Science.gov

Sample records for computer generated forces

  1. Achieving realistic performance and decison-making capabilities in computer-generated air forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Sheila B.; Stytz, Martin R.; Santos, Eugene, Jr.; Zurita, Vincent B.; Benslay, James L., Jr.

    1997-07-01

    For a computer-generated force (CGF) system to be useful in training environments, it must be able to operate at multiple skill levels, exhibit competency at assigned missions, and comply with current doctrine. Because of the rapid rate of change in distributed interactive simulation (DIS) and the expanding set of performance objectives for any computer- generated force, the system must also be modifiable at reasonable cost and incorporate mechanisms for learning. Therefore, CGF applications must have adaptable decision mechanisms and behaviors and perform automated incorporation of past reasoning and experience into its decision process. The CGF must also possess multiple skill levels for classes of entities, gracefully degrade its reasoning capability in response to system stress, possess an expandable modular knowledge structure, and perform adaptive mission planning. Furthermore, correctly performing individual entity behaviors is not sufficient. Issues related to complex inter-entity behavioral interactions, such as the need to maintain formation and share information, must also be considered. The CGF must also be able to acceptably respond to unforeseen circumstances and be able to make decisions in spite of uncertain information. Because of the need for increased complexity in the virtual battlespace, the CGF should exhibit complex, realistic behavior patterns within the battlespace. To achieve these necessary capabilities, an extensible software architecture, an expandable knowledge base, and an adaptable decision making mechanism are required. Our lab has addressed these issues in detail. The resulting DIS-compliant system is called the automated wingman (AW). The AW is based on fuzzy logic, the common object database (CODB) software architecture, and a hierarchical knowledge structure. We describe the techniques we used to enable us to make progress toward a CGF entity that satisfies the requirements presented above. We present our design and

  2. Force propagation and force generation in cells.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Oliver; Duschl, Claus

    2010-09-01

    Determining how forces are produced by and propagated through the cytoskeleton (CSK) of the cell is of great interest as dynamic processes of the CSK are intimately correlated with many molecular signaling pathways. We are presenting a novel approach for integrating measurements on cell elasticity, transcellular force propagation, and cellular force generation to obtain a comprehensive description of dynamic and mechanical properties of the CSK under force loading. This approach uses a combination of scanning force microscopy (SFM) and Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. We apply well-defined loading schemes onto the apical cell membrane of fibroblasts using the SFM and simultaneously use TIRF microscopy to image the topography of the basal cell membrane. The locally distinct changes of shape and depth of the cytoskeletal imprints onto the basal membrane are interpreted as results of force propagation through the cytoplasm. This observation provides evidence for the tensegrity model and demonstrates the usefulness of our approach that does not depend on potentially disturbing marker compounds. We confirm that the actin network greatly determines cell stiffness and represents the substrate that mediates force transduction through the cytoplasm of the cell. The latter is an essential feature of tensegrity. Most importantly, our new finding that, both intact actin and microtubule networks are required for enabling the cell to produce work, can only be understood within the framework of the tensegrity model. We also provide, for the first time, a direct measurement of the cell's mechanical power output under compression at two femtowatts. PMID:20607861

  3. The fifth generation computer

    SciTech Connect

    Moto-Oka, T.; Kitsuregawa, M.

    1985-01-01

    The leader of Japan's Fifth Generation computer project, known as the 'Apollo' project, and a young computer scientist elucidate in this book the process of how the idea came about, international reactions, the basic technology, prospects for realization, and the abilities of the Fifth Generation computer. Topics considered included forecasting, research programs, planning, and technology impacts.

  4. Next-generation computers

    SciTech Connect

    Torrero, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    Developments related to tomorrow's computers are discussed, taking into account advances toward the fifth generation in Japan, the challenge to U.S. supercomputers, plans concerning the creation of supersmart computers for the U.S. military, a U.S. industry response to the Japanese challenge, a survey of U.S. and European research, Great Britain, the European Common Market, codifying human knowledge for machine reading, software engineering, the next-generation softwave, plans for obtaining the million-transistor chip, and fabrication issues for next-generation circuits. Other topics explored are related to a status report regarding artificial intelligence, an assessment of the technical challenges, aspects of sociotechnology, and defense advanced research projects. Attention is also given to expert systems, speech recognition, computer vision, function-level programming and automated programming, computing at the speed limit, VLSI, and superpower computers.

  5. The vector of jaw muscle force as determined by computer-generated three dimensional simulation: a test of Greaves' model.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Philip; Wroe, Stephen; McHenry, Colin; Moreno, Karen; Bourke, Jason

    2008-11-14

    We present results from a detailed three-dimensional finite element analysis of the cranium and mandible of the Australian dingo (Canis lupus dingo) during a range of feeding activities and compare results with predictions based on two-dimensional methodology [Greaves, W.S., 2000. Location of the vector of jaw muscle force in mammals. Journal of Morphology 243, 293-299]. Greaves showed that the resultant muscle vector intersects the mandible line slightly posterior to the lower third molar (m3). Our work demonstrates that this is qualitatively correct, although the actual point is closer to the jaw joint. We show that it is theoretically possible for the biting side of the mandible to dislocate during unilateral biting; however, the bite point needs to be posterior to m3. Simulations show that reduced muscle activation on the non-biting side can considerably diminish the likelihood of dislocation with only a minor decrease in bite force during unilateral biting. By modulating muscle recruitment the animal may be able to maximise bite force whilst minimising the risk of dislocation. PMID:18838138

  6. Computer Generated Lenticular Stereograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Shaun T.; McAllister, David F.

    1989-09-01

    Computer generated true three dimensional hardcopy using lenticular sheets offers advantages over alternative hardcopy methods. Easier to record than holographic stereograms and offering full color, lenticular displays have image quality similar to barrier displays but without problems of brightness. Two different means of computer generation are possible. For both, a sequence of perspective views are calculated then merged into a single composite image or stereogram. Interlacing these views is usually done optically but a computational method is also considered. Efforts have been made at direct writing of holograms but can be achieved much more readily for lenticular stereograms since a much lower spatial frequency will suffice. The resolution needed depends upon the pitch of the cylindrical lenses in the lenticular sheet and the number of perspective views to be interlaced. We consider the use of 300 dpi laser printers and show that while the resolution is sufficient, linewidth and spacing are problematic. We also consider production of full color stereograms and discuss the problems caused by dithering for color palette generation. Higher resolution output devices such as digital film recorders offer much greater potential for panoramic, full color display and direct writing of lenticular stereograms is considered a viable, cost effective technique to generate autostereoscopic 3D display.

  7. Finite difference computation of Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2016-09-01

    In this Invited paper, we begin by a historical introduction to provide a motivation for the classical problems of interatomic force computation and associated challenges. This analysis will lead us from early theoretical and experimental accomplishments to the integration of these fascinating interactions into the operation of realistic, next-generation micro- and nanodevices both for the advanced metrology of fundamental physical processes and in breakthrough industrial applications. Among several powerful strategies enabling vastly enhanced performance and entirely novel technological capabilities, we shall specifically consider Casimir force time-modulation and the adoption of non-trivial geometries. As to the former, the ability to alter the magnitude and sign of the Casimir force will be recognized as a crucial principle to implement thermodynamical nano-engines. As to the latter, we shall first briefly review various reported computational approaches. We shall then discuss the game-changing discovery, in the last decade, that standard methods of numerical classical electromagnetism can be retooled to formulate the problem of Casimir force computation in arbitrary geometries. This remarkable development will be practically illustrated by showing that such an apparently elementary method as standard finite-differencing can be successfully employed to numerically recover results known from the Lifshitz theory of dispersion forces in the case of interacting parallel-plane slabs. Other geometries will be also be explored and consideration given to the potential of non-standard finite-difference methods. Finally, we shall introduce problems at the computational frontier, such as those including membranes deformed by Casimir forces and the effects of anisotropic materials. Conclusions will highlight the dramatic transition from the enduring perception of this field as an exotic application of quantum electrodynamics to the recent demonstration of a human climbing

  8. Computer generated holographic microtags

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.

    1998-01-01

    A microlithographic tag comprising an array of individual computer generated holographic patches having feature sizes between 250 and 75 nanometers. The tag is a composite hologram made up of the individual holographic patches and contains identifying information when read out with a laser of the proper wavelength and at the proper angles of probing and reading. The patches are fabricated in a steep angle Littrow readout geometry to maximize returns in the -1 diffracted order. The tags are useful as anti-counterfeiting markers because of the extreme difficulty in reproducing them.

  9. Computer generated holographic microtags

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, W.C.

    1998-03-17

    A microlithographic tag comprising an array of individual computer generated holographic patches having feature sizes between 250 and 75 nanometers is disclosed. The tag is a composite hologram made up of the individual holographic patches and contains identifying information when read out with a laser of the proper wavelength and at the proper angles of probing and reading. The patches are fabricated in a steep angle Littrow readout geometry to maximize returns in the -1 diffracted order. The tags are useful as anti-counterfeiting markers because of the extreme difficulty in reproducing them. 5 figs.

  10. Augmented Computer Mouse Would Measure Applied Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Larry C. H.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed computer mouse measures force of contact applied by user. Adds another dimension to two-dimensional-position-measuring capability of conventional computer mouse; force measurement designated to represent any desired continuously variable function of time and position, such as control force, acceleration, velocity, or position along axis perpendicular to computer video display. Proposed mouse enhances sense of realism and intuition in interaction between operator and computer. Useful in such applications as three-dimensional computer graphics, computer games, and mathematical modeling of dynamics.

  11. Parallel computation with the force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    A methodology, called the force, supports the construction of programs to be executed in parallel by a force of processes. The number of processes in the force is unspecified, but potentially very large. The force idea is embodied in a set of macros which produce multiproceossor FORTRAN code and has been studied on two shared memory multiprocessors of fairly different character. The method has simplified the writing of highly parallel programs within a limited class of parallel algorithms and is being extended to cover a broader class. The individual parallel constructs which comprise the force methodology are discussed. Of central concern are their semantics, implementation on different architectures and performance implications.

  12. Computer-generated speech

    SciTech Connect

    Aimthikul, Y.

    1981-12-01

    This thesis reviews the essential aspects of speech synthesis and distinguishes between the two prevailing techniques: compressed digital speech and phonemic synthesis. It then presents the hardware details of the five speech modules evaluated. FORTRAN programs were written to facilitate message creation and retrieval with four of the modules driven by a PDP-11 minicomputer. The fifth module was driven directly by a computer terminal. The compressed digital speech modules (T.I. 990/306, T.S.I. Series 3D and N.S. Digitalker) each contain a limited vocabulary produced by the manufacturers while both the phonemic synthesizers made by Votrax permit an almost unlimited set of sounds and words. A text-to-phoneme rules program was adapted for the PDP-11 (running under the RSX-11M operating system) to drive the Votrax Speech Pac module. However, the Votrax Type'N Talk unit has its own built-in translator. Comparison of these modules revealed that the compressed digital speech modules were superior in pronouncing words on an individual basis but lacked the inflection capability that permitted the phonemic synthesizers to generate more coherent phrases. These findings were necessarily highly subjective and dependent on the specific words and phrases studied. In addition, the rapid introduction of new modules by manufacturers will necessitate new comparisons. However, the results of this research verified that all of the modules studied do possess reasonable quality of speech that is suitable for man-machine applications. Furthermore, the development tools are now in place to permit the addition of computer speech output in such applications.

  13. An Improved Computational Technique for Calculating Electromagnetic Forces and Power Absorptions Generated in Spherical and Deformed Body in Levitation Melting Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zong, Jin-Ho; Szekely, Julian; Schwartz, Elliot

    1992-01-01

    An improved computational technique for calculating the electromagnetic force field, the power absorption and the deformation of an electromagnetically levitated metal sample is described. The technique is based on the volume integral method, but represents a substantial refinement; the coordinate transformation employed allows the efficient treatment of a broad class of rotationally symmetrical bodies. Computed results are presented to represent the behavior of levitation melted metal samples in a multi-coil, multi-frequency levitation unit to be used in microgravity experiments. The theoretical predictions are compared with both analytical solutions and with the results or previous computational efforts for the spherical samples and the agreement has been very good. The treatment of problems involving deformed surfaces and actually predicting the deformed shape of the specimens breaks new ground and should be the major usefulness of the proposed method.

  14. An improved computational technique for calculating electromagnetic forces and power absorptions generated in spherical and deformed body in levitation melting devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zong, Jin-Ho; Szekely, Julian; Schwartz, Elliot

    1992-01-01

    An improved computational technique for calculating the electromagnetic force field, the power absorption and the deformation of an electromagnetically levitated metal sample is described. The technique is based on the volume integral method, but represents a substantial refinement; the coordinate transformation employed allows the efficient treatment of a broad class of rotationally symmetrical bodies. Computed results are presented to represent the behavior of levitation melted metal samples in a multi-coil, multi-frequency levitation unit to be used in microgravity experiments. The theoretical predictions are compared with both analytical solutions and with the results of previous computational efforts for the spherical samples and the agreement has been very good. The treatment of problems involving deformed surfaces and actually predicting the deformed shape of the specimens breaks new ground and should be the major usefulness of the proposed method.

  15. Computing Thermal Imbalance Forces On Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigue, Yvonne; Schutz, Robert E.; Sewell, Granville; Abusali, Pothai A. M.

    1994-01-01

    HEAT.PRO computer program calculates imbalance force caused by heating of surfaces of satellite. Calculates thermal imbalance force and determines its effect on orbit of satellite, especially where shadow cast by Earth Causes periodic changes in thermal environment around satellite. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  16. Keratocytes generate traction forces in two phases.

    PubMed

    Burton, K; Park, J H; Taylor, D L

    1999-11-01

    Forces generated by goldfish keratocytes and Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts have been measured with nanonewton precision and submicrometer spatial resolution. Differential interference contrast microscopy was used to visualize deformations produced by traction forces in elastic substrata, and interference reflection microscopy revealed sites of cell-substratum adhesions. Force ranged from a few nanonewtons at submicrometer spots under the lamellipodium to several hundred nanonewtons under the cell body. As cells moved forward, centripetal forces were applied by lamellipodia at sites that remained stationary on the substratum. Force increased and abruptly became lateral at the boundary of the lamellipodium and the cell body. When the cell retracted at its posterior margin, cell-substratum contact area decreased more rapidly than force, so that stress (force divided by area) increased as the cell pulled away. An increase in lateral force was associated with widening of the cell body. These mechanical data suggest an integrated, two-phase mechanism of cell motility: (1) low forces in the lamellipodium are applied in the direction of cortical flow and cause the cell body to be pulled forward; and (2) a component of force at the flanks pulls the rear margins forward toward the advancing cell body, whereas a large lateral component contributes to detachment of adhesions without greatly perturbing forward movement. PMID:10564269

  17. Dynein arms are oscillating force generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingyoji, Chikako; Higuchi, Hideo; Yoshimura, Misako; Katayama, Eisaku; Yanagida, Toshio

    1998-06-01

    Eukaryotic flagella beat rhythmically. Dynein is a protein that powers flagellar motion, and oscillation may be inherent to this protein. Here we determine whether oscillation is a property of dynein arms themselves or whether oscillation requires an intact axoneme, which is the central core of the flagellum and consists ofa regular array of microtubules. Using optical trapping nanometry,, we measured the force generated by a few dynein arms on an isolated doublet microtubule. When the dynein arms on the doublet microtubule contact a singlet microtubule and are activated by photolysis of caged ATP, they generate a peak force of ~6pN and move the singlet microtubule over the doublet microtubule in a processive manner. The force and displacement oscillate with a peak-to-peak force and amplitude of ~2pN and ~30nm, respectively. The geometry of the interaction indicates that very few (possibly one) dynein arms are needed to generate the oscillation. The maximum frequency of the oscillation at 0.75mM ATP is ~70Hz this frequency decreases as the ATP concentration decreases. A similar oscillatory force is also generated by inner dynein arms alone on doublet microtubules that are depleted of outer dynein arms. The oscillation of the dynein arm may be a basic mechanism underlying flagellar beating.

  18. Minimizing forced outage risk in generator bidding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Dibyendu

    Competition in power markets has exposed the participating companies to physical and financial uncertainties. Generator companies bid to supply power in a day-ahead market. Once their bids are accepted by the ISO they are bound to supply power. A random outage after acceptance of bids forces a generator to buy power from the expensive real-time hourly spot market and sell to the ISO at the set day-ahead market clearing price, incurring losses. A risk management technique is developed to assess this financial risk associated with forced outages of generators and then minimize it. This work presents a risk assessment module which measures the financial risk of generators bidding in an open market for different bidding scenarios. The day-ahead power market auction is modeled using a Unit Commitment algorithm and a combination of Normal and Cauchy distributions generate the real time hourly spot market. Risk profiles are derived and VaRs are calculated at 98 percent confidence level as a measure of financial risk. Risk Profiles and VaRs help the generators to analyze the forced outage risk and different factors affecting it. The VaRs and the estimated total earning for different bidding scenarios are used to develop a risk minimization module. This module will develop a bidding strategy of the generator company such that its estimated total earning is maximized keeping the VaR below a tolerable limit. This general framework of a risk management technique for the generating companies bidding in competitive day-ahead market can also help them in decisions related to building new generators.

  19. Do centrioles generate a polar ejection force?

    PubMed

    Wells, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    A microtubule-dependent polar ejection force that pushes chromosomes away from spindle poles during prometaphase is observed in animal cells but not in the cells of higher plants. Elongating microtubules and kinesin-like motor molecules have been proposed as possible causes, but neither accounts for all the data. In the hypothesis proposed here a polar ejection force is generated by centrioles, which are found in animals but not in higher plants. Centrioles consist of nine microtubule triplets arranged like the blades of a tiny turbine. Instead of viewing centrioles through the spectacles of molecular reductionism and neo-Darwinism, this hypothesis assumes that they are holistically designed to be turbines. Orthogonally oriented centriolar turbines could generate oscillations in spindle microtubules that resemble the motion produced by a laboratory vortexer. The result would be a microtubule-mediated ejection force tending to move chromosomes away from the spindle axis and the poles. A rise in intracellular calcium at the onset of anaphase could regulate the polar ejection force by shutting down the centriolar turbines, but defective regulation could result in an excessive force that contributes to the chromosomal instability characteristic of most cancer cells.

  20. Do centrioles generate a polar ejection force?

    PubMed

    Wells, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    A microtubule-dependent polar ejection force that pushes chromosomes away from spindle poles during prometaphase is observed in animal cells but not in the cells of higher plants. Elongating microtubules and kinesin-like motor molecules have been proposed as possible causes, but neither accounts for all the data. In the hypothesis proposed here a polar ejection force is generated by centrioles, which are found in animals but not in higher plants. Centrioles consist of nine microtubule triplets arranged like the blades of a tiny turbine. Instead of viewing centrioles through the spectacles of molecular reductionism and neo-Darwinism, this hypothesis assumes that they are holistically designed to be turbines. Orthogonally oriented centriolar turbines could generate oscillations in spindle microtubules that resemble the motion produced by a laboratory vortexer. The result would be a microtubule-mediated ejection force tending to move chromosomes away from the spindle axis and the poles. A rise in intracellular calcium at the onset of anaphase could regulate the polar ejection force by shutting down the centriolar turbines, but defective regulation could result in an excessive force that contributes to the chromosomal instability characteristic of most cancer cells. PMID:15889341

  1. A Computer Generated Audiovisuals Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogen, Betty

    Eccles Medical Sciences Library at the University of Utah has developed a computer-generated catalog for its audiovisual health and medical materials. The catalog contains four sections: (1) the main listing of type of media, with descriptions, call numbers, and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) used for each item; (2) a listing by title, with call…

  2. Computational Modeling of Vortex Generators for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.

    2002-01-01

    In this work computational models were developed and used to investigate applications of vortex generators (VGs) to turbomachinery. The work was aimed at increasing the efficiency of compressor components designed for the NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program. Initial calculations were used to investigate the physical behavior of VGs. A parametric study of the effects of VG height was done using 3-D calculations of isolated VGs. A body force model was developed to simulate the effects of VGs without requiring complicated grids. The model was calibrated using 2-D calculations of the VG vanes and was validated using the 3-D results. Then three applications of VGs to a compressor rotor and stator were investigated: 1) The results of the 3-D calculations were used to simulate the use of small casing VGs used to generate rotor preswirl or counterswirl. Computed performance maps were used to evaluate the effects of VGs. 2) The body force model was used to simulate large part-span splitters on the casing ahead of the stator. Computed loss buckets showed the effects of the VGs. 3) The body force model was also used to investigate the use of tiny VGs on the stator suction surface for controlling secondary flows. Near-surface particle traces and exit loss profiles were used to evaluate the effects of the VGs.

  3. Force generation in a regrowing eukaryotic flagellum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polin, Marco; Bruneau, Bastien; Johnson, Thomas; Goldstein, Raymond

    2012-02-01

    Flagella are whip-like organelles with a complex internal structure, the axoneme, highly conserved across eukaryotic species. The highly regulated activity of motor proteins arranged along the axoneme moves the flagellum in the surrounding fluid, generating forces that can be used for swimming or fluid propulsion. Although our understanding of the general mechanism behind flagellar motion is well established, the details of its implementation in a real axoneme is still poorly understood. Here we explore the inner working of the eukaryotic flagellum using a uniflagellated mutant of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to investigate in detail the force and power generated by a moving flagellum during axonemal regrowth after deflagellation. These experiments will contribute to our understanding of the inner working of the eukaryotic flagellum.

  4. 48 CFR 53.105 - Computer generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Computer generation. 53...) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS General 53.105 Computer generation. (a) Agencies may computer-generate the... be computer generated by the public. Unless prohibited by agency regulations, forms prescribed...

  5. Computer-Generated Feedback on Student Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Paige

    2011-01-01

    A distinction must be made between "computer-generated scoring" and "computer-generated feedback". Computer-generated scoring refers to the provision of automated scores derived from mathematical models built on organizational, syntactic, and mechanical aspects of writing. In contrast, computer-generated feedback, the focus of this article, refers…

  6. 48 CFR 53.105 - Computer generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Computer generation. 53...) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS General 53.105 Computer generation. (a) Agencies may computer-generate the... be computer generated by the public. Unless prohibited by agency regulations, forms prescribed...

  7. Modular Aspects of Kinesin Force Generation Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, William R.; Steiner, Miriam; Wohlever, Matthew L.; Kamm, Roger D.; Hwang, Wonmuk; Lang, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    The motor head of kinesin carries out microtubule binding, ATP hydrolysis, and force generation. Despite a high level of sequence and structural conservation, subtle variations in subdomains of the motor head determine family-specific properties. In particular, both Kinesin-1 (Kin-1) and Kinesin-5 (Kin-5) walk processively to the microtubule plus-end, yet show distinct motility characteristics suitable for their functions. We studied chimeric Kin-1/Kin-5 constructs with a combination of single molecule motility assays and molecular dynamics simulations to demonstrate that Kin-5 possesses a force-generating element similar to Kin-1, i.e., the cover-neck bundle. Furthermore, the Kin-5 neck linker makes additional contacts with the core of the motor head via loop L13, which putatively compensates for the shorter cover-neck bundle of Kin-5. Our results indicate that Kin-1 is mechanically optimized for individual cargo transport, whereas Kin-5 does not necessarily maximize its mechanical performance. Its biochemical rates and enhanced force sensitivity may instead be beneficial for operation in a group of motors. Such variations in subdomains would be a strategy for achieving diversity in motility with the conserved motor head. PMID:23663840

  8. Control Strategies for Accurate Force Generation and Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka, Chiaki; Fujiwara, Motoko

    2016-10-01

    Characteristics and motor strategies for force generation and force relaxation were examined using graded tasks during isometric force control. Ten female college students (M age = 20.2 yr., SD = 1.1) were instructed to accurately control the force of isometric elbow flexion using their right arm to match a target force level as quickly as possible. They performed: (1) a generation task, wherein they increased their force from 0% maximum voluntary force to 20% maximum voluntary force (0%-20%), 40% maximum voluntary force (0%-40%), or 60% maximum voluntary force (0%-60%) and (2) and a relaxation task, in which they decreased their force from 60% maximum voluntary force to 40% maximum voluntary force (60%-40%), 20% maximum voluntary force (60%-20%), or to 0% maximum voluntary force (60%-0%). Produced force parameters of point of accuracy (force level, error), quickness (reaction time, adjustment time, rate of force development), and strategy (force wave, rate of force development) were analyzed. Errors of force relaxation were all greater, and reaction times shorter, than those of force generation. Adjustment time depended on the magnitude of force and peak rates of force development and force relaxation differed. Controlled relaxation of force is more difficult with low magnitude of force control.

  9. Control Strategies for Accurate Force Generation and Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka, Chiaki; Fujiwara, Motoko

    2016-10-01

    Characteristics and motor strategies for force generation and force relaxation were examined using graded tasks during isometric force control. Ten female college students (M age = 20.2 yr., SD = 1.1) were instructed to accurately control the force of isometric elbow flexion using their right arm to match a target force level as quickly as possible. They performed: (1) a generation task, wherein they increased their force from 0% maximum voluntary force to 20% maximum voluntary force (0%-20%), 40% maximum voluntary force (0%-40%), or 60% maximum voluntary force (0%-60%) and (2) and a relaxation task, in which they decreased their force from 60% maximum voluntary force to 40% maximum voluntary force (60%-40%), 20% maximum voluntary force (60%-20%), or to 0% maximum voluntary force (60%-0%). Produced force parameters of point of accuracy (force level, error), quickness (reaction time, adjustment time, rate of force development), and strategy (force wave, rate of force development) were analyzed. Errors of force relaxation were all greater, and reaction times shorter, than those of force generation. Adjustment time depended on the magnitude of force and peak rates of force development and force relaxation differed. Controlled relaxation of force is more difficult with low magnitude of force control. PMID:27555365

  10. Recent advances in computer image generation simulation.

    PubMed

    Geltmacher, H E

    1988-11-01

    An explosion in flight simulator technology over the past 10 years is revolutionizing U.S. Air Force (USAF) operational training. The single, most important development has been in computer image generation. However, other significant advances are being made in simulator handling qualities, real-time computation systems, and electro-optical displays. These developments hold great promise for achieving high fidelity combat mission simulation. This article reviews the progress to date and predicts its impact, along with that of new computer science advances such as very high speed integrated circuits (VHSIC), on future USAF aircrew simulator training. Some exciting possibilities are multiship, full-mission simulators at replacement training units, miniaturized unit level mission rehearsal training simulators, onboard embedded training capability, and national scale simulator networking.

  11. Age-Related Corresponding Relationships of Controlled Force Exertion Measured by a Computer-Generated Sinusoidal and Quasi-Random Display

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagasawa, Yoshinori; Demura, Shinichi

    2011-01-01

    This study examined age-group corresponding relationships of the controlled force exertion based on sinusoidal and quasi-random waveforms in 175 right-handed male adults aged 20 to 86 years. The subjects were divided into 3 groups based on age-level: 53 young (mean age 24.6, SD = 3.3 years), 71 middle aged (mean age 44.3, SD = 8.7 years), and 51…

  12. Fourth-Generation Computer Languages: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricks, John

    1988-01-01

    Points out that mainframe computer users today can make their requirements known to the computer in simple English. Provides a listing of fourth generation computer language advantages over third generation languages. Summarizes a program to streamline faculty records on a mainframe computer. (MVL)

  13. Force Generation by Membrane-Associated Myosin-I

    PubMed Central

    Pyrpassopoulos, Serapion; Arpağ, Göker; Feeser, Elizabeth A.; Shuman, Henry; Tüzel, Erkan; Ostap, E. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate myosin-IC (Myo1c) is a type-1 myosin that links cell membranes to the cytoskeleton via its actin-binding motor domain and its phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2)-binding tail domain. While it is known that Myo1c bound to PtdIns(4,5)P2 in fluid-lipid bilayers can propel actin filaments in an unloaded motility assay, its ability to develop forces against external load on actin while bound to fluid bilayers has not been explored. Using optical tweezers, we measured the diffusion coefficient of single membrane-bound Myo1c molecules by force-relaxation experiments, and the ability of ensembles of membrane-bound Myo1c molecules to develop and sustain forces. To interpret our results, we developed a computational model that recapitulates the basic features of our experimental ensemble data and suggests that Myo1c ensembles can generate forces parallel to lipid bilayers, with larger forces achieved when the myosin works away from the plane of the membrane or when anchored to slowly diffusing regions. PMID:27156719

  14. 48 CFR 53.105 - Computer generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Computer generation. 53...) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS General 53.105 Computer generation. (a) The forms prescribed by this part may be computer generated—without exception approval (see 53.103), provided— (1) There is no change to the...

  15. 48 CFR 53.105 - Computer generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Computer generation. 53...) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS General 53.105 Computer generation. (a) The forms prescribed by this part may be computer generated—without exception approval (see 53.103), provided— (1) There is no change to the...

  16. 48 CFR 53.105 - Computer generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Computer generation. 53...) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS General 53.105 Computer generation. (a) The forms prescribed by this part may be computer generated—without exception approval (see 53.103), provided— (1) There is no change to the...

  17. Computation of generating functions for biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.A.; Smith, T.F.; Waterman, M.S.

    1980-08-01

    The object of this paper is to give algorithms and techniques for computing generating functions of certain RNA configurations. Combinatorics and symbolic computation are utilized to calculate the generating functions for small RNA molecules. From these generating functions, it is possible to obtain information about the bonding and structure of the molecules. Specific examples of interest to biology are given and discussed.

  18. Computer Code Generates Homotopic Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moitra, Anutosh

    1992-01-01

    HOMAR is computer code using homotopic procedure to produce two-dimensional grids in cross-sectional planes, which grids then stacked to produce quasi-three-dimensional grid systems for aerospace configurations. Program produces grids for use in both Euler and Navier-Stokes computation of flows. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  19. A Report of the Computer Application Task Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Library, Trenton.

    Ways in which computer technology can be used to support the development of a library network are proposed by the Computer Application Task Force, following the recommendations of the New Jersey Statewide Planning Group and its several task forces. A summary of three primary recommendations is followed by a general discussion of opportunities…

  20. Program Generates Two-Dimensional Computational Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.

    1994-01-01

    TDIGG is fast and versatile computer program for generating two-dimensional computational grids for use in programs solving equations of flow by finite-difference methods. Both algebraic and elliptic grid-generation systems included. Enables user to view results of each iteration. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  1. FUNCTION GENERATOR FOR ANALOGUE COMPUTERS

    DOEpatents

    Skramstad, H.K.; Wright, J.H.; Taback, L.

    1961-12-12

    An improved analogue computer is designed which can be used to determine the final ground position of radioactive fallout particles in an atomic cloud. The computer determines the fallout pattern on the basis of known wind velocity and direction at various altitudes, and intensity of radioactivity in the mushroom cloud as a function of particle size and initial height in the cloud. The output is then displayed on a cathode-ray tube so that the average or total luminance of the tube screen at any point represents the intensity of radioactive fallout at the geographical location represented by that point. (AEC)

  2. Building blocks (fifth-generation computers)

    SciTech Connect

    Feigenbaum, E.A.; Hayes-roth, F.; Waltz, D.L.; Reddy, R.; Zue, V.; Kanade, T.

    1983-11-01

    Major areas of artificial intelligence (AI) research as it impacts on next-generation computing are explored in five short, related articles. The first article provides an overview of the background and current goals of AI. The remaining four discuss, in turn: the codification of human knowledge for machine reading; helping computers understand natural languages; continuous speech recognition; and computer vision with imperfect inputs.

  3. The Distribution of Active Force Generators Controls Mitotic Spindle Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Stephan W.; Howard, Jonathon; Schäffer, Erik; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.; Hyman, Anthony A.

    2003-07-01

    During unequal cell divisions a mitotic spindle is eccentrically positioned before cell cleavage. To determine the basis of the net force imbalance that causes spindle displacement in one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, we fragmented centrosomes with an ultraviolet laser. Analysis of the mean and variance of fragment speeds suggests that the force imbalance is due to a larger number of force generators pulling on astral microtubules of the posterior aster relative to the anterior aster. Moreover, activation of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) α subunits is required to generate these astral forces.

  4. Instructional Uses of the Computer: Program Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrander, P.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a program which simulates motion in two dimensions of a point mass subject to a force which is a function of position, velocity, or time. Sample applications are noted and a source of a complete list of applications and programs is given. (GH)

  5. CHARMM additive and polarizable force fields for biophysics and computer-aided drug design

    PubMed Central

    Vanommeslaeghe, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular Mechanics (MM) is the method of choice for computational studies of biomolecular systems owing to its modest computational cost, which makes it possible to routinely perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on chemical systems of biophysical and biomedical relevance. Scope of Review As one of the main factors limiting the accuracy of MD results is the empirical force field used, the present paper offers a review of recent developments in the CHARMM additive force field, one of the most popular bimolecular force fields. Additionally, we present a detailed discussion of the CHARMM Drude polarizable force field, anticipating a growth in the importance and utilization of polarizable force fields in the near future. Throughout the discussion emphasis is placed on the force fields’ parametrization philosophy and methodology. Major Conclusions Recent improvements in the CHARMM additive force field are mostly related to newly found weaknesses in the previous generation of additive force fields. Beyond the additive approximation is the newly available CHARMM Drude polarizable force field, which allows for MD simulations of up to 1 microsecond on proteins, DNA, lipids and carbohydrates. General Significance Addressing the limitations ensures the reliability of the new CHARMM36 additive force field for the types of calculations that are presently coming into routine computational reach while the availability of the Drude polarizable force fields offers a model that is an inherently more accurate model of the underlying physical forces driving macromolecular structures and dynamics. PMID:25149274

  6. Turbofan noise generation. Volume 2: Computer programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventres, C. S.; Theobald, M. A.; Mark, W. D.

    1982-07-01

    The use of a package of computer programs developed to calculate the in duct acoustic mods excited by a fan/stator stage operating at subsonic tip speed is described. The following three noise source mechanisms are included: (1) sound generated by the rotor blades interacting with turbulence ingested into, or generated within, the inlet duct; (2) sound generated by the stator vanes interacting with the turbulent wakes of the rotor blades; and (3) sound generated by the stator vanes interacting with the velocity deficits in the mean wakes of the rotor blades. The computations for three different noise mechanisms are coded as three separate computer program packages. The computer codes are described by means of block diagrams, tables of data and variables, and example program executions; FORTRAN listings are included.

  7. Turbofan noise generation. Volume 2: Computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ventres, C. S.; Theobald, M. A.; Mark, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    The use of a package of computer programs developed to calculate the in duct acoustic mods excited by a fan/stator stage operating at subsonic tip speed is described. The following three noise source mechanisms are included: (1) sound generated by the rotor blades interacting with turbulence ingested into, or generated within, the inlet duct; (2) sound generated by the stator vanes interacting with the turbulent wakes of the rotor blades; and (3) sound generated by the stator vanes interacting with the velocity deficits in the mean wakes of the rotor blades. The computations for three different noise mechanisms are coded as three separate computer program packages. The computer codes are described by means of block diagrams, tables of data and variables, and example program executions; FORTRAN listings are included.

  8. The generation of side force by distributed suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Leonard; Hong, John

    1993-01-01

    This report provides an approximate analysis of the generation of side force on a cylinder placed horizontal to the flow direction by the application of distributed suction on the rearward side of the cylinder. Relationships are derived between the side force coefficients and the required suction coefficients necessary to maintain attached flow on one side of the cylinder, thereby inducing circulation around the cylinder and a corresponding side force.

  9. The generation of side force by distributed suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Leonard; Hong, John

    1993-05-01

    This report provides an approximate analysis of the generation of side force on a cylinder placed horizontal to the flow direction by the application of distributed suction on the rearward side of the cylinder. Relationships are derived between the side force coefficients and the required suction coefficients necessary to maintain attached flow on one side of the cylinder, thereby inducing circulation around the cylinder and a corresponding side force.

  10. Computer-Generated Movies for Mission Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, P. H., Jr.; vanDillen, S. L.

    1973-01-01

    Computer-generated movies help the viewer to understand mission dynamics and get quantitative details. Sample movie frames demonstrate the uses and effectiveness of movies in mission planning. Tools needed for movie-making include computer programs to generate images on film and film processing to give the desired result. Planning scenes to make an effective product requires some thought and experience. Viewpoints and timing are particularly important. Lessons learned so far and problems still encountered are discussed.

  11. Complementary computer generated holography for aesthetic watermarking.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Christophe; Lemonnier, Olivier; Laulagnet, Fabien; Fargeix, Alain; Tissot, Florent; Armand, Marie Françoise

    2012-02-27

    We present herein an original solution for the watermarking of holograms in binary graphic arts without unaesthetic diffractive effect. It is based on the Babinet principle of complementary diffractive structures adapted to Lohmann-type computer generated holograms. We introduce the concept and demonstrate its interest for anti-counterfeiting applications with the decoding of a hidden data matrix. A process of thermal lithography is used for the manufacturing of binary graphic arts containing complementary computer generated holograms.

  12. Force generation by the growth of amyloid aggregates.

    PubMed

    Herling, Therese W; Garcia, Gonzalo A; Michaels, Thomas C T; Grentz, Wolfgang; Dean, James; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Gang, Hongze; Müller, Thomas; Kav, Batuhan; Terentjev, Eugene M; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2015-08-01

    The generation of mechanical forces are central to a wide range of vital biological processes, including the function of the cytoskeleton. Although the forces emerging from the polymerization of native proteins have been studied in detail, the potential for force generation by aberrant protein polymerization has not yet been explored. Here, we show that the growth of amyloid fibrils, archetypical aberrant protein polymers, is capable of unleashing mechanical forces on the piconewton scale for individual filaments. We apply microfluidic techniques to measure the forces released by amyloid growth for two systems: insulin and lysozyme. The level of force measured for amyloid growth in both systems is comparable to that observed for actin and tubulin, systems that have evolved to generate force during their native functions and, unlike amyloid growth, rely on the input of external energy in the form of nucleotide hydrolysis for maximum force generation. Furthermore, we find that the power density released from growing amyloid fibrils is comparable to that of high-performance synthetic polymer actuators. These findings highlight the potential of amyloid structures as active materials and shed light on the criteria for regulation and reversibility that guide molecular evolution of functional polymers.

  13. Force generation by the growth of amyloid aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Herling, Therese W.; Garcia, Gonzalo A.; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Grentz, Wolfgang; Dean, James; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Gang, Hongze; Müller, Thomas; Kav, Batuhan; Terentjev, Eugene M.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of mechanical forces are central to a wide range of vital biological processes, including the function of the cytoskeleton. Although the forces emerging from the polymerization of native proteins have been studied in detail, the potential for force generation by aberrant protein polymerization has not yet been explored. Here, we show that the growth of amyloid fibrils, archetypical aberrant protein polymers, is capable of unleashing mechanical forces on the piconewton scale for individual filaments. We apply microfluidic techniques to measure the forces released by amyloid growth for two systems: insulin and lysozyme. The level of force measured for amyloid growth in both systems is comparable to that observed for actin and tubulin, systems that have evolved to generate force during their native functions and, unlike amyloid growth, rely on the input of external energy in the form of nucleotide hydrolysis for maximum force generation. Furthermore, we find that the power density released from growing amyloid fibrils is comparable to that of high-performance synthetic polymer actuators. These findings highlight the potential of amyloid structures as active materials and shed light on the criteria for regulation and reversibility that guide molecular evolution of functional polymers. PMID:26195762

  14. Highbay Generator Room, looking northwest Beale Air Force Base, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Highbay Generator Room, looking northwest - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Power Plant, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  15. Land of the Rising Fifth Generation Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feigenbaum, Edward; McCorduck, Pamela

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a major, national plan (Fifth Generation Computer Systems) for Japan to become number one in the computer industry by the latter half of the 1990s. Includes comments on the likely success of and problems associated with the plan supported by Japan's Ministery of International Trade and Industry. (JN)

  16. Clinical dietitians use computer-generated worksheet.

    PubMed

    Hoover, L W; Meylor, D J

    1976-10-01

    Clinical dietitians at the UMC Medical Center expressed a desire for a computer-generated listing of patients which could be used to record pertinent information obtained during patient visitation. An existing computer-stored census file was used as the data base for a computer program developed to print a dietitan's worksheet, which included the patient's name, location, and birth date. The form was printed on 8 1/2

  17. Scaling of motor cortical excitability during unimanual force generation.

    PubMed

    Perez, Monica A; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2009-10-01

    During performance of a unimanual force generation task primary motor cortices (M1s) experience clear functional changes. Here, we evaluated the way in which M1s interact during parametric increases in right wrist flexion force in healthy volunteers. We measured the amplitude and the slope of motor evoked potentials (MEP) recruitment curves to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in the left and right flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscles at rest and during 10%, 30% and 70% of maximal wrist flexion force. At rest, no differences were observed in the amplitude and slope of MEP recruitment curves in the left and right FCR muscles. With increasing right wrist flexion force, MEP amplitudes increased in both FCR muscles, with larger amplitudes in the right FCR. We found a significant correlation between the left and right MEP amplitudes across conditions. The slope of right and left FCR MEP recruitment curve was significantly steeper at 70% of force compared to rest and 10% of force. A significant correlation between the slope of left and right FCR MEP amplitudes was found at 70% of force only. Our results indicate a differential scaling of excitability in the corticospinal system controlling right and left FCR muscles at increasing levels of unimanual force generation. Specifically, these data highlights that at strong levels of unimanual force the increases in motor cortical excitability with increasing TMS stimulus intensities follow a similar pattern in both M1s, while at low levels of force they do not.

  18. Parallel unstructured grid generation for computational aerosciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research project is to develop efficient parallel automatic grid generation procedures for use in computational aerosciences. This effort is focused on a parallel version of the Finite Octree grid generator. Progress made during the first six months is reported.

  19. Detecting photographic and computer generated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conotter, V.; Cordin, L.

    2011-03-01

    Nowadays, sophisticated computer graphics editors lead to a significant increase in the photorealism of images. Thus, computer generated (CG) images result to be convincing and hard to be distinguished from real ones at a first glance. Here, we propose an image forensics technique able to automatically detect local forgeries, i.e., objects generated via computer graphics software inserted in natural images, and vice versa. We develop a novel hybrid classifier based on wavelet based features and sophisticated pattern noise statistics. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  20. Computation of unbalanced radial force in permanent magnet motors

    SciTech Connect

    Salon, S.J.; Howe, M.; Slavik, C.J.; DeBortoli, M.J.; Nevins, R.J.

    1998-10-01

    Nonuniformity in magnet strength in permanent magnet motors results in a vibration-inducing unbalanced force acting on the rotor. This force is the difference of two large numbers and as such is difficult to determine precisely with numerical models. In this paper, a permanent magnet motor with unbalanced magnets is analyzed by the finite element method. Three different techniques for computing the net force on the rotor, including a recently developed field-correction approach, are compared. Sensitivities of the techniques to computational limitations and finite element mesh characteristics are discussed.

  1. Protrusion force microscopy reveals oscillatory force generation and mechanosensing activity of human macrophage podosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labernadie, Anna; Bouissou, Anaïs; Delobelle, Patrick; Balor, Stéphanie; Voituriez, Raphael; Proag, Amsha; Fourquaux, Isabelle; Thibault, Christophe; Vieu, Christophe; Poincloux, Renaud; Charrière, Guillaume M.; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle

    2014-11-01

    Podosomes are adhesion structures formed in monocyte-derived cells. They are F-actin-rich columns perpendicular to the substrate surrounded by a ring of integrins. Here, to measure podosome protrusive forces, we designed an innovative experimental setup named protrusion force microscopy (PFM), which consists in measuring by atomic force microscopy the deformation induced by living cells onto a compliant Formvar sheet. By quantifying the heights of protrusions made by podosomes onto Formvar sheets, we estimate that a single podosome generates a protrusion force that increases with the stiffness of the substratum, which is a hallmark of mechanosensing activity. We show that the protrusive force generated at podosomes oscillates with a constant period and requires combined actomyosin contraction and actin polymerization. Finally, we elaborate a model to explain the mechanical and oscillatory activities of podosomes. Thus, PFM shows that podosomes are mechanosensing cell structures exerting a protrusive force.

  2. Protrusion force microscopy reveals oscillatory force generation and mechanosensing activity of human macrophage podosomes.

    PubMed

    Labernadie, Anna; Bouissou, Anaïs; Delobelle, Patrick; Balor, Stéphanie; Voituriez, Raphael; Proag, Amsha; Fourquaux, Isabelle; Thibault, Christophe; Vieu, Christophe; Poincloux, Renaud; Charrière, Guillaume M; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Podosomes are adhesion structures formed in monocyte-derived cells. They are F-actin-rich columns perpendicular to the substrate surrounded by a ring of integrins. Here, to measure podosome protrusive forces, we designed an innovative experimental setup named protrusion force microscopy (PFM), which consists in measuring by atomic force microscopy the deformation induced by living cells onto a compliant Formvar sheet. By quantifying the heights of protrusions made by podosomes onto Formvar sheets, we estimate that a single podosome generates a protrusion force that increases with the stiffness of the substratum, which is a hallmark of mechanosensing activity. We show that the protrusive force generated at podosomes oscillates with a constant period and requires combined actomyosin contraction and actin polymerization. Finally, we elaborate a model to explain the mechanical and oscillatory activities of podosomes. Thus, PFM shows that podosomes are mechanosensing cell structures exerting a protrusive force. PMID:25385672

  3. Force generation by endocytic actin patches in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Anders E; Bayly, Philip V

    2014-04-15

    Membrane deformation during endocytosis in yeast is driven by local, templated assembly of a sequence of proteins including polymerized actin and curvature-generating coat proteins such as clathrin. Actin polymerization is required for successful endocytosis, but it is not known by what mechanisms actin polymerization generates the required pulling forces. To address this issue, we develop a simulation method in which the actin network at the protein patch is modeled as an active gel. The deformation of the gel is treated using a finite-element approach. We explore the effects and interplay of three different types of force driving invagination: 1), forces perpendicular to the membrane, generated by differences between actin polymerization rates at the edge of the patch and those at the center; 2), the inherent curvature of the coat-protein layer; and 3), forces parallel to the membrane that buckle the coat protein layer, generated by an actomyosin contractile ring. We find that with optimistic estimates for the stall stress of actin gel growth and the shear modulus of the actin gel, actin polymerization can generate almost enough force to overcome the turgor pressure. In combination with the other mechanisms, actin polymerization can the force over the critical value.

  4. Force Generation by Endocytic Actin Patches in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Anders E.; Bayly, Philip V.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane deformation during endocytosis in yeast is driven by local, templated assembly of a sequence of proteins including polymerized actin and curvature-generating coat proteins such as clathrin. Actin polymerization is required for successful endocytosis, but it is not known by what mechanisms actin polymerization generates the required pulling forces. To address this issue, we develop a simulation method in which the actin network at the protein patch is modeled as an active gel. The deformation of the gel is treated using a finite-element approach. We explore the effects and interplay of three different types of force driving invagination: 1), forces perpendicular to the membrane, generated by differences between actin polymerization rates at the edge of the patch and those at the center; 2), the inherent curvature of the coat-protein layer; and 3), forces parallel to the membrane that buckle the coat protein layer, generated by an actomyosin contractile ring. We find that with optimistic estimates for the stall stress of actin gel growth and the shear modulus of the actin gel, actin polymerization can generate almost enough force to overcome the turgor pressure. In combination with the other mechanisms, actin polymerization can the force over the critical value. PMID:24739159

  5. Next generation distributed computing for cancer research.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Pankaj; Owzar, Kouros

    2014-01-01

    Advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) and mass spectrometry (MS) technologies have provided many new opportunities and angles for extending the scope of translational cancer research while creating tremendous challenges in data management and analysis. The resulting informatics challenge is invariably not amenable to the use of traditional computing models. Recent advances in scalable computing and associated infrastructure, particularly distributed computing for Big Data, can provide solutions for addressing these challenges. In this review, the next generation of distributed computing technologies that can address these informatics problems is described from the perspective of three key components of a computational platform, namely computing, data storage and management, and networking. A broad overview of scalable computing is provided to set the context for a detailed description of Hadoop, a technology that is being rapidly adopted for large-scale distributed computing. A proof-of-concept Hadoop cluster, set up for performance benchmarking of NGS read alignment, is described as an example of how to work with Hadoop. Finally, Hadoop is compared with a number of other current technologies for distributed computing.

  6. Next generation distributed computing for cancer research.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Pankaj; Owzar, Kouros

    2014-01-01

    Advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) and mass spectrometry (MS) technologies have provided many new opportunities and angles for extending the scope of translational cancer research while creating tremendous challenges in data management and analysis. The resulting informatics challenge is invariably not amenable to the use of traditional computing models. Recent advances in scalable computing and associated infrastructure, particularly distributed computing for Big Data, can provide solutions for addressing these challenges. In this review, the next generation of distributed computing technologies that can address these informatics problems is described from the perspective of three key components of a computational platform, namely computing, data storage and management, and networking. A broad overview of scalable computing is provided to set the context for a detailed description of Hadoop, a technology that is being rapidly adopted for large-scale distributed computing. A proof-of-concept Hadoop cluster, set up for performance benchmarking of NGS read alignment, is described as an example of how to work with Hadoop. Finally, Hadoop is compared with a number of other current technologies for distributed computing. PMID:25983539

  7. Next Generation Distributed Computing for Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Pankaj; Owzar, Kouros

    2014-01-01

    Advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) and mass spectrometry (MS) technologies have provided many new opportunities and angles for extending the scope of translational cancer research while creating tremendous challenges in data management and analysis. The resulting informatics challenge is invariably not amenable to the use of traditional computing models. Recent advances in scalable computing and associated infrastructure, particularly distributed computing for Big Data, can provide solutions for addressing these challenges. In this review, the next generation of distributed computing technologies that can address these informatics problems is described from the perspective of three key components of a computational platform, namely computing, data storage and management, and networking. A broad overview of scalable computing is provided to set the context for a detailed description of Hadoop, a technology that is being rapidly adopted for large-scale distributed computing. A proof-of-concept Hadoop cluster, set up for performance benchmarking of NGS read alignment, is described as an example of how to work with Hadoop. Finally, Hadoop is compared with a number of other current technologies for distributed computing. PMID:25983539

  8. Nuclear Forces and High-Performance Computing: The Perfect Match

    SciTech Connect

    Luu, T; Walker-Loud, A

    2009-06-12

    High-performance computing is now enabling the calculation of certain nuclear interaction parameters directly from Quantum Chromodynamics, the quantum field theory that governs the behavior of quarks and gluons and is ultimately responsible for the nuclear strong force. We briefly describe the state of the field and describe how progress in this field will impact the greater nuclear physics community. We give estimates of computational requirements needed to obtain certain milestones and describe the scientific and computational challenges of this field.

  9. Keratocytes Generate Traction Forces in Two PhasesV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Kevin; Park, Jung H.; Taylor, D. Lansing

    1999-01-01

    Forces generated by goldfish keratocytes and Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts have been measured with nanonewton precision and submicrometer spatial resolution. Differential interference contrast microscopy was used to visualize deformations produced by traction forces in elastic substrata, and interference reflection microscopy revealed sites of cell-substratum adhesions. Force ranged from a few nanonewtons at submicrometer spots under the lamellipodium to several hundred nanonewtons under the cell body. As cells moved forward, centripetal forces were applied by lamellipodia at sites that remained stationary on the substratum. Force increased and abruptly became lateral at the boundary of the lamellipodium and the cell body. When the cell retracted at its posterior margin, cell-substratum contact area decreased more rapidly than force, so that stress (force divided by area) increased as the cell pulled away. An increase in lateral force was associated with widening of the cell body. These mechanical data suggest an integrated, two-phase mechanism of cell motility: (1) low forces in the lamellipodium are applied in the direction of cortical flow and cause the cell body to be pulled forward; and (2) a component of force at the flanks pulls the rear margins forward toward the advancing cell body, whereas a large lateral component contributes to detachment of adhesions without greatly perturbing forward movement. PMID:10564269

  10. New coding technique for computer generated holograms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskell, R. E.; Culver, B. C.

    1972-01-01

    A coding technique is developed for recording computer generated holograms on a computer controlled CRT in which each resolution cell contains two beam spots of equal size and equal intensity. This provides a binary hologram in which only the position of the two dots is varied from cell to cell. The amplitude associated with each resolution cell is controlled by selectively diffracting unwanted light into a higher diffraction order. The recording of the holograms is fast and simple.

  11. Computer Program For Generation Of Surface Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ching, Raymond; Pierce, Lawrence

    1993-01-01

    S3D is useful computer program for generation of grids on surfaces of bodies having complicated shapes. Product of integration of robust and widely applicable interpolation technique with latest in computer-workstation technology. Incorporates highly efficient and easy-to-use graphical-interface software, enables real-time and interactive analyses of surface-geometry data and facilitates construction of surface grids.

  12. A third-generation digital optical computer

    SciTech Connect

    Guilfoyle, P.S. )

    1993-05-01

    A third generation digital optical computer (DOC III) which is currently being developed by OptiComp Corp. is described. DOC III integrates GaAs technology with global optical interconnects and will achieve multipurpose functionality at speeds up to 10 exp 14 bit operations per second. The DOC III project based on a second-generation digital optical computer employs N4 global interconnect technology. Smart pixel technology which is further developed in DOC III within a GaAs smart pixel design makes it possible to reduce the power consumption and the package size, and to increase the throughput of the system. 6 refs.

  13. Optical Interconnection Via Computer-Generated Holograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang; Zhou, Shaomin

    1995-01-01

    Method of free-space optical interconnection developed for data-processing applications like parallel optical computing, neural-network computing, and switching in optical communication networks. In method, multiple optical connections between multiple sources of light in one array and multiple photodetectors in another array made via computer-generated holograms in electrically addressed spatial light modulators (ESLMs). Offers potential advantages of massive parallelism, high space-bandwidth product, high time-bandwidth product, low power consumption, low cross talk, and low time skew. Also offers advantage of programmability with flexibility of reconfiguration, including variation of strengths of optical connections in real time.

  14. Generation of spin motive force in a soliton lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, A. S. Sinitsyn, V. E.; Bostrem, I. G.; Kishine, J.

    2013-05-15

    The generation of a spin motive force in a chiral helimagnet due to the action of two crossed magnetic fields is considered. The cases of pulsed and periodic magnetic fields directed along the helical axis under a perpendicular dc field are analyzed. It is shown that, in the case of a pulsed field, the spin motive force is related to dissipation, whereas in a periodic field, there is a reactive component that is not related to damping processes.

  15. Direct measurement of the forces generated by an undulatory microswimmer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, Rafael; Backholm, Matilda; Ryu, William; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2014-11-01

    C. elegans is a millimeter-sized nematode which has served as a model organism in biology for several decades, primarily due to its simple anatomy. Employing an undulatory form of locomotion, this worm is capable of propelling itself through various media. Using a micropipette deflection technique, in conjunction with high speed imaging, we directly measure the time-varying forces generated by C. elegans. We observe excellent agreement between our measured forces and the predictions of resistive force theory, through which we determine the drag coefficients of the worm. We also perform the direct force measurements at controlled distances from a single solid boundary as well as between two solid boundaries. We extract the drag coefficients of the worm to quantify the influence of the boundary on the swimming and the hydrodynamic forces involved.

  16. Aeroacoustics. [analysis of properties of sound generated by aerodynamic forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M., E.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis was conducted to determine the properties of sound generated by aerodynamic forces or motions originating in a flow, such as the unsteady aerodynamic forces on propellers or by turbulent flows around an aircraft. The acoustics of moving media are reviewed and mathematical models are developed. Lighthill's acoustic analogy and the application to turbulent flows are analyzed. The effects of solid boundaries are calculated. Theories based on the solution of linearized vorticity and acoustic field equations are explained. The effects of nonuniform mean flow on the generation of sound are reported.

  17. Force Generation and Dynamics of Individual Cilia under External Loading

    PubMed Central

    Hill, David B.; Swaminathan, Vinay; Estes, Ashley; Cribb, Jeremy; O'Brien, E. Timothy; Davis, C. William; Superfine, R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Motile cilia are unique multimotor systems that display coordination and periodicity while imparting forces to biological fluids. They play important roles in normal physiology, and ciliopathies are implicated in a growing number of human diseases. In this work we measure the response of individual human airway cilia to calibrated forces transmitted via spot-labeled magnetic microbeads. Cilia respond to applied forces by 1), a reduction in beat amplitude (up to an 85% reduction by 160–170 pN of force); 2), a decreased tip velocity proportionate to applied force; and 3), no significant change in beat frequency. Tip velocity reduction occurred in each beat direction, independently of the direction of applied force, indicating that the cilium is “driven” in both directions at all times. By applying a quasistatic force model, we deduce that axoneme stiffness is dominated by the rigidity of the microtubules, and that cilia can exert 62 ± 18 pN of force at the tip via the generation of 5.6 ± 1.6 pN/dynein head. PMID:20085719

  18. Evaluation of force generation mechanisms in natural, passive hydraulic actuators.

    PubMed

    Le Duigou, A; Castro, M

    2016-01-01

    Pine cones are well known natural actuators that can move their scales upon humidity gradient. The mechanism manifests itself through a displacement easily observable by the naked eye, but coupled with stress generation. In ancient Egypt, wooden wedges were used to break soft blocks of stone by the generated swelling stress. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the ability of pine cone scales to generate forces while being wetted. In our experiments, a blocking force of around 3N is measured depending on the position on the pine cone where the scales are extracted. A fairly good agreement is obtained when theoretical results based on bimetallic strip systems are compared with experimental data, even if overestimation is observed arising from the input data considered for dry tissues. Inspired by a simplified pine cone microstructure, a biocomposite analogue is manufactured and tested. Although an adequate blocking force can be generated, it has a lower value compared to natural pine cones which benefit from optimized swelling tissue content and interfacial bond strength between them. This study provides new insights to understand the generation of force by pine cones as well as to develop novel biocomposite functionalities. PMID:26726792

  19. Evaluation of force generation mechanisms in natural, passive hydraulic actuators

    PubMed Central

    Le Duigou, A.; Castro, M.

    2016-01-01

    Pine cones are well known natural actuators that can move their scales upon humidity gradient. The mechanism manifests itself through a displacement easily observable by the naked eye, but coupled with stress generation. In ancient Egypt, wooden wedges were used to break soft blocks of stone by the generated swelling stress. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the ability of pine cone scales to generate forces while being wetted. In our experiments, a blocking force of around 3N is measured depending on the position on the pine cone where the scales are extracted. A fairly good agreement is obtained when theoretical results based on bimetallic strip systems are compared with experimental data, even if overestimation is observed arising from the input data considered for dry tissues. Inspired by a simplified pine cone microstructure, a biocomposite analogue is manufactured and tested. Although an adequate blocking force can be generated, it has a lower value compared to natural pine cones which benefit from optimized swelling tissue content and interfacial bond strength between them. This study provides new insights to understand the generation of force by pine cones as well as to develop novel biocomposite functionalities. PMID:26726792

  20. Evaluation of force generation mechanisms in natural, passive hydraulic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Duigou, A.; Castro, M.

    2016-01-01

    Pine cones are well known natural actuators that can move their scales upon humidity gradient. The mechanism manifests itself through a displacement easily observable by the naked eye, but coupled with stress generation. In ancient Egypt, wooden wedges were used to break soft blocks of stone by the generated swelling stress. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the ability of pine cone scales to generate forces while being wetted. In our experiments, a blocking force of around 3N is measured depending on the position on the pine cone where the scales are extracted. A fairly good agreement is obtained when theoretical results based on bimetallic strip systems are compared with experimental data, even if overestimation is observed arising from the input data considered for dry tissues. Inspired by a simplified pine cone microstructure, a biocomposite analogue is manufactured and tested. Although an adequate blocking force can be generated, it has a lower value compared to natural pine cones which benefit from optimized swelling tissue content and interfacial bond strength between them. This study provides new insights to understand the generation of force by pine cones as well as to develop novel biocomposite functionalities.

  1. Diffusible crosslinkers generate directed forces in microtubule networks.

    PubMed

    Lansky, Zdenek; Braun, Marcus; Lüdecke, Annemarie; Schlierf, Michael; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Janson, Marcel E; Diez, Stefan

    2015-03-12

    Cytoskeletal remodeling is essential to eukaryotic cell division and morphogenesis. The mechanical forces driving the restructuring are attributed to the action of molecular motors and the dynamics of cytoskeletal filaments, which both consume chemical energy. By contrast, non-enzymatic filament crosslinkers are regarded as mere friction-generating entities. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that diffusible microtubule crosslinkers of the Ase1/PRC1/Map65 family generate directed microtubule sliding when confined between partially overlapping microtubules. The Ase1-generated forces, directly measured by optical tweezers to be in the piconewton-range, were sufficient to antagonize motor-protein driven microtubule sliding. Force generation is quantitatively explained by the entropic expansion of confined Ase1 molecules diffusing within the microtubule overlaps. The thermal motion of crosslinkers is thus harnessed to generate mechanical work analogous to compressed gas propelling a piston in a cylinder. As confinement of diffusible proteins is ubiquitous in cells, the associated entropic forces are likely of importance for cellular mechanics beyond cytoskeletal networks. PMID:25748652

  2. Computer programming for generating visual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Farhan; Kurylo, Daniel D

    2008-02-01

    Critical to vision research is the generation of visual displays with precise control over stimulus metrics. Generating stimuli often requires adapting commercial software or developing specialized software for specific research applications. In order to facilitate this process, we give here an overview that allows nonexpert users to generate and customize stimuli for vision research. We first give a review of relevant hardware and software considerations, to allow the selection of display hardware, operating system, programming language, and graphics packages most appropriate for specific research applications. We then describe the framework of a generic computer program that can be adapted for use with a broad range of experimental applications. Stimuli are generated in the context of trial events, allowing the display of text messages, the monitoring of subject responses and reaction times, and the inclusion of contingency algorithms. This approach allows direct control and management of computer-generated visual stimuli while utilizing the full capabilities of modern hardware and software systems. The flowchart and source code for the stimulus-generating program may be downloaded from www.psychonomic.org/archive.

  3. Computer-generated mineral commodity deposit maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schruben, Paul G.; Hanley, J. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    This report describes an automated method of generating deposit maps of mineral commodity information. In addition, it serves as a user's manual for the authors' mapping system. Procedures were developed which allow commodity specialists to enter deposit information, retrieve selected data, and plot deposit symbols in any geographic area within the conterminous United States. The mapping system uses both micro- and mainframe computers. The microcomputer is used to input and retrieve information, thus minimizing computing charges. The mainframe computer is used to generate map plots which are printed by a Calcomp plotter. Selector V data base system is employed for input and retrieval on the microcomputer. A general mapping program (Genmap) was written in FORTRAN for use on the mainframe computer. Genmap can plot fifteen symbol types (for point locations) in three sizes. The user can assign symbol types to data items interactively. Individual map symbols can be labeled with a number or the deposit name. Genmap also provides several geographic boundary file and window options.

  4. New-generation amber united-atom force field.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lijiang; Tan, Chun-Hu; Hsieh, Meng-Juei; Wang, Junmei; Duan, Yong; Cieplak, Piotr; Caldwell, James; Kollman, Peter A; Luo, Ray

    2006-07-01

    We have developed a new-generation Amber united-atom force field for simulations involving highly demanding conformational sampling such as protein folding and protein-protein binding. In the new united-atom force field, all hydrogens on aliphatic carbons in all amino acids are united with carbons except those on Calpha. Our choice of explicit representation of all protein backbone atoms aims at minimizing perturbation to protein backbone conformational distributions and to simplify development of backbone torsion terms. Tests with dipeptides and solvated proteins show that our goal is achieved quite successfully. The new united-atom force field uses the same new RESP charging scheme based on B3LYP/cc-pVTZ//HF/6-31g** quantum mechanical calculations in the PCM continuum solvent as that in the Duan et al. force field. van der Waals parameters are empirically refitted starting from published values with respect to experimental solvation free energies of amino acid side-chain analogues. The suitability of mixing new point charges and van der Waals parameters with existing Amber covalent terms is tested on alanine dipeptide and is found to be reasonable. Parameters for all new torsion terms are refitted based on the new point charges and the van der Waals parameters. Molecular dynamics simulations of three small globular proteins in the explicit TIP3P solvent are performed to test the overall stability and accuracy of the new united-atom force field. Good agreements between the united-atom force field and the Duan et al. all-atom force field for both backbone and side-chain conformations are observed. In addition, the per-step efficiency of the new united-atom force field is demonstrated for simulations in the implicit generalized Born solvent. A speedup around two is observed over the Duan et al. all-atom force field for the three tested small proteins. Finally, the efficiency gain of the new united-atom force field in conformational sampling is further demonstrated

  5. Infrared Flight Simulation Using Computer Generated Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weathersby, Marshall R.; Finlay, W. Mark

    1985-01-01

    A sophisticated deterministic interactive software model for computer generation of three-dimensionally projected infrared scenes has been developed. Scenes can be produced using either a self-emission or near infrared reflectance model. The software allows for generation of flight paths through a data base consisting of both feature and topography and near real-time display of stored precomputed images. The emphasis in the model development has been in computer generation of infrared scenes which accurately reproduce the characteristics of real-world imagery. The software combines computer graphics and infrared physics to produce synthetic scenes with the statistical properties of real scenes. Options exist for generation of images in near-infrared, 3-5 or 8-12 micron spectral bands including atmospheric attenuation effects. The three-dimensional projection algorithms allow for viewing of the scenes from any geometry and include concave and convex surfaces as well as hidden objects. Features exist for insertion of additional objects into the three-dimensional scenes. Thus targets, buildings, and other natural or man-made objects can be inserted with any orientation anywhere in the scenes. This allows full simulation of varying depression angles, range closure, and fly-over. The three-dimensional infrared background clutter model is an evaluation tool capable of both assessing system performance in clutter and increasing our understanding of clutter itself. The model in its current form represents a powerful tool for the fundamental understanding of infrared clutter. Possible applications include, but are most certainly not limited to, sensor operator training in the area of target discrimination with dynamic imagery, evaluation of automatic target recognizer (ATR) algorithms, and simulations allowing pilots to pre-fly missions.

  6. 48 CFR 52.253-1 - Computer Generated Forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Computer Generated Forms....253-1 Computer Generated Forms. As prescribed in FAR 53.111, insert the following clause: Computer... by the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) may be submitted on a computer generated version of...

  7. 48 CFR 52.253-1 - Computer Generated Forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Computer Generated Forms....253-1 Computer Generated Forms. As prescribed in FAR 53.111, insert the following clause: Computer... by the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) may be submitted on a computer generated version of...

  8. 48 CFR 52.253-1 - Computer Generated Forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Computer Generated Forms....253-1 Computer Generated Forms. As prescribed in FAR 53.111, insert the following clause: Computer... by the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) may be submitted on a computer generated version of...

  9. 48 CFR 52.253-1 - Computer Generated Forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Computer Generated Forms....253-1 Computer Generated Forms. As prescribed in FAR 53.111, insert the following clause: Computer... by the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) may be submitted on a computer generated version of...

  10. 48 CFR 52.253-1 - Computer Generated Forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Computer Generated Forms....253-1 Computer Generated Forms. As prescribed in FAR 53.111, insert the following clause: Computer... by the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) may be submitted on a computer generated version of...

  11. High Resolution Traction Force Microscopy Based on Experimental and Computational Advances

    PubMed Central

    Sabass, Benedikt; Gardel, Margaret L.; Waterman, Clare M.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration crucially depend on the transmission of actomyosin-generated forces through sites of focal adhesion to the extracellular matrix. Here we report experimental and computational advances in improving the resolution and reliability of traction force microscopy. First, we introduce the use of two differently colored nanobeads as fiducial markers in polyacrylamide gels and explain how the displacement field can be computationally extracted from the fluorescence data. Second, we present different improvements regarding standard methods for force reconstruction from the displacement field, which are the boundary element method, Fourier-transform traction cytometry, and traction reconstruction with point forces. Using extensive data simulation, we show that the spatial resolution of the boundary element method can be improved considerably by splitting the elastic field into near, intermediate, and far field. Fourier-transform traction cytometry requires considerably less computer time, but can achieve a comparable resolution only when combined with Wiener filtering or appropriate regularization schemes. Both methods tend to underestimate forces, especially at small adhesion sites. Traction reconstruction with point forces does not suffer from this limitation, but is only applicable with stationary and well-developed adhesion sites. Third, we combine these advances and for the first time reconstruct fibroblast traction with a spatial resolution of ∼1 μm. PMID:17827246

  12. The Shuttle Mission Simulator computer generated imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, T. H.

    1984-01-01

    Equipment available in the primary training facility for the Space Transportation System (STS) flight crews includes the Fixed Base Simulator, the Motion Base Simulator, the Spacelab Simulator, and the Guidance and Navigation Simulator. The Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) consists of the Fixed Base Simulator and the Motion Base Simulator. The SMS utilizes four visual Computer Generated Image (CGI) systems. The Motion Base Simulator has a forward crew station with six-degrees of freedom motion simulation. Operation of the Spacelab Simulator is planned for the spring of 1983. The Guidance and Navigation Simulator went into operation in 1982. Aspects of orbital visual simulation are discussed, taking into account the earth scene, payload simulation, the generation and display of 1079 stars, the simulation of sun glare, and Reaction Control System jet firing plumes. Attention is also given to landing site visual simulation, and night launch and landing simulation.

  13. Computer modeling of thermoelectric generator performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmielewski, A. B.; Shields, V.

    1982-01-01

    Features of the DEGRA 2 computer code for simulating the operations of a spacecraft thermoelectric generator are described. The code models the physical processes occurring during operation. Input variables include the thermoelectric couple geometry and composition, the thermoelectric materials' properties, interfaces and insulation in the thermopile, the heat source characteristics, mission trajectory, and generator electrical requirements. Time steps can be specified and sublimation of the leg and hot shoe is accounted for, as are shorts between legs. Calculations are performed for conduction, Peltier, Thomson, and Joule heating, the cold junction can be adjusted for solar radition, and the legs of the thermoelectric couple are segmented to enhance the approximation accuracy. A trial run covering 18 couple modules yielded data with 0.3% accuracy with regard to test data. The model has been successful with selenide materials, SiGe, and SiN4, with output of all critical operational variables.

  14. First Estimates of the Radiative Forcing of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning using Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chistopher, Sundar A.; Kliche, Donna V.; Chou, Joyce; Welch, Ronald M.

    1996-01-01

    Collocated measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanner are used to examine the radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols generated from biomass burning for 13 images in South America. Using the AVHRR, Local Area Coverage (LAC) data, a new technique based on a combination of spectral and textural measures is developed for detecting these aerosols. Then, the instantaneous shortwave, longwave, and net radiative forcing values are computed from the ERBE instantaneous scanner data. Results for the selected samples from 13 images show that the mean instantaneous net radiative forcing for areas with heavy aerosol loading is about -36 W/sq m and that for the optically thin aerosols are about -16 W/sq m. These results, although preliminary, provide the first estimates of radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols from biomass burning using satellite data.

  15. First Estimates of the Radiative Forcing of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning Using Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, Sundar A.; Kliche, Donna A.; Chou, Joyce; Welch, Ronald M.

    1996-01-01

    Collocated measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanner are used to examine the radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols generated from biomass burning for 13 images in South America. Using the AVHRR, Local Area Coverage (LAC) data, a new technique based on a combination of spectral and textural measures is developed for detecting these aerosols. Then, the instantaneous shortwave, longwave, and net radiative forcing values are computed from the ERBE instantaneous scanner data. Results for the selected samples from 13 images show that the mean instantaneous net radiative forcing for areas with heavy aerosol loading is about -36 W/sq m and that for the optically thin aerosols are about -16 W/sq m. These results, although preliminary, provide the first estimates of radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols from biomass burning using satellite data.

  16. Forecasting global generation of obsolete personal computers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinglei; Williams, Eric; Ju, Meiting; Yang, Yan

    2010-05-01

    Electronic waste (e-waste) has emerged as a new policy priority around the world. Motivations to address e-waste include rapidly growing waste streams, concern over the environmental fate of heavy metals and other substances in e-waste, and impacts of informal recycling in developing countries. Policy responses to global e-waste focus on banning international trade in end-of-life electronics, the premise being that e-waste is mainly generated in the developed world and then exported to the developing world. Sales of electronics have, however, been growing rapidly in developing nations, raising the question of whether informal recycling in developing countries driven by international trade or domestic generation. This paper addresses this question by forecasting the global generation of obsolete personal computers (PCs) using the logistic model and material flow analysis. Results show that the volume of obsolete PCs generated in developing regions will exceed that of developed regions by 2016-2018. By 2030, the obsolete PCs from developing regions will reach 400-700 million units, far more than from developed regions at 200-300 million units. Future policies to mitigate the impacts of informal recycling should address the domestic situation in developing countries.

  17. Computational optical palpation: micro-scale force mapping using finite-element methods (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesinghe, Philip; Sampson, David D.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate quantification of forces, applied to, or generated by, tissue, is key to understanding many biomechanical processes, fabricating engineered tissues, and diagnosing diseases. Many techniques have been employed to measure forces; in particular, tactile imaging - developed to spatially map palpation-mimicking forces - has shown potential in improving the diagnosis of cancer on the macro-scale. However, tactile imaging often involves the use of discrete force sensors, such as capacitive or piezoelectric sensors, whose spatial resolution is often limited to 1-2 mm. Our group has previously presented a type of tactile imaging, termed optical palpation, in which the change in thickness of a compliant layer in contact with tissue is measured using optical coherence tomography, and surface forces are extracted, with a micro-scale spatial resolution, using a one-dimensional spring model. We have also recently combined optical palpation with compression optical coherence elastography (OCE) to quantify stiffness. A main limitation of this work, however, is that a one-dimensional spring model is insufficient in describing the deformation of mechanically heterogeneous tissue with uneven boundaries, generating significant inaccuracies in measured forces. Here, we present a computational, finite-element method, which we term computational optical palpation. In this technique, by knowing the non-linear mechanical properties of the layer, and from only the axial component of displacement measured by phase-sensitive OCE, we can estimate, not only the axial forces, but the three-dimensional traction forces at the layer-tissue interface. We use a non-linear, three-dimensional model of deformation, which greatly increases the ability to accurately measure force and stiffness in complex tissues.

  18. Computer Generated Cardiac Model For Nuclear Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hills, John F.; Miller, Tom R.

    1981-07-01

    A computer generated mathematical model of a thallium-201 myocardial image is described which is based on realistic geometric and physiological assumptions. The left ventricle is represented by an ellipsoid truncated by aortic and mitral valve planes. Initially, an image of a motionless left ventricle is calculated with the location, size, and relative activity of perfusion defects selected by the designer. The calculation includes corrections for photon attenuation by overlying structures and the relative distribution of activity within the tissues. Motion of the ventricular walls is simulated either by a weighted sum of images at different stages in the cardiac cycle or by a blurring function whose width varies with position. Camera and collimator blurring are estimated by the MTF of the system measured at a representative depth in a phantom. Statistical noise is added using a Poisson random number generator. The usefulness of this model is due to two factors: the a priori characterization of location and extent of perfusion defects and the strong visual similarity of the images to actual clinical studies. These properties should permit systematic evaluation of image processing algorithms using this model. The principles employed in developing this cardiac image model can readily be applied to the simulation of other nuclear medicine studies and to other medical imaging modalities including computed tomography, ultrasound, and digital radiography.

  19. Comparative evaluation of inertial forces generated by ultrasonic lithotriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Bodo E.

    2010-02-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy has become the standard of care for large renal calculi requiring surgical removal. Ultrasonic intracorporeal lithotriptors are used to fragment and evacuate the calculi. Numerous commercially available systems exist. While previous study has demonstrated differing performance characteristics of the various systems, a standardized testing modality does not exist.1-6 In addition, ultrasonic lithotriptor efficiency is thought to deteriorate over time, but an objective measurement technique has not been reported. Rather, subjective performance of the ultrasound during surgical procedures is used to gauge the effectiveness of the instrument. In this study we test the performance of two commercially available ultrasonic lithotriptors, the Lithoclast Select (Boston Scientific, Natick, MA) and Cyberwand (Gyrus ACMI, Southborough, MA). The Lithoclast Select combines pneumatic and ultrasonic lithotripsy in one handpiece but only the ultrasonic component was evaluated in this study. The Cyberwand combines two concentric ultrasound probes into a single handpiece. Several recent studies have shown the clinical effectiveness of the Lithoclast Ultra for PCNL.1-5 The Cyberwand has been shown during in vitro testing to be an efficient lithotrite.6 G-force is the measurement of as objects acceleration relative to free-fall and is measured by the unit g. One g is equal to the standard of gravity which is 9.806 m/s2. In this study we measured the g-forces generated by the ultrasonic lithotriptors to determine if there was a difference in the forces generated by the devices.

  20. Pulling together: Tissue-generated forces that drive lumen morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Navis, Adam; Nelson, Celeste M

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical interactions are essential for bending and shaping tissues during morphogenesis. A common feature of nearly all internal organs is the formation of a tubular network consisting of an epithelium that surrounds a central lumen. Lumen formation during organogenesis requires precisely coordinated mechanical and biochemical interactions. Whereas many genetic regulators of lumen formation have been identified, relatively little is known about the mechanical cues that drive lumen morphogenesis. Lumens can be shaped by a variety of physical behaviors including wrapping a sheet of cells around a hollow core, rearranging cells to expose a lumenal cavity, or elongating a tube via cell migration, though many of the details underlying these movements remain poorly understood. It is essential to define how forces generated by individual cells cooperate to produce the tissue-level forces that drive organogenesis. Transduction of mechanical forces relies on several conserved processes including the contraction of cytoskeletal networks or expansion of lumens through increased fluid pressure. The morphogenetic events that drive lumen formation serve as a model for similar mechanical processes occurring throughout development. To understand how lumenal networks arise, it will be essential to investigate how biochemical and mechanical processes integrate to generate complex structures from comparatively simple interactions.

  1. Frequency spectra of magnetostrictive and Lorentz forces generated in ferromagnetic materials by a CW excited EMAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouge, C.; Lhémery, A.; Aristégui, C.

    2014-04-01

    Magnetostriction arises in ferromagnetic materials subjected to magnetization, e.g., when an EMAT (Electro-Magnetic Acoustic Transducer) is used to generate ultrasonic waves. In such a case, the magnetostriction force must be taken into account as a transduction process that adds up to the Lorentz force. When the static magnetic field is high compared to the dynamic field, both forces are driven by the excitation frequency. For lower static relative values of the magnetic fields, the Lorentz force comprises both the excitation frequency and its first harmonic. In this work, a model is derived to predict the frequency content of the magnetostrictive force that comprises several harmonics. The discrete frequency spectrum strongly depends on both the static field and the relative amplitude of the dynamic field. The only material input data needed to predict it is the curve of macroscopic magnetostrictive strain that can be measured in the direction of an imposed magnetic field. Then, the various frequency-dependent distributions of Lorentz and magnetostriction body forces can be transformed into equivalent surface stresses. Examples of computation are given for different static and dynamic magnetic fields to study their influence on the frequency content of waves generated in ferromagnetic materials.

  2. Direct computation of parameters for accurate polarizable force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Verstraelen, Toon Vandenbrande, Steven; Ayers, Paul W.

    2014-11-21

    We present an improved electronic linear response model to incorporate polarization and charge-transfer effects in polarizable force fields. This model is a generalization of the Atom-Condensed Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (DFT), approximated to second order (ACKS2): it can now be defined with any underlying variational theory (next to KS-DFT) and it can include atomic multipoles and off-center basis functions. Parameters in this model are computed efficiently as expectation values of an electronic wavefunction, obviating the need for their calibration, regularization, and manual tuning. In the limit of a complete density and potential basis set in the ACKS2 model, the linear response properties of the underlying theory for a given molecular geometry are reproduced exactly. A numerical validation with a test set of 110 molecules shows that very accurate models can already be obtained with fluctuating charges and dipoles. These features greatly facilitate the development of polarizable force fields.

  3. Magnetic resonance force microscopy and a solid state quantum computer.

    SciTech Connect

    Pelekhov, D. V.; Martin, I.; Suter, A.; Reagor, D. W.; Hammel, P. C.

    2001-01-01

    A Quantum Computer (QC) is a device that utilizes the principles of Quantum Mechanics to perform computations. Such a machine would be capable of accomplishing tasks not achievable by means of any conventional digital computer, for instance factoring large numbers. Currently it appears that the QC architecture based on an array of spin quantum bits (qubits) embedded in a solid-state matrix is one of the most promising approaches to fabrication of a scalable QC. However, the fabrication and operation of a Solid State Quantum Computer (SSQC) presents very formidable challenges; primary amongst these are: (1) the characterization and control of the fabrication process of the device during its construction and (2) the readout of the computational result. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM)--a novel scanning probe technique based on mechanical detection of magnetic resonance-provides an attractive means of addressing these requirements. The sensitivity of the MRFM significantly exceeds that of conventional magnetic resonance measurement methods, and it has the potential for single electron spin detection. Moreover, the MRFM is capable of true 3D subsurface imaging. These features will make MRFM an invaluable tool for the implementation of a spin-based QC. Here we present the general principles of MRFM operation, the current status of its development and indicate future directions for its improvement.

  4. Computer Generated Inputs for NMIS Processor Verification

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Mullens; J. E. Breeding; J. A. McEvers; R. W. Wysor; L. G. Chiang; J. R. Lenarduzzi; J. T. Mihalczo; J. K. Mattingly

    2001-06-29

    Proper operation of the Nuclear Identification Materials System (NMIS) processor can be verified using computer-generated inputs [BIST (Built-In-Self-Test)] at the digital inputs. Preselected sequences of input pulses to all channels with known correlation functions are compared to the output of the processor. These types of verifications have been utilized in NMIS type correlation processors at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory since 1984. The use of this test confirmed a malfunction in a NMIS processor at the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) in 1998. The NMIS processor boards were returned to the U.S. for repair and subsequently used in NMIS passive and active measurements with Pu at VNIIEF in 1999.

  5. Dynamics of Oscillatory Vortex Multipoles Generated by Electromagnetic Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Aldo; Cuevas, Sergio; Ramos, Eduardo

    2010-11-01

    Vortices formed by the concurrent effect on a localized magnetic field distribution and two alternate electric currents perpendicular to each other in a shallow (4mm) layer of an electrolyte are analyzed. Alternate currents with frequencies and amplitude in the range of 1-500 mHz and 80 mA, respectively, are explored. For a single dipolar magnetic field and a single electric current, the dominant structure of the flow is a pair of alternating lobes located co-linear with the generated Lorenz force. The flow presents a resonant behavior when the forcing frequency is around 10 mHz. When multipoles are used to generate the magnetic field, more complicated lobe distributions are obtained. The flow patterns were successfully described using a quasi-two-dimensional numerical model. A tridimensional numerical models corroborates the theoretical results. Flow visualization and numerical Lagrangian particle tracking indicate that multipolar flows present symmetries according to the magnetic field distributions. Although in some regions the flow patterns efficiently mix the fluid, the mixing is inhomogeneous due to symmetry conditions of the flows. Mixing is enhanced when symmetries are destroyed by the use of a random array of magnets or by injecting two electric currents.

  6. Force Generation, Polymerization Dynamics and Nucleation of Actin Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruizhe

    We study force generation and actin filament dynamics using stochastic and deterministic methods. First, we treat force generation of bundled actin filaments by polymerization via molecular-level stochastic simulations. In the widely-used Brownian Ratchet model, actin filaments grow freely whenever the tip-obstacle gap created by thermal fluctuation exceeds the monomer size. We name this model the Perfect Brownian Ratchet (PBR) model. In the PBR model, actin monomer diffusion is treated implicitly. We perform a series of simulations based on the PBR, in which obstacle motion is treated explicitly; in most previous studies, obstacle motion has been treated implicitly. We find that the cooperativity of filaments is generally weak in the PBR model, meaning that more filaments would grow more slowly given the same force per filament. Closed-form formulas are also developed, which match the simulation results. These portable and accurate formulas provide guidance for experiments and upper and lower bounds for theoretical analyses. We also studied a variation of the PBR, called the Diffusing Brownian Ratchet (DBR) model, in which both actin monomer and obstacle diffusion are treated explicitly. We find that the growth rate of multiple filaments is even lower, compared with that in PBR. This finding challenges the widely-accepted PBR assumption and suggests that pushing the study of actin dynamics down to the sub-nanometer level yields new insights. We subsequently used a rate equation approach to model the effect of local depletion of actin monomers on the nucleation of actin filaments on biomimetic beads, and how the effect is regulated by capping protein (CP). We find that near the bead surface, a higher CP concentration increases local actin concentration, which leads to an enhanced activities of actin filaments' nucleation. Our model analysis matches the experimental results and lends support to an important but undervalued hypothesis proposed by Carlier and

  7. Evidence for an electrostatic mechanism of force generation by the bacteriophage T4 DNA packaging motor

    PubMed Central

    Migliori, Amy D.; Keller, Nicholas; Alam, Tanfis I.; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Rao, Venigalla B.; Arya, Gaurav; Smith, Douglas E

    2014-01-01

    How viral packaging motors generate enormous forces to translocate DNA into viral capsids remains unknown. Recent structural studies of the bacteriophage T4 packaging motor have led to a proposed mechanism wherein the gp17 motor protein translocates DNA by transitioning between extended and compact states, orchestrated by electrostatic interactions between complimentarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal subdomains. Here, we show that site-directed alterations in these residues cause force dependent impairments of motor function including lower translocation velocity, lower stall force, and higher frequency of pauses and slips. We further show that the measured impairments correlate with computed changes in free energy differences between the two states. These findings support the proposed structural mechanism and further suggest an energy landscape model of motor activity that couples the free energy profile of motor conformational states with that of the ATP hydrolysis cycle. PMID:24937091

  8. Evidence for an electrostatic mechanism of force generation by the bacteriophage T4 DNA packaging motor.

    PubMed

    Migliori, Amy D; Keller, Nicholas; Alam, Tanfis I; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Rao, Venigalla B; Arya, Gaurav; Smith, Douglas E

    2014-01-01

    How viral packaging motors generate enormous forces to translocate DNA into viral capsids remains unknown. Recent structural studies of the bacteriophage T4 packaging motor have led to a proposed mechanism wherein the gp17 motor protein translocates DNA by transitioning between extended and compact states, orchestrated by electrostatic interactions between complimentarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal subdomains. Here we show that site-directed alterations in these residues cause force dependent impairments of motor function including lower translocation velocity, lower stall force and higher frequency of pauses and slips. We further show that the measured impairments correlate with computed changes in free-energy differences between the two states. These findings support the proposed structural mechanism and further suggest an energy landscape model of motor activity that couples the free-energy profile of motor conformational states with that of the ATP hydrolysis cycle. PMID:24937091

  9. Evidence for an electrostatic mechanism of force generation by the bacteriophage T4 DNA packaging motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliori, Amy D.; Keller, Nicholas; Alam, Tanfis I.; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Rao, Venigalla B.; Arya, Gaurav; Smith, Douglas E.

    2014-06-01

    How viral packaging motors generate enormous forces to translocate DNA into viral capsids remains unknown. Recent structural studies of the bacteriophage T4 packaging motor have led to a proposed mechanism wherein the gp17 motor protein translocates DNA by transitioning between extended and compact states, orchestrated by electrostatic interactions between complimentarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal subdomains. Here we show that site-directed alterations in these residues cause force dependent impairments of motor function including lower translocation velocity, lower stall force and higher frequency of pauses and slips. We further show that the measured impairments correlate with computed changes in free-energy differences between the two states. These findings support the proposed structural mechanism and further suggest an energy landscape model of motor activity that couples the free-energy profile of motor conformational states with that of the ATP hydrolysis cycle.

  10. Dynein arms are strain-dependent direction-switching force generators.

    PubMed

    Shingyoji, Chikako; Nakano, Izumi; Inoue, Yuichi; Higuchi, Hideo

    2015-08-01

    Dynein is a minus-end-directed motor that can generate (forward) force to move along the microtubule toward its minus end. In addition, axonemal dyneins were reported to oscillate in the generation of forward force, and cytoplasmic dynein is observed to generate bidirectional forces in response to defined chemical states. Both dyneins can also respond to mechanically applied force. To test whether axonemal dynein can switch direction of force generation, we measured force using an optical trap and UV-photolysis of caged ATP. We observed that isolated dynein could repeatedly generate force in both directions along the microtubule. Bidirectional force was also observed for dynein arms that are still attached on the doublet microtubules. Axonemal dynein generated force to move backward (∼ 4 pN) as well as forward (5-6 pN) along microtubules. Furthermore, backward force could be stimulated by plus-end directed external force applied to axonemal dynein before ATP application. The results show that axonemal dynein is unique exhibiting multiple modes of force generation including backward and forward force, oscillatory force and slow, repetitive bidirectional force. The results also demonstrate that mechanical strain is important for switching the directionality of force generation in axonemal dyneins.

  11. Endothermic force generation in skinned cardiac muscle from rat.

    PubMed

    Ranatunga, K W

    1999-08-01

    Isometric tension responses to rapid temperature jumps (T-jumps) of 2-6 degrees C were examined in skinned muscle fibre bundles isolated from papillary muscles of the rat heart. T-jumps were induced by an infra-red laser pulse (wave length 1.32 microm, pulse duration 0.2 ms) obtained from a Nd-YAG laser, which heated the fibres and bathing buffer solution in a 50 microl trough; the increased temperature by laser pulse was clamped at the high temperature by a Peltier system (see Ranatunga, 1996). In maximally Ca2+ -activated (pCa ca. 4.5) fibres, the relationship between tension and temperature was non-linear, the increase of active tension with temperature being more pronounced at lower temperatures (below ca. 20 degrees C). A T-jump at any temperature (range 3-35 degrees C) induced an initial step decrease of tension of variable amplitude (Phase 1), probably due to thermal expansion, and it was followed by a tension transient which resulted in a net rise of tension above the pre-T-jump level. The rate of net rise of tension (Phase 2b or endothermic force generation) was 7-10/s at ca. 12 degrees C and its Q10 was 6.3 (below 25 degrees C). In cases where the step decrease of tension in Phase 1 was prominent, an initial quick tension recovery phase (Phase 2a, 70-100/s at 12 degrees C) that did not contribute to a rise of tension above the pre-T-jump level, was also seen. This phase (Phase 2a) appeared to be similar to the quick tension recovery induced by a small length release and its rate increased with temperature with a Q10 of 1.8. In some cases where Phase 2a was present, a slower tension rise (Phase 3) was seen; its rate (ca. 5/s) was temperature-insensitive. The results show that the rate of endothermic force generation in cardiac fibres is clearly different from that of either fast-twitch or slow-twitch mammalian skeletal muscle fibres; implication of such fibre type-specific differences is discussed in relation to the difficulty in identifying the

  12. Wavefront reconstruction using computer-generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Christian; Flamm, Daniel; Schmidt, Oliver A.; Duparré, Michael

    2012-02-01

    We propose a new method to determine the wavefront of a laser beam, based on modal decomposition using computer-generated holograms (CGHs). Thereby the beam under test illuminates the CGH with a specific, inscribed transmission function that enables the measurement of modal amplitudes and phases by evaluating the first diffraction order of the hologram. Since we use an angular multiplexing technique, our method is innately capable of real-time measurements of amplitude and phase, yielding the complete information about the optical field. A measurement of the Stokes parameters, respectively of the polarization state, provides the possibility to calculate the Poynting vector. Two wavefront reconstruction possibilities are outlined: reconstruction from the phase for scalar beams and reconstruction from the Poynting vector for inhomogeneously polarized beams. To quantify single aberrations, the reconstructed wavefront is decomposed into Zernike polynomials. Our technique is applied to beams emerging from different kinds of multimode optical fibers, such as step-index, photonic crystal and multicore fibers, whereas in this work results are exemplarily shown for a step-index fiber and compared to a Shack-Hartmann measurement that serves as a reference.

  13. Regulation of the basement membrane by epithelia generated forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Kandice

    2012-12-01

    Tumor metastasis involves a progressive loss of tissue architecture and dissolution of structural boundaries between the epithelium and connective tissue. The basement membrane (BM), a specialized network of extracellular matrix proteins forms a barrier that physically restricts pre-invasive lesions such that they remain as local insults. The BM is not a static structure, but one that is constantly regenerated and remodeled in the adult organism. Matrix organization also regulates cell function. Thus alterations in the balance of synthesis, remodeling and proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix proteins may contribute to a loss of structural integrity. However, the de novo assembly and maintenance of the complex structural properties of in vivo basement membranes remain elusive. Here, this paper highlights the current understanding on the structural properties and the establishment of the BM, and discusses the potential role of self-generated forces in adult tissue remodeling and the maintenance of the BM as a malignancy suppressor.

  14. Cooperative Force Generation of KIF1A Brownian Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriola, David; Casademunt, Jaume

    2013-07-01

    KIF1A is a kinesin motor protein that can work processively in a monomeric (single-headed) form by using a noise-driven ratchet mechanism. Here, we show that the combination of a passive diffusive state and finite-time kinetics of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis provides a powerful mechanism of cooperative force generation, implying for instance that ˜10 monomeric KIF1As can team up to become ˜100 times stronger than a single one. Consequently, we propose that KIF1A could outperform conventional (double-headed) kinesin collectively and thus explain its specificity in axonal trafficking. We elucidate the cooperativity mechanism with a lattice model that includes multiparticle transitions.

  15. Molecular organization and force-generating mechanism of dynein.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Oiwa, Kazuhiro

    2011-09-01

    Dynein, which is a minus-end-directed microtubule motor, is crucial to a range of cellular processes. The mass of its motor domain is about 10 times that of kinesin, the other microtubule motor. Its large size and the difficulty of expressing and purifying mutants have hampered progress in dynein research. Recently, however, electron microscopy, X-ray crystallography and single-molecule nanometry have shed light on several key unsolved questions concerning how the dynein molecule is organized, what conformational changes in the molecule accompany ATP hydrolysis, and whether two or three motor domains are coordinated in the movements of dynein. This minireview describes our current knowledge of the molecular organization and the force-generating mechanism of dynein, with emphasis on findings from electron microscopy and single-molecule nanometry.

  16. Computer programs for generating involute gears

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, J.D.; Wolf, M.L.

    1992-02-01

    Methods and computer programs are given for computing the shapes of involute gears. A proof is given of conditions under which uniform angular velocity is maintained for a pair of interacting cams. A program is given for the animation of gear motion. It runs on an APOLLO 4500 computer. The other programs are general and are written in FORTRAN and C.

  17. Computational Catalysis Using the Artificial Force Induced Reaction Method.

    PubMed

    Sameera, W M C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2016-04-19

    The artificial force induced reaction (AFIR) method in the global reaction route mapping (GRRM) strategy is an automatic approach to explore all important reaction paths of complex reactions. Most traditional methods in computational catalysis require guess reaction paths. On the other hand, the AFIR approach locates local minima (LMs) and transition states (TSs) of reaction paths without a guess, and therefore finds unanticipated as well as anticipated reaction paths. The AFIR method has been applied for multicomponent organic reactions, such as the aldol reaction, Passerini reaction, Biginelli reaction, and phase-transfer catalysis. In the presence of several reactants, many equilibrium structures are possible, leading to a number of reaction pathways. The AFIR method in the GRRM strategy determines all of the important equilibrium structures and subsequent reaction paths systematically. As the AFIR search is fully automatic, exhaustive trial-and-error and guess-and-check processes by the user can be eliminated. At the same time, the AFIR search is systematic, and therefore a more accurate and comprehensive description of the reaction mechanism can be determined. The AFIR method has been used for the study of full catalytic cycles and reaction steps in transition metal catalysis, such as cobalt-catalyzed hydroformylation and iron-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond formation reactions in aqueous media. Some AFIR applications have targeted the selectivity-determining step of transition-metal-catalyzed asymmetric reactions, including stereoselective water-tolerant lanthanide Lewis acid-catalyzed Mukaiyama aldol reactions. In terms of establishing the selectivity of a reaction, systematic sampling of the transition states is critical. In this direction, AFIR is very useful for performing a systematic and automatic determination of TSs. In the presence of a comprehensive description of the transition states, the selectivity of the reaction can be calculated more accurately

  18. Computational Catalysis Using the Artificial Force Induced Reaction Method.

    PubMed

    Sameera, W M C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2016-04-19

    The artificial force induced reaction (AFIR) method in the global reaction route mapping (GRRM) strategy is an automatic approach to explore all important reaction paths of complex reactions. Most traditional methods in computational catalysis require guess reaction paths. On the other hand, the AFIR approach locates local minima (LMs) and transition states (TSs) of reaction paths without a guess, and therefore finds unanticipated as well as anticipated reaction paths. The AFIR method has been applied for multicomponent organic reactions, such as the aldol reaction, Passerini reaction, Biginelli reaction, and phase-transfer catalysis. In the presence of several reactants, many equilibrium structures are possible, leading to a number of reaction pathways. The AFIR method in the GRRM strategy determines all of the important equilibrium structures and subsequent reaction paths systematically. As the AFIR search is fully automatic, exhaustive trial-and-error and guess-and-check processes by the user can be eliminated. At the same time, the AFIR search is systematic, and therefore a more accurate and comprehensive description of the reaction mechanism can be determined. The AFIR method has been used for the study of full catalytic cycles and reaction steps in transition metal catalysis, such as cobalt-catalyzed hydroformylation and iron-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond formation reactions in aqueous media. Some AFIR applications have targeted the selectivity-determining step of transition-metal-catalyzed asymmetric reactions, including stereoselective water-tolerant lanthanide Lewis acid-catalyzed Mukaiyama aldol reactions. In terms of establishing the selectivity of a reaction, systematic sampling of the transition states is critical. In this direction, AFIR is very useful for performing a systematic and automatic determination of TSs. In the presence of a comprehensive description of the transition states, the selectivity of the reaction can be calculated more accurately

  19. Objective measurement of knee extension force based on computer adaptive testing.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Avi; Marcus, Etgar; Mizrahi, Joseph

    2007-02-01

    False impairment is encountered when tested subjects either unintentionally or deliberately put an artificial upper limit on their force, in which case their true capacity cannot be disclosed in a straight forward measurement. The aim of this study was to develop a computer adaptive testing (CAT) system for directing subjects into generating greater forces than they intended. The system was tested on eleven cooperative female subjects who volunteered to take part in this study. The CAT consisted of interactive testing cycles, each containing a series of isometric tasks of differing intensities. While fulfilling these tasks, the tested subjects were asked to take care not to exceed a self-selected upper force limit (F(ssl)) that they were previously trained to memorize (order of 40% of the maximal voluntary contraction). Visual feedback, displaying the applied force exertions, was provided to the tested subjects but was modified by re-scaling the display in an un-anticipated manner. To confirm the subject's ability to remember her F(ssl), repeatability of joint memory was tested one week after the CAT. The CAT results were successful in causing ten out of the eleven tested participants to exert a higher force than they intended to. Additionally, the CAT algorithm caused a statistically significant higher force than the repeatability test. These results demonstrate the potential of CAT methods in improving the clinical evaluation of muscle strength, particularly in those cases where the subject's cooperation is not sufficient.

  20. Effect of gust on force generation around a robotic hummingbird wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquez, Eloy; Tian, Ruijun; Shu, Fangjun

    2012-11-01

    Among the computational, theoretical and experimental studies on the high efficiency flapping flight, many are focused on the mystery of hovering. Most of these studies were conducted under steady in flow conditions. However, real-life ornithopters in the field have to routinely tackle gust and directional changes of the wind. These sudden perturbations could produce significant effect on humming bird hovering due to the small Reynolds numbers. Our experimental work was performed in a water channel using a two degree-of-freedom humming bird model. The dynamic response of the hovering motion to gust from different directions was investigated. PIV was used to measure the effect of the gust on the surrounding flow field including vortex evolution. In addition, a six-component force/torque sensor was used to measure the real-time lift and drag forces generated by the wing with and without gust. Results show that gust changes the magnitude of lift force in one stroke. However, the time-averaged lift force keeps approximately constant. Supported by Army High Performance Computing Center.

  1. APT a next generation QM-based reactive force field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappé, A. K.; Bormann-Rochotte, L. M.; Wiser, D. C.; Hart, J. R.; Pietsch, M. A.; Casewit, C. J.; Skiff, W. M.

    Modelling reactivity at the nanoscale is a major computational challenge. Both reactive force field and combined QM-MM methodologies have been and are being developed to study reactivity at this boundary between molecules and the solid state. There have been more than 1500 publications since the mid-1990s, on combined QM-MM methodologies. Limitations in current models include the distortional characteristics of force field potential terms, the smooth transit from one potential surface to another, rather than surface hopping, and the blending of electrostatics between QM and MM portions of a QM-MM model. Functional forms, potential surface coupling terms, and parameterization strategies for the Approximate Pair Theory (APT), a next generation reactive force field model, are described. The APT model has been developed to correct a number of limitations in current reactive force field models as well as providing a foundation for a next generation QM-MM model. Chemical bonding concepts are used to develop fully dissociative bond stretch, bend, torsion, and inversion valence terms. Quantum mechanics also provides functional forms for potential surface coupling terms that permit a general description of reactivity from hydrogen bonding, through non-classical carbocations and cracking, to olefin polymerization, oxidation, and metathesis. Van der Waals, electrostatic, and metallic bonding models also derive from quantum mechanical resonance. Finally, Pauli Principle-based orthogonality provides a way to electrostatically couple the QM and MM portions of a QM-MM model that will support arbitrarily large basis sets.

  2. Generating Grids For Computing Flow In A Manifold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Peter G.

    1993-01-01

    Establishing computer code modified to apply to complicated shapes. Grids for computing flows in manifold of complicated shape generated by use of modified version of geometry module of LWIND computer code. Code adaptable to other computations of flows in different geometries.

  3. Explorations in Space and Time: Computer-Generated Astronomy Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeks, M. L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the use of the computer animation technique to travel through space and time and watch models of astronomical systems in motion. Included is a list of eight computer-generated demonstration films entitled Explorations in Space and Time.'' (CC)

  4. Computer graphics techniques and computer-generated movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzman, Robert E.; Blinn, James F.

    1988-04-01

    The JPL Computer Graphics Laboratory (CGL) has been using advanced computer graphics for more than ten years to simulate space missions and related activities. Applications have ranged from basic computer graphics used interactively to allow engineers to study problems, to sophisticated color graphics used to simulate missions and produce realistic animations and stills for use by NASA and the scientific press. In addition, the CGL did the computer animation for ``Cosmos'', a series of general science programs done for Public Television in the United States by Carl Sagan and shown world-wide. The CGL recently completed the computer animation for ``The Mechanical Universe'', a series of fifty-two half-hour elementary physics lectures, led by Professor David Goodstein of the California Institute of Technology, and now being shown on Public Television in the US. For this series, the CGL produced more than seven hours of computer animation, averaging approximately eight minutes and thirty seconds of computer animation per half-hour program. Our aim at the JPL Computer Graphics Laboratory (CGL) is the realistic depiction of physical phenomena, that is, we deal primarily in ``science education'' rather than in scientific research. Of course, our attempts to render physical events realistically often require the development of new capabilities through research or technology advances, but those advances are not our primary goal.

  5. A method of billing third generation computer users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P. N.; Hyter, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    A method is presented for charging users for the processing of their applications on third generation digital computer systems is presented. For background purposes, problems and goals in billing on third generation systems are discussed. Detailed formulas are derived based on expected utilization and computer component cost. These formulas are then applied to a specific computer system (UNIVAC 1108). The method, although possessing some weaknesses, is presented as a definite improvement over use of second generation billing methods.

  6. Illustrating Language through Computer Generated Animation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withrow, Margaret

    1979-01-01

    Originally part of a symposium on educational media for the deaf, the paper discusses the use of animated sequences which illustrate linguistic principles. The work of the Computer Graphics Research Group at Ohio State University is highlighted. It has been discovered that computer-assisted instructional systems enhance learning through greater…

  7. Computational Prediction of Flow-Generated Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Freund, Jonathan B.; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a critical review of computational techniques for flow-noise prediction and the underlying theories. Hybrid approaches, in which the turbulent noise source field is computed and/or modeled separately from the far-field calculation, are afforded particular attention. Numerical methods and modern flow simulation techniques are discussed in terms of their suitability and accuracy for flow-noise calculations. Other topics highlighted include some important formulation and computational issues in the application of aeroacoustic theories, generalized acoustic analogies with better accounts of flow-sound interaction, and recent computational investigations of noise-control strategies. The review ends with an analysis of major challenges and key areas for improvement in order to advance the state of the art of computational aeroacoustics.

  8. 2nd Generation QUATARA Flight Computer Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, Jay; Keys, Andrew; Fraticelli, Jose Molina; Capo-Iugo, Pedro; Peeples, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Single core flight computer boards have been designed, developed, and tested (DD&T) to be flown in small satellites for the last few years. In this project, a prototype flight computer will be designed as a distributed multi-core system containing four microprocessors running code in parallel. This flight computer will be capable of performing multiple computationally intensive tasks such as processing digital and/or analog data, controlling actuator systems, managing cameras, operating robotic manipulators and transmitting/receiving from/to a ground station. In addition, this flight computer will be designed to be fault tolerant by creating both a robust physical hardware connection and by using a software voting scheme to determine the processor's performance. This voting scheme will leverage on the work done for the Space Launch System (SLS) flight software. The prototype flight computer will be constructed with Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components which are estimated to survive for two years in a low-Earth orbit.

  9. Third Generation Educational Use of Computer Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egenfeldt-Nielsen, Simon

    2007-01-01

    This article outlines the characteristics and problems related to edutainment and of the associated research studies demonstrating that learning outcomes looks promising. The article suggests that we are moving towards a new generation of educational use of games that is more inclusive. This new generation relies on constructivist learning…

  10. Compensation for Transport Delays Produced by Computer Image Generation Systems. Cooperative Training Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricard, G. L.; And Others

    The cooperative Navy/Air Force project described is aimed at the problem of image-flutter encountered when visual displays that present computer generated images are used for the simulation of certain flying situations. Two experiments are described which extend laboratory work on delay compensation schemes to the simulation of formation flight in…

  11. Recent Developments in Grid Generation and Force Integration Technology for Overset Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; VanDalsem, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Recent developments in algorithms and software tools for generating overset grids for complex configurations are described. These include the overset surface grid generation code SURGRD and version 2.0 of the hyperbolic volume grid generation code HYPGEN. The SURGRD code is in beta test mode where the new features include the capability to march over a collection of panel networks, a variety of ways to control the side boundaries and the marching step sizes and distance, a more robust projection scheme and an interpolation option. New features in version 2.0 of HYPGEN include a wider range of boundary condition types. The code also allows the user to specify different marching step sizes and distance for each point on the surface grid. A scheme that takes into account of the overlapped zones on the body surface for the purpose of forces and moments computation is also briefly described, The process involves the following two software modules: MIXSUR - a composite grid generation module to produce a collection of quadrilaterals and triangles on which pressure and viscous stresses are to be integrated, and OVERINT - a forces and moments integration module.

  12. Task III: Development of an Effective Computational Methodology for Body Force Representation of High-speed Rotor 37

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Choon-Sooi; Suder, Kenneth (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A framework for an effective computational methodology for characterizing the stability and the impact of distortion in high-speed multi-stage compressor is being developed. The methodology consists of using a few isolated-blade row Navier-Stokes solutions for each blade row to construct a body force database. The purpose of the body force database is to replace each blade row in a multi-stage compressor by a body force distribution to produce same pressure rise and flow turning. To do this, each body force database is generated in such a way that it can respond to the changes in local flow conditions. Once the database is generated, no hrther Navier-Stokes computations are necessary. The process is repeated for every blade row in the multi-stage compressor. The body forces are then embedded as source terms in an Euler solver. The method is developed to have the capability to compute the performance in a flow that has radial as well as circumferential non-uniformity with a length scale larger than a blade pitch; thus it can potentially be used to characterize the stability of a compressor under design. It is these two latter features as well as the accompanying procedure to obtain the body force representation that distinguish the present methodology from the streamline curvature method. The overall computational procedures have been developed. A dimensional analysis was carried out to determine the local flow conditions for parameterizing the magnitudes of the local body force representation of blade rows. An Euler solver was modified to embed the body forces as source terms. The results from the dimensional analysis show that the body forces can be parameterized in terms of the two relative flow angles, the relative Mach number, and the Reynolds number. For flow in a high-speed transonic blade row, they can be parameterized in terms of the local relative Mach number alone.

  13. Force Generation by Molecular-Motor-Powered Microtubule Bundles; Implications for Neuronal Polarization and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Jakobs, Maximilian; Franze, Kristian; Zemel, Assaf

    2015-01-01

    The heavily cross-linked microtubule (MT) bundles found in neuronal processes play a central role in the initiation, growth and maturation of axons and dendrites; however, a quantitative understanding of their mechanical function is still lacking. We here developed computer simulations to investigate the dynamics of force generation in 1D bundles of MTs that are cross-linked and powered by molecular motors. The motion of filaments and the forces they exert are investigated as a function of the motor type (unipolar or bipolar), MT density and length, applied load, and motor connectivity. We demonstrate that only unipolar motors (e.g., kinesin-1) can provide the driving force for bundle expansion, while bipolar motors (e.g., kinesin-5) oppose it. The force generation capacity of the bundles is shown to depend sharply on the fraction of unipolar motors due to a percolation transition that must occur in the bundle. Scaling laws between bundle length, force, MT length and motor fraction are presented. In addition, we investigate the dynamics of growth in the presence of a constant influx of MTs. Beyond a short equilibration period, the bundles grow linearly in time. In this growth regime, the bundle extends as one mass forward with most filaments sliding with the growth velocity. The growth velocity is shown to be dictated by the inward flux of MTs, to inversely scale with the load and to be independent of the free velocity of the motors. These findings provide important molecular-level insights into the mechanical function of the MT cytoskeleton in normal axon growth and regeneration after injury. PMID:26617489

  14. Explicit polarization: a quantum mechanical framework for developing next generation force fields.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiali; Truhlar, Donald G; Wang, Yingjie; Mazack, Michael J M; Löffler, Patrick; Provorse, Makenzie R; Rehak, Pavel

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Molecular mechanical force fields have been successfully used to model condensed-phase and biological systems for a half century. By means of careful parametrization, such classical force fields can be used to provide useful interpretations of experimental findings and predictions of certain properties. Yet, there is a need to further improve computational accuracy for the quantitative prediction of biomolecular interactions and to model properties that depend on the wave functions and not just the energy terms. A new strategy called explicit polarization (X-Pol) has been developed to construct the potential energy surface and wave functions for macromolecular and liquid-phase simulations on the basis of quantum mechanics rather than only using quantum mechanical results to fit analytic force fields. In this spirit, this approach is called a quantum mechanical force field (QMFF). X-Pol is a general fragment method for electronic structure calculations based on the partition of a condensed-phase or macromolecular system into subsystems ("fragments") to achieve computational efficiency. Here, intrafragment energy and the mutual electronic polarization of interfragment interactions are treated explicitly using quantum mechanics. X-Pol can be used as a general, multilevel electronic structure model for macromolecular systems, and it can also serve as a new-generation force field. As a quantum chemical model, a variational many-body (VMB) expansion approach is used to systematically improve interfragment interactions, including exchange repulsion, charge delocalization, dispersion, and other correlation energies. As a quantum mechanical force field, these energy terms are approximated by empirical functions in the spirit of conventional molecular mechanics. This Account first reviews the formulation of X-Pol, in the full variationally correct version, in the faster embedded version, and with systematic many-body improvements. We discuss illustrative examples

  15. Explicit Polarization: A Quantum Mechanical Framework for Developing Next Generation Force Fields

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Molecular mechanical force fields have been successfully used to model condensed-phase and biological systems for a half century. By means of careful parametrization, such classical force fields can be used to provide useful interpretations of experimental findings and predictions of certain properties. Yet, there is a need to further improve computational accuracy for the quantitative prediction of biomolecular interactions and to model properties that depend on the wave functions and not just the energy terms. A new strategy called explicit polarization (X-Pol) has been developed to construct the potential energy surface and wave functions for macromolecular and liquid-phase simulations on the basis of quantum mechanics rather than only using quantum mechanical results to fit analytic force fields. In this spirit, this approach is called a quantum mechanical force field (QMFF). X-Pol is a general fragment method for electronic structure calculations based on the partition of a condensed-phase or macromolecular system into subsystems (“fragments”) to achieve computational efficiency. Here, intrafragment energy and the mutual electronic polarization of interfragment interactions are treated explicitly using quantum mechanics. X-Pol can be used as a general, multilevel electronic structure model for macromolecular systems, and it can also serve as a new-generation force field. As a quantum chemical model, a variational many-body (VMB) expansion approach is used to systematically improve interfragment interactions, including exchange repulsion, charge delocalization, dispersion, and other correlation energies. As a quantum mechanical force field, these energy terms are approximated by empirical functions in the spirit of conventional molecular mechanics. This Account first reviews the formulation of X-Pol, in the full variationally correct version, in the faster embedded version, and with systematic many-body improvements. We discuss illustrative

  16. Explicit polarization: a quantum mechanical framework for developing next generation force fields.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiali; Truhlar, Donald G; Wang, Yingjie; Mazack, Michael J M; Löffler, Patrick; Provorse, Makenzie R; Rehak, Pavel

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Molecular mechanical force fields have been successfully used to model condensed-phase and biological systems for a half century. By means of careful parametrization, such classical force fields can be used to provide useful interpretations of experimental findings and predictions of certain properties. Yet, there is a need to further improve computational accuracy for the quantitative prediction of biomolecular interactions and to model properties that depend on the wave functions and not just the energy terms. A new strategy called explicit polarization (X-Pol) has been developed to construct the potential energy surface and wave functions for macromolecular and liquid-phase simulations on the basis of quantum mechanics rather than only using quantum mechanical results to fit analytic force fields. In this spirit, this approach is called a quantum mechanical force field (QMFF). X-Pol is a general fragment method for electronic structure calculations based on the partition of a condensed-phase or macromolecular system into subsystems ("fragments") to achieve computational efficiency. Here, intrafragment energy and the mutual electronic polarization of interfragment interactions are treated explicitly using quantum mechanics. X-Pol can be used as a general, multilevel electronic structure model for macromolecular systems, and it can also serve as a new-generation force field. As a quantum chemical model, a variational many-body (VMB) expansion approach is used to systematically improve interfragment interactions, including exchange repulsion, charge delocalization, dispersion, and other correlation energies. As a quantum mechanical force field, these energy terms are approximated by empirical functions in the spirit of conventional molecular mechanics. This Account first reviews the formulation of X-Pol, in the full variationally correct version, in the faster embedded version, and with systematic many-body improvements. We discuss illustrative examples

  17. Improved finite-difference computation of the van der Waals force: One-dimensional case

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2009-10-15

    We present an improved demonstration of the calculation of Casimir forces in one-dimensional systems based on the recently proposed numerical imaginary frequency Green's function computation approach. The dispersion force on two thick lossy dielectric slabs separated by an empty gap and placed within a perfectly conducting cavity is obtained from the Green's function of the modified Helmholtz equation by means of an ordinary finite-difference method. In order to demonstrate the possibility to develop algorithms to explore complex geometries in two and three dimensions to higher order in the mesh spacing, we generalize existing classical electromagnetism algebraic methods to generate the difference equations for dielectric boundaries not coinciding with any grid points. Diagnostic tests are presented to monitor the accuracy of our implementation of the method and follow-up applications in higher dimensions are introduced.

  18. A Comparison of Three Computer-Generated Feedback Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, David R.

    This study explores a relatively new area of computer research, i.e., utilization of computer-generated feedback based upon the knowledge gained in both written and computer-based instruction. One hundred and twenty-six freshmen and sophomore college students from a variety of academic majors volunteered for this study. The instructional materials…

  19. Generating and Transforming by a Computer without a Dictionary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornan, Uzzi

    1978-01-01

    The ability of the computer to generate output not included in the input may be used for linguistic as well as for computational input. The ability to accept linguistic data and process it according to a certain program seems to be a promising field for investigation. Progress in this field may strengthen the assumption that the computer can be…

  20. Characterization of the pre-force-generation state in the actomyosin cross-bridge cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mingxuan; Rose, Michael B.; Ananthanarayanan, Shobana K.; Jacobs, Donald J.; Yengo, Christopher M.

    2008-01-01

    Myosin is an actin-based motor protein that generates force by cycling between actin-attached (strong binding: ADP or rigor) and actin-detached (weak binding: ATP or ADP·Pi) states during its ATPase cycle. However, it remains unclear what specific conformational changes in the actin binding site take place on binding to actin, and how these structural changes lead to product release and the production of force and motion. We studied the dynamics of the actin binding region of myosin V by using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to monitor conformational changes in the upper-50-kDa domain of the actin binding cleft in the weak and strong actin binding states. Steady-state and lifetime data monitoring the FRET signal suggest that the cleft is in a more open conformation in the weak actin binding states. Transient kinetic experiments suggest that a rapid conformational change occurs, which is consistent with cleft closure before actin-activated phosphate release. Our results have identified a pre-force-generation actomyosin ADP·Pi state, and suggest force generation may occur from a state not yet seen by crystallography in which the actin binding cleft and the nucleotide binding pocket are closed. Computational modeling uncovers dramatic changes in the rigidity of the upper-50-kDa domain in different nucleotide states, which suggests that the intrinsic flexibility of this domain allows myosin motors to accomplish simultaneous tight nucleotide binding (closed nucleotide binding pocket) and high-affinity actin binding (closed actin binding cleft). PMID:18552179

  1. Computer-Generated Diagrams for the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carle, Mark A.; Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Describes 10 computer programs used to draw diagrams usually drawn on chalkboards, such as addition of three vectors, vector components, range of a projectile, lissajous figures, beats, isotherms, Snell's law, waves passing through a lens, magnetic field due to Helmholtz coils, and three curves. Several programming tips are included. (JN)

  2. User's Manual for FOMOCO Utilities-Force and Moment Computation Tools for Overset Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; Buning, Pieter G.

    1996-01-01

    In the numerical computations of flows around complex configurations, accurate calculations of force and moment coefficients for aerodynamic surfaces are required. When overset grid methods are used, the surfaces on which force and moment coefficients are sought typically consist of a collection of overlapping surface grids. Direct integration of flow quantities on the overlapping grids would result in the overlapped regions being counted more than once. The FOMOCO Utilities is a software package for computing flow coefficients (force, moment, and mass flow rate) on a collection of overset surfaces with accurate accounting of the overlapped zones. FOMOCO Utilities can be used in stand-alone mode or in conjunction with the Chimera overset grid compressible Navier-Stokes flow solver OVERFLOW. The software package consists of two modules corresponding to a two-step procedure: (1) hybrid surface grid generation (MIXSUR module), and (2) flow quantities integration (OVERINT module). Instructions on how to use this software package are described in this user's manual. Equations used in the flow coefficients calculation are given in Appendix A.

  3. The next generation of command post computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Ross D.; Lieb, Aaron J.; Samuel, Jason M.; Burger, Mitchell A.

    2015-05-01

    The future of command post computing demands an innovative new solution to address a variety of challenging operational needs. The Command Post of the Future is the Army's primary command and control decision support system, providing situational awareness and collaborative tools for tactical decision making, planning, and execution management from Corps to Company level. However, as the U.S. Army moves towards a lightweight, fully networked battalion, disconnected operations, thin client architecture and mobile computing become increasingly essential. The Command Post of the Future is not designed to support these challenges in the coming decade. Therefore, research into a hybrid blend of technologies is in progress to address these issues. This research focuses on a new command and control system utilizing the rich collaboration framework afforded by Command Post of the Future coupled with a new user interface consisting of a variety of innovative workspace designs. This new system is called Tactical Applications. This paper details a brief history of command post computing, presents the challenges facing the modern Army, and explores the concepts under consideration for Tactical Applications that meet these challenges in a variety of innovative ways.

  4. SRG - SCHEDULE REPORT GENERATOR COMPUTER PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collazo, F. F.

    1994-01-01

    The Schedule Organizer, SO (COSMIC Program MSC-21525), Schedule Tracker, ST (COSMIC Program MSC-21526), and Schedule Report Generator, SRG, are programs that manipulate data base files in ways that are advantageous to scheduling applications. Originally designed for the Space Shuttle flight schedule, the program can be easily modified for other scheduling situations. Schedule Organizer provides a simple method for generating distribution lists. These distribution lists contain readers' names for each task schedule defined by the input files. Schedule Tracker provides an effective method for tracking tasks that are 'past due' and/or 'near term'. ST generates reports for each responsible staff member with one or more assigned tasks that fall within the two listed categories. This enables an engineering manager to monitor tasks assigned to staff by running ST on a weekly basis. ST only lists tasks on reports that have become past due or are schedule for recent completion (near term). Schedule Reports Generator provides a simple method for generating periodic schedule reports. SRG enables an engineering manager to monitor tasks assigned to staff members on a weekly basis. SRG sorts three types of reports using one or more data fields as sort keys. One type is sorted using the calendar year as the primary key and the end date as the secondary key. Another type is sorted by flight number. A third type of report, Waterfall plots, is also generated by SRG using the end date as the sorting key. SRG requires as input a single file or two concatenated files with up to 400 single line entries. The user constructs the input file by using the LSE editor VAX utility prior to the execution of the program. The user is able to modify the current functional description text lines just displayed. ST and SRG use the same data base file as input. The common data base file has a maximum number of 400 entries. The time span of all three programs is nineteen months. Both of these maximum

  5. Field measurement of basal forces generated by erosive debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, S.W.; Tucker, G.E.; Kean, J.W.; Coe, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    It has been proposed that debris flows cut bedrock valleys in steeplands worldwide, but field measurements needed to constrain mechanistic models of this process remain sparse due to the difficulty of instrumenting natural flows. Here we present and analyze measurements made using an automated sensor network, erosion bolts, and a 15.24 cm by 15.24 cm force plate installed in the bedrock channel floor of a steep catchment. These measurements allow us to quantify the distribution of basal forces from natural debris‒flow events that incised bedrock. Over the 4 year monitoring period, 11 debris‒flow events scoured the bedrock channel floor. No clear water flows were observed. Measurements of erosion bolts at the beginning and end of the study indicated that the bedrock channel floor was lowered by 36 to 64 mm. The basal force during these erosive debris‒flow events had a large‒magnitude (up to 21 kN, which was approximately 50 times larger than the concurrent time‒averaged mean force), high‒frequency (greater than 1 Hz) fluctuating component. We interpret these fluctuations as flow particles impacting the bed. The resulting variability in force magnitude increased linearly with the time‒averaged mean basal force. Probability density functions of basal normal forces were consistent with a generalized Pareto distribution, rather than the exponential distribution that is commonly found in experimental and simulated monodispersed granular flows and which has a lower probability of large forces. When the bed sediment thickness covering the force plate was greater than ~ 20 times the median bed sediment grain size, no significant fluctuations about the time‒averaged mean force were measured, indicating that a thin layer of sediment (~ 5 cm in the monitored cases) can effectively shield the subjacent bed from erosive impacts. Coarse‒grained granular surges and water‒rich, intersurge flow had very similar basal force distributions despite

  6. ADGEN: ADjoint GENerator for computer models

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, B.A.; Pin, F.G.; Horwedel, J.E.; Oblow, E.M.

    1989-05-01

    This paper presents the development of a FORTRAN compiler and an associated supporting software library called ADGEN. ADGEN reads FORTRAN models as input and produces and enhanced version of the input model. The enhanced version reproduces the original model calculations but also has the capability to calculate derivatives of model results of interest with respect to any and all of the model data and input parameters. The method for calculating the derivatives and sensitivities is the adjoint method. Partial derivatives are calculated analytically using computer calculus and saved as elements of an adjoint matrix on direct assess storage. The total derivatives are calculated by solving an appropriate adjoint equation. ADGEN is applied to a major computer model of interest to the Low-Level Waste Community, the PRESTO-II model. PRESTO-II sample problem results reveal that ADGEN correctly calculates derivatives of response of interest with respect to 300 parameters. The execution time to create the adjoint matrix is a factor of 45 times the execution time of the reference sample problem. Once this matrix is determined, the derivatives with respect to 3000 parameters are calculated in a factor of 6.8 that of the reference model for each response of interest. For a single 3000 for determining these derivatives by parameter perturbations. The automation of the implementation of the adjoint technique for calculating derivatives and sensitivities eliminates the costly and manpower-intensive task of direct hand-implementation by reprogramming and thus makes the powerful adjoint technique more amenable for use in sensitivity analysis of existing models. 20 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  7. Computation of ion drag force on a static spherical dust grain immersed in rf discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ikkurthi, V. R.; Melzer, A.; Matyash, K.; Schneider, R.

    2009-04-15

    The ion drag force on static spherical dust grains located in an argon rf discharge under typical laboratory experiment conditions has been computed using a three-dimensional particle-particle-particle-mesh code. Elastic and inelastic collisions have been included in the current model to obtain realistic rf discharge plasma conditions. The ion drag has been computed for various sizes of dust placed at different locations in the rf discharge under different gas pressures. The orbital drag force is typically found larger than the collection drag force. Ion-neutral collisions increase flux to the dust and hence the total drag force for collisional case is found larger than the collisionless case. Within the pressure range investigated, the drag forces do not vary much with pressure. The size dependence of the drag force is nonlinear and agrees well with the forces computed from the analytical models.

  8. Crafting a Balanced System of Assessment in Wisconsin. Recommendations of the Next Generation Assessment Task Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Next Generation Assessment Task Force was convened to formulate Wisconsin's path forward. Task force members listened to leaders from business and technology sectors as well as leaders from PK-12 and higher education. This summary shares the process, definitions, assumptions, and recommendations of the task force. This paper aims to use these…

  9. Method of generating and measuring static small force using down-slope component of gravity.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yusaku

    2007-06-01

    A method of generating and measuring static small forces at the micro-Newton level is proposed. In the method, the down-slope component of gravity acting on a mass on an inclined plane is used as a static force. To realize a linear motion of the mass with a small friction, an aerostatic linear bearing is used. The forces acting on the mass, such as the down-slope component of gravity and the dynamic frictional force, are determined by the levitation mass method. In an experiment, a static small force of approximately 183 microN is generated and measured with a standard uncertainty of approximately 2 microN.

  10. A body-force based method to generate supersonic equilibrium turbulent boundary layer profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waindim, M.; Gaitonde, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    We further develop a simple counterflow body force-based approach to generate an equilibrium spatially developing turbulent boundary layer suitable for Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) or Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of viscous-inviscid interactions. The force essentially induces a small separated region in an incoming specified laminar boundary layer. The resulting unstable shear layer then transitions and breaks down to yield the desired unsteady profile. The effects of wall thermal conditions are explored to demonstrate the capability of the method for both fixed wall and adiabatic wall conditions. We then describe an efficient method to select parameters that ensure transition by examining precursor signatures using generalized stability variables. These precursors are shown to be evident in a computational domain spanning only a small region around the trip and can also be detected using 2D simulations. Finally, the method is tested for different Mach numbers ranging from 1.7 to 2.9, with emphasis on flow field surveys, Reynolds stresses, and energy spectra. These results provide guidance on boundary conditions for desired boundary layer thickness at each Mach number. The consequences of using a much lower Reynolds number in computation relative to experiment are evident at the higher Mach number, where a self sustaining turbulent boundary layer is more difficult to obtain.

  11. Computer-generated animal model stimuli.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kevin L

    2007-01-01

    Communication between animals is diverse and complex. Animals may communicate using auditory, seismic, chemosensory, electrical, or visual signals. In particular, understanding the constraints on visual signal design for communication has been of great interest. Traditional methods for investigating animal interactions have used basic observational techniques, staged encounters, or physical manipulation of morphology. Less intrusive methods have tried to simulate conspecifics using crude playback tools, such as mirrors, still images, or models. As technology has become more advanced, video playback has emerged as another tool in which to examine visual communication (Rosenthal, 2000). However, to move one step further, the application of computer-animation now allows researchers to specifically isolate critical components necessary to elicit social responses from conspecifics, and manipulate these features to control interactions. Here, I provide detail on how to create an animation using the Jacky dragon as a model, but this process may be adaptable for other species. In building the animation, I elected to use Lightwave 3D to alter object morphology, add texture, install bones, and provide comparable weight shading that prevents exaggerated movement. The animation is then matched to select motor patterns to replicate critical movement features. Finally, the sequence must rendered into an individual clip for presentation. Although there are other adaptable techniques, this particular method had been demonstrated to be effective in eliciting both conspicuous and social responses in staged interactions.

  12. Adaptive force generation for precision-grip lifting by a spectral timing model of the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Antonio; Bullock, Daniel; Rhodes, Bradley J

    2003-01-01

    We modeled adaptive generation of precision grip forces during object lifting. The model presented adjusts reactive and anticipatory grip forces to a level just above that needed to stabilize lifted objects in the hand. The model obeys principles of cerebellar structure and function by using slip sensations as error signals to adapt phasic motor commands to tonic force generators associated with output synergies controlling grip aperture. The learned phasic commands are weight- and texture-dependent. Simulations of the new circuit model reproduce key aspects of experimental observations of force application. Over learning trials, the onset of grip force buildup comes to lead the load force buildup, and the rate-of-rise of grip force, but not load force, scales inversely with the friction of the object.

  13. New Generation General Purpose Computer (GPC) compact IBM unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    New Generation General Purpose Computer (GPC) compact IBM unit replaces a two-unit earlier generation computer. The new IBM unit is documented in table top views alone (S91-26867, S91-26868), with the onboard equipment it supports including the flight deck CRT screen and keypad (S91-26866), and next to the two earlier versions it replaces (S91-26869).

  14. Generate rigorous pyrolysis models for olefins production by computer

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.T.; Broadbelt, L.J.; Grittman, D.H.

    1997-04-01

    With recent advances in the automation of the model-building process for large networks of kinetic equations, it may become feasible to generate computer pyrolysis models for naphthas and gas oil feedstocks. The potential benefit of a rigorous mechanistic model for these relatively complex liquid feedstocks is great, due to diverse characterizations and yield spectrums. An ethane pyrolysis example is used to illustrate the computer generation of reaction mechanism models.

  15. Computer-Generated Phase Diagrams for Binary Mixtures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolls, Kenneth R.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Computer programs that generate projections of thermodynamic phase surfaces through computer graphics were used to produce diagrams representing properties of water and steam and the pressure-volume-temperature behavior of most of the common equations of state. The program, program options emphasizing thermodynamic features of interest, and…

  16. Integrated Analysis of Contractile Kinetics, Force Generation, and Electrical Activity in Single Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kijlstra, Jan David; Hu, Dongjian; Mittal, Nikhil; Kausel, Eduardo; van der Meer, Peter; Garakani, Arman; Domian, Ibrahim J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The quantitative analysis of cardiomyocyte function is essential for stem cell-based approaches for the in vitro study of human cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. We present a method to comprehensively assess the function of single human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hPSC-CMs) through simultaneous quantitative analysis of contraction kinetics, force generation, and electrical activity. We demonstrate that statistical analysis of movies of contracting hPSC-CMs can be used to quantify changes in cellular morphology over time and compute contractile kinetics. Using a biomechanical model that incorporates substrate stiffness, we calculate cardiomyocyte force generation at single-cell resolution and validate this approach with conventional traction force microscopy. The addition of fluorescent calcium indicators or membrane potential dyes allows the simultaneous analysis of contractility and calcium handling or action potential morphology. Accordingly, our approach has the potential for broad application in the study of cardiac disease, drug discovery, and cardiotoxicity screening. PMID:26626178

  17. Force generation in transient deployment of square or triangular flat panels in the presence of a wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierides, Alexis; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2007-11-01

    We investigate the force generated by square or tringular flaps hinged at the wall beneath a flow during their transient deployment with an angular velocity between 10 and 100 rad/s. The objective of this study is to understand the mechanisms of unsteady flapping-wings motion and the system of vortices generated. The transient flow field has been simulated experimentally in a low speed wind tunnel and computationally by using CFD with moving boundaries capabilities. The results indicated that all lift and drag force coefficients during the transient deployment are different than the corresponding coefficients under stationary conditions at the same deployment angle after adjusting for inertial effects. These dynamic effects depend on the Strouhal number which can be considered as the ratio the Stokes to Reynolds number of the flow. It was found that these effects are augmented with increasing Strouhal number and decrease with increasing boundary layer thickness. Reasonable agreement has been found between computational and experimental data.

  18. Fifth Generation Computer-Assisted Career Guidance Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Andrew D.; Cartwright, Glenn F.

    1997-01-01

    Emerging "fifth-generation" computer-assisted career guidance systems include Internet-based resources such as listservs and Web sites. Obstacles to fifth-generation systems include confidentiality, counselor resistance, and lack of training. Counselors can aid their development by authoring, collaborating, evaluating, and advocating for equal…

  19. Computer simulations reveal complex distribution of haemodynamic forces in a mouse retina model of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu, Miguel O; Jones, Martin L; Nielsen, Jens H; Krüger, Timm; Nash, Rupert W; Groen, Derek; Schmieschek, Sebastian; Hetherington, James; Gerhardt, Holger; Franco, Claudio A; Coveney, Peter V

    2014-10-01

    There is currently limited understanding of the role played by haemodynamic forces on the processes governing vascular development. One of many obstacles to be overcome is being able to measure those forces, at the required resolution level, on vessels only a few micrometres thick. In this paper, we present an in silico method for the computation of the haemodynamic forces experienced by murine retinal vasculature (a widely used vascular development animal model) beyond what is measurable experimentally. Our results show that it is possible to reconstruct high-resolution three-dimensional geometrical models directly from samples of retinal vasculature and that the lattice-Boltzmann algorithm can be used to obtain accurate estimates of the haemodynamics in these domains. We generate flow models from samples obtained at postnatal days (P) 5 and 6. Our simulations show important differences between the flow patterns recovered in both cases, including observations of regression occurring in areas where wall shear stress (WSS) gradients exist. We propose two possible mechanisms to account for the observed increase in velocity and WSS between P5 and P6: (i) the measured reduction in typical vessel diameter between both time points and (ii) the reduction in network density triggered by the pruning process. The methodology developed herein is applicable to other biomedical domains where microvasculature can be imaged but experimental flow measurements are unavailable or difficult to obtain.

  20. Structural Optimization of a Force Balance Using a Computational Experiment Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, P. A.; DeLoach, R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes a new approach to force balance structural optimization featuring a computational experiment design. Currently, this multi-dimensional design process requires the designer to perform a simplification by executing parameter studies on a small subset of design variables. This one-factor-at-a-time approach varies a single variable while holding all others at a constant level. Consequently, subtle interactions among the design variables, which can be exploited to achieve the design objectives, are undetected. The proposed method combines Modern Design of Experiments techniques to direct the exploration of the multi-dimensional design space, and a finite element analysis code to generate the experimental data. To efficiently search for an optimum combination of design variables and minimize the computational resources, a sequential design strategy was employed. Experimental results from the optimization of a non-traditional force balance measurement section are presented. An approach to overcome the unique problems associated with the simultaneous optimization of multiple response criteria is described. A quantitative single-point design procedure that reflects the designer's subjective impression of the relative importance of various design objectives, and a graphical multi-response optimization procedure that provides further insights into available tradeoffs among competing design objectives are illustrated. The proposed method enhances the intuition and experience of the designer by providing new perspectives on the relationships between the design variables and the competing design objectives providing a systematic foundation for advancements in structural design.

  1. Molecular interactions and residues involved in force generation in the T4 viral DNA packaging motor.

    PubMed

    Migliori, Amy D; Smith, Douglas E; Arya, Gaurav

    2014-12-12

    Many viruses utilize molecular motors to package their genomes into preformed capsids. A striking feature of these motors is their ability to generate large forces to drive DNA translocation against entropic, electrostatic, and bending forces resisting DNA confinement. A model based on recently resolved structures of the bacteriophage T4 motor protein gp17 suggests that this motor generates large forces by undergoing a conformational change from an extended to a compact state. This transition is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions between complementarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains of gp17. Here we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate in detail the molecular interactions and residues involved in such a compaction transition of gp17. We find that although electrostatic interactions between charged residues contribute significantly to the overall free energy change of compaction, interactions mediated by the uncharged residues are equally if not more important. We identify five charged residues and six uncharged residues at the interface that play a dominant role in the compaction transition and also reveal salt bridging, van der Waals, and solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions mediated by these residues in stabilizing the compact form of gp17. The formation of a salt bridge between Glu309 and Arg494 is found to be particularly crucial, consistent with experiments showing complete abrogation in packaging upon Glu309Lys mutation. The computed contributions of several other residues are also found to correlate well with single-molecule measurements of impairments in DNA translocation activity caused by site-directed mutations. PMID:25311860

  2. A computational model of cardiovascular physiology and heart sound generation.

    PubMed

    Watrous, Raymond L

    2009-01-01

    A computational model of the cardiovascular system is described which provides a framework for implementing and testing quantitative physiological models of heart sound generation. The lumped-parameter cardiovascular model can be solved for the hemodynamic variables on which the heart sound generation process is built. Parameters of the cardiovascular model can be adjusted to represent various normal and pathological conditions, and the acoustic consequences of those adjustments can be explored. The combined model of the physiology of cardiovascular circulation and heart sound generation has promise for application in teaching, training and algorithm development in computer-aided auscultation of the heart.

  3. Assessing computer waste generation in Chile using material flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Steubing, Bernhard; Böni, Heinz; Schluep, Mathias; Silva, Uca; Ludwig, Christian

    2010-03-01

    The quantities of e-waste are expected to increase sharply in Chile. The purpose of this paper is to provide a quantitative data basis on generated e-waste quantities. A material flow analysis was carried out assessing the generation of e-waste from computer equipment (desktop and laptop PCs as well as CRT and LCD-monitors). Import and sales data were collected from the Chilean Customs database as well as from publications by the International Data Corporation. A survey was conducted to determine consumers' choices with respect to storage, re-use and disposal of computer equipment. The generation of e-waste was assessed in a baseline as well as upper and lower scenarios until 2020. The results for the baseline scenario show that about 10,000 and 20,000 tons of computer waste may be generated in the years 2010 and 2020, respectively. The cumulative e-waste generation will be four to five times higher in the upcoming decade (2010-2019) than during the current decade (2000-2009). By 2020, the shares of LCD-monitors and laptops will increase more rapidly replacing other e-waste including the CRT-monitors. The model also shows the principal flows of computer equipment from production and sale to recycling and disposal. The re-use of computer equipment plays an important role in Chile. An appropriate recycling scheme will have to be introduced to provide adequate solutions for the growing rate of e-waste generation.

  4. Tablet Computers on Trial: A Transformative Force in Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjartansdóttir, Skúlína Hlíf; Jakobsdóttir, Sólveig

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of an evaluation study of a development project for the introduction and use of tablet computers (iPads) at the lower secondary level in Nordlinga school, a compulsory school in Reykjavík. In the study, we assess the impact of the use of tablet computers on instruction and students' learning in grades 9 to 10,…

  5. Measurement of hydrodynamic force generation by swimming dolphins using bubble DPIV.

    PubMed

    Fish, Frank E; Legac, Paul; Williams, Terrie M; Wei, Timothy

    2014-01-15

    Attempts to measure the propulsive forces produced by swimming dolphins have been limited. Previous uses of computational hydrodynamic models and gliding experiments have provided estimates of thrust production by dolphins, but these were indirect tests that relied on various assumptions. The thrust produced by two actively swimming bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) was directly measured using digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). For dolphins swimming in a large outdoor pool, the DPIV method used illuminated microbubbles that were generated in a narrow sheet from a finely porous hose and a compressed air source. The movement of the bubbles was tracked with a high-speed video camera. Dolphins swam at speeds of 0.7 to 3.4 m s(-1) within the bubble sheet oriented along the midsagittal plane of the animal. The wake of the dolphin was visualized as the microbubbles were displaced because of the action of the propulsive flukes and jet flow. The oscillations of the dolphin flukes were shown to generate strong vortices in the wake. Thrust production was measured from the vortex strength through the Kutta-Joukowski theorem of aerodynamics. The dolphins generated up to 700 N during small amplitude swimming and up to 1468 N during large amplitude starts. The results of this study demonstrated that bubble DPIV can be used effectively to measure the thrust produced by large-bodied dolphins.

  6. Applying the cost of generating force hypothesis to uphill running

    PubMed Central

    Taboga, Paolo; Kram, Rodger

    2014-01-01

    Historically, several different approaches have been applied to explain the metabolic cost of uphill human running. Most of these approaches result in unrealistically high values for the efficiency of performing vertical work during running uphill, or are only valid for running up steep inclines. The purpose of this study was to reexamine the metabolic cost of uphill running, based upon our understanding of level running energetics and ground reaction forces during uphill running. In contrast to the vertical efficiency approach, we propose that during incline running at a certain velocity, the forces (and hence metabolic energy) required for braking and propelling the body mass parallel to the running surface are less than during level running. Based on this idea, we propose that the metabolic rate during uphill running can be predicted by a model, which posits that (1) the metabolic cost of perpendicular bouncing remains the same as during level running, (2) the metabolic cost of running parallel to the running surface decreases with incline, (3) the delta efficiency of producing mechanical power to lift the COM vertically is constant, independent of incline and running velocity, and (4) the costs of leg and arm swing do not change with incline. To test this approach, we collected ground reaction force (GRF) data for eight runners who ran thirty 30-second trials (velocity: 2.0–3.0 m/s; incline: 0–9°). We also measured the metabolic rates of eight different runners for 17, 7-minute trials (velocity: 2.0–3.0 m/s; incline: 0–8°). During uphill running, parallel braking GRF approached zero for the 9° incline trials. Thus, we modeled the metabolic cost of parallel running as exponentially decreasing with incline. With that assumption, best-fit parameters for the metabolic rate data indicate that the efficiency of producing mechanical power to lift the center of mass vertically was independent of incline and running velocity, with a value of ∼29%. The

  7. Computer generated hologram from point cloud using graphics processor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rick H-Y; Wilkinson, Timothy D

    2009-12-20

    Computer generated holography is an extremely demanding and complex task when it comes to providing realistic reconstructions with full parallax, occlusion, and shadowing. We present an algorithm designed for data-parallel computing on modern graphics processing units to alleviate the computational burden. We apply Gaussian interpolation to create a continuous surface representation from discrete input object points. The algorithm maintains a potential occluder list for each individual hologram plane sample to keep the number of visibility tests to a minimum. We experimented with two approximations that simplify and accelerate occlusion computation. It is observed that letting several neighboring hologram plane samples share visibility information on object points leads to significantly faster computation without causing noticeable artifacts in the reconstructed images. Computing a reduced sample set via nonuniform sampling is also found to be an effective acceleration technique. PMID:20029585

  8. Force-free magnetic fields - Generating functions and footpoint displacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfson, Richard; Verma, Ritu

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents analytic and numerical calculations that explore equilibrium sequences of bipolar force-free magnetic fields in relation to displacments of their magnetic footpoints. It is shown that the appearance of magnetic islands - sometimes interpreted as marking the loss of equilibrium in models of the solar atmosphere - is likely associated only with physically unrealistic footpoint displacements such as infinite separation or 'tearing' of the model photosphere. The work suggests that the loss of equilibrium in bipolar configurations, sometimes proposed as a mechanism for eruptive solar events, probably requires either fully three-dimensional field configurations or nonzero plasma pressure. The results apply only to fields that are strictly bipolar, and do not rule out equilibrium loss in more complex structures such as quadrupolar fields.

  9. Aerodynamic force generation, performance and control of body orientation during gliding in sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps).

    PubMed

    Bishop, Kristin L

    2007-08-01

    Gliding has often been discussed in the literature as a possible precursor to powered flight in vertebrates, but few studies exist on the mechanics of gliding in living animals. In this study I analyzed the 3D kinematics of sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps) during short glides in an enclosed space. Short segments of the glide were captured on video, and the positions of marked anatomical landmarks were used to compute linear distances and angles, as well as whole body velocities and accelerations. From the whole body accelerations I estimated the aerodynamic forces generated by the animals. I computed the correlations between movements of the limbs and body rotations to examine the control of orientation during flight. Finally, I compared these results to those of my earlier study on the similarly sized and distantly related southern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans). The sugar gliders in this study accelerated downward slightly (1.0+/-0.5 m s(-2)), and also accelerated forward (2.1+/-0.6 m s(-2)) in all but one trial, indicating that the body weight was not fully supported by aerodynamic forces and that some of the lift produced forward acceleration rather than just balancing body weight. The gliders used high angles of attack (44.15+/-3.12 degrees ), far higher than the angles at which airplane wings would stall, yet generated higher lift coefficients (1.48+/-0.18) than would be expected for a stalled wing. Movements of the limbs were strongly correlated with body rotations, suggesting that sugar gliders make extensive use of limb movements to control their orientation during gliding flight. In addition, among individuals, different limb movements were associated with a given body rotation, suggesting that individual variation exists in the control of body rotations. Under similar conditions, flying squirrels generated higher lift coefficients and lower drag coefficients than sugar gliders, yet had only marginally shallower glides. Flying squirrels have a

  10. Aerodynamic force generation, performance and control of body orientation during gliding in sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps).

    PubMed

    Bishop, Kristin L

    2007-08-01

    Gliding has often been discussed in the literature as a possible precursor to powered flight in vertebrates, but few studies exist on the mechanics of gliding in living animals. In this study I analyzed the 3D kinematics of sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps) during short glides in an enclosed space. Short segments of the glide were captured on video, and the positions of marked anatomical landmarks were used to compute linear distances and angles, as well as whole body velocities and accelerations. From the whole body accelerations I estimated the aerodynamic forces generated by the animals. I computed the correlations between movements of the limbs and body rotations to examine the control of orientation during flight. Finally, I compared these results to those of my earlier study on the similarly sized and distantly related southern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans). The sugar gliders in this study accelerated downward slightly (1.0+/-0.5 m s(-2)), and also accelerated forward (2.1+/-0.6 m s(-2)) in all but one trial, indicating that the body weight was not fully supported by aerodynamic forces and that some of the lift produced forward acceleration rather than just balancing body weight. The gliders used high angles of attack (44.15+/-3.12 degrees ), far higher than the angles at which airplane wings would stall, yet generated higher lift coefficients (1.48+/-0.18) than would be expected for a stalled wing. Movements of the limbs were strongly correlated with body rotations, suggesting that sugar gliders make extensive use of limb movements to control their orientation during gliding flight. In addition, among individuals, different limb movements were associated with a given body rotation, suggesting that individual variation exists in the control of body rotations. Under similar conditions, flying squirrels generated higher lift coefficients and lower drag coefficients than sugar gliders, yet had only marginally shallower glides. Flying squirrels have a

  11. Local Lorentz force flowmeter at a continuous caster model using a new generation multicomponent force and torque sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Daniel; Schleichert, Jan; Karcher, Christian; Fröhlich, Thomas; Wondrak, Thomas; Timmel, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    Lorentz force velocimetry is a non-invasive velocity measurement technique for electrical conductive liquids like molten steel. In this technique, the metal flow interacts with a static magnetic field generating eddy currents which, in turn, produce flow-braking Lorentz forces within the fluid. These forces are proportional to the electrical conductivity and to the velocity of the melt. Due to Newton’s third law, a counter force of the same magnitude acts on the source of the applied static magnetic field which is in our case a permanent magnet. In this paper we will present a new multicomponent sensor for the local Lorentz force flowmeter (L2F2) which is able to measure simultaneously all three components of the force as well as all three components of the torque. Therefore, this new sensor is capable of accessing all three velocity components at the same time in the region near the wall. In order to demonstrate the potential of this new sensor, it is used to identify the 3-dimensional velocity field near the wide face of the mold of a continuous caster model available at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. As model melt, the eutectic alloy GaInSn is used.

  12. Pseudo-random number generator for the Sigma 5 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, S. N.

    1983-01-01

    A technique is presented for developing a pseudo-random number generator based on the linear congruential form. The two numbers used for the generator are a prime number and a corresponding primitive root, where the prime is the largest prime number that can be accurately represented on a particular computer. The primitive root is selected by applying Marsaglia's lattice test. The technique presented was applied to write a random number program for the Sigma 5 computer. The new program, named S:RANDOM1, is judged to be superior to the older program named S:RANDOM. For applications requiring several independent random number generators, a table is included showing several acceptable primitive roots. The technique and programs described can be applied to any computer having word length different from that of the Sigma 5.

  13. Parallel grid generation algorithm for distributed memory computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moitra, Stuti; Moitra, Anutosh

    1994-01-01

    A parallel grid-generation algorithm and its implementation on the Intel iPSC/860 computer are described. The grid-generation scheme is based on an algebraic formulation of homotopic relations. Methods for utilizing the inherent parallelism of the grid-generation scheme are described, and implementation of multiple levELs of parallelism on multiple instruction multiple data machines are indicated. The algorithm is capable of providing near orthogonality and spacing control at solid boundaries while requiring minimal interprocessor communications. Results obtained on the Intel hypercube for a blended wing-body configuration are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm. Fortran implementations bAsed on the native programming model of the iPSC/860 computer and the Express system of software tools are reported. Computational gains in execution time speed-up ratios are given.

  14. Generative Representations for Computer-Automated Design Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornby, Gregory S.

    2004-01-01

    With the increasing computational power of Computers, software design systems are progressing from being tools for architects and designers to express their ideas to tools capable of creating designs under human guidance. One of the main limitations for these computer-automated design programs is the representation with which they encode designs. If the representation cannot encode a certain design, then the design program cannot produce it. Similarly, a poor representation makes some types of designs extremely unlikely to be created. Here we define generative representations as those representations which can create and reuse organizational units within a design and argue that reuse is necessary for design systems to scale to more complex and interesting designs. To support our argument we describe GENRE, an evolutionary design program that uses both a generative and a non-generative representation, and compare the results of evolving designs with both types of representations.

  15. Generative Representations for Computer-Automated Evolutionary Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornby, Gregory S.

    2006-01-01

    With the increasing computational power of computers, software design systems are progressing from being tools for architects and designers to express their ideas to tools capable of creating designs under human guidance. One of the main limitations for these computer-automated design systems is the representation with which they encode designs. If the representation cannot encode a certain design, then the design system cannot produce it. To be able to produce new types of designs, and not just optimize pre-defined parameterizations, evolutionary design systems must use generative representations. Generative representations are assembly procedures, or algorithms, for constructing a design thereby allowing for truly novel design solutions to be encoded. In addition, by enabling modularity, regularity and hierarchy, the level of sophistication that can be evolved is increased. We demonstrate the advantages of generative representations on two different design domains: the evolution of spacecraft antennas and the evolution of 3D objects.

  16. Surface texture generation during cylindrical milling in the aspect of cutting force variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, S.; Twardowski, P.; Pelic, M.

    2014-03-01

    The work presented here concentrates on surface texture analysis, after cylindrical milling of hardened steel. Cutting force variations occurring in the machining process have direct influence on the cutter displacements and thus on the generated surface texture. Therefore, in these experiments, the influence of active number of teeth (zc) on the cutting force variations was investigated. Cutting forces and cutter displacements were measured during machining process (online) using, namely piezoelectric force dynamometer and 3D laser vibrometer. Surface roughness parameters were measured using stylus surface profiler. The surface roughness model including cutting parameters (fz, D) and cutting force variations was also developed. The research revealed that in cylindrical milling process, cutting force variations have immediate influence on surface texture generation.

  17. Next-Generation Force Fields from Symmetry-Adapted Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaniel, Jesse G.; Schmidt, J. R.

    2016-05-01

    Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) provides a unique set of advantages for parameterizing next-generation force fields from first principles. SAPT provides a direct, basis-set superposition error free estimate of molecular interaction energies, a physically intuitive energy decomposition, and a seamless transition to an asymptotic picture of intermolecular interactions. These properties have been exploited throughout the literature to develop next-generation force fields for a variety of applications, including classical molecular dynamics simulations, crystal structure prediction, and quantum dynamics/spectroscopy. This review provides a brief overview of the formalism and theory of SAPT, along with a practical discussion of the various methodologies utilized to parameterize force fields from SAPT calculations. It also highlights a number of applications of SAPT-based force fields for chemical systems of particular interest. Finally, the review ends with a brief outlook on the future opportunities and challenges that remain for next-generation force fields based on SAPT.

  18. Next-Generation Force Fields from Symmetry-Adapted Perturbation Theory.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Jesse G; Schmidt, J R

    2016-05-27

    Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) provides a unique set of advantages for parameterizing next-generation force fields from first principles. SAPT provides a direct, basis-set superposition error free estimate of molecular interaction energies, a physically intuitive energy decomposition, and a seamless transition to an asymptotic picture of intermolecular interactions. These properties have been exploited throughout the literature to develop next-generation force fields for a variety of applications, including classical molecular dynamics simulations, crystal structure prediction, and quantum dynamics/spectroscopy. This review provides a brief overview of the formalism and theory of SAPT, along with a practical discussion of the various methodologies utilized to parameterize force fields from SAPT calculations. It also highlights a number of applications of SAPT-based force fields for chemical systems of particular interest. Finally, the review ends with a brief outlook on the future opportunities and challenges that remain for next-generation force fields based on SAPT.

  19. Characteristics and computer model simulation of magnetic damping forces in maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.L.; Rote, D.M.; Chen, S.S.

    1994-05-01

    This report discusses the magnetic damping force in electrodynamic suspension (EDS) maglev systems. The computer model simulations, which combine electrical system equations with mechanical motion equations on the basis of dynamic circuit theory, were conducted for a loop-shaped coil guideway. The intrinsic damping characteristics of the EDS-type guideway are investigated, and the negative damping phenomenon is confirmed by the computer simulations. The report also presents a simple circuit model to aid in understanding damping-force characteristics.

  20. Installation of new Generation General Purpose Computer (GPC) compact unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) high bay 2, Spacecraft Electronics technician Ed Carter (right), wearing clean suit, prepares for (26864) and installs (26865) the new Generation General Purpose Computer (GPC) compact IBM unit in Atlantis', Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104's, middeck avionics bay as Orbiter Systems Quality Control technician Doug Snider looks on. Both men work for NASA contractor Lockheed Space Operations Company. All three orbiters are being outfitted with the compact IBM unit, which replaces a two-unit earlier generation computer.

  1. An empirical generative framework for computational modeling of language acquisition.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Heidi R; Sandbank, Ben; Onnis, Luca; Edelman, Shimon

    2010-06-01

    This paper reports progress in developing a computer model of language acquisition in the form of (1) a generative grammar that is (2) algorithmically learnable from realistic corpus data, (3) viable in its large-scale quantitative performance and (4) psychologically real. First, we describe new algorithmic methods for unsupervised learning of generative grammars from raw CHILDES data and give an account of the generative performance of the acquired grammars. Next, we summarize findings from recent longitudinal and experimental work that suggests how certain statistically prominent structural properties of child-directed speech may facilitate language acquisition. We then present a series of new analyses of CHILDES data indicating that the desired properties are indeed present in realistic child-directed speech corpora. Finally, we suggest how our computational results, behavioral findings, and corpus-based insights can be integrated into a next-generation model aimed at meeting the four requirements of our modeling framework.

  2. Tensioning the helix: a mechanism for force generation in twining plants

    PubMed Central

    Isnard, Sandrine; Cobb, Alexander R.; Holbrook, N.Michele; Zwieniecki, Maciej; Dumais, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Twining plants use their helical stems to clasp supports and to generate a squeezing force, providing stability against gravity. To elucidate the mechanism that allows force generation, we measured the squeezing forces exerted by the twiner Dioscorea bulbifera while following its growth using time-lapse photography. We show that the development of the squeezing force is accompanied by stiffening of the stem and the expansion of stipules at the leaf base. We use a simple thin rod model to show that despite their small size and sparse distribution, stipules impose a stem deformation sufficient to account for the measured squeezing force. We further demonstrate that tensioning of the stem helix, although counter-intuitive, is the most effective mechanism for generating large squeezing forces in twining plants. Our observations and model point to a general mechanism for the generation of the twining force: a modest radial stem expansion during primary growth, or the growth of lateral structures such as leaf bases, causes a delayed stem tensioning that creates the squeezing forces necessary for twining plants to ascend their supports. Our study thus provides the long-sought answer to the question of how twining plants ascend smooth supports without the use of adhesive or hook-like structures. PMID:19386656

  3. Compliant tactile sensor for generating a signal related to an applied force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Jara, Eduardo (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Tactile sensor. The sensor includes a compliant convex surface disposed above a sensor array, the sensor array adapted to respond to deformation of the convex surface to generate a signal related to an applied force vector.

  4. Phase-regularized polygon computer-generated holograms.

    PubMed

    Im, Dajeong; Moon, Eunkyoung; Park, Yohan; Lee, Deokhwan; Hahn, Joonku; Kim, Hwi

    2014-06-15

    The dark-line defect problem in the conventional polygon computer-generated hologram (CGH) is addressed. To resolve this problem, we clarify the physical origin of the defect and address the concept of phase-regularization. A novel synthesis algorithm for a phase-regularized polygon CGH for generating photorealistic defect-free holographic images is proposed. The optical reconstruction results of the phase-regularized polygon CGHs without the dark-line defects are presented.

  5. Molecular mechanism of motion and force generation by cytoplasmic dynein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennerich, Arne

    2013-03-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is an intricate microtubule (MT) motor with four AAA (ATPase associated with various cellular activities) ATPases per head domain. Dynein homodimers take hundreds of consecutive steps, during which the leading and trailing heads experience intramolecular tension in opposite directions. We hypothesize that this asymmetry may differentially regulate the MT-binding and ATPase functions in each head, thereby facilitating processive movement. Here, we elucidate the function of tension in regulating dynein-MT interactions, and dissect the roles of its multiple AAA subunits in effecting and modulating this behavior. Using optical tweezers to measure unbinding forces of single S. cerevisiae dynein heads in the absence of nucleotide, we show that intrinsic dynein-MT binding is significantly weaker under forward (MT-minus-end directed) tension than under rearward tension. Thus, forward tension likely promotes rear head detachment in the dimeric motor. The nucleotide states of specific AAA sites modify this intrinsic behavior. Mutational analysis shows that ATP binding to AAA1 substantially weakens MT binding. Moreover, ADP binding to AAA3 `locks' dynein in a previously undescribed, weak MT-binding state with a relatively symmetric response to tension. Interestingly, tension also affects nucleotide affinity: ADP affinity is lower under rearward than under forward load, suggesting that the front head preferentially releases ADP (likely from AAA3), perhaps driving a transition from an ADP state with relatively weak MT attachment to a strongly MT-attached, nucleotide-free state. Our analysis suggests that intramolecular tension is key to dynein motility, and highlights the importance of including multiple AAA ATPases in models for dynein mechanochemistry. NIH R01GM098469

  6. ADITEC: joining forces for next-generation vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rappuoli, Rino; Medaglini, Donata

    2012-04-01

    Scientists sit poised at a singular moment in the history of vaccine research. Genomics and systems biology have fueled advances in our understanding of human immunology. Together with adjuvant development and structure-based design of immunogens, these next-generation technologies are transforming the field of vaccinology and shaping the future of medicine. However, the sophisticated science behind the development of modern vaccines and the resulting knotty ethical issues have become so complex that scientists and policy-makers need a new model for vaccine research. The European Commission-sponsored Advanced Immunization Technologies project--ADITEC--brings together some of the leading laboratories in the field to tackle the problems that no lab can tackle in isolation.

  7. Future trends in computer waste generation in India.

    PubMed

    Dwivedy, Maheshwar; Mittal, R K

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to estimate the future projection of computer waste in India and to subsequently analyze their flow at the end of their useful phase. For this purpose, the study utilizes the logistic model-based approach proposed by Yang and Williams to forecast future trends in computer waste. The model estimates future projection of computer penetration rate utilizing their first lifespan distribution and historical sales data. A bounding analysis on the future carrying capacity was simulated using the three parameter logistic curve. The observed obsolete generation quantities from the extrapolated penetration rates are then used to model the disposal phase. The results of the bounding analysis indicate that in the year 2020, around 41-152 million units of computers will become obsolete. The obsolete computer generation quantities are then used to estimate the End-of-Life outflows by utilizing a time-series multiple lifespan model. Even a conservative estimate of the future recycling capacity of PCs will reach upwards of 30 million units during 2025. Apparently, more than 150 million units could be potentially recycled in the upper bound case. However, considering significant future investment in the e-waste recycling sector from all stakeholders in India, we propose a logistic growth in the recycling rate and estimate the requirement of recycling capacity between 60 and 400 million units for the lower and upper bound case during 2025. Finally, we compare the future obsolete PC generation amount of the US and India.

  8. Computer-Generated Geometry Instruction: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Helen W.; Zentall, Sydney S.

    2011-01-01

    This study hypothesized that increased intensity of graphic information, presented in computer-generated instruction, could be differentially beneficial for students with hyperactivity and inattention by improving their ability to sustain attention and hold information in-mind. To this purpose, 18 2nd-4th grade students, recruited from general…

  9. SNAP: A computer program for generating symbolic network functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, P. M.; Alderson, G. E.

    1970-01-01

    The computer program SNAP (symbolic network analysis program) generates symbolic network functions for networks containing R, L, and C type elements and all four types of controlled sources. The program is efficient with respect to program storage and execution time. A discussion of the basic algorithms is presented, together with user's and programmer's guides.

  10. Advanced Computer Image Generation Techniques Exploiting Perceptual Characteristics. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenger, Anthony J.; And Others

    This study suggests and identifies computer image generation (CIG) algorithms for visual simulation that improve the training effectiveness of CIG simulators and identifies areas of basic research in visual perception that are significant for improving CIG technology. The first phase of the project entailed observing three existing CIG simulators.…

  11. An Empirical Generative Framework for Computational Modeling of Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterfall, Heidi R.; Sandbank, Ben; Onnis, Luca; Edelman, Shimon

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports progress in developing a computer model of language acquisition in the form of (1) a generative grammar that is (2) algorithmically learnable from realistic corpus data, (3) viable in its large-scale quantitative performance and (4) psychologically real. First, we describe new algorithmic methods for unsupervised learning of…

  12. Computer Generated Optical Illusions: A Teaching and Research Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Bruce; Harman, Wade

    Interactive computer-generated simulations that highlight psychological principles were investigated in this study in which 33 female and 19 male undergraduate college student volunteers of median age 21 matched line and circle sizes in six variations of Ponzo's illusion. Prior to working with the illusions, data were collected based on subjects'…

  13. Computation and Visualization of Casimir Forces in Arbitrary Geometries: Nonmonotonic Lateral-Wall Forces and the Failure of Proximity-Force Approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Alejandro; Ibanescu, Mihai; Joannopoulos, J. D.; Johnson, Steven G.; Iannuzzi, Davide; Capasso, Federico

    2007-08-24

    We present a method of computing Casimir forces for arbitrary geometries, with any desired accuracy, that can directly exploit the efficiency of standard numerical-electromagnetism techniques. Using the simplest possible finite-difference implementation of this approach, we obtain both agreement with past results for cylinder-plate geometries, and also present results for new geometries. In particular, we examine a pistonlike problem involving two dielectric and metallic squares sliding between two metallic walls, in two and three dimensions, respectively, and demonstrate nonadditive and nonmonotonic changes in the force due to these lateral walls.

  14. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  15. Computation of forced laminar convection in rotating cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, J. W.

    1985-05-01

    Finite difference solutions are presented for forced laminar convection in a rotating cylindrical cavity with radial outflow. This forms a simple model of the cooling flow between two compressor disks in a gas turbine engine. If the fluid enters the cavity from a uniform radial source, it is shown that the local Nusselt number changes from that of a 'free disk' near the center of the cavity to that for Ekman layer flow at larger radii. With an axial inlet, the flow, and consequently, the heat transfer, is more complex. If vortex breakdown occurs, then the results are very similar to those for the radial inlet case, but otherwise a wall jet forms on the downstream disk, and the heat transfer from this disk may be several times that for the upstream disk. Variation of mean Nusselt number with rotational speed is qualitatively similar to previously published experimental measurements in turbulent flow. The effect of Prandtl number on heat transfer has also been demonstrated.

  16. A component analysis of the generation and release of isometric force in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, N; Sagar, H J; Cooper, J A

    1992-01-01

    Paradigms of isometric force control allow study of the generation and release of movement in the absence of complications due to disordered visuomotor coordination. The onset and release of isometric force in Parkinson's disease (PD) was studied, using computerised determinants of latency of response and rate of force generation and release. Components of isometric force control were related to measures of cognitive, affective and clinical motor disability. The effects of treatment were determined by longitudinal study of de novo patients. Patients with PD showed impairment in latency and rate of force change for movement release as well as onset. Rate of force change correlated with depression, clinical motor disability and memory quotient but latency showed no correlation with any of these measures. Treatment improved rate of force release, in concert with clinical motor disability, but not latency. These results suggest dissociations between latency and rate of force change that may be linked to different neurochemical deficits. Further, they demonstrate akinetic deficits in force release that argue against the "neural energy hypothesis" of akinesia. PMID:1640233

  17. An Improved Optical Tweezers Assay for Measuring the Force Generation of Single Kinesin Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Matthew P.; Rao, Lu; Gennerich, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Numerous microtubule-associated molecular motors, including several kinesins and cytoplasmic dynein, produce opposing forces that regulate spindle and chromosome positioning during mitosis. The motility and force generation of these motors are therefore critical to normal cell division, and dysfunction of these processes may contribute to human disease. Optical tweezers provide a powerful method for studying the nanometer motility and piconewton force generation of single motor proteins in vitro. Using kinesin-1 as a prototype, we present a set of step-by-step, optimized protocols for expressing a kinesin construct (K560-GFP) in Escherichia coli, purifying it, and studying its force generation in an optical tweezers microscope. We also provide detailed instructions on proper alignment and calibration of an optical trapping microscope. These methods provide a foundation for a variety of similar experiments. PMID:24633799

  18. Robustness of muscle synergies underlying three-dimensional force generation at the hand in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Rymer, William Z.; Beer, Randall F.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies using advanced matrix factorization techniques have shown that the coordination of human voluntary limb movements may be accomplished using combinations of a small number of intermuscular coordination patterns, or muscle synergies. However, the potential use of muscle synergies for isometric force generation has been evaluated mostly using correlational methods. The results of such studies suggest that fixed relationships between the activations of pairs of muscles are relatively rare. There is also emerging evidence that the nervous system uses independent strategies to control movement and force generation, which suggests that one cannot conclude a priori that isometric force generation is accomplished by combining muscle synergies, as shown in movement control. In this study, we used non-negative matrix factorization to evaluate the ability of a few muscle synergies to reconstruct the activation patterns of human arm muscles underlying the generation of three-dimensional (3-D) isometric forces at the hand. Surface electromyographic (EMG) data were recorded from eight key elbow and shoulder muscles during 3-D force target-matching protocols performed across a range of load levels and hand positions. Four synergies were sufficient to explain, on average, 95% of the variance in EMG datasets. Furthermore, we found that muscle synergy composition was conserved across biomechanical task conditions, experimental protocols, and subjects. Our findings are consistent with the view that the nervous system can generate isometric forces by assembling a combination of a small number of muscle synergies, differentially weighted according to task constraints. PMID:22279190

  19. An assessment of methods for computing radiative forcing in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Eui-Seok; Soden, Brian J.

    2015-07-01

    Because the radiative forcing is rarely computed separately when performing climate model simulations, several alternative methods have been developed to estimate both the instantaneous (or direct) forcing and the adjusted forcing. The adjusted forcing accounts for the radiative impact arising from the adjustment of climate variables to the instantaneous forcing, independent of any surface warming. Using climate model experiments performed for CMIP5, we find the adjusted forcing for 4 × CO2 ranges from roughly 5.5-9 W m-2 in current models. This range is shown to be consistent between different methods of estimating the adjusted forcing. Decomposition using radiative kernels and offline double-call radiative transfer calculations indicates that the spread receives a substantial contribution (roughly 50%) from intermodel differences in the instantaneous component of the radiative forcing. Moreover, nearly all of the spread in adjusted forcing can be accounted for by differences in the instantaneous forcing and stratospheric adjustment, implying that tropospheric adjustments to CO2 play only a secondary role. This suggests that differences in modeling radiative transfer are responsible for substantial differences in the projected climate response and underscores the need to archive double-call radiative transfer calculations of the instantaneous forcing as a routine diagnostic.

  20. Computational ligand-based rational design: Role of conformational sampling and force fields in model development

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jihyun; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2011-01-01

    A significant number of drug discovery efforts are based on natural products or high throughput screens from which compounds showing potential therapeutic effects are identified without knowledge of the target molecule or its 3D structure. In such cases computational ligand-based drug design (LBDD) can accelerate the drug discovery processes. LBDD is a general approach to elucidate the relationship of a compound's structure and physicochemical attributes to its biological activity. The resulting structure-activity relationship (SAR) may then act as the basis for the prediction of compounds with improved biological attributes. LBDD methods range from pharmacophore models identifying essential features of ligands responsible for their activity, quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) yielding quantitative estimates of activities based on physiochemical properties, and to similarity searching, which explores compounds with similar properties as well as various combinations of the above. A number of recent LBDD approaches involve the use of multiple conformations of the ligands being studied. One of the basic components to generate multiple conformations in LBDD is molecular mechanics (MM), which apply an empirical energy function to relate conformation to energies and forces. The collection of conformations for ligands is then combined with functional data using methods ranging from regression analysis to neural networks, from which the SAR is determined. Accordingly, for effective application of LBDD for SAR determinations it is important that the compounds be accurately modelled such that the appropriate range of conformations accessible to the ligands is identified. Such accurate modelling is largely based on use of the appropriate empirical force field for the molecules being investigated and the approaches used to generate the conformations. The present chapter includes a brief overview of currently used SAR methods in LBDD followed by a more

  1. Computer Generated Holography with Intensity-Graded Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Rossella; Assayag, Osnath; de Sars, Vincent; Guillon, Marc; Emiliani, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Computer Generated Holography achieves patterned illumination at the sample plane through phase modulation of the laser beam at the objective back aperture. This is obtained by using liquid crystal-based spatial light modulators (LC-SLMs), which modulate the spatial phase of the incident laser beam. A variety of algorithms is employed to calculate the phase modulation masks addressed to the LC-SLM. These algorithms range from simple gratings-and-lenses to generate multiple diffraction-limited spots, to iterative Fourier-transform algorithms capable of generating arbitrary illumination shapes perfectly tailored on the base of the target contour. Applications for holographic light patterning include multi-trap optical tweezers, patterned voltage imaging and optical control of neuronal excitation using uncaging or optogenetics. These past implementations of computer generated holography used binary input profile to generate binary light distribution at the sample plane. Here we demonstrate that using graded input sources, enables generating intensity graded light patterns and extend the range of application of holographic light illumination. At first, we use intensity-graded holograms to compensate for LC-SLM position dependent diffraction efficiency or sample fluorescence inhomogeneity. Finally we show that intensity-graded holography can be used to equalize photo evoked currents from cells expressing different levels of chanelrhodopsin2 (ChR2), one of the most commonly used optogenetics light gated channels, taking into account the non-linear dependence of channel opening on incident light. PMID:27799896

  2. A computational tool to design and generate crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, R. C.; Vieira, M. B.; Dantas, S. O.; Lobosco, M.

    2014-03-01

    The evolution of computers, more specifically regarding the increased storage and data processing capacity, allowed the construction of computational tools for the simulation of physical and chemical phenomena. Thus, practical experiments are being replaced, in some cases, by computational ones. In this context, we can highlight models used to simulate different phenomena on atomic scale. The construction of these simulators requires, by developers, the study and definition of accurate and reliable models. This complexity is often reflected in the construction of complex simulators, which simulate a limited group of structures. Such structures are sometimes expressed in a fixed manner using a limited set of geometric shapes. This work proposes a computational tool that aims to generate a set of crystal structures. The proposed tool consists of a) a programming language, which is used to describe the structures using for this purpose their characteristic functions and CSG (Constructive Solid Geometry) operators, and b) a compiler/interpreter that examines the source code written in the proposed language, and generates the objects accordingly. This tool enables the generation of an unrestricted number of structures, which can be incorporated in simulators such as the Monte Carlo Spin Engine, developed by our group at UFJF.

  3. The Application of Computer Musculoskeletal Modeling and Simulation to Investigate Compressive Tibiofemoral Force and Muscle Functions in Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to utilize musculoskeletal modelling and simulation to investigate the compressive tibiofemoral force and individual muscle function in obese children. We generated a 3D muscle-driven simulation of eight obese and eight normal-weight boys walking at their self-selected speed. The compressive tibiofemoral force and individual muscle contribution to the support and progression accelerations of center of mass (COM) were computed for each participant based on the subject-specific model. The simulated results were verified by comparing them to the experimental kinematics and EMG data. We found a linear relationship between the average self-selected speed and the normalized peak compressive tibiofemoral force (R2 = 0.611). The activity of the quadriceps contributed the most to the peak compressive tibiofemoral force during the stance phase. Obese children and nonobese children use similar muscles to support and accelerate the body COM, but nonobese children had significantly greater contributions of individual muscles. The obese children may therefore adopt a compensation strategy to avoid increasing joint loads and muscle requirements during walking. The absolute compressive tibiofemoral force and muscle forces were still greater in obese children. The long-term biomechanical adaptations of the musculoskeletal system to accommodate the excess body weight during walking are a concern. PMID:24288573

  4. Generation of optical vortex based on computer-generated holographic gratings by photolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaoxiang; Wang, Zhenwei

    2013-09-01

    The Laguerre-Gaussian beam is a typical example of the optical vortices, which can be generated by computer-generated holograms (CGHs) with the topological charge controlled. Here, we fabricated transmission-amplitude CGH gratings (up to 100 lines per millimeter) on metal film by photolithography technique. Such CGH grating grooves feature high resolution and fine smoothness, so that the gratings can be used to generate Laguerre-Gaussian beam with perfect mode. They are also applicable for the generation of femtosecond optical vortices due to the high damage threshold of the metal film.

  5. EMAT generation of bulk forces in a ferromagnetic plate and their equivalent surface stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouge, C.; Lhémery, A.; Aristégui, C.

    2014-04-01

    Electro-magnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT) are successfully used in many NDE applications, despite their low efficiency: they do not require a coupling medium and can easily generate elastic waves that standard piezoelectric transducers cannot, such as shear horizontal guided waves. There are all sorts of EMAT designs, so much so that dedicated simulation tools are necessary to optimally conceive an EMAT for a given application. EMAT performances also strongly depend on material properties of the piece under test. Here, ferromagnetic materials are considered. In such a material, an EMAT is the source of three forces resulting from three distinct and generally nonlinear phenomena: in addition to the Lorentz's force generated in all conductive media, the magnetization and magnetostriction forces take place. All these forces are modelled as vector fields in the volume of the specimen. However, wave generation is more efficiently predicted by considering sources of surface stress than sources of body force. Thus, a general model is derived for transforming body forces into surface stresses; this approach is used to express the 2D modal amplitudes of Lamb waves generated by an EMAT in a ferromagnetic plate as quasi-closed form solutions.

  6. A comparative assessment of forces and moments generated by lingual and conventional brackets.

    PubMed

    Sifakakis, Iosif; Pandis, Nikolaos; Makou, Margarita; Katsaros, Christos; Eliades, Theodore; Bourauel, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bracket type on the labiopalatal forces and moments generated in the sagittal plane. Incognito™ lingual brackets (3M Unitek), STb™ lingual brackets (Light Lingual System; ORMCO), and conventional 0.018 inch slot brackets (Gemini; 3M Unitek) were bonded on three identical maxillary acrylic resin models, with a palatally displaced right lateral incisor. The transfer trays for the indirect bonding of the lingual brackets were constructed in certified laboratories. Each model was mounted on the orthodontic measurement and simulation system and ten 0.013 inch CuNiTi wires were used for each bracket type. The wire was ligated with elastomerics and each measurement was repeated once after re-ligation. The labiopalatal forces and the moments in the sagittal plane were recorded on the right lateral incisor. One-way analysis of variance and post hoc Scheffe pairwise comparisons were used to assess the effect on bracket type on the generated forces and moments. The magnitude of forces ranged from 1.62, 1.27, and 1.81 N for the STb, conventional, and Incognito brackets, respectively; the corresponding moments were 2.01, 1.45, and 2.19 N mm, respectively. Bracket type was a significant predictor of the generated forces (P < 0.001) and moments (P < 0.001). The produced forces were different among all three bracket types, whereas the generated moments differed between conventional and lingual brackets but not between lingual brackets.

  7. Using DSMC to compute the force on a particle in a rarefied gas flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Rader, Daniel John; Torczynski, John Robert

    2002-06-01

    An approach is presented to compute the force on a spherical particle in a rarefied flow of a monatomic gas. This approach relies on the development of a Green's function that describes the force on a spherical particle in a delta-function molecular velocity distribution function. The gas-surface interaction model in this development allows incomplete accommodation of energy and tangential momentum. The force from an arbitrary molecular velocity distribution is calculated by computing the moment of the force Green's function in the same way that other macroscopic variables are determined. Since the molecular velocity distribution function is directly determined in the DSMC method, the force Green's function approach can be implemented straightforwardly in DSMC codes. A similar approach yields the heat transfer to a spherical particle in a rarefied gas flow. The force Green's function is demonstrated by application to two problems. First, the drag force on a spherical particle at arbitrary temperature and moving at arbitrary velocity through an equilibrium motionless gas is found analytically and numerically. Second, the thermophoretic force on a motionless particle in a motionless gas with a heat flux is found analytically and numerically. Good agreement is observed in both situations.

  8. Molecular interaction forces generated during protein adsorption to well-defined polymer brush surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Sho; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2015-03-17

    The molecular interaction forces generated during the adsorption of proteins to surfaces were examined by the force-versus-distance (f-d) curve measurements of atomic force microscopy using probes modified with appropriate molecules. Various substrates with polymer brush layers bearing zwitterionic, cationic, anionic, and hydrophobic groups were systematically prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. Surface interaction forces on these substrates were analyzed by the f-d curve measurements using probes with the same polymer brush layer as the substrate. Repulsive forces, which decreased depending on the ionic strength, were generated between cationic or anionic polyelectrolyte brush layers; these were considered to be electrostatic interaction forces. A strong adhesive force was detected between hydrophobic polymer brush layers during retraction; this corresponded to the hydrophobic interaction between two hydrophobic polymer layers. In contrast, no significant interaction forces were detected between zwitterionic polymer brush layers. Direct interaction forces between proteins and polymer brush layers were then quantitatively evaluated by the f-d curve measurements using protein-immobilized probes consisting of negatively charged albumin and positively charged lysozyme under physiological conditions. In addition, the amount of protein adsorbed on the polymer brush layer was quantified by surface plasmon resonance measurements. Relatively large amounts of protein adsorbed to the polyelectrolyte brush layers with opposite charges. It was considered that the detachment of the protein after contact with the polymer brush layer hardly occurred due to salt formation at the interface. Both proteins adsorbed significantly on the hydrophobic polymer brush layer, which was due to hydrophobic interactions at the interface. In contrast, the zwitterionic polymer brush layer exhibited no significant interaction force with proteins and suppressed

  9. A computational study of the aerodynamic forces and power requirements of dragonfly (Aeschna juncea) hovering.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mao; Lan, Shi Long

    2004-05-01

    Aerodynamic force generation and mechanical power requirements of a dragonfly (Aeschna juncea) in hovering flight are studied. The method of numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations in moving overset grids is used. When the midstroke angles of attack in the downstroke and the upstroke are set to 52 degrees and 8 degrees, respectively (these values are close to those observed), the mean vertical force equals the insect weight, and the mean thrust is approximately zero. There are two large vertical force peaks in one flapping cycle. One is in the first half of the cycle, which is mainly due to the hindwings in their downstroke; the other is in the second half of the cycle, which is mainly due to the forewings in their downstroke. Hovering with a large stroke plane angle (52 degrees ), the dragonfly uses drag as a major source for its weight-supporting force (approximately 65% of the total vertical force is contributed by the drag and 35% by the lift of the wings). The vertical force coefficient of a wing is twice as large as the quasi-steady value. The interaction between the fore- and hindwings is not very strong and is detrimental to the vertical force generation. Compared with the case of a single wing in the same motion, the interaction effect reduces the vertical forces on the fore- and hindwings by 14% and 16%, respectively, of that of the corresponding single wing. The large vertical force is due to the unsteady flow effects. The mechanism of the unsteady force is that in each downstroke of the hindwing or the forewing, a new vortex ring containing downward momentum is generated, giving an upward force. The body-mass-specific power is 37 W kg(-1), which is mainly contributed by the aerodynamic power.

  10. Shortening actin filaments cause force generation in actomyosin network to change from contractile to extensile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nitin; Gardel, Margaret

    Motor proteins in conjunction with filamentous proteins convert biochemical energy into mechanical energy which serves a number of cellular processes including cell motility, force generation and intracellular cargo transport. In-vitro experiments suggest that the forces generated by kinesin motors on microtubule bundles are extensile in nature whereas myosin motors on actin filaments are contractile. It is not clear how qualitatively similar systems can show completely different behaviors in terms of the nature of force generation. In order to answer this question, we carry out in vitro experiments where we form quasi 2D filamentous actomyosin networks and vary the length of actin filaments by adding capping protein. We show that when filaments are much shorter than their typical persistence length (approximately 10 microns), the forces generated are extensile and we see active nematic defect propagation, as seen in the microtubule-kinesin system. Based on this observation, we claim that the rigidity of rods plays an important role in dictating the nature of force generation in such systems. In order to understand this transition, we selectively label individual filaments and find that longer filaments show considerable bending and buckling, making them difficult to slide and extend along their length.

  11. Mechanisms of force generation by end-on kinetochore-microtubule attachments

    PubMed Central

    Joglekar, Ajit P.; Bloom, Kerry S.; Salmon, E. D.

    2010-01-01

    Generation of motile force is one of the main functions of the eukaryotic kinetochore during cell division. In recent years, the KMN network of proteins (Ndc80 complex, Mis12 complex and KNL-1 complex) has emerged as a highly conserved core microtubule-binding complex at the kinetochore. It plays a major role in coupling force generation to microtubule plus-end polymerization and depolymerization. In this review, we discuss current theoretical mechanisms of force generation, and then focus on emerging information about mechanistic contributions from the Ndc80 complex in eukaryotes, and the microtubule-binding Dam1/DASH complex from fungi. New information has also become available from super-resolution light microscopy on the protein architecture of the kinetochore-microtubule attachment site in both budding yeast and humans, which provides further insight into the mechanism of force generation. We briefly discuss potential contributions of motors, other microtubule-associated proteins, and microtubule depolymerases. Using the above evidence, we present speculative models of force generation at the kinetochore. PMID:20061128

  12. Source Term Model for Vortex Generator Vanes in a Navier-Stokes Computer Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waithe, Kenrick A.

    2004-01-01

    A source term model for an array of vortex generators was implemented into a non-proprietary Navier-Stokes computer code, OVERFLOW. The source term models the side force created by a vortex generator vane. The model is obtained by introducing a side force to the momentum and energy equations that can adjust its strength automatically based on the local flow. The model was tested and calibrated by comparing data from numerical simulations and experiments of a single low profile vortex generator vane on a flat plate. In addition, the model was compared to experimental data of an S-duct with 22 co-rotating, low profile vortex generators. The source term model allowed a grid reduction of about seventy percent when compared with the numerical simulations performed on a fully gridded vortex generator on a flat plate without adversely affecting the development and capture of the vortex created. The source term model was able to predict the shape and size of the stream-wise vorticity and velocity contours very well when compared with both numerical simulations and experimental data. The peak vorticity and its location were also predicted very well when compared to numerical simulations and experimental data. The circulation predicted by the source term model matches the prediction of the numerical simulation. The source term model predicted the engine fan face distortion and total pressure recovery of the S-duct with 22 co-rotating vortex generators very well. The source term model allows a researcher to quickly investigate different locations of individual or a row of vortex generators. The researcher is able to conduct a preliminary investigation with minimal grid generation and computational time.

  13. A Novel 3D Fibril Force Assay Implicates Src in Tumor Cell Force Generation in Collagen Networks

    PubMed Central

    Polackwich, Robert J.; Koch, Daniel; Arevalo, Richard; Miermont, Anne M.; Jee, Kathleen J.; Lazar, John; Urbach, Jeffrey; Mueller, Susette C.; McAllister, Ryan G.

    2013-01-01

    New insight into the biomechanics of cancer cell motility in 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) environments would significantly enhance our understanding of aggressive cancers and help identify new targets for intervention. While several methods for measuring the forces involved in cell-matrix interactions have been developed, previous to this study none have been able to measure forces in a fibrillar environment. We have developed a novel assay for simultaneously measuring cell mechanotransduction and motility in 3D fibrillar environments. The assay consists of a controlled-density fibrillar collagen gel atop a controlled-stiffness polyacrylamide (PAA) surface. Forces generated by living cells and their migration in the 3D collagen gel were measured with the 3D motion of tracer beads within the PAA layer. Here, this 3D fibril force assay is used to study the role of the invasion-associated protein kinase Src in mechanotransduction and motility. Src expression and activation are linked with proliferation, invasion, and metastasis, and have been shown to be required in 2D for invadopodia membranes to direct and mediate invasion. Breast cancer cell line MDA-MD-231 was stably transfected with GFP-tagged constitutively active Src or wild-type Src. In 3D fibrillar collagen matrices we found that, relative to wild-type Src, constitutively active Src: 1) increased the strength of cell-induced forces on the ECM, 2) did not significantly change migration speed, and 3) increased both the duration and the length, but not the number, of long membrane protrusions. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that Src controls invasion by controlling the ability of the cell to form long lasting cellular protrusions to enable penetration through tissue barriers, in addition to its role in promoting invadopodia matrix-degrading activity. PMID:23536784

  14. Image quality evaluation and control of computer-generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Uetake, Hiroki

    2016-03-01

    Image quality of the computer-generated holograms are usually evaluated subjectively. For example, the re- constructed image from the hologram is compared with other holograms, or evaluated by the double-stimulus impairment scale method to compare with the original image. This paper proposes an objective image quality evaluation of a computer-generated hologram by evaluating both diffraction efficiency and peak signal-to-noise ratio. Theory and numerical experimental results are shown on Fourier transform transmission hologram of both amplitude and phase modulation. Results without the optimized random phase show that the amplitude transmission hologram gives better peak signal-to noise ratio, but the phase transmission hologram provides about 10 times higher diffraction efficiency to the amplitude type. As an optimized phase hologram, Kinoform is evaluated. In addition, we investigate to control image quality by non-linear operation.

  15. Computing the dissipative part of the gravitational self force: II. Numerical implementation and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Scott; Flanagan, Eanna; Hinderer, Tanja; Ruangsri, Uchupol

    2015-04-01

    We describe how we have modified a frequency-domain Teukolsky-equation solver, previously used for computing orbit-averaged dissipation, in order to compute the dissipative piece of the gravitational self force on orbits of Kerr black holes. This calculation involves summing over a large number of harmonics. Each harmonic is independent of all others, so it is well suited to parallel computation. We show preliminary results for equatorial eccentric orbits and circular inclined orbits, demonstrating convergence of the harmonic expansion, as well as interesting phenomenology of the self force's behavior in the strong field. We conclude by discussing plans for using this force to study generic orbits, with a focus on the behavior of orbital resonances.

  16. Computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy: energy dissipation of cantilever.

    PubMed

    Senda, Yasuhiro; Blomqvist, Janne; Nieminen, Risto M

    2016-09-21

    We propose a computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM) in which the atomic force between the cantilever tip and the surface is calculated using a molecular dynamics method, and the macroscopic motion of the cantilever is modeled by an oscillating spring. The movement of atoms in the tip and surface is connected with the oscillating spring using a recently developed coupling method. In this computational model, the oscillation energy is dissipated, as observed in AFM experiments. We attribute this dissipation to the hysteresis and nonconservative properties of the interatomic force that acts between the atoms in the tip and sample surface. The dissipation rate strongly depends on the parameters used in the computational model. PMID:27420398

  17. Computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy: energy dissipation of cantilever.

    PubMed

    Senda, Yasuhiro; Blomqvist, Janne; Nieminen, Risto M

    2016-09-21

    We propose a computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM) in which the atomic force between the cantilever tip and the surface is calculated using a molecular dynamics method, and the macroscopic motion of the cantilever is modeled by an oscillating spring. The movement of atoms in the tip and surface is connected with the oscillating spring using a recently developed coupling method. In this computational model, the oscillation energy is dissipated, as observed in AFM experiments. We attribute this dissipation to the hysteresis and nonconservative properties of the interatomic force that acts between the atoms in the tip and sample surface. The dissipation rate strongly depends on the parameters used in the computational model.

  18. Computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy: energy dissipation of cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senda, Yasuhiro; Blomqvist, Janne; Nieminen, Risto M.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM) in which the atomic force between the cantilever tip and the surface is calculated using a molecular dynamics method, and the macroscopic motion of the cantilever is modeled by an oscillating spring. The movement of atoms in the tip and surface is connected with the oscillating spring using a recently developed coupling method. In this computational model, the oscillation energy is dissipated, as observed in AFM experiments. We attribute this dissipation to the hysteresis and nonconservative properties of the interatomic force that acts between the atoms in the tip and sample surface. The dissipation rate strongly depends on the parameters used in the computational model.

  19. Incorporating core hysteresis properties in three-dimensional computations of transformer inrush current forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adly, A. A.; Hanafy, H. H.

    2009-04-01

    It is well known that transformer inrush currents depend upon the core properties, residual flux, switching instant, and the overall circuit parameters. Large transient inrush currents introduce abnormal electromagnetic forces which may destroy the transformer windings. This paper presents an approach through which core hysteresis may be incorporated in three-dimensional computations of transformer inrush current forces. Details of the approach, measurements, and simulations for a shell-type transformer are given in the paper.

  20. Hardware architecture for full analytical Fraunhofer computer-generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zhi-Yong; Xu, Zong-Xi; Xiong, Yi; Chen, Biao; Dai, Hui-Min; Jiang, Shao-Ji; Dong, Jian-Wen

    2015-09-01

    Hardware architecture of parallel computation is proposed for generating Fraunhofer computer-generated holograms (CGHs). A pipeline-based integrated circuit architecture is realized by employing the modified Fraunhofer analytical formulism, which is large scale and enables all components to be concurrently operated. The architecture of the CGH contains five modules to calculate initial parameters of amplitude, amplitude compensation, phases, and phase compensation, respectively. The precalculator of amplitude is fully adopted considering the "reusable design" concept. Each complex operation type (such as square arithmetic) is reused only once by means of a multichannel selector. The implemented hardware calculates an 800×600 pixels hologram in parallel using 39,319 logic elements, 21,074 registers, and 12,651 memory bits in an Altera field-programmable gate array environment with stable operation at 50 MHz. Experimental results demonstrate that the quality of the images reconstructed from the hardware-generated hologram can be comparable to that of a software implementation. Moreover, the calculation speed is approximately 100 times faster than that of a personal computer with an Intel i5-3230M 2.6 GHz CPU for a triangular object.

  1. Computational power and generative capacity of genetic systems.

    PubMed

    Igamberdiev, Abir U; Shklovskiy-Kordi, Nikita E

    2016-01-01

    Semiotic characteristics of genetic sequences are based on the general principles of linguistics formulated by Ferdinand de Saussure, such as the arbitrariness of sign and the linear nature of the signifier. Besides these semiotic features that are attributable to the basic structure of the genetic code, the principle of generativity of genetic language is important for understanding biological transformations. The problem of generativity in genetic systems arises to a possibility of different interpretations of genetic texts, and corresponds to what Alexander von Humboldt called "the infinite use of finite means". These interpretations appear in the individual development as the spatiotemporal sequences of realizations of different textual meanings, as well as the emergence of hyper-textual statements about the text itself, which underlies the process of biological evolution. These interpretations are accomplished at the level of the readout of genetic texts by the structures defined by Efim Liberman as "the molecular computer of cell", which includes DNA, RNA and the corresponding enzymes operating with molecular addresses. The molecular computer performs physically manifested mathematical operations and possesses both reading and writing capacities. Generativity paradoxically resides in the biological computational system as a possibility to incorporate meta-statements about the system, and thus establishes the internal capacity for its evolution. PMID:26829769

  2. Computational power and generative capacity of genetic systems.

    PubMed

    Igamberdiev, Abir U; Shklovskiy-Kordi, Nikita E

    2016-01-01

    Semiotic characteristics of genetic sequences are based on the general principles of linguistics formulated by Ferdinand de Saussure, such as the arbitrariness of sign and the linear nature of the signifier. Besides these semiotic features that are attributable to the basic structure of the genetic code, the principle of generativity of genetic language is important for understanding biological transformations. The problem of generativity in genetic systems arises to a possibility of different interpretations of genetic texts, and corresponds to what Alexander von Humboldt called "the infinite use of finite means". These interpretations appear in the individual development as the spatiotemporal sequences of realizations of different textual meanings, as well as the emergence of hyper-textual statements about the text itself, which underlies the process of biological evolution. These interpretations are accomplished at the level of the readout of genetic texts by the structures defined by Efim Liberman as "the molecular computer of cell", which includes DNA, RNA and the corresponding enzymes operating with molecular addresses. The molecular computer performs physically manifested mathematical operations and possesses both reading and writing capacities. Generativity paradoxically resides in the biological computational system as a possibility to incorporate meta-statements about the system, and thus establishes the internal capacity for its evolution.

  3. Comparative assessment of forces generated during simulated alignment with self-ligating and conventional brackets.

    PubMed

    Pandis, Nikolaos; Eliades, Theodore; Bourauel, Christoph

    2009-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to comparatively assess the magnitude and direction of forces and moments generated from different bracket systems, during the initial levelling and alignment stage of orthodontic treatment. Three types of brackets were used: Orthos2 (Ormco), Damon2 (Ormco), and In-Ovation R (GAC). The brackets were bonded on resin replicas models of a patient's crowded mandibular arch, and a 0.014 inch Damon archform CuNiTi (Ormco) wire was inserted. The model was mounted on the Orthodontic Measurement and Simulation System (OMSS) and six static measurements were taken at the initial crowded state per bracket for the lateral incisor, canine, and first premolar. A total of 10 repetitions were performed for each measurement, with new brackets and archwires used for each trial. The forces and moments generated were registered directly on the OMSS software and were statistically analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance separately for each dental arch location and force component. Group differences were further analyzed with Tukey's post hoc comparisons test at the 0.05 significance level. The lingually inclined, crowded lateral incisor presented an extrusive and buccal movement and showed the lowest force in the vertical direction, whereas the self-ligating group of brackets generated the highest force in the buccolingual direction. The moments applied by the three bracket systems followed the general trend shown for forces; in the vertical axis, the self-ligating brackets exerted lower forces than their conventional counterpart. This was modified in the buccolingual direction where, in most instances, the self-ligating appliances applied higher moments compared with the conventional bracket. In most cases, the magnitude of forces and moments ranged between 30-70 cN and 2-6 N mm, respectively. However, maximum forces and moments developed at the lateral incisor were almost four times higher than the average. PMID:19349418

  4. The use of computer vision and force sensing for tight tolerance assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, J.D.

    1993-05-19

    Computer vision and force control provide feedback for robot manipulation during the assembly of objects. Both techniques have weaknesses, but their complementary strengths enable them to work well together, achieving assembly with tight tolerances. For instance, camera resolution limits the accuracy of computer vision, but it can locate approximately where the part should be placed and is an excellent choice for coarse placement of the part. Force control senses the force induced by object contact and if used extensively could damage a delicate part, but when used for fine placement of an object, it compensates for the error in coarse placement. It is our goal to utilize the best features of force sensing and computer vision to reduce the error in placement of an object. The results of placing a peg in a 0.15mm tolerance hole with different camera resolutions will be presented. We have chosen to use computer vision to move the peg as close to its correct placement point as possible and force control to make minor adjustments, achieving the correct positioning of the peg.

  5. Forces and moments generated by the human arm: Variability and control

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y; Terekhov, AV; Latash, ML; Zatsiorsky, VM

    2012-01-01

    This is an exploratory study of the accurate endpoint force vector production by the human arm in isometric conditions. We formulated three common-sense hypotheses and falsified them in the experiment. The subjects (n=10) exerted static forces on the handle in eight directions in a horizontal plane for 25 seconds. The forces were of 4 magnitude levels (10 %, 20%, 30% and 40% of individual MVC). The torsion moment on the handle (grasp moment) was not specified in the instruction. The two force components and the grasp moment were recorded, and the shoulder, elbow, and wrist joint torques were computed. The following main facts were observed: (a) While the grasp moment was not prescribed by the instruction, it was always produced. The moment magnitude and direction depended on the instructed force magnitude and direction. (b) The within-trial angular variability of the exerted force vector (angular precision) did not depend on the target force magnitude (a small negative correlation was observed). (c) Across the target force directions, the variability of the exerted force magnitude and directional variability exhibited opposite trends: In the directions where the variability of force magnitude was maximal, the directional variability was minimal and vice versa. (d) The time profiles of joint torques in the trials were always positively correlated, even for the force directions where flexion torque was produced at one joint and extension torque was produced at the other joint. (e) The correlations between the grasp moment and the wrist torque were negative across the tasks and positive within the individual trials. (f) In static serial kinematic chains, the pattern of the joint torques distribution could not be explained by an optimization cost function additive with respect to the torques. Plans for several future experiments have been suggested. PMID:23080084

  6. Forces and moments generated by the human arm: variability and control.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Terekhov, A V; Latash, M L; Zatsiorsky, V M

    2012-11-01

    This is an exploratory study of the accurate endpoint force vector production by the human arm in isometric conditions. We formulated three common-sense hypotheses and falsified them in the experiment. The subjects (n = 10) exerted static forces on the handle in eight directions in a horizontal plane for 25 s. The forces were of 4 magnitude levels (10, 20, 30 and 40 % of individual maximal voluntary contractions). The torsion moment on the handle (grasp moment) was not specified in the instruction. The two force components and the grasp moment were recorded, and the shoulder, elbow, and wrist joint torques were computed. The following main facts were observed: (a) While the grasp moment was not prescribed by the instruction, it was always produced. The moment magnitude and direction depended on the instructed force magnitude and direction. (b) The within-trial angular variability of the exerted force vector (angular precision) did not depend on the target force magnitude (a small negative correlation was observed). (c) Across the target force directions, the variability of the exerted force magnitude and directional variability exhibited opposite trends: In the directions where the variability of force magnitude was maximal, the directional variability was minimal and vice versa. (d) The time profiles of joint torques in the trials were always positively correlated, even for the force directions where flexion torque was produced at one joint and extension torque was produced at the other joint. (e) The correlations between the grasp moment and the wrist torque were negative across the tasks and positive within the individual trials. (f) In static serial kinematic chains, the pattern of the joint torques distribution could not be explained by an optimization cost function additive with respect to the torques. Plans for several future experiments have been suggested. PMID:23080084

  7. The myofilament elasticity and its effect on kinetics of force generation by the myosin motor.

    PubMed

    Piazzesi, Gabriella; Dolfi, Mario; Brunello, Elisabetta; Fusi, Luca; Reconditi, Massimo; Bianco, Pasquale; Linari, Marco; Lombardi, Vincenzo

    2014-06-15

    The half-sarcomere is the functional unit of striated muscle, in which, according to a "linear" mechanical model, myosin motors are parallel force generators with an average strain s acting between the opposing myosin and actin filaments that behave as a series elastic element with compliance Cf. Thus the definition of the mechanism of force generation by myosin motors in muscle requires integration of the crystallographic model of the working stroke with the mechanical constraints provided by the organization of motors in the half-sarcomere. The relation between half-sarcomere compliance and force (Chs-T) during the development of isometric contraction deviates, at low forces, from that predicted by the linear model, indicating the presence of an elastic element in parallel with the myosin motors, which may influence the estimate of s. A working stroke model, kinetically constrained by the early phase of the isotonic velocity transient following a force step, predicts that the rate of quick force recovery following a length step is reduced to the observed value by a Cf of 12.6nm/MPa. With this value of Cf, the fit of Chs-T relation during the isometric force rise gives s=1.8-1.9nm, similar to the values estimated using the linear model. PMID:24631572

  8. Automatic generation of computable implementation guides from clinical information models.

    PubMed

    Boscá, Diego; Maldonado, José Alberto; Moner, David; Robles, Montserrat

    2015-06-01

    Clinical information models are increasingly used to describe the contents of Electronic Health Records. Implementation guides are a common specification mechanism used to define such models. They contain, among other reference materials, all the constraints and rules that clinical information must obey. However, these implementation guides typically are oriented to human-readability, and thus cannot be processed by computers. As a consequence, they must be reinterpreted and transformed manually into an executable language such as Schematron or Object Constraint Language (OCL). This task can be difficult and error prone due to the big gap between both representations. The challenge is to develop a methodology for the specification of implementation guides in such a way that humans can read and understand easily and at the same time can be processed by computers. In this paper, we propose and describe a novel methodology that uses archetypes as basis for generation of implementation guides. We use archetypes to generate formal rules expressed in Natural Rule Language (NRL) and other reference materials usually included in implementation guides such as sample XML instances. We also generate Schematron rules from NRL rules to be used for the validation of data instances. We have implemented these methods in LinkEHR, an archetype editing platform, and exemplify our approach by generating NRL rules and implementation guides from EN ISO 13606, openEHR, and HL7 CDA archetypes. PMID:25910958

  9. The actin crosslinking protein palladin modulates force generation and mechanosensitivity of tumor associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Azatov, Mikheil; Goicoechea, Silvia M.; Otey, Carol A.; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2016-01-01

    Cells organize actin filaments into higher-order structures by regulating the composition, distribution and concentration of actin crosslinkers. Palladin is an actin crosslinker found in the lamellar actin network and stress fibers, which are critical for mechanosensing of the environment. Palladin also serves as a molecular scaffold for α-actinin, another key actin crosslinker. By virtue of its close interactions with actomyosin structures in the cell, palladin may play an important role in cell mechanics. However, the role of palladin in cellular force generation and mechanosensing has not been studied. Here, we investigate the role of palladin in regulating the plasticity of the actin cytoskeleton and cellular force generation in response to alterations in substrate stiffness. Traction force microscopy revealed that tumor-associated fibroblasts generate larger forces on substrates of increased stiffness. Contrary to expectations, knocking down palladin increased the forces generated by cells and inhibited their ability to sense substrate stiffness for very stiff gels. This was accompanied by significant differences in actin organization, adhesion dynamics and altered myosin organization in palladin knock-down cells. Our results suggest that actin crosslinkers such as palladin and myosin motors coordinate for optimal cell function and to prevent aberrant behavior as in cancer metastasis. PMID:27353427

  10. Computer Aided Design of Computer Generated Holograms for electron beam fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urquhart, Kristopher S.; Lee, Sing H.; Guest, Clark C.; Feldman, Michael R.; Farhoosh, Hamid

    1989-01-01

    Computer Aided Design (CAD) systems that have been developed for electrical and mechanical design tasks are also effective tools for the process of designing Computer Generated Holograms (CGHs), particularly when these holograms are to be fabricated using electron beam lithography. CAD workstations provide efficient and convenient means of computing, storing, displaying, and preparing for fabrication many of the features that are common to CGH designs. Experience gained in the process of designing CGHs with various types of encoding methods is presented. Suggestions are made so that future workstations may further accommodate the CGH design process.

  11. Fast high-resolution computer-generated hologram computation using multiple graphics processing unit cluster system.

    PubMed

    Takada, Naoki; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Shiraki, Atsushi; Okada, Naohisa; Oikawa, Minoru; Masuda, Nobuyuki; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2012-10-20

    To overcome the computational complexity of a computer-generated hologram (CGH), we implement an optimized CGH computation in our multi-graphics processing unit cluster system. Our system can calculate a CGH of 6,400×3,072 pixels from a three-dimensional (3D) object composed of 2,048 points in 55 ms. Furthermore, in the case of a 3D object composed of 4096 points, our system is 553 times faster than a conventional central processing unit (using eight threads).

  12. Accuracy of Computer-Generated, Spanish-Language Medicine Labels

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Iman; Tse, Julia

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We evaluated the accuracy of translated, Spanish-language medicine labels among pharmacies in a borough with a large Spanish-speaking population. METHODS A cross-sectional, telephone survey of all pharmacies in the Bronx, New York, was performed. Selected pharmacies were visited to learn about the computer software being used to generate Spanish medicine labels. Outcomes included the proportion of pharmacies providing Spanish medicine labels, frequency of computerized translation, and description of Spanish medicine labels produced. RESULTS Of 316 pharmacies, 286 (91%) participated. Overall, 209 (73%) provided medicine labels in Spanish. Independent pharmacies were significantly more likely to provide Spanish labels than were hospital or chain pharmacies (88% vs 57% vs 32%; P < .0001). Pharmacies that provided Spanish labels mostly commonly (86%) used computer programs to do so; 11% used lay staff members, and 3% used a professional interpreter. We identified 14 different computer programs used to generate Spanish labels, with 70% of pharmacies using 1 of 3 major programs. We evaluated 76 medicine labels generated by 13 different computer programs. Overall, 32 Spanish labels (43%) included incomplete translations (a mixture of English and Spanish), and 6 additional labels contained misspellings or grammar errors, which resulted in an overall error rate of 50%. CONCLUSIONS Although pharmacies were likely to provide medicine labels translated into Spanish, the quality of the translations was inconsistent and potentially hazardous. Unless regulations and funding support the technological advances needed to ensure the safety of such labeling, we risk perpetuating health disparities for populations with limited English proficiency. PMID:20368321

  13. Revisions to the hydrogen gas generation computer model

    SciTech Connect

    Jerrell, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    Waste Management Technology has requested SRTC to maintain and extend a previously developed computer model, TRUGAS, which calculates hydrogen gas concentrations within the transuranic (TRU) waste drums. TRUGAS was written by Frank G. Smith using the BASIC language and is described in the report A Computer Model of gas Generation and Transport within TRU Waste Drums (DP- 1754). The computer model has been partially validated by yielding results similar to experimental data collected at SRL and LANL over a wide range of conditions. The model was created to provide the capability of predicting conditions that could potentially lead to the formation of flammable gas concentrations within drums, and to assess proposed drum venting methods. The model has served as a tool in determining how gas concentrations are affected by parameters such as filter vent sizes, waste composition, gas generation values, the number and types of enclosures, water instrusion into the drum, and curie loading. The success of the TRUGAS model has prompted an interest in the program's maintenance and enhancement. Experimental data continues to be collected at various sites on such parameters as permeability values, packaging arrangements, filter designs, and waste contents. Information provided by this data is used to improve the accuracy of the model's predictions. Also, several modifications to the model have been made to enlarge the scope of problems which can be analyzed. For instance, the model has been used to calculate hydrogen concentrations inside steel cabinets containing retired glove boxes (WSRC-RP-89-762). The revised TRUGAS computer model, H2GAS, is described in this report. This report summarizes all modifications made to the TRUGAS computer model and provides documentation useful for making future updates to H2GAS.

  14. Revisions to the hydrogen gas generation computer model

    SciTech Connect

    Jerrell, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    Waste Management Technology has requested SRTC to maintain and extend a previously developed computer model, TRUGAS, which calculates hydrogen gas concentrations within the transuranic (TRU) waste drums. TRUGAS was written by Frank G. Smith using the BASIC language and is described in the report A Computer Model of gas Generation and Transport within TRU Waste Drums (DP- 1754). The computer model has been partially validated by yielding results similar to experimental data collected at SRL and LANL over a wide range of conditions. The model was created to provide the capability of predicting conditions that could potentially lead to the formation of flammable gas concentrations within drums, and to assess proposed drum venting methods. The model has served as a tool in determining how gas concentrations are affected by parameters such as filter vent sizes, waste composition, gas generation values, the number and types of enclosures, water instrusion into the drum, and curie loading. The success of the TRUGAS model has prompted an interest in the program`s maintenance and enhancement. Experimental data continues to be collected at various sites on such parameters as permeability values, packaging arrangements, filter designs, and waste contents. Information provided by this data is used to improve the accuracy of the model`s predictions. Also, several modifications to the model have been made to enlarge the scope of problems which can be analyzed. For instance, the model has been used to calculate hydrogen concentrations inside steel cabinets containing retired glove boxes (WSRC-RP-89-762). The revised TRUGAS computer model, H2GAS, is described in this report. This report summarizes all modifications made to the TRUGAS computer model and provides documentation useful for making future updates to H2GAS.

  15. Grid generation and inviscid flow computation about aircraft geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1989-01-01

    Grid generation and Euler flow about fighter aircraft are described. A fighter aircraft geometry is specified by an area ruled fuselage with an internal duct, cranked delta wing or strake/wing combinations, canard and/or horizontal tail surfaces, and vertical tail surfaces. The initial step before grid generation and flow computation is the determination of a suitable grid topology. The external grid topology that has been applied is called a dual-block topology which is a patched C (exp 1) continuous multiple-block system where inner blocks cover the highly-swept part of a cranked wing or strake, rearward inner-part of the wing, and tail components. Outer-blocks cover the remainder of the fuselage, outer-part of the wing, canards and extend to the far field boundaries. The grid generation is based on transfinite interpolation with Lagrangian blending functions. This procedure has been applied to the Langley experimental fighter configuration and a modified F-18 configuration. Supersonic flow between Mach 1.3 and 2.5 and angles of attack between 0 degrees and 10 degrees have been computed with associated Euler solvers based on the finite-volume approach. When coupling geometric details such as boundary layer diverter regions, duct regions with inlets and outlets, or slots with the general external grid, imposing C (exp 1) continuity can be extremely tedious. The approach taken here is to patch blocks together at common interfaces where there is no grid continuity, but enforce conservation in the finite-volume solution. The key to this technique is how to obtain the information required for a conservative interface. The Ramshaw technique which automates the computation of proportional areas of two overlapping grids on a planar surface and is suitable for coding was used. Researchers generated internal duct grids for the Langley experimental fighter configuration independent of the external grid topology, with a conservative interface at the inlet and outlet.

  16. Turbofan forced mixer-nozzle internal flowfield. Volume 2: Computational fluid dynamic predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werle, M. J.; Vasta, V. N.

    1982-01-01

    A general program was conducted to develop and assess a computational method for predicting the flow properties in a turbofan forced mixed duct. The detail assessment of the resulting computer code is presented. It was found that the code provided excellent predictions of the kinematics of the mixing process throughout the entire length of the mixer nozzle. The thermal mixing process between the hot core and cold fan flows was found to be well represented in the low speed portion of the flowfield.

  17. Generation of sidelobe-free optical vortices utilizing object-oriented computer generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sujuan; He, Chao; Wang, Tingyun

    2014-03-01

    A novel approach for producing sidelobe-free optical vortices is proposed, for the first time, utilizing object-oriented computer generated holograms (CGH). By conjugate-symmetrically extending the complex amplitude of any desired optical vortices prior to performing the discrete Fourier transform, the resulting real-valued number profile is encoded into an object-oriented CGH without having conventional forked-shaped fringes. On the basis of the CGH generated, use is first made of numerical simulations to reconstruct optical vortices with spiral phase profiles. Detailed experimental measurements employing a computer-controlled spatial light modulator and extensive numerical simulations are undertaken to verify the proposed technique. Excellent agreements between numerical simulations and experimental measurements are observed. Results show that optical vortices with a single primary intensity ring are generated without the occurrence of any sidelobes in the periphery for absolute values of topological charges as large as 20.

  18. Development of a Polarizable Force Field For Proteins via Ab Initio Quantum Chemistry: First Generation Model and Gas Phase Tests

    PubMed Central

    KAMINSKI, GEORGE A.; STERN, HARRY A.; BERNE, B. J.; FRIESNER, RICHARD A.; CAO, YIXIANG X.; MURPHY, ROBERT B.; ZHOU, RUHONG; HALGREN, THOMAS A.

    2014-01-01

    We present results of developing a methodology suitable for producing molecular mechanics force fields with explicit treatment of electrostatic polarization for proteins and other molecular system of biological interest. The technique allows simulation of realistic-size systems. Employing high-level ab initio data as a target for fitting allows us to avoid the problem of the lack of detailed experimental data. Using the fast and reliable quantum mechanical methods supplies robust fitting data for the resulting parameter sets. As a result, gas-phase many-body effects for dipeptides are captured within the average RMSD of 0.22 kcal/mol from their ab initio values, and conformational energies for the di- and tetrapeptides are reproduced within the average RMSD of 0.43 kcal/mol from their quantum mechanical counterparts. The latter is achieved in part because of application of a novel torsional fitting technique recently developed in our group, which has already been used to greatly improve accuracy of the peptide conformational equilibrium prediction with the OPLS-AA force field.1 Finally, we have employed the newly developed first-generation model in computing gas-phase conformations of real proteins, as well as in molecular dynamics studies of the systems. The results show that, although the overall accuracy is no better than what can be achieved with a fixed-charges model, the methodology produces robust results, permits reasonably low computational cost, and avoids other computational problems typical for polarizable force fields. It can be considered as a solid basis for building a more accurate and complete second-generation model. PMID:12395421

  19. Performance Evaluation Tools for Next Generation Scalable Computing Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Jerry C.; Sarukkai, Sekhar; Craw, James (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Federal High Performance and Communications (HPCC) Program continue to focus on R&D in a wide range of high performance computing and communications technologies. Using its accomplishments in the past four years as building blocks towards a Global Information Infrastructure (GII), an Implementation Plan that identifies six Strategic Focus Areas for R&D has been proposed. This white paper argues that a new generation of system software and programming tools must be developed to support these focus areas, so that the R&D we invest today can lead to technology pay-off a decade from now. The Global Computing Infrastructure (GCI) in the Year 2000 and Beyond would consists of thousands of powerful computing nodes connected via high-speed networks across the globe. Users will be able to obtain computing in formation services the GCI with the ease of using a plugging a toaster into the electrical outlet on the wall anywhere in the country. Developing and managing the GO requires performance prediction and monitoring capabilities that do not exist. Various accomplishments in this field today must be integrated and expanded to support this vision.

  20. Random phase-free computer-generated hologram.

    PubMed

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2015-04-01

    Addition of random phase to the object light is required in computer-generated holograms (CGHs) to widely diffuse the object light and to avoid its concentration on the CGH; however, this addition causes considerable speckle noise in the reconstructed image. For improving the speckle noise problem, techniques such as iterative phase retrieval algorithms and multi-random phase method are used; however, they are time consuming and are of limited effectiveness. Herein, we present a simple and computationally inexpensive method that drastically improves the image quality and reduces the speckle noise by multiplying the object light with the virtual convergence light. Feasibility of the proposed method is shown using simulations and optical reconstructions; moreover, we apply it to lens-less zoom-able holographic projection. The proposed method is useful for the speckle problems in holographic applications.

  1. A force-generating machinery maintains the spindle at the cell center during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Garzon-Coral, Carlos; Fantana, Horatiu A; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-05-27

    The position and orientation of the mitotic spindle is precisely regulated to ensure the accurate partition of the cytoplasm between daughter cells and the correct localization of the daughters within growing tissue. Using magnetic tweezers to perturb the position of the spindle in intact cells, we discovered a force-generating machinery that maintains the spindle at the cell center during metaphase and anaphase in one- and two-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The forces increase with the number of microtubules and are larger in smaller cells. The machinery is rigid enough to suppress thermal fluctuations to ensure precise localization of the mitotic spindle, yet compliant enough to allow molecular force generators to fine-tune the position of the mitotic spindle to facilitate asymmetric division. PMID:27230381

  2. A force-generating machinery maintains the spindle at the cell center during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Garzon-Coral, Carlos; Fantana, Horatiu A; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-05-27

    The position and orientation of the mitotic spindle is precisely regulated to ensure the accurate partition of the cytoplasm between daughter cells and the correct localization of the daughters within growing tissue. Using magnetic tweezers to perturb the position of the spindle in intact cells, we discovered a force-generating machinery that maintains the spindle at the cell center during metaphase and anaphase in one- and two-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The forces increase with the number of microtubules and are larger in smaller cells. The machinery is rigid enough to suppress thermal fluctuations to ensure precise localization of the mitotic spindle, yet compliant enough to allow molecular force generators to fine-tune the position of the mitotic spindle to facilitate asymmetric division.

  3. 27 CFR 19.634 - Computer-generated reports and transaction forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Computer-generated reports... Reports Filing Forms and Reports § 19.634 Computer-generated reports and transaction forms. TTB will accept computer-generated reports of operations and transaction forms made using a computer printer...

  4. 27 CFR 19.634 - Computer-generated reports and transaction forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Computer-generated reports... Reports Filing Forms and Reports § 19.634 Computer-generated reports and transaction forms. TTB will accept computer-generated reports of operations and transaction forms made using a computer printer...

  5. 27 CFR 19.634 - Computer-generated reports and transaction forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Computer-generated reports... Reports Filing Forms and Reports § 19.634 Computer-generated reports and transaction forms. TTB will accept computer-generated reports of operations and transaction forms made using a computer printer...

  6. 27 CFR 19.634 - Computer-generated reports and transaction forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Computer-generated reports... Reports Filing Forms and Reports § 19.634 Computer-generated reports and transaction forms. TTB will accept computer-generated reports of operations and transaction forms made using a computer printer...

  7. Molecular adaptations allow dynein to generate large collective forces inside cells.

    PubMed

    Rai, Arpan K; Rai, Ashim; Ramaiya, Avin J; Jha, Rupam; Mallik, Roop

    2013-01-17

    Many cellular processes require large forces that are generated collectively by multiple cytoskeletal motor proteins. Understanding how motors generate force as a team is therefore fundamentally important but is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate optical trapping at single-molecule resolution inside cells to quantify force generation by motor teams driving single phagosomes. In remarkable paradox, strong kinesins fail to work collectively, whereas weak and detachment-prone dyneins team up to generate large forces that tune linearly in strength and persistence with dynein number. Based on experimental evidence, we propose that leading dyneins in a load-carrying team take short steps, whereas trailing dyneins take larger steps. Dyneins in such a team bunch close together and therefore share load better to overcome low/intermediate loads. Up against higher load, dyneins "catch bond" tenaciously to the microtubule, but kinesins detach rapidly. Dynein therefore appears uniquely adapted to work in large teams, which may explain how this motor executes bewilderingly diverse cellular processes.

  8. The force generated by biological membranes on a polymer rod and its response: Statics and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, D. R.; Turner, M. S.

    2004-10-01

    We propose a theory for the force exerted by a fluctuating membrane on a polymer rod tip. Using statistical mechanical methods, the expression for the generated force is written in terms of the distance of the rod tip from the membrane "frame." We apply the theory in calculating the stall force and membrane displacement required to cease the growth of a growing fiber induced by membrane fluctuations, as well as the membrane force and membrane displacement required for rod/fiber buckling. We also consider the dynamics of a growing fiber tip under the influence of a fluctuation-induced membrane force. We discuss the importance of our results in various biological contexts. Finally, we present a method to simultaneously extract both the rigidity of the semiflexible rod and the force applied by, e.g., the membrane from the measurements of the bending fluctuations of the rod. Such a measurement of the force would give information about the thermodynamics of the rod polymerization that involves the usual Brownian ratchet mechanism.

  9. Transient forces generated by projectiles on variable quality mouthguards monitored by instrumented impact testing

    PubMed Central

    Warnet, L; Greasley, A

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—(a) To determine the force-time trace that occurs when a spring mounted simulated upper jaw is impacted; (b) to examine if mouthguards of variable quality have significant influence on such force-time traces; (c) to attempt to relate physical events to the profile of the force-time traces recorded. Methods—A simulated jaw, consisting of ceramic teeth inserted into a hard rubber arch reinforced with a composite jawbone, was fitted with various mouthguards as part of a previous round robin study. A clinical assessment distinguished good, bad, and poor mouthguards, and these were each fitted to the jaw, which was then submitted to instrumental impact tests under conditions expected to produce tooth fractures. The force-time trace was recorded for such impact events. Results—The spring mounting method caused two distinct peaks in the force-time trace. The initial one was related to inertia effects and showed an increase in magnitude with impactor velocity as expected. The second peak showed features that were related to the differences in the mouthguards selected. Conclusions—The use of a force washer within a conical ended impactor enabled force-time traces to be recorded during the impact of a spring mounted simulated jaw fitted with mouthguards of variable quality. The spring mounting system causes an initial inertial peak followed by a second peak once the spring mount has fully compressed. Good fitting guards, which keep most teeth intact, result in high stiffness targets that in turn generate high reaction forces in the impactor. If the spring mounting is omitted, the two peaks are combined to give even higher reaction forces. The force-time trace offers some potential for assessing both overall mouthguard performance and individual events during the impact sequence. Mouthguards with good retention to the jaw remained attached during the impact event and helped to preserve the structural integrity of the target. This in turn developed high

  10. Improvement of force factor of magnetostrictive vibration power generator for high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Shota Ueno, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Sotoshi

    2015-05-07

    We develop high power magnetostrictive vibration power generator for battery-free wireless electronics. The generator is based on a cantilever of parallel beam structure consisting of coil-wound Galfenol and stainless plates with permanent magnet for bias. Oscillating force exerted on the tip bends the cantilever in vibration yields stress variation of Galfenol plate, which causes flux variation and generates voltage on coil due to the law of induction. This generator has advantages over conventional, such as piezoelectric or moving magnet types, in the point of high efficiency, highly robust, and low electrical impedance. Our concern is the improvement of energy conversion efficiency dependent on the dimension. Especially, force factor, the conversion ratio of the electromotive force (voltage) on the tip velocity in vibration, has an important role in energy conversion process. First, the theoretical value of the force factor is formulated and then the validity was verified by experiments, where we compare four types of prototype with parameters of the dimension using 7.0 × 1.5 × 50 mm beams of Galfenol with 1606-turn wound coil. In addition, the energy conversion efficiency of the prototypes depending on load resistance was measured. The most efficient prototype exhibits the maximum instantaneous power of 0.73 W and energy of 4.7 mJ at a free vibration of frequency of 202 Hz in the case of applied force is 25 N. Further, it was found that energy conversion efficiency depends not only on the force factor but also on the damping (mechanical loss) of the vibration.

  11. Improvement of force factor of magnetostrictive vibration power generator for high efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Shota; Ueno, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Sotoshi

    2015-05-01

    We develop high power magnetostrictive vibration power generator for battery-free wireless electronics. The generator is based on a cantilever of parallel beam structure consisting of coil-wound Galfenol and stainless plates with permanent magnet for bias. Oscillating force exerted on the tip bends the cantilever in vibration yields stress variation of Galfenol plate, which causes flux variation and generates voltage on coil due to the law of induction. This generator has advantages over conventional, such as piezoelectric or moving magnet types, in the point of high efficiency, highly robust, and low electrical impedance. Our concern is the improvement of energy conversion efficiency dependent on the dimension. Especially, force factor, the conversion ratio of the electromotive force (voltage) on the tip velocity in vibration, has an important role in energy conversion process. First, the theoretical value of the force factor is formulated and then the validity was verified by experiments, where we compare four types of prototype with parameters of the dimension using 7.0 × 1.5 × 50 mm beams of Galfenol with 1606-turn wound coil. In addition, the energy conversion efficiency of the prototypes depending on load resistance was measured. The most efficient prototype exhibits the maximum instantaneous power of 0.73 W and energy of 4.7 mJ at a free vibration of frequency of 202 Hz in the case of applied force is 25 N. Further, it was found that energy conversion efficiency depends not only on the force factor but also on the damping (mechanical loss) of the vibration.

  12. Computer Generated Snapshot of Our Sun's Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    These banana-shaped loops are part of a computer-generated snapshot of our sun's magnetic field. The solar magnetic-field lines loop through the sun's corona, break through the sun's surface, and cornect regions of magnetic activity, such as sunspots. This image --part of a magnetic-field study of the sun by NASA's Allen Gary -- shows the outer portion (skins) of interconnecting systems of hot (2 million degrees Kelvin) coronal loops within and between two active magnetic regions on opposite sides of the sun's equator. The diameter of these coronal loops at their foot points is approximately the same size as the Earth's radius (about 6,000 kilometers).

  13. Computer-generated imagery for 4-D meteorological data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, William L.

    1986-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science and Engineering Center is developing animated stereo display terminals for use with McIDAS (Man-computer Interactive Data Access System). This paper describes image-generation techniques which have been developed to take maximum advantage of these terminals, integrating large quantities of four-dimensional meteorological data from balloon and satellite soundings, satellite images, Doppler and volumetric radar, and conventional surface observations. The images have been designed to use perspective, shading, hidden-surface removal, and transparency to augment the animation and stereo-display geometry. They create an illusion of a moving three-dimensional model of the atmosphere. This paper describes the design of these images and a number of rules of thumb for generating four-dimensional meteorological displays.

  14. Comparison of different simulation methods for multiplane computer generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kämpfe, Thomas; Hudelist, Florian; Waddie, Andrew J.; Taghizadeh, Mohammad R.; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tunnermann, Andreas

    2008-04-01

    Computer generated holograms (CGH) are used to transform an incoming light distribution into a desired output. Recently multi plane CGHs became of interest since they allow the combination of some well known design methods for thin CGHs with unique properties of thick holograms. Iterative methods like the iterative Fourier transform algorithm (IFTA) require an operator that transforms a required optical function into an actual physical structure (e.g. a height structure). Commonly the thin element approximation (TEA) is used for this purpose. Together with the angular spectrum of plane waves (APSW) it has also been successfully used in the case of multi plane CGHs. Of course, due to the approximations inherent in TEA, it can only be applied above a certain feature size. In this contribution we want to give a first comparison of the TEA & ASPW approach with simulation results from the Fourier modal method (FMM) for the example of one dimensional, pattern generating, multi plane CGH.

  15. Optimization of computer-generated binary holograms using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cojoc, Dan; Alexandrescu, Adrian

    1999-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to compare genetic algorithms against direct point oriented coding in the design of binary phase Fourier holograms, computer generated. These are used as fan-out elements for free space optical interconnection. Genetic algorithms are optimization methods which model the natural process of genetic evolution. The configuration of the hologram is encoded to form a chromosome. To start the optimization, a population of different chromosomes randomly generated is considered. The chromosomes compete, mate and mutate until the best chromosome is obtained according to a cost function. After explaining the operators that are used by genetic algorithms, this paper presents two examples with 32 X 32 genes in a chromosome. The crossover type and the number of mutations are shown to be important factors which influence the convergence of the algorithm. GA is demonstrated to be a useful tool to design namely binary phase holograms of complicate structures.

  16. A parallel computational fluid dynamics unstructured grid generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Deborah E.

    1993-12-01

    This research addressed the development of a parallel computational fluid dynamics unstructured grid generator using Delaunay triangulation. The generator is applied to simple elliptical and cylindrical two-dimensional bodies. The methodologies used included Watson's point insertion algorithm, Holmes and Snyder's point creation algorithm, a discretized surface definition, Anderson's clustering function, and a Laplacian smoother. The first version of the software involved a processor boundary exchange at the end of each iteration with no inter-processor communications during the iterations. The second version used inter-processor communication during each iteration instead of the boundary exchange. Version 1 demonstrated a speedup of 1.8 for some portions of the code, but proved to be unscalable for more than two nodes due to the interdependency of the triangular elements. The results of Version 2 were similar. Two distribution methodologies, a simple 360-degree distribution and recursive spectral bisection (RSB), were examined. For the initial grid distribution, the distribution generated by the RSB code would be similar to the distribution generated by the 360-degree methodology and would require significantly more time to execute.

  17. Computation of trunk muscle forces, spinal loads and stability in whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazrgari, B.; Shirazi-Adl, A.; Kasra, M.

    2008-12-01

    Whole-body vibration has been indicated as a risk factor in back disorders. Proper prevention and treatment management, however, requires a sound knowledge of associated muscle forces and loads on the spine. Previous trunk model studies have either neglected or over-simplified the trunk redundancy with time-varying unknown muscle forces. Trunk stability has neither been addressed. A novel iterative dynamic kinematics-driven approach was employed to evaluate muscle forces, spinal loads and system stability in a seated subject under a random vertical base excitation with ˜±1 g peak acceleration contents. This iterative approach satisfied equations of motion in all directions/levels while accounting for the nonlinear passive resistance of the ligamentous spine. The effect of posture, co-activity in abdominal muscles and changes in buttocks stiffness were also investigated. The computed vertical accelerations were in good agreement with measurements. The input base excitation, via inertial and muscle forces, substantially influenced spinal loads and system stability. The flexed posture in sitting increased the net moment, muscle forces and passive spinal loads while improving the trunk stability. Similarly, the introduction of low to moderate antagonistic coactivity in abdominal muscles increased the passive spinal loads and improved the spinal stability. A trade-off, hence, exists between lower muscle forces and spinal loads on one hand and more stable spine on the other. Base excitations with larger peak acceleration contents substantially increase muscle forces/spinal loads and, hence, the risk of injury.

  18. Computational study of the effect of side wall quality of the template on release force in nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tochino, Takamitsu; Uemura, Kimiaki; Michalowski, Marcin; Fujii, Kazuo; Yasuda, Masaaki; Kawata, Hiroaki; Rymuza, Zygmund; Hirai, Yoshihiko

    2015-06-01

    A template release force is one of the important factors for a low-defect template release process in nanoimprint lithography. In this work, the origin of the template release force is investigated by computational study of side wall quality characteristics such as the critical separation forces between the template and the resist interface, and the slope angle of the side wall. The critical separation forces in the normal and shear directions, which are related to adhesion and friction characteristics are experimentally evaluated for the computational study. The computational results show that the shear separation force, which is related to the static friction between the template surface and the resist, strongly affects the release force characteristics. On the other hand, the side wall slope angle also affects the template release force above the critical side wall slope angle. The computational results show good agreement with experimental results.

  19. Preparing the periphery for a subsequent behavior: motor neuronal activity during biting generates little force but prepares a retractor muscle to generate larger forces during swallowing in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; McManus, Jeffrey M; Cullins, Miranda J; Chiel, Hillel J

    2015-03-25

    Some behaviors occur in obligatory sequence, such as reaching before grasping an object. Can the earlier behavior serve to prepare the musculature for the later behavior? If it does, what is the underlying neural mechanism of the preparation? To address this question, we examined two feeding behaviors in the marine mollusk Aplysia californica, one of which must precede the second: biting and swallowing. Biting is an attempt to grasp food. When that attempt is successful, the animal immediately switches to swallowing to ingest food. The main muscle responsible for pulling food into the buccal cavity during swallowing is the I3 muscle, whose motor neurons B6, B9, and B3 have been previously identified. By performing recordings from these neurons in vivo in intact, behaving animals or in vitro in a suspended buccal mass preparation, we demonstrated that the frequencies and durations of these motor neurons increased from biting to swallowing. Using the physiological patterns of activation to drive these neurons intracellularly, we further demonstrated that activating them using biting-like frequencies and durations, either alone or in combination, generated little or no force in the I3 muscle. When biting-like patterns preceded swallowing-like patterns, however, the forces during the subsequent swallowing-like patterns were significantly enhanced. Sequences of swallowing-like patterns, either with these neurons alone or in combination, further enhanced forces in the I3 muscle. These results suggest a novel mechanism for enhancing force production in a muscle, and may be relevant to understanding motor control in vertebrates.

  20. Computer-generated holograms allowing 360-degree viewing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yuji; Kashiwagi, Akifumi; Murarya, Yoshimi

    2007-02-01

    Holograms that is allowing 360-degree viewing such as cylindrical holograms, show us 3D images with motion parallax and look-around property. Especially, full parallax holograms - not multiplex holograms - make reproductions with an impressive 3-D feeling. However, it has not been realized by a computer-generated hologram, because it takes huge amount of time to calculate a fringe pattern by a PC. To improve the calculation time, we have studied two types of computer-generated holograms allowing 360-degree viewing: cylindrical holograms and prismatic holograms. A prismatic hologram consists of some plates, and it takes not so much time to synthesize the hologram on each plate, because there are some fast calculation methods on planar shape hologram. For the example of the prismatic holograms, we made decagonal prismatic holograms that consist of 10 plates. On the other hand, a fast calculation method of cylindrical-holograms has been proposed, theoretically. We have implemented the method and verified the efficiency of the method. Both calculated fringe patterns were printed on transparent sheets and were carried out experiments of reconstruction. As the results, the holograms show us 3D images of objects at the center of the hologram. A viewer can see the 3D objects from 360-degree by both eyes. In this paper, we discuss the methods and experimental results.

  1. Automatic GROMACS topology generation and comparisons of force fields for solvation free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Lundborg, Magnus; Lindahl, Erik

    2015-01-22

    Free energy calculation has long been an important goal for molecular dynamics simulation and force field development, but historically it has been challenged by limited performance, accuracy, and creation of topologies for arbitrary small molecules. This has made it difficult to systematically compare different sets of parameters to improve existing force fields, but in the past few years several authors have developed increasingly automated procedures to generate parameters for force fields such as Amber, CHARMM, and OPLS. Here, we present a new framework that enables fully automated generation of GROMACS topologies for any of these force fields and an automated setup for parallel adaptive optimization of high-throughput free energy calculation by adjusting lambda point placement on the fly. As a small example of this automated pipeline, we have calculated solvation free energies of 50 different small molecules using the GAFF, OPLS-AA, and CGenFF force fields and four different water models, and by including the often neglected polarization costs, we show that the common charge models are somewhat underpolarized.

  2. Computational modeling of healing: an application of the material force method.

    PubMed

    Kuhl, E; Steinmann, P

    2004-06-01

    The basic aim of the present contribution is the qualitative simulation of healing phenomena typically encountered in hard and soft tissue mechanics. The mechanical framework is provided by the theory of open system thermodynamics, which will be formulated in the spatial as well as in the material motion context. While the former typically aims at deriving the density and the spatial motion deformation field in response to given spatial forces, the latter will be applied to determine the material forces in response to a given density and material deformation field. We derive a general computational framework within the finite element context that will serve to evaluate both the spatial and the material motion problem. However, once the spatial motion problem has been solved, the solution of the material motion problem represents a mere post-processing step and is thus extremely cheap from a computational point of view. The underlying algorithm will be elaborated systematically by means of two prototype geometries subjected to three different representative loading scenarios, tension, torsion, and bending. Particular focus will be dedicated to the discussion of the additional information provided by the material force method. Since the discrete material node point forces typically point in the direction of potential material deposition, they can be interpreted as a driving force for the healing mechanism.

  3. Similar scaling of contralateral and ipsilateral cortical responses during graded unimanual force generation.

    PubMed

    Derosière, G; Alexandre, F; Bourdillon, N; Mandrick, K; Ward, T E; Perrey, S

    2014-01-15

    Hemibody movements are strongly considered as being under the control of the contralateral hemisphere of the cerebral cortex. However, some neuroimaging studies have found a bilateral activation of either the primary sensori-motor (SM1) areas or the rostral prefrontal cortex (PFC), during unimanual tasks. More than just bilateral, the activation of these areas was found to be symmetrical in some studies. However, the symmetrical response remains strongly controversial notably for handgrip force generations. We therefore aimed to examine the bilateral SM1 and rostral PFC area activations in response to graded submaximal force generation during a unilateral handgrip task. Fifteen healthy subjects performed 6 levels of force (ranging from 5 to 50% of MVC) during a handgrip task. We concomitantly measured the activation of bilateral SM1 and rostral PFC areas through near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the bilateral flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) muscles. Symmetrical activation was found over the SM1 areas for all the investigated levels of force. At the highest level of force (i.e., 50% of MVC), the EMG of the passive FDS increased significantly and the ipsilateral rostral PFC activation was found more intense than the corresponding contralateral rostral PFC activation. We suggest that the visuo-guided control of force levels during a handgrip task requires the cross-talk from ipsi- to contralateral SM1 to cope for the relative complexity of the task, similar to that which occurs during complex sequential finger movement. We also propose alternative explanations for the observed symmetrical SM1 activation including (i) the ipsilateral corticospinal tract and (ii) interhemispheric inhibition (IHI) mechanism. The increase in EMG activity over the passive FDS could be associated with a release of IHI at 50% of MVC. Finally, our results suggest that the greater ipsilateral (right) rostral PFC activation may reflect the

  4. Effect of exhaustive incremental treadmill effort on force generation repeatability in biathletes.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębska, Agnieszka D; Błacha, Ryszard

    2014-01-01

    The authors examined how force generation repeatability changes as the result of incremental maximal test to volitional exhaustion by well-trained (VO2/kg [mL · kg(-1) · min(-1)] 62.55 ± 5.27) individuals. 13 young biathletes (18.9 ± 1.7 years) performed isometric maximum voluntary contraction (IMVC) and submaximal targeted (98N) pushes against the force transducers by arms: elbow extension (EE), elbow flexion (EF) and legs: knee extensions (KE) in pre- and posttest conditions after incremental exhaustive test performed on treadmill. IMVC did not differ significantly between pre and posttest conditions for upper and statistically decrease in lower extremities measurements (p <.01). The mean force of 10 submaximal targeted force productions (F(mean); N) is similar for pre- and posttest measurements. Standard deviation of F(mean) (Fsd; N) and coefficient variation (CV;%) decrease statistically in elbows flexion p <.02 but not extension. The reduction of force repetition accuracy in left knee extension was noticed (p <.01). The fatigue induced by incremental running test decreases a magnitude of force production variability in specifically trained muscle groups in biathletes.

  5. Running on water: Three-dimensional force generation by basilisk lizards

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, S. Tonia; Lauder, George V.

    2004-01-01

    Water provides a unique challenge for legged locomotion because it readily yields to any applied force. Previous studies have shown that static stability during locomotion is possible only when the center of mass remains within a theoretical region of stability. Running across a highly yielding surface could move the center of mass beyond the edges of the region of stability, potentially leading to tripping or falling. Yet basilisk lizards are proficient water runners, regularly dashing across bodies of water to evade predators. We present here direct measurements of time-averaged force produced by juvenile plumed basilisk lizards (Basiliscus plumifrons) while running across water. By using digital particle image velocimetry to visualize fluid flow induced by foot movement, we show that sufficient support force is generated for a lizard to run across water and that novel strategies are also required to run across a highly yielding surface. Juvenile basilisk lizards produce greatest support and propulsive forces during the first half of the step, when the foot moves primarily vertically downwards into the water; they also produce large transverse reaction forces that change from medial (79% body weight) to lateral (37% body weight) throughout the step. These forces may act to dynamically stabilize the lizards during water running. Our results give insight into the mechanics of how basilisk lizards run across water and, on a broader scale, provide a conceptual basis for how locomotor surface properties can challenge established rules for the mechanics of legged locomotion. PMID:15550546

  6. Endoplasmic filaments generate the motive force for rotational streaming in Nitella.

    PubMed

    Allen, N S

    1974-10-01

    The streaming endoplasm of characean cells has been shown to contain previously unreported endoplasmic filaments along which bending waves are observed under the light microscope using special techniques. The bending waves are similar to those propagated along sperm tails causing propulsion of sperm. In Nitella there is reason to believe that nearly all of the filaments are anchored in the cortex and that their beating propels the endoplasm in which they are suspended. This hypothesis is supported by calculations in which typical and average wave parameters have been inserted into the classical hydrodynamic equations derived for sperm tail bending waves. These calculations come within an order of magnitude of predicting the velocity of streaming and they show that waves of the character described, propagated along an estimated 52 m of endoplasmic filaments per cell, must generate a total motive force per cell within less than an order of magnitude of the forces measured experimentally by others. If we assume that undulating filaments produce the force driving the endoplasm, then the method described for measuring the motive force could lead to a lower than actual value for the motive force, since both centrifugation and vacuolar perfusion would reverse the orientation of some filaments. Observations of the initiation of particle translation in association with the filaments suggest that particle transport and wave propagation, which occur at the same velocity, may both be dependent on the same process. The possibility that some form of contractility provides the motive force for filament flection and particle transport is discussed.

  7. ENDOPLASMIC FILAMENTS GENERATE THE MOTIVE FORCE FOR ROTATIONAL STREAMING IN NITELLA

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Nina Strömgren

    1974-01-01

    The streaming endoplasm of characean cells has been shown to contain previously unreported endoplasmic filaments along which bending waves are observed under the light microscope using special techniques. The bending waves are similar to those propagated along sperm tails causing propulsion of sperm. In Nitella there is reason to believe that nearly all of the filaments are anchored in the cortex and that their beating propels the endoplasm in which they are suspended. This hypothesis is supported by calculations in which typical and average wave parameters have been inserted into the classical hydrodynamic equations derived for sperm tail bending waves. These calculations come within an order of magnitude of predicting the velocity of streaming and they show that waves of the character described, propagated along an estimated 52 m of endoplasmic filaments per cell, must generate a total motive force per cell within less than an order of magnitude of the forces measured experimentally by others. If we assume that undulating filaments produce the force driving the endoplasm, then the method described for measuring the motive force could lead to a lower than actual value for the motive force, since both centrifugation and vacuolar perfusion would reverse the orientation of some filaments. Observations of the initiation of particle translation in association with the filaments suggest that particle transport and wave propagation, which occur at the same velocity, may both be dependent on the same process. The possibility that some form of contractility provides the motive force for filament flection and particle transport is discussed. PMID:4608919

  8. On the numerical computation of nonlinear force-free magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Chang, H. M.; Hagyard, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed to extrapolate nonlinear force-free magnetic fields from a source surface, given the proper boundary conditions. The results of this work; describing the mathematical formalism that was developed, the numerical techniques employed, and the stability criteria developed for these numerical schemes are presented. An analytical solution is used for a test case; the results show that the computational accuracy for the case of a nonlinear force-free magnetic field was on the order of a few percent ( 5%).

  9. Virtual photons in imaginary time: Computing exact Casimir forces via standard numerical electromagnetism techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Alejandro; Ibanescu, Mihai; Joannopoulos, J. D.; Johnson, Steven G.; Iannuzzi, Davide

    2007-09-15

    We describe a numerical method to compute Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries, for arbitrary dielectric and metallic materials, with arbitrary accuracy (given sufficient computational resources). Our approach, based on well-established integration of the mean stress tensor evaluated via the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, is designed to directly exploit fast methods developed for classical computational electromagnetism, since it only involves repeated evaluation of the Green's function for imaginary frequencies (equivalently, real frequencies in imaginary time). We develop the approach by systematically examining various formulations of Casimir forces from the previous decades and evaluating them according to their suitability for numerical computation. We illustrate our approach with a simple finite-difference frequency-domain implementation, test it for known geometries such as a cylinder and a plate, and apply it to new geometries. In particular, we show that a pistonlike geometry of two squares sliding between metal walls, in both two and three dimensions with both perfect and realistic metallic materials, exhibits a surprising nonmonotonic ''lateral'' force from the walls.

  10. Self-motion perception: assessment by computer-generated animations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. E.; Harm, D. L.; Sandoz, G. R.; Skinner, N. C.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this research is more precise description of adaptation to sensory rearrangements, including microgravity, by development of improved procedures for assessing spatial orientation perception. Thirty-six subjects reported perceived self-motion following exposure to complex inertial-visual motion. Twelve subjects were assigned to each of 3 perceptual reporting procedures: (a) animation movie selection, (b) written report selection and (c) verbal report generation. The question addressed was: do reports produced by these procedures differ with respect to complexity and reliability? Following repeated (within-day and across-day) exposures to 4 different "motion profiles," subjects either (a) selected movies presented on a laptop computer, or (b) selected written descriptions from a booklet, or (c) generated self-motion verbal descriptions that corresponded most closely with their motion experience. One "complexity" and 2 reliability "scores" were calculated. Contrary to expectations, reliability and complexity scores were essentially equivalent for the animation movie selection and written report selection procedures. Verbal report generation subjects exhibited less complexity than did subjects in the other conditions and their reports were often ambiguous. The results suggest that, when selecting from carefully written descriptions and following appropriate training, people may be better able to describe their self-motion experience with words than is usually believed.

  11. The effects of learner-generated representations versus computer-generated representations on physics problem solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Gwyneth A.

    In this study, multiple external representations and Generative Learning Theory were used to design instruction that would facilitate physics learning. Specifically, the study looks at the learning differences that may occur when students are engaged in generating a graphical representation as compared to being presented with a computer-generated graph. It is hypothesized that by generating the graphical representation students will be able to overcome obstacles to integration and determine the relationships involved within a representation. In doing so, students will build a more complete mental model of the situation and be able to more readily use this information in transfer situations, thus improving their problem solving ability. Though the results of this study do not lend strong support for the hypothesis, the results are still informative and encouraging. Though several of the obstacles associated with learning from multiple representations such as cognitive load were cause for concern, those students with appropriate prior knowledge and familiarity with graphical representations were able to benefit from the generative activity. This finding indicates that if the issues are directly addressed within instruction, it may be that all students may be able to benefit from being actively engaged in generating representations.

  12. Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Birman, Kenneth; Ganesh, Lakshmi; Renessee, Robbert van; Ferris, Michael; Hofmann, Andreas; Williams, Brian; Sztipanovits, Janos; Hemingway, Graham; University, Vanderbilt; Bose, Anjan; Stivastava, Anurag; Grijalva, Santiago; Grijalva, Santiago; Ryan, Sarah M.; McCalley, James D.; Woodruff, David L.; Xiong, Jinjun; Acar, Emrah; Agrawal, Bhavna; Conn, Andrew R.; Ditlow, Gary; Feldmann, Peter; Finkler, Ulrich; Gaucher, Brian; Gupta, Anshul; Heng, Fook-Luen; Kalagnanam, Jayant R; Koc, Ali; Kung, David; Phan, Dung; Singhee, Amith; Smith, Basil

    2011-10-05

    The April 2011 DOE workshop, 'Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid', was the culmination of a year-long process to bring together some of the Nation's leading researchers and experts to identify computational challenges associated with the operation and planning of the electric power system. The attached papers provide a journey into these experts' insights, highlighting a class of mathematical and computational problems relevant for potential power systems research. While each paper defines a specific problem area, there were several recurrent themes. First, the breadth and depth of power system data has expanded tremendously over the past decade. This provides the potential for new control approaches and operator tools that can enhance system efficiencies and improve reliability. However, the large volume of data poses its own challenges, and could benefit from application of advances in computer networking and architecture, as well as data base structures. Second, the computational complexity of the underlying system problems is growing. Transmitting electricity from clean, domestic energy resources in remote regions to urban consumers, for example, requires broader, regional planning over multi-decade time horizons. Yet, it may also mean operational focus on local solutions and shorter timescales, as reactive power and system dynamics (including fast switching and controls) play an increasingly critical role in achieving stability and ultimately reliability. The expected growth in reliance on variable renewable sources of electricity generation places an exclamation point on both of these observations, and highlights the need for new focus in areas such as stochastic optimization to accommodate the increased uncertainty that is occurring in both planning and operations. Application of research advances in algorithms (especially related to optimization techniques and uncertainty quantification) could accelerate power system software tool

  13. Hilbert phase dynamometry (HPD) for real-time measurement of cell generated forces (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Li, Yanfen; Bhaduri, Basanta; Majeed, Hassaan; Dupenloup, Paul; Levine, Alex; Kilian, Kristopher A.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    Traction force microscopy is the most widely used technique for studying the forces exerted by cells on deformable substrates. However, the method is computationally intense and cells have to be detached from the substrate prior to measuring the displacement map. We have developed a new method, referred to as Hilbert phase dynamometry (HPD), which yields real-time force fields and, simultaneously, cell dry mass and growth information. HPD operates by imaging cells on a deformable substrate that is patterned with a grid of fluorescent proteins. A Hilbert transform is used to extract the phase map associated with the grid deformation, which provides the displacement field. By combining this information with substrate stiffness, an elasticity model was developed to measure forces exerted by cells with high spatial resolution. In our study, we prepared 10kPa gels and them with a 2-D grid of FITC-conjugated fibrinogen/fibronectin mixture, an extracellular matrix protein to which cells adhere. We cultured undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), and MSCs that were in the process of undergoing adipogenesis and osteogenesis. The cells were measured over the course of 24 hours using Spatial Light Interference Microscopy (SLIM) and wide-field epi-fluorescence microscopy allowing us to simultaneously measure cell growth and the forces exerted by the cells on the substrate.

  14. External forces and torques generated by the brachiating white-handed gibbon (Hylobates lar).

    PubMed

    Chang, Y H; Bertram, J E; Lee, D V

    2000-10-01

    We compared the kinetics of brachiation to bipedal walking and running. Gibbons use pectoral limbs in continuous contact with their overhead support at slow speeds, but exhibit aerial phases (or ricochetal brachiation) at faster speeds. This basic interaction between limb and support suggests some analogy to walking and running. We quantified the forces in three axes and torque about the vertical axis generated by a brachiating White-handed gibbon (Hylobates lar) and compared them with bipedal locomotion. Handholds oriented perpendicular to the direction of travel (as in ladder rungs) were spaced 0.80, 1.20, 1.60, 1.72, 1.95, and 2.25 m apart. The gibbon proportionally matched forward velocity to stride length. Handhold reaction forces resembled ground reaction forces of running humans except that the order of horizontal braking and propulsion were reversed. Peak vertical forces in brachiation increased with speed as in bipedal locomotion. In contrast to bipedalism, however, peak horizontal forces changed little with speed. Gait transition occurred within the same relative velocity range as the walk-run transition in bipeds (Froude number = 0.3-0.6). We oriented handholds parallel to the direction of travel (as in a continuous pole) at 0.80 and 1.60 m spacings. In ricochetal brachiation, the gibbon generated greater torque with handholds oriented perpendicular as opposed to parallel to the direction of travel. Handhold orientation did not affect peak forces. The similarities and differences between brachiation and bipedalism offer insight into the ubiquity of mechanical principles guiding all limbed locomotion and the distinctiveness of brachiation as a unique mode of locomotion.

  15. Contractile forces generated by striae distensae fibroblasts embedded in collagen lattices.

    PubMed

    Viennet, Céline; Bride, Jacqueline; Armbruster, Vincent; Aubin, François; Gabiot, Anne-Claude; Gharbi, Tijani; Humbert, Philippe

    2005-07-01

    Striae distensae are characterized by linear, smooth bands of atrophic-appearing skin that are reddish at first and finally white. They are due to stretching of the skin, as in rapid weight gain, or mechanical stress, as in weight lifting. The pathogenesis of striae distensae is unknown but probably relates to changes in the fibroblast phenotype. In order to characterize striae distensae fibroblasts, alpha-smooth muscle actin expression and contractile forces were studied. Five healthy women with early erythematous striae and five healthy women with older striae were selected. Paired biopsies were taken from the center of lesional striae and adjacent normal skin. Fibroblasts were obtained by an explant technique and expanded in vitro in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. Contractile forces generated by fibroblasts in collagen lattices were measured with the Glasbox device developed in our laboratory. Alpha-smooth muscle actin expression was studied by immunofluorescence labeling of cells and by flow cytometry. Fibroblasts from early striae distensae were the richest cells in alpha-smooth muscle actin filaments and generated the highest contractile forces. Their peak contractile force was 26% greater than normal fibroblasts. There was a 150% higher level of alpha-smooth muscle actin content in fibroblasts from early striae distensae compared with fibroblasts from normal skin. In contrast, there was no significant difference in force generation between old striae fibroblasts and normal fibroblasts with cells expressing no alpha-smooth muscle actin. The contractile properties of fibroblasts from striae distensae varies depending on the stage of the disease. In early striae distensae, fibroblasts acquire a more contractile phenotype, corresponding to that of myofibroblasts.

  16. Reconfigurable optical interconnections via dynamic computer-generated holograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang (Inventor); Zhou, Shaomin (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A system is proposed for optically providing one-to-many irregular interconnections, and strength-adjustable many-to-many irregular interconnections which may be provided with strengths (weights) w(sub ij) using multiple laser beams which address multiple holograms and means for combining the beams modified by the holograms to form multiple interconnections, such as a cross-bar switching network. The optical means for interconnection is based on entering a series of complex computer-generated holograms on an electrically addressed spatial light modulator for real-time reconfigurations, thus providing flexibility for interconnection networks for largescale practical use. By employing multiple sources and holograms, the number of interconnection patterns achieved is increased greatly.

  17. Reconfigurable Optical Interconnections Via Dynamic Computer-Generated Holograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang (Inventor); Zhou, Shao-Min (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A system is presented for optically providing one-to-many irregular interconnections, and strength-adjustable many-to-many irregular interconnections which may be provided with strengths (weights) w(sub ij) using multiple laser beams which address multiple holograms and means for combining the beams modified by the holograms to form multiple interconnections, such as a cross-bar switching network. The optical means for interconnection is based on entering a series of complex computer-generated holograms on an electrically addressed spatial light modulator for real-time reconfigurations, thus providing flexibility for interconnection networks for large-scale practical use. By employing multiple sources and holograms, the number of interconnection patterns achieved is increased greatly.

  18. ROM type holographic disk using computer generated hologram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimoto, K.; Kubota, E.; Watanabe, D.; Yamaguchi, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Nakajima, M.; Kobayashi, T.

    2006-05-01

    ROM type holographic disk that can be made by the optical disk cutting method and has compatibility with the recordable holographic memory was studied. Computer generated hologram data was recorded on the master disk by bit-by-bit recording. Then, after making a stamper, a holographic disk was made by the injection molding. To this holographic disk, it was confirmed that the data reproduction of low bit error rate is possible. In order to enable data reproduction by using a continuously rotating disk, the recorded data was made in such a way that random phase is given to the reproduced data. It became possible to distribute data to the entire area of the hologram and it enabled the reproduction of all the data of the hologram by reproducing a part of the hologram. This made it possible to reproduce data with a continuously rotating disk. Furthermore, the simulation showed that multiplex recoding became possible by the aperture multiplexing.

  19. Beam steering by computer generated hologram for optical switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Keita; Suzuki, Kenya; Yamaguchi, Joji

    2016-02-01

    We describe a computer generated hologram (CGH) method for application to a multiple input and multiple output (MxN) optical switch based on a liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS). The conventional MxN optical switch needs multiple spatial light modulations. However, the CGH method realizes an MxN optical switch simply with a one-time spatial light modulation, resulting in fewer optical elements and better cost efficiency. Moreover, the intrinsic loss of the proposed MxN switch resulting from beam splitting can be reduced by routing multiple signals with a single knob control, which is called a multi-pole multi-throw switch. In this paper, we demonstrate a 5x5 wavelength selective switch (WSS) and a 2-degree ROADM that we realized using the above CGH method. The experimental results indicate that these switches work well with a crosstalk of < -14.9 dB.

  20. Knowledge-based zonal grid generation for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Alison E.

    1988-01-01

    Automation of flow field zoning in two dimensions is an important step towards reducing the difficulty of three-dimensional grid generation in computational fluid dynamics. Using a knowledge-based approach makes sense, but problems arise which are caused by aspects of zoning involving perception, lack of expert consensus, and design processes. These obstacles are overcome by means of a simple shape and configuration language, a tunable zoning archetype, and a method of assembling plans from selected, predefined subplans. A demonstration system for knowledge-based two-dimensional flow field zoning has been successfully implemented and tested on representative aerodynamic configurations. The results show that this approach can produce flow field zonings that are acceptable to experts with differing evaluation criteria.

  1. Computation of Ion Drag Force and Charge on a Static Spherical Dust Grain in RF Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikkurthi, V. R.; Melzer, A.; Matyash, K.; Schneider, R.

    2008-09-07

    The ion drag force and charge on a spherical dust grain located in RF discharge plasma is computed using a 3-dimensional Particle-Particle Particle-Mesh (P3M) code. Our plasma model includes finite-size effects for dust grains and allows to self-consistently resolve the dust grain charging due to absorption of plasma electrons and ions. Ion drag and dust charge have been computed for various sizes of dust particles placed at various locations in the discharge. The results for ion drag have been compared with previous collisionless models and affect of collisions on drag has been discussed in detail.

  2. On the numerical computation of nonlinear force-free magnetic fields. [from solar photosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Sun, M. T.; Chang, H. M.; Hagyard, M. J.; Gary, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed to extrapolate nonlinear force-free magnetic fields from the photosphere, given the proper boundary conditions. This paper presents the results of this work, describing the mathematical formalism that was developed, the numerical techniques employed, and comments on the stability criteria and accuracy developed for these numerical schemes. An analytical solution is used for a benchmark test; the results show that the computational accuracy for the case of a nonlinear force-free magnetic field was on the order of a few percent (less than 5 percent). This newly developed scheme was applied to analyze a solar vector magnetogram, and the results were compared with the results deduced from the classical potential field method. The comparison shows that additional physical features of the vector magnetogram were revealed in the nonlinear force-free case.

  3. Another method to compute the thermodynamic Casimir force in lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenbusch, Martin

    2009-12-01

    We discuss a method that allows us to compute the thermodynamic Casimir force at a given temperature in lattice models by performing a single Monte Carlo simulation. It is analogous to the one used by de Forcrand and co-workers in the study of ‘t Hooft loops and the interface tension in SU(N) lattice gauge models in four dimensions. We test the method at the example of thin films in the XY universality class. In particular we simulate the improved two-component ϕ4 model on the simple cubic lattice. This allows us to compare with our previous study, where we have computed the Casimir force by numerically integrating energy densities over the inverse temperature.

  4. Intermolecular forces between low generation PAMAM dendrimer condensed DNA helices: role of cation architecture.

    PubMed

    An, Min; Parkin, Sean R; DeRouchey, Jason E

    2014-01-28

    In recent years, dendriplexes, complexes of cationic dendrimers with DNA, have become attractive DNA delivery vehicles due to their well-defined chemistries. To better understand the nature of the forces condensing dendriplexes, we studied low generation poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer-DNA complexes and compared them to comparably charged linear arginine peptides. Using osmotic stress coupled with X-ray scattering, we have investigated the effect of molecular chain architecture on DNA-DNA intermolecular forces that determine the net attraction and equilibrium interhelical distance within these polycation condensed DNA arrays. In order to compact DNA, linear cations are believed to bind in DNA grooves and to interact with the phosphate backbone of apposing helices. We have previously shown a length dependent attraction resulting in higher packaging densities with increasing charge for linear cations. Hyperbranched polycations, such as polycationic dendrimers, presumably would not be able to bind to DNA and correlate their charges in the same manner as linear cations. We show that attractive and repulsive force amplitudes in PAMAM-DNA assemblies display significantly different trends than comparably charged linear arginines resulting in lower DNA packaging densities with increasing PAMAM generation. The salt and pH dependencies of packaging in PAMAM dendrimer-DNA and linear arginine-DNA complexes were also investigated. Significant differences in the force curve behaviour and salt and pH sensitivities suggest that different binding modes may be present in DNA condensed by dendrimers when compared to linear polycations.

  5. Three-dimensional analysis of optical forces generated by an active tractor beam using radial polarization.

    PubMed

    Carretero, Luis; Acebal, Pablo; Blaya, Salvador

    2014-02-10

    We theoretically study the three-dimensional behavior of nanoparticles in an active optical conveyor. To do this, we solved the Langevin equation when the forces are generated by a focusing system at the near field. Analytical expressions for the optical forces generated by the optical conveyor were obtained by solving the Richards and Wolf vectorial diffraction integrals in an approximated form when a mask of two annular pupils is illuminated by a radially polarized Hermite-Gauss beam. Trajectories, in both the transverse plane and the longitudinal direction, are analyzed showing that the behavior of the optical conveyor can be optimized by conveniently choosing the configuration of the mask of the two annular pupils (inner and outer radius of the two rings) in order to trap and transport all particles at the focal plane. PMID:24663619

  6. NuSAP governs chromosome oscillation by facilitating the Kid-generated polar ejection force

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenyu; Xue, Chenyi; Yang, Qiaoyun; Low, Boon Chuan; Liou, Yih-Cherng

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrate cells, chromosomes oscillate to align precisely during metaphase. NuSAP, a microtubule-associated protein, plays a critical role in stabilizing spindle microtubules. In this study, we utilize 3D time-lapse live-cell imaging to monitor the role of NuSAP in chromosome oscillation and identify NuSAP as a novel regulator of the chromokinesin, Kid. Depletion of NuSAP significantly suppresses the amplitude and velocity of chromosome oscillation. We analyse the effects of NuSAP and Kid depletion in monopolar and bipolar cells with or without kinetochore microtubule depletion. Twelve postulated conditions are deciphered to reveal the contribution of NuSAP to the polar force generated at kinetochore microtubules and to the regulation of the polar ejection force generated by Kid, thus revealing a pivotal role of NuSAP in chromosome oscillation. PMID:26839278

  7. Computer Folding of RNA Tetraloops: Identification of Key Force Field Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kührová, Petra; Best, Robert B; Bottaro, Sandro; Bussi, Giovanni; Šponer, Jiří; Otyepka, Michal; Banáš, Pavel

    2016-09-13

    The computer-aided folding of biomolecules, particularly RNAs, is one of the most difficult challenges in computational structural biology. RNA tetraloops are fundamental RNA motifs playing key roles in RNA folding and RNA-RNA and RNA-protein interactions. Although state-of-the-art Molecular Dynamics (MD) force fields correctly describe the native state of these tetraloops as a stable free-energy basin on the microsecond time scale, enhanced sampling techniques reveal that the native state is not the global free energy minimum, suggesting yet unidentified significant imbalances in the force fields. Here, we tested our ability to fold the RNA tetraloops in various force fields and simulation settings. We employed three different enhanced sampling techniques, namely, temperature replica exchange MD (T-REMD), replica exchange with solute tempering (REST2), and well-tempered metadynamics (WT-MetaD). We aimed to separate problems caused by limited sampling from those due to force-field inaccuracies. We found that none of the contemporary force fields is able to correctly describe folding of the 5'-GAGA-3' tetraloop over a range of simulation conditions. We thus aimed to identify which terms of the force field are responsible for this poor description of TL folding. We showed that at least two different imbalances contribute to this behavior, namely, overstabilization of base-phosphate and/or sugar-phosphate interactions and underestimated stability of the hydrogen bonding interaction in base pairing. The first artifact stabilizes the unfolded ensemble, while the second one destabilizes the folded state. The former problem might be partially alleviated by reparametrization of the van der Waals parameters of the phosphate oxygens suggested by Case et al., while in order to overcome the latter effect we suggest local potentials to better capture hydrogen bonding interactions.

  8. Force Generation by Microtubule Assembly/Disassembly in Mitosis and Related Movements

    PubMed Central

    Inoué, Shinya; Salmon, Edward D.

    1995-01-01

    In this article, we review the dynamic nature of the filaments (microtubules) that make up the labile fibers of the mitotic spindle and asters, we discuss the roles that assembly and disassembly of microtubules play in mitosis, and we consider how such assembling and disassembling polymer filaments can generate forces that are utilized by the living cell in mitosis and related movements. Images PMID:8590794

  9. Generation of a strong core-centering force in a submillimeter compound droplet system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.C.; Feng, I.; Elleman, D.D.; Wang, T.G.; Young, A.T.

    1981-01-01

    By amplitude-modulating the driving voltage of an acoustic levitating apparatus, a strong core-centering force can be generated in a submillimeter compound droplet system suspended by the radiation pressure in a gaseous medium. Depending on the acoustic characteristics of the droplet system, it has been found that the technique can be utilized advantageously in the multiple-layer coating of an inertial-confinement-fusion pellet.

  10. Digital computer program for generating dynamic turbofan engine models (DIGTEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniele, C. J.; Krosel, S. M.; Szuch, J. R.; Westerkamp, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes DIGTEM, a digital computer program that simulates two spool, two-stream turbofan engines. The turbofan engine model in DIGTEM contains steady-state performance maps for all of the components and has control volumes where continuity and energy balances are maintained. Rotor dynamics and duct momentum dynamics are also included. Altogether there are 16 state variables and state equations. DIGTEM features a backward-differnce integration scheme for integrating stiff systems. It trims the model equations to match a prescribed design point by calculating correction coefficients that balance out the dynamic equations. It uses the same coefficients at off-design points and iterates to a balanced engine condition. Transients can also be run. They are generated by defining controls as a function of time (open-loop control) in a user-written subroutine (TMRSP). DIGTEM has run on the IBM 370/3033 computer using implicit integration with time steps ranging from 1.0 msec to 1.0 sec. DIGTEM is generalized in the aerothermodynamic treatment of components.

  11. FtsZ in Bacterial Cytokinesis: Cytoskeleton and Force Generator All in One†

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Harold P.; Anderson, David E.; Osawa, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    Summary: FtsZ, a bacterial homolog of tubulin, is well established as forming the cytoskeletal framework for the cytokinetic ring. Recent work has shown that purified FtsZ, in the absence of any other division proteins, can assemble Z rings when incorporated inside tubular liposomes. Moreover, these artificial Z rings can generate a constriction force, demonstrating that FtsZ is its own force generator. Here we review light microscope observations of how Z rings assemble in bacteria. Assembly begins with long-pitch helices that condense into the Z ring. Once formed, the Z ring can transition to short-pitch helices that are suggestive of its structure. FtsZ assembles in vitro into short protofilaments that are ∼30 subunits long. We present models for how these protofilaments might be further assembled into the Z ring. We discuss recent experiments on assembly dynamics of FtsZ in vitro, with particular attention to how two regulatory proteins, SulA and MinC, inhibit assembly. Recent efforts to develop antibacterial drugs that target FtsZ are reviewed. Finally, we discuss evidence of how FtsZ generates a constriction force: by protofilament bending into a curved conformation. PMID:21119015

  12. Grid generation and flow computation about a Martian entry vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, J. E.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1990-01-01

    A number of vehicles are currently being proposed for a manned mission to Mars. One of these vehicles has a modified blunt-nosed cone configuration. Experimental results were obtained for this vehicle in 1968. They show lift-over-drag ratios comparable to those needed for Mars entry. Computations are performed to verify the earlier results and to further describe the flight characteristics of this vehicle. An analytical method is used to define the surface of this vehicle. A single-block volume grid is generated around the vehicle using the algebraic Two-Boundary Grid Generation algorithm (TBGG) and transfinite interpolation. Euler solutions are then obtained from a Langley Aerodynamic Upward Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) at Mach 6.0 and angles of attack of 0, 6, and 12 deg. The lift coefficient determined from the LAURA code agree very well with the experimental results. The drag and pitching moment coefficients, however, are underestimated by the code since viscous effects are not considered. Contour plots of the flowfield show no evidence of separation for angles of attack up to 12 deg.

  13. R5FORCE/MOD3s: A program to compute fluid induced forces using hydrodynamic output from the RELAP5/MOD3 code

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, J.C.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes an update of a computer program which operates on hydrodynamic output from the RELAPS/MOD3 program and computes piping hydrodynamic force/time histories for input into various structural analysis codes. This version of the program is compatible with RELAPS/MOD3 and the Micro Vax computing environment whereas an earlier version of the program was compatible with RELAPS/MOD1. The report describes the force calculation theory, showing the development of a general force equation and the solution of this equation within the RELAPS output structure. To illustrate the calculational method and provide results for discussion, a sample problem is presented. A detailed user manual for the computer program is included as an appendix. 10 refs., 17 figs.

  14. Studies in computational geometry motivated by mesh generation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.D.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis sprawls over most of discrete and computational geometry. There are four loose bodies of theory developed. (1) A quantitative and algorithmic theory of crossing number and crossing-free line segment graphs in the plane. As five applications of this theory: the author disproves two long - standing conjectures on the crossing number of the complete and complete bipartite graphs, he presents the first exponential algorithm for planar minimum Steiner tree, and the first subexponential algorithms for planar traveling salesman tour and optimum triangulation, and he presents an algorithm for generating all non-isomorphic V-vertex planar graphs, in O(V{sup 3)}time per graph, using O(V) total workspace. (2) Mesh generation, and the triangulation of polytopes: He has the strongest bounds on the number of d-simplices required to triangulate the d-cube, and new triangulation methods in the plane. A quantitative and qualitative - and practical - theory of finite element mesh quality suggest a new, simple strategy for generating good meshes. (3) The theory of geometrical graphs on N point sites in d-space. This subsumes many new results in: geometrical probability, sphere packing, and extremal configurations. An array of new multidimensional search date structures are used to devise fast algorithms for construction many geometrical graphs. (4) Useful new results concerning the mensuration and structure of d-polytopes. In particular he extensively generalizes the famous formula of Heron and Alexandria (75 AD), for the area of a triangle, and he presents the first linear time congruence algorithm for 3 -dimensional polyhedra. He closes with the largest bibliography of the field, containing over 3000 references.

  15. Fan interaction noise reduction using a wake generator: experiments and computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polacsek, C.; Desbois-Lavergne, F.

    2003-08-01

    A control grid (wake generator) aimed at reducing rotor-stator interaction modes in fan engines when mounted upstream of the rotor has been studied here. This device complements other active noise control systems currently proposed. The compressor model of the instrumented ONERA CERF-rig is used to simulate suitable conditions. The design of the grid is drafted out using semi-empirical models for wake and potential flow, and experimentally achieved. Cylindrical rods are able to generate a spinning mode of the same order and similar level as the interaction mode. Mounting the rods on a rotating ring allows for adjusting the phase of the control mode so that an 8 dB sound pressure level (SPL) reduction at the blade passing frequency is achieved when the two modes are out of phase. Experimental results are assessed by a numerical approach using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). A Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes 2-D solver, developed at ONERA, is used to provide the unsteady force components on blades and vanes required for acoustics. The loading noise source term of the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation is used to model the interaction noise between the sources, and an original coupling to a boundary element method (BEM) code is realized to take account of the inlet geometry effects on acoustic in-duct propagation. Calculations using the classical analytical the Green function of an infinite annular duct are also addressed. Simple formulations written in the frequency domain and expanded into modes are addressed and used to compute an in-duct interaction mode and to compare with the noise reduction obtained during the tests. A fairly good agreement between predicted and measured SPL is found when the inlet geometry effects are part of the solution (by coupling with the BEM). Furthermore, computed aerodynamic penalties due to the rods are found to be negligible. These results partly validate the computation chain and highlight the potential of the wake generator

  16. How muscle fiber lengths and velocities affect muscle force generation as humans walk and run at different speeds.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Edith M; Hamner, Samuel R; Seth, Ajay; Millard, Matthew; Delp, Scott L

    2013-06-01

    The lengths and velocities of muscle fibers have a dramatic effect on muscle force generation. It is unknown, however, whether the lengths and velocities of lower limb muscle fibers substantially affect the ability of muscles to generate force during walking and running. We examined this issue by developing simulations of muscle-tendon dynamics to calculate the lengths and velocities of muscle fibers from electromyographic recordings of 11 lower limb muscles and kinematic measurements of the hip, knee and ankle made as five subjects walked at speeds of 1.0-1.75 m s(-1) and ran at speeds of 2.0-5.0 m s(-1). We analyzed the simulated fiber lengths, fiber velocities and forces to evaluate the influence of force-length and force-velocity properties on force generation at different walking and running speeds. The simulations revealed that force generation ability (i.e. the force generated per unit of activation) of eight of the 11 muscles was significantly affected by walking or running speed. Soleus force generation ability decreased with increasing walking speed, but the transition from walking to running increased the force generation ability by reducing fiber velocities. Our results demonstrate the influence of soleus muscle architecture on the walk-to-run transition and the effects of muscle-tendon compliance on the plantarflexors' ability to generate ankle moment and power. The study presents data that permit lower limb muscles to be studied in unprecedented detail by relating muscle fiber dynamics and force generation to the mechanical demands of walking and running.

  17. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Hydrodynamic Force Acting on a Swimmer’S Hand in a Swimming Competition

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yohei; Hino, Takanori

    2013-01-01

    A stroke-analysis system based on a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation has been developed to evaluate the hydrodynamic forces acting on a swimmer’s hand. Using the present stroke-analysis system, a stroke technique of top swimmers can be recognized with regard to the hydrodynamic forces. The developed analysis system takes into account the effect of a transient stroke motion including acceleration and a curved stroke path without using assumptions such as a quasi-static approach. An unsteady Navier-Stokes solver based on an unstructured grid method is employed as the CFD method to calculate a viscous flow around a swimmer’s hand which can cope with the complicated geometry of hands. The CFD method is validated by comparison with experiments in steady-state and transient conditions. Following the validations, a stroke-analysis system is proposed, in which a hand moves in accordance with a stroke path measured by synchronized video cameras, and the fluid forces acting on the hand are computed with the CFD method. As a demonstration of the stroke-analysis system, two world class swimmers’ strokes in a race of 200 m freestyle are analyzed. The hydrodynamic forces acting on the hands of the top swimmers are computed, and the comparison of two swimmers shows that the stroke of the faster swimmer, who advanced at 1.84 m·s-1 during the stroke-analysis, generated larger thrust with higher thrust efficiency than that of the slower swimmer, who advanced at 1.75 m·s-1. The applicability of the present stroke analysis system has been proved through this analysis. Key Points The stroke-analysis system using CFD technique has been established. The stroke path and the hand orientation are obtained from a swimming competition with two synchronized underwater video camera, and used for the input data to the CFD analysis. The hydrodynamic force acting on the swimmer’s hand and thrust efficiency are analyzed, and the stroke technique can be evaluated. PMID

  18. A computational fluid dynamics analysis of hydrodynamic force acting on a swimmer's hand in a swimming competition.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yohei; Hino, Takanori

    2013-01-01

    A stroke-analysis system based on a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation has been developed to evaluate the hydrodynamic forces acting on a swimmer's hand. Using the present stroke-analysis system, a stroke technique of top swimmers can be recognized with regard to the hydrodynamic forces. The developed analysis system takes into account the effect of a transient stroke motion including acceleration and a curved stroke path without using assumptions such as a quasi-static approach. An unsteady Navier-Stokes solver based on an unstructured grid method is employed as the CFD method to calculate a viscous flow around a swimmer's hand which can cope with the complicated geometry of hands. The CFD method is validated by comparison with experiments in steady-state and transient conditions. Following the validations, a stroke-analysis system is proposed, in which a hand moves in accordance with a stroke path measured by synchronized video cameras, and the fluid forces acting on the hand are computed with the CFD method. As a demonstration of the stroke-analysis system, two world class swimmers' strokes in a race of 200 m freestyle are analyzed. The hydrodynamic forces acting on the hands of the top swimmers are computed, and the comparison of two swimmers shows that the stroke of the faster swimmer, who advanced at 1.84 m·s(-1) during the stroke-analysis, generated larger thrust with higher thrust efficiency than that of the slower swimmer, who advanced at 1.75 m·s(-1). The applicability of the present stroke analysis system has been proved through this analysis. Key PointsThe stroke-analysis system using CFD technique has been established.The stroke path and the hand orientation are obtained from a swimming competition with two synchronized underwater video camera, and used for the input data to the CFD analysis.The hydrodynamic force acting on the swimmer's hand and thrust efficiency are analyzed, and the stroke technique can be evaluated. PMID:24421727

  19. Computing solvent-induced forces in the solvation approach called Semi Explicit Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brini, Emiliano; Hummel, Michelle H.; Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Fennell, Christopher J.; Dill, Ken A.

    2014-03-01

    Many biologically relevant processes (e.g. protein folding) are often too big and slow to be simulated by computer methods that model atomically detailed water. Faster physical models of water are needed. We have developed an approach called Semi Explicit Assembly (SEA) [C.J. Fennell, C.W. Kehoe, K.A. Dill, PNAS, 108, 3234 (2011)]. It is physical because it uses pre-simulations of explicit-solvent models, and it is fast because at runtime, we just combine the pre-simulated results in rapid computations. SEA has also now been proven physically accurate in two blind tests called SAMPL. Here, we describe the computation of solvation forces in SEA, so that this solvation procedure can be incorporated into standard molecular dynamics codes. We describe experimental tests.

  20. Cyclic Fatigue Resistance and Force Generated by OneShape Instruments during Curved Canal Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the cyclic fatigue resistance and the force generated by OneShape files during preparation of simulated curved canals. Methods Six OneShape files (the test) and six ProTaper F2 files (the control) were subject to the bending ability test. Another thirty files of each type were used to prepare artificial canals (n = 60), which were divided into 3 groups according to respective curvatures of the canals (30°, 60°, and 90°). The numbers of cycles to fatigue (NCF) as well as the positive and negative forces that were generated by files during canal preparation were recorded. The scanning electron microscopy was applied to detect the fracture surfaces. Results Compared with ProTaper F2 files, the bending loads of OneShape files were significantly lower at deflections of 45°(P < .05), 60° (P < .05) and 75° (P < .01). No significant difference was found at 30°. OneShape files presented a higher NCF in both 60° and 90° canals than the control (P < .01). No significant difference of NCF was found between OneShape and ProTaper files in 30° canals. During the preparation of 30° canals by both files, the negative forces were dominant. With the increase of the curvature, more positive forces were observed. When the OneShape Files were compared with the control, significant different forces were found at D3 and D2 (P < .05) in 30° canals, at D2 (P < .05), D1 (P < .01) and D0 (P < .01) in 60° canals, and at D4 and D3 (P < .01) in 90° canals. Conclusions OneShape files possessed a reliable flexibility and cyclic fatigue resistance. According to the assessments of the forces generated by files, OneShape instruments performed in a more fatigue-resistant way during curved canal preparation, compared with the ProTaper F2 files. PMID:27513666

  1. Computational design of materials for solar hydrogen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezawa, Naoto

    Photocatalysis has a great potential for the production of hydrogen from aquerous solution under solar light. In this talk, two different approaches toward the computational materials desing for solar hydrogen generation will be presented. Tin (Sn), which has two major oxidation states, Sn2+ and Sn4+, is abundant on the earth's crust. Recently, visible-light responsive photocatalytc H2 evolution reaction was identified over a mixed valence tin oxide Sn3O4. We have carried out crystal structure prediction for mixed valence tin oxides in different atomic compositions under ambient pressure condition using advanced computational methods based on the evolutionary crystal-structure search and density-functional theory. The predicted novel crystal structures realize the desirable band gaps and band edge positions for H2 evolution under visible light irradiation. It is concluded that multivalent tin oxides have a great potential as an abundant, cheap and environmentally-benign solar-energy conversion photofunctional materials. Transition metal doping is effective for sensitizing SrTiO3 under visible light. We have theoretically investigated the roles of the doped Cr in STO based on hybrid density-functional calculations. Cr atoms are preferably substituting for Ti under any equilibrium growth conditions. The lower oxidation state Cr3+, which is stabilized under an n-type condition of STO, is found to be advantageous for the photocatalytic performance. It is firther predicted that lanthanum is the best codopant for stabilizing the favorable oxidation state, Cr3+. The prediction was validated by our experiments that La and Cr co-doped STO shows the best performance among examined samples. This work was supported by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology (PRESTO) and International Research Fellow program of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) through project P14207.

  2. Forces Generated by High Velocity Impact of Ice on a Rigid Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Padula, Santo A., II; Revilock, Duane M.; Melis, Matthew E.

    2006-01-01

    Tests were conducted to measure the impact forces generated by cylindrical ice projectiles striking a relatively rigid target. Two types of ice projectiles were used, solid clear ice and lower density fabricated ice. Three forms of solid clear ice were tested: single crystal, poly-crystal, and "rejected" poly-crystal (poly-crystal ice in which defects were detected during inspection.) The solid ice had a density of approximately 56 lb/cu ft (0.9 gm/cu cm). A second set of test specimens, termed "low density ice" was manufactured by molding shaved ice into a cylindrical die to produce ice with a density of approximately 40 lb/cu ft (0.65 gm/cu cm). Both the static mechanical characteristics and the crystalline structure of the ice were found to have little effect on the observed transient response. The impact forces generated by low density ice projectiles, which had very low mechanical strength, were comparable to those of full density solid ice. This supports the hypothesis that at a velocity significantly greater than that required to produce fracture in the ice, the mechanical properties become relatively insignificant, and the impact forces are governed by the shape and mass of the projectile.

  3. Running induces nausea in rats: Kaolin intake generated by voluntary and forced wheel running.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2016-10-01

    Three experiments were conducted showing rats' pica behavior (kaolin clay intake) due to running in activity wheels. The amount of kaolin consumed was a positive function of the available time of voluntary running (20, 40, or 60 min), although this relationship was blunted by a descending (i.e., 60 → 40 → 20 min) test series of execution (Experiment 1). Pica was also generated by forced running in a motorized wheel for 60 min as a positive function of the speed of wheel rotations at 98, 185, or 365 m/h, independent of the order of execution (Experiment 2). Voluntary running generated more pica than did forced running at 80 m/h, although the distance travelled in the former condition was 27% lesser than that in the latter condition (Experiment 3). Because kaolin intake is regarded as a reliable measure of nausea in rats, these results show that wheel running, either voluntary or forced, induces nausea in rats.

  4. Dynein's C-terminal Domain Plays a Novel Role in Regulating Force Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennerich, Arne; Nicholas, Matthew; Brenner, Sibylle; Lazar, Caitlin; Weil, Sarah; Vallee, Richard; Hook, Peter; Gennerich Lab Collaboration; Vallee Lab Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a microtubule motor involved in a wide range of low and high force requiring functions in metazoans. In contrast, yeast dynein is involved in a single, nonessential function, nuclear positioning. Interestingly, the single-molecule function of yeast dynein is also unique: whereas mammalian dyneins generate forces of 1-2 pN, S. cerevisiae dynein stalls at 5-7 pN. The basis for this functional difference is unknown. However, the major structural difference between mammalian and yeast dyneins is a ~30 kDa C-terminal extension (CT) present in higher eukaryotic dyneins, but missing in yeast. To test whether the CT accounts for the differences in function, we produced recombinant rat dynein motor domains (MD) with (WT-MD) and without (ΔCT-MD) the CT, using baculovirus expression. To define motor function, we performed single-molecule optical trapping studies. Dimerized WT-MD stalls at ~1 pN and detaches from microtubules after brief stalls, in agreement with previous studies on native mammalian dynein. In sharp contrast, but similar to yeast dynein, ΔCT-MD stalls at ~6 pN, with stall durations up to minutes. These results identify the CT as a new regulatory element for controlling dynein force generation. Supported by NIH GM094415 (A.G.) and GM102347 (R.B.V.)

  5. An efficient and numerically stable procedure for generating sextic force fields in normal mode coordinates.

    PubMed

    Sibaev, M; Crittenden, D L

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we outline a general, scalable, and black-box approach for calculating high-order strongly coupled force fields in rectilinear normal mode coordinates, based upon constructing low order expansions in curvilinear coordinates with naturally limited mode-mode coupling, and then transforming between coordinate sets analytically. The optimal balance between accuracy and efficiency is achieved by transforming from 3 mode representation quartic force fields in curvilinear normal mode coordinates to 4 mode representation sextic force fields in rectilinear normal modes. Using this reduced mode-representation strategy introduces an error of only 1 cm(-1) in fundamental frequencies, on average, across a sizable test set of molecules. We demonstrate that if it is feasible to generate an initial semi-quartic force field in curvilinear normal mode coordinates from ab initio data, then the subsequent coordinate transformation procedure will be relatively fast with modest memory demands. This procedure facilitates solving the nuclear vibrational problem, as all required integrals can be evaluated analytically. Our coordinate transformation code is implemented within the extensible PyPES library program package, at http://sourceforge.net/projects/pypes-lib-ext/. PMID:27276945

  6. An efficient and numerically stable procedure for generating sextic force fields in normal mode coordinates.

    PubMed

    Sibaev, M; Crittenden, D L

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we outline a general, scalable, and black-box approach for calculating high-order strongly coupled force fields in rectilinear normal mode coordinates, based upon constructing low order expansions in curvilinear coordinates with naturally limited mode-mode coupling, and then transforming between coordinate sets analytically. The optimal balance between accuracy and efficiency is achieved by transforming from 3 mode representation quartic force fields in curvilinear normal mode coordinates to 4 mode representation sextic force fields in rectilinear normal modes. Using this reduced mode-representation strategy introduces an error of only 1 cm(-1) in fundamental frequencies, on average, across a sizable test set of molecules. We demonstrate that if it is feasible to generate an initial semi-quartic force field in curvilinear normal mode coordinates from ab initio data, then the subsequent coordinate transformation procedure will be relatively fast with modest memory demands. This procedure facilitates solving the nuclear vibrational problem, as all required integrals can be evaluated analytically. Our coordinate transformation code is implemented within the extensible PyPES library program package, at http://sourceforge.net/projects/pypes-lib-ext/.

  7. How Well Do Computer-Generated Faces Tap Face Expertise?

    PubMed Central

    Crookes, Kate; Ewing, Louise; Gildenhuys, Ju-dith; Kloth, Nadine; Hayward, William G.; Oxner, Matt; Pond, Stephen; Rhodes, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    The use of computer-generated (CG) stimuli in face processing research is proliferating due to the ease with which faces can be generated, standardised and manipulated. However there has been surprisingly little research into whether CG faces are processed in the same way as photographs of real faces. The present study assessed how well CG faces tap face identity expertise by investigating whether two indicators of face expertise are reduced for CG faces when compared to face photographs. These indicators were accuracy for identification of own-race faces and the other-race effect (ORE)–the well-established finding that own-race faces are recognised more accurately than other-race faces. In Experiment 1 Caucasian and Asian participants completed a recognition memory task for own- and other-race real and CG faces. Overall accuracy for own-race faces was dramatically reduced for CG compared to real faces and the ORE was significantly and substantially attenuated for CG faces. Experiment 2 investigated perceptual discrimination for own- and other-race real and CG faces with Caucasian and Asian participants. Here again, accuracy for own-race faces was significantly reduced for CG compared to real faces. However the ORE was not affected by format. Together these results signal that CG faces of the type tested here do not fully tap face expertise. Technological advancement may, in the future, produce CG faces that are equivalent to real photographs. Until then caution is advised when interpreting results obtained using CG faces. PMID:26535910

  8. The FORCE: A portable parallel programming language supporting computational structural mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Harry F.; Benten, Muhammad S.; Brehm, Juergen; Ramanan, Aruna

    1989-01-01

    This project supports the conversion of codes in Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) to a parallel form which will efficiently exploit the computational power available from multiprocessors. The work is a part of a comprehensive, FORTRAN-based system to form a basis for a parallel version of the NICE/SPAR combination which will form the CSM Testbed. The software is macro-based and rests on the force methodology developed by the principal investigator in connection with an early scientific multiprocessor. Machine independence is an important characteristic of the system so that retargeting it to the Flex/32, or any other multiprocessor on which NICE/SPAR might be imnplemented, is well supported. The principal investigator has experience in producing parallel software for both full and sparse systems of linear equations using the force macros. Other researchers have used the Force in finite element programs. It has been possible to rapidly develop software which performs at maximum efficiency on a multiprocessor. The inherent machine independence of the system also means that the parallelization will not be limited to a specific multiprocessor.

  9. Large-Scale Magnetic Field Generation by Randomly Forced Shearing Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, T.; McWilliams, J. C.; Schekochihin, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    A rigorous theory for the generation of a large-scale magnetic field by random nonhelically forced motions of a conducting fluid combined with a linear shear is presented in the analytically tractable limit of low magnetic Reynolds number (Rm) and weak shear. The dynamo is kinematic and due to fluctuations in the net (volume-averaged) electromotive force. This is a minimal proof-of-concept quasilinear calculation aiming to put the shear dynamo, a new effect recently found in numerical experiments, on a firm theoretical footing. Numerically observed scalings of the wave number and growth rate of the fastest-growing mode, previously not understood, are derived analytically. The simplicity of the model suggests that shear dynamo action may be a generic property of sheared magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

  10. Clathrin-coat disassembly illuminates the mechanisms of Hsp70 force generation.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Rui; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Cuéllar, Jorge; Jin, Suping; Valpuesta, José M; Jin, Albert J; Lafer, Eileen M

    2016-09-01

    Hsp70s use ATP hydrolysis to disrupt protein-protein associations and to move macromolecules. One example is the Hsc70- mediated disassembly of the clathrin coats that form on vesicles during endocytosis. Here, we exploited the exceptional features of these coats to test three models-Brownian ratchet, power-stroke and entropic pulling-proposed to explain how Hsp70s transform their substrates. Our data rule out the ratchet and power-stroke models and instead support a collision-pressure mechanism whereby collisions between clathrin-coat walls and Hsc70s drive coats apart. Collision pressure is the complement to the pulling force described in the entropic pulling model. We also found that self-association augments collision pressure, thereby allowing disassembly of clathrin lattices that have been predicted to be resistant to disassembly. These results illuminate how Hsp70s generate the forces that transform their substrates. PMID:27478930

  11. FtsZ protofilaments use a hinge-opening mechanism for constrictive force generation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Hsin, Jen; Zhao, Lingyun; Cheng, Yiwen; Shang, Weina; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Wang, Hong-Wei; Ye, Sheng

    2013-07-26

    The essential bacterial protein FtsZ is a guanosine triphosphatase that self-assembles into a structure at the division site termed the "Z ring". During cytokinesis, the Z ring exerts a constrictive force on the membrane by using the chemical energy of guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis. However, the structural basis of this constriction remains unresolved. Here, we present the crystal structure of a guanosine diphosphate-bound Mycobacterium tuberculosis FtsZ protofilament, which exhibits a curved conformational state. The structure reveals a longitudinal interface that is important for function. The protofilament curvature highlights a hydrolysis-dependent conformational switch at the T3 loop that leads to longitudinal bending between subunits, which could generate sufficient force to drive cytokinesis.

  12. Acoustic manipulation of active spherical carriers: Generation of negative radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Majid; Mojahed, Alireza

    2016-09-01

    This paper examines theoretically a novel mechanism of generating negative (pulling) radiation force for acoustic manipulation of spherical carriers equipped with piezoelectric actuators in its inner surface. In this mechanism, the spherical particle is handled by common plane progressive monochromatic acoustic waves instead of zero-/higher- order Bessel beams or standing waves field. The handling strategy is based on applying a spatially uniform harmonic electrical voltage at the piezoelectric actuator with the same frequency of handling acoustic waves, in order to change the radiation force effect from repulsive (away from source) to attractive (toward source). This study may be considered as a start point for development of contact-free precise handling and entrapment technology of active carriers which are essential in many engineering and medicine applications.

  13. Analysis of Dragonfly Take-off Mechanism: Initial Impulse Generated by Aerodynamic Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruijie; Bode-Oke, Ayodeji; Ren, Yan; Dong, Haibo; Flow Simulation Research Team

    2013-11-01

    Take-off is a critical part of insect flight due to not only that every single flight initiates from take-off, but also that the take-off period, despite its short duration, accounts for a relatively large fraction of the total energy consumption. Thus, studying the mechanism of insect take-off will help to improve the design of Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) in two major properties, the success rate and the energy efficiency of take-off. In this work, we study 20 cases in which dragonflies (species including Pachydiplax longipennis, Epitheca Cynosura, Epitheca princeps etc.) take off from designed platform. By high-speed photogrammetry, 3-d reconstruction and numerical simulation, we explore how dragonflies coordinate different body parts to help take-off. We evaluate how aerodynamic forces generated by wing flapping create the initial impulse, and how these forces help save energy consumption. Supported by NSF CBET-1343154.

  14. Interactive computer methods for generating mineral-resource maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calkins, James Alfred; Crosby, A.S.; Huffman, T.E.; Clark, A.L.; Mason, G.T.; Bascle, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    Inasmuch as maps are a basic tool of geologists, the U.S. Geological Survey's CRIB (Computerized Resources Information Bank) was constructed so that the data it contains can be used to generate mineral-resource maps. However, by the standard methods used-batch processing and off-line plotting-the production of a finished map commonly takes 2-3 weeks. To produce computer-generated maps more rapidly, cheaply, and easily, and also to provide an effective demonstration tool, we have devised two related methods for plotting maps as alternatives to conventional batch methods. These methods are: 1. Quick-Plot, an interactive program whose output appears on a CRT (cathode-ray-tube) device, and 2. The Interactive CAM (Cartographic Automatic Mapping system), which combines batch and interactive runs. The output of the Interactive CAM system is final compilation (not camera-ready) paper copy. Both methods are designed to use data from the CRIB file in conjunction with a map-plotting program. Quick-Plot retrieves a user-selected subset of data from the CRIB file, immediately produces an image of the desired area on a CRT device, and plots data points according to a limited set of user-selected symbols. This method is useful for immediate evaluation of the map and for demonstrating how trial maps can be made quickly. The Interactive CAM system links the output of an interactive CRIB retrieval to a modified version of the CAM program, which runs in the batch mode and stores plotting instructions on a disk, rather than on a tape. The disk can be accessed by a CRT, and, thus, the user can view and evaluate the map output on a CRT immediately after a batch run, without waiting 1-3 days for an off-line plot. The user can, therefore, do most of the layout and design work in a relatively short time by use of the CRT, before generating a plot tape and having the map plotted on an off-line plotter.

  15. True Three-Dimensional Display Of Computer Generated Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stover, Hank; Fletcher, John

    1983-12-01

    The display of data in three dimensions overcomes the ambiguity often found in two dimensional displays. A truly objective examination of the display data is allowed while two-dimensional displays require a subjective interpretation of what might exist in the Z direction. Data can occupy a volume of 20 X 25 X 30 centimeters since SpaceGraph allows the display of data in a volume filling manner. The display volume is generated by observing the reflection of a CRT in a circular mirror. The mirror is flexed about a rubber hinge located on a concentric circle several inches from the edge. By exciting this assembly with a hi-fi woofer, the mirror is caused to vibrate and takes on concave and convex optical shapes thus varying the focal length. The varying focal length causes the image of the CRT to sweep out apparent distance in Z of about 30 centimeters. By plotting points on the CRT in X and Y, these points permit us to draw vectors which can describe a wide variety of three-dimensional objects, such as molecules, mechanical subassemblies or total assemblies such as aircraft and ships. In the vector mode, SpaceGraph provides 23 meters of vectors which can appear in as many segments as required by the object being displayed. The three-dimensional display can also be used in a second mode which can be called the image mode. In this mode, X and Y are controlled to generate a raster much like one generated in a conventional home TV. While the raster is being swept, brightness is varied to provide an image in gray shades. As this process takes place, the Z is continuously swept by the mirror as in the vector mode and a volume filling image is created. This mode appears to be of particular interest in computer-aided tomography and to seismologists. Computeraided design, ultra sound analysis, anti-submarine warfare and air traffic control are other applications or views of science which appear promising for 3-D displays.

  16. Machine discovery based on numerical data generated in computer experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Tsuyoshi; Shimura, Masamichi

    1996-12-31

    In the discovery of useful theorems or formulas, experimental data acquisition plays a fundamental role. Most of the previous discovery systems which have the abilities for experimentation, however, require much knowledge for evaluating experimental results, or require plans of common experiments which are given to the systems in advance. Only few systems have been attempted to make experiments which enable the discovery based on acquired experimental data without depending on given initial knowledge. This paper proposes a new approach for discovering useful theorems in the domain of plane geometry by employing experimentation. In this domain, drawing a figure and observing it correspond to making experimentation since these two processes are preparations for acquiring geometrical data. EXPEDITION, a discovery system based on experimental data acquisition, generates figures by itself and acquires expressions describing relations among line segments and angles in the figures. Such expressions can be extracted from the numerical data obtained in the computer experiments. By using simple heuristics for drawing and observing figures, the system succeeds in discovering many new useful theorems and formulas as well as rediscovering well-known theorems, such as power theorems and Thales` theorem.

  17. Too real for comfort? Uncanny responses to computer generated faces

    PubMed Central

    MacDorman, Karl F.; Green, Robert D.; Ho, Chin-Chang; Koch, Clinton T.

    2014-01-01

    As virtual humans approach photorealistic perfection, they risk making real humans uncomfortable. This intriguing phenomenon, known as the uncanny valley, is well known but not well understood. In an effort to demystify the causes of the uncanny valley, this paper proposes several perceptual, cognitive, and social mechanisms that have already helped address riddles like empathy, mate selection, threat avoidance, cognitive dissonance, and psychological defenses. In the four studies described herein, a computer generated human character’s facial proportions, skin texture, and level of detail were varied to examine their effect on perceived eeriness, human likeness, and attractiveness. In Study I, texture photorealism and polygon count increased human likeness. In Study II, texture photorealism heightened the accuracy of human judgments of ideal facial proportions. In Study III, atypical facial proportions were shown to be more disturbing on photorealistic faces than on other faces. In Study IV, a mismatch in the size and texture of the eyes and face was especially prone to make a character eerie. These results contest the depiction of the uncanny valley as a simple relation between comfort level and human likeness. This paper concludes by introducing a set of design principles for bridging the uncanny valley. PMID:25506126

  18. Computer Generated Hologram System for Wavefront Measurement System Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olczak, Gene

    2011-01-01

    Computer Generated Holograms (CGHs) have been used for some time to calibrate interferometers that require nulling optics. A typical scenario is the testing of aspheric surfaces with an interferometer placed near the paraxial center of curvature. Existing CGH technology suffers from a reduced capacity to calibrate middle and high spatial frequencies. The root cause of this shortcoming is as follows: the CGH is not placed at an image conjugate of the asphere due to limitations imposed by the geometry of the test and the allowable size of the CGH. This innovation provides a calibration system where the imaging properties in calibration can be made comparable to the test configuration. Thus, if the test is designed to have good imaging properties, then middle and high spatial frequency errors in the test system can be well calibrated. The improved imaging properties are provided by a rudimentary auxiliary optic as part of the calibration system. The auxiliary optic is simple to characterize and align to the CGH. Use of the auxiliary optic also reduces the size of the CGH required for calibration and the density of the lines required for the CGH. The resulting CGH is less expensive than the existing technology and has reduced write error and alignment error sensitivities. This CGH system is suitable for any kind of calibration using an interferometer when high spatial resolution is required. It is especially well suited for tests that include segmented optical components or large apertures.

  19. A comparative reliability analysis of computer-generated bitemark overlays.

    PubMed

    McNamee, Anne H; Sweet, David; Pretty, Iain

    2005-03-01

    This study compared the reliability of two methods used to produce computer-generated bitemark overlays with Adobe Photoshop (Adobe Systems Inc., San Jose, CA). Scanned images of twelve dental casts were sent to 30 examiners with different experience levels. Examiners were instructed to produce an overlay for each cast image based on the instructions provided for the two techniques. Measurements of the area and the x-y coordinate position of the biting edges of the anterior teeth were obtained using Scion Image software program (Scion Corporation, Frederick, MD) for each overlay. The inter- and intra-reliability assessment of the measurements was performed using an analysis of variance and calculation of reliability coefficients. The assessment of the area measurements showed significant variances seen in the examiner variable for both techniques resulting in low reliability coefficients. Conversely, the results for the positional measurements showed no significant differences in the variances between examiners with exceptionally high reliability coefficients. It was concluded that both techniques were reliable methods to produce bitemark overlays in assessing tooth position. PMID:15818864

  20. Transport delay compensation for computer-generated imagery systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, Richard E.

    1988-01-01

    In the problem of pure transport delay in a low-pass system, a trade-off exists with respect to performance within and beyond a frequency bandwidth. When activity beyond the band is attenuated because of other considerations, this trade-off may be used to improve the performance within the band. Specifically, transport delay in computer-generated imagery systems is reduced to a manageable problem by recognizing frequency limits in vehicle activity and manual-control capacity. Based on these limits, a compensation algorithm has been developed for use in aircraft simulation at NASA Ames Research Center. For direct measurement of transport delays, a beam-splitter experiment is presented that accounts for the complete flight simulation environment. Values determined by this experiment are appropriate for use in the compensation algorithm. The algorithm extends the bandwidth of high-frequency flight simulation to well beyond that of normal pilot inputs. Within this bandwidth, the visual scene presentation manifests negligible gain distortion and phase lag. After a year of utilization, two minor exceptions to universal simulation applicability have been identified and subsequently resolved.

  1. Force and torque on spherical particles in micro-channel flows using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Suo, Jin; Edwards, Erin E; Anilkumar, Ananyaveena; Sulchek, Todd; Giddens, Don P; Thomas, Susan N

    2016-07-01

    To delineate the influence of hemodynamic force on cell adhesion processes, model in vitro fluidic assays that mimic physiological conditions are commonly employed. Herein, we offer a framework for solution of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to estimate the forces resulting from fluid flow near a plane acting on a sphere that is either stationary or in free flow, and we compare these results to a widely used theoretical model that assumes Stokes flow with a constant shear rate. We find that while the full three-dimensional solutions using a parabolic velocity profile in CFD simulations yield similar translational velocities to those predicted by the theoretical method, the CFD approach results in approximately 50% larger rotational velocities over the wall shear stress range of 0.1-5.0 dynes cm(-2). This leads to an approximately 25% difference in force and torque calculations between the two methods. When compared with experimental measurements of translational and rotational velocities of microspheres or cells perfused in microfluidic channels, the CFD simulations yield significantly less error. We propose that CFD modelling can provide better estimations of hemodynamic force levels acting on perfused microspheres and cells in flow fields through microfluidic devices used for cell adhesion dynamics analysis.

  2. Accurate computation of surface stresses and forces with immersed boundary methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goza, Andres; Liska, Sebastian; Morley, Benjamin; Colonius, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Many immersed boundary methods solve for surface stresses that impose the velocity boundary conditions on an immersed body. These surface stresses may contain spurious oscillations that make them ill-suited for representing the physical surface stresses on the body. Moreover, these inaccurate stresses often lead to unphysical oscillations in the history of integrated surface forces such as the coefficient of lift. While the errors in the surface stresses and forces do not necessarily affect the convergence of the velocity field, it is desirable, especially in fluid-structure interaction problems, to obtain smooth and convergent stress distributions on the surface. To this end, we show that the equation for the surface stresses is an integral equation of the first kind whose ill-posedness is the source of spurious oscillations in the stresses. We also demonstrate that for sufficiently smooth delta functions, the oscillations may be filtered out to obtain physically accurate surface stresses. The filtering is applied as a post-processing procedure, so that the convergence of the velocity field is unaffected. We demonstrate the efficacy of the method by computing stresses and forces that converge to the physical stresses and forces for several test problems.

  3. Force and torque on spherical particles in micro-channel flows using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Suo, Jin; Edwards, Erin E; Anilkumar, Ananyaveena; Sulchek, Todd; Giddens, Don P; Thomas, Susan N

    2016-07-01

    To delineate the influence of hemodynamic force on cell adhesion processes, model in vitro fluidic assays that mimic physiological conditions are commonly employed. Herein, we offer a framework for solution of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to estimate the forces resulting from fluid flow near a plane acting on a sphere that is either stationary or in free flow, and we compare these results to a widely used theoretical model that assumes Stokes flow with a constant shear rate. We find that while the full three-dimensional solutions using a parabolic velocity profile in CFD simulations yield similar translational velocities to those predicted by the theoretical method, the CFD approach results in approximately 50% larger rotational velocities over the wall shear stress range of 0.1-5.0 dynes cm(-2). This leads to an approximately 25% difference in force and torque calculations between the two methods. When compared with experimental measurements of translational and rotational velocities of microspheres or cells perfused in microfluidic channels, the CFD simulations yield significantly less error. We propose that CFD modelling can provide better estimations of hemodynamic force levels acting on perfused microspheres and cells in flow fields through microfluidic devices used for cell adhesion dynamics analysis. PMID:27493783

  4. Force and torque on spherical particles in micro-channel flows using computational fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Suo, Jin; Edwards, Erin E.; Anilkumar, Ananyaveena; Sulchek, Todd; Giddens, Don P.

    2016-01-01

    To delineate the influence of hemodynamic force on cell adhesion processes, model in vitro fluidic assays that mimic physiological conditions are commonly employed. Herein, we offer a framework for solution of the three-dimensional Navier–Stokes equations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to estimate the forces resulting from fluid flow near a plane acting on a sphere that is either stationary or in free flow, and we compare these results to a widely used theoretical model that assumes Stokes flow with a constant shear rate. We find that while the full three-dimensional solutions using a parabolic velocity profile in CFD simulations yield similar translational velocities to those predicted by the theoretical method, the CFD approach results in approximately 50% larger rotational velocities over the wall shear stress range of 0.1–5.0 dynes cm−2. This leads to an approximately 25% difference in force and torque calculations between the two methods. When compared with experimental measurements of translational and rotational velocities of microspheres or cells perfused in microfluidic channels, the CFD simulations yield significantly less error. We propose that CFD modelling can provide better estimations of hemodynamic force levels acting on perfused microspheres and cells in flow fields through microfluidic devices used for cell adhesion dynamics analysis. PMID:27493783

  5. Visualization of x-ray computer tomography using computer-generated holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daibo, Masahiro; Tayama, Norio

    1998-09-01

    The theory converted from x-ray projection data to the hologram directly by combining the computer tomography (CT) with the computer generated hologram (CGH), is proposed. The purpose of this study is to offer the theory for realizing the all- electronic and high-speed seeing through 3D visualization system, which is for the application to medical diagnosis and non- destructive testing. First, the CT is expressed using the pseudo- inverse matrix which is obtained by the singular value decomposition. CGH is expressed in the matrix style. Next, `projection to hologram conversion' (PTHC) matrix is calculated by the multiplication of phase matrix of CGH with pseudo-inverse matrix of the CT. Finally, the projection vector is converted to the hologram vector directly, by multiplication of the PTHC matrix with the projection vector. Incorporating holographic analog computation into CT reconstruction, it becomes possible that the calculation amount is drastically reduced. We demonstrate the CT cross section which is reconstituted by He-Ne laser in the 3D space from the real x-ray projection data acquired by x-ray television equipment, using our direct conversion technique.

  6. Numerical computation of the effective-one-body potential q using self-force results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Sarp; van de Meent, Maarten

    2016-03-01

    The effective-one-body theory (EOB) describes the conservative dynamics of compact binary systems in terms of an effective Hamiltonian approach. The Hamiltonian for moderately eccentric motion of two nonspinning compact objects in the extreme mass-ratio limit is given in terms of three potentials: a (v ) , d ¯ (v ) , q (v ) . By generalizing the first law of mechanics for (nonspinning) black hole binaries to eccentric orbits, [A. Le Tiec, Phys. Rev. D 92, 084021 (2015).] recently obtained new expressions for d ¯(v ) and q (v ) in terms of quantities that can be readily computed using the gravitational self-force approach. Using these expressions we present a new computation of the EOB potential q (v ) by combining results from two independent numerical self-force codes. We determine q (v ) for inverse binary separations in the range 1 /1200 ≤v ≲1 /6 . Our computation thus provides the first-ever strong-field results for q (v ) . We also obtain d ¯ (v ) in our entire domain to a fractional accuracy of ≳10-8 . We find that our results are compatible with the known post-Newtonian expansions for d ¯(v ) and q (v ) in the weak field, and agree with previous (less accurate) numerical results for d ¯(v ) in the strong field.

  7. Magnetic Field, Force, and Inductance Computations for an Axially Symmetric Solenoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Immer, Christopher D.; Simpson, James C.

    2001-01-01

    The pumping of liquid oxygen (LOX) by magnetic fields (B field), using an array of electromagnets, is a current topic of research and development at Kennedy Space Center, FL. Oxygen is paramagnetic so that LOX, like a ferrofluid, can be forced in the direction of a B field gradient. It is well known that liquid oxygen has a sufficient magnetic susceptibility that a strong magnetic gradient can lift it in the earth's gravitational field. It has been proposed that this phenomenon can be utilized in transporting (i.e., pumping) LOX not only on earth, but on Mars and in the weightlessness of space. In order to design and evaluate such a magnetic pumping system, it is essential to compute the magnetic and force fields, as well as inductance, of various types of electromagnets (solenoids). In this application, it is assumed that the solenoids are air wrapped, and that the current is essentially time independent.

  8. Altered force-generating capacity is well-perceived regardless of the pain presence.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Thibault; Magnard, Justine; Jubeau, Marc; Hug, François; Tucker, Kylie

    2016-09-01

    An inability to perceive changes in action capabilities may result in increased risk of injury and/or reduced performance. We investigated whether the perception of ability to perform a maximal single-leg hop was updated when the actual ability to perform the task was reduced due to experimentally altered force-generating capacity and associated pain. Twenty-five healthy volunteers performed a series of maximal isometric voluntary knee extensions (MVC), performance estimates and actual performances of a maximal single-leg hop. The motor tasks were completed for each leg, before (t), and immediately (t), 48 hr (t) and 1 month (t) after, a neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) protocol was used to decrease the force generating capacity of the quadriceps muscle of 1 leg. MVC torque decreased by ∼30% after the NMES protocol for the stimulated leg at t and t (p < .001). This reduction was associated with a significant decrease in estimation of performance and actual performance of the maximal single-leg hop at t and t for the test leg (p < .001). The reduction in performance ability was associated with low-level pain immediately after NMES, and moderate pain and an increase in the belief that everyday motor tasks would be harmful 48 hours after NMES. Participants accurately estimated their performance capabilities during each testing period. This study provides a critical step toward understanding the potential for decreased force-generating capacity and muscle pain to modify the relationship between motor performance and perceived abilities. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Defect localization in fibre-reinforced composites by computing external volume forces from surface sensor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, F.; Schöpfer, F.; Schuster, T.

    2015-02-01

    We suggest a prospective method for detecting and visualizing defects in fibre-reinforced composites by computing external volume forces from measurements acquired by sensors that are integrated on the surface of the structure. Anisotropic materials like carbon fibre-reinforced composites are widely used in light weight construction which can exhibit damages that are not optically detectable. The key idea of our method is the interpretation of defects in such structures as if they were induced by an external volume force. This idea is based on the observation that a propagating elastic wave interferes with a damaged area by reflecting the wave. In that sense a damage can be seen as an additional source. Thus identifying the external volume force which has caused this wave is supposed to reveal the location of the defect. This approach leads to the inverse problem of determining the inhomogeneity of a hyperbolic initial-boundary value problem. We tackle this ill-posed problem by minimizing a Tikhonov functional which takes the oberservation points of our surface measurements into account. In the article we address the solvability of the direct problem, state and analyze the PDE-based optimization problem that aims for computing the external force and develop a numerical realization of its solution using the conjugate gradient method. First numerical results for a simple model case with different sensor adjustments show that the defects in fact are detectable. In that sense this article might be seen as starting point of future research which should comprehend deeper numerical studies and analysis of the problem.

  10. How muscle fiber lengths and velocities affect muscle force generation as humans walk and run at different speeds

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Edith M.; Hamner, Samuel R.; Seth, Ajay; Millard, Matthew; Delp, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The lengths and velocities of muscle fibers have a dramatic effect on muscle force generation. It is unknown, however, whether the lengths and velocities of lower limb muscle fibers substantially affect the ability of muscles to generate force during walking and running. We examined this issue by developing simulations of muscle–tendon dynamics to calculate the lengths and velocities of muscle fibers from electromyographic recordings of 11 lower limb muscles and kinematic measurements of the hip, knee and ankle made as five subjects walked at speeds of 1.0–1.75 m s−1 and ran at speeds of 2.0–5.0 m s−1. We analyzed the simulated fiber lengths, fiber velocities and forces to evaluate the influence of force–length and force–velocity properties on force generation at different walking and running speeds. The simulations revealed that force generation ability (i.e. the force generated per unit of activation) of eight of the 11 muscles was significantly affected by walking or running speed. Soleus force generation ability decreased with increasing walking speed, but the transition from walking to running increased the force generation ability by reducing fiber velocities. Our results demonstrate the influence of soleus muscle architecture on the walk-to-run transition and the effects of muscle–tendon compliance on the plantarflexors' ability to generate ankle moment and power. The study presents data that permit lower limb muscles to be studied in unprecedented detail by relating muscle fiber dynamics and force generation to the mechanical demands of walking and running. PMID:23470656

  11. Generative Computer Assisted Instruction: An Application of Artificial Intelligence to CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koffman, Elliot B.

    Frame-oriented computer-assisted instruction (CAI) systems dominate the field, but these mechanized programed texts utilize the computational power of the computer to a minimal degree and are difficult to modify. Newer, generative CAI systems which are supplied with a knowledge of subject matter can generate their own problems and solutions, can…

  12. Comparing Hand Drawn and Computer Generated Concept Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royer, Regina; Royer, Jeffery

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the use of paper/pencil and computer tools for creating concept maps. Participants were 52 students in two combined 9th/10th grade biology classes. An independent measures research design was used. There were two treatment groups: computer and paper/pencil. The computer group created concept maps using Inspiration software…

  13. Analysis of radial and longitudinal force of plasma wakefield generated by a chirped pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ghasemi, Leila; Afhami, Saeedeh; Eslami, Esmaeil

    2015-08-15

    In present paper, the chirp effect of an electromagnetic pulse via an analytical model of wakefield generation is studied. Different types of chirps are employed in this study. Our results show that by the use of nonlinear chirped pulse the longitudinal wakefield and focusing force is stronger than that of linear chirped pulse. It is indicated that quadratic nonlinear chirped pulses are globally much efficient than periodic nonlinear chirped pulses. Our calculations also predict that in nonlinear chirped pulse case, the overlap of focusing and accelerating regions is broader than that achieved in linear chirped pulse.

  14. Localized sequential use of resilient lining to generate orthodontic force in thermoformed active removable appliances.

    PubMed

    Ng, E W H

    2005-12-01

    A new modality of orthodontic treatment based on the thermoformed appliance was developed and trialled clinically. A light-cured resilient lining material commonly used for denture relining was placed locally and sequentially in thermoformed appliances to generate orthodontic forces. The new method appeared to be effective. All the presented cases showed substantial improvement in dental alignment. A number of orthodontic movements were demonstrated. Localized use of resilient lining in thermoformed orthodontic appliances appeared to be a promising alternative to other thermoformed active removable appliance (TARA) treatments. Further studies are required to optimize the procedures and explore its full potential.

  15. Correlation of embryonic skeletal muscle myotube physical characteristics with contractile force generation on an atomic force microscope-based bio-microelectromechanical systems device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirozzi, K. L.; Long, C. J.; McAleer, C. W.; Smith, A. S. T.; Hickman, J. J.

    2013-08-01

    Rigorous analysis of muscle function in in vitro systems is needed for both acute and chronic biomedical applications. Forces generated by skeletal myotubes on bio-microelectromechanical cantilevers were calculated using a modified version of Stoney's thin-film equation and finite element analysis (FEA), then analyzed for regression to physical parameters. The Stoney's equation results closely matched the more intensive FEA and the force correlated to cross-sectional area (CSA). Normalizing force to measured CSA significantly improved the statistical sensitivity and now allows for close comparison of in vitro data to in vivo measurements for applications in exercise physiology, robotics, and modeling neuromuscular diseases.

  16. Correlation of embryonic skeletal muscle myotube physical characteristics with contractile force generation on an atomic force microscope-based bio-microelectromechanical systems device.

    PubMed

    Pirozzi, K L; Long, C J; McAleer, C W; Smith, A S T; Hickman, J J

    2013-08-19

    Rigorous analysis of muscle function in in vitro systems is needed for both acute and chronic biomedical applications. Forces generated by skeletal myotubes on bio-microelectromechanical cantilevers were calculated using a modified version of Stoney's thin-film equation and finite element analysis (FEA), then analyzed for regression to physical parameters. The Stoney's equation results closely matched the more intensive FEA and the force correlated to cross-sectional area (CSA). Normalizing force to measured CSA significantly improved the statistical sensitivity and now allows for close comparison of in vitro data to in vivo measurements for applications in exercise physiology, robotics, and modeling neuromuscular diseases. PMID:24046483

  17. Computing forces on interface elements exerted by dislocations in an elastically anisotropic crystalline material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Arsenlis, A.; Aubry, S.

    2016-06-01

    Driven by the growing interest in numerical simulations of dislocation–interface interactions in general crystalline materials with elastic anisotropy, we develop algorithms for the integration of interface tractions needed to couple dislocation dynamics with a finite element or boundary element solver. The dislocation stress fields in elastically anisotropic media are made analytically accessible through the spherical harmonics expansion of the derivative of Green’s function, and analytical expressions for the forces on interface elements are derived by analytically integrating the spherical harmonics series recursively. Compared with numerical integration by Gaussian quadrature, the newly developed analytical algorithm for interface traction integration is highly beneficial in terms of both computation precision and speed.

  18. Experimental Validation Data for Computational Fluid Dynamics of Forced Convection on a Vertical Flat Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Jeff R.; Lance, Blake W.; Smith, Barton L.

    2015-08-10

    We present computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation dataset for turbulent forced convection on a vertical plate. The design of the apparatus is based on recent validation literature and provides a means to simultaneously measure boundary conditions (BCs) and system response quantities (SRQs). Important inflow quantities for Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). CFD are also measured. Data are acquired at two heating conditions and cover the range 40,000 < Rex < 300,000, 357 < Reδ2 < 813, and 0.02 < Gr/Re2 < 0.232.

  19. Experimental Validation Data for Computational Fluid Dynamics of Forced Convection on a Vertical Flat Plate

    DOE PAGES

    Harris, Jeff R.; Lance, Blake W.; Smith, Barton L.

    2015-08-10

    We present computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation dataset for turbulent forced convection on a vertical plate. The design of the apparatus is based on recent validation literature and provides a means to simultaneously measure boundary conditions (BCs) and system response quantities (SRQs). Important inflow quantities for Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). CFD are also measured. Data are acquired at two heating conditions and cover the range 40,000 < Rex < 300,000, 357 < Reδ2 < 813, and 0.02 < Gr/Re2 < 0.232.

  20. Dual beam generation at a ray caustic by a multiplexing computer-generated hologram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Peng; Hudman, Josh; Sasian, Jose M.; Dallas, William J.

    2005-06-01

    Computer generated holograms (CGHs) are used for testing aspherical surfaces. They are also used for certifying null lens systems that are in turn used to test large aspheric mirrors. We demonstrate that, in order to minimize size, a null-corrector-certifying CGH can be located at a ray caustic. This placement minimizes the required size of the CGH and so makes it possible to certify some null correctors that otherwise, due to current size limitations of high-precision CGHs, could not be certified. Fabrication limits of precision CGHs are in the size range of 200 250 mm and one part in 10^5 in feature placement. Our proof of principle involves a CGH that is about 20mm in diameter with a fabrication tolerance of one part in 10^4.

  1. Rotating Detonation Combustion: A Computational Study for Stationary Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, Sergio

    The increased availability of gaseous fossil fuels in The US has led to the substantial growth of stationary Gas Turbine (GT) usage for electrical power generation. In fact, from 2013 to 2104, out of the 11 Tera Watts-hour per day produced from fossil fuels, approximately 27% was generated through the combustion of natural gas in stationary GT. The thermodynamic efficiency for simple-cycle GT has increased from 20% to 40% during the last six decades, mainly due to research and development in the fields of combustion science, material science and machine design. However, additional improvements have become more costly and more difficult to obtain as technology is further refined. An alternative to improve GT thermal efficiency is the implementation of a combustion regime leading to pressure-gain; rather than pressure loss across the combustor. One concept being considered for such purpose is Rotating Detonation Combustion (RDC). RDC refers to a combustion regime in which a detonation wave propagates continuously in the azimuthal direction of a cylindrical annular chamber. In RDC, the fuel and oxidizer, injected from separated streams, are mixed near the injection plane and are then consumed by the detonation front traveling inside the annular gap of the combustion chamber. The detonation products then expand in the azimuthal and axial direction away from the detonation front and exit through the combustion chamber outlet. In the present study Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is used to predict the performance of Rotating Detonation Combustion (RDC) at operating conditions relevant to GT applications. As part of this study, a modeling strategy for RDC simulations was developed. The validation of the model was performed using benchmark cases with different levels of complexity. First, 2D simulations of non-reactive shock tube and detonation tubes were performed. The numerical predictions that were obtained using different modeling parameters were compared with

  2. Infragravity wave generation and dynamics over a mild slope beach : Experiments and numerical computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cienfuegos, R.; Duarte, L.; Hernandez, E.

    2008-12-01

    Charasteristic frequencies of gravity waves generated by wind and propagating towards the coast are usually comprised between 0.05Hz and 1Hz. Nevertheless, lower frequecy waves, in the range of 0.001Hz and 0.05Hz, have been observed in the nearshore zone. Those long waves, termed as infragravity waves, are generated by complex nonlinear mechanisms affecting the propagation of irregular waves up to the coast. The groupiness of an incident random wave field may be responsible for producing a slow modulation of the mean water surface thus generating bound long waves travelling at the group speed. Similarly, a quasi- periodic oscillation of the break-point location, will be accompained by a slow modulation of set-up/set-down in the surf zone and generation and release of long waves. If the primary structure of the carrying incident gravity waves is destroyed (e.g. by breaking), forced long waves can be freely released and even reflected at the coast. Infragravity waves can affect port operation through resonating conditions, or strongly affect sediment transport and beach morphodynamics. In the present study we investigate infragravity wave generation mechanisms both, from experiments and numerical computations. Measurements were conducted at the 70-meter long wave tank, located at the Instituto Nacional de Hidraulica (Chile), prepared with a beach of very mild slope of 1/80 in order to produce large surf zone extensions. A random JONSWAP type wave field (h0=0.52m, fp=0.25Hz, Hmo=0.17m) was generated by a piston wave-maker and measurements of the free surface displacements were performed all over its length at high spatial resolution (0.2m to 1m). Velocity profiles were also measured at four verticals inside the surf zone using an ADV. Correlation maps of wave group envelopes and infragravity waves are computed in order to identify long wave generation and dynamics in the experimental set-up. It appears that both mechanisms (groupiness and break-point oscillation) are

  3. The Use of Force Sensors and a Computer System to Introduce the Concept of Inertia at a School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogacz, Bogdan F.; Pedziwiatr, Antoni T.

    2014-01-01

    A classical experiment used to introduce the concept of body inertia, breaking of a thread below and above a hanging weight, is described mathematically and presented in a new way, using force sensors and a computer system.

  4. Measurement of the impuslive force generated by colapsing bubble close to a solid boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Milos; Unger, Jiri; Holata, Jakub; Zima, Patrik

    2012-04-01

    The article presents experimental results of the acoustical and optical study of cavitation bubble collapse close to a solid boundary in water. The bubble was generated by discharge of low-voltage capacitor into a couple of wires closing a simple circuit. Different distances from the solid wall and different maximum bubble radii were studied. The bubble radius was studied using time-resolved photography and by PVDF film sensor glued on the solid boundary. The illumination was provided by high-power led diode. Synchronization of the system was provided by pulse generator connected to an oscilloscope. The impact power of the bubble to the wall was estimated from the time-resolved photography of the bubble and from the PVDF film sensor signal. The PVDF film sensor calibration was performed by a pendulum test to estimate the impact force.

  5. Mathematical model to generate near-periodic human jumping force signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racic, V.; Pavic, A.

    2010-01-01

    A mathematical modelling procedure has been developed to generate synthetic vertical force signals induced by a single person jumping. The ability to replicate much of the temporal and spectral features of real jumping loads give this model a definite advantage over the conventional half-sine models coupled with Fourier series analysis. This includes modelling of the omnipresent lack of symmetry of individual jumping pulses and jump-by-jump variations in amplitudes and timing. The model therefore belongs to a new generation of synthetic narrowband jumping loads that simulate reality better. The proposed mathematical concept for characterisation of irregular jumping pulses may be utilised in vibration serviceability assessment of civil engineering assembly structures, such as grandstands, footbridges and concert or gym floors, to estimate realistic dynamic structural response due to people jumping.

  6. Computer-generated holograms on a CD-R disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yuji; Morishima, Morito; Usui, Akira

    2004-06-01

    In order to display three-dimensional imagery by computer-generated holograms, it is necessary to draw hologram data on a medium with a resolution on the micrometer order. Conventionally, optical lithography, electron beam lithography, and special laser beam printers designed especially for holograms are used. However these systems are large and expensive, and need special environments such as darkrooms and clean rooms. We have developed a new device that draws hologram data on CD-R (Compact Disc-Recordable) disks, and which is based on a Yamaha CRW-F1 CD-R/RW drive. The drive produces holograms in a short amount of time, at low cost, and at the high resolution of 1.5μm. Moreover, the drive is small, portable and does not require a special environment, so that all of the processes of Desktop Holograming, from hologram calculation to recording, are made possible with just one PC. We evaluated optical properties of the CD-R disk as a viable hologram recording media. There are characteristics that are different from conventional media, because hologram data is recorded on spiral shaped grooves. We propose a new calculation method of hologram data suitable for a CD-R disk in order to display three-dimensional imagery. Using this method, we carried out optical experiments and it showed reconstructed three-dimensional imagery on CD-R disks successfully. In this paper, we discuss the optical properties of the CD-R disk, calculation method, and the experimental results.

  7. Microholographic computer generated holograms for security applications: Microtags

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatt, W.C.; Warren, M.E.; Kravitz, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a method for encoding phase and amplitude in microscopic computer-generated holograms (microtags) for security applications. Eight-by-eight-cell and 12 x 12-cell phase-only and phase-and-amplitude microtag designs has been exposed in photoresist using the extreme-ultraviolet (13.4 nm) lithography (EUVL) tool developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Using EUVL, we have also fabricated microtags consisting of 150-nm lines arranged to form 300-nm-period gratings. The microtags described in this report were designed for readout at 632.8 nm and 442 nm. The smallest microtag measures 56 {mu}m x 80 {mu}m when viewed at normal incidence. The largest microtag measures 80 by 160 microns and contains features 0.2 {mu}m wide. The microtag design process uses a modified iterative Fourier-transform algorithm to create either phase-only or phase-and-amplitude microtags. We also report on a simple and compact readout system for recording the diffraction pattern formed by a microtag. The measured diffraction patterns agree very well with predictions. We present the results of a rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) of microtags. Microtags are CD modeled as consisting of sub-wavelength gratings of a trapezoidal profile. Transverse-electric (TE) and TM readout polarizations are modeled. The objective of our analysis is the determination of optimal microtag-grating design parameter values and tolerances on those parameters. The parameters are grating wall-slope angle, grating duty cycle, grating depth, and metal-coating thickness. Optimal microtag-grating parameter values result in maximum diffraction efficiency. Maximum diffraction efficiency is calculated at 16% for microtag gratings in air and 12% for microtag gratings underneath a protective dielectric coating, within fabrication constraints. TM-microtag gratings. Finally, we suggest several additional microtag concepts, such as two-dimensional microtags and pixel-code microtags.

  8. Design of the magnetorheological mount with high damping force for medium speed diesel generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, O.-H.; Kim, W.-H.; Joo, W. H.; Park, J.-H.

    2013-04-01

    This paper investigates the controllable magnetorheological (MR) mount for the marine diesel-generator (D/G) sets. Sometimes, significant vibrations over the allowable limit are observed on the D/G sets due to their huge excitation forces. Because the severe vibration can lead to structural damages to the D/G sets, it should be reduced to below the limit. Although passive mounts with rubber isolators are usually used, the vibration reduction performance is not always sufficient. In addition, expecting that the vibration levels required by customers will get more severe, semi-active vibration isolation system needs to be developed. To the aim, the valve (flow) mode type of MR mount has been designed. Especially, the annular-radial configuration was adopted to enhance the damping force within the restricted space. The geometry of the mount has been optimized to obtain the required damping force and the magnetic field analysis has been carried out using ANSYS APDL. To verify the performance of the developed MR mount, excitation test was conducted and the dynamic characteristics were identified. Since damping property of the MR fluid is changed by the applied magnetic field strength and excitation frequency, responses to changing applied currents and frequencies were obtained. From the results, damping performance of the MR mount was evaluated.

  9. Aerodynamic force generation and power requirements in forward flight in a fruit fly with modeled wing motion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mao; Wu, Jiang Hao

    2003-09-01

    Aerodynamic force generation and power requirements in forward flight in a fruit fly with modeled wing motion were studied using the method of computational fluid dynamics. The Navier-Stokes equations were solved numerically. The solution provided the flow velocity and pressure fields, from which the vorticity wake structure and the unsteady aerodynamic forces and torques were obtained (the inertial torques due to the acceleration of the wing-mass were computed analytically). From the flow-structure and force information, insights were gained into the unsteady aerodynamic force generation. On the basis of the aerodynamic and inertial torques, the mechanical power was obtained, and its properties were investigated. The unsteady force mechanisms revealed previously for hovering (i.e. delayed stall, rapid acceleration at the beginning of the strokes and fast pitching-up rotation at the end of the strokes) apply to forward flight. Even at high advance ratios, e.g. J=0.53-0.66 (J is the advance ratio), the leading edge vortex does not shed (at such advance ratios, the wing travels approximately 6.5 chord lengths during the downstroke). At low speeds (J approximately equal to 0.13), the lift (vertical force) for weight support is produced during both the down- and upstrokes (the downstroke producing approximately 80% and the upstroke producing approximately 20% of the mean lift), and the lift is contributed mainly by the wing lift; the thrust that overcomes the body drag is produced during the upstroke, and it is contributed mainly by the wing drag. At medium speeds (J approximately equal to 0.27), the lift is mainly produced during the downstroke and the thrust mainly during the upstroke; both of them are contributed almost equally by the wing lift and wing drag. At high speeds (J approximately equal to 0.53), the lift is mainly produced during the downstroke and is mainly contributed by the wing drag; the thrust is produced during both the down- and upstrokes, and in

  10. Conserved mechanisms of microtubule-stimulated ADP release, ATP binding, and force generation in transport kinesins

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, Joseph; Farabella, Irene; Yu, I-Mei; Rosenfeld, Steven S; Houdusse, Anne; Topf, Maya; Moores, Carolyn A

    2014-01-01

    Kinesins are a superfamily of microtubule-based ATP-powered motors, important for multiple, essential cellular functions. How microtubule binding stimulates their ATPase and controls force generation is not understood. To address this fundamental question, we visualized microtubule-bound kinesin-1 and kinesin-3 motor domains at multiple steps in their ATPase cycles—including their nucleotide-free states—at ∼7 Å resolution using cryo-electron microscopy. In both motors, microtubule binding promotes ordered conformations of conserved loops that stimulate ADP release, enhance microtubule affinity and prime the catalytic site for ATP binding. ATP binding causes only small shifts of these nucleotide-coordinating loops but induces large conformational changes elsewhere that allow force generation and neck linker docking towards the microtubule plus end. Family-specific differences across the kinesin–microtubule interface account for the distinctive properties of each motor. Our data thus provide evidence for a conserved ATP-driven mechanism for kinesins and reveal the critical mechanistic contribution of the microtubule interface. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03680.001 PMID:25209998

  11. The Structural Basis of Force Generation by the Mitotic Motor Kinesin-5*

    PubMed Central

    Goulet, Adeline; Behnke-Parks, William M.; Sindelar, Charles V.; Major, Jennifer; Rosenfeld, Steven S.; Moores, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-01

    Kinesin-5 is required for forming the bipolar spindle during mitosis. Its motor domain, which contains nucleotide and microtubule binding sites and mechanical elements to generate force, has evolved distinct properties for its spindle-based functions. In this study, we report subnanometer resolution cryoelectron microscopy reconstructions of microtubule-bound human kinesin-5 before and after nucleotide binding and combine this information with studies of the kinetics of nucleotide-induced neck linker and cover strand movement. These studies reveal coupled, nucleotide-dependent conformational changes that explain many of this motor's properties. We find that ATP binding induces a ratchet-like docking of the neck linker and simultaneous, parallel docking of the N-terminal cover strand. Loop L5, the binding site for allosteric inhibitors of kinesin-5, also undergoes a dramatic reorientation when ATP binds, suggesting that it is directly involved in controlling nucleotide binding. Our structures indicate that allosteric inhibitors of human kinesin-5, which are being developed as anti-cancer therapeutics, bind to a motor conformation that occurs in the course of normal function. However, due to evolutionarily defined sequence variations in L5, this conformation is not adopted by invertebrate kinesin-5s, explaining their resistance to drug inhibition. Together, our data reveal the precision with which the molecular mechanism of kinesin-5 motors has evolved for force generation. PMID:23135273

  12. Generation of ultrasound radiation force with the use of time reversal acoustics principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvazyan, Armen; Sutin, Alexander

    2005-09-01

    There are numerous medical applications of ultrasound radiation force (RF) which could be made more effective using the time reversal acoustics (TRA) principles. This paper gives an overview of research into physical and technical bases of RF generation in heterogeneous biological media using TRA focusing systems. A custom-designed compact multichannel TRA system for receiving, digitizing, storing, time reversing, and transmitting acoustic signals in a wide frequency range from 0.01 to 10 MHz has been developed and extensively tested in model systems and ex vivo tissues and bones. Shear strain and shear waves remotely induced in soft tissues and bones by radiation force were detected using various acoustical and optical means. Experimental studies fully confirmed the feasibility of TRA generation of RF and demonstrated several advantages over conventional means of remotely inducing shear stress in biological media. These advantages include a possibility to create highly localized (close to diffraction limit) shear stress in heterogeneous media stir focused ultrasound beam in 3-D volume using very simple hardware. [Work supported by NIH grant.

  13. Evaluating Statistical Process Control (SPC) techniques and computing the uncertainty of force calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navard, Sharon E.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years there has been a push within NASA to use statistical techniques to improve the quality of production. Two areas where statistics are used are in establishing product and process quality control of flight hardware and in evaluating the uncertainty of calibration of instruments. The Flight Systems Quality Engineering branch is responsible for developing and assuring the quality of all flight hardware; the statistical process control methods employed are reviewed and evaluated. The Measurement Standards and Calibration Laboratory performs the calibration of all instruments used on-site at JSC as well as those used by all off-site contractors. These calibrations must be performed in such a way as to be traceable to national standards maintained by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and they must meet a four-to-one ratio of the instrument specifications to calibrating standard uncertainty. In some instances this ratio is not met, and in these cases it is desirable to compute the exact uncertainty of the calibration and determine ways of reducing it. A particular example where this problem is encountered is with a machine which does automatic calibrations of force. The process of force calibration using the United Force Machine is described in detail. The sources of error are identified and quantified when possible. Suggestions for improvement are made.

  14. Next Generation Workload Management System For Big Data on Heterogeneous Distributed Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Klimentov, A.; Buncic, P.; De, K.; Jha, S.; Maeno, T.; Mount, R.; Nilsson, P.; Oleynik, D.; Panitkin, S.; Petrosyan, A.; Porter, R. J.; Read, K. F.; Vaniachine, A.; Wells, J. C.; Wenaus, T.

    2015-05-22

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), operating at the international CERN Laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, is leading Big Data driven scientific explorations. Experiments at the LHC explore the fundamental nature of matter and the basic forces that shape our universe, and were recently credited for the discovery of a Higgs boson. ATLAS and ALICE are the largest collaborations ever assembled in the sciences and are at the forefront of research at the LHC. To address an unprecedented multi-petabyte data processing challenge, both experiments rely on a heterogeneous distributed computational infrastructure. The ATLAS experiment uses PanDA (Production and Data Analysis) Workload Management System (WMS) for managing the workflow for all data processing on hundreds of data centers. Through PanDA, ATLAS physicists see a single computing facility that enables rapid scientific breakthroughs for the experiment, even though the data centers are physically scattered all over the world. The scale is demonstrated by the following numbers: PanDA manages O(102) sites, O(105) cores, O(108) jobs per year, O(103) users, and ATLAS data volume is O(1017) bytes. In 2013 we started an ambitious program to expand PanDA to all available computing resources, including opportunistic use of commercial and academic clouds and Leadership Computing Facilities (LCF). The project titled 'Next Generation Workload Management and Analysis System for Big Data' (BigPanDA) is funded by DOE ASCR and HEP. Extending PanDA to clouds and LCF presents new challenges in managing heterogeneity and supporting workflow. The BigPanDA project is underway to setup and tailor PanDA at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) and at the National Research Center "Kurchatov Institute" together with ALICE distributed computing and ORNL computing professionals. Our approach to integration of HPC platforms at the OLCF and elsewhere is to reuse, as much as

  15. Next Generation Workload Management System For Big Data on Heterogeneous Distributed Computing

    DOE PAGES

    Klimentov, A.; Buncic, P.; De, K.; Jha, S.; Maeno, T.; Mount, R.; Nilsson, P.; Oleynik, D.; Panitkin, S.; Petrosyan, A.; et al

    2015-05-22

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), operating at the international CERN Laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, is leading Big Data driven scientific explorations. Experiments at the LHC explore the fundamental nature of matter and the basic forces that shape our universe, and were recently credited for the discovery of a Higgs boson. ATLAS and ALICE are the largest collaborations ever assembled in the sciences and are at the forefront of research at the LHC. To address an unprecedented multi-petabyte data processing challenge, both experiments rely on a heterogeneous distributed computational infrastructure. The ATLAS experiment uses PanDA (Production and Data Analysis) Workload Managementmore » System (WMS) for managing the workflow for all data processing on hundreds of data centers. Through PanDA, ATLAS physicists see a single computing facility that enables rapid scientific breakthroughs for the experiment, even though the data centers are physically scattered all over the world. The scale is demonstrated by the following numbers: PanDA manages O(102) sites, O(105) cores, O(108) jobs per year, O(103) users, and ATLAS data volume is O(1017) bytes. In 2013 we started an ambitious program to expand PanDA to all available computing resources, including opportunistic use of commercial and academic clouds and Leadership Computing Facilities (LCF). The project titled 'Next Generation Workload Management and Analysis System for Big Data' (BigPanDA) is funded by DOE ASCR and HEP. Extending PanDA to clouds and LCF presents new challenges in managing heterogeneity and supporting workflow. The BigPanDA project is underway to setup and tailor PanDA at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) and at the National Research Center "Kurchatov Institute" together with ALICE distributed computing and ORNL computing professionals. Our approach to integration of HPC platforms at the OLCF and elsewhere is to reuse, as much as possible, existing components of the PanDA system

  16. Next Generation Workload Management System For Big Data on Heterogeneous Distributed Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimentov, A.; Buncic, P.; De, K.; Jha, S.; Maeno, T.; Mount, R.; Nilsson, P.; Oleynik, D.; Panitkin, S.; Petrosyan, A.; Porter, R. J.; Read, K. F.; Vaniachine, A.; Wells, J. C.; Wenaus, T.

    2015-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), operating at the international CERN Laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, is leading Big Data driven scientific explorations. Experiments at the LHC explore the fundamental nature of matter and the basic forces that shape our universe, and were recently credited for the discovery of a Higgs boson. ATLAS and ALICE are the largest collaborations ever assembled in the sciences and are at the forefront of research at the LHC. To address an unprecedented multi-petabyte data processing challenge, both experiments rely on a heterogeneous distributed computational infrastructure. The ATLAS experiment uses PanDA (Production and Data Analysis) Workload Management System (WMS) for managing the workflow for all data processing on hundreds of data centers. Through PanDA, ATLAS physicists see a single computing facility that enables rapid scientific breakthroughs for the experiment, even though the data centers are physically scattered all over the world. The scale is demonstrated by the following numbers: PanDA manages O(102) sites, O(105) cores, O(108) jobs per year, O(103) users, and ATLAS data volume is O(1017) bytes. In 2013 we started an ambitious program to expand PanDA to all available computing resources, including opportunistic use of commercial and academic clouds and Leadership Computing Facilities (LCF). The project titled ‘Next Generation Workload Management and Analysis System for Big Data’ (BigPanDA) is funded by DOE ASCR and HEP. Extending PanDA to clouds and LCF presents new challenges in managing heterogeneity and supporting workflow. The BigPanDA project is underway to setup and tailor PanDA at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) and at the National Research Center "Kurchatov Institute" together with ALICE distributed computing and ORNL computing professionals. Our approach to integration of HPC platforms at the OLCF and elsewhere is to reuse, as much as possible, existing components of the PanDA system. We

  17. Variables Affecting the Legibility of Computer Generated Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, Simon; Hannafin, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses text displayed on computer screens and examines the effects of three layout variables--justification, line length, and leading--on reading speed and comprehension. Current literature on each variable is reviewed, and implications for the design of computer-based instruction are presented. (Author/LRW)

  18. A New Multivariate Approach in Generating Ensemble Meteorological Forcings for Hydrological Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajehei, Sepideh; Moradkhani, Hamid

    2015-04-01

    Producing reliable and accurate hydrologic ensemble forecasts are subject to various sources of uncertainty, including meteorological forcing, initial conditions, model structure, and model parameters. Producing reliable and skillful precipitation ensemble forecasts is one approach to reduce the total uncertainty in hydrological applications. Currently, National Weather Prediction (NWP) models are developing ensemble forecasts for various temporal ranges. It is proven that raw products from NWP models are biased in mean and spread. Given the above state, there is a need for methods that are able to generate reliable ensemble forecasts for hydrological applications. One of the common techniques is to apply statistical procedures in order to generate ensemble forecast from NWP-generated single-value forecasts. The procedure is based on the bivariate probability distribution between the observation and single-value precipitation forecast. However, one of the assumptions of the current method is fitting Gaussian distribution to the marginal distributions of observed and modeled climate variable. Here, we have described and evaluated a Bayesian approach based on Copula functions to develop an ensemble precipitation forecast from the conditional distribution of single-value precipitation forecasts. Copula functions are known as the multivariate joint distribution of univariate marginal distributions, which are presented as an alternative procedure in capturing the uncertainties related to meteorological forcing. Copulas are capable of modeling the joint distribution of two variables with any level of correlation and dependency. This study is conducted over a sub-basin in the Columbia River Basin in USA using the monthly precipitation forecasts from Climate Forecast System (CFS) with 0.5x0.5 Deg. spatial resolution to reproduce the observations. The verification is conducted on a different period and the superiority of the procedure is compared with Ensemble Pre

  19. A polarizable force field for computing the infrared spectra of the polypeptide backbone.

    PubMed

    Schultheis, Verena; Reichold, Rudolf; Schropp, Bernhard; Tavan, Paul

    2008-10-01

    The shapes of the amide bands in the infrared (IR) spectra of proteins and peptides are caused by electrostatically coupled vibrations within the polypeptide backbone and code the structures of these biopolymers. A structural decoding of the amide bands has to resort to simplified models because the huge size of these macromolecules prevents the application of accurate quantum mechanical methods such as density functional theory (DFT). Previous models employed transition-dipole coupling methods that are of limited accuracy. Here we propose a concept for the computation of protein IR spectra, which describes the molecular mechanics (MM) of polypeptide backbones by a polarizable force field of "type II". By extending the concepts of conventional polarizable MM force fields, such a PMM/II approach employs field-dependent parameters not only for the electrostatic signatures of the molecular components but also for the local potentials modeling the stiffness of chemical bonds with respect to elongations, angle deformations, and torsions. Using a PMM/II force field, the IR spectra of the polypeptide backbone can be efficiently calculated from the time dependence of the backbone's dipole moment during a short (e.g., 100 ps) MD simulation by Fourier transformation. PMM/II parameters are derived for harmonic bonding potentials of amide groups in polypeptides from a series of DFT calculations on the model molecule N-methylacetamide (NMA) exposed to homogeneous external electric fields. The amide force constants are shown to vary by as much as 20% for relevant field strengths. As a proof of principle, it is shown that the large solvatochromic effects observed in the IR spectra of NMA upon transfer from the gas phase into aqueous solution are not only excellently reproduced by DFT/MM simulations but are also nicely modeled by the PMM/II approach. The tasks remaining for a proof of practice are specified.

  20. Fast generation of a high-quality computer-generated hologram using a scalable and flexible PC cluster.

    PubMed

    Song, Joongseok; Kim, Changseob; Park, Hanhoon; Park, Jong-Il

    2016-05-01

    In order to efficiently generate a high-quality computer-generated hologram (HQ-CGH), which requires that both a three-dimensional object image and its computer-generated hologram (CGH) are in high-definition resolution, we implement a fast CGH generation system using a scalable and flexible personal computer (PC) cluster. From experimental results obtained in generating a HQ-CGH with a CGH resolution of 1536×1536 and 2,155,898 light sources using a PC cluster comprising a server PC and nine client PCs, it is verified that the proposed system is approximately 4.7 times faster than a single PC with two high-performance GPUs.

  1. Computer skills for the next generation of healthcare executives.

    PubMed

    Côté, Murray J; Van Enyde, Donald F; DelliFraine, Jami L; Tucker, Stephen L

    2005-01-01

    Students beginning a career in healthcare administration must possess an array of professional and management skills in addition to a strong fundamental understanding of the field of healthcare administration. Proficient computer skills are a prime example of an essential management tool for healthcare administrators. However, it is unclear which computer skills are absolutely necessary for healthcare administrators and the extent of congruency between the computer skills possessed by new graduates and the needs of senior healthcare professionals. Our objectives in this research are to assess which computer skills are the most important to senior healthcare executives and recent healthcare administration graduates and examine the level of agreement between the two groups. Based on a survey of senior healthcare executives and graduate healthcare administration students, we identify a comprehensive and pragmatic array of computer skills and categorize them into four groups, according to their importance, for making recent health administration graduates valuable in the healthcare administration workplace. Traditional parametric hypothesis tests are used to assess congruency between responses of senior executives and of recent healthcare administration graduates. For each skill, responses of the two groups are averaged to create an overall ranking of the computer skills. Not surprisingly, both groups agreed on the importance of computer skills for recent healthcare administration graduates. In particular, computer skills such as word processing, graphics and presentation, using operating systems, creating and editing databases, spreadsheet analysis, using imported data, e-mail, using electronic bulletin boards, and downloading information were among the highest ranked computer skills necessary for recent graduates. However, there were statistically significant differences in perceptions between senior executives and healthcare administration students as to the extent

  2. Computer skills for the next generation of healthcare executives.

    PubMed

    Côté, Murray J; Van Enyde, Donald F; DelliFraine, Jami L; Tucker, Stephen L

    2005-01-01

    Students beginning a career in healthcare administration must possess an array of professional and management skills in addition to a strong fundamental understanding of the field of healthcare administration. Proficient computer skills are a prime example of an essential management tool for healthcare administrators. However, it is unclear which computer skills are absolutely necessary for healthcare administrators and the extent of congruency between the computer skills possessed by new graduates and the needs of senior healthcare professionals. Our objectives in this research are to assess which computer skills are the most important to senior healthcare executives and recent healthcare administration graduates and examine the level of agreement between the two groups. Based on a survey of senior healthcare executives and graduate healthcare administration students, we identify a comprehensive and pragmatic array of computer skills and categorize them into four groups, according to their importance, for making recent health administration graduates valuable in the healthcare administration workplace. Traditional parametric hypothesis tests are used to assess congruency between responses of senior executives and of recent healthcare administration graduates. For each skill, responses of the two groups are averaged to create an overall ranking of the computer skills. Not surprisingly, both groups agreed on the importance of computer skills for recent healthcare administration graduates. In particular, computer skills such as word processing, graphics and presentation, using operating systems, creating and editing databases, spreadsheet analysis, using imported data, e-mail, using electronic bulletin boards, and downloading information were among the highest ranked computer skills necessary for recent graduates. However, there were statistically significant differences in perceptions between senior executives and healthcare administration students as to the extent

  3. (abstract) The Nest Generation of Space Flight Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkalaj, Leon; Panwar, Ramesh

    1993-01-01

    To meet new design objectives for drastic reductions in mass, size, and power consumption, the Flight Computer Development Group at JPL is participating in a design study and development of a light-weight, small-sized, low-power 3-D Space Flight Computer. In this paper, we will present a detailed design and tradeoff study of the proposed computer. We will also discuss a complete design of the multichip modules and their size, weight, and power consumption. Prelimimary thermal models will also be discussed.

  4. Navier-Stokes Computations of Longitudinal Forces and Moments for a Blended Wing Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul; Biedron, Robert T.; Park, Michael A.; Fremaux, C. Michael; Vicroy, Dan D.

    2005-01-01

    The object of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of applying CFD methods to aerodynamic analyses for aircraft stability and control. The integrated aerodynamic parameters used in stability and control, however, are not necessarily those extensively validated in the state of the art CFD technology. Hence, an exploratory study of such applications and the comparison of the solutions to available experimental data will help to assess the validity of the current computation methods. In addition, this study will also examine issues related to wind tunnel measurements such as measurement uncertainty and support interference effects. Several sets of experimental data from the NASA Langley 14x22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel and the National Transonic Facility are presented. Two Navier-Stokes flow solvers, one using structured meshes and the other unstructured meshes, were used to compute longitudinal static stability derivatives for an advanced Blended Wing Body configuration over a wide range of angles of attack. The computations were performed for two different Reynolds numbers and the resulting forces and moments are compared with the above mentioned wind tunnel data.

  5. Navier-Stokes Computations of Longitudinal Forces and Moments for a Blended Wing Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul; Biedron, Robert T.; Park, Michael A.; Fremaux, C. Michael; Vicroy, Dan D.

    2004-01-01

    The object of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of applying CFD methods to aerodynamic analyses for aircraft stability and control. The integrated aerodynamic parameters used in stability and control, however, are not necessarily those extensively validated in the state of the art CFD technology. Hence, an exploratory study of such applications and the comparison of the solutions to available experimental data will help to assess the validity of the current computation methods. In addition, this study will also examine issues related to wind tunnel measurements such as measurement uncertainty and support interference effects. Several sets of experimental data from the NASA Langley 14x22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel and the National Transonic Facility are presented. Two Navier-Stokes flow solvers, one using structured meshes and the other unstructured meshes, were used to compute longitudinal static stability derivatives for an advanced Blended Wing Body configuration over a wide range of angles of attack. The computations were performed for two different Reynolds numbers and the resulting forces and moments are compared with the above mentioned wind tunnel data.

  6. Computation of radiation pressure force on arbitrary shaped homogenous particles by multilevel fast multipole algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yang, Minglin; Ren, Kuan Fang; Gou, Mingjiang; Sheng, Xinqing

    2013-06-01

    A full-wave numerical method based on the surface integral equation for computing radiation pressure force (RPF) exerted by a shaped light beam on arbitrary shaped homogenous particles is presented. The multilevel fast multipole algorithm is employed to reduce memory requirement and to improve its capability. The resultant matrix equation is solved by using an iterative solver to obtain equivalent electric and magnetic currents. Then RPF is computed by vector flux of the Maxwell's stress tensor over a spherical surface tightly enclosing the particle. So the analytical expressions for electromagnetic fields of incident beam in near region are used. Some numerical results are performed to illustrate the validity and capability of the developed method. Good agreements between our method and the Lorenz-Mie theory for spherical and small spheroidal particle are found while our method has powerful capability for computing RPF of any shaped beam on a relatively large particle of complex shape. Tests for ellipsoidal and red blood cell-like particles illuminated by Gaussian beam have shown that the size of the particle can be as large as 50-100 wavelengths, respectively, for the relative refractive of 1.33 and 1.1.

  7. Mean and fluctuating basal forces generated by granular flows: Laboratory observations in a large vertically rotating drum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, L.; Dietrich, W. E.; Sklar, L. S.

    2014-06-01

    A flowing granular mass generates forces on the boundary that drive near-bed grain dynamics, bed surface erosion, and energy dissipation. Few quantitative analyses exist of the controls on the dynamically fluctuating force caused by granular flows with wide-grain-size distributions and a liquid phase in the pores. To study the mechanisms controlling the boundary forces, we used a 225 cm2 load plate to measure the bed-normal force from a suite of granular flows in a 4 m diameter, 80 cm wide vertically rotating drum. We analyzed the time series of bed forces generated in flows composed of granular material for both narrow (gravel-water) and wide (muddy, sand-gravel-cobble) grain-size distributions. The tail of the force distribution was captured more closely by a generalized Pareto distribution than an exponential distribution, suggesting a way to predict empirically the force distribution. We show that the impulse on the bed, related to kinetic energy transferred to the bed from the granular collisions, is quantified by the standard deviation of the force. The mean bulk force equaled the static weight of the flow, whereas the force fluctuations, represented by the standard deviation and the averaged top 1% of force, were a near-linear function of effective grain diameter and flow velocity, and a ˜0.5 power function of an inertial stress scaling term. The force fluctuations depend on both Savage and Bagnold numbers. The correlations revealed in this study suggest that it may be possible to estimate dynamic forces on the bed from gross properties of the flows.

  8. Generalized lattice Boltzmann equation with forcing term for computation of wall-bounded turbulent flows.

    PubMed

    Premnath, Kannan N; Pattison, Martin J; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we present a framework based on the generalized lattice Boltzmann equation (GLBE) using multiple relaxation times with forcing term for eddy capturing simulation of wall-bounded turbulent flows. Due to its flexibility in using disparate relaxation times, the GLBE is well suited to maintaining numerical stability on coarser grids and in obtaining improved solution fidelity of near-wall turbulent fluctuations. The subgrid scale (SGS) turbulence effects are represented by the standard Smagorinsky eddy viscosity model, which is modified by using the van Driest wall-damping function to account for reduction of turbulent length scales near walls. In order to be able to simulate a wider class of problems, we introduce forcing terms, which can represent the effects of general nonuniform forms of forces, in the natural moment space of the GLBE. Expressions for the strain rate tensor used in the SGS model are derived in terms of the nonequilibrium moments of the GLBE to include such forcing terms, which comprise a generalization of those presented in a recent work [Yu, Comput. Fluids 35, 957 (2006)]. Variable resolutions are introduced into this extended GLBE framework through a conservative multiblock approach. The approach, whose optimized implementation is also discussed, is assessed for two canonical flow problems bounded by walls, viz., fully developed turbulent channel flow at a shear or friction Reynolds number (Re) of 183.6 based on the channel half-width and three-dimensional (3D) shear-driven flows in a cubical cavity at a Re of 12 000 based on the side length of the cavity. Comparisons of detailed computed near-wall turbulent flow structure, given in terms of various turbulence statistics, with available data, including those from direct numerical simulations (DNS) and experiments showed good agreement. The GLBE approach also exhibited markedly better stability characteristics and avoided spurious near-wall turbulent fluctuations on coarser grids

  9. Generalized lattice Boltzmann equation with forcing term for computation of wall-bounded turbulent flows.

    PubMed

    Premnath, Kannan N; Pattison, Martin J; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we present a framework based on the generalized lattice Boltzmann equation (GLBE) using multiple relaxation times with forcing term for eddy capturing simulation of wall-bounded turbulent flows. Due to its flexibility in using disparate relaxation times, the GLBE is well suited to maintaining numerical stability on coarser grids and in obtaining improved solution fidelity of near-wall turbulent fluctuations. The subgrid scale (SGS) turbulence effects are represented by the standard Smagorinsky eddy viscosity model, which is modified by using the van Driest wall-damping function to account for reduction of turbulent length scales near walls. In order to be able to simulate a wider class of problems, we introduce forcing terms, which can represent the effects of general nonuniform forms of forces, in the natural moment space of the GLBE. Expressions for the strain rate tensor used in the SGS model are derived in terms of the nonequilibrium moments of the GLBE to include such forcing terms, which comprise a generalization of those presented in a recent work [Yu, Comput. Fluids 35, 957 (2006)]. Variable resolutions are introduced into this extended GLBE framework through a conservative multiblock approach. The approach, whose optimized implementation is also discussed, is assessed for two canonical flow problems bounded by walls, viz., fully developed turbulent channel flow at a shear or friction Reynolds number (Re) of 183.6 based on the channel half-width and three-dimensional (3D) shear-driven flows in a cubical cavity at a Re of 12 000 based on the side length of the cavity. Comparisons of detailed computed near-wall turbulent flow structure, given in terms of various turbulence statistics, with available data, including those from direct numerical simulations (DNS) and experiments showed good agreement. The GLBE approach also exhibited markedly better stability characteristics and avoided spurious near-wall turbulent fluctuations on coarser grids

  10. Computational studies of protein-membrane interactions and forced unfolding of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krammer, Andre Thomas

    2000-11-01

    A novel computational technique called steered molecular dynamics (SMD) is used to study the forced unfolding of protein domains possessing a β-sandwich structure consisting of two antiparallel β-sheets. Immunoglobulin domains of the muscle protein titin, as well as type III domains of the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin are investigated using this novel computational approach. The unfolding pathways of individual domains for both module types exhibit similar force-extension profiles consisting of a single pronounced peak for the unfolding of each domain, consistent with the experimentally observed consecutive domain unfolding under external tension. The domain rupture event that is reported at an early stage of the unfolding pathway can be attributed to the breakage of a cluster of hydrogen bond pairs between terminal β-strands. SMD simulations of the RGD-containing fibronectin type III domain, FnIII 10, reveal that the C- terminal β-strand breaks away first from the domain on forced unfolding whereas the remaining fold maintains its structural integrity. The separation of this strand from the remaining fold perturbes the conformation of the RGD-loop that mediates cell adhesion to membrane-bound integrins. This suggests that the RDG-loop is located strategically to undergo conformational changes in the early stretching stages of the domain and thus constitutes a mechanosensitive cell-adhesion control. Constant force SMD simulations of four fibronectin type III domains leads to estimates of their unfolding energy barrier from which their relative mechanical stability can be deduced. Two distinct barriers for each domain are observed and indicate the existence of an intermediate state with the two β-sheets sheared against each other and their β-strands aligned in parallel. The conformation and stability of a bombesin peptide inserted into a fully hydrated dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayer are investigated by means of molecular dynamics

  11. Dynamic actin interaction of cross-bridges during force generation: implications for cross-bridge action in muscle.

    PubMed

    Brenner, B

    1993-01-01

    The force response of Ca(2+)-activated, permeabilized segments of rabbit psoas muscle fibers to stretches and releases was studied. These length changes were imposed (i) during isometric steady state contraction, (ii) as a restretch at the end of a ramp-shaped prerelease, and (iii) during isotonic steady state shortening. The speed of the stretches/releases was varied between about 10 and 10(5) (nm/half-sarcomere)/s. At physiological ionic strength and at low temperature (5 degrees C), the force response to stretches apparently is neither affected by cross-bridges that occupy weak-binding states nor by redistribution among various attached force-generating states. Plots of force vs. imposed length change ("T-plots") and plots of apparent fiber stiffness vs. speed of the imposed length change ("stiffness-speed relations") recorded under all these conditions suggest that cross-bridges, even during force-generation, dissociate and reassociate from and to actin on a time scale that is fast compared to active cross-bridge cycling (> 50- 1000s-1 vs. 1-10s-1). This rapid dissociation/reassociation of force-generating cross-bridges may provide a mechanism to account for the unexpectedly low ATPase activity during high-speed shortening and for filament sliding exceeding 10-20nm while a cross-bridge passes through the force-generating states.

  12. Fifth-generation computing: dedicated software is the key

    SciTech Connect

    Hindin, H.J.

    1984-09-01

    The nation that controls the manufacture of the best of tomorrow's computers will emerge as the dominant economic power. But, VLSI chips will not determine the best computers. Software, uniquely designed and tailored to an application, will drive the machines that will be made with commodity-like, readily available hardware. Three distinct, but overlapping computer types will dominate the artificial intelligence-based machine that simulates human behavior; the supercomputer geared to high speed number crunching and massive calculations; and the ''standard'' home, factory, or office machine, be it micro, mini, or mainframe. With fine-tuned software, the AI computer will use languages that optimize its symbolic processing and logic manipulations. Meanwhile, the supercomputer will use software geared to its highly parallel architecture, and the ''run-of-the-mill'' machine will feature easy-to-use, portable software that facilitates the networked home, office, and factory.

  13. Numerical study of eigenmode forcing effects on jet flow development and noise generation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiderling, Felix; Kleiser, Leonhard; Bogey, Christophe

    2009-04-01

    The effect of nonlinear interaction of instability eigenmodes on jet flow transition and its near acoustic field for a high-subsonic round jet at a Reynolds number of Re=4.5×105 and a Mach number of Ma=0.9 is investigated using large-eddy simulations. At the inflow, helical perturbations of azimuthal wavenumbers |n|=4,…,8 determined from linear stability theory are superimposed on a laminar base flow in order to trigger transition to turbulence. The disturbance amplitude is varied parametrically in the range from 1.5% to 4.5% of the jet exit velocity Uj. Thereby we aim to characterize sources of noise generation and, in particular, underlying mode interactions. With increasing forcing amplitude, the transitional behavior of the jet changes which affects the mean flow and also the acoustic near-field, which are both analyzed in detail. As the forcing amplitude is increased, the axial root-mean-square peak levels along the jet centerline are reduced by approximately 7%. Simultaneously, pronounced dual-peak distributions are generated along the jet lip line which are related to the localization of vortex pairings of the jet column mode. For low-amplitude excitation the azimuthal turbulent kinetic energy spectra show that the unexcited, naturally least stable axisymmetric mode n =0 and the helical mode n =1 dominate the early nonlinear regimes between z ≈6r0 and 9r0 where r0 is the jet radius. An analysis of the Fourier mode amplitude clarifies that this energy rise is linked to the helical mode n =1. For higher forcing amplitudes, in addition to the varicose mode n =0 interactions between the excited even mode n =4 and higher azimuthal harmonics thereof dominate the azimuthal energy spectra. These differences in the early nonlinear development of the eigenmodes are found to alter the acoustic near-field. At small angles from the downstream jet axis, the peak acoustic frequency occurs at a Strouhal number based on the angular frequency ω and the jet diameter Dj

  14. Boundary conditions for direct computation of aerodynamic sound generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colonius, Tim; Lele, Sanjiva K.; Moin, Parviz

    1992-01-01

    A numerical scheme suitable for the computation of both the near field acoustic sources and the far field sound produced by turbulent free shear flows utilizing the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. To produce stable numerical schemes in the presence of shear, damping terms must be added to the boundary conditions. The numerical technique and boundary conditions are found to give stable results for computations of spatially evolving mixing layers.

  15. On the generation of flight dynamics aerodynamic tables by computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Ronch, A.; Ghoreyshi, M.; Badcock, K. J.

    2011-11-01

    An approach for the generation of aerodynamic tables using computational fluid dynamics is discussed. For aircraft flight dynamics, forces and moments are often tabulated in multi-dimensional look-up tables, requiring a large number of calculations to fill the tables. A method to efficiently reduce the number of high-fidelity analyses is reviewed. The method uses a kriging-based surrogate model. Low-fidelity (computationally cheap) estimates are augmented with higher fidelity data. Data fusion combines the two datasets into one single database. The approach can also handle changes in aircraft geometry. Once constructed, the look-up tables can be used in real-time to fly the aircraft through the database. To demonstrate the capabilities of the framework presented, five test cases are considered. These include a transonic cruiser concept design, an unconventional configuration, two passenger jet aircraft, and a jet trainer aircraft. Investigations into the areas of flight handling qualities, stability and control characteristics and manoeuvring aircraft are made. To assess the accuracy of the simulations, numerical results are also compared with wind tunnel and flight test data.

  16. Grid generation for two-dimensional finite element flowfield computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatum, K. E.

    1980-01-01

    The finite element method for fluid dynamics was used to develop a two dimensional mesh generation scheme. The method consists of shearing and conformal maps with upper and lower surfaces handled independently to allow sharp leading edges. The method also generates meshes of triangular or quadrilateral elements.

  17. Nature of the coupling between neural drive and force-generating capacity in the human quadriceps muscle.

    PubMed

    Hug, François; Goupille, Clément; Baum, Daniel; Raiteri, Brent J; Hodges, Paul W; Tucker, Kylie

    2015-11-22

    The force produced by a muscle depends on both the neural drive it receives and several biomechanical factors. When multiple muscles act on a single joint, the nature of the relationship between the neural drive and force-generating capacity of the synergistic muscles is largely unknown. This study aimed to determine the relationship between the ratio of neural drive and the ratio of muscle force-generating capacity between two synergist muscles (vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus medialis (VM)) in humans. Twenty-one participants performed isometric knee extensions at 20 and 50% of maximal voluntary contractions (MVC). Myoelectric activity (surface electromyography (EMG)) provided an index of neural drive. Physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) was estimated from measurements of muscle volume (magnetic resonance imaging) and muscle fascicle length (three-dimensional ultrasound imaging) to represent the muscles' force-generating capacities. Neither PCSA nor neural drive was balanced between VL and VM. There was a large (r = 0.68) and moderate (r = 0.43) correlation between the ratio of VL/VM EMG amplitude and the ratio of VL/VM PCSA at 20 and 50% of MVC, respectively. This study provides evidence that neural drive is biased by muscle force-generating capacity, the greater the force-generating capacity of VL compared with VM, the stronger bias of drive to the VL.

  18. Group B streptococcus has no effect on piglet diaphragmatic force generation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, T D; Mayock, D E; Standaert, T A; Gibson, R L; Woodrum, D E

    1992-02-01

    Recent studies indicate that diaphragmatic contractility is adversely affected by bacterial infection. Using transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi) with phrenic nerve stimulation, the effect of continuous Group B Streptococcus (GBS) infusion on diaphragmatic force output was studied in seven anesthetized, spontaneously breathing 1-month old piglets. Pdi was measured under baseline condition (50% O2/50% N2) and at 1, 2, and 4 h of GBS infusion. The GBS was infused at a level that caused a doubling of the pulmonary artery pressure and a 32% decrease in cardiac output but which avoided hypotension or acidosis--both of which can decrease diaphragmatic contractility. In addition, the piglets were kept hyperoxic (PaO2 greater than 100) and no piglet with hypercapnia (PaCO2 greater than 65) was studied, as hypoxia and hypercapnia also can cause respiratory muscle dysfunction. Pdi in response to phrenic nerve stimulation did not change during GBS infusion. We conclude that GBS infusion, in the absence of hypotension, hypercapnia, hypoxia, or acidosis, has no effect on diaphragmatic force generation in the piglet. PMID:1736760

  19. Spring constant calibration techniques for next-generation fast-scanning atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Ashley D; Blanch, Adam J; Ejov, Vladimir; Quinton, Jamie S; Gibson, Christopher T

    2014-08-22

    As a recent technological development, high-speed atomic force microscopy (AFM) has provided unprecedented insights into dynamic processes on the nanoscale, and is capable of measuring material property variation over short timescales. Miniaturized cantilevers developed specifically for high-speed AFM differ greatly from standard cantilevers both in size and dynamic properties, and calibration of the cantilever spring constant is critical for accurate, quantitative measurement. This work investigates specifically, the calibration of these new-generation cantilevers for the first time. Existing techniques are tested and the challenges encountered are reported and the most effective approaches for calibrating fast-scanning cantilevers with high accuracy are identified, providing a resource for microscopists in this rapidly developing field. Not only do these cantilevers offer faster acquisition of images and force data but due to their high resonant frequencies (up to 2 MHz) they are also excellent mass sensors. Accurate measurement of deposited mass requires accurate calibration of the cantilever spring constant, therefore the results of this work will also be useful for mass-sensing applications.

  20. The Role of Rac1 in the Growth Cone Dynamics and Force Generation of DRG Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sayyad, Wasim A.; Fabris, Paolo; Torre, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    We used optical tweezers, video imaging, immunocytochemistry and a variety of inhibitors to analyze the role of Rac1 in the motility and force generation of lamellipodia and filopodia from developing growth cones of isolated Dorsal Root Ganglia neurons. When the activity of Rac1 was inhibited by the drug EHop-016, the period of lamellipodia protrusion/retraction cycles increased and the lamellipodia retrograde flow rate decreased; moreover, the axial force exerted by lamellipodia was reduced dramatically. Inhibition of Arp2/3 by a moderate amount of the drug CK-548 caused a transient retraction of lamellipodia followed by a complete recovery of their usual motility. This recovery was abolished by the concomitant inhibition of Rac1. The filopodia length increased upon inhibition of both Rac1 and Arp2/3, but the speed of filopodia protrusion increased when Rac1 was inhibited and decreased instead when Arp2/3 was inhibited. These results suggest that Rac1 acts as a switch that activates upon inhibition of Arp2/3. Rac1 also controls the filopodia dynamics necessary to explore the environment. PMID:26766136

  1. New liquid aerosol generation devices: systems that force pressurized liquids through nozzles.

    PubMed

    Geller, David E

    2002-12-01

    Over the past few decades, aerosol delivery devices have been relatively inefficient, wasteful, and difficult for patients to use. These drawbacks have been tolerated because the drugs available for inhalation have wide therapeutic margins and steep dose-response curves at low doses. Recently several forces have converged to drive innovation in the aerosol device industry: the ban on chlorofluorocarbon propellants in metered-dose inhalers, the need for more user-friendly devices, and the invention of expensive inhalable therapies for topical and systemic lung delivery. Numerous devices are in development to improve the efficiency, ease of use, and reproducibility of aerosol delivery to the lung, including systems that force liquid through a nozzle to form the aerosol cloud. The Respimat is a novel, compact, propellant-free, multi-dose inhaler that employs a spring to push drug solution through a nozzle, which generates a slow-moving aerosol. Deposition studies show that the Respimat can deliver 39-44% of a dose to the lungs. Clinical asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease trials with bronchodilators show that the Respimat is 2-8 times as effective as a metered-dose inhaler. Respimat has been tested with bronchodilators and inhaled corticosteroids. The AERx device uses sophisticated electronics to deliver aerosol from a single-dose blister, using an integral, disposable nozzle array. The electronics control dose expression and titration, timing of aerosol generation with the breath, and provide feedback for proper inhalation technique. Lung deposition ranges from 50 to 80% of the loaded dose, with remarkable reproducibility. AERx has been tested with a variety of drugs, for both topical and systemic delivery, including rhDNase (dornase alfa), insulin, and opioids. These novel devices face competition from other technologies as well as financial and regulatory hurdles, but they both offer a marked improvement in the efficiency of pulmonary drug delivery.

  2. Formate Metabolism in Shewanella oneidensis Generates Proton Motive Force and Prevents Growth without an Electron Acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Aunica L.; Brutinel, Evan D.; Joo, Heena; Maysonet, Rebecca; VanDrisse, Chelsey M.; Kotloski, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that thrives in redox-stratified environments due to its ability to utilize a wide array of terminal electron acceptors. Conversely, the electron donors utilized by S. oneidensis are more limited and include products of primary fermentation such as lactate, pyruvate, formate, and hydrogen. Lactate, pyruvate, and hydrogen metabolisms in S. oneidensis have been described previously, but little is known about the role of formate oxidation in the ecophysiology of these bacteria. Formate is produced by S. oneidensis through pyruvate formate lyase during anaerobic growth on carbon sources that enter metabolism at or above the level of pyruvate, and the genome contains three gene clusters predicted to encode three complete formate dehydrogenase complexes. To determine the contribution of each complex to formate metabolism, strains lacking one, two, or all three annotated formate dehydrogenase gene clusters were generated and examined for growth rates and yields on a variety of carbon sources. Here, we report that formate oxidation contributes to both the growth rate and yield of S. oneidensis through the generation of proton motive force. Exogenous formate also greatly accelerated growth on N-acetylglucosamine, a carbon source normally utilized very slowly by S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions. Surprisingly, deletion of all three formate dehydrogenase gene clusters enabled growth of S. oneidensis using pyruvate in the absence of a terminal electron acceptor, a mode of growth never before observed in these bacteria. Our results demonstrate that formate oxidation is a fundamental strategy under anaerobic conditions for energy conservation in S. oneidensis. IMPORTANCE Shewanella species have garnered interest in biotechnology applications for their ability to respire extracellular terminal electron acceptors, such as insoluble iron oxides and electrodes. While much effort has gone into studying the

  3. Computation of the internal forces in cilia: application to ciliary motion, the effects of viscosity, and cilia interactions.

    PubMed

    Gueron, S; Levit-Gurevich, K

    1998-04-01

    This paper presents a simple and reasonable method for generating a phenomenological model of the internal mechanism of cilia. The model uses a relatively small number of parameters whose values can be obtained by fitting to ciliary beat shapes. Here, we use beat patterns observed in Paramecium. The forces that generate these beats are computed and fit to a simple functional form called the "engine." This engine is incorporated into a recently developed hydrodynamic model that accounts for interactions between neighboring cilia and between the cilia and the surface from which they emerge. The model results are compared to data on ciliary beat patterns of Paramecium obtained under conditions where the beats are two-dimensional. Many essential features of the motion, including several properties that are not built in explicitly, are shown to be captured. In particular, the model displays a realistic change in beat pattern and frequency in response to increased viscosity and to the presence of neighboring cilia in configurations such as rows of cilia and two-dimensional arrays of cilia. We found that when two adjacent model cilia start beating at different phases they become synchronized within several beat periods, as observed in experiments where two flagella are brought into close proximity. Furthermore, examination of various multiciliary configurations shows that an approximately antiplectic wave pattern evolves autonomously. This modeling evidence supports earlier conjectures that metachronism may occur, at least partially, as a self-organized phenomenon due to hydrodynamic interactions between neighboring cilia. PMID:9545031

  4. Computation of the internal forces in cilia: application to ciliary motion, the effects of viscosity, and cilia interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Gueron, S; Levit-Gurevich, K

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a simple and reasonable method for generating a phenomenological model of the internal mechanism of cilia. The model uses a relatively small number of parameters whose values can be obtained by fitting to ciliary beat shapes. Here, we use beat patterns observed in Paramecium. The forces that generate these beats are computed and fit to a simple functional form called the "engine." This engine is incorporated into a recently developed hydrodynamic model that accounts for interactions between neighboring cilia and between the cilia and the surface from which they emerge. The model results are compared to data on ciliary beat patterns of Paramecium obtained under conditions where the beats are two-dimensional. Many essential features of the motion, including several properties that are not built in explicitly, are shown to be captured. In particular, the model displays a realistic change in beat pattern and frequency in response to increased viscosity and to the presence of neighboring cilia in configurations such as rows of cilia and two-dimensional arrays of cilia. We found that when two adjacent model cilia start beating at different phases they become synchronized within several beat periods, as observed in experiments where two flagella are brought into close proximity. Furthermore, examination of various multiciliary configurations shows that an approximately antiplectic wave pattern evolves autonomously. This modeling evidence supports earlier conjectures that metachronism may occur, at least partially, as a self-organized phenomenon due to hydrodynamic interactions between neighboring cilia. PMID:9545031

  5. Phase Aberration and Attenuation Effects on Acoustic Radiation Force-Based Shear Wave Generation.

    PubMed

    Carrascal, Carolina Amador; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F; Urban, Matthew W

    2016-02-01

    Elasticity is measured by shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) methods using acoustic radiation force to create the shear waves. Phase aberration and tissue attenuation can hamper the generation of shear waves for in vivo applications. In this study, the effects of phase aberration and attenuation in ultrasound focusing for creating shear waves were explored. This includes the effects of phase shifts and amplitude attenuation on shear wave characteristics such as shear wave amplitude, shear wave speed, shear wave center frequency, and bandwidth. Two samples of swine belly tissue were used to create phase aberration and attenuation experimentally. To explore the phase aberration and attenuation effects individually, tissue experiments were complemented with ultrasound beam simulations using fast object-oriented C++ ultrasound simulator (FOCUS) and shear wave simulations using finite-element-model (FEM) analysis. The ultrasound frequency used to generate shear waves was varied from 3.0 to 4.5 MHz. Results: The measured acoustic pressure and resulting shear wave amplitude decreased approximately 40%-90% with the introduction of the tissue samples. Acoustic intensity and shear wave displacement were correlated for both tissue samples, and the resulting Pearson's correlation coefficients were 0.99 and 0.97. Analysis of shear wave generation with tissue samples (phase aberration and attenuation case), measured phase screen, (only phase aberration case), and FOCUS/FEM model (only attenuation case) showed that tissue attenuation affected the shear wave generation more than tissue aberration. Decreasing the ultrasound frequency helped maintain a focused beam for creation of shear waves in the presence of both phase aberration and attenuation.

  6. Osmotic forces and gap junctions in spreading depression: a computational model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, B. E.

    2001-01-01

    In a computational model of spreading depression (SD), ionic movement through a neuronal syncytium of cells connected by gap junctions is described electrodiffusively. Simulations predict that SD will not occur unless cells are allowed to expand in response to osmotic pressure gradients and K+ is allowed to move through gap junctions. SD waves of [K+]out approximately 25 to approximately 60 mM moving at approximately 2 to approximately 18 mm/min are predicted over the range of parametric values reported in gray matter, with extracellular space decreasing up to approximately 50%. Predicted waveform shape is qualitatively similar to laboratory reports. The delayed-rectifier, NMDA, BK, and Na+ currents are predicted to facilitate SD, while SK and A-type K+ currents and glial activity impede SD. These predictions are consonant with recent findings that gap junction poisons block SD and support the theories that cytosolic diffusion via gap junctions and osmotic forces are important mechanisms underlying SD.

  7. Problem of long-range forces in the computer simulation of condensed media

    SciTech Connect

    Ceperely, D.

    1980-07-01

    Simulation (both Monte Carlo and molecular dynamical) has become a powerful tool in the study of classical systems of particles interacting with short-range pair potentials. For systems involving long-range forces (e.g., Coulombic, dipolar, hydrodynamic) it is a different story. Relating infinite-system properties to the results of computer simulation involving relatively small numbers of particles, periodically replicated, raises difficult and challenging problems. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together a group of scientists, all of whom share a strong direct interest in clearly formulating and resolving these problems. There were 46 participants, most of whom have been actively engaged in simulations of Hamiltonian models of condensed media. A few participants were scientists who are not primarily concerned, themselves, with simulation, but who are deeply involved in the theory of such models.

  8. Computer-Generated, Three-Dimensional Character Animation: A Report and Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsbury, Douglas Lee

    This master's thesis details the experience gathered in the production "Snoot and Muttly," a short character animation with 3-D computer generated images, and provides an analysis of the computer-generated 3-D character animation system capabilities. Descriptions are provided of the animation environment at the Ohio State University Computer…

  9. A Computer-Controlled Classroom Model of an Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engstrom, Tyler A.; Johnson, Matthew M.; Eklund, Peter C.; Russin, Timothy J.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of "seeing by feeling" as a way to circumvent limitations on sight is universal on the macroscopic scale—reading Braille, feeling one's way around a dark room, etc. The development of the atomic force microscope (AFM) in 1986 extended this concept to imaging in the nanoscale. While there are classroom demonstrations that use a tactile probe to map the topography or some other property of a sample, the rastering of the probe over the sample is manually controlled, which is both tedious and potentially inaccurate. Other groups have used simulation or tele-operation of an AFM probe. In this paper we describe a teaching AFM with complete computer control to map out topographic and magnetic properties of a "crystal" consisting of two-dimensional arrays of spherical marble "atoms." Our AFM is well suited for lessons on the "Big Ideas of Nanoscale" such as tools and instrumentation, as well as a pre-teaching activity for groups with remote access AFM or mobile AFM. The principle of operation of our classroom AFM is the same as that of a real AFM, excepting the nature of the force between sample and probe.

  10. Fast calculation of computer-generated hologram using run-length encoding based recurrence relation.

    PubMed

    Nishitsuji, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Kakue, Takashi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2015-04-20

    Computer-Generated Holograms (CGHs) can be generated by superimposing zoneplates. A zoneplate is a grating that can concentrate an incident light into a point. Since a zoneplate has a circular symmetry, we reported an algorithm that rapidly generates a zoneplate by drawing concentric circles using computer graphic techniques. However, random memory access was required in the algorithm and resulted in degradation of the computational efficiency. In this study, we propose a fast CGH generation algorithm without random memory access using run-length encoding (RLE) based recurrence relation. As a result, we succeeded in improving the calculation time by 88%, compared with that of the previous work.

  11. A computer method of finding valuations forcing validity of LC formulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godlewski, Łukasz; Świetorzecka, Kordula; Mulawka, Jan

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the computer implementation of a system known as LC temporal logic [1]. Firstly, to become familiar with some theoretical issues, a short introduction to this logic is discussed. The algorithms allowing a deep analysis of the formulae of LC logic are considered. In particular we discuss how to determine if a formula is a tautology, contrtautology or it is satisfable. Next, we show how to find all valuations to satisfy the formula. Finally, we consider finding histories generated by the formula and transforming these histories into the state machine. Moreover, a description of the experiments that verify the implementation are briefly presented.

  12. Statistical analysis of mesoscale rainfall: Dependence of a random cascade generator on large-scale forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Over, Thomas, M.; Gupta, Vijay K.

    1994-01-01

    Under the theory of independent and identically distributed random cascades, the probability distribution of the cascade generator determines the spatial and the ensemble properties of spatial rainfall. Three sets of radar-derived rainfall data in space and time are analyzed to estimate the probability distribution of the generator. A detailed comparison between instantaneous scans of spatial rainfall and simulated cascades using the scaling properties of the marginal moments is carried out. This comparison highlights important similarities and differences between the data and the random cascade theory. Differences are quantified and measured for the three datasets. Evidence is presented to show that the scaling properties of the rainfall can be captured to the first order by a random cascade with a single parameter. The dependence of this parameter on forcing by the large-scale meteorological conditions, as measured by the large-scale spatial average rain rate, is investigated for these three datasets. The data show that this dependence can be captured by a one-to-one function. Since the large-scale average rain rate can be diagnosed from the large-scale dynamics, this relationship demonstrates an important linkage between the large-scale atmospheric dynamics and the statistical cascade theory of mesoscale rainfall. Potential application of this research to parameterization of runoff from the land surface and regional flood frequency analysis is briefly discussed, and open problems for further research are presented.

  13. Force generation by skeletal muscle is controlled by mechanosensing in myosin filaments.

    PubMed

    Linari, Marco; Brunello, Elisabetta; Reconditi, Massimo; Fusi, Luca; Caremani, Marco; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Piazzesi, Gabriella; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Irving, Malcolm

    2015-12-10

    Contraction of both skeletal muscle and the heart is thought to be controlled by a calcium-dependent structural change in the actin-containing thin filaments, which permits the binding of myosin motors from the neighbouring thick filaments to drive filament sliding. Here we show by synchrotron small-angle X-ray diffraction of frog (Rana temporaria) single skeletal muscle cells that, although the well-known thin-filament mechanism is sufficient for regulation of muscle shortening against low load, force generation against high load requires a second permissive step linked to a change in the structure of the thick filament. The resting (switched 'OFF') structure of the thick filament is characterized by helical tracks of myosin motors on the filament surface and a short backbone periodicity. This OFF structure is almost completely preserved during low-load shortening, which is driven by a small fraction of constitutively active (switched 'ON') myosin motors outside thick-filament control. At higher load, these motors generate sufficient thick-filament stress to trigger the transition to its long-periodicity ON structure, unlocking the major population of motors required for high-load contraction. This concept of the thick filament as a regulatory mechanosensor provides a novel explanation for the dynamic and energetic properties of skeletal muscle. A similar mechanism probably operates in the heart. PMID:26560032

  14. Relativistic force field: parametric computations of proton-proton coupling constants in (1)H NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2014-09-01

    Spin-spin coupling constants in (1)H NMR carry a wealth of structural information and offer a powerful tool for deciphering molecular structures. However, accurate ab initio or DFT calculations of spin-spin coupling constants have been very challenging and expensive. Scaling of (easy) Fermi contacts, fc, especially in the context of recent findings by Bally and Rablen (Bally, T.; Rablen, P. R. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 4818), offers a framework for achieving practical evaluation of spin-spin coupling constants. We report a faster and more precise parametrization approach utilizing a new basis set for hydrogen atoms optimized in conjunction with (i) inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries, (ii) inexpensive 4-31G basis set for carbon atoms in fc calculations, and (iii) individual parametrization for different atom types/hybridizations, not unlike a force field in molecular mechanics, but designed for the fc's. With the training set of 608 experimental constants we achieved rmsd <0.19 Hz. The methodology performs very well as we illustrate with a set of complex organic natural products, including strychnine (rmsd 0.19 Hz), morphine (rmsd 0.24 Hz), etc. This precision is achieved with much shorter computational times: accurate spin-spin coupling constants for the two conformers of strychnine were computed in parallel on two 16-core nodes of a Linux cluster within 10 min.

  15. Relativistic force field: parametric computations of proton-proton coupling constants in (1)H NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2014-09-01

    Spin-spin coupling constants in (1)H NMR carry a wealth of structural information and offer a powerful tool for deciphering molecular structures. However, accurate ab initio or DFT calculations of spin-spin coupling constants have been very challenging and expensive. Scaling of (easy) Fermi contacts, fc, especially in the context of recent findings by Bally and Rablen (Bally, T.; Rablen, P. R. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 4818), offers a framework for achieving practical evaluation of spin-spin coupling constants. We report a faster and more precise parametrization approach utilizing a new basis set for hydrogen atoms optimized in conjunction with (i) inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries, (ii) inexpensive 4-31G basis set for carbon atoms in fc calculations, and (iii) individual parametrization for different atom types/hybridizations, not unlike a force field in molecular mechanics, but designed for the fc's. With the training set of 608 experimental constants we achieved rmsd <0.19 Hz. The methodology performs very well as we illustrate with a set of complex organic natural products, including strychnine (rmsd 0.19 Hz), morphine (rmsd 0.24 Hz), etc. This precision is achieved with much shorter computational times: accurate spin-spin coupling constants for the two conformers of strychnine were computed in parallel on two 16-core nodes of a Linux cluster within 10 min. PMID:25158224

  16. Condition Driven Adaptive Music Generation for Computer Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naushad, Alamgir; Muhammad, Tufail

    2013-02-01

    The video game industry has grown to a multi-billion dollar, worldwide industry. The background music tends adaptively in reference to the specific game content during the game length of the play. Adaptive music should be further explored by looking at the particular condition in the game; such condition is driven by generating a specific music in the background which best fits in with the active game content throughout the length of the gameplay. This research paper outlines the use of condition driven adaptive music generation for audio and video to dynamically incorporate adaptively.

  17. Graphics and Flow Visualization of Computer Generated Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kathong, M.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1987-01-01

    Flow field variables are visualized using color representations described on surfaces that are interpolated from computational grids and transformed to digital images. Techniques for displaying two and three dimensional flow field solutions are addressed. The transformations and the use of an interactive graphics program for CFD flow field solutions, called PLOT3D, which runs on the color graphics IRIS workstation are described. An overview of the IRIS workstation is also described.

  18. Computer program for automatic generation of BWR control rod patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Taner, M.S.; Levine, S.H.; Hsia, M.Y. )

    1990-01-01

    A computer program named OCTOPUS has been developed to automatically determine a control rod pattern that approximates some desired target power distribution as closely as possible without violating any thermal safety or reactor criticality constraints. The program OCTOPUS performs a semi-optimization task based on the method of approximation programming (MAP) to develop control rod patterns. The SIMULATE-E code is used to determine the nucleonic characteristics of the reactor core state.

  19. A Computer Program for the Generation of ARIMA Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Samuel B.; Noles, Keith O.

    1977-01-01

    The autoregressive integrated moving averages model (ARIMA) has been applied to time series data in psychological and educational research. A program is described that generates ARIMA data of a known order. The program enables researchers to explore statistical properties of ARIMA data and simulate systems producing time dependent observations.…

  20. Relationship between muscle fiber pennation and force generation capability in Olympic athletes.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Y; Kanehisa, H; Ito, M; Kawakami, Y; Fukunaga, T

    1998-11-01

    The thickness (TBmt) and fiber pennation angle (TBpen) of triceps brachii as well as isokinetic force developed during elbow extension were measured in Olympic athletes to investigate the relationship between muscle fiber pennation and force generation capability. The subjects were male members of the 1996 Japanese Olympic team who competed in seven different events; 9 wrestlers, 16 soccer players, 11 sprinters, 5 judo athletes, 7 gymnasts, 9 rowers and 18 baseball players. The TBmt and TBpen, measured by a B-mode ultrasound, ranged between 29 mm and 50 mm and between 11 degrees and 30 degrees, respectively, and on average were larger in the judo athletes, wrestlers and gymnasts compared to the other groups. A significant correlation (r=0.580, p < 0.05) was found between TPpen and TBmt per unit of the upper arm length, and so the observed event-related differences in TBpen tended to reflect the differences in TBmt. The isokinetic forces relative to the cross-sectional area (CSA) estimated from TBmt, measured at two constant velocities of 1.05 rad/s (F1.05/CSA) and 3.14 rad/s (F3.14/ CSA), were negatively correlated to the CSA; r=-0.617 (p < 0.05) for F1.05/CSA and r=-0.635 (p < 0.05) for F3.14/CSA. In addition, low but significant negative correlations existed between TBpen and both F1.05/CSA (r=-0.365, p < 0.05) and F3.14/ CSA (r=-0.336, p <0.05). Even when the effect of TBpen was statistically normalized, the F1.05/CSA and F3.14/CSA were still negatively correlated to the CSA, r=-0.530 (p < 0.05) for F1.05/ CSA and r=-0.561 (p < 0.05) for F3.14/CSA. Therefore, at least in the Olympic athletes tested in this study, the magnitude of the pennation angles reflects muscle size, but it does not seem to be a factor that explains extensively the lower F/CSA in athletes with large muscle size.

  1. PC-compatible computer-generated stimuli for video-task testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, David A.

    1990-01-01

    A program for automatic computer generation of novel nonverbal stimuli is described. The program, STIMGEN, allows menu-driven control over the type and appearance of stimuli. Data are presented in which two monkeys matched to sample with high accuracy using stimuli generated with STIMGEN. These data are interpreted to support the usefulness and value of automatic stimulus generation in a variety of applications.

  2. Monopolar active accessories can be connected to Covidien ForceTriad electrosurgical generators incorrectly, disabling coagulation mode.

    PubMed

    2011-03-01

    The monopolar output receptacle on the Covidien ForceTriad electrosurgical generator is designed in such a way that users can unknowingly connect active accessories in the wrong orientation, disabling the system's coagulation function. The manufacturer is developing labeling for ForceTriad production units that depicts the proper orientation in which to connect the accessory during setup. Covidien is currently considering how it will address units already in the field.

  3. Shaded-Color Picture Generation of Computer-Defined Arbitrary Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cozzolongo, J. V.; Hermstad, D. L.; Mccoy, D. S.; Clark, J.

    1986-01-01

    SHADE computer program generates realistic color-shaded pictures from computer-defined arbitrary shapes. Objects defined for computer representation displayed as smooth, color-shaded surfaces, including varying degrees of transparency. Results also used for presentation of computational results. By performing color mapping, SHADE colors model surface to display analysis results as pressures, stresses, and temperatures. NASA has used SHADE extensively in sign and analysis of high-performance aircraft. Industry should find applications for SHADE in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing. SHADE written in VAX FORTRAN and MACRO Assembler for either interactive or batch execution.

  4. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of aerosol in a U-shaped steam generator tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmire, Pamela

    To quantify primary side aerosol retention, an Eulerian/Lagrangian approach was used to investigate aerosol transport in a compressible, turbulent, adiabatic, internal, wall-bounded flow. The ARTIST experimental project (Phase I) served as the physical model replicated for numerical simulation. Realizable k-epsilon and standard k-o turbulence models were selected from the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, FLUENT, to provide the Eulerian description of the gaseous phase. Flow field simulation results exhibited: (a) onset of weak secondary flow accelerated at bend entrance towards the inner wall; (b) flow separation zone development on the convex wall that persisted from the point of onset; (c) centrifugal force concentrated high velocity flow in the direction of the concave wall; (d) formation of vortices throughout the flow domain resulted from rotational (Dean-type) flow; (e) weakened secondary flow assisted the formation of twin vortices in the outflow cross section; and (f) perturbations induced by the bend influenced flow recovery several pipe diameters upstream of the bend. These observations were consistent with those of previous investigators. The Lagrangian discrete random walk model, with and without turbulent dispersion, simulated the dispersed phase behavior, incorrectly. Accurate deposition predictions in wall-bounded flow require modification of the Eddy Impaction Model (EIM). Thus, to circumvent shortcomings of the EIM, the Lagrangian time scale was changed to a wall function and the root-mean-square (RMS) fluctuating velocities were modified to account for the strong anisotropic nature of flow in the immediate vicinity of the wall (boundary layer). Subsequent computed trajectories suggest a precision that ranges from 0.1% to 0.7%, statistical sampling error. The aerodynamic mass median diameter (AMMD) at the inlet (5.5 mum) was consistent with the ARTIST experimental findings. The geometric standard deviation (GSD) varied depending on the

  5. Role of the Animator in the Generation of 3-Dimensional Computer Generated Animation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wedge, John Christian

    This master's thesis investigates the relationship between the traditional animator and the computer as computer animation systems allow them to apply traditional skills with a high degree of success. The advantages and disadvantages of traditional animation as a medium for expressing motion and character are noted, and it is argued that the…

  6. Computer-generated Model of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP) is an important target enzyme for the design of anti-cancer and immunosuppressive drugs. Bacterial PNP, which is slightly different from the human enzyme, is used to synthesize chemotherapuautic agents. Knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the bacterial PNP molecule is useful in efforts to engineer different types of PNP enzymes, that can be used to produce new chemotherapeutic agents. This picture shows a computer model of bacterial PNP, which looks a lot like a display of colorful ribbons. Principal Investigator was Charles Bugg.

  7. Robot Control Through Brain Computer Interface For Patterns Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belluomo, P.; Bucolo, M.; Fortuna, L.; Frasca, M.

    2011-09-01

    A Brain Computer Interface (BCI) system processes and translates neuronal signals, that mainly comes from EEG instruments, into commands for controlling electronic devices. This system can allow people with motor disabilities to control external devices through the real-time modulation of their brain waves. In this context an EEG-based BCI system that allows creative luminous artistic representations is here presented. The system that has been designed and realized in our laboratory interfaces the BCI2000 platform performing real-time analysis of EEG signals with a couple of moving luminescent twin robots. Experiments are also presented.

  8. Aging related changes in determinants of muscle force generating capacity: a comparison of muscle aging in men and male rodents.

    PubMed

    Ballak, Sam B; Degens, Hans; de Haan, Arnold; Jaspers, Richard T

    2014-03-01

    Human aging is associated with a progressive decline in skeletal muscle mass and force generating capacity, however the exact mechanisms underlying these changes are not fully understood. Rodents models have often been used to enhance our understanding of mechanisms of age-related changes in human skeletal muscle. However, to what extent age-related alterations in determinants of muscle force generating capacity observed in rodents resemble those in humans has not been considered thoroughly. This review compares the effect of aging on muscle force generating determinants (muscle mass, fiber size, fiber number, fiber type distribution and muscle specific tension), in men and male rodents at similar relative age. It appears that muscle aging in male F344*BN rat resembles that in men most; 32-35-month-old rats exhibit similar signs of muscle weakness to those of 70-80-yr-old men, and the decline in 36-38-month-old rats is similar to that in men aged over 80 yrs. For male C57BL/6 mice, age-related decline in muscle force generating capacity seems to occur only at higher relative age than in men. We conclude that the effects on determinants of muscle force differ between species as well as within species, but qualitatively show the same pattern as that observed in men.

  9. A distributed computing tool for generating neural simulation databases.

    PubMed

    Calin-Jageman, Robert J; Katz, Paul S

    2006-12-01

    After developing a model neuron or network, it is important to systematically explore its behavior across a wide range of parameter values or experimental conditions, or both. However, compiling a very large set of simulation runs is challenging because it typically requires both access to and expertise with high-performance computing facilities. To lower the barrier for large-scale model analysis, we have developed NeuronPM, a client/server application that creates a "screen-saver" cluster for running simulations in NEURON (Hines & Carnevale, 1997). NeuronPM provides a user-friendly way to use existing computing resources to catalog the performance of a neural simulation across a wide range of parameter values and experimental conditions. The NeuronPM client is a Windows-based screen saver, and the NeuronPM server can be hosted on any Apache/PHP/MySQL server. During idle time, the client retrieves model files and work assignments from the server, invokes NEURON to run the simulation, and returns results to the server. Administrative panels make it simple to upload model files, define the parameters and conditions to vary, and then monitor client status and work progress. NeuronPM is open-source freeware and is available for download at http://neuronpm.homeip.net . It is a useful entry-level tool for systematically analyzing complex neuron and network simulations.

  10. Characterization of the photocurrents generated by the laser of atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanfeng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Iglesias, Vanessa; Lewis, David; Niu, Jiebin; Long, Shibing; Liu, Ming; Hofer, Alexander; Frammelsberger, Werner; Benstetter, Guenther; Scheuermann, Andrew; McIntyre, Paul C; Lanza, Mario

    2016-08-01

    The conductive atomic force microscope (CAFM) has become an essential tool for the nanoscale electronic characterization of many materials and devices. When studying photoactive samples, the laser used by the CAFM to detect the deflection of the cantilever can generate photocurrents that perturb the current signals collected, leading to unreliable characterization. In metal-coated semiconductor samples, this problem is further aggravated, and large currents above the nanometer range can be observed even without the application of any bias. Here we present the first characterization of the photocurrents introduced by the laser of the CAFM, and we quantify the amount of light arriving to the surface of the sample. The mechanisms for current collection when placing the CAFM tip on metal-coated photoactive samples are also analyzed in-depth. Finally, we successfully avoided the laser-induced perturbations using a two pass technique: the first scan collects the topography (laser ON) and the second collects the current (laser OFF). We also demonstrate that CAFMs without a laser (using a tuning fork for detecting the deflection of the tip) do not have this problem. PMID:27587127

  11. Successive incorporation of force-generating units in the bacterial rotary motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Steven M.; Berg, Howard C.

    1984-05-01

    Mot mutants of Escherichia coli are paralysed: their flagella appear to be intact but do not rotate1 . The motA and motB gene products are found in the cytoplasmic membrane2; they do not co-purify with flagellar basal bodies isolated in neutral detergents1. Silverman et al. found that mot mutants could be `resurrected' through protein synthesis directed by λ transducing phages carrying the wild-type genes2. Here, we have studied this activation at the level of a single flagellar motor. Cells of a motB strain carrying plasmids in which transcription of the wild-type motB gene was controlled by the lac promoter were tethered to a glass surface by a single flagellum. These cells began to spin within several minutes after the addition of a lac inducer, and their rotational speed changed in a series of equally spaced steps. As many as 7 steps were seen in individual cells and, from the final speeds attained, as many as 16 steps could be inferred. These experiments show that each flagellar motor contains several independent force-generating units comprised, at least in part, of motB protein.

  12. A mathematical model for the thrust force generated by a flapping elastic wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Alexander E.; Sumbatyan, Mezhlum A.

    2012-11-01

    The physical nature of the thrust force generated by flapping wings is of a long-time interest of many researchers. The idea of the thrust effect came from the observation of birds' flight. Apparently, Leonardo da Vinci was first who tried to explain the mechanism of the flapping wing trust, for possible engineering applications. Nevertheless, the fundamental basics of a theoretical study of wing oscillations were laid only near the beginning of the 20th century. The thrust effect of the flapping wing was explained by Knoller in 1909 and Betz in 1912, independently. The principal problem in this theory is to define an optimal deformation law which provides the flapping wing to work with highest efficiency. In the present paper we study a rectangular elastic wing of finite span as a propulsion device. We propose an analytical approach, to study harmonic oscillations of a thin elastic rectangular wing at zero attack angle in a flow of inviscid incompressible fluid. The problem is reduced to an integro-differential equation, in frames of the "plane sections" hypothesis.

  13. Characterization of the photocurrents generated by the laser of atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanfeng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Iglesias, Vanessa; Lewis, David; Niu, Jiebin; Long, Shibing; Liu, Ming; Hofer, Alexander; Frammelsberger, Werner; Benstetter, Guenther; Scheuermann, Andrew; McIntyre, Paul C; Lanza, Mario

    2016-08-01

    The conductive atomic force microscope (CAFM) has become an essential tool for the nanoscale electronic characterization of many materials and devices. When studying photoactive samples, the laser used by the CAFM to detect the deflection of the cantilever can generate photocurrents that perturb the current signals collected, leading to unreliable characterization. In metal-coated semiconductor samples, this problem is further aggravated, and large currents above the nanometer range can be observed even without the application of any bias. Here we present the first characterization of the photocurrents introduced by the laser of the CAFM, and we quantify the amount of light arriving to the surface of the sample. The mechanisms for current collection when placing the CAFM tip on metal-coated photoactive samples are also analyzed in-depth. Finally, we successfully avoided the laser-induced perturbations using a two pass technique: the first scan collects the topography (laser ON) and the second collects the current (laser OFF). We also demonstrate that CAFMs without a laser (using a tuning fork for detecting the deflection of the tip) do not have this problem.

  14. Generating and characterizing the mechanical properties of cell-derived matrices using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tello, Marta; Spenlé, Caroline; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Mercier, Luc; Fabre, Roxane; Allio, Guillaume; Simon-Assmann, Patricia; Goetz, Jacky G

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical interaction between cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) controls key processes such as proliferation, differentiation and motility. For many years, two-dimensional (2D) models were used to better understand the interactions between cells and their surrounding ECM. More recently, variation of the mechanical properties of tissues has been reported to play a major role in physiological and pathological scenarios such as cancer progression. The 3D architecture of the ECM finely tunes cellular behavior to perform physiologically relevant tasks. Technical limitations prevented scientists from obtaining accurate assessment of the mechanical properties of physiologically realistic matrices. There is therefore a need for combining the production of high-quality cell-derived 3D matrices (CDMs) and the characterization of their topographical and mechanical properties. Here, we describe methods that allow to accurately measure the young modulus of matrices produced by various cellular types. In the first part, we will describe and review several protocols for generating CDMs matrices from endothelial, epithelial, fibroblastic, muscle and mesenchymal stem cells. We will discuss tools allowing the characterization of the topographical details as well as of the protein content of such CDMs. In a second part, we will report the methodologies that can be used, based on atomic force microscopy, to accurately evaluate the stiffness properties of the CDMs through the quantification of their young modulus. Altogether, such methodologies allow characterizing the stiffness and topography of matrices deposited by the cells, which is key for the understanding of cellular behavior in physiological conditions.

  15. Characterization of the photocurrents generated by the laser of atomic force microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yanfeng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Iglesias, Vanessa; Lewis, David; Niu, Jiebin; Long, Shibing; Liu, Ming; Hofer, Alexander; Frammelsberger, Werner; Benstetter, Guenther; Scheuermann, Andrew; McIntyre, Paul C.; Lanza, Mario

    2016-08-01

    The conductive atomic force microscope (CAFM) has become an essential tool for the nanoscale electronic characterization of many materials and devices. When studying photoactive samples, the laser used by the CAFM to detect the deflection of the cantilever can generate photocurrents that perturb the current signals collected, leading to unreliable characterization. In metal-coated semiconductor samples, this problem is further aggravated, and large currents above the nanometer range can be observed even without the application of any bias. Here we present the first characterization of the photocurrents introduced by the laser of the CAFM, and we quantify the amount of light arriving to the surface of the sample. The mechanisms for current collection when placing the CAFM tip on metal-coated photoactive samples are also analyzed in-depth. Finally, we successfully avoided the laser-induced perturbations using a two pass technique: the first scan collects the topography (laser ON) and the second collects the current (laser OFF). We also demonstrate that CAFMs without a laser (using a tuning fork for detecting the deflection of the tip) do not have this problem.

  16. Generating and characterizing the mechanical properties of cell-derived matrices using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tello, Marta; Spenlé, Caroline; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Mercier, Luc; Fabre, Roxane; Allio, Guillaume; Simon-Assmann, Patricia; Goetz, Jacky G

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical interaction between cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) controls key processes such as proliferation, differentiation and motility. For many years, two-dimensional (2D) models were used to better understand the interactions between cells and their surrounding ECM. More recently, variation of the mechanical properties of tissues has been reported to play a major role in physiological and pathological scenarios such as cancer progression. The 3D architecture of the ECM finely tunes cellular behavior to perform physiologically relevant tasks. Technical limitations prevented scientists from obtaining accurate assessment of the mechanical properties of physiologically realistic matrices. There is therefore a need for combining the production of high-quality cell-derived 3D matrices (CDMs) and the characterization of their topographical and mechanical properties. Here, we describe methods that allow to accurately measure the young modulus of matrices produced by various cellular types. In the first part, we will describe and review several protocols for generating CDMs matrices from endothelial, epithelial, fibroblastic, muscle and mesenchymal stem cells. We will discuss tools allowing the characterization of the topographical details as well as of the protein content of such CDMs. In a second part, we will report the methodologies that can be used, based on atomic force microscopy, to accurately evaluate the stiffness properties of the CDMs through the quantification of their young modulus. Altogether, such methodologies allow characterizing the stiffness and topography of matrices deposited by the cells, which is key for the understanding of cellular behavior in physiological conditions. PMID:26439175

  17. First flight vehicle controlled by computer generated software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirab, H.; Tubb, F.

    1993-09-01

    The use of rapid prototyping design methodologies for real time control systems development have become mnore accepted within production engineering organizations. We will use a case study of the Multiple Sensor Technology Integration (MSTI) Program (pro- nounced 'Misty') to consider some of the problems with tradi- tional design approaches and attempt to quantify some advantages of rapid prototyping. The MSTI team used rapid prototyping techniques to develop operational flight software for a spacecraft in under fourteen months. MSTI will be the first spacecraft launched which uses automatically generated real-time flight software.

  18. ROM-type computer-generated-hologram memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, Tomoko; Kubota, Eriko; Nishimoto, Kazumasa; Yamamoto, Manabu

    2004-09-01

    The capacity of holographic memory can be made higher than that of the conventional optical disks because it can use 3D memory storing area. This paper discusses ROM type holographic memory that uses CGH for data storing. High speed calculation method for creation of CGH is studied. By the experiment and simulation to create the Lohmann type CGH pattern by the optical disc cutting system, it was shown that the creation of CGH pattern that can generate high quality reconstructed 2D image is feasible by this method.

  19. A comprehensive approach to decipher biological computation to achieve next generation high-performance exascale computing.

    SciTech Connect

    James, Conrad D.; Schiess, Adrian B.; Howell, Jamie; Baca, Michael J.; Partridge, L. Donald; Finnegan, Patrick Sean; Wolfley, Steven L.; Dagel, Daryl James; Spahn, Olga Blum; Harper, Jason C.; Pohl, Kenneth Roy; Mickel, Patrick R.; Lohn, Andrew; Marinella, Matthew

    2013-10-01

    The human brain (volume=1200cm3) consumes 20W and is capable of performing > 10^16 operations/s. Current supercomputer technology has reached 1015 operations/s, yet it requires 1500m^3 and 3MW, giving the brain a 10^12 advantage in operations/s/W/cm^3. Thus, to reach exascale computation, two achievements are required: 1) improved understanding of computation in biological tissue, and 2) a paradigm shift towards neuromorphic computing where hardware circuits mimic properties of neural tissue. To address 1), we will interrogate corticostriatal networks in mouse brain tissue slices, specifically with regard to their frequency filtering capabilities as a function of input stimulus. To address 2), we will instantiate biological computing characteristics such as multi-bit storage into hardware devices with future computational and memory applications. Resistive memory devices will be modeled, designed, and fabricated in the MESA facility in consultation with our internal and external collaborators.

  20. Realistic computer network simulation for network intrusion detection dataset generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payer, Garrett

    2015-05-01

    The KDD-99 Cup dataset is dead. While it can continue to be used as a toy example, the age of this dataset makes it all but useless for intrusion detection research and data mining. Many of the attacks used within the dataset are obsolete and do not reflect the features important for intrusion detection in today's networks. Creating a new dataset encompassing a large cross section of the attacks found on the Internet today could be useful, but would eventually fall to the same problem as the KDD-99 Cup; its usefulness would diminish after a period of time. To continue research into intrusion detection, the generation of new datasets needs to be as dynamic and as quick as the attacker. Simply examining existing network traffic and using domain experts such as intrusion analysts to label traffic is inefficient, expensive, and not scalable. The only viable methodology is simulation using technologies including virtualization, attack-toolsets such as Metasploit and Armitage, and sophisticated emulation of threat and user behavior. Simulating actual user behavior and network intrusion events dynamically not only allows researchers to vary scenarios quickly, but enables online testing of intrusion detection mechanisms by interacting with data as it is generated. As new threat behaviors are identified, they can be added to the simulation to make quicker determinations as to the effectiveness of existing and ongoing network intrusion technology, methodology and models.

  1. A Organization for High-Level Interactive Programmatic Control of Computer-Generated Sound.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sumit

    The state of computer generated sound has advanced rapidly, and there exist many different ways of conceptualizing the abstract sound structures that comprise music and other complex organizations of sound. Many of these methods are radically different from one another, and so are not usually used within the same system. One problem that almost all methods share is one of control, as large amounts of data are needed to specify sounds. How do we create, examine, and modify these complex structures? The problem is exacerbated if we consider the realm of interactively controlled sound. This paper presents an organization which, rather than forcing a particular way of thinking about sound, allows multiple arbitrarily high-level views to coexist, all sharing a common interface. The methods or algorithms are abstracted into objects called auditory actors. This encapsulation allows different algorithms to be used concurrently. All communication with and between these actors is carried out through message-passing, which allows arbitrary types of information (such as other messages) to be easily communicated. This standardizes control without limiting it to a particular type of data. A prototype system was implemented using this model. This system was used by a number of different developers to create audio interfaces for interactive virtual reality applications, which were demonstrated at the SIGGRAPH 94 conference in Orlando, Florida. Compared to earlier systems, developers were able to create more complex audio interfaces in a shorter time.

  2. Computational analysis of wake structure and body forces on marine animal research tag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosanio, Matthew; Morrida, Jacob; Green, Melissa

    2013-11-01

    The Acousounde 3B marine animal research tag is used to study the relationship between the sounds made by whales and their behaviors, and ultimately to improve whale conservation efforts. In practical implementation, some researchers have attached external GPS Fastloc devices to the top surface of the tag, in order to accurately record the position of the whales throughout the deployment. There is a need to characterize the flow over the tag in order to better understand the body forces being exerted on it and how wake turbulence could affect noise measurements. The addition of the GPS Fastloc exacerbates both of these concerns, as it complicates the hydrodynamics of the device. Using CFD techniques, we were able to simulate the flow over the tag with a GPS attachment at multiple yaw angles. We used Pointwise to construct the mesh and Fluent to simulate the flow. We have also used flow visualization to experimentally validate our computational results. It was found that the GPS has a minimal effect on the wake of the tag at a 0 degree offset from the freestream flow. However, at increasing offset angles, the presence of the GPS greatly increased the amount of wake turbulence observed. Performed work while undergrad at Syracuse.

  3. SENSITIVITY OF HELIOSEISMIC TRAVEL TIMES TO THE IMPOSITION OF A LORENTZ FORCE LIMITER IN COMPUTATIONAL HELIOSEISMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Hamed; Cally, Paul S.

    2014-02-20

    The rapid exponential increase in the Alfvén wave speed with height above the solar surface presents a serious challenge to physical modeling of the effects of magnetic fields on solar oscillations, as it introduces a significant Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy time-step constraint for explicit numerical codes. A common approach adopted in computational helioseismology, where long simulations in excess of 10 hr (hundreds of wave periods) are often required, is to cap the Alfvén wave speed by artificially modifying the momentum equation when the ratio between the Lorentz and hydrodynamic forces becomes too large. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the Alfvén wave speed plays a critical role in the MHD mode conversion process, particularly in determining the reflection height of the upwardly propagating helioseismic fast wave. Using numerical simulations of helioseismic wave propagation in constant inclined (relative to the vertical) magnetic fields we demonstrate that the imposition of such artificial limiters significantly affects time-distance travel times unless the Alfvén wave-speed cap is chosen comfortably in excess of the horizontal phase speeds under investigation.

  4. "Simulated molecular evolution" or computer-generated artifacts?

    PubMed

    Darius, F; Rojas, R

    1994-11-01

    1. The authors define a function with value 1 for the positive examples and 0 for the negative ones. They fit a continuous function but do not deal at all with the error margin of the fit, which is almost as large as the function values they compute. 2. The term "quality" for the value of the fitted function gives the impression that some biological significance is associated with values of the fitted function strictly between 0 and 1, but there is no justification for this kind of interpretation and finding the point where the fit achieves its maximum does not make sense. 3. By neglecting the error margin the authors try to optimize the fitted function using differences in the second, third, fourth, and even fifth decimal place which have no statistical significance. 4. Even if such a fit could profit from more data points, the authors should first prove that the region of interest has some kind of smoothness, that is, that a continuous fit makes any sense at all. 5. "Simulated molecular evolution" is a misnomer. We are dealing here with random search. Since the margin of error is so large, the fitted function does not provide statistically significant information about the points in search space where strings with cleavage sites could be found. This implies that the method is a highly unreliable stochastic search in the space of strings, even if the neural network is capable of learning some simple correlations. 6. Classical statistical methods are for these kind of problems with so few data points clearly superior to the neural networks used as a "black box" by the authors, which in the way they are structured provide a model with an error margin as large as the numbers being computed.7. And finally, even if someone would provide us with a function which separates strings with cleavage sites from strings without them perfectly, so-called simulated molecular evolution would not be better than random selection.Since a perfect fit would only produce exactly ones or

  5. Generating volumetric composition maps from particle based computational geodynamic simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    The advent of using large scale, high resolution three-dimensional hybrid particle-grid based methods to study geodynamics processes is upon us. Visualizing and interpreting the three-dimensional geometry of the material configuration after severe deformation has occurred is a challenging task when adopting such a point based representation. In two-dimensions, the material configuration is readily visualized by creating a simple (x,y) scatter plot, using the particles position vector and coloring the points according to the lithology which each particle represents. Using only colored points (which do not need to be rendered as spheres), this approach unambiguous fills the 2D model domain with information defining the current material configuration. Along with an increased volume (i.e. MBytes) of output data generated by three-dimensional simulations, the higher dimensionality introduces additional complexities for visualization. The geometry of the deformed material in three-space will become topologically more complex than its two-dimensional counterpart. Secondly, the scatter plot approach used in 2D to represent the material configuration simply does not extend to three-dimensions as technique is unable to provide any sense of depth. To address some of the visualization challenges posed by such methods, we describe how an Approximate Voronoi Diagram (AVD) can be used to produce a volumetric representation of point based data. The AVD approach allows us to efficiently construct a volumetric partitioning of any subset of the model domain amongst a set points. From this representation, we can efficiently generate a representation of the material configuration which can be volume rendered, contoured, or from which cross sections can be extracted. The type of volumetric representations possible, and the performance characteristics of the AVD algorithm were demonstrated by applying the technique to simulation results from models of continental collision and salt

  6. PLOTTER: An independent computer program for the generation of graphical displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatt, C. R.; Hirsch, G. N.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program is described for generating graphical information from input data or auxiliary analysis programs on a variety of graphical devices. Options are presented for tabulating the data in columnar format and for plotting auxiliary text in the vicinity of the plotted information. Display device selection is accomplished by interfacing the basic computer code through routines which convert the internally generated plot vectors to hardware commands for the display device. The plotting techniques employed in the computer program are discussed. User's instructions are presented with examples which illustrate the use of the program in generating plotted information from various sources and presenting the information in alternate plot formats. Technical discussion of the computer code is presented giving the physical characteristics, computer loading instructions and descriptions of the subroutines.

  7. Listeners discern affective variation in computer-generated musical sounds.

    PubMed

    Bailes, Freya; Dean, Roger T

    2009-01-01

    We carried out two experiments to test the relationship between real-time perception of structural change in stylistically unusual musical sounds, and perception of its affect (arousal and valence). Computer music was used because of its unfamiliarity and our capacity to control it in ecologically appropriate ways. In experiment 1, thirteen participants unselected for musical training participated in tasks to detect segmentation and changes in affect. Changes in affect occurred upon detection of segmentation; but not all algorithmically distinct segments conveyed distinct affect. Short segments followed by long segments led to greater changes in arousal and valence at the point of segmentation than vice versa. In experiment 2, intra-segment sound transitions were introduced. Sixteen musicians performed the same affect task as in experiment 1, and a novel change in sound task. Participants were slow to respond to a continuous transition, but quick to respond to instantaneous transitions. Contrary to literature on the perception of affect in more familiar music, the musician participants in experiment 2 differed more in their ratings of arousal than of valence, in spite of a strong correlation of arousal with the composition of the stimuli. These findings are discussed in relation to the positive valence attributed to the more familiar sounds in both experiments.

  8. Brain-computer interface based on generation of visual images.

    PubMed

    Bobrov, Pavel; Frolov, Alexander; Cantor, Charles; Fedulova, Irina; Bakhnyan, Mikhail; Zhavoronkov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the task of recognizing EEG patterns that correspond to performing three mental tasks: relaxation and imagining of two types of pictures: faces and houses. The experiments were performed using two EEG headsets: BrainProducts ActiCap and Emotiv EPOC. The Emotiv headset becomes widely used in consumer BCI application allowing for conducting large-scale EEG experiments in the future. Since classification accuracy significantly exceeded the level of random classification during the first three days of the experiment with EPOC headset, a control experiment was performed on the fourth day using ActiCap. The control experiment has shown that utilization of high-quality research equipment can enhance classification accuracy (up to 68% in some subjects) and that the accuracy is independent of the presence of EEG artifacts related to blinking and eye movement. This study also shows that computationally-inexpensive bayesian classifier based on covariance matrix analysis yields similar classification accuracy in this problem as a more sophisticated Multi-class Common Spatial Patterns (MCSP) classifier.

  9. OCT-based quantification of flow velocity, shear force, and power generated by a biological ciliated surface (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Brendan K.; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Loewenberg, Michael; Choma, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    In cilia-driven fluid flow physiology, quantification of flow velocity, shearing force, and power dissipation is important in defining abnormal ciliary function. The capacity to generate flow can be robustly described in terms of shearing force. Dissipated power can be related to net ATP consumption by ciliary molecular motors. To date, however, only flow velocity can be routinely quantified in a non-invasive, non-contact manner. Additionally, traditional power-based metrics rely on metabolic consumption that reflects energy consumption not just from cilia but also from all active cellular processes. Here, we demonstrate the estimation of all three of these quantities (flow velocity, shear force, and power dissipation) using only optical coherence tomography (OCT). Specifically, we develop a framework that can extract force and power information from vectorial flow velocity fields obtained using OCT-based methods. We do so by (a) estimating the viscous stress tensor from flow velocity fields to estimate shearing force and (b) using the viscous stress tensor to estimate the power dissipation function to infer total mechanical power. These estimates have the advantage of (a) requiring only a single modality, (b) being non-invasive in nature, and (c) being reflective of only the net power work generated by a ciliated surface. We demonstrate our all-optical approach to the estimation of these parameters in the Xenopus animal model system under normal and increased viscous loading. Our preliminary data support the hypothesis that the Xenopus ciliated surface can increase force output under loading conditions.

  10. SETI reloaded: Next generation radio telescopes, transients and cognitive computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Michael A.

    2015-08-01

    The Search for Extra-terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) using radio telescopes is an area of research that is now more than 50 years old. Thus far, both targeted and wide-area surveys have yet to detect artificial signals from intelligent civilisations. In this paper, I argue that the incidence of co-existing intelligent and communicating civilisations is probably small in the Milky Way. While this makes successful SETI searches a very difficult pursuit indeed, the huge impact of even a single detection requires us to continue the search. A substantial increase in the overall performance of radio telescopes (and in particular future wide-field instruments such as the Square Kilometre Array - SKA), provide renewed optimism in the field. Evidence for this is already to be seen in the success of SETI researchers in acquiring observations on some of the world's most sensitive radio telescope facilities via open, peer-reviewed processes. The increasing interest in the dynamic radio sky, and our ability to detect new and rapid transient phenomena such as Fast Radio Bursts (FRB) is also greatly encouraging. While the nature of FRBs is not yet fully understood, I argue they are unlikely to be the signature of distant extra-terrestrial civilisations. As astronomers face a data avalanche on all sides, advances made in related areas such as advanced Big Data analytics, and cognitive computing are crucial to enable serendipitous discoveries to be made. In any case, as the era of the SKA fast approaches, the prospects of a SETI detection have never been better.

  11. The comparative effect of individually-generated vs. collaboratively-generated computer-based concept mapping on science concept learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, So Young

    Using a quasi-experimental design, the researcher investigated the comparative effects of individually-generated and collaboratively-generated computer-based concept mapping on middle school science concept learning. Qualitative data were analyzed to explain quantitative findings. One hundred sixty-one students (74 boys and 87 girls) in eight, seventh grade science classes at a middle school in Southeast Texas completed the entire study. Using prior science performance scores to assure equivalence of student achievement across groups, the researcher assigned the teacher's classes to one of the three experimental groups. The independent variable, group, consisted of three levels: 40 students in a control group, 59 students trained to individually generate concept maps on computers, and 62 students trained to collaboratively generate concept maps on computers. The dependent variables were science concept learning as demonstrated by comprehension test scores, and quality of concept maps created by students in experimental groups as demonstrated by rubric scores. Students in the experimental groups received concept mapping training and used their newly acquired concept mapping skills to individually or collaboratively construct computer-based concept maps during study time. The control group, the individually-generated concept mapping group, and the collaboratively-generated concept mapping group had equivalent learning experiences for 50 minutes during five days, excepting that students in a control group worked independently without concept mapping activities, students in the individual group worked individually to construct concept maps, and students in the collaborative group worked collaboratively to construct concept maps during their study time. Both collaboratively and individually generated computer-based concept mapping had a positive effect on seventh grade middle school science concept learning but neither strategy was more effective than the other. However

  12. Multiple Exciton Generation in Semiconductor Nanostructures: DFT-based Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaylov, Deyan; Kryjevski, Andrei; Kilin, Dmitri; Kilina, Svetlana; Vogel, Dayton

    Multiple exciton generation (MEG) in nm-sized H-passivated Si nanowires (NWs), and quasi 2D nanofilms depends strongly on the degree of the core structural disorder as shown by the perturbation theory calculations based on the DFT simulations. In perturbation theory, we work to the 2nd order in the electron-photon coupling and in the (approximate) RPA-screened Coulomb interaction. We also include the effect of excitons for which we solve Bethe-Salpeter Equation. To describe MEG we calculate exciton-to-biexciton as well as biexciton-to-exciton rates and quantum efficiency (QE). We consider 3D arrays of Si29H36 quantum dots, NWs, and quasi 2D silicon nanofilms, all with both crystalline and amorphous core structures. Efficient MEG with QE of 1.3 up to 1.8 at the photon energy of about 3Egap is predicted in these nanoparticles except for the crystalline NW and film where QE ~=1. MEG in the amorphous nanoparticles is enhanced by the electron localization due to structural disorder. The exciton effects significantly red-shift QE vs. photon energy curves. Nm-sized a-Si NWs and films are predicted to have effective MEG within the solar spectrum range. Also, we find efficient MEG in the chiral single-wall Carbon nanotubes and in a perovskite nanostructure.

  13. Generation and physical characteristics of the ERTS MSS system corrected computer compatible tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, V. L.

    1973-01-01

    The generation and format are discussed of the ERTS system corrected multispectral scanner computer compatible tapes. The discussion includes spacecraft sensors, scene characteristics, data transmission, and conversion of data to computer compatible tapes at the NASA Data Processing Facility. Geometeric and radiometric corrections, tape formats, and the physical characteristics of the tapes are also included.

  14. Generation and physical characteristics of the LANDSAT-1, -2 and -3 MSS computer compatible tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, V. L.

    1977-01-01

    The generation and format of the LANDSAT 1, 2, and 3 system corrected multispectral scanner computer compatible tapes are discussed. Included in the discussion are the spacecraft sensors, scene characteristics, the transmission of data, and the conversion of the data to computer compatible tapes. Also included in the discussion are geometric and radiometric corrections, tape formats, and the physical characteristics of the tape.

  15. Correlation of hierarchal Upper Silurian stacking patterns generated by Milankovitch orbital forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Mauriello, D.J.; Ketterer, M.W. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The Upper Silurian Wills Creek Formation in Pennsylvania and Maryland is entirely divisible into meter-scale allocycles. Stacking patterns of these allocycles reveal a hierarchy consistent with predictions based on the Milankovitch model of orbital forcing. Asymmetrical Sixth-Order cycles (PACs), bounded by surfaces produced by precessional sea-level rises, are divisible into a lower highstand portion and an upper lowstand portion separated by a sharp sea-level fall surface produced by a rapid sea-level drop within the precessional cycle. Sixth-Order cycles may be genetically grouped into Fifth-Order (100 ky.) and subsequently, Fourth-Order (400 ky.) cycles, each of which exhibits a distinct internal symmetry. Fifth-Order cycles, on average three to four meters in thickness, are composed of a basal transgressive portion consisting of two PACs followed by two or three successively regressive PACs. Four Fifth-Order cycles constitute a complete Fourth-Order cycle, in which the second Fifth-Order cycle contains facies representing the deepest or least restricted paleoenvironments. In each case, the fundamental Sixth-Order cycles were generated by the precessional signal modulated by orbital eccentricity variations. Over distances in excess of 100 km, Wills Creek facies change laterally from nearshore marine to fluvial coastal plain. Stacking patterns in these distinct facies are identical, and thus correlative, indicating the basin-wide extent of the stratigraphic events which produced these patterns. These correlations demonstrate that Milankovitch-driven eustatic sea-level fluctuations were occurring during the Late Silurian.

  16. Long Range Debye-Hückel Correction for Computation of Grid-based Electrostatic Forces Between Biomacromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Mereghetti, Paolo; Martinez, M.; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2014-06-17

    Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations can be used to study very large molecular systems, such as models of the intracellular environment, using atomic-detail structures. Such simulations require strategies to contain the computational costs, especially for the computation of interaction forces and energies. A common approach is to compute interaction forces between macromolecules by precomputing their interaction potentials on three-dimensional discretized grids. For long-range interactions, such as electrostatics, grid-based methods are subject to finite size errors. We describe here the implementation of a Debye-Hückel correction to the grid-based electrostatic potential used in the SDA BD simulation software that was applied to simulate solutions of bovine serum albumin and of hen egg white lysozyme.

  17. Entropic elasticity in the generation of muscle force--a theoretical model.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2002-11-01

    A novel simplified structural model of sarcomeric force production in striate muscle is presented. Using some simple assumptions regarding the distribution of myosin spring lengths at different sliding velocities it is possible to derive a very simple expression showing the main components of the experimentally observed force-velocity relationship of muscle: nonlinearity during contraction (Hill, 1938), maximal force production during stretching equal to two times the isometric force (Katz, 1939), yielding at high stretching velocity, slightly concave force-extension relationship during sudden length changes (Ford et al., 1977; Lombardi & Piazzesi, 1990), accurate reproduction of the rate of ATP consumption (Shirakawa et al., 2000; He et al., 2000) and of the extra energy liberation rate (Hill, 1964a). Different assumptions regarding the force-length relationship of individual cross-bridges are explored [linear, power function and worm-like chain (WLC) model based], and it is shown that the best results are obtained if the individual myosin-spring forces are modelled using a WLC model, thus hinting that entropic elasticity could be the main source of force in myosin undergoing the conformational changes associated with the power stroke.

  18. Limited rotational and rovibrational line lists computed with highly accurate quartic force fields and ab initio dipole surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fortenberry, Ryan C; Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W; Lee, Timothy J

    2014-02-01

    In this work, computational procedures are employed to compute the rotational and rovibrational spectra and line lists for H2O, CO2, and SO2. Building on the established use of quartic force fields, MP2 and CCSD(T) Dipole Moment Surfaces (DMSs) are computed for each system of study in order to produce line intensities as well as the transition energies. The computed results exhibit a clear correlation to reference data available in the HITRAN database. Additionally, even though CCSD(T) DMSs produce more accurate intensities as compared to experiment, the use of MP2 DMSs results in reliable line lists that are still comparable to experiment. The use of the less computationally costly MP2 method is beneficial in the study of larger systems where use of CCSD(T) would be more costly. PMID:23692860

  19. Computational Interpretations of the Gricean Maxims in the Generation of Referring Expressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Robert; Reiter, Ehud

    1995-01-01

    Presents four computational interpretations of the Gricean conversational maxims in the generation of referring expressions: (1) full brevity interpretation; (2) greedy heuristic interpretation; (3) local brevity interpretation; and (4) incremental interpretation. Examines problems involved in generating definite noun phrases that are appropriate…

  20. A Computer Program for Generating Sequences of Primary Arithmetic Facts in Random Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Edward

    A computer program which generates randomly sequenced problems for testing the abilities of students to add, subtract, and multiply one-digit numbers is described. Appendices provide tables of random sequences with directions for using the tables. The 54-statement FORTRAN program which can be used in generating additional sequences is also…

  1. Calculation of reflectance distribution using angular spectrum convolution in mesh-based computer generated hologram.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Han-Ju; Park, Jae-Hyeung

    2016-08-22

    We propose a method to obtain a computer-generated hologram that renders reflectance distributions of individual mesh surfaces of three-dimensional objects. Unlike previous methods which find phase distribution inside each mesh, the proposed method performs convolution of angular spectrum of the mesh to obtain desired reflectance distribution. Manipulation in the angular spectrum domain enables its application to fully-analytic mesh based computer generated hologram, removing the necessity for resampling of the spatial frequency grid. It is also computationally inexpensive as the convolution can be performed efficiently using Fourier transform. In this paper, we present principle, error analysis, simulation, and experimental verification results of the proposed method.

  2. Grid generation and compressible flow computations about a high-speed civil transport configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abolhassani, J. S.; Stewart, J. E.; Farr, N.; Smith, R. E.; Kerr, P. W.; Everton, E. L.

    1991-01-01

    Techniques and software are discussed for generating grids about a high-speed civil transport configuration. The configuration is defined by a computer-aided design system in wing, fuselage, tail and engine-nacelle components. Grid topology and the surfaces outlining the blocks of the topology are computed with interactive software. The volume grid is computed using software based on transfinite interpolation and Lagrangian blending functions. Several volume grids for inviscid and viscous flow have been generated using this system of codes. Demonstration flowfields around this vehicle are described.

  3. Extraction of primitive representation from captured human movements and measured ground reaction force to generate physically consistent imitated behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ariki, Yuka; Hyon, Sang-Ho; Morimoto, Jun

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we propose an imitation learning framework to generate physically consistent behaviors by estimating the ground reaction force from captured human behaviors. In the proposed framework, we first extract behavioral primitives, which are represented by linear dynamical models, from captured human movements and measured ground reaction force by using the Gaussian mixture of linear dynamical models. Therefore, our method has small dependence on classification criteria defined by an experimenter. By switching primitives with different combinations while estimating the ground reaction force, different physically consistent behaviors can be generated. We apply the proposed method to a four-link robot model to generate squat motion sequences. The four-link robot model successfully generated the squat movements by using our imitation learning framework. To show generalization performance, we also apply the proposed method to robot models that have different torso weights and lengths from a human demonstrator and evaluate the control performances. In addition, we show that the robot model is able to recognize and imitate demonstrator movements even when the observed movements are deviated from the movements that are used to construct the primitives. For further evaluation in higher-dimensional state space, we apply the proposed method to a seven-link robot model. The seven-link robot model was able to generate squat-and-sway motions by using the proposed framework.

  4. A computational model of cerebrospinal fluid production and reabsorption driven by Starling forces.

    PubMed

    Buishas, Joel; Gould, Ian G; Linninger, Andreas A

    2014-10-01

    Experimental evidence has cast doubt on the classical model of river-like cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow from the choroid plexus to the arachnoid granulations. We propose a novel model of water transport through the parenchyma from the microcirculation as driven by Starling forces. This model investigates the effect of osmotic pressure on water transport between the cerebral vasculature, the extracellular space (ECS), the perivascular space (PVS), and the CSF. A rigorous literature search was conducted focusing on experiments which alter the osmolarity of blood or ventricles and measure the rate of CSF production. Investigations into the effect of osmotic pressure on the volume of ventricles and the flux of ions in the blood, choroid plexus epithelium, and CSF are reviewed. Increasing the osmolarity of the serum via a bolus injection completely inhibits nascent fluid flow production in the ventricles. A continuous injection of a hyperosmolar solution into the ventricles can increase the volume of the ventricle by up to 125%. CSF production is altered by 0.231 μL per mOsm in the ventricle and by 0.835 μL per mOsm in the serum. Water flux from the ECS to the CSF is identified as a key feature of intracranial dynamics. A complete mathematical model with all equations and scenarios is fully described, as well as a guide to constructing a computational model of intracranial water balance dynamics. The model proposed in this article predicts the effects the osmolarity of ECS, blood, and CSF on water flux in the brain, establishing a link between osmotic imbalances and pathological conditions such as hydrocephalus and edema. PMID:25358881

  5. The Children of the Computer Generation: An Analysis of the Family Computer Fad in Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishigaki, Emiko Hannah

    Results of a survey of grade school and junior high school students suggest that Japan is now caught up in a TV game fad called Family Computer (Fami-Com). Fami-Com is a household electric machine for video games that allows players to use more than 100 currently marketed software products. Since its introduction in 1983, the popularity of the…

  6. Complex force history of a calving-generated glacial earthquake derived from broadband seismic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeant, Amandine; Mangeney, Anne; Stutzmann, Eléonore; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Walter, Fabian; Moretti, Laurent; Castelnau, Olivier

    2016-02-01

    The force applied to the Earth by the calving of two icebergs at Jakobshavn Isbrae, Greenland, has been quantified. The source force history was recovered by inversion of regional broadband seismograms without any a priori constraint on the source time function, in contrast with previous studies. For periods 10-100 s, the three-component force can be obtained from distant stations alone and is proportional to the closest station seismograms. This inversion makes it possible to quantify changes of the source force direction and amplitude as a function of time and frequency. A detailed comparison with a video of the event was used to identify four forces associated with collision, then bottom-out and top-out rotation of the first and second icebergs, and ice mélange motion. Only the two iceberg rotations were identified in previous studies. All four processes are found here to contribute to the force amplitude and variability. Such a complete time-frequency force history provides unique dynamical constraints for mechanical calving models.

  7. Computationally generated velocity taper for efficiency enhancement in a coupled-cavity traveling-wave tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    1989-01-01

    A computational routine has been created to generate velocity tapers for efficiency enhancement in coupled-cavity TWTs. Programmed into the NASA multidimensional large-signal coupled-cavity TWT computer code, the routine generates the gradually decreasing cavity periods required to maintain a prescribed relationship between the circuit phase velocity and the electron-bunch velocity. Computational results for several computer-generated tapers are compared to those for an existing coupled-cavity TWT with a three-step taper. Guidelines are developed for prescribing the bunch-phase profile to produce a taper for efficiency. The resulting taper provides a calculated RF efficiency 45 percent higher than the step taper at center frequency and at least 37 percent higher over the bandwidth.

  8. Initial forces generated by three types of thermoplastic appliances on an upper central incisor during tipping.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Wolfram; Fialka-Fricke, Julia; Dathe, Henning; Fricke-Zech, Susanne; Zapf, Antonia; Gruber, Rudolf; Kubein-Meesenburg, Dietmar; Sadat-Khonsari, Reza

    2009-12-01

    The force properties of thermoformed appliances have not been systematically investigated. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to quantify the forces delivered by thermoplastic appliances manufactured from three different materials, with the same thickness, on a central upper incisor, during tipping. Five identical appliances were manufactured from three different materials all with a thickness of 1.0 mm (Ideal Clear, Erkodur, and Biolon). For measuring the forces, an isolated measuring tooth, as part of a standardized resin model incorporated in a newly developed measuring device, was tipped in nine 2.7 arc minute (0.04629 degree) steps, from 0 to 0.416 degrees in the vestibular and palatal directions around a rotational axis through the virtual apex, after positioning an appliance on the model. For statistical analysis, the force components Fx/tipping and Fz/intrusion at a displacement of +/-0.151 mm from the incisor edge were determined. Means and standard deviations (SDs) were calculated. The Kruskal-Wallis test for overall effects and the Wilcoxon two-sample test for individual group pairings were used (P < 0.05 significance level). The mean Fx forces ranged from -2.82 N (SD 0.62) to 5.42 N (SD 0.56). The mean Fz forces were between -0.14 N (SD 0.52) and -2.3 N (SD 0.43). The highest intrusive forces were measured during vestibular displacement of the measuring tooth. The forces delivered by the Biolon appliance were found to be much greater (P < 0.01) than those of the other materials. The forces delivered by the materials investigated were mostly higher than those stated in the literature.

  9. HOMAR: A computer code for generating homotopic grids using algebraic relations: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moitra, Anutosh

    1989-01-01

    A computer code for fast automatic generation of quasi-three-dimensional grid systems for aerospace configurations is described. The code employs a homotopic method to algebraically generate two-dimensional grids in cross-sectional planes, which are stacked to produce a three-dimensional grid system. Implementation of the algebraic equivalents of the homotopic relations for generating body geometries and grids are explained. Procedures for controlling grid orthogonality and distortion are described. Test cases with description and specification of inputs are presented in detail. The FORTRAN computer program and notes on implementation and use are included.

  10. Application of a single-board computer as a low-cost pulse generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedrizzi, Marcus; Soria, Julio

    2015-09-01

    A BeagleBone Black (BBB) single-board open-source computer was implemented as a low-cost fully programmable pulse generator. The pulse generator makes use of the BBB Programmable Real-Time Unit (PRU) subsystem to achieve a deterministic temporal resolution of 5 ns, an RMS jitter of 290 ps and a timebase stability on the order of 10 ppm. A Python-based software framework has also been developed to simplify the usage of the pulse generator.

  11. Transferable next-generation force fields from simple liquids to complex materials.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J R; Yu, Kuang; McDaniel, Jesse G

    2015-03-17

    Molecular simulations have had a transformative impact on chemists' understanding of the structure and dynamics of molecular systems. Simulations can both explain and predict chemical phenomena, and they provide a unique bridge between the microscopic and macroscopic regimes. The input for such simulations is the intermolecular interactions, which then determine the forces on the constituent atoms and therefore the time evolution and equilibrium properties of the system. However, in practice, accuracy and reliability are often limited by the fidelity of the description of those very same interactions, most typically embodied approximately in mathematical form in what are known as force fields. Force fields most often utilize conceptually simple functional forms that have been parametrized to reproduce existing experimental gas phase or bulk data. Yet, reliance on empirical parametrization can sometimes introduce limitations with respect to novel chemical systems or uncontrolled errors when moving to temperatures, pressures, or environments that differ from those for which they were developed. Alternatively, it is possible to develop force fields entirely from first principles, using accurate electronic structure calculations to determine the intermolecular interactions. This introduces a new set of challenges, including the transferability of the resulting force field to related chemical systems. In response, we recently developed an alternative approach to develop force fields entirely from first-principles electronic structure calculations based on intermolecular perturbation theory. Making use of an energy decomposition analysis ensures, by construction, that the resulting force fields contain the correct balance of the various components of intermolecular interaction (exchange repulsion, electrostatics, induction, and dispersion), each treated by a functional form that reflects the underlying physics. We therefore refer to the resulting force fields as

  12. Transferable next-generation force fields from simple liquids to complex materials.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J R; Yu, Kuang; McDaniel, Jesse G

    2015-03-17

    Molecular simulations have had a transformative impact on chemists' understanding of the structure and dynamics of molecular systems. Simulations can both explain and predict chemical phenomena, and they provide a unique bridge between the microscopic and macroscopic regimes. The input for such simulations is the intermolecular interactions, which then determine the forces on the constituent atoms and therefore the time evolution and equilibrium properties of the system. However, in practice, accuracy and reliability are often limited by the fidelity of the description of those very same interactions, most typically embodied approximately in mathematical form in what are known as force fields. Force fields most often utilize conceptually simple functional forms that have been parametrized to reproduce existing experimental gas phase or bulk data. Yet, reliance on empirical parametrization can sometimes introduce limitations with respect to novel chemical systems or uncontrolled errors when moving to temperatures, pressures, or environments that differ from those for which they were developed. Alternatively, it is possible to develop force fields entirely from first principles, using accurate electronic structure calculations to determine the intermolecular interactions. This introduces a new set of challenges, including the transferability of the resulting force field to related chemical systems. In response, we recently developed an alternative approach to develop force fields entirely from first-principles electronic structure calculations based on intermolecular perturbation theory. Making use of an energy decomposition analysis ensures, by construction, that the resulting force fields contain the correct balance of the various components of intermolecular interaction (exchange repulsion, electrostatics, induction, and dispersion), each treated by a functional form that reflects the underlying physics. We therefore refer to the resulting force fields as

  13. Control of Human Generating Force by Use of Acoustic Information ─ Utilization of Onomatopoeic Utterance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Taichi; Oyama, Keiichi; Iimura, Miki; Kobayashi, Harumi; Tanaka, Kihachiro

    We have performed basic experiments for the purpose of applying onomatopoeia to engineering problems. In these experiments, test subjects were made to perform lifting actions while listening to onomatopoeic utterances. We thereby demonstrated that there is a relationship between the onomatopoeic utterances and the lifting forces exerted by the test subjects. We examined how the lifting forces are related to the envelope of onomatopoeic utterances. Furthermore, we investigated how the lifting force is affected depending on whether or not emotion is expressed when uttering the onomatopoeia.

  14. Hybrid electro-optical stimulation of the rat sciatic nerve induces force generation in the plantarflexor muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Austin R.; Peterson, Erik; Mackanos, Mark A.; Atkinson, James; Tyler, Dustin; Jansen, E. Duco

    2012-12-01

    Objective. Optical methods of neural activation are becoming important tools for the study and treatment of neurological disorders. Infrared nerve stimulation (INS) is an optical technique exhibiting spatially precise activation in the native neural system. While this technique shows great promise, the risk of thermal damage may limit some applications. Combining INS with traditional electrical stimulation, a method known as hybrid electro-optical stimulation, reduces the laser power requirements and mitigates the risk of thermal damage while maintaining spatial selectivity. Here we investigate the capability of inducing force generation in the rat hind limb through hybrid stimulation of the sciatic nerve. Approach. Hybrid stimulation was achieved by combining an optically transparent nerve cuff for electrical stimulation and a diode laser coupled to an optical fiber for infrared stimulation. Force generation in the rat plantarflexor muscles was measured in response to hybrid stimulation with 1 s bursts of pulses at 15 and 20 Hz and with a burst frequency of 0.5 Hz. Main results. Forces were found to increase with successive stimulus trains, ultimately reaching a plateau by the 20th train. Hybrid evoked forces decayed at a rate similar to the rate of thermal diffusion in tissue. Preconditioning the nerve with an optical stimulus resulted in an increase in the force response to both electrical and hybrid stimulation. Histological evaluation showed no signs of thermally induced morphological changes following hybrid stimulation. Our results indicate that an increase in baseline temperature is a likely contributor to hybrid force generation. Significance. Extraneural INS of peripheral nerves at physiologically relevant repetition rates is possible using hybrid electro-optical stimulation.

  15. Design of a magnetic force exciter for a small-scale windmill using a piezo-composite generating element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Hung Truyen; Goo, Nam Seo

    2011-03-01

    We introduce a design for a magnetic force exciter that applies vibration to a piezo-composite generating element (PCGE) for a small-scale windmill to convert wind energy into electrical energy. The windmill can be used to harvest wind energy in urban regions. The magnetic force exciter consists of exciting magnets attached to the device's input rotor, and a secondary magnet that is fixed at the tip of the PCGE. Under an applied wind force, the input rotor rotates to create a magnetic force interaction to excite the PCGE. Deformation of the PCGE enables it to generate the electric power. Experiments were performed to test power generation and battery charging capabilities. In a battery charging test, the charging time for a 40 mAh battery is approximately 1.5 hours for a wind speed of 2.5 m/s. Our experimental results show that the prototype can harvest energy in urban areas with low wind speeds, and convert the wasted wind energy into electricity for city use.

  16. Vegetation Canopies and Objects of Arbitrary Shapes: Computer Generation and Bidirectional Reflectance Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, Narenda S.; Rozehnal, I.; Thompson, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    A general computer graphics based model is presented for computer generation of objects of arbitrary shape and for calculating Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF) and scattering from them, in the optical region. The computer generation uses a modified Lindemayer system (L system) approach. For rendering on a computer screen, the object is divided into polygons, and innovative computer graphics techniques are used to display the object and to calculate the scattering and reflectance from the object. The use of the technique is illustrated with scattering from canopies of simulated corn plants and from a snow covered mountain. The scattering is quantified using measures like BRF and albedo and by rendering the objects with brightness of each of the two facets of a polygon proportional to the amount of light scattered from the object in the viewer's direction.

  17. Photorefractive and computational holography in the experimental generation of Airy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, Rafael A. B.; Vieira, Tarcio A.; Yepes, Indira S. V.; Gesualdi, Marcos R. R.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present the experimental generation of Airy beams via computational and photorefractive holography. Experimental generation of Airy beams using conventional optical components presents several difficulties and a practically infeasible. Thus, the optical generation of Airy beams has been made from the optical reconstruction of a computer generated hologram implemented by a spatial light modulator. In the photorefractive holography technique, being used for the first time to our knowledge, the hologram of an Airy beam is constructed (recorded) and reconstructed (read) optically in a nonlinear photorefractive medium. The Airy beam experimental realization was made by a setup of computational and photorefractive holography using a photorefractive Bi12 TiO20 crystal as holographic recording medium. Airy beams and Airy beam arrays were obtained experimentally in accordance with the predicted theory; with excellent prospects for applications in optical trapping and optical communications systems.

  18. Mechanical unzipping and rezipping of a single SNARE complex reveals hysteresis as a force-generating mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Min, Duyoung; Kim, Kipom; Hyeon, Changbong; Hoon Cho, Yong; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Yoon, Tae-Young

    2013-01-01

    Formation of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex provides mechanical thrust for membrane fusion, but its molecular mechanism is still unclear. Here using magnetic tweezers, we observe mechanical responses of a single neuronal SNARE complex under constant pulling force. Single SNARE complexes may be unzipped with 34 pN force. When rezipping is induced by lowering the force to 11 pN, only a partially assembled state results, with the C-terminal half of the SNARE complex remaining disassembled. Reassembly of the C-terminal half occurs only when the force is further lowered below 11 pN. Thus, mechanical hysteresis, characterized by the unzipping and rezipping cycle of a single SNARE complex, produces the partially assembled state. In this metastable state, unzipping toward the N-terminus is suppressed while zippering toward the C-terminus is initiated as a steep function of force. This ensures the directionality of SNARE-complex formation, making the SNARE complex a robust force-generating machine. PMID:23591872

  19. Modelling LARES temperature distribution and thermal drag II: Numerical computation of current-epoch thermal forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Jason W.; Matzner, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The LARES satellite is a laser-ranged space experiment to contribute to geophysics observation, and to measure the general relativistic Lense-Thirring effect. LARES consists of a solid tungsten alloy sphere, into which 92 fused-silica Cube Corner Reflectors (CCRs) are set in colatitude circles ("rows"). During its first four months in orbit it was observed to undergo an anomalous along-track orbital acceleration of approximately -0.4 pm/s2 (pm: = picometer). The first paper in this series (Eur. Phys. J. Plus 130, 206 (2015) - Paper I) computed the thermally induced along-track "thermal drag" on the LARES satellite during the first 126 days after launch. The results there suggest that the IR absorbance α and emissivity ɛ of the CCRs equal 0.60, a possible value for silica with slight surface contamination subjected to the space environment. Paper I computed an average thermal drag acceleration of -0.36 pm/s2 for a 120-day period starting with the 7th day after launch. The heating and the resultant along-track acceleration depend on the plane of the orbit, the sun position, and in particular on the occurrence of eclipses, all of which are functions of time. Thus we compute the thermal drag for specific days. The satellite is heated from two sources: sunlight and Earth's infrared (IR) radiation. Paper I worked in the fast-spin regime, where CCRs with the same colatitude can be taken to have the same temperature. Further, since all temperature variations (temporal or spatial) were small in this regime, Paper I linearized the Stefan-Boltzmann law and performed a Fourier series analysis. However, the spin rate of the satellite is expected currently ( ≈ day 1500) to be slow, of order ≈ 5 /orbit, so the "fast-spin equal-temperatures in a row" assumption is suspect. In this paper, which considers epochs up to 1580 days after launch, we do not linearize and we use direct numerical integration instead of Fourier methods. In addition to the along-track drag, this code

  20. Computer image generation: Reconfigurability as a strategy in high fidelity space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartholomew, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    The demand for realistic, high fidelity, computer image generation systems to support space simulation is well established. However, as the number and diversity of space applications increase, the complexity and cost of computer image generation systems also increase. One strategy used to harmonize cost with varied requirements is establishment of a reconfigurable image generation system that can be adapted rapidly and easily to meet new and changing requirements. The reconfigurability strategy through the life cycle of system conception, specification, design, implementation, operation, and support for high fidelity computer image generation systems are discussed. The discussion is limited to those issues directly associated with reconfigurability and adaptability of a specialized scene generation system in a multi-faceted space applications environment. Examples and insights gained through the recent development and installation of the Improved Multi-function Scene Generation System at Johnson Space Center, Systems Engineering Simulator are reviewed and compared with current simulator industry practices. The results are clear; the strategy of reconfigurability applied to space simulation requirements provides a viable path to supporting diverse applications with an adaptable computer image generation system.

  1. Two-dimensional stick slip on a soft elastic polymer: pattern generation using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, J. A.; Brown, C. L.; Myhra, S.; Watson, G. S.

    2006-05-01

    It has been demonstrated that it is possible to create laterally differentiated frictional patterning and three-dimensional structures using an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe on the surface of a soft elastic polymer, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). The resulting effect of contact mode imaging at low loading forces (<100 nN), observed in the lateral force mode, revealed a homogeneous pattern on the PDMS surface exhibiting higher friction. With higher loading forces ({\\gg }100 nN) the effect is non-uniform, resulting in structures with depths on the nanometre scale. The topographic and frictional data revealed stick-slip responses in both the fast (orthogonal to the long axis of the lever) and slow (parallel to the long axis of the lever) directions of probe travel from scanning in a raster pattern. The stick-slip events are manifested in the form of a series of shallow channels spaced evenly apart on the polymer surface. Detailed friction loop analysis acquired during the manipulation process showed that the lateral force changed according to the strength of trapping of the tip with the polymer surface exhibiting significant in-plane deformation due to lateral forces being imposed. An incremental increase in the initial loading force resulted in an increase in in-plane displacement and a greater spacing between the stick lines/channels in the slow-scan direction. A decrease in channel length in the fast-scan direction is also observed as a result of an increase in static friction with normal force, resulting in greater surface deformation and shorter track length for sliding friction.

  2. Estimation of changes in dynamic hydraulic force in a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with transient computational fluid dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, Toru; Ohta, Akiko; Tanaka, Nobuatu; Qian, Yi; Tsukiya, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the hydraulic force on magnetically levitated (maglev) pumps should be studied carefully to improve the suspension performance and the reliability of the pumps. A maglev centrifugal pump, developed at Ibaraki University, was modeled with 926 376 hexahedral elements for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. The pump has a fully open six-vane impeller with a diameter of 72.5 mm. A self-bearing motor suspends the impeller in the radial direction. The maximum pressure head and flow rate were 250 mmHg and 14 l/min, respectively. First, a steady-state analysis was performed using commercial code STAR-CD to confirm the model's suitability by comparing the results with the real pump performance. Second, transient analysis was performed to estimate the hydraulic force on the levitated impeller. The impeller was rotated in steps of 1 degrees using a sliding mesh. The force around the impeller was integrated at every step. The transient analysis revealed that the direction of the radial force changed dynamically as the vane's position changed relative to the outlet port during one circulation, and the magnitude of this force was about 1 N. The current maglev pump has sufficient performance to counteract this hydraulic force. Transient CFD analysis is not only useful for observing dynamic flow conditions in a centrifugal pump but is also effective for obtaining information about the levitation dynamics of a maglev pump. PMID:19894088

  3. Estimation of changes in dynamic hydraulic force in a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with transient computational fluid dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, Toru; Ohta, Akiko; Tanaka, Nobuatu; Qian, Yi; Tsukiya, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the hydraulic force on magnetically levitated (maglev) pumps should be studied carefully to improve the suspension performance and the reliability of the pumps. A maglev centrifugal pump, developed at Ibaraki University, was modeled with 926 376 hexahedral elements for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. The pump has a fully open six-vane impeller with a diameter of 72.5 mm. A self-bearing motor suspends the impeller in the radial direction. The maximum pressure head and flow rate were 250 mmHg and 14 l/min, respectively. First, a steady-state analysis was performed using commercial code STAR-CD to confirm the model's suitability by comparing the results with the real pump performance. Second, transient analysis was performed to estimate the hydraulic force on the levitated impeller. The impeller was rotated in steps of 1 degrees using a sliding mesh. The force around the impeller was integrated at every step. The transient analysis revealed that the direction of the radial force changed dynamically as the vane's position changed relative to the outlet port during one circulation, and the magnitude of this force was about 1 N. The current maglev pump has sufficient performance to counteract this hydraulic force. Transient CFD analysis is not only useful for observing dynamic flow conditions in a centrifugal pump but is also effective for obtaining information about the levitation dynamics of a maglev pump.

  4. Optical trapping reveals propulsion forces, power generation and motility efficiency of the unicellular parasites Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    PubMed Central

    Stellamanns, Eric; Uppaluri, Sravanti; Hochstetter, Axel; Heddergott, Niko; Engstler, Markus; Pfohl, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Unicellular parasites have developed sophisticated swimming mechanisms to survive in a wide range of environments. Cell motility of African trypanosomes, parasites responsible for fatal illness in humans and animals, is crucial both in the insect vector and the mammalian host. Using millisecond-scale imaging in a microfluidics platform along with a custom made optical trap, we are able to confine single cells to study trypanosome motility. From the trapping characteristics of the cells, we determine the propulsion force generated by cells with a single flagellum as well as of dividing trypanosomes with two fully developed flagella. Estimates of the dissipative energy and the power generation of single cells obtained from the motility patterns of the trypanosomes within the optical trap indicate that specific motility characteristics, in addition to locomotion, may be required for antibody clearance. Introducing a steerable second optical trap we could further measure the force, which is generated at the flagellar tip. Differences in the cellular structure of the trypanosomes are correlated with the trapping and motility characteristics and in consequence with their propulsion force, dissipative energy and power generation. PMID:25269514

  5. Optical trapping reveals propulsion forces, power generation and motility efficiency of the unicellular parasites Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stellamanns, Eric; Uppaluri, Sravanti; Hochstetter, Axel; Heddergott, Niko; Engstler, Markus; Pfohl, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Unicellular parasites have developed sophisticated swimming mechanisms to survive in a wide range of environments. Cell motility of African trypanosomes, parasites responsible for fatal illness in humans and animals, is crucial both in the insect vector and the mammalian host. Using millisecond-scale imaging in a microfluidics platform along with a custom made optical trap, we are able to confine single cells to study trypanosome motility. From the trapping characteristics of the cells, we determine the propulsion force generated by cells with a single flagellum as well as of dividing trypanosomes with two fully developed flagella. Estimates of the dissipative energy and the power generation of single cells obtained from the motility patterns of the trypanosomes within the optical trap indicate that specific motility characteristics, in addition to locomotion, may be required for antibody clearance. Introducing a steerable second optical trap we could further measure the force, which is generated at the flagellar tip. Differences in the cellular structure of the trypanosomes are correlated with the trapping and motility characteristics and in consequence with their propulsion force, dissipative energy and power generation.

  6. Automatic Generation of Individual Finite-Element Models for Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Structure Mechanics Simulations in the Arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazer, D.; Schmidt, E.; Unterhinninghofen, R.; Richter, G. M.; Dillmann, R.

    2009-08-01

    Abnormal hemodynamics and biomechanics of blood flow and vessel wall conditions in the arteries may result in severe cardiovascular diseases. Cardiovascular diseases result from complex flow pattern and fatigue of the vessel wall and are prevalent causes leading to high mortality each year. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Structure Mechanics (CSM) and Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) have become efficient tools in modeling the individual hemodynamics and biomechanics as well as their interaction in the human arteries. The computations allow non-invasively simulating patient-specific physical parameters of the blood flow and the vessel wall needed for an efficient minimally invasive treatment. The numerical simulations are based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) and require exact and individual mesh models to be provided. In the present study, we developed a numerical tool to automatically generate complex patient-specific Finite Element (FE) mesh models from image-based geometries of healthy and diseased vessels. The mesh generation is optimized based on the integration of mesh control functions for curvature, boundary layers and mesh distribution inside the computational domain. The needed mesh parameters are acquired from a computational grid analysis which ensures mesh-independent and stable simulations. Further, the generated models include appropriate FE sets necessary for the definition of individual boundary conditions, required to solve the system of nonlinear partial differential equations governed by the fluid and solid domains. Based on the results, we have performed computational blood flow and vessel wall simulations in patient-specific aortic models providing a physical insight into the pathological vessel parameters. Automatic mesh generation with individual awareness in terms of geometry and conditions is a prerequisite for performing fast, accurate and realistic FEM-based computations of hemodynamics and biomechanics in the

  7. Theoretical and Computational Study of Forced-Convection Heat Transfer at Supercritical Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jianguo

    In the simulation of turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer at supercritical pressures, substantial difficulties have been encountered in the modeling of turbulence and bounda-ry layer. This is due to significant fluid property variations with respect to the local temperature and pressure, especially in the near-wall region of a heated wall, where large temperature differences occur. The classical turbulence models available in literature were typically developed for constant-property fluids, where an empirical wall function in the high-Re k-epsilon model, and a damping function in the low-Re k-epsilon model were derived based on the constant-property data to solve the boundary layer. As it can be found in the existing literature, large differences have been observed between the experimental and numerical simulation results of the heat transfer coefficient predictions in the en-hanced and deteriorated heat transfer situations for supercritical fluids. In this thesis, a novel near-wall treatment method is proposed to treat large property variations in the thermal and velocity sub-layers. In the near-wall region, the supercritical fluids can be considered thermal-conductive and viscous forces dominated. The thick-ness of the viscous sub-layer (VSL) and the conduction sub-layer (CSL) can be related to the wall shear stress and local Prandtl number information by using computational CFD models, such as that implemented in the NPHASE-CMFD code. The fluids' bulk and wall temperature information has been obtained from the literature review of experi-mental measurements. The wall temperature and heat transfer coefficient calculated from the k-epsilon model with the proposed wall treatment method have been found to be in good agreement with experimental data for both heat transfer enhancement and deterioration cases for two most widely used fluids: CO2 and water. The proposed model has been applied in the reactor-scale thermal-hydraulic analysis of different flow path

  8. Impact of computed tomography image and contact force technology on catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Marai, Ibrahim; Suleiman, Mahmoud; Blich, Miry; Lessick, Jonathan; Abadi, Sobhi; Boulos, Monther

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of using computed tomography (CT) and contact force (CF) technology on recurrence of atrial tachyarrhythmia after atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. METHODS: This non-randomized study included 2 groups of patients. All patients had symptomatic recurrent paroxysmal or persistent AF and were treated with at least 1 anti arrhythmic medication or intolerant to medication. The first group included 33 patients who underwent circumferential pulmonary veins isolation (PVI) for AF during 2012 and 2013 guided by CT image integration (Cartomerge, Biosense Webster, Diamond Bar, CA, United States) of left atrium and pulmonary veins into an electroanatomic mapping (EAM) system (CT group) using standard irrigated radiofrequency catheter (ThermoCool, Carto, Biosense Webster, Diamond Bar, CA, United States) or irrigated catheter with integrated CF sensor (Smart Touch, Carto, Biosense Webster, Diamond Bar, CA, United States). The second group included immediately preceding 32 patients who had circumferential PVI by standard irrigated catheter (ThermoCool) using only EAM (Carto) system (EAM group). Linear lesions were performed according to the discretion of operator. RESULTS: Sex, age, and persistent AF were not different between groups. PVI was achieved in all patients in both groups. Linear ablations including cavo-tricuspid isthmus and or roof line ablation were not different between groups. Free of atrial tachyarrhythmia during follow-up of 24 mo was significantly higher among CT group compared to EAM group (81% vs 55%; respectively; P = 0.027). When 11 patients from CT group who had ablation using Smart Touch catheter were excluded, the difference between CT group and EAM became non significant (73% vs 55%; respectively; P = 0.16). Sub analysis of CT group showed that patients who had ablation using Smart Touch catheter tend to be more free of atrial tachyarrhythmia compared to patients who had ablation using standard irrigated catheter during

  9. Computational Intelligence Based Data Fusion Algorithm for Dynamic sEMG and Skeletal Muscle Force Modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekhar Potluri,; Madhavi Anugolu; Marco P. Schoen; D. Subbaram Naidu

    2013-08-01

    In this work, an array of three surface Electrography (sEMG) sensors are used to acquired muscle extension and contraction signals for 18 healthy test subjects. The skeletal muscle force is estimated using the acquired sEMG signals and a Non-linear Wiener Hammerstein model, relating the two signals in a dynamic fashion. The model is obtained from using System Identification (SI) algorithm. The obtained force models for each sensor are fused using a proposed fuzzy logic concept with the intent to improve the force estimation accuracy and resilience to sensor failure or misalignment. For the fuzzy logic inference system, the sEMG entropy, the relative error, and the correlation of the force signals are considered for defining the membership functions. The proposed fusion algorithm yields an average of 92.49% correlation between the actual force and the overall estimated force output. In addition, the proposed fusionbased approach is implemented on a test platform. Experiments indicate an improvement in finger/hand force estimation.

  10. Effects of Computer-Aided Interlimb Force Coupling Training on Paretic Hand and Arm Motor Control following Chronic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chueh-Ho; Chou, Li-Wei; Luo, Hong-Ji; Tsai, Po-Yi; Lieu, Fu-Kong; Chiang, Shang-Lin; Sung, Wen-Hsu

    2015-01-01

    Objective We investigated the training effects of interlimb force coupling training on paretic upper extremity outcomes in patients with chronic stroke and analyzed the relationship between motor recovery of the paretic hand, arm and functional performances on paretic upper limb. Design A randomized controlled trial with outcome assessment at baseline and after 4 weeks of intervention. Setting Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming University. Participants Thirty-three subjects with chronic stroke were recruited and randomly assigned to training (n = 16) and control groups (n = 17). Interventions The computer-aided interlimb force coupling training task with visual feedback included different grip force generation methods on both hands. Main Outcome Measures The Barthel Index (BI), the upper extremity motor control Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA-UE), the Motor Assessment Score (MAS), and the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT). All assessments were executed by a blinded evaluator, and data management and statistical analysis were also conducted by a blinded researcher. Results The training group demonstrated greater improvement on the FMA-UE (p<.001), WMFT (p<.001), MAS (p = .004) and BI (p = .037) than the control group after 4 weeks of intervention. In addition, a moderate correlation was found between the improvement of scores for hand scales of the FMA and other portions of the FMA UE (r = .528, p = .018) or MAS (r = .596, p = .015) in the training group. Conclusion Computer-aided interlimb force coupling training improves the motor recovery of a paretic hand, and facilitates motor control and enhances functional performance in the paretic upper extremity of people with chronic stroke. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02247674. PMID:26193492

  11. Computation of Atomic Solvent Accessible Surface Areas and Gradients for the Calculation of Solvation Energy and Forces on Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Michelle; Fennel, Christopher; Coutsias, Evangelos; Dill, Kenneth; Brini, Emiliano

    2014-03-01

    Many models for the calculation of solvation energy and forces on a molecule involve atomic solvent accessible surface areas and their gradients. We present analytical formulas for such areas and gradients which utilize the Delaunay tetrahedrization of a molecule and its subset called the α-complex. These formulas have been implemented in a fast computer program in conjunction with a solvation approach called Semi Explicit Assembly (SEA), and has shown to produce quick and physically accurate results.

  12. Using PHM to measure equipment usable life on the Air Force's next generation reusable space booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasdel, A.

    The U.S. Air Force procures many launch vehicles and launch vehicle services to place their satellites at their desired location in space. The equipment on-board these satellite and launch vehicle often suffer from premature failures that result in the total loss of the satellite or a shortened mission life sometimes requiring the purchase of a replacement satellite and launch vehicle. The Air Force uses its EELV to launch its high priority satellites. Due to a rise in the cost of purchasing a launch using the Air Force's EELV from 72M in 1997 to as high as 475M per launch today, the Air Force is working to replace the EELV with a reusable space booster (RSB). The RSB will be similar in design and operations to the recently cancelled NASA reusable space booster known as the Space Shuttle. If the Air Force uses the same process that procures the EELV and other launch vehicles and satellites, the RSB will also suffer from premature equipment failures thus putting the payloads at a similar high risk of mission failure. The RSB is expected to lower each launch cost by 50% compared to the EELV. The development of the RSB offers the Air Force an opportunity to use a new reliability paradigm that includes a prognostic and health management program and a condition-based maintenance program. These both require using intelligent, decision making self-prognostic equipment The prognostic and health management program and its condition-based maintenance program allows increases in RSB equipment usable life, lower logistics and maintenance costs, while increasing safety and mission assurance. The PHM removes many decisions from personnel that, in the past resulted in catastrophic failures and loss of life. Adding intelligent, decision-making self-prognostic equipment to the RSB will further decrease launch costs while decreasing risk and increasing safety and mission assurance.

  13. Jar-opening challenges. Part 2: estimating the force-generating capacity of thumb muscles in healthy young adults during jar-opening tasks.

    PubMed

    Kuo, L C; Chang, J H; Lin, C F; Hsu, H Y; Ho, K Y; Su, F C

    2009-07-01

    This study discusses the force-generating capacity of thumb muscles during jar-opening tasks using two grip patterns: the power grip and the precision grip. This study develops a three-dimensional biomechanical model of the thumb to predict muscle forces in jar-opening activities based on external forces measured by a custom-designed jar device. Ten healthy subjects participated in the study. Each participant turned a jar lid of 66 mm diameter counterclockwise with maximal effort and preferred speed using both grip patterns. The average normal and tangential forces applied by the thumb to the jar lid show that the normal force is the primary contributive force for opening a jar. This normal force is approximately three times the tangential force. Muscular force-generating capacity measurements show that the major active muscles during a jar-opening activity for both grips include the flexor pollicis longus, flexor pollicis brevis, abductor pollicis brevis, adductor pollicis, and opponens pollicis. The total muscle force ratios for the precision grip and power grip with respect to externally applied forces are 5.6 and 4.7 respectively. These ratios indicate that the power grip pattern produces less muscle force per unit of external applied load. The technique proposed in this study provides a proper apparatus and model for measuring three-dimensional loads and estimating the force-generating capacity of each muscle and tendon of the thumb during jar-opening tasks. PMID:19623911

  14. Identification of natural images and computer-generated graphics based on statistical and textural features.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fei; Li, Jiao-ting; Long, Min

    2015-03-01

    To discriminate the acquisition pipelines of digital images, a novel scheme for the identification of natural images and computer-generated graphics is proposed based on statistical and textural features. First, the differences between them are investigated from the view of statistics and texture, and 31 dimensions of feature are acquired for identification. Then, LIBSVM is used for the classification. Finally, the experimental results are presented. The results show that it can achieve an identification accuracy of 97.89% for computer-generated graphics, and an identification accuracy of 97.75% for natural images. The analyses also demonstrate the proposed method has excellent performance, compared with some existing methods based only on statistical features or other features. The method has a great potential to be implemented for the identification of natural images and computer-generated graphics.

  15. Magnetic Circuit Model of PM Motor-Generator to Predict Radial Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLallin, Kerry (Technical Monitor); Kascak, Peter E.; Dever, Timothy P.; Jansen, Ralph H.

    2004-01-01

    A magnetic circuit model is developed for a PM motor for flywheel applications. A sample motor is designed and modeled. Motor configuration and selection of materials is discussed, and the choice of winding configuration is described. A magnetic circuit model is described, which includes the stator back iron, rotor yoke, permanent magnets, air gaps and the stator teeth. Iterative solution of this model yields flux linkages, back EMF, torque, power, and radial force at the rotor caused by eccentricity. Calculated radial forces are then used to determine motor negative stiffness.

  16. Computational study of the electromagnetic forces and torques on different ITER first wall designs.

    SciTech Connect

    Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Garde, Joseph Maurico; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Pasik, Michael Francis; Ulrickson, Michael Andrew

    2009-06-01

    An electromagnetic analysis is performed on different first wall designs for the ITER device. The electromagnetic forces and torques present due to a plasma disruption event are calculated and compared for the different designs.

  17. Precise computer controlled positioning of robot end effectors using force sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, L. S.; Mcinnis, B. C.; Wang, J. C.

    1988-01-01

    A thorough study of combined position/force control using sensory feedback for a one-dimensional manipulator model, which may count for the spacecraft docking problem or be extended to the multi-joint robot manipulator problem, was performed. The additional degree of freedom introduced by the compliant force sensor is included in the system dynamics in the design of precise position control. State feedback based on the pole placement method and with integral control is used to design the position controller. A simple constant gain force controller is used as an example to illustrate the dependence of the stability and steady-state accuracy of the overall position/force control upon the design of the inner position controller. Supportive simulation results are also provided.

  18. Image communication scheme based on dynamic visual cryptography and computer generated holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palevicius, Paulius; Ragulskis, Minvydas

    2015-01-01

    Computer generated holograms are often exploited to implement optical encryption schemes. This paper proposes the integration of dynamic visual cryptography (an optical technique based on the interplay of visual cryptography and time-averaging geometric moiré) with Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. A stochastic moiré grating is used to embed the secret into a single cover image. The secret can be visually decoded by a naked eye if only the amplitude of harmonic oscillations corresponds to an accurately preselected value. The proposed visual image encryption scheme is based on computer generated holography, optical time-averaging moiré and principles of dynamic visual cryptography. Dynamic visual cryptography is used both for the initial encryption of the secret image and for the final decryption. Phase data of the encrypted image are computed by using Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. The optical image is decrypted using the computationally reconstructed field of amplitudes.

  19. Filopodial retraction force is generated by cortical actin dynamics and controlled by reversible tethering at the tip

    PubMed Central

    Bornschlögl, Thomas; Romero, Stéphane; Vestergaard, Christian L.; Joanny, Jean-François; Van Nhieu, Guy Tran; Bassereau, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Filopodia are dynamic, finger-like plasma membrane protrusions that sense the mechanical and chemical surroundings of the cell. Here, we show in epithelial cells that the dynamics of filopodial extension and retraction are determined by the difference between the actin polymerization rate at the tip and the retrograde flow at the base of the filopodium. Adhesion of a bead to the filopodial tip locally reduces actin polymerization and leads to retraction via retrograde flow, reminiscent of a process used by pathogens to invade cells. Using optical tweezers, we show that filopodial retraction occurs at a constant speed against counteracting forces up to 50 pN. Our measurements point toward retrograde flow in the cortex together with frictional coupling between the filopodial and cortical actin networks as the main retraction-force generator for filopodia. The force exerted by filopodial retraction, however, is limited by the connection between filopodial actin filaments and the membrane at the tip. Upon mechanical rupture of the tip connection, filopodia exert a passive retraction force of 15 pN via their plasma membrane. Transient reconnection at the tip allows filopodia to continuously probe their surroundings in a load-and-fail manner within a well-defined force range. PMID:24198333

  20. Forces generated during stretch in the heart of the lobster Homarus americanus are anisotropic and are altered by neuromodulators.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, E S; Johnson, A S; Ellers, O; Dickinson, P S

    2016-04-15

    Mechanical and neurophysiological anisotropies mediate three-dimensional responses of the heart of ITALIC! Homarus americanus Although hearts ITALIC! in vivoare loaded multi-axially by pressure, studies of invertebrate cardiac function typically use uniaxial tests. To generate whole-heart length-tension curves, stretch pyramids at constant lengthening and shortening rates were imposed uniaxially and biaxially along longitudinal and transverse axes of the beating whole heart. To determine whether neuropeptides that are known to modulate cardiac activity in ITALIC! H. americanusaffect the active or passive components of these length-tension curves, we also performed these tests in the presence of SGRNFLRFamide (SGRN) and GYSNRNYLRFamide (GYS). In uniaxial and biaxial tests, both passive and active forces increased with stretch along both measurement axes. The increase in passive forces was anisotropic, with greater increases along the longitudinal axis. Passive forces showed hysteresis and active forces were higher during lengthening than shortening phases of the stretch pyramid. Active forces at a given length were increased by both neuropeptides. To exert these effects, neuropeptides might have acted indirectly on the muscle via their effects on the cardiac ganglion, directly on the neuromuscular junction, or directly on the muscles. Because increases in response to stretch were also seen in stimulated motor nerve-muscle preparations, at least some of the effects of the peptides are likely peripheral. Taken together, these findings suggest that flexibility in rhythmic cardiac contractions results from the amplified effects of neuropeptides interacting with the length-tension characteristics of the heart.

  1. Forces generated during stretch in the heart of the lobster Homarus americanus are anisotropic and are altered by neuromodulators.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, E S; Johnson, A S; Ellers, O; Dickinson, P S

    2016-04-15

    Mechanical and neurophysiological anisotropies mediate three-dimensional responses of the heart of ITALIC! Homarus americanus Although hearts ITALIC! in vivoare loaded multi-axially by pressure, studies of invertebrate cardiac function typically use uniaxial tests. To generate whole-heart length-tension curves, stretch pyramids at constant lengthening and shortening rates were imposed uniaxially and biaxially along longitudinal and transverse axes of the beating whole heart. To determine whether neuropeptides that are known to modulate cardiac activity in ITALIC! H. americanusaffect the active or passive components of these length-tension curves, we also performed these tests in the presence of SGRNFLRFamide (SGRN) and GYSNRNYLRFamide (GYS). In uniaxial and biaxial tests, both passive and active forces increased with stretch along both measurement axes. The increase in passive forces was anisotropic, with greater increases along the longitudinal axis. Passive forces showed hysteresis and active forces were higher during lengthening than shortening phases of the stretch pyramid. Active forces at a given length were increased by both neuropeptides. To exert these effects, neuropeptides might have acted indirectly on the muscle via their effects on the cardiac ganglion, directly on the neuromuscular junction, or directly on the muscles. Because increases in response to stretch were also seen in stimulated motor nerve-muscle preparations, at least some of the effects of the peptides are likely peripheral. Taken together, these findings suggest that flexibility in rhythmic cardiac contractions results from the amplified effects of neuropeptides interacting with the length-tension characteristics of the heart. PMID:26896540

  2. Computing Average Passive Forces in Sarcomeres in Length-Ramp Simulations.

    PubMed

    Schappacher-Tilp, Gudrun; Leonard, Timothy; Desch, Gertrud; Herzog, Walter

    2016-06-01

    Passive forces in sarcomeres are mainly related to the giant protein titin. Titin's extensible region consists of spring-like elements acting in series. In skeletal muscles these elements are the PEVK segment, two distinct immunoglobulin (Ig) domain regions (proximal and distal), and a N2A portion. While distal Ig domains are thought to form inextensible end filaments in intact sarcomeres, proximal Ig domains unfold in a force- and time-dependent manner. In length-ramp experiments of single titin strands, sequential unfolding of Ig domains leads to a typical saw-tooth pattern in force-elongation curves which can be simulated by Monte Carlo simulations. In sarcomeres, where more than a thousand titin strands are arranged in parallel, numerous Monte Carlo simulations are required to estimate the resultant force of all titin filaments based on the non-uniform titin elongations. To simplify calculations, the stochastic model of passive forces is often replaced by linear or non-linear deterministic and phenomenological functions. However, new theories of muscle contraction are based on the hypothesized binding of titin to the actin filament upon activation, and thereby on a prominent role of the structural properties of titin. Therefore, these theories necessitate a detailed analysis of titin forces in length-ramp experiments. In our study we present a simple and efficient alternative to Monte Carlo simulations. Based on a structural titin model, we calculate the exact probability distributions of unfolded Ig domains under length-ramp conditions needed for rigorous analysis of expected forces, distribution of unfolding forces, etc. Due to the generality of our model, the approach is applicable to a wide range of stochastic protein unfolding problems.

  3. Computing Average Passive Forces in Sarcomeres in Length-Ramp Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Schappacher-Tilp, Gudrun; Desch, Gertrud; Herzog, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Passive forces in sarcomeres are mainly related to the giant protein titin. Titin’s extensible region consists of spring-like elements acting in series. In skeletal muscles these elements are the PEVK segment, two distinct immunoglobulin (Ig) domain regions (proximal and distal), and a N2A portion. While distal Ig domains are thought to form inextensible end filaments in intact sarcomeres, proximal Ig domains unfold in a force- and time-dependent manner. In length-ramp experiments of single titin strands, sequential unfolding of Ig domains leads to a typical saw-tooth pattern in force-elongation curves which can be simulated by Monte Carlo simulations. In sarcomeres, where more than a thousand titin strands are arranged in parallel, numerous Monte Carlo simulations are required to estimate the resultant force of all titin filaments based on the non-uniform titin elongations. To simplify calculations, the stochastic model of passive forces is often replaced by linear or non-linear deterministic and phenomenological functions. However, new theories of muscle contraction are based on the hypothesized binding of titin to the actin filament upon activation, and thereby on a prominent role of the structural properties of titin. Therefore, these theories necessitate a detailed analysis of titin forces in length-ramp experiments. In our study we present a simple and efficient alternative to Monte Carlo simulations. Based on a structural titin model, we calculate the exact probability distributions of unfolded Ig domains under length-ramp conditions needed for rigorous analysis of expected forces, distribution of unfolding forces, etc. Due to the generality of our model, the approach is applicable to a wide range of stochastic protein unfolding problems. PMID:27276390

  4. Theory and computation of general force balance in non-axisymmetric tokamak equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong-Kyu; Logan, Nikolas; Wang, Zhirui; Kim, Kimin; Boozer, Allen; Liu, Yueqiang; Menard, Jonathan

    2014-10-01

    Non-axisymmetric equilibria in tokamaks can be effectively described by linearized force balance. In addition to the conventional isotropic pressure force, there are three important components that can strongly contribute to the force balance; rotational, anisotropic tensor pressure, and externally given forces, i.e. ∇ --> p + ρv-> . ∇ --> v-> + ∇ --> . <-->Π + f-> = j-> × B-> , especially in, but not limited to, high β and rotating plasmas. Within the assumption of nested flux surfaces, Maxwell equations and energy minimization lead to the modified-generalized Newcomb equation for radial displacements with simple algebraic relations for perpendicular and parallel displacements, including an inhomogeneous term if any of the forces are not explicitly dependent on displacements. The general perturbed equilibrium code (GPEC) solves this force balance consistent with energy and torque given by external perturbations. Local and global behaviors of solutions will be discussed when ∇ --> . <-->Π is solved by the semi-analytic code PENT and will be compared with MARS-K. Any first-principle transport code calculating ∇ --> . <-->Π or f-> , e.g. POCA, can also be incorporated without demanding iterations. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  5. Determination of forces in a magnetic bearing actuator - Numerical computation with comparison to experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. D.; Xia, Z.; Mccaul, E.; Hacker, H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations of the forces exerted on a journal by a magnetic bearing actuator are presented, along with comparisons to experimentally measured forces. The calculations are based on two-dimensional solutions for the flux distribution in the metal parts and free space, using finite but constant permeability in the metals. Above a relative permeability of 10,000 the effects of changes in permeability are negligible, but below 10,000 decreases in permeability cause significant decreases in the force. The calculated forces are shown to depend on the metal permeability more strongly when the journal is displaced from its centered position. The predicted forces in the principal attractive direction are in good agreement with experiment when a relatively low value of permeability is chosen. The forces measured normal to the axis of symmetry when the journal is displaced from that axis, however, are significantly higher than predicted by theory, even with a value of relative permeability larger than 5000. These results indicate a need for further work including nonlinear permeability distributions.

  6. Generation and physical characteristics of the Landsat 1 and 2 MSS computer compatible tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, V. L.

    1975-01-01

    The generation and format is discussed of the Landsat 1 and 2 system corrected multispectral scanner computer compatible tapes. Included in the discussion are the spacecraft sensors, scene characteristics, the transmission of data, and the conversion of the data to computer compatible tapes at the NASA Data Processing Facility. Geometric and radiometric corrections, tape formats, and the physical characteristics of the tape are also described.

  7. Hologravure as a computer-generated and laser engraved scratch hologram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augier, Ángel G.; Sánchez, Raúl B.

    2011-01-01

    We presented "hologravure" as the generalization of a scratch hologram, generated by computer from a three-dimensional (3D) model by using an appropriate software, and laser-drawing with a conventional engraver-laser system. For making this type of computer-generated hologram, neither diffractive optics, nor mask pattern or photo-reduction of a transparency onto a high resolution film plate is needed. The shape of a 3D virtual object is encoded in a two-dimensional (2D) multiple circular-scratch drawing. A computer program was created for generating the holograms. Hologravures representing several 3D models are engraved on different materials, and the quality of the lines traced by the CO 2 laser is considered. Sheets of acrylic, polycarbonate, glass and thermo-resistant pieces of acetate were tested. Reconstructed images of all this computer-generated and laser engraved holograms and also of computer assisted and hand-drawn scratch holograms, synthesized by means of the same software are shown.

  8. Effects of Rate of Movement on Effective Maximal Force Generated by Elbow Extensors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Updyke, Wynn F.; And Others

    This study investigated the effects of the velocity of muscular contraction on the effective force (torque) exerted by forty 18- to 21-year-old males. The dynomemeter lever arm, the fulcrum of which was aligned with the axis of elbow rotation, allowed extension and flexion for the subjects. All subjects were tested at three velocities (.10, .20,…

  9. Computational Research Challenges and Opportunities for the Optimization of Fossil Energy Power Generation System

    SciTech Connect

    Zitney, S.E.

    2007-06-01

    Emerging fossil energy power generation systems must operate with unprecedented efficiency and near-zero emissions, while optimizing profitably amid cost fluctuations for raw materials, finished products, and energy. To help address these challenges, the fossil energy industry will have to rely increasingly on the use advanced computational tools for modeling and simulating complex process systems. In this paper, we present the computational research challenges and opportunities for the optimization of fossil energy power generation systems across the plant lifecycle from process synthesis and design to plant operations. We also look beyond the plant gates to discuss research challenges and opportunities for enterprise-wide optimization, including planning, scheduling, and supply chain technologies.

  10. From medical images to flow computations without user-generated meshes.

    PubMed

    Dillard, Seth I; Mousel, John A; Shrestha, Liza; Raghavan, Madhavan L; Vigmostad, Sarah C

    2014-10-01

    Biomedical flow computations in patient-specific geometries require integrating image acquisition and processing with fluid flow solvers. Typically, image-based modeling processes involve several steps, such as image segmentation, surface mesh generation, volumetric flow mesh generation, and finally, computational simulation. These steps are performed separately, often using separate pieces of software, and each step requires considerable expertise and investment of time on the part of the user. In this paper, an alternative framework is presented in which the entire image-based modeling process is performed on a Cartesian domain where the image is embedded within the domain as an implicit surface. Thus, the framework circumvents the need for generating surface meshes to fit complex geometries and subsequent creation of body-fitted flow meshes. Cartesian mesh pruning, local mesh refinement, and massive parallelization provide computational efficiency; the image-to-computation techniques adopted are chosen to be suitable for distributed memory architectures. The complete framework is demonstrated with flow calculations computed in two 3D image reconstructions of geometrically dissimilar intracranial aneurysms. The flow calculations are performed on multiprocessor computer architectures and are compared against calculations performed with a standard multistep route.

  11. From medical images to flow computations without user-generated meshes

    PubMed Central

    Dillard, Seth I.; Mousel, John A.; Shrestha, Liza; Raghavan, Madhavan L.; Vigmostad, Sarah C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Biomedical flow computations in patient-specific geometries require integrating image acquisition and processing with fluid flow solvers. Typically, image-based modeling processes involve several steps, such as image segmentation, surface mesh generation, volumetric flow mesh generation, and finally computational simulation. These steps are performed separately, often using separate pieces of software, and each step requires considerable expertise and investment of time on the part of the user. In this paper an alternative framework is presented in which the entire image-based modeling process is performed on a Cartesian domain where the image is embedded within the domain as an implicit surface. Thus the framework circumvents the need for generating surface meshes to fit complex geometries and subsequent creation of body-fitted flow meshes. Cartesian mesh pruning, local mesh refinement, and massive parallelization provide computational efficiency; the image-to-computation techniques adopted are chosen to be suitable for distributed memory architectures. The complete framework is demonstrated with flow calculations computed in two 3D image reconstructions of geometrically dissimilar intracranial aneurysms. The flow calculations are performed on multiprocessor computer architectures and are compared against calculations performed with a standard multi-step route. PMID:24753504

  12. The forces generated within the musculature of the left ventricular wall

    PubMed Central

    Lunkenheimer, P P; Redmann, K; Florek, J; Fassnacht, U; Cryer, C W; Wübbeling, F; Niederer, P; Anderson, R H

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To test the hypothesis that two populations of myocardial fibres—fibres aligned parallel to the surfaces of the wall and an additional population of fibres that extend obliquely through the wall—when working in concert produce a dualistic, self stabilising arrangement. Methods: Assessment of tensile forces in the walls of seven porcine hearts by using needle probes. Ventricular diameter was measured with microsonometry and the intracavitary pressure through a fluid filled catheter. Positive inotropism was induced by dopamine, and negative inotropism by thiopental. The preload was raised by volume load and lowered by withdrawal of blood. Afterload was increased by inflation of a balloon in the aortic root. The anatomical orientation of the fibres was established subsequently in histological sections. Results: The forces in the fibres parallel to the surface decreased 20–35% during systolic shrinkage of the ventricle, during negative inotropism, and during ventricular unloading. They increased 10–30% on positive inotropic stimulation and with augmentation in preload and afterload. The forces in the oblique transmural fibres increased 8–65% during systole, on positive inotropic medication, with an increase in afterload and during ventricular shrinkage, and decreased 36% on negative inotropic medication. There was a delay of up to 147 ms in the drop in activity during relaxation in the oblique transmural fibres. Conclusion: Although the two populations of myocardial fibres are densely interwoven, it is possible to distinguish their functions with force probes. The delayed drop in force during relaxation in obliquely oriented fibres indicates that they are hindered in their shortening to an extent that parallels any increase in mural thickness. The transmural fibres, therefore, contribute to stiffening of the ventricular wall and hence to confining ventricular compliance. PMID:14729798

  13. Simple and fast cosine approximation method for computer-generated hologram calculation.

    PubMed

    Nishitsuji, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Kakue, Takashi; Arai, Daisuke; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2015-12-14

    The cosine function is a heavy computational operation in computer-generated hologram (CGH) calculation; therefore, it is implemented by substitution methods such as a look-up table. However, the computational load and required memory space of such methods are still large. In this study, we propose a simple and fast cosine function approximation method for CGH calculation. As a result, we succeeded in creating CGH with sufficient quality and made the calculation time 1.6 times as fast at maximum compared to using the look-up table of the cosine function on CPU implementation.

  14. Design quadrilateral apertures in binary computer-generated holograms of large space bandwidth product.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Sheng, Yunlong

    2016-09-20

    A new approach for designing the binary computer-generated hologram (CGH) of a very large number of pixels is proposed. Diffraction of the CGH apertures is computed by the analytical Abbe transform and by considering the aperture edges as the basic diffracting elements. The computation cost is independent of the CGH size. The arbitrary-shaped polygonal apertures in the CGH consist of quadrilateral apertures, which are designed by assigning the binary phases using the parallel genetic algorithm with a local search, followed by optimizing the locations of the co-vertices with a direct search. The design results in high performance with low image reconstruction error. PMID:27661593

  15. Fast calculation method of computer-generated cylindrical hologram using wave-front recording surface.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Piao, Mei-lan; Li, Gang; Kim, Nam

    2015-07-01

    Fast calculation method for a computer-generated cylindrical hologram (CGCH) is proposed. The method consists of two steps: the first step is a calculation of a virtual wave-front recording surface (WRS), which is located between the 3D object and CGCH. In the second step, in order to obtain a CGCH, we execute the diffraction calculation based on the fast Fourier transform (FFT) from the WRS to the CGCH, which are in the same concentric arrangement. The computational complexity is dramatically reduced in comparison with direct integration method. The simulation results confirm that our proposed method is able to improve the computational speed of CGCH.

  16. Acceleration of computer-generated hologram by Greatly Reduced Array of Processor Element with Data Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Atsushi; Masuda, Nobuyuki; Oikawa, Minoru; Okada, Naohisa; Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2014-11-01

    We have implemented a computer-generated hologram (CGH) calculation on Greatly Reduced Array of Processor Element with Data Reduction (GRAPE-DR) processors. The cost of CGH calculation is enormous, but CGH calculation is well suited to parallel computation. The GRAPE-DR is a multicore processor that has 512 processor elements. The GRAPE-DR supports a double-precision floating-point operation and can perform CGH calculation with high accuracy. The calculation speed of the GRAPE-DR system is seven times faster than that of a personal computer with an Intel Core i7-950 processor.

  17. Removal of line artifacts on mesh boundary in computer generated hologram by mesh phase matching.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Hyeung; Yeom, Han-Ju; Kim, Hee-Jae; Zhang, HuiJun; Li, BoNi; Ji, Yeong-Min; Kim, Sang-Hoo

    2015-03-23

    Mesh-based computer generated hologram enables realistic and efficient representation of three-dimensional scene. However, the dark line artifacts on the boundary between neighboring meshes are frequently observed, degrading the quality of the reconstruction. In this paper, we propose a simple technique to remove the dark line artifacts by matching the phase on the boundary of neighboring meshes. The feasibility of the proposed method is confirmed by the numerical and optical reconstruction of the generated hologram.

  18. Long range Debye-Hückel correction for computation of grid-based electrostatic forces between biomacromolecules

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations can be used to study very large molecular systems, such as models of the intracellular environment, using atomic-detail structures. Such simulations require strategies to contain the computational costs, especially for the computation of interaction forces and energies. A common approach is to compute interaction forces between macromolecules by precomputing their interaction potentials on three-dimensional discretized grids. For long-range interactions, such as electrostatics, grid-based methods are subject to finite size errors. We describe here the implementation of a Debye-Hückel correction to the grid-based electrostatic potential used in the SDA BD simulation software that was applied to simulate solutions of bovine serum albumin and of hen egg white lysozyme. Results We found that the inclusion of the long-range electrostatic correction increased the accuracy of both the protein-protein interaction profiles and the protein diffusion coefficients at low ionic strength. Conclusions An advantage of this method is the low additional computational cost required to treat long-range electrostatic interactions in large biomacromolecular systems. Moreover, the implementation described here for BD simulations of protein solutions can also be applied in implicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations that make use of gridded interaction potentials. PMID:25045516

  19. DNA strand generation for DNA computing by using a multi-objective differential evolution algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chaves-González, José M; Vega-Rodríguez, Miguel A

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we use an adapted multi-objective version of the differential evolution (DE) metaheuristics for the design and generation of reliable DNA libraries that can be used for computation. DNA sequence design is a very relevant task in many recent research fields, e.g. nanotechnology or DNA computing. Specifically, DNA computing is a new computational model which uses DNA molecules as information storage and their possible biological interactions as processing operators. Therefore, the possible reactions and interactions among molecules must be strictly controlled to prevent incorrect computations. The design of reliable DNA libraries for bio-molecular computing is an NP-hard combinatorial problem which involves many heterogeneous and conflicting design criteria. For this reason, we modelled DNA sequence design as a multiobjective optimization problem and we solved it by using an adapted multi-objective version of DE metaheuristics. Seven different bio-chemical design criteria have been simultaneously considered to obtain high quality DNA sequences which are suitable for molecular computing. Furthermore, we have developed the multiobjective standard fast non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II) in order to perform a formal comparative study by using multi-objective indicators. Additionally, we have also compared our results with other relevant results published in the literature. We conclude that our proposal is a promising approach which is able to generate reliable real-world DNA sequences that significantly improve other DNA libraries previously published in the literature.

  20. Computational analysis of contact forces influence on cold forming processes in the dies with complex surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragnea, D.; Lixandru, P.; Chereches, T.; Velicu, St.

    2016-08-01

    Interaction forces between the workpiece and the die appear during the cold forming process of metals in dies. Surface forces of high-intensity influence the mesh structure and internal structure of the finished piece by mechanical action. Frictional forces hinder the flow of the material in contact with the die walls, especially on surfaces of complex shape. Under certain conditions, the material can adhere to the wall of the die, leading to the blocking of the cold forming process. In order to highlight the influence of contact forces on cold forming processes in dies with complex surfaces there were used numerical simulation methods with finite elements. Numerical simulations of the process of axial cold forming in the die were carried out for analysis data acquisition necessary, in order to achieve HTD pulleys, for an ordinary range of friction coefficients. The analysis was directed to the gearing area of the HTD pulleys (head, flank and base of the tooth). The analysis highlighted the negative effects of friction forces on the shape and quality of the products and the need to use quality lubricants. Also, using the cold forming process they can be achieved substantial savings by redistribution of the material without removing it.