patients were managed by a well-trained trauma team and were suitable for CT examination. The enrolled patients are all transferred directly from the scene of an accident, not from other medical institutions with a definitive diagnosis. The scanning regions of WBCT include head, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis. We analyzed differences between non-WBCT and WBCT groups, including gender, age, hospital stay, Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Scale, Revised Trauma Score, time in emergency department (ED), medical cost, and survival outcome.Fifty-five patients received the conventional approach for treating trauma, and 89 patients received immediate WBCT scanning after an initial examination. Patients' time in ED was significantly shorter in the WBCT group in comparison with the non-WBCT group (158.62 ± 80.13 vs 216.56 ± 168.32 min, P = 0.02). After adjusting for all possible confounding factors, we also found that survival outcome of the WBCT group was better than that of the non-WBCT group (odds ratio: 0.21, 95% confidence interval: 0.06-0.75, P = 0.016).Early performing WBCT during initial trauma management is a better approach for treating unconscious patients with high-energy multiple trauma. PMID:27631215

  8. Computer Models for IRIS Control System Transient Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gary D. Storrick; Bojan Petrovic; Luca Oriani

    2007-01-31

    This report presents results of the Westinghouse work performed under Task 3 of this Financial Assistance Award and it satisfies a Level 2 Milestone for the project. Task 3 of the collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled “Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor” focuses on developing computer models for transient analysis. This report summarizes the work performed under Task 3 on developing control system models. The present state of the IRIS plant design – such as the lack of a detailed secondary system or I&C system designs – makes finalizing models impossible at this time. However, this did not prevent making considerable progress. Westinghouse has several working models in use to further the IRIS design. We expect to continue modifying the models to incorporate the latest design information until the final IRIS unit becomes operational. Section 1.2 outlines the scope of this report. Section 2 describes the approaches we are using for non-safety transient models. It describes the need for non-safety transient analysis and the model characteristics needed to support those analyses. Section 3 presents the RELAP5 model. This is the highest-fidelity model used for benchmark evaluations. However, it is prohibitively slow for routine evaluations and additional lower-fidelity models have been developed. Section 4 discusses the current Matlab/Simulink model. This is a low-fidelity, high-speed model used to quickly evaluate and compare competing control and protection concepts. Section 5 describes the Modelica models developed by POLIMI and Westinghouse. The object-oriented Modelica language provides convenient mechanisms for developing models at several levels of detail. We have used this to develop a high-fidelity model for detailed analyses and a faster-running simplified model to help speed the I&C development process

  9. High-resolution three-dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy characterization of oxide-nitride-oxide layer interfaces in Si-based semiconductors using computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Sadayama, Shoji; Sekiguchi, Hiromi; Bright, Alexander; Suzuki, Naohisa; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Kaneko, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Oxide-nitride-oxide (ONO) layer structures are widely used for charge storage in flash memory devices. The ONO layer interfaces should be as flat as possible, so measurement of the nanoscale roughness of those interfaces is needed. In this study, quantification of an ONO film from a commercially available flash memory device was carried out with a pillar-shaped specimen using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and computed tomography. The ONO area contained only low Z- and low STEM-contrast materials, which makes high-quality reconstruction difficult. The optimum three-dimensional reconstruction was achieved with an STEM annular dark-field detector inner collection angle of 32 mrad, a sample tilt range from -78° to +78° and 25 iterations for the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique.

  10. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan in von Hippel-Lindau syndrome: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Solav, Shrikant; Bhandari, Ritu

    2012-01-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome is a hereditary autosomal dominant disorder caused by defective tumor suppression gene at 3p25-p26. The gene for VHL disease is found on chromosome 3, and is inherited in a dominant fashion. The VHL gene is a tumor suppressor gene. This means that its role in a normal cell is to stop the uncontrolled growth and proliferation. It is characterized by abnormal growth of blood vessels. It strikes the eyes, central nervous system, kidneys, endocrine glands, etc. It predisposes the patient to retinal angiomas, central nervous system hemangioblastoma, renal cell carcinoma (RCC), pheochromocytomas, islet cell tumor of the pancreas, endolymphatic sac tumors, renal, pancreatic, epididymal cysts. We present a case of familial VHL syndrome whose Fluorine 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan was truly positive for adrenal pheochromocytoma but was falsely negative for RCC. Review of literature related to this entity is made. PMID:23723586

  11. Additive Manufacturing of Single-Crystal Superalloy CMSX-4 Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy: Computational Modeling, Experimental Process Development, and Process Parameter Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Amrita; Acharya, Ranadip; Das, Suman

    2016-08-01

    This paper focuses on additive manufacturing (AM) of single-crystal (SX) nickel-based superalloy CMSX-4 through scanning laser epitaxy (SLE). SLE, a powder bed fusion-based AM process was explored for the purpose of producing crack-free, dense deposits of CMSX-4 on top of similar chemistry investment-cast substrates. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations revealed the presence of dendritic microstructures that consisted of fine γ' precipitates within the γ matrix in the deposit region. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based process modeling, statistical design of experiments (DoE), and microstructural characterization techniques were combined to produce metallurgically bonded single-crystal deposits of more than 500 μm height in a single pass along the entire length of the substrate. A customized quantitative metallography based image analysis technique was employed for automatic extraction of various deposit quality metrics from the digital cross-sectional micrographs. The processing parameters were varied, and optimal processing windows were identified to obtain good quality deposits. The results reported here represent one of the few successes obtained in producing single-crystal epitaxial deposits through a powder bed fusion-based metal AM process and thus demonstrate the potential of SLE to repair and manufacture single-crystal hot section components of gas turbine systems from nickel-based superalloy powders.

  12. Modification of a fuel-cell engine for control by a digital computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, N. H.

    1972-01-01

    A manually operated fuel-cell system was modified to be monitored and controlled by a digital computer. The purpose was to have a test item with which to study possible system-computer interface problems. The modification consisted of installing solenoid valves, circuitry, transducers, and limit switches on the system. These modifications permit computer control of load current, reactant purge, water removal, and electrolyte concentration and computer initiation of system shutdown.

  13. Implementation of a Hybrid Controller for Ventilation Control Using Soft Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Craig G. Rieger; D. Subbaram Naidu

    2005-06-01

    Many industrial facilities utilize pressure control gradients to prevent migration of hazardous species from containment areas to occupied zones, often using Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) control systems. When operators rebalance the facility, variation from the desired gradients can occur and the operating conditions can change enough that the PID parameters are no longer adequate to maintain a stable system. As the goal of the ventilation control system is to optimize the pressure gradients and associated flows for the facility, Linear Quadratic Tracking (LQT) is a method that provides a time-based approach to guiding facility interactions. However, LQT methods are susceptible to modeling and measurement errors, and therefore the additional use of Soft Computing methods are proposed for implementation to account for these errors and nonlinearities.

  14. Frequency and Clinical Significance of Previously Undetected Incidental Findings Detected on Computed Tomography Simulation Scans for Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Naoki; Tsunoda, Hiroko; Takahashi, Osamu; Kikuchi, Mari; Honda, Satoshi; Shikama, Naoto; Akahane, Keiko; Sekiguchi, Kenji

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the frequency and clinical significance of previously undetected incidental findings found on computed tomography (CT) simulation images for breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: All CT simulation images were first interpreted prospectively by radiation oncologists and then double-checked by diagnostic radiologists. The official reports of CT simulation images for 881 consecutive postoperative breast cancer patients from 2009 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Potentially important incidental findings (PIIFs) were defined as any previously undetected benign or malignancy-related findings requiring further medical follow-up or investigation. For all patients in whom a PIIF was detected, we reviewed the clinical records to determine the clinical significance of the PIIF. If the findings from the additional studies prompted by a PIIF required a change in management, the PIIF was also recorded as a clinically important incidental finding (CIIF). Results: There were a total of 57 (6%) PIIFs. The 57 patients in whom a PIIF was detected were followed for a median of 17 months (range, 3-26). Six cases of CIIFs (0.7% of total) were detected. Of the six CIIFs, three (50%) cases had not been noted by the radiation oncologist until the diagnostic radiologist detected the finding. On multivariate analysis, previous CT examination was an independent predictor for PIIF (p = 0.04). Patients who had not previously received chest CT examinations within 1 year had a statistically significantly higher risk of PIIF than those who had received CT examinations within 6 months (odds ratio, 3.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-9.50; p = 0.01). Conclusions: The rate of incidental findings prompting a change in management was low. However, radiation oncologists appear to have some difficulty in detecting incidental findings that require a change in management. Considering cost, it may be reasonable that routine interpretations are given to those who have not

  15. Experiences in control system design aided by interactive computer programs: temperature control of the laser isotope separation vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D.T.; Pittenger, L.C.; McDonald, J.S.; Cramer, P.G.; Herget, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    A robust control system has been designed to regulate temperature in a vacuum vessel. The thermodynamic process is modeled by a set of nonlinear, implicit differential equations. The control design and analysis task exercised many of the computer-aided control systems design software packages, including MATLAB, DELIGHT, and LSAP. The working environment is a VAX computer. Advantages and limitations of the software and environment, and the impact on final controller design is discussed.

  16. Availability of feature-oriented scanning probe microscopy for remote-controlled measurements on board a space laboratory or planet exploration Rover.

    PubMed

    Lapshin, Rostislav V

    2009-06-01

    Prospects for a feature-oriented scanning (FOS) approach to investigations of sample surfaces, at the micrometer and nanometer scales, with the use of scanning probe microscopy under space laboratory or planet exploration rover conditions, are examined. The problems discussed include decreasing sensitivity of the onboard scanning probe microscope (SPM) to temperature variations, providing autonomous operation, implementing the capabilities for remote control, self-checking, self-adjustment, and self-calibration. A number of topical problems of SPM measurements in outer space or on board a planet exploration rover may be solved via the application of recently proposed FOS methods.

  17. Availability of feature-oriented scanning probe microscopy for remote-controlled measurements on board a space laboratory or planet exploration Rover.

    PubMed

    Lapshin, Rostislav V

    2009-06-01

    Prospects for a feature-oriented scanning (FOS) approach to investigations of sample surfaces, at the micrometer and nanometer scales, with the use of scanning probe microscopy under space laboratory or planet exploration rover conditions, are examined. The problems discussed include decreasing sensitivity of the onboard scanning probe microscope (SPM) to temperature variations, providing autonomous operation, implementing the capabilities for remote control, self-checking, self-adjustment, and self-calibration. A number of topical problems of SPM measurements in outer space or on board a planet exploration rover may be solved via the application of recently proposed FOS methods. PMID:19566423

  18. Gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    Liver gallium scan; Bony gallium scan ... You will get a radioactive material called gallium injected into your vein. The gallium travels through the bloodstream and collects in the bones and certain organs. Your health care provider will ...

  19. AESOP: A computer-aided design program for linear multivariable control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, B.; Geyser, L. C.

    1982-01-01

    An interactive computer program (AESOP) which solves quadratic optimal control and is discussed. The program can also be used to perform system analysis calculations such as transient and frequency responses, controllability, observability, etc., in support of the control and filter design computations.

  20. Bone scanning.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, L D; Bennett, L R

    1975-03-01

    Scanning is based on the uptake of a nuclide by the crystal lattice of bone and is related to bone blood flow. Cancer cells do not take up the tracer. Normally, the scan visualizes the highly vascular bones. Scans are useful and are indicated in metastatic bone disease, primary bone tumors, hematologic malignancies and some non-neoplastic diseases. The scan is more sensitive than x-ray in the detection of malignant diseases of the skeleton. PMID:1054210

  1. Embedded computer systems for control applications in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.B.; Start, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the embedded computer systems approach taken at Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) for non-safety related systems. The hardware and software structures for typical embedded systems are presented The embedded systems development process is described. Three examples are given which illustrate typical embedded computer applications in EBR-II.

  2. Embedded computer systems for control applications in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.B.; Start, S.E.

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the embedded computer systems approach taken at Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) for non-safety related systems. The hardware and software structures for typical embedded systems are presented The embedded systems development process is described. Three examples are given which illustrate typical embedded computer applications in EBR-II.

  3. The Incidence, Classification, and Management of Acute Adverse Reactions to the Low-Osmolar Iodinated Contrast Media Isovue and Ultravist in Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Dong, Yuhao; Liang, Long; Lian, Zhouyang; Liu, Jing; Luo, Xiaoning; Chen, Wenbo; Li, Xinyu; Liang, Changhong; Zhang, Shuixing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Some epidemiologic surveillance studies have recorded adverse drug reactions to radiocontrast agents. We aimed to investigate the incidence and management of acute adverse reactions (AARs) to Ultravist-370 and Isovue-370 in patients who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scanning. Data from 137,473 patients were analyzed. They had undergone enhanced CT scanning with intravenous injection of Ultravist-370 or Isovue-370 during the period of January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2012 in our hospital. We investigated and classified AARs according to the American College of Radiology and the Chinese Society of Radiology (CSR) guidelines for iodinated contrast media. We analyzed risk factors for AARs and compared the AARs induced by Ultravist-370 and Isovue-370. Four hundred and twenty-eight (0.31%) patients experienced AARs, which included 330 (0.24%) patients with mild AARs, 82 (0.06%) patients with moderate AARs, and 16 (0.01%) patients with severe AARs (including 3 cases of cardiac arrest and one case of death). The incidence of AARs was higher with Ultravist-370 than with Isovue-370 (0.38% vs 0.24%, P < 0.001), but only for mild AARs (0.32% vs 0.16%, P < 0.001). Analyses on risk factors indicated that female patients (n = 221, 0.43%, P < 0.001), emergency patients (n = 11, 0.51%, P < 0.001), elderly patients aged 50 to 60 years (n = 135, 0.43%, P < 0.001), and patients who underwent coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) (n = 55, 0.51%, P < 0.001) had a higher risk of AARs. Cutaneous manifestations (50.52%)—especially rash (59.74%)—were the most frequent mild AARs. Cardiovascular manifestations accounted for most moderate and severe AARs (62.91% and 48.28%, respectively). After proper management, the symptoms and signs of 96.5% of the AARs resolved within 24 hours without sequelae. Ultravist-370 and Isovue-370 are safe for patients undergoing enhanced CT scanning. The incidence of AARs is

  4. The Incidence, Classification, and Management of Acute Adverse Reactions to the Low-Osmolar Iodinated Contrast Media Isovue and Ultravist in Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography Scanning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Dong, Yuhao; Liang, Long; Lian, Zhouyang; Liu, Jing; Luo, Xiaoning; Chen, Wenbo; Li, Xinyu; Liang, Changhong; Zhang, Shuixing

    2016-03-01

    Some epidemiologic surveillance studies have recorded adverse drug reactions to radiocontrast agents. We aimed to investigate the incidence and management of acute adverse reactions (AARs) to Ultravist-370 and Isovue-370 in patients who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scanning.Data from 137,473 patients were analyzed. They had undergone enhanced CT scanning with intravenous injection of Ultravist-370 or Isovue-370 during the period of January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2012 in our hospital. We investigated and classified AARs according to the American College of Radiology and the Chinese Society of Radiology (CSR) guidelines for iodinated contrast media. We analyzed risk factors for AARs and compared the AARs induced by Ultravist-370 and Isovue-370.Four hundred and twenty-eight (0.31%) patients experienced AARs, which included 330 (0.24%) patients with mild AARs, 82 (0.06%) patients with moderate AARs, and 16 (0.01%) patients with severe AARs (including 3 cases of cardiac arrest and one case of death). The incidence of AARs was higher with Ultravist-370 than with Isovue-370 (0.38% vs 0.24%, P < 0.001), but only for mild AARs (0.32% vs 0.16%, P < 0.001). Analyses on risk factors indicated that female patients (n = 221, 0.43%, P < 0.001), emergency patients (n = 11, 0.51%, P < 0.001), elderly patients aged 50 to 60 years (n = 135, 0.43%, P < 0.001), and patients who underwent coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) (n = 55, 0.51%, P < 0.001) had a higher risk of AARs. Cutaneous manifestations (50.52%)-especially rash (59.74%)-were the most frequent mild AARs. Cardiovascular manifestations accounted for most moderate and severe AARs (62.91% and 48.28%, respectively). After proper management, the symptoms and signs of 96.5% of the AARs resolved within 24 hours without sequelae.Ultravist-370 and Isovue-370 are safe for patients undergoing enhanced CT scanning. The incidence of AARs is higher with Ultravist

  5. Wavefront Control and Image Restoration with Less Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    PseudoDiversity is a method of recovering the wavefront in a sparse- or segmented- aperture optical system typified by an interferometer or a telescope equipped with an adaptive primary mirror consisting of controllably slightly moveable segments. (PseudoDiversity should not be confused with a radio-antenna-arraying method called pseudodiversity.) As in the cases of other wavefront- recovery methods, the streams of wavefront data generated by means of PseudoDiversity are used as feedback signals for controlling electromechanical actuators of the various segments so as to correct wavefront errors and thereby, for example, obtain a clearer, steadier image of a distant object in the presence of atmospheric turbulence. There are numerous potential applications in astronomy, remote sensing from aircraft and spacecraft, targeting missiles, sighting military targets, and medical imaging (including microscopy) through such intervening media as cells or water. In comparison with prior wavefront-recovery methods used in adaptive optics, PseudoDiversity involves considerably simpler equipment and procedures and less computation. For PseudoDiversity, there is no need to install separate metrological equipment or to use any optomechanical components beyond those that are already parts of the optical system to which the method is applied. In Pseudo- Diversity, the actuators of a subset of the segments or subapertures are driven to make the segments dither in the piston, tilt, and tip degrees of freedom. Each aperture is dithered at a unique frequency at an amplitude of a half wavelength of light. During the dithering, images on the focal plane are detected and digitized at a rate of at least four samples per dither period. In the processing of the image samples, the use of different dither frequencies makes it possible to determine the separate effects of the various dithered segments or apertures. The digitized image-detector outputs are processed in the spatial

  6. Using Off-the-Shelf Gaming Controllers For Computer Control in the K-12 Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgoin, N. L.; Withee, J.; Segee, M.; Birkel, S. D.; Albee, E.; Koons, P. O.; Zhu, Y.; Segee, B.

    2009-12-01

    In the classroom, the interaction between students, teachers, and datasets is becoming more game like. Software such as GoogleEarth allow students to interact with data on a more personal level; allowing them the dynamically change variables, move arbitrarily, and personalize their experience with the datasets. As this becomes more immersive, traditional software control such as keyboard and mouse begin to hold the student back in terms of intuitive interfacing with the data. This is a problem that has best been tackled by modern gaming systems such as the Wii, XBox 360, and Playstation 3 Systems. By utilizing the solutions given by these gaming systems, it is possible to further a students immersion with a system. Through an NSF ITEST (Information and Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers) grant, researchers at the University of Maine have experimented with using the game controller that is used for interacting with the Nintendo Wii (often called a Wiimote) with existing geodynamic systems in an effort to eases interaction with these systems. Since these game controllers operate using Bluetooth, a common protocol in computing, Wiimotes can easily communicate with existing laptop computers that are issued to Maine students. This paper describes the technical requirements, setup, and usage of Wiimotes as an input device to complex geodynamical systems for use in the K-12 classroom.

  7. Randomized control trial of computer-based rehabilitation of spatial neglect syndrome: the RESPONSE trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Spatial neglect is a frequent and debilitating consequence of acquired brain injury and currently has no widely accepted standard of care. While previous interventions for spatial neglect have targeted patients’ overt spatial deficits (e.g., reduced contralesional visual scanning), far fewer have directly targeted patients’ non-spatial deficits (e.g., sustained attention deficits). Considering that non-spatial deficits have shown to be highly predictive of long-term disability, we developed a novel computer based training program that targets both sustained (tonic) and moment-to-moment (phasic) aspects of non-spatial attention (Tonic and Phasic Alertness Training, TAPAT). Preliminary studies demonstrate that TAPAT is safe and effective in improving both spatial and non-spatial attention deficits in the post-acute recovery phase in neglect patients. The purpose of the current trial (referred to as the REmediation of SPatial Neglect or RESPONSE trial) is to compare TAPAT to an active control training condition, include a larger sample of patients, and assess both cognitive and functional outcomes. Methods/Design We will employ a multi-site, longitudinal, blinded randomized controlled trial (RCT) design with a target sample of 114 patients with spatial neglect. Patients will either perform, at their home, the experimental TAPAT training program or an active control computer games condition for thirty minutes/day, five days a week, over three months. Patients will be assessed on a battery of cognitive and functional outcomes on three occasions: a) immediately before training, b) within forty-eight hours post completion of total training, and c) after a three-month no-contact period post completion of total training, to assess the longevity of potential training effects. Discussion The strengths of this protocol are that it tests an innovative, in-home administered treatment that targets a fundamental deficit in neglect, employs highly sensitive computer

  8. Incorporation of Process Control Computers in the Undergraduate Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Wm. Curtis, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the conversion of a laboratory and change in course content in a chemical engineering curriculum. Lists laboratory experiments and computer programs used in the course. Discusses difficulties during the laboratory conversion and future plans for the course. (YP)

  9. Navier-Stokes computations for circulation control airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulliam, Thomas H.; Jespersen, Dennis C.; Barth, Timothy J.

    1987-01-01

    Navier-Stokes computations of subsonic to transonic flow past airfoils with augmented lift due to rearward jet blowing over a curved trailing edge are presented. The approach uses a spiral grid topology. Solutions are obtained using a Navier-Stokes code which employs an implicit finite difference method, an algebraic turbulence model, and developments which improve stability, convergence, and accuracy. Results are compared against experiments for no jet blowing and moderate jet pressures and demonstrate the capability to compute these complicated flows.

  10. Navier-Stokes computations for circulation controlled airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulliam, T. H.; Jesperen, D. C.; Barth, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    Navier-Stokes computations of subsonic to transonic flow past airfoils with augmented lift due to rearward jet blowing over a curved trailing edge are presented. The approach uses a spiral grid topology. Solutions are obtained using a Navier-Stokes code which employs an implicit finite difference method, an algebraic turbulence model, and developments which improve stability, convergence, and accuracy. Results are compared against experiments for no jet blowing and moderate jet pressures and demonstrate the capability to compute these complicated flows.

  11. Fourth NASA Workshop on Computational Control of Flexible Aerospace Systems, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr. (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    A collection of papers presented at the Fourth NASA Workshop on Computational Control of Flexible Aerospace Systems is given. The papers address modeling, systems identification, and control of flexible aircraft, spacecraft and robotic systems.

  12. Requirements for Control Room Computer-Based Procedures for use in Hybrid Control Rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Le Blanc, Katya Lee; Oxstrand, Johanna Helene; Joe, Jeffrey Clark

    2015-05-01

    Many plants in the U.S. are currently undergoing control room modernization. The main drivers for modernization are the aging and obsolescence of existing equipment, which typically results in a like-for-like replacement of analogue equipment with digital systems. However, the modernization efforts present an opportunity to employ advanced technology that would not only extend the life, but enhance the efficiency and cost competitiveness of nuclear power. Computer-based procedures (CBPs) are one example of near-term advanced technology that may provide enhanced efficiencies above and beyond like for like replacements of analog systems. Researchers in the LWRS program are investigating the benefits of advanced technologies such as CBPs, with the goal of assisting utilities in decision making during modernization projects. This report will describe the existing research on CBPs, discuss the unique issues related to using CBPs in hybrid control rooms (i.e., partially modernized analog control rooms), and define the requirements of CBPs for hybrid control rooms.

  13. Integrated 3D view of postmating responses by the Drosophila melanogaster female reproductive tract, obtained by micro-computed tomography scanning.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Alexandra L; Riccio, Mark L; Avila, Frank W; Wolfner, Mariana F

    2015-07-01

    Physiological changes in females during and after mating are triggered by seminal fluid components in conjunction with female-derived molecules. In insects, these changes include increased egg production, storage of sperm, and changes in muscle contraction within the reproductive tract (RT). Such postmating changes have been studied in dissected RT tissues, but understanding their coordination in vivo requires a holistic view of the tissues and their interrelationships. Here, we used high-resolution, multiscale micro-computed tomography (CT) scans to visualize and measure postmating changes in situ in the Drosophila female RT before, during, and after mating. These studies reveal previously unidentified dynamic changes in the conformation of the female RT that occur after mating. Our results also reveal how the reproductive organs temporally shift in concert within the confines of the abdomen. For example, we observed chiral loops in the uterus and in the upper common oviduct that relax and constrict throughout sperm storage and egg movement. We found that specific seminal fluid proteins or female secretions mediate some of the postmating changes in morphology. The morphological movements, in turn, can cause further changes due to the connections among organs. In addition, we observed apparent copulatory damage to the female intima, suggesting a mechanism for entry of seminal proteins, or other exogenous components, into the female's circulatory system. The 3D reconstructions provided by high-resolution micro-CT scans reveal how male and female molecules and anatomy interface to carry out and coordinate mating-dependent changes in the female's reproductive physiology.

  14. Usefulness of target delineation based on the two extreme phases of a four-dimensional computed tomography scan in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Seong Soon; Huh, Gil Ja; Park, Suk Young; Yang, Po Song; Cho, EunYoun

    2015-01-01

    Background An evaluation of the usefulness of target delineation based only on the two extreme phases of a four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) scan in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods Seventeen patients treated with SBRT via 4D CT scans for lung cancer were retrospectively enrolled. Volumetric and geometric analyses were performed for the internal target volumes (ITVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) generated using different respiratory phases (all phases and 2 extreme phases) and setup margins (3 mm and 5 mm). Results As the setup margins were added to the ITVs, the overlap percentage between the PTVs based on all phases and the two extreme phases increased (85.1% for ITVs, 89.8% for PTVs_3 mm, and 91.3% for PTVs_5 mm), and there were no differences according to the tumor parameters, such as the gross tumor volume and 3D mobility. The missing-volume differences for ITVs derived from cone-beam CT images also decreased, with values of 5.3% between ITVs, 0.5% between PTVs_3 mm, and 0.2% between PTVs_5 mm. Compared with the plan based on all phases and a 3 mm margin, the average lung-dose differences found for the PTV based on the two extreme phases and a 5 mm margin were 0.41 Gy for the mean lung dose and 0.93% for V20. Conclusions Regardless of tumor characteristics, PTV construction based only on the two extreme phases and a 5 mm setup margin may be a useful tool for reducing the clinical workload involved in target delineation in SBRT for lung cancer. PMID:26273368

  15. [{sup 18}F]FDG-Positron Emission Tomography Coregistration With Computed Tomography Scans for Radiation Treatment Planning of Lymphoma and Hematologic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Terezakis, Stephanie A.; Hunt, Margie A.; Kowalski, Alexander; McCann, Patrick; Schmidtlein, C. Ross; Reiner, Anne; Goenen, Mithat; Kirov, Assen S.; Gonzales, Anne Marie; Schoeder, Heiko; Yahalom, Joachim

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Positron emission-tomography (PET) using 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG-PET) increases sensitivity and specificity of disease detection in lymphoma and thus is standard in lymphoma management. This study examines the effects of coregistering FDG-PET and computed tomography (CT) (PET/CT) scans on treatment planning for lymphoma patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty-nine patients (30 positive PET scans) underwent PET/CT treatment planning from July 2004 to February 2007 and were retrospectively studied. For each patient, gross tumor volume was blindly contoured on the CT-only and PET/CT studies by a radiation oncologist. Treatment plans were generated for both the CT-only and PET/CT planning target volumes (PTVs) for all patients. Normal tissue doses and PTV coverage were evaluated using dose--volume histograms for all sites. Results: Thirty-two treatment sites were evaluated. Twenty-one patients had non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 5 patients had Hodgkin lymphoma, and 3 patients had plasma cell neoplasms. Previously undetected FDG-avid sites were identified in 3 patients during PET/CT simulation, resulting in one additional treatment field. Due to unexpected PET/CT simulation findings, 2 patients did not proceed with radiation treatment. The addition of PET changed the volume of 23 sites (72%). The PTV was increased in 15 sites (47%) by a median of 11% (range, 6-40%) and reduced in 8 sites (25%) by a median of 20% (range, 6%-75%). In six (19%) replanned sites, the CT-based treatment plan would not have adequately covered the PTV defined by PET/CT. Conclusions: Incorporation of FDG-PET into CT-based treatment planning for lymphoma patients resulted in considerable changes in management, volume definition, and normal tissue dosimetry for a significant number of patients.

  16. Integrated 3D view of postmating responses by the Drosophila melanogaster female reproductive tract, obtained by micro-computed tomography scanning

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Alexandra L.; Riccio, Mark L.; Avila, Frank W.; Wolfner, Mariana F.

    2015-01-01

    Physiological changes in females during and after mating are triggered by seminal fluid components in conjunction with female-derived molecules. In insects, these changes include increased egg production, storage of sperm, and changes in muscle contraction within the reproductive tract (RT). Such postmating changes have been studied in dissected RT tissues, but understanding their coordination in vivo requires a holistic view of the tissues and their interrelationships. Here, we used high-resolution, multiscale micro-computed tomography (CT) scans to visualize and measure postmating changes in situ in the Drosophila female RT before, during, and after mating. These studies reveal previously unidentified dynamic changes in the conformation of the female RT that occur after mating. Our results also reveal how the reproductive organs temporally shift in concert within the confines of the abdomen. For example, we observed chiral loops in the uterus and in the upper common oviduct that relax and constrict throughout sperm storage and egg movement. We found that specific seminal fluid proteins or female secretions mediate some of the postmating changes in morphology. The morphological movements, in turn, can cause further changes due to the connections among organs. In addition, we observed apparent copulatory damage to the female intima, suggesting a mechanism for entry of seminal proteins, or other exogenous components, into the female’s circulatory system. The 3D reconstructions provided by high-resolution micro-CT scans reveal how male and female molecules and anatomy interface to carry out and coordinate mating-dependent changes in the female’s reproductive physiology. PMID:26041806

  17. [Evaluation of Slavic continuity for electrocardiograph (ECG)-gated non-helical scan using multi detector-row computed tomography with 64 data acquisition system].

    PubMed

    Shiotani, Masataka; Ogawa, Masato; Watanabe, Ryo; Shinohara, Tamotsu

    2012-01-01

    Multi detector-row computed tomography with 64 data acquisition systems are widely used for coronary CT angiography with an electrocardiograph (ECG) gated helical scan (HS). Step and shoot with ECG gated non-helical scan (snap shot pulse: SSP) could reduce exposure dose but banding artifact-like discontinuity was observed between adjacent slabs on volume rendering (VR) and curved planner reconstruction (CPR). Therefore, we investigated the factors that influence continuity of VR and CPR images by calculating image properties of Z-axis direction of slab. The observer performance studies were performed for evaluating continuity of simulated blood vessels of VR and CPR images at simulated heart rates: 50, 55, 57 and 60 beat per minute (bpm). As a result, the value of SD at both slab edges in SSP were 20.5% lower than middle part of slab and differences of value of SD were up to 4.4 between adjacent slab edges. Slice thickness of both slab edges were 20.3% thinner than that of the peripheral part of slab. At the border of the adjacent slab, the position of the simulated blood vessel was shifted. VR images of SSP at 57 bpm was indicated as the highest score and HS was significantly superior to SSP at 55 and 60 bpm (p<0.05). In CPR images, there were no significant differences at all simulated heart rates. In conclusion, we considered that VR images of SSP were influenced heart rates except 57 bpm (resonance case) and there was little difference of visibility for discontinuity of both CPR images obtained by SSP and HS.

  18. Control optimization, stabilization and computer algorithms for aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, M. (Editor); Willsky, A. S. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The analysis and design of complex multivariable reliable control systems are considered. High performance and fault tolerant aircraft systems are the objectives. A preliminary feasibility study of the design of a lateral control system for a VTOL aircraft that is to land on a DD963 class destroyer under high sea state conditions is provided. Progress in the following areas is summarized: (1) VTOL control system design studies; (2) robust multivariable control system synthesis; (3) adaptive control systems; (4) failure detection algorithms; and (5) fault tolerant optimal control theory.

  19. Individualized Nonadaptive and Online-Adaptive Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment Strategies for Cervical Cancer Patients Based on Pretreatment Acquired Variable Bladder Filling Computed Tomography Scans

    SciTech Connect

    Bondar, M.L.; Hoogeman, M.S.; Mens, J.W.; Quint, S.; Ahmad, R.; Dhawtal, G.; Heijmen, B.J.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To design and evaluate individualized nonadaptive and online-adaptive strategies based on a pretreatment established motion model for the highly deformable target volume in cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: For 14 patients, nine to ten variable bladder filling computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired at pretreatment and after 40 Gy. Individualized model-based internal target volumes (mbITVs) accounting for the cervix and uterus motion due to bladder volume changes were generated by using a motion-model constructed from two pretreatment CT scans (full and empty bladder). Two individualized strategies were designed: a nonadaptive strategy, using an mbITV accounting for the full-range of bladder volume changes throughout the treatment; and an online-adaptive strategy, using mbITVs of bladder volume subranges to construct a library of plans. The latter adapts the treatment online by selecting the plan-of-the-day from the library based on the measured bladder volume. The individualized strategies were evaluated by the seven to eight CT scans not used for mbITVs construction, and compared with a population-based approach. Geometric uniform margins around planning cervix-uterus and mbITVs were determined to ensure adequate coverage. For each strategy, the percentage of the cervix-uterus, bladder, and rectum volumes inside the planning target volume (PTV), and the clinical target volume (CTV)-to-PTV volume (volume difference between PTV and CTV) were calculated. Results: The margin for the population-based approach was 38 mm and for the individualized strategies was 7 to 10 mm. Compared with the population-based approach, the individualized nonadaptive strategy decreased the CTV-to-PTV volume by 48% {+-} 6% and the percentage of bladder and rectum inside the PTV by 5% to 45% and 26% to 74% (p < 0.001), respectively. Replacing the individualized nonadaptive strategy by an online-adaptive, two-plan library further decreased the percentage of

  20. Cardiac dosimetric evaluation of deep inspiration breath-hold level variances using computed tomography scans generated from deformable image registration displacement vectors.

    PubMed

    Harry, Taylor; Rahn, Doug; Semenov, Denis; Gu, Xuejun; Yashar, Catheryn; Einck, John; Jiang, Steve; Cerviño, Laura

    2016-01-01

    There is a reduction in cardiac dose for left-sided breast radiotherapy during treatment with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) when compared with treatment with free breathing (FB). Various levels of DIBH may occur for different treatment fractions. Dosimetric effects due to this and other motions are a major component of uncertainty in radiotherapy in this setting. Recent developments in deformable registration techniques allow displacement vectors between various temporal and spatial patient representations to be digitally quantified. We propose a method to evaluate the dosimetric effect to the heart from variable reproducibility of DIBH by using deformable registration to create new anatomical computed tomography (CT) scans. From deformable registration, 3-dimensional deformation vectors are generated with FB and DIBH. The obtained deformation vectors are scaled to 75%, 90%, and 110% and are applied to the reference image to create new CT scans at these inspirational levels. The scans are then imported into the treatment planning system and dose calculations are performed. The average mean dose to the heart was 2.5Gy (0.7 to 9.6Gy) at FB, 1.2Gy (0.6 to 3.8Gy, p < 0.001) at 75% inspiration, 1.1Gy (0.6 to 3.1Gy, p = 0.004) at 90% inspiration, 1.0Gy (0.6 to 3.0Gy) at 100% inspiration or DIBH, and 1.0Gy (0.6 to 2.8Gy, p = 0.019) at 110% inspiration. The average mean dose to the left anterior descending artery (LAD) was 19.9Gy (2.4 to 46.4Gy), 8.6Gy (2.0 to 43.8Gy, p < 0.001), 7.2Gy (1.9 to 40.1Gy, p = 0.035), 6.5Gy (1.8 to 34.7Gy), and 5.3Gy (1.5 to 31.5Gy, p < 0.001), correspondingly. This novel method enables numerous anatomical situations to be mimicked and quantifies the dosimetric effect they have on a treatment plan. PMID:26206154

  1. Cardiac dosimetric evaluation of deep inspiration breath-hold level variances using computed tomography scans generated from deformable image registration displacement vectors.

    PubMed

    Harry, Taylor; Rahn, Doug; Semenov, Denis; Gu, Xuejun; Yashar, Catheryn; Einck, John; Jiang, Steve; Cerviño, Laura

    2016-01-01

    There is a reduction in cardiac dose for left-sided breast radiotherapy during treatment with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) when compared with treatment with free breathing (FB). Various levels of DIBH may occur for different treatment fractions. Dosimetric effects due to this and other motions are a major component of uncertainty in radiotherapy in this setting. Recent developments in deformable registration techniques allow displacement vectors between various temporal and spatial patient representations to be digitally quantified. We propose a method to evaluate the dosimetric effect to the heart from variable reproducibility of DIBH by using deformable registration to create new anatomical computed tomography (CT) scans. From deformable registration, 3-dimensional deformation vectors are generated with FB and DIBH. The obtained deformation vectors are scaled to 75%, 90%, and 110% and are applied to the reference image to create new CT scans at these inspirational levels. The scans are then imported into the treatment planning system and dose calculations are performed. The average mean dose to the heart was 2.5Gy (0.7 to 9.6Gy) at FB, 1.2Gy (0.6 to 3.8Gy, p < 0.001) at 75% inspiration, 1.1Gy (0.6 to 3.1Gy, p = 0.004) at 90% inspiration, 1.0Gy (0.6 to 3.0Gy) at 100% inspiration or DIBH, and 1.0Gy (0.6 to 2.8Gy, p = 0.019) at 110% inspiration. The average mean dose to the left anterior descending artery (LAD) was 19.9Gy (2.4 to 46.4Gy), 8.6Gy (2.0 to 43.8Gy, p < 0.001), 7.2Gy (1.9 to 40.1Gy, p = 0.035), 6.5Gy (1.8 to 34.7Gy), and 5.3Gy (1.5 to 31.5Gy, p < 0.001), correspondingly. This novel method enables numerous anatomical situations to be mimicked and quantifies the dosimetric effect they have on a treatment plan.

  2. Computational Methods for Dynamic Stability and Control Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Spence, Angela M.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    2004-01-01

    Force and moment measurements from an F-16XL during forced pitch oscillation tests result in dynamic stability derivatives, which are measured in combinations. Initial computational simulations of the motions and combined derivatives are attempted via a low-order, time-dependent panel method computational fluid dynamics code. The code dynamics are shown to be highly questionable for this application and the chosen configuration. However, three methods to computationally separate such combined dynamic stability derivatives are proposed. One of the separation techniques is demonstrated on the measured forced pitch oscillation data. Extensions of the separation techniques to yawing and rolling motions are discussed. In addition, the possibility of considering the angles of attack and sideslip state vector elements as distributed quantities, rather than point quantities, is introduced.

  3. Computational Methods for Dynamic Stability and Control Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Spence, Angela M.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    2003-01-01

    Force and moment measurements from an F-16XL during forced pitch oscillation tests result in dynamic stability derivatives, which are measured in combinations. Initial computational simulations of the motions and combined derivatives are attempted via a low-order, time-dependent panel method computational fluid dynamics code. The code dynamics are shown to be highly questionable for this application and the chosen configuration. However, three methods to computationally separate such combined dynamic stability derivatives are proposed. One of the separation techniques is demonstrated on the measured forced pitch oscillation data. Extensions of the separation techniques to yawing and rolling motions are discussed. In addition, the possibility of considering the angles of attack and sideslip state vector elements as distributed quantities, rather than point quantities, is introduced.

  4. Computer simulation of control strategies for optimal anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Strömberg, S; Possfelt, M O; Liu, J

    2013-01-01

    Three previously published control strategies for anaerobic digestion were implemented in Simulink/Matlab using Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) to model the biological process. The controllers' performance were then simulated and evaluated based on their responses from five different types of process scenarios i.e. start-up and steady state performance as well as disturbances from concentration, pH and ammonia in the inflow. Of the three evaluated control strategies, the extremum-seeking variable gain controller gave the best overall performance. However, a proportional feedback controller based on the pH-level, used as a reference case in the evaluation, proved to give as good results as the extremum-seeking variable gain controller but with a lower wear on the pump. It was therefore concluded that a fast proportional control of the reactor pH is a key element for optimally controlling a low-buffering anaerobic digestion process.

  5. Proceedings of the Fourth Annual Workshop on the Use of Digital Computers in Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Cecil L., Ed.

    Contents: Computer hardware testing (results of vendor-user interaction); CODIL (a new language for process control programing); the design and implementation of control systems utilizing CRT display consoles; the systems contractor - valuable professional or unnecessary middle man; power station digital computer applications; from inspiration to…

  6. Learner Control Commands for Computer-Assisted Instruction Systems. Technical Report 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Stephen Ronald

    Student control of computer-assisted instruction has a number of pragmatic advantages due to difficulties in providing a general program which is truly individualized. The attempt here has been to define and describe the commands which could be modified to provide learner control in any computer-assisted instruction course. Some of the commands…

  7. The Computational and Neural Basis of Cognitive Control: Charted Territory and New Frontiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botvinick, Matthew M.; Cohen, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive control has long been one of the most active areas of computational modeling work in cognitive science. The focus on computational models as a medium for specifying and developing theory predates the PDP books, and cognitive control was not one of the areas on which they focused. However, the framework they provided has injected work on…

  8. A Test Control Languate for a Computer-automated Battery Testing Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Kulaga, Joseph E.; Krol, Ronald R.

    2006-02-08

    A test control language was developed for a compute automated battery testing laboratory to permit an operator to construct testing scripts to define an arbitrary battery test regime. The statements defined by the language are tested for syntax and control block structures are produced by a compiler for downloading into data acquisition computers.

  9. Analysis of the computed torque drive method and comparison with conventional position servo for a computer-controlled manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markiewicz, B. R.

    1973-01-01

    A manipulator and its control system (modeled after a Stanford design) is being developed as part of an artificial intelligence project. This development includes an analytical study of the control system software. A comparison is presented of the computed torque method and the conventional position servo. No conclusion is made as to the perference of one system over the other, as it is dependent upon the application and the results of a sampled data analysis.

  10. Over-exposure correction in knee cone-beam CT imaging with automatic exposure control using a partial low dose scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Muller, Kerstin; Hsieh, Scott; Maier, Andreas; Gold, Garry; Levenston, Marc; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2016-03-01

    C-arm-based cone-beam CT (CBCT) systems with flat-panel detectors are suitable for diagnostic knee imaging due to their potentially flexible selection of CT trajectories and wide volumetric beam coverage. In knee CT imaging, over-exposure artifacts can occur because of limitations in the dynamic range of the flat panel detectors present on most CBCT systems. We developed a straightforward but effective method for correction and detection of over-exposure for an Automatic Exposure Control (AEC)-enabled standard knee scan incorporating a prior low dose scan. The radiation dose associated with the low dose scan was negligible (0.0042mSv, 2.8% increase) which was enabled by partially sampling the projection images considering the geometry of the knees and lowering the dose further to be able to just see the skin-air interface. We combined the line integrals from the AEC and low dose scans after detecting over-exposed regions by comparing the line profiles of the two scans detector row-wise. The combined line integrals were reconstructed into a volumetric image using filtered back projection. We evaluated our method using in vivo human subject knee data. The proposed method effectively corrected and detected over-exposure, and thus recovered the visibility of exterior tissues (e.g., the shape and density of the patella, and the patellar tendon), incorporating a prior low dose scan with a negligible increase in radiation exposure.

  11. Description of a digital computer simulation of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory test model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolley, C. T.; Groom, N. J.

    1981-01-01

    A description of a digital computer simulation of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory model is presented. The AMCD is a momentum exchange device which is under development as an advanced control effector for spacecraft attitude control systems. The digital computer simulation of this device incorporates the following models: six degree of freedom rigid body dynamics; rim warp; controller dynamics; nonlinear distributed element axial bearings; as well as power driver and power supply current limits. An annotated FORTRAN IV source code listing of the computer program is included.

  12. Interactive computer graphics and its role in control system design of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S. S. R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper attempts to show the relevance of interactive computer graphics in the design of control systems to maintain attitude and shape of large space structures to accomplish the required mission objectives. The typical phases of control system design, starting from the physical model such as modeling the dynamics, modal analysis, and control system design methodology are reviewed and the need of the interactive computer graphics is demonstrated. Typical constituent parts of large space structures such as free-free beams and free-free plates are used to demonstrate the complexity of the control system design and the effectiveness of the interactive computer graphics.

  13. Evaluation of cumulative dose for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans within phantoms made from different compositions using Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Abuhaimed, Abdullah; Martin, Colin J; Sankaralingam, Marimuthu; Oomen, Kurian; Gentle, David J

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of cumulative dose ƒ(0,150) with a small ionization chamber within standard polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) CT head and body phantoms, 150 mm in length, is a possible practical method for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) dosimetry. This differs from evaluating cumulative dose under scatter equilibrium conditions within an infinitely long phantom ƒ(0,∞), which is proposed by AAPM TG-111 for CBCT dosimetry. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using ƒ(0,150) to estimate values for ƒ(0,∞) in long head and body phantoms made of PMMA, polyethylene (PE), and water, using beam qualities for tube potentials of 80-140 kV. The study also investigated the possibility of using 150 mm PE phantoms for assessment of ƒ(0,∞) within long PE phantoms, the ICRU/AAPM phantom. The influence of scan parameters, composition, and length of the phantoms was investigated. The capability of ƒ(0,150) to assess ƒ(0,∞) has been defined as the efficiency and assessed in terms of the ratios ε(ƒ(0,150) / ƒ(0,∞)). The efficiencies were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations for an On-Board Imager (OBI) system mounted on a TrueBeam linear accelerator. Head and body scanning protocols with beams of width 40-500 mm were used. Efficiencies ε(PMMA/PMMA) and ε(PE/PE) as a function of beam width exhibited three separate regions. For beam widths < 150 mm, ε(PMMA/PMMA) and ε(PE/PE) values were greater than 90% for the head and body phantoms. The efficiency values then fell rapidly with increasing beam width before levelling off at 74% for ε(PMMA/PMMA) and 69% for ε(PE/PE) for a 500 mm beam width. The quantities ε(PMMA/PE) and ε(PMMA/Water) varied with beam width in a different manner. Values at the centers of the phantoms for narrow beams were lower and increased to a steady state for ~100-150 mm wide beams, before declining with increasing the beam width, whereas values at the peripheries decreased steadily with beam width. Results for ε

  14. Evaluation of cumulative dose for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans within phantoms made from different compositions using Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Abuhaimed, Abdullah; Martin, Colin J; Sankaralingam, Marimuthu; Oomen, Kurian; Gentle, David J

    2015-11-08

    Measurement of cumulative dose ƒ(0,150) with a small ionization chamber within standard polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) CT head and body phantoms, 150 mm in length, is a possible practical method for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) dosimetry. This differs from evaluating cumulative dose under scatter equilibrium conditions within an infinitely long phantom ƒ(0,∞), which is proposed by AAPM TG-111 for CBCT dosimetry. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using ƒ(0,150) to estimate values for ƒ(0,∞) in long head and body phantoms made of PMMA, polyethylene (PE), and water, using beam qualities for tube potentials of 80-140 kV. The study also investigated the possibility of using 150 mm PE phantoms for assessment of ƒ(0,∞) within long PE phantoms, the ICRU/AAPM phantom. The influence of scan parameters, composition, and length of the phantoms was investigated. The capability of ƒ(0,150) to assess ƒ(0,∞) has been defined as the efficiency and assessed in terms of the ratios ε(ƒ(0,150) / ƒ(0,∞)). The efficiencies were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations for an On-Board Imager (OBI) system mounted on a TrueBeam linear accelerator. Head and body scanning protocols with beams of width 40-500 mm were used. Efficiencies ε(PMMA/PMMA) and ε(PE/PE) as a function of beam width exhibited three separate regions. For beam widths < 150 mm, ε(PMMA/PMMA) and ε(PE/PE) values were greater than 90% for the head and body phantoms. The efficiency values then fell rapidly with increasing beam width before levelling off at 74% for ε(PMMA/PMMA) and 69% for ε(PE/PE) for a 500 mm beam width. The quantities ε(PMMA/PE) and ε(PMMA/Water) varied with beam width in a different manner. Values at the centers of the phantoms for narrow beams were lower and increased to a steady state for ~100-150 mm wide beams, before declining with increasing the beam width, whereas values at the peripheries decreased steadily with beam width. Results for ε

  15. In Depth Analyses of LEDs by a Combination of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) and Light Microscopy (LM) Correlated with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jörg; Thomas, Christian; Tappe, Frank; Ogbazghi, Tekie

    2016-01-01

    In failure analysis, device characterization and reverse engineering of light emitting diodes (LEDs), and similar electronic components of micro-characterization, plays an important role. Commonly, different techniques like X-ray computed tomography (CT), light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used separately. Similarly, the results have to be treated for each technique independently. Here a comprehensive study is shown which demonstrates the potentials leveraged by linking CT, LM and SEM. In depth characterization is performed on a white emitting LED, which can be operated throughout all characterization steps. Major advantages are: planned preparation of defined cross sections, correlation of optical properties to structural and compositional information, as well as reliable identification of different functional regions. This results from the breadth of information available from identical regions of interest (ROIs): polarization contrast, bright and dark-field LM images, as well as optical images of the LED cross section in operation. This is supplemented by SEM imaging techniques and micro-analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. PMID:27341190

  16. Application of intelligent optimal kV scanning technology (CARE kV) in dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Kang, Shaolei; Han, Dan; Xie, Xiaojie; Deng, Yaming

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the applications and values of dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) intelligent optimal kV scanning technology (CARE kV) in coronary CT angiography (CCTA). 150 patients with normal body mass index were performed DSCT coronary angiography, then randomly divided into the "Semi", 120,100 and 80 kV Group, and the 2 "on" groups, with 30 patients in each group. The first 5 groups used the reference voltage as 120 kV, and the reference current as 400 mAs, while the other group used the reference voltage as 100 kV, and the reference current as 400 mAs. The image quality, average CT value, image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and radiation dose were comparatively analyzed among the 5 groups. The image quality scores of the five groups showed no significant difference (P > 0.05); the average CT values and image noises had significance (P < 0.05), while SNR and CNR showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). The 80 kV group showed the biggest noise, with the CT value as 700 HU, while the radiation dose was the lowest, followed by the on group. As for the patients with normal body mass index (BMI), CARE kV-"on" could obtain high-quality images and lower radiation dose for CCTA, while the operation was simple and convenient.

  17. In Depth Analyses of LEDs by a Combination of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) and Light Microscopy (LM) Correlated with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jörg; Thomas, Christian; Tappe, Frank; Ogbazghi, Tekie

    2016-06-16

    In failure analysis, device characterization and reverse engineering of light emitting diodes (LEDs), and similar electronic components of micro-characterization, plays an important role. Commonly, different techniques like X-ray computed tomography (CT), light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used separately. Similarly, the results have to be treated for each technique independently. Here a comprehensive study is shown which demonstrates the potentials leveraged by linking CT, LM and SEM. In depth characterization is performed on a white emitting LED, which can be operated throughout all characterization steps. Major advantages are: planned preparation of defined cross sections, correlation of optical properties to structural and compositional information, as well as reliable identification of different functional regions. This results from the breadth of information available from identical regions of interest (ROIs): polarization contrast, bright and dark-field LM images, as well as optical images of the LED cross section in operation. This is supplemented by SEM imaging techniques and micro-analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  18. Computer memory power control for the Galileo spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detwiler, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    The developmental history, major design drives, and final topology of the computer memory power system on the Galileo spacecraft are described. A unique method of generating memory backup power directly from the fault current drawn during a spacecraft power overload or fault condition allows this system to provide continuous memory power. This concept provides a unique solution to the problem of volatile memory loss without the use of a battery of other large energy storage elements usually associated with uninterrupted power supply designs.

  19. A computer control system for the alternating gradient magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garland, Michael M.

    1989-01-01

    An alternating gradient magnetometer was interfaced to a computer for the automation of data taking. Using a fast Fourier transform analysis system data can be acquired and processed in real time. Data are stored on disk and can be recalled for plotting and further analysis. With the addition of a simple liquid nitrogen cryostat, magnetization measurements can be performed in the range from 300 to 77 K. Results are reported on three different types of piezoelectric transducers.

  20. Computer Simulator for OTEC System Design : Pump Control of Flow Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Masatoshi; Ikegami, Yasuyuki; Uehara, Haruo

    The purpose of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is to extract power from temperature differences existing in the oceans. The OTEC system design mainly comprises an OTEC plant design and an OTEC control design. The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of a computer simulator for the OTEC system design. The computer simulator, constructed by a computer with A/D and D/A converters, produces analogue input and output signals which are equivalent to those of an actual OTEC plant. By using the computer simulator of an OTEC plant, we can estimate properties of any OTEC plant easily, economically and safely. The computer simulator also plays an important role in detecting difficulties in designing the OTEC controller. We furthermore described the procedure for designing the OTEC controller as follows: (i) statement of the control objective, (ii) modeling of the controlled object, (iii) application of control theory to the model, (iv) characterization of the detector and the input signal part, and (v) construction of the controller. We constructed the computer simulator and the controller for pump flow rate as part of the OTEC plant. We then obtained satisfactory control performance for flow rate control of experiments.