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Sample records for computer networking courses

  1. Student Motivation in Computer Networking Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsin, Wen-Jung

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces several hands-on projects that have been used to motivate students in learning various computer networking concepts. These projects are shown to be very useful and applicable to the learners' daily tasks and activities such as emailing, Web browsing, and online shopping and banking, and lead to an unexpected byproduct,…

  2. Improving a Computer Networks Course Using the Partov Simulation Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Momeni, B.; Kharrazi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Computer networks courses are hard to teach as there are many details in the protocols and techniques involved that are difficult to grasp. Employing programming assignments as part of the course helps students to obtain a better understanding and gain further insight into the theoretical lectures. In this paper, the Partov simulation engine and…

  3. Software Assisted Syllabus Preparation for Computer Networks Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ercan, Tuncay; Sahin, Yasar Guneri

    2007-01-01

    Course descriptions prepared by the lecturers in the beginning of the academic year do not get any feed back from the students enrolled it. These syllabuses are not only used for the future semesters, but also used by the other lecturers without even making any changes. This causes a negative effect on the student education since many of the…

  4. Designing a Versatile Dedicated Computing Lab to Support Computer Network Courses: Insights from a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gercek, Gokhan; Saleem, Naveed

    2006-01-01

    Providing adequate computing lab support for Management Information Systems (MIS) and Computer Science (CS) programs is a perennial challenge for most academic institutions in the US and abroad. Factors, such as lack of physical space, budgetary constraints, conflicting needs of different courses, and rapid obsolescence of computing technology,…

  5. Motivating students' participation in a computer networks course by means of magic, drama and games.

    PubMed

    Hilas, Constantinos S; Politis, Anastasios

    2014-01-01

    The recent economic crisis has forced many universities to cut down expenses by packing students into large lecture groups. The problem with large auditoria is that they discourage dialogue between students and faculty and they burden participation. Adding to this, students in computer science courses usually find the field to be full of theoretical and technical concepts. Lack of understanding leads them to lose interest and / or motivation. Classroom experience shows that the lecturer could employ alternative teaching methods, especially for early-year undergraduate students, in order to grasp their interest and introduce basic concepts. This paper describes some of the approaches that may be used to keep students interested and make them feel comfortable as they comprehend basic concepts in computer networks. The lecturing procedure was enriched with games, magic tricks and dramatic representations. This approach was used experimentally for two semesters and the results were more than encouraging.

  6. Networking computers.

    PubMed

    McBride, D C

    1997-03-01

    This decade the role of the personal computer has shifted dramatically from a desktop device designed to increase individual productivity and efficiency to an instrument of communication linking people and machines in different places with one another. A computer in one city can communicate with another that may be thousands of miles away. Networking is how this is accomplished. Just like the voice network used by the telephone, computer networks transmit data and other information via modems over these same telephone lines. A network can be created over both short and long distances. Networks can be established within a hospital or medical building or over many hospitals or buildings covering many geographic areas. Those confined to one location are called LANs, local area networks. Those that link computers in one building to those at other locations are known as WANs, or wide area networks. The ultimate wide area network is the one we've all been hearing so much about these days--the Internet, and its World Wide Web. Setting up a network is a process that requires careful planning and commitment. To avoid potential pitfalls and to make certain the network you establish meets your needs today and several years down the road, several steps need to be followed. This article reviews the initial steps involved in getting ready to network.

  7. Computer ethics: A capstone course

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, T.G.; Abunawass, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents a capstone course on computer ethics required for all computer science majors in our program. The course was designed to encourage students to evaluate their own personal value systems in terms of the established values in computer science as represented by the ACM Code of Ethics. The structure, activities, and topics of the course as well as assessment of the students are presented. Observations on various course components and student evaluations of the course are also presented.

  8. Introduction to Computing Course Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii State Dept. of Education, Honolulu. Office of Instructional Services.

    Developed to aid intermediate-level teachers and principals in initiating and developing computer literacy programs for their students, this document is a guide for the development of a one-semester course--Introduction to Computing--for the seventh and eighth grades. The course is designed to provide opportunities for students to develop computer…

  9. The Merit Computer Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aupperle, Eric M.; Davis, Donna L.

    1978-01-01

    The successful Merit Computer Network is examined in terms of both technology and operational management. The network is fully operational and has a significant and rapidly increasing usage, with three major institutions currently sharing computer resources. (Author/CMV)

  10. Conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics, part III: network forensics and penetration testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2014-02-01

    IT security and computer forensics are important components in the information technology. From year to year, incidents and crimes increase that target IT systems or were done with their help. More and more companies and authorities have security problems in their own IT infrastructure. To respond to these incidents professionally, it is important to have well trained staff. The fact that many agencies and companies work with very sensitive data make it necessary to further train the own employees in the field of network forensics and penetration testing. Motivated by these facts, this paper - a continuation of a paper of January 2012 [1], which showed the conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics - addresses the practical implementation important relationships of network forensic and penetration testing.

  11. Computer Networking for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCain, Ted D. E.; Ekelund, Mark

    This book is intended to introduce the basic concepts of connecting computers together and to equip individuals with the technical background necessary to begin constructing small networks. For those already experienced with creating and maintaining computer networks, the book can help in considering the creation of a schoolwide network. The book…

  12. Classroom Computer Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lent, John

    1984-01-01

    This article describes a computer network system that connects several microcomputers to a single disk drive and one copy of software. Many schools are switching to networks as a cheaper and more efficient means of computer instruction. Teachers may be faced with copywriting problems when reproducing programs. (DF)

  13. Ada in Introductory Computer Science Courses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Sacred Heart University’s current computer science curriculum has been modified in the 1992-1993 school year after receiving an ARPA grant(Advanced...grant entitled Ada in Introductory Computer Science Course, allowed for the modification of both introductory programming courses to use Ada as the...introductory computer science courses CS050 (Introduction to Computer Science ) and CS051 (Data Structures) were developed to include Ada and software

  14. Hyperswitch Communication Network Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John C.; Chow, Edward T.; Priel, Moshe; Upchurch, Edwin T.

    1993-01-01

    Hyperswitch Communications Network (HCN) computer is prototype multiple-processor computer being developed. Incorporates improved version of hyperswitch communication network described in "Hyperswitch Network For Hypercube Computer" (NPO-16905). Designed to support high-level software and expansion of itself. HCN computer is message-passing, multiple-instruction/multiple-data computer offering significant advantages over older single-processor and bus-based multiple-processor computers, with respect to price/performance ratio, reliability, availability, and manufacturing. Design of HCN operating-system software provides flexible computing environment accommodating both parallel and distributed processing. Also achieves balance among following competing factors; performance in processing and communications, ease of use, and tolerance of (and recovery from) faults.

  15. Computer Programming Projects in Technology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Charles R.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses programming projects in applied technology courses, examining documentation, formal reports, and implementation. Includes recommendations based on experience with a sophomore machine elements course which provided computers for problem solving exercises. (DH)

  16. Computers, Networks and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Alan C.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is how globally networked, easy-to-use computers can enhance learning only within an educational environment that encourages students to question "facts" and seek challenges. The strengths and weaknesses of computers used as amplifiers for learning are described. (KR)

  17. Teaching Computer Science Courses in Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huan, Xiaoli; Shehane, Ronald; Ali, Adel

    2011-01-01

    As the success of distance learning (DL) has driven universities to increase the courses offered online, certain challenges arise when teaching computer science (CS) courses to students who are not physically co-located and have individual learning schedules. Teaching CS courses involves high level demonstrations and interactivity between the…

  18. Educational Computing Course. [SITE 2001 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bump, Wren, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on the educational computing course from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2001 conference: "Using a Flexible Format To Create a Constructivist Learning Environment in the Educational Computing Course" (Wren M. Bump); "Technological Diversity: Managing…

  19. Computer Network Resources for Physical Geography Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Michael P.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Asserts that the use of computer networks provides an important and effective resource for geography instruction. Describes the use of the Internet network in physical geography instruction. Provides an example of the use of Internet resources in a climatology/meteorology course. (CFR)

  20. Computer network programming

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.Y.

    1996-12-31

    The programs running on a computer network can be divided into two parts, the Network Operating System and the user applications. Any high level language translator, such as C, JAVA, BASIC, FORTRAN, or COBOL, runs under NOS as a programming tool to produce network application programs or software. Each application program while running on the network provides the human user with network application services, such as remote data base search, retrieval, etc. The Network Operating System should provide a simple and elegant system interface to all the network application programs. This programming interface may request the Transport layer services on behalf of a network application program. The primary goals are to achieve programming convenience, and to avoid complexity. In a 5-layer network model, the system interface is comprised of a group of system calls which are collectively known as the session layer with its own Session Protocol Data Units. This is a position paper discussing the basic system primitives which reside between a network application program and the Transport layer, and a programming example of using such primitives.

  1. Computer and information networks.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, M; Aronofsky, J; McKenney, J L; Massy, W F

    1973-10-05

    The most basic conclusion coming out of the EDUCOM seminars is that computer networking must be acknowledged as an important new mode for obtaining information and computation (15). It is a real alternative that needs to be given serious attention in current planning and decision-making. Yet the fact is that many institutions are not taking account of networks when they confer on whether or how to replace their main computer. Articulation of the possibilities of computer networks goes back to the early 1960's and before, and working networks have been in evidence for several years now, both commercially and in universities. What is new, however, is the unmistakable recognition-bordering on a sense of the inevitable-that networks are finally practical and here to stay. The visionary and promotional phases of computer networks are over. It is time for hard-nosed comparative analysis (16). Another conclusion of the seminars has to do with the factors that hinder the fuller development of networking. The major problems to be overcome in applying networks to research and education are political, organizational, and economic in nature rather than technological. This is not to say that the hardware and software problems of linking computers and information systems are completely solved, but they are not the big bottlenecks at present. Research and educational institutions must find ways to organize themselves as well as their computers to work together for greater resource sharing. The coming of age of networks takes on special significance as a result of widespread dissatisfactions expressed with the present computing situation. There is a feeling that the current mode of autonomous, self-sufficient operation in the provision of computing and information services is frequently wasteful, deficient, and unresponsive to users' needs because of duplication of effort from one installation to another, incompatibilities, and inadequate documentation, program support, and user

  2. Ada in Introductory Computer Science Courses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-20

    Science Courses", BAA #91-ld Cataeoiy• l issued to Scared Heart University Computer Science Pepartment which is a part; of the Faculty of Science, Math...and Computer Science . In addition to the time spent on developing CS050 and CS051, this grant presented many opportunities to meet other educators... Computer Science Department approved the changes as proposed in the DARPA grant for our introductory courses in the CS curriculum. During the fall of 1992

  3. A Computer Applications Course for Biology Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralph, Charles L.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a computer applications course developed for undergraduate biology students (primarily sophomores) to teach word processing, database and spreadsheet programs, graphing programs, telecommunications, and file transfer procedures. AppleWorks software is discussed, course content is explained, and the microcomputer laboratory is described.…

  4. The Educational Computing Course. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bump, Wren, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on the educational computing course from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference: (1) "Integrating Media Literacy into a Technology Course for Preservice Secondary Teachers" (Gregg Brownell and Nancy Brownell); (2) "From Video Tutors to Electronic Portfolios:…

  5. Computers across the Curriculum: Teaching a Computer Literacy Course for Multi-Disciplinary Use in a Network Environment--Content and Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormerod, Dana E.

    Kent State University (Ohio) Regional Campuses have conducted surveys of their applied business associate degree graduates in office management, accounting, business management, and their employers. Responses indicated the need for computer literacy appropriate to the employment situation. In addition, instructors of traditional liberal arts…

  6. Computer Maintenance Technology. Suggested Basic Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This competency-based basic course outline is designed for a two-year secondary program in computer maintenance technology. The first year is devoted to basic electricity and electronics, the second to the troubleshooting, maintenance, and service of microcomputers. (The repair section is based upon the Apple II computer, disc drive, monitor, and…

  7. Survey: Computer Usage in Design Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henley, Ernest J.

    1983-01-01

    Presents results of a survey of chemical engineering departments regarding computer usage in senior design courses. Results are categorized according to: computer usage (use of process simulators, student-written programs, faculty-written or "canned" programs; costs (hard and soft money); and available software. Programs offered are…

  8. Network Coding for Function Computation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appuswamy, Rathinakumar

    2011-01-01

    In this dissertation, the following "network computing problem" is considered. Source nodes in a directed acyclic network generate independent messages and a single receiver node computes a target function f of the messages. The objective is to maximize the average number of times f can be computed per network usage, i.e., the "computing…

  9. Plagiarism in computer science courses

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.K.

    1994-12-31

    Plagiarism of computer programs has long been a problem in higher education. Ease of electronic copying, vague understanding by students as to what constitutes plagiarism, increasing acceptance of plagiarism by students, lack of enforcement by instructors and school administrators, and a whole host of other factors contribute to plagiarism. The first step in curbing plagiarism is prevention, the second (and much less preferable) is detection. History files and software metrics can be used as a tool to aid in detecting possible plagiarism. This paper gives advice concerning how to deal with plagiarism and with using software monitors to detect plagiarism.

  10. A social implications of computing course which teaches computer ethics

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, S.C.

    1994-12-31

    Computers are integral to today`s world, forming our society as well as responding to it, In recognition of this interaction, as well as in response to requirements by the Computer Science Accrediting Board (CSAB), many schools are incorporating computer ethics and values and addressing the social implications of computing within their curriculum. The approach discussed here is through a separate course, rather than relying on the integration of specific topics throughout the curriculum.

  11. A Survey of Computer Science Capstone Course Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugan, Robert F., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we surveyed literature related to undergraduate computer science capstone courses. The survey was organized around course and project issues. Course issues included: course models, learning theories, course goals, course topics, student evaluation, and course evaluation. Project issues included: software process models, software…

  12. Computer Networks and Networking: A Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Mauri P.

    1993-01-01

    Provides a basic introduction to computer networks and networking terminology. Topics addressed include modems; the Internet; TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol); transmission lines; Internet Protocol numbers; network traffic; Fidonet; file transfer protocol (FTP); TELNET; electronic mail; discussion groups; LISTSERV; USENET;…

  13. Augmenting computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, S. H.; Raza, A. D.

    1984-01-01

    Three methods of augmenting computer networks by adding at most one link per processor are discussed: (1) A tree of N nodes may be augmented such that the resulting graph has diameter no greater than 4log sub 2((N+2)/3)-2. Thi O(N(3)) algorithm can be applied to any spanning tree of a connected graph to reduce the diameter of that graph to O(log N); (2) Given a binary tree T and a chain C of N nodes each, C may be augmented to produce C so that T is a subgraph of C. This algorithm is O(N) and may be used to produce augmented chains or rings that have diameter no greater than 2log sub 2((N+2)/3) and are planar; (3) Any rectangular two-dimensional 4 (8) nearest neighbor array of size N = 2(k) may be augmented so that it can emulate a single step shuffle-exchange network of size N/2 in 3(t) time steps.

  14. Collective Computation of Neural Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-15

    Sciences, Beijing ABSTRACT Computational neuroscience is a new branch of neuroscience originating from current research on the theory of computer...scientists working in artificial intelligence engineering and neuroscience . The paper introduces the collective computational properties of model neural...vision research. On this basis, the authors analyzed the significance of the Hopfield model. Key phrases: Computational Neuroscience , Neural Network, Model

  15. Course 10: Basic Concepts in Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekert, A.; Hayden, P. M.; Inamori, H.

    Contents 1 Qubits, gates and networks 2 Quantum arithmetic and function evaluations 3 Algorithms and their complexity 4 From interferometers to computers 5 The first quantum algorithms 6 Quantum search 7 Optimal phase estimation 8 Periodicity and quantum factoring 9 Cryptography 10 Conditional quantum dynamics 11 Decoherence and recoherence 12 Concluding remarks

  16. A Computer-based Course in Classical Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, D.; Sherwood, B.

    1980-01-01

    Describes and illustrates the tutorial and homework exercise lessons, student routing, course organization, administration, and evaluation of a PLATO computer-based course in classical mechanics. An appendix lists 41 lessons developed for the course. (CMV)

  17. Computer Art--A New Course Offering for General Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertlein, Grace C.

    The developmental background and rationale are given for an introductory course in computers. Using computer art as the vehicle for instruction, this course is designed for people in disciplines other than computer science. The 16-week course syllabus described contains a weekly lecture, laboratory activities, assignments, and final exams. Several…

  18. Computer and Software Use in Teaching the Beginning Statistics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartz, Albert E.; Sabolik, Marisa A.

    2001-01-01

    Surveys the extent of computer usage in the beginning statistics course and the variety of statistics software used. Finds that 69% of the psychology departments used computers in beginning statistics courses and 90% used computer-assisted data analysis in statistics or other courses. (CMK)

  19. Using Computers in Introductory Astronomy Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Grace L.

    1995-12-01

    Computer literacy is fast becoming a focal point in undergraduate education. Scientific literacy has been a continuing goal of undergraduate programs across the nation and a course in introductory astronomy is often used to satisfy such science requirements. At U. MD an introduction to computer skills is being integrated into our astronomy curriculum for non-science majors. The campus is adequately equipped with computer labs, yet many students enter college without basic computer skills. In Astronomy 101 (General Astronomy) students are introduced to electronic mail, a Listserver, and the world wide web. Students in this course are required to register for a free campus computer account. Their first assignment is to use e-mail to subscribe to the class Listserver, Milkyway. Through Milkyway, students have access to weekly lecture summaries, questions to review for exams, and copies of previous exams. Using e-mail students may pose questions, provide comments, or exchange opinions using Milkyway, or they may e-mail the instructor directly. Studies indicate that using e-mail is less intimidating to a student than asking a question in a class of 200 students. Monitoring e-mail for student questions has not been a problem. Student reaction has been favorable to using e-mail, since instructor office hours are not always convenient, especially to commuting or working students. Through required assignments, students receive an introduction to accessing information on the world wide web using Netscape. Astronomy has great resources available on the Internet which can be used to supplement and reinforce introductory material. Assignments are structured so that students will gain the techniques necessary to access available information. It is hoped that students will successfully apply the computer skills they learn in astronomy class to their own fields and as life-long learners. We have found that students comfortable with computers are willing to share their knowledge

  20. Queueing in networks of computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1991-01-01

    The designers of networks of computers must assess the capacity of the network to complete work within reasonable times. The utilization law, Little's law, forced-flow law, and response time formula are simple tools that can be used to calculate throughput and response times of networks. Bottleneck analysis can be used to calculate simple lower bounds on response time in terms of individual server parameters and the load on network as a whole. These simple results are important tools for all users of scientific networks - back of the envelope calculations can quickly reveal the effects of distant servers on local throughput and response time.

  1. A CAD (Classroom Assessment Design) of a Computer Programming Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawi, Nazir S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a CAD (classroom assessment design) of an entry-level undergraduate computer programming course "Computer Programming I". CAD has been the product of a long experience in teaching computer programming courses including teaching "Computer Programming I" 22 times. Each semester, CAD is evaluated and modified…

  2. Computer Network Defense Roadmap

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    networks, podcasts , and wikis, and mobile end- user devices, has brought a new set of challenges to CND. The DON will work with the JTF-GNO and other...within an overarching, full spectrum enterprise access control schema that supports the end-to-end requirements in a coalition, first responder/non

  3. LINCS: Livermore's network architecture. [Octopus computing network

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    Octopus, a local computing network that has been evolving at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for over fifteen years, is currently undergoing a major revision. The primary purpose of the revision is to consolidate and redefine the variety of conventions and formats, which have grown up over the years, into a single standard family of protocols, the Livermore Interactive Network Communication Standard (LINCS). This standard treats the entire network as a single distributed operating system such that access to a computing resource is obtained in a single way, whether that resource is local (on the same computer as the accessing process) or remote (on another computer). LINCS encompasses not only communication but also such issues as the relationship of customer to server processes and the structure, naming, and protection of resources. The discussion includes: an overview of the Livermore user community and computing hardware, the functions and structure of each of the seven layers of LINCS protocol, the reasons why we have designed our own protocols and why we are dissatisfied by the directions that current protocol standards are taking.

  4. Computer Design in an Introductory Course--Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spoerri, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Describes the use of a logic circuit simulator to design a computer in an introductory computer course. Discusses the design of a sequence generator, control circuits, and testing of a computer's instruction set. (YP)

  5. Software Tools: A One-Semester Secondary School Computer Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, John; Lakatos, John

    1985-01-01

    Provides a course outline, describes equipment and teacher requirements, discusses student evaluation and course outcomes, and details the computer programs used in a high school course. The course is designed to teach students use of the microcomputer as a tool through hands-on experience with a variety of commercial software programs. (MBR)

  6. Computer Network Security- The Challenges of Securing a Computer Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Vincent, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    This article is intended to give the reader an overall perspective on what it takes to design, implement, enforce and secure a computer network in the federal and corporate world to insure the confidentiality, integrity and availability of information. While we will be giving you an overview of network design and security, this article will concentrate on the technology and human factors of securing a network and the challenges faced by those doing so. It will cover the large number of policies and the limits of technology and physical efforts to enforce such policies.

  7. Information visualization courses for students with a computer science background.

    PubMed

    Kerren, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Linnaeus University offers two master's courses in information visualization for computer science students with programming experience. This article briefly describes the syllabi, exercises, and practices developed for these courses.

  8. Optical computer switching network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clymer, B.; Collins, S. A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The design for an optical switching system for minicomputers that uses an optical spatial light modulator such as a Hughes liquid crystal light valve is presented. The switching system is designed to connect 80 minicomputers coupled to the switching system by optical fibers. The system has two major parts: the connection system that connects the data lines by which the computers communicate via a two-dimensional optical matrix array and the control system that controls which computers are connected. The basic system, the matrix-based connecting system, and some of the optical components to be used are described. Finally, the details of the control system are given and illustrated with a discussion of timing.

  9. An Introductory Course in Dental Computing and Research Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joshi, Anil; Douglass, Chester W.

    1992-01-01

    A Harvard School of Dental Medicine introductory course in computer basics and providing computer-assisted instruction in scientific research methodology is described and evaluated. Most students found the coursework difficult, and only one-quarter found it relevant. Integration of computer science into content-area courses is recommended. (MSE)

  10. Hyperswitch Network For Hypercube Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Edward; Madan, Herbert; Peterson, John

    1989-01-01

    Data-driven dynamic switching enables high speed data transfer. Proposed hyperswitch network based on mixed static and dynamic topologies. Routing header modified in response to congestion or faults encountered as path established. Static topology meets requirement if nodes have switching elements that perform necessary routing header revisions dynamically. Hypercube topology now being implemented with switching element in each computer node aimed at designing very-richly-interconnected multicomputer system. Interconnection network connects great number of small computer nodes, using fixed hypercube topology, characterized by point-to-point links between nodes.

  11. Networking DEC and IBM computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mish, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    Local Area Networking of DEC and IBM computers within the structure of the ISO-OSI Seven Layer Reference Model at a raw signaling speed of 1 Mops or greater are discussed. After an introduction to the ISO-OSI Reference Model nd the IEEE-802 Draft Standard for Local Area Networks (LANs), there follows a detailed discussion and comparison of the products available from a variety of manufactures to perform this networking task. A summary of these products is presented in a table.

  12. Collective network for computer structures

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Coteus, Paul W.; Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Hoenicke, Dirk; Takken, Todd E.; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2011-08-16

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global collective communications among interconnected processing nodes. The global collective network optimally enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices ate included that interconnect the nodes of the network via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual network and class structures. The global collective network may be configured to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner. When implemented in a massively-parallel supercomputing structure, the global collective network is physically and logically partitionable according to needs of a processing algorithm.

  13. Collective network for computer structures

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A; Coteus, Paul W; Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan; Giampapa, Mark E; Heidelberger, Philip; Hoenicke, Dirk; Takken, Todd E; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D; Vranas, Pavlos M

    2014-01-07

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global collective communications among interconnected processing nodes. The global collective network optimally enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the network via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual network. The global collective network may be configured to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner. When implemented in a massively-parallel supercomputing structure, the global collective network is physically and logically partitionable according to the needs of a processing algorithm.

  14. Using Virtualization and Automatic Evaluation: Adapting Network Services Management Courses to the EHEA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ros, S.; Robles-Gomez, A.; Hernandez, R.; Caminero, A. C.; Pastor, R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines the adaptation of a course on the management of network services in operating systems, called NetServicesOS, to the context of the new European Higher Education Area (EHEA). NetServicesOS is a mandatory course in one of the official graduate programs in the Faculty of Computer Science at the Universidad Nacional de Educacion a…

  15. Combining Cloud Networks and Course Management Systems for Enhanced Analysis in Teaching Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Neal M.

    2012-01-01

    A cloud network system is combined with standard computing applications and a course management system to provide a robust method for sharing data among students. This system provides a unique method to improve data analysis by easily increasing the amount of sampled data available for analysis. The data can be shared within one course as well as…

  16. Simulation of reliability in multiserver computer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkevičius, Saulius

    2012-11-01

    The performance in terms of reliability of computer multiserver networks motivates this paper. The probability limit theorem is derived on the extreme queue length in open multiserver queueing networks in heavy traffic and applied to a reliability model for multiserver computer networks where we relate the time of failure of a multiserver computer network to the system parameters.

  17. Problems of Introducing Courses in Computer-Assisted Reporting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kevin C.; Fleming, Charles A.

    1995-01-01

    Addresses questions associated with the introduction of computer-assisted reporting (CAR) courses at universities. Briefly outlines the use of computers in newsrooms, and then details the authors' Delphi study of CAR's future in journalism programs. (SR)

  18. Courses About Computers--For Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattei, K. C.

    1974-01-01

    Goals and guidelines for teaching courses about computers to secondary school students are discussed. A method of teaching introductory ideas of computer operations through the use of a programmable calculator is suggested. (DT)

  19. Integrating Computational Chemistry into a Course in Classical Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martini, Sheridan R.; Hartzell, Cynthia J.

    2015-01-01

    Computational chemistry is commonly addressed in the quantum mechanics course of undergraduate physical chemistry curricula. Since quantum mechanics traditionally follows the thermodynamics course, there is a lack of curricula relating computational chemistry to thermodynamics. A method integrating molecular modeling software into a semester long…

  20. An Introduction to Computing: Content for a High School Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Jean B.

    A general outline of the topics that might be covered in a computers and computing course for high school students is provided. Topics are listed in the order in which they should be taught, and the relative amount of time to be spent on each topic is suggested. Seven units are included in the course outline: (1) general introduction, (2) using…

  1. Improving Student Engagement Using Course-Based Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imlawi, Jehad Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    This study proposes an engagement model that supports use of course-based online social networks for engaging student, and hence, improving their educational outcomes. This research demonstrates that instructors who create course-based online social networks to communicate with students can increase the student engagement in these online social…

  2. Demonstrations of Neural Network Computations Involving Students

    PubMed Central

    May, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    David Marr famously proposed three levels of analysis (implementational, algorithmic, and computational) for understanding information processing systems such as the brain. While two of these levels are commonly taught in neuroscience courses (the implementational level through neurophysiology and the computational level through systems/cognitive neuroscience), the algorithmic level is typically neglected. This leaves an explanatory gap in students’ understanding of how, for example, the flow of sodium ions enables cognition. Neural networks bridge these two levels by demonstrating how collections of interacting neuron-like units can give rise to more overtly cognitive phenomena. The demonstrations in this paper are intended to facilitate instructors’ introduction and exploration of how neurons “process information.” PMID:23493501

  3. Computer networking at SLR stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novotny, Antonin

    1993-01-01

    There are several existing communication methods to deliver data from the satellite laser ranging (SLR) station to the SLR data center and back: telephonmodem, telex, and computer networks. The SLR scientific community has been exploiting mainly INTERNET, BITNET/EARN, and SPAN. The total of 56 countries are connected to INTERNET and the number of nodes is exponentially growing. The computer networks mentioned above and others are connected through E-mail protocol. The scientific progress of SLR requires the increase of communication speed and the amount of the transmitted data. The TOPEX/POSEIDON test campaign required to deliver Quick Look data (1.7 kB/pass) from a SLR site to SLR data center within 8 hours and full rate data (up to 500 kB/pass) within 24 hours. We developed networking for the remote SLR station in Helwan, Egypt. The reliable scheme for data delivery consists of: compression of MERIT2 format (up to 89 percent), encoding to ASCII Me (files); and e-mail sending from SLR station--e-mail receiving, decoding, and decompression at the center. We do propose to use the ZIP method for compression/decompression and the UUCODE method for ASCII encoding/decoding. This method will be useful for stations connected via telephonemodems or commercial networks. The electronics delivery could solve the problem of the too late receiving of the FR data by SLR data center.

  4. Computer networking at SLR stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, Antonin

    1993-06-01

    There are several existing communication methods to deliver data from the satellite laser ranging (SLR) station to the SLR data center and back: telephonmodem, telex, and computer networks. The SLR scientific community has been exploiting mainly INTERNET, BITNET/EARN, and SPAN. The total of 56 countries are connected to INTERNET and the number of nodes is exponentially growing. The computer networks mentioned above and others are connected through E-mail protocol. The scientific progress of SLR requires the increase of communication speed and the amount of the transmitted data. The TOPEX/POSEIDON test campaign required to deliver Quick Look data (1.7 kB/pass) from a SLR site to SLR data center within 8 hours and full rate data (up to 500 kB/pass) within 24 hours. We developed networking for the remote SLR station in Helwan, Egypt. The reliable scheme for data delivery consists of: compression of MERIT2 format (up to 89 percent), encoding to ASCII Me (files); and e-mail sending from SLR station--e-mail receiving, decoding, and decompression at the center. We do propose to use the ZIP method for compression/decompression and the UUCODE method for ASCII encoding/decoding. This method will be useful for stations connected via telephonemodems or commercial networks. The electronics delivery could solve the problem of the too late receiving of the FR data by SLR data center.

  5. Integrating Emerging Topics through Online Team Design in a Hybrid Communication Networks Course: Interaction Patterns and Impact of Prior Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisslein, Jana; Seeling, Patrick; Reisslein, Martin

    2005-01-01

    An important challenge in the introductory communication networks course in electrical and computer engineering curricula is to integrate emerging topics, such as wireless Internet access and network security, into the already content-intensive course. At the same time it is essential to provide students with experiences in online collaboration,…

  6. Addressing Small Computers in the First OS Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutt, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Small computers are emerging as important components of the contemporary computing scene. Their operating systems vary from specialized software for an embedded system to the same style of OS used on a generic desktop or server computer. This article describes a course in which systems are classified by their hardware capability and the…

  7. Computer network security for the radiology enterprise.

    PubMed

    Eng, J

    2001-08-01

    As computer networks become an integral part of the radiology practice, it is appropriate to raise concerns regarding their security. The purpose of this article is to present an overview of computer network security risks and preventive strategies as they pertain to the radiology enterprise. A number of technologies are available that provide strong deterrence against attacks on networks and networked computer systems in the radiology enterprise. While effective, these technologies must be supplemented with vigilant user and system management.

  8. Delayed Commutation in Quantum Computer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Escartín, Juan Carlos; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro

    2006-09-01

    In the same way that classical computer networks connect and enhance the capabilities of classical computers, quantum networks can combine the advantages of quantum information and communication. We propose a nonclassical network element, a delayed commutation switch, that can solve the problem of switching time in packet switching networks. With the help of some local ancillary qubits and superdense codes, we can route a qubit packet after part of it has left the network node.

  9. Of Bugs, Bytes, LANS and Viruses: The Changing Countenance of Computer Courses in Administrator Preparation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, William H.

    Instruction in computing over the past three decades has experienced dramatic changes in both method and substance. Beginning with on-the-job training, courses evolved to become highly sophisticated and widespread in education. The second decade, the 70's, focused on mainframe use, and the third decade on micros and widely networked systems.…

  10. An Elective Course on Computer-Aided Process Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommerfeld, Jude T.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate chemical engineering course which has been offered at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The objectives, structure, instructional materials and content of this course, which emphasizes the structure and usage of computer-aided design systems, are also included. (HM)

  11. Experiences of Using Automated Assessment in Computer Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, John; English, Tammy

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the use of automated assessment in a variety of computer science courses that have been taught at Israel Academic College by the authors. The course assignments were assessed entirely automatically using Checkpoint, a web-based automated assessment framework. The assignments all used free-text questions (where the students…

  12. Automating a Massive Online Course with Cluster Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Before massive numbers of students can take online courses for college credit, the challenges of providing tutoring support, answers to student-posed questions, and the control of cheating will need to be addressed. These challenges are taken up here by developing an online course delivery system that runs in a cluster computing environment and is…

  13. Computer Technology and Student Preferences in a Nutrition Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Norman J.; Kemp, Wendy C.; Benson, Wendy A.

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed learner preferences for using computer-based technology in a distance education course. A questionnaire was posted to students who had taken an undergraduate nutrition course at Athabasca University, Canada. The response rate was 57.1% (176 returned out of 308). Subjects were predominately female (93.7%) and nursing students…

  14. Combining Cases and Computer Simulations in Strategic Management Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Rex C.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the author compared the effectiveness of two different strategic management course designs: one centered on case discussions and the other combining a computer-based simulation with some cases. In addition to evaluation of the research literature, the study involved experiments with six course sections composed of 130 students, Both…

  15. A Computer-Based Graphics Course and Students' Cognitive Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cookman, Claude

    1998-01-01

    Argues that integration of computer experiences into a visual communications course and a computerized publications design course engages students' higher cognitive skills. Describes a unit on informational graphics, and uses three theoretical perspectives (cognitive apprenticeship, seven principles of good practice, and Bloom's taxonomy) to…

  16. Software For Monitoring A Computer Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Young H.

    1992-01-01

    SNMAT is rule-based expert-system computer program designed to assist personnel in monitoring status of computer network and identifying defective computers, workstations, and other components of network. Also assists in training network operators. Network for SNMAT located at Space Flight Operations Center (SFOC) at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Intended to serve as data-reduction system providing windows, menus, and graphs, enabling users to focus on relevant information. SNMAT expected to be adaptable to other computer networks; for example in management of repair, maintenance, and security, or in administration of planning systems, billing systems, or archives.

  17. Terminal-oriented computer-communication networks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, M.; Boorstyn, R. R.; Pickholtz, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Four examples of currently operating computer-communication networks are described in this tutorial paper. They include the TYMNET network, the GE Information Services network, the NASDAQ over-the-counter stock-quotation system, and the Computer Sciences Infonet. These networks all use programmable concentrators for combining a multiplicity of terminals. Included in the discussion for each network is a description of the overall network structure, the handling and transmission of messages, communication requirements, routing and reliability consideration where applicable, operating data and design specifications where available, and unique design features in the area of computer communications.

  18. Pacific Educational Computer Network Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. ALOHA System.

    The Pacific Educational Computer Network Feasibility Study examined technical and non-technical aspects of the formation of an international Pacific Area computer network for higher education. The technical study covered the assessment of the feasibility of a packet-switched satellite and radio ground distribution network for data transmission…

  19. "Horses for Courses": Categories of Computer-Based Learning Program and Their Uses in Pharmacology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Ian E.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the pharma-CAL-ogy project, funded by Teaching and Learning Technology Programme (TLTP), which has developed various types of software for use in pharmacology courses. Topics include course organization and delivery software, drill and practice software, tutorial-type programs, simulations, and the need to integrate computer-assisted…

  20. Student Learning Networks on Residential Field Courses: Does Size Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langan, A. Mark; Cullen, W. Rod; Shuker, David M.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes learner and tutor reports of a learning network that formed during the completion of investigative projects on a residential field course. Staff and students recorded project-related interactions, who they were with and how long they lasted over four phases during the field course. An enquiry based learning format challenged…

  1. Code 672 observational science branch computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, D. W.; Shirk, H. G.

    1988-01-01

    In general, networking increases productivity due to the speed of transmission, easy access to remote computers, ability to share files, and increased availability of peripherals. Two different networks within the Observational Science Branch are described in detail.

  2. Computer-Assisted Instruction in an Elementary College Economics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paden, Donald W.; Barr, Michael D.

    1980-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of the computer component of a cost effective college course in economics. The main computer ingredients consisted of seven instructional lessons, three one-hour exams, a sophisticated record-keeping system, and note-writing capability. Tables are included. (Author/CHC)

  3. Course Syllabus: The Social Impact of Computer Information Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behar, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    This syllabus describes the course background, central themes and issues, texts, resources, and recommended readings. Main topics are the sociology of information technology, computers and social change, telecommunications, computers and human interactions, applications in working, and social issues and political implications. (YP)

  4. A Computer Course for Business Students: Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterhouse, Ann

    This teacher's guide is for a course designed to teach business students the fundamentals of the BASIC language and computer programming using a series of business-oriented programs. Each lesson contains an introduction, flow charts, and computer programs. The six lesson topics are print-out and format control, count-average, withholding tax…

  5. The DDN (Defense Data Network) Course,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    Introduction and Concepts ................................... 3-1 *A. The Need for Network Architectures................... 3-1 B. A Natural Layering of...Management Protocol Covrso 44 ~----~ DataALinkcnton,4 Fucto Adrssniotngriceiinng..’ 3 -42 K7 IV- 𔄁 %q % % A.,4 %.. -.O -p % B. A Natural Layering of Network...returns 2) A Natural Grouping and Hierarchy of Functions a) Network functions depend on each other. b) Functional dependency is a hierarchical

  6. Time-course of cortical networks involved in working memory

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Phan; Caggiano, Daniel M.; Geyer, Alexandra; Lewis, Jenn; Cohn, Joseph; Tucker, Don M.

    2014-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is one of the most studied cognitive constructs. Although many neuroimaging studies have identified brain networks involved in WM, the time course of these networks remains unclear. In this paper we use dense-array electroencephalography (dEEG) to capture neural signals during performance of a standard WM task, the n-back task, and a blend of principal components analysis and independent components analysis (PCA/ICA) to statistically identify networks of WM and their time courses. Results reveal a visual cortex centric network, that also includes the posterior cingulate cortex, that is active prior to stimulus onset and that appears to reflect anticipatory, attention-related processes. After stimulus onset, the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, lateral prefrontal prefrontal cortex, and temporal poles become associated with the prestimulus network. This second network appears to reflect executive control processes. Following activation of the second network, the cortices of the temporo-parietal junction with the temporal lobe structures seen in the first and second networks re-engage. This third network appears to reflect activity of the ventral attention network involved in control of attentional reorientation. The results point to important temporal features of network dynamics that integrate multiple subsystems of the ventral attention network with the default mode network in the performance of working memory tasks. PMID:24523686

  7. A Computer Security Course in the Undergraduate Computer Science Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spillman, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the importance of computer security and considers criminal, national security, and personal privacy threats posed by security breakdown. Several examples are given, including incidents involving computer viruses. Objectives, content, instructional strategies, resources, and a sample examination for an experimental undergraduate computer…

  8. Computing as a Matter of Course. The Instructional Use of Computers at Dartmouth College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevison, John M.

    The faculty of Dartmouth College was surveyed to measure the extent of instructional computing in undergraduate courses, including the total amount, the spread across the curriculum, and the variety of individual efforts. The on-campus teaching faculty received a short, four-question card asking if they had used computing in their courses. Those…

  9. Micro Computer Technician Course. Course Design, Course Curricula, Learning Units, Resource Requirements. InfoTVE 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech. (Australia).

    This guide to the core curricula for the training of microcomputer technicians is designed for school leavers after 10 or more years of general/vocational education with a science and mathematics background. The 2-year course is to be administered in four semesters. An introductory outline of course design and curricula provides the rationale,…

  10. Working the network: Initiating a new science and technology course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepburn, Gary Roy

    1997-12-01

    This study explores the introduction of a new applied physics course into a British Columbia high school during the 1994-1995 school year. The course was part of a provincial effort aimed at making science and technology education more responsive to the workplace. Data collection took place during the first year the applied physics course was being piloted at the school and focused on the pilot teacher and the applied physics classes, but also involved others inside and outside the school who had a connection to the course. A variety of methods were used in data collection including interviews, observation, and document analysis. Using actor-network theory and sociocultural theory, the focus of the research is on the networks that were constructed at the pilot school and at the provincial level where the course was conceptualized and developed. The research describes how the teacher and other network builders attempted to enroll various human and nonhuman actors into the networks they were constructing in support of the course. They did this by convincing the actors that the course was compatible with their interests. The types of actors that were enrolled, the sociocultural communities they belonged to, and what it took to convince them to support the course are shown to shape the way that the course was enacted in the classroom. In addition, it is demonstrated that the network that was constructed at the provincial level had only a minor connection to the one the teacher was constructing at the school level. The lack of contact between the two networks meant that the interests of those who were involved in organizing the applied physics pilots at the provincial level were seldom taken into account in the course at the school. Fourteen conclusions are drawn about the networks that were constructed and the network building process at both the school and provincial levels. These conclusions have implications for policy in educational change initiatives and for

  11. Integration of Major Computer Program Packages into Experimental Courses: Organic Synthesis Design and the Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandel, Bonnie Burns; Solomon, Robert W.

    1981-01-01

    Presents discussion on: (1) computer assisted synthesis in industry and academia; (2) computer applications to teaching organic synthesis; (3) a computer program (ORGSYN) incorporating reactions to synthesize aliphatic compounds; and (4) the design of a computer program as a heuristic device in an introductory organic course. (SK)

  12. Integrating ethical topics in a traditional computer science course

    SciTech Connect

    Winrich, L.B.

    1994-12-31

    It is never hard to find additional, often unconventional, topics which seem to beg inclusion in standard courses. A dynamic discipline like computer science usually provides a steady stream of new technical ideas to vie for time and attention with more traditional material. As difficult as it may be to keep standard CS courses up-to-date with technical innovations, it often seems even more difficult to include non-technical topics even when there is universal agreement on their importance, Inevitably the question of whether or not such inclusion will compromise the technical content of the course arises. This paper describes an attempt to include two such topics in a traditional course in data structures. The two topics are writing and ethics and, although the effort concentrates on the inclusion of ethical questions in a standard CS course, writing is the vehicle for accomplishing this goal. Furthermore, the inclusion writing in the CS curriculum is certainly recognized as a desirable outcome.

  13. Computing preimages of Boolean networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present an algorithm based on the sum-product algorithm that finds elements in the preimage of a feed-forward Boolean networks given an output of the network. Our probabilistic method runs in linear time with respect to the number of nodes in the network. We evaluate our algorithm for randomly constructed Boolean networks and a regulatory network of Escherichia coli and found that it gives a valid solution in most cases. PMID:24267277

  14. Super-speed computer interfaces and networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tolmie, D.E.; St. John, W.; DuBois, D.H.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Research into super-speed computer interfaces has been directed towards identifying networking requirements from compute-intensive applications that are crucial to DOE programs. In particular, both the DOE Energy Research High Performance Computing Research Centers (HPCRC) and the DOE Defense Programs Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) have planned applications that will require large increases in network bandwidth. This project was set up to help network researchers identify those networking requirements and to plan the development of such networks. Based on studies, research, and LANL-sponsored workshops, this project helped forge the beginnings for multi-gigabit/sec network research and developments that today is being lead by Los Alamos in the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 6.4 gigabit/sec specification called HIPPI-6400.

  15. Computer-Based Information Networks: Selected Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Larry

    The history, purpose, and operation of six computer-based information networks are described in general and nontechnical terms. In the introduction the many definitions of an information network are explored. Ohio College Library Center's network (OCLC) is the first example. OCLC began in 1963, and since early 1973 has been extending its services…

  16. Neural-Network Computer Transforms Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Josin, Gary M.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical simulation demonstrated ability of conceptual neural-network computer to generalize what it has "learned" from few examples. Ability to generalize achieved with even simple neural network (relatively few neurons) and after exposure of network to only few "training" examples. Ability to obtain fairly accurate mappings after only few training examples used to provide solutions to otherwise intractable mapping problems.

  17. Using E-Mail across Computer Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazari, Sunil

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the use of telecommunications technology to exchange electronic mail, files, and messages across different computer networks. Networks highlighted include ARPA Internet; BITNET; USENET; FidoNet; MCI Mail; and CompuServe. Examples of the successful use of networks in higher education are given. (Six references) (LRW)

  18. Integrating Network Management for Cloud Computing Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Integrating Network Management For Cloud Computing Services Peng Sun A Dissertation Presented to the Faculty of Princeton University in Candidacy for...2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Integrating Network Management for Cloud Computing Services... integrate the management of various network components. With commercial deployment, our operational experiences feed back into revision of the

  19. Efficiency of Computer Literacy Course in Communication Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gümüs, Agah; Özad, Bahire Efe

    2004-01-01

    Following the exponential increase in the global usage of the Internet as one of the main tools for communication, the Internet established itself as the fourth most powerful media. In a similar vein, computer literacy education and related courses established themselves as the essential components of the Faculty of Communication and Media…

  20. Computer-Mediated Communication in Library Credit Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewald, Nancy H.

    1996-01-01

    Describes two undergraduate library credit courses using computer-mediated communication. The first focuses on information searching and electronic resources in the students' areas of study. The second teaches basic research skills, the use of Netscape, and the use of e-mail and conferencing software in four areas: library studies; health…

  1. Computed Tomography-Enhanced Anatomy Course Using Enterprise Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Hila; Cohen, Haim; Medlej, Bahaa; Kornreich, Liora; Peled, Nathan; Hershkovitz, Israel

    2013-01-01

    Rapid changes in medical knowledge are forcing continuous adaptation of the basic science courses in medical schools. This article discusses a three-year experience developing a new Computed Tomography (CT)-based anatomy curriculum at the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, including describing the motivations and reasoning for the…

  2. Evaluating Computer Lab Modules for Large Biology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichinger, David C.; And Others

    This paper describes the first phase of a study to investigate students' evaluations of computer laboratory modules in a university-level, non-majors biology course. The National Science Foundation-funded project has two primary goals: (1) to develop programmable, multifunctional Bio LabStations for data collection and analysis, lab extensions,…

  3. A Term Project for a Course on Computer Forensics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Warren

    2006-01-01

    The typical approach to creating an examination disk for exercises and projects in a course on computer forensics is for the instructor to populate a piece of media with evidence to be retrieved. While such an approach supports the simple use of forensic tools, in many cases the use of an instructor-developed examination disk avoids utilizing some…

  4. Multidimensional neural growing networks and computer intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchenko, V.A.

    1995-03-01

    This paper examines information-computation processes in time and in space and some aspects of computer intelligence using multidimensional matrix neural growing networks. In particular, issues of object-oriented {open_quotes}thinking{close_quotes} of computers are considered.

  5. The Effect of Computer Literacy Course on Students' Attitudes toward Computer Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlich, Zippy; Gadot, Rivka; Shahak, Daphna

    2009-01-01

    Studies indicate that the use of technologies as teaching aids and tools for self-study is influenced by students' attitudes toward computers and their applications. The purpose of this study is to determine whether taking a Computer Literacy and Applications (CLA) course has an impact on students' attitudes toward computer applications, across…

  6. Course 10: Three Lectures on Biological Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnasco, M. O.

    1 Enzymatic networks. Proofreading knots: How DNA topoisomerases disentangle DNA 1.1 Length scales and energy scales 1.2 DNA topology 1.3 Topoisomerases 1.4 Knots and supercoils 1.5 Topological equilibrium 1.6 Can topoisomerases recognize topology? 1.7 Proposal: Kinetic proofreading 1.8 How to do it twice 1.9 The care and proofreading of knots 1.10 Suppression of supercoils 1.11 Problems and outlook 1.12 Disquisition 2 Gene expression networks. Methods for analysis of DNA chip experiments 2.1 The regulation of gene expression 2.2 Gene expression arrays 2.3 Analysis of array data 2.4 Some simplifying assumptions 2.5 Probeset analysis 2.6 Discussion 3 Neural and gene expression networks: Song-induced gene expression in the canary brain 3.1 The study of songbirds 3.2 Canary song 3.3 ZENK 3.4 The blush 3.5 Histological analysis 3.6 Natural vs. artificial 3.7 The Blush II: gAP 3.8 Meditation

  7. Queuing theory models for computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, David C.

    1989-01-01

    A set of simple queuing theory models which can model the average response of a network of computers to a given traffic load has been implemented using a spreadsheet. The impact of variations in traffic patterns and intensities, channel capacities, and message protocols can be assessed using them because of the lack of fine detail in the network traffic rates, traffic patterns, and the hardware used to implement the networks. A sample use of the models applied to a realistic problem is included in appendix A. Appendix B provides a glossary of terms used in this paper. This Ames Research Center computer communication network is an evolving network of local area networks (LANs) connected via gateways and high-speed backbone communication channels. Intelligent planning of expansion and improvement requires understanding the behavior of the individual LANs as well as the collection of networks as a whole.

  8. An introductory course in computation molecular biology: rationale, history, observations, and course description.

    PubMed

    Johns, S J; Thompson, S M; Dunker, A K

    1996-01-01

    A course called "Molecular Biology Computer Techniques" was implemented in 1987 and has been evolving ever since. Currently the semester-long three credit course consists of thirty hours of lecture (three hours/week for the first ten weeks of the semester) and a minimum of 45 hours of laboratory instruction (three hours/week). The lectures survey both bioinformatics and structure based methods. The laboratory has two tracks, one that can be described loosely as "sequence analysis" and the other as "molecular modelling." Most students choose one of the two laboratory tracks, although a small number have done both, either simultaneously or in successive years. For each student, the goal of the course is the completion of a student-initiated research project. The culmination of the course is the presentation of the completed projects at a "Poster Session Final." During this final, which is conducted like a poster session at a typical biological science meeting, students are examined, not only by the instructors in the course, but also by a diverse cross-section of the university community at large, including non-scientists (who are specially invited to attend). Questioning by non-scientists provides opportunity for the students to improve their communication skills with the lay public. In this manuscript we discuss our views regarding the rationale for the development of formal courses in computational molecular biology, relate our experiences in the development of our course, and describe the course as it stood the last time it was taught, which was in the Fall of 1994.

  9. The Computer as a Tool: Basis for a University-Wide Computer Literacy Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Susan

    1985-01-01

    When a core curriculum degree requirement in computer literacy was approved at Hardin-Simmons University (a small, private institution), a committee of faculty members developed the course specifications. They include a weekly one-hour lecture and a two-hour laboratory to achieve eight educational goals. These goals and the course format are…

  10. Scaling in Computer Network Traffic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Laboratory for Applied Network Research). ♠ CAIDA (Cooperative Association for Internet Data Analysis). ♥ ♠ WAND (Waikato Applied Network Dynamics [DAG...permission of CAIDA , c© 2001 CAIDA /UC Regents. Mapnet Author: Bradley Huffaker. 15 Flows and Packets Flows are sets of packets associated to the same data

  11. Computer network environment planning and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalphin, John F.

    1989-01-01

    The GSFC Computer Network Environment provides a broadband RF cable between campus buildings and ethernet spines in buildings for the interlinking of Local Area Networks (LANs). This system provides terminal and computer linkage among host and user systems thereby providing E-mail services, file exchange capability, and certain distributed computing opportunities. The Environment is designed to be transparent and supports multiple protocols. Networking at Goddard has a short history and has been under coordinated control of a Network Steering Committee for slightly more than two years; network growth has been rapid with more than 1500 nodes currently addressed and greater expansion expected. A new RF cable system with a different topology is being installed during summer 1989; consideration of a fiber optics system for the future will begin soon. Summmer study was directed toward Network Steering Committee operation and planning plus consideration of Center Network Environment analysis and modeling. Biweekly Steering Committee meetings were attended to learn the background of the network and the concerns of those managing it. Suggestions for historical data gathering have been made to support future planning and modeling. Data Systems Dynamic Simulator, a simulation package developed at NASA and maintained at GSFC was studied as a possible modeling tool for the network environment. A modeling concept based on a hierarchical model was hypothesized for further development. Such a model would allow input of newly updated parameters and would provide an estimation of the behavior of the network.

  12. Educator's Guide to Networking: Using Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spurgin, Judy Barrett

    Since electronic networking via microcomputers is fast becoming one of the most popular communications mediums of this decade, this manual is designed to help educators use personal computers as communication devices. The purpose of the document is to acquaint the reader with: (1) the many available communications options on electronic networks;…

  13. Neural networks applications to control and computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luxemburg, Leon A.

    1994-01-01

    Several interrelated problems in the area of neural network computations are described. First an interpolation problem is considered, then a control problem is reduced to a problem of interpolation by a neural network via Lyapunov function approach, and finally a new, faster method of learning as compared with the gradient descent method, was introduced.

  14. Some neural networks compute, others don't.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, Gualtiero

    2008-01-01

    I address whether neural networks perform computations in the sense of computability theory and computer science. I explicate and defend the following theses. (1) Many neural networks compute--they perform computations. (2) Some neural networks compute in a classical way. Ordinary digital computers, which are very large networks of logic gates, belong in this class of neural networks. (3) Other neural networks compute in a non-classical way. (4) Yet other neural networks do not perform computations. Brains may well fall into this last class.

  15. Optimization of an interactive distributive computer network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, V.

    1985-01-01

    The activities under a cooperative agreement for the development of a computer network are briefly summarized. Research activities covered are: computer operating systems optimization and integration; software development and implementation of the IRIS (Infrared Imaging of Shuttle) Experiment; and software design, development, and implementation of the APS (Aerosol Particle System) Experiment.

  16. Computer Networking with the Victorian Correspondence School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conboy, Ian

    During 1985 the Education Department installed two-way radios in 44 remote secondary schools in Victoria, Australia, to improve turn-around time for correspondence assignments. Subsequently, teacher supervisors at Melbourne's Correspondence School sought ways to further augument audio interactivity with computer networking. Computer equipment was…

  17. Prediction and Assessment of Student Behaviour in Open and Distance Education in Computers Using Bayesian Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xenos, Michalis

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a methodological approach based on Bayesian Networks for modelling the behaviour of the students of a bachelor course in computers in an Open University that deploys distance educational methods. It describes the structure of the model, its application for modelling the behaviour of student groups in the Informatics Course of…

  18. Role of Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) in an Introductory Computer Concepts Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skudrna, Vincent J.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the role of computer assisted instruction (CAI) in undergraduate education via a survey of related literature and specific applications. Describes an undergraduate computer concepts course and includes appendices of instructions, flowcharts, programs, sample student work in accounting, COBOL instructional model, decision logic in a…

  19. Engineering Technology Programs Courses Guide for Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This guide describes the requirements for courses in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) that are part of engineering technology programs conducted in vocational-technical schools in Georgia. The guide is organized in five sections. The first section provides a rationale for occupations in design and in production,…

  20. Spontaneous Ad Hoc Mobile Cloud Computing Network

    PubMed Central

    Lacuesta, Raquel; Sendra, Sandra; Peñalver, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing helps users and companies to share computing resources instead of having local servers or personal devices to handle the applications. Smart devices are becoming one of the main information processing devices. Their computing features are reaching levels that let them create a mobile cloud computing network. But sometimes they are not able to create it and collaborate actively in the cloud because it is difficult for them to build easily a spontaneous network and configure its parameters. For this reason, in this paper, we are going to present the design and deployment of a spontaneous ad hoc mobile cloud computing network. In order to perform it, we have developed a trusted algorithm that is able to manage the activity of the nodes when they join and leave the network. The paper shows the network procedures and classes that have been designed. Our simulation results using Castalia show that our proposal presents a good efficiency and network performance even by using high number of nodes. PMID:25202715

  1. Spontaneous ad hoc mobile cloud computing network.

    PubMed

    Lacuesta, Raquel; Lloret, Jaime; Sendra, Sandra; Peñalver, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing helps users and companies to share computing resources instead of having local servers or personal devices to handle the applications. Smart devices are becoming one of the main information processing devices. Their computing features are reaching levels that let them create a mobile cloud computing network. But sometimes they are not able to create it and collaborate actively in the cloud because it is difficult for them to build easily a spontaneous network and configure its parameters. For this reason, in this paper, we are going to present the design and deployment of a spontaneous ad hoc mobile cloud computing network. In order to perform it, we have developed a trusted algorithm that is able to manage the activity of the nodes when they join and leave the network. The paper shows the network procedures and classes that have been designed. Our simulation results using Castalia show that our proposal presents a good efficiency and network performance even by using high number of nodes.

  2. Computational chaos in massively parallel neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhen, Jacob; Gulati, Sandeep

    1989-01-01

    A fundamental issue which directly impacts the scalability of current theoretical neural network models to massively parallel embodiments, in both software as well as hardware, is the inherent and unavoidable concurrent asynchronicity of emerging fine-grained computational ensembles and the possible emergence of chaotic manifestations. Previous analyses attributed dynamical instability to the topology of the interconnection matrix, to parasitic components or to propagation delays. However, researchers have observed the existence of emergent computational chaos in a concurrently asynchronous framework, independent of the network topology. Researcher present a methodology enabling the effective asynchronous operation of large-scale neural networks. Necessary and sufficient conditions guaranteeing concurrent asynchronous convergence are established in terms of contracting operators. Lyapunov exponents are computed formally to characterize the underlying nonlinear dynamics. Simulation results are presented to illustrate network convergence to the correct results, even in the presence of large delays.

  3. Impact of Multimedia and Network Services on an Introductory Level Course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russ, John C.

    1996-01-01

    We will demonstrate and describe the impact of our use of multimedia and network connectivity on a sophomore-level introductory course in materials science. This class services all engineering students, resulting in large (more than 150) class sections with no hands-on laboratory. In 1990 we began to develop computer graphics that might substitute for some laboratory or real-world experiences, and demonstrate relationships hard to show with static textbook images or chalkboard drawings. We created a comprehensive series of modules that cover the entire course content. Called VIMS (Visualizations in Materials Science), these are available in the form of a CD-ROM and also via the internet.

  4. Professional networking using computer-mediated communication.

    PubMed

    Washer, Peter

    Traditionally, professionals have networked with others in their field through attending conferences, professional organizations, direct mailing, and via the workplace. Recently, there have been new possibilities to network with other professionals using the internet. This article looks at the possibilities that the internet offers for professional networking, particularly e-mailing lists, newsgroups and membership databases, and compares them against more traditional methods of professional networking. The different types of computer-mediated communication are discussed and their relative merits and disadvantages are examined. The benefits and potential pitfalls of internet professional networking, as it relates to the nursing profession, are examined. Practical advice is offered on how the internet can be used as a means to foster professional networks of academic, clinical or research interests.

  5. Computing with structured connections networks. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, J.A.; Fanty, M.A.; Goddard, N.; Lynne, K.

    1987-04-01

    Rapid advances both in the neurosciences and in computer science are beginning to lead to a new interest in computational models linking animal brains and behavior. In computer science, there is a large and growing body of knowledge about parallel computation and another, largely separate, science of artificial intelligence. The idea of looking directly at massively parallel realizations of intelligent activity promises to be fruitful for the study of both natural and artificial computations. Much attention has been directed towards the biological implications of this interdisciplinary effort, but there are equally important relations with computational theory, hardware and software. This article focuses on the design and use of massively parallel computational models, particularly in artificial intelligence. Much of the recent work on massively parallel computation has been carried out by physicists and examines the emergent behavior of large, unstructured collections of computing units. We are more concerned with how one can design, realize and analyze networks that embody the specific computational structures needed to solve hard problems. Adaptation and learning are treated as ways to improve structured networks, not as a replacement for analysis and design.

  6. Networking Course Syllabus in Accredited Library and Information Science Programs: A Comparative Analysis Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abouserie, Hossam Eldin Mohamed Refaat

    2009-01-01

    The study investigated networking courses offered in accredited Library and Information Science schools in the United States in 2009. The study analyzed and compared network syllabi according to Course Syllabus Evaluation Rubric to obtain in-depth understanding of basic features and characteristics of networking courses taught. The study embraced…

  7. Profiles of Motivated Self-Regulation in College Computer Science Courses: Differences in Major versus Required Non-Major Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Duane F.; Soh, Leen-Kiat

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to utilize a profiling approach to understand differences in motivation and strategic self-regulation among post-secondary STEM students in major versus required non-major computer science courses. Participants were 233 students from required introductory computer science courses (194 men; 35 women; 4 unknown) at…

  8. Position paper on active countermeasures for computer networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Randwyk, Jamie A.

    2003-07-01

    Computer security professionals have used passive network countermeasures for several years in order to secure computer networks. Passive countermeasures such as firewalls and intrusion detection systems are effective but their use alone is not enough to protect a network. Active countermeasures offer new ways of protecting a computer network. Corporations and government entities should adopt active network countermeasures as a means of protecting their computer networks.

  9. Student Perceived Importance and Correlations of Selected Computer Literacy Course Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciampa, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Traditional college-level courses designed to teach computer literacy are in a state of flux. Today's students have high rates of access to computing technology and computer ownership, leading many policy decision makers to conclude that students already are computer literate and thus computer literacy courses are dinosaurs in a modern digital…

  10. Meteorological Monitoring And Warning Computer Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Randolph J.; Dianic, Allan V.; Moore, Lien N.

    1996-01-01

    Meteorological monitoring system (MMS) computer network tracks weather conditions and issues warnings when weather hazards are about to occur. Receives data from such meteorological instruments as wind sensors on towers and lightning detectors, and compares data with weather restrictions specified for outdoor activities. If weather violates restriction, network generates audible and visible alarms to alert people involved in activity. Also displays weather and toxic diffusion data and disseminates weather forecasts, advisories, and warnings to workstations.

  11. Computation of signal delays in RC networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hidalgo, Juan Carlos; Narendran, Paliath; Chaiken, Seth

    1993-01-01

    A model for signal delay computation in RC networks is presented. The strength of the paradigm is its generality and simplicity. The definition of delay is applicable to RC meshes with potential resistive attenuating paths to ground. The algorithms can also be applied to undriven circuits (static charge sharing) and circuits with initial charge. To compute the delays, each node in the network is explored locally to derive a system of sparse linear equations. The solutions of the system are delay values based on the Elmore time constant at each point in the circuit.

  12. Anonymous Transactions in Computer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolev, Shlomi; Kopeetsky, Marina

    We present schemes for providing anonymous transactions while privacy and anonymity are preserved, providing user anonymous authentication in distributed networks such as the Internet. We first present a practical scheme for anonymous transactions while the transaction resolution is assisted by a Trusted Authority. This practical scheme is extended to a theoretical scheme where a Trusted Authority is not involved in the transaction resolution. Given an authority that generates for each player hard to produce evidence EVID (e. g., problem instance with or without a solution) to each player, the identity of a user U is defined by the ability to prove possession of said evidence. We use Zero-Knowledge proof techniques to repeatedly identify U by providing a proof that U has evidence EVID, without revealing EVID, therefore avoiding identity theft.

  13. Effects of Computer Course on Computer Self-Efficacy, Computer Attitudes and Achievements of Young Individuals in Siirt, Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çelik, Halil Coskun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of computer courses on young individuals' computer self-efficacy, attitudes and achievement. The study group of this research included 60 unemployed young individuals (18-25 ages) in total; 30 in the experimental group and 30 in the control group. An experimental research model with pretest…

  14. On computer vision in wireless sensor networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Nina M.; Ko, Teresa H.

    2004-09-01

    Wireless sensor networks allow detailed sensing of otherwise unknown and inaccessible environments. While it would be beneficial to include cameras in a wireless sensor network because images are so rich in information, the power cost of transmitting an image across the wireless network can dramatically shorten the lifespan of the sensor nodes. This paper describe a new paradigm for the incorporation of imaging into wireless networks. Rather than focusing on transmitting images across the network, we show how an image can be processed locally for key features using simple detectors. Contrasted with traditional event detection systems that trigger an image capture, this enables a new class of sensors which uses a low power imaging sensor to detect a variety of visual cues. Sharing these features among relevant nodes cues specific actions to better provide information about the environment. We report on various existing techniques developed for traditional computer vision research which can aid in this work.

  15. Computational Statistical Methods for Social Network Models

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, David R.; Krivitsky, Pavel N.; Schweinberger, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We review the broad range of recent statistical work in social network models, with emphasis on computational aspects of these methods. Particular focus is applied to exponential-family random graph models (ERGM) and latent variable models for data on complete networks observed at a single time point, though we also briefly review many methods for incompletely observed networks and networks observed at multiple time points. Although we mention far more modeling techniques than we can possibly cover in depth, we provide numerous citations to current literature. We illustrate several of the methods on a small, well-known network dataset, Sampson’s monks, providing code where possible so that these analyses may be duplicated. PMID:23828720

  16. Access to Inter-Organization Computer Networks.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    provided to the M1T Laboratory for Computer Science by the IBM Corporation . 2 . . o Access to Inter-Organization Computer Networks Abstract Whcn two or...4: Example of category tables for the MIT Multics system. 170 Figure 8-5: Example of category tables for corporate R&D. 172 Figure 12- 1: Background...mail use at Digital Equipment Corporation . He compared the costs of two different internal electronic mail systems with telephone and inter-office

  17. Multimedia computer support for a course in ground control

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D.A.; Unal, A.

    1996-12-31

    A prototype multimedia compact disc (CD) was created using the facilities at the Rock Mechanics and Explosives Research Center (RMERC) of the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR) to teach a portion of a course in Ground Control. Multimedia computers offer an environment where audio-visual presentations can be made in an interactive fashion. Together with relevant animation clips, video clips, and 3-D representations, the difficulties in describing mining processes and earth structures can be overcome. This paper describes the experience gained in preparing interactive multimedia lectures on computers. The hardware and software used in creating the sound commentary, 3-D graphics, animation clips, video clips, and movies are listed. The structure of the program and how interactivity was achieved is explained in detail. Such an instructional tool is not only an excellent supplement to regular courses but it also is an inexpensive and effective way of providing distance education for mining engineers working at remote locations scattered all over the country.

  18. Reducing the diameters of computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, S. H.; Raza, A. D.

    1986-01-01

    Three methods of reducing the diameters of computer networks by adding additional processor to processor links under the constraint that no more than one I/O port be added to each processor are discussed. This is equivalent to adding edges to a given graph under the constraint that the degree of any node be increased, at most, by one.

  19. Network based high performance concurrent computing

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderam, V.S.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objectives of this project are to investigate research issues pertaining to programming tools and efficiency issues in network based concurrent computing systems. The basis for these efforts is the PVM project that evolved during my visits to Oak Ridge Laboratories under the DOE Faculty Research Participation program; I continue to collaborate with researchers at Oak Ridge on some portions of the project.

  20. Women Who Learn Computing Like Men: Different Gender Positions on Basic Computer Courses in Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salminen-Karlsson, Minna

    2009-01-01

    This article argues that research on gender and adult learning too often regards men and women as unified and separate groups, and does not take intra-gender variation into account. It presents one possible approach to address this problem, in a study of 142 women and 35 men attending basic computer courses in Swedish municipal adult education…

  1. Pedagogical Utilization and Assessment of the Statistic Online Computational Resource in Introductory Probability and Statistics Courses

    PubMed Central

    Dinov, Ivo D.; Sanchez, Juana; Christou, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    Technology-based instruction represents a new recent pedagogical paradigm that is rooted in the realization that new generations are much more comfortable with, and excited about, new technologies. The rapid technological advancement over the past decade has fueled an enormous demand for the integration of modern networking, informational and computational tools with classical pedagogical instruments. Consequently, teaching with technology typically involves utilizing a variety of IT and multimedia resources for online learning, course management, electronic course materials, and novel tools of communication, engagement, experimental, critical thinking and assessment. The NSF-funded Statistics Online Computational Resource (SOCR) provides a number of interactive tools for enhancing instruction in various undergraduate and graduate courses in probability and statistics. These resources include online instructional materials, statistical calculators, interactive graphical user interfaces, computational and simulation applets, tools for data analysis and visualization. The tools provided as part of SOCR include conceptual simulations and statistical computing interfaces, which are designed to bridge between the introductory and the more advanced computational and applied probability and statistics courses. In this manuscript, we describe our designs for utilizing SOCR technology in instruction in a recent study. In addition, present the results of the effectiveness of using SOCR tools at two different course intensity levels on three outcome measures: exam scores, student satisfaction and choice of technology to complete assignments. Learning styles assessment was completed at baseline. We have used three very different designs for three different undergraduate classes. Each course included a treatment group, using the SOCR resources, and a control group, using classical instruction techniques. Our findings include marginal effects of the SOCR treatment per individual

  2. Multiple network alignment on quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskin, Anmer; Grama, Ananth; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-01

    Comparative analyses of graph-structured datasets underly diverse problems. Examples of these problems include identification of conserved functional components (biochemical interactions) across species, structural similarity of large biomolecules, and recurring patterns of interactions in social networks. A large class of such analyses methods quantify the topological similarity of nodes across networks. The resulting correspondence of nodes across networks, also called node alignment, can be used to identify invariant subgraphs across the input graphs. Given graphs as input, alignment algorithms use topological information to assign a similarity score to each -tuple of nodes, with elements (nodes) drawn from each of the input graphs. Nodes are considered similar if their neighbors are also similar. An alternate, equivalent view of these network alignment algorithms is to consider the Kronecker product of the input graphs and to identify high-ranked nodes in the Kronecker product graph. Conventional methods such as PageRank and HITS (Hypertext-Induced Topic Selection) can be used for this purpose. These methods typically require computation of the principal eigenvector of a suitably modified Kronecker product matrix of the input graphs. We adopt this alternate view of the problem to address the problem of multiple network alignment. Using the phase estimation algorithm, we show that the multiple network alignment problem can be efficiently solved on quantum computers. We characterize the accuracy and performance of our method and show that it can deliver exponential speedups over conventional (non-quantum) methods.

  3. Non-harmful insertion of data mimicking computer network attacks

    DOEpatents

    Neil, Joshua Charles; Kent, Alexander; Hash, Jr, Curtis Lee

    2016-06-21

    Non-harmful data mimicking computer network attacks may be inserted in a computer network. Anomalous real network connections may be generated between a plurality of computing systems in the network. Data mimicking an attack may also be generated. The generated data may be transmitted between the plurality of computing systems using the real network connections and measured to determine whether an attack is detected.

  4. Counseling Student Computer Competency Skills: Effects of Technology Course in Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Yolanda V.; Portman, Tarrell Awe Agahe; Bethea, James

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this article is to assess counseling student computer competency level as an effect of a one-credit hour introductory course in computer technology. Results indicate student computer competencies increased after completing the computer technology course in the following areas: ethics, assisting clients with internet searches,…

  5. Distributed sensor networks with collective computation

    SciTech Connect

    Lanman, D. R.

    2001-01-01

    Simulations of a network of N sensors have been performed. The simulation space contains a number of sound sources and a large number of sensors. Each sensor is equipped with an omni-directional microphone and is capable of measuring only the time of arrival of a signal. Sensors are able to wirelessly transmit and receive packets of information, and have some computing power. The sensors were programmed to merge all information (received packets as well as local measurements) into a 'world view' for that node. This world view is then transmitted. In this way, information can slowly diffuse across the network. One node was monitored in the network as a proxy for when information had diffused across the network. Simulations demonstrated that the energy expended per sensor per time step was approximately independent of N.

  6. Neural network computer simulation of medical aerosols.

    PubMed

    Richardson, C J; Barlow, D J

    1996-06-01

    Preliminary investigations have been conducted to assess the potential for using artificial neural networks to simulate aerosol behaviour, with a view to employing this type of methodology in the evaluation and design of pulmonary drug-delivery systems. Details are presented of the general purpose software developed for these tasks; it implements a feed-forward back-propagation algorithm with weight decay and connection pruning, the user having complete run-time control of the network architecture and mode of training. A series of exploratory investigations is then reported in which different network structures and training strategies are assessed in terms of their ability to simulate known patterns of fluid flow in simple model systems. The first of these involves simulations of cellular automata-generated data for fluid flow through a partially obstructed two-dimensional pipe. The artificial neural networks are shown to be highly successful in simulating the behaviour of this simple linear system, but with important provisos relating to the information content of the training data and the criteria used to judge when the network is properly trained. A second set of investigations is then reported in which similar networks are used to simulate patterns of fluid flow through aerosol generation devices, using training data furnished through rigorous computational fluid dynamics modelling. These more complex three-dimensional systems are modelled with equal success. It is concluded that carefully tailored, well trained networks could provide valuable tools not just for predicting but also for analysing the spatial dynamics of pharmaceutical aerosols.

  7. DTW-MIC Coexpression Networks from Time-Course Data

    PubMed Central

    Riccadonna, Samantha; Jurman, Giuseppe; Visintainer, Roberto; Filosi, Michele; Furlanello, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    When modeling coexpression networks from high-throughput time course data, Pearson Correlation Coefficient (PCC) is one of the most effective and popular similarity functions. However, its reliability is limited since it cannot capture non-linear interactions and time shifts. Here we propose to overcome these two issues by employing a novel similarity function, Dynamic Time Warping Maximal Information Coefficient (DTW-MIC), combining a measure taking care of functional interactions of signals (MIC) and a measure identifying time lag (DTW). By using the Hamming-Ipsen-Mikhailov (HIM) metric to quantify network differences, the effectiveness of the DTW-MIC approach is demonstrated on a set of four synthetic and one transcriptomic datasets, also in comparison to TimeDelay ARACNE and Transfer Entropy. PMID:27031641

  8. A Textbook for a First Course in Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zingg, D. W.; Pulliam, T. H.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the textbook, Fundamentals of Computational Fluid Dynamics by Lomax, Pulliam, and Zingg, which is intended for a graduate level first course in computational fluid dynamics. This textbook emphasizes fundamental concepts in developing, analyzing, and understanding numerical methods for the partial differential equations governing the physics of fluid flow. Its underlying philosophy is that the theory of linear algebra and the attendant eigenanalysis of linear systems provides a mathematical framework to describe and unify most numerical methods in common use in the field of fluid dynamics. Two linear model equations, the linear convection and diffusion equations, are used to illustrate concepts throughout. Emphasis is on the semi-discrete approach, in which the governing partial differential equations (PDE's) are reduced to systems of ordinary differential equations (ODE's) through a discretization of the spatial derivatives. The ordinary differential equations are then reduced to ordinary difference equations (O(Delta)E's) using a time-marching method. This methodology, using the progression from PDE through ODE's to O(Delta)E's, together with the use of the eigensystems of tridiagonal matrices and the theory of O(Delta)E's, gives the book its distinctiveness and provides a sound basis for a deep understanding of fundamental concepts in computational fluid dynamics.

  9. Fuzzy logic, neural networks, and soft computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zadeh, Lofti A.

    1994-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed a rapid growth of interest in a cluster of modes of modeling and computation which may be described collectively as soft computing. The distinguishing characteristic of soft computing is that its primary aims are to achieve tractability, robustness, low cost, and high MIQ (machine intelligence quotient) through an exploitation of the tolerance for imprecision and uncertainty. Thus, in soft computing what is usually sought is an approximate solution to a precisely formulated problem or, more typically, an approximate solution to an imprecisely formulated problem. A simple case in point is the problem of parking a car. Generally, humans can park a car rather easily because the final position of the car is not specified exactly. If it were specified to within, say, a few millimeters and a fraction of a degree, it would take hours or days of maneuvering and precise measurements of distance and angular position to solve the problem. What this simple example points to is the fact that, in general, high precision carries a high cost. The challenge, then, is to exploit the tolerance for imprecision by devising methods of computation which lead to an acceptable solution at low cost. By its nature, soft computing is much closer to human reasoning than the traditional modes of computation. At this juncture, the major components of soft computing are fuzzy logic (FL), neural network theory (NN), and probabilistic reasoning techniques (PR), including genetic algorithms, chaos theory, and part of learning theory. Increasingly, these techniques are used in combination to achieve significant improvement in performance and adaptability. Among the important application areas for soft computing are control systems, expert systems, data compression techniques, image processing, and decision support systems. It may be argued that it is soft computing, rather than the traditional hard computing, that should be viewed as the foundation for artificial

  10. Computational inference of neural information flow networks.

    PubMed

    Smith, V Anne; Yu, Jing; Smulders, Tom V; Hartemink, Alexander J; Jarvis, Erich D

    2006-11-24

    Determining how information flows along anatomical brain pathways is a fundamental requirement for understanding how animals perceive their environments, learn, and behave. Attempts to reveal such neural information flow have been made using linear computational methods, but neural interactions are known to be nonlinear. Here, we demonstrate that a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) inference algorithm we originally developed to infer nonlinear transcriptional regulatory networks from gene expression data collected with microarrays is also successful at inferring nonlinear neural information flow networks from electrophysiology data collected with microelectrode arrays. The inferred networks we recover from the songbird auditory pathway are correctly restricted to a subset of known anatomical paths, are consistent with timing of the system, and reveal both the importance of reciprocal feedback in auditory processing and greater information flow to higher-order auditory areas when birds hear natural as opposed to synthetic sounds. A linear method applied to the same data incorrectly produces networks with information flow to non-neural tissue and over paths known not to exist. To our knowledge, this study represents the first biologically validated demonstration of an algorithm to successfully infer neural information flow networks.

  11. Parallel Computation of Unsteady Flows on a Network of Workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Parallel computation of unsteady flows requires significant computational resources. The utilization of a network of workstations seems an efficient solution to the problem where large problems can be treated at a reasonable cost. This approach requires the solution of several problems: 1) the partitioning and distribution of the problem over a network of workstation, 2) efficient communication tools, 3) managing the system efficiently for a given problem. Of course, there is the question of the efficiency of any given numerical algorithm to such a computing system. NPARC code was chosen as a sample for the application. For the explicit version of the NPARC code both two- and three-dimensional problems were studied. Again both steady and unsteady problems were investigated. The issues studied as a part of the research program were: 1) how to distribute the data between the workstations, 2) how to compute and how to communicate at each node efficiently, 3) how to balance the load distribution. In the following, a summary of these activities is presented. Details of the work have been presented and published as referenced.

  12. Computer Network Attack: An Operational Tool?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Spectrum of Conflict, Cyber Warfare , Preemptive Strike, Effects Based Targeting. 15. Abstract: Computer Network Attack (CNA) is defined as...great deal of attention as the world’s capabilities in cyber - warfare grow. 11 Although addressing the wide ranging legal aspects of CNA is beyond the...the notion of cyber - warfare has not yet developed to the point that international norms have been established.15 These norms will be developed in

  13. Criteria development for upgrading computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efe, Kemal

    1995-01-01

    Being an infrastructure system, the computer network has a fundamental role in the day to day activities of personnel working at KSC. It is easily appreciated that the lack of 'satisfactory' network performance can have a high 'cost' for KSC. Yet, this seemingly obvious concept is quite difficult to demonstrate. At what point do we say that performance is below the lowest tolerable level? How do we know when the 'cost' of using the system at the current level of degraded performance exceeds the cost of upgrading it? In this research, we consider the cost and performance factors that may have an effect in decision making in regards to upgrading computer networks. Cost factors are detailed in terms of 'direct costs' and 'subjective costs'. Performance factors are examined in terms of 'required performance' and 'offered performance.' Required performance is further examined by presenting a methodology for trend analysis based on applying interpolation methods to observed traffic levels. Offered performance levels are analyzed by deriving simple equations to evaluate network performance. The results are evaluated in the light of recommended upgrade policies currently in use for telephone exchange systems, similarities and differences between the two types of services are discussed.

  14. Computer networks. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. E.

    1980-08-01

    Research reports on aspects of computer networks, including hardware, software, data transmission, time sharing, and applicable theory to network design are cited. Specific studies on the ARPA networks, and other such systems are listed.

  15. Computer Based Collaborative Problem Solving for Introductory Courses in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Carolina; Lee, Kevin

    2010-03-01

    We discuss collaborative problem solving computer-based recitation style. The course is designed by Lee [1], and the idea was proposed before by Christian, Belloni and Titus [2,3]. The students find the problems on a web-page containing simulations (physlets) and they write the solutions on an accompanying worksheet after discussing it with a classmate. Physlets have the advantage of being much more like real-world problems than textbook problems. We also compare two protocols for web-based instruction using simulations in an introductory physics class [1]. The inquiry protocol allowed students to control input parameters while the worked example protocol did not. We will discuss which of the two methods is more efficient in relation to Scientific Discovery Learning and Cognitive Load Theory. 1. Lee, Kevin M., Nicoll, Gayle and Brooks, Dave W. (2004). ``A Comparison of Inquiry and Worked Example Web-Based Instruction Using Physlets'', Journal of Science Education and Technology 13, No. 1: 81-88. 2. Christian, W., and Belloni, M. (2001). Physlets: Teaching Physics With Interactive Curricular Material, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ. 3. Christian,W., and Titus,A. (1998). ``Developing web-based curricula using Java Physlets.'' Computers in Physics 12: 227--232.

  16. Computer network defense through radial wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Ian J.

    The purpose of this research is to synthesize basic and fundamental findings in quantum computing, as applied to the attack and defense of conventional computer networks. The concept focuses on uses of radio waves as a shield for, and attack against traditional computers. A logic bomb is analogous to a landmine in a computer network, and if one was to implement it as non-trivial mitigation, it will aid computer network defense. As has been seen in kinetic warfare, the use of landmines has been devastating to geopolitical regions in that they are severely difficult for a civilian to avoid triggering given the unknown position of a landmine. Thus, the importance of understanding a logic bomb is relevant and has corollaries to quantum mechanics as well. The research synthesizes quantum logic phase shifts in certain respects using the Dynamic Data Exchange protocol in software written for this work, as well as a C-NOT gate applied to a virtual quantum circuit environment by implementing a Quantum Fourier Transform. The research focus applies the principles of coherence and entanglement from quantum physics, the concept of expert systems in artificial intelligence, principles of prime number based cryptography with trapdoor functions, and modeling radio wave propagation against an event from unknown parameters. This comes as a program relying on the artificial intelligence concept of an expert system in conjunction with trigger events for a trapdoor function relying on infinite recursion, as well as system mechanics for elliptic curve cryptography along orbital angular momenta. Here trapdoor both denotes the form of cipher, as well as the implied relationship to logic bombs.

  17. Using Microcomputer Simulations in the Classroom: Examples from Undergraduate and Faculty Computer Literacy Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Jeffrey A.

    Examples of the use of computer simulations in two undergraduate courses, (American Foreign Policy and Introduction to International Politics), and a faculty computer literacy course on simulations and artificial intelligence, are provided in this compilation of various instructional items. A list of computer simulations available for various…

  18. Path Not Found: Disparities in Access to Computer Science Courses in California High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Alexis; McAlear, Frieda; Scott, Allison

    2015-01-01

    "Path Not Found: Disparities in Access to Computer Science Courses in California High Schools" exposes one of the foundational causes of underrepresentation in computing: disparities in access to computer science courses in California's public high schools. This report provides new, detailed data on these disparities by student body…

  19. Using satellite communications for a mobile computer network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyman, Douglas J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: patrol car automation, mobile computer network, network requirements, network design overview, MCN mobile network software, MCN hub operation, mobile satellite software, hub satellite software, the benefits of patrol car automation, the benefits of satellite mobile computing, and national law enforcement satellite.

  20. Nanoarchitectonic atomic switch networks for unconventional computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demis, Eleanor C.; Aguilera, Renato; Scharnhorst, Kelsey; Aono, Masakazu; Stieg, Adam Z.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2016-11-01

    Developments in computing hardware are constrained by the operating principles of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, fabrication limits of nanometer scaled features, and difficulties in effective utilization of high density interconnects. This set of obstacles has promulgated a search for alternative, energy efficient approaches to computing inspired by natural systems including the mammalian brain. Atomic switch network (ASN) devices are a unique platform specifically developed to overcome these current barriers to realize adaptive neuromorphic technology. ASNs are composed of a massively interconnected network of atomic switches with a density of ∼109 units/cm2 and are structurally reminiscent of the neocortex of the brain. ASNs possess both the intrinsic capabilities of individual memristive switches, such as memory capacity and multi-state switching, and the characteristics of large-scale complex systems, such as power-law dynamics and non-linear transformations of input signals. Here we describe the successful nanoarchitectonic fabrication of next-generation ASN devices using combined top-down and bottom-up processing and experimentally demonstrate their utility as reservoir computing hardware. Leveraging their intrinsic dynamics and transformative input/output (I/O) behavior enabled waveform regression of periodic signals in the absence of embedded algorithms, further supporting the potential utility of ASN technology as a platform for unconventional approaches to computing.

  1. Computational Fact Checking from Knowledge Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ciampaglia, Giovanni Luca; Shiralkar, Prashant; Rocha, Luis M.; Bollen, Johan; Menczer, Filippo; Flammini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Traditional fact checking by expert journalists cannot keep up with the enormous volume of information that is now generated online. Computational fact checking may significantly enhance our ability to evaluate the veracity of dubious information. Here we show that the complexities of human fact checking can be approximated quite well by finding the shortest path between concept nodes under properly defined semantic proximity metrics on knowledge graphs. Framed as a network problem this approach is feasible with efficient computational techniques. We evaluate this approach by examining tens of thousands of claims related to history, entertainment, geography, and biographical information using a public knowledge graph extracted from Wikipedia. Statements independently known to be true consistently receive higher support via our method than do false ones. These findings represent a significant step toward scalable computational fact-checking methods that may one day mitigate the spread of harmful misinformation. PMID:26083336

  2. Computational drug repositioning through heterogeneous network clustering

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Given the costly and time consuming process and high attrition rates in drug discovery and development, drug repositioning or drug repurposing is considered as a viable strategy both to replenish the drying out drug pipelines and to surmount the innovation gap. Although there is a growing recognition that mechanistic relationships from molecular to systems level should be integrated into drug discovery paradigms, relatively few studies have integrated information about heterogeneous networks into computational drug-repositioning candidate discovery platforms. Results Using known disease-gene and drug-target relationships from the KEGG database, we built a weighted disease and drug heterogeneous network. The nodes represent drugs or diseases while the edges represent shared gene, biological process, pathway, phenotype or a combination of these features. We clustered this weighted network to identify modules and then assembled all possible drug-disease pairs (putative drug repositioning candidates) from these modules. We validated our predictions by testing their robustness and evaluated them by their overlap with drug indications that were either reported in published literature or investigated in clinical trials. Conclusions Previous computational approaches for drug repositioning focused either on drug-drug and disease-disease similarity approaches whereas we have taken a more holistic approach by considering drug-disease relationships also. Further, we considered not only gene but also other features to build the disease drug networks. Despite the relative simplicity of our approach, based on the robustness analyses and the overlap of some of our predictions with drug indications that are under investigation, we believe our approach could complement the current computational approaches for drug repositioning candidate discovery. PMID:24564976

  3. Computed tomography-enhanced anatomy course using enterprise visualization.

    PubMed

    May, Hila; Cohen, Haim; Medlej, Bahaa; Kornreich, Liora; Peled, Nathan; Hershkovitz, Israel

    2013-01-01

    Rapid changes in medical knowledge are forcing continuous adaptation of the basic science courses in medical schools. This article discusses a three-year experience developing a new Computed Tomography (CT)-based anatomy curriculum at the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, including describing the motivations and reasoning for the new curriculum, the CT-based learning system itself, practical examples of visual dissections, and student assessments of the new curriculum. At the heart of this new curriculum is the emphasis on studying anatomy by navigating inside the bodies of various living individuals utilizing a CT viewer. To assess the students' experience with the new CT-based learning method, an anonymous questionnaire was administered at the end of the course for three consecutive academic years: 2008/2009, 2009/2010, 2010/2011. Based upon the results, modifications were made to the curriculum in the summers of 2009 and 2010. Results showed that: (1) during these three years the number of students extensively using the CT system quadrupled (from 11% to 46%); (2) students' satisfaction from radiologists involvement increased by 150%; and (3) student appreciation of the CT-based learning method significantly increased (from 13% to 68%). It was concluded that discouraging results (mainly negative feedback from students) during the first years and a priori opposition from the teaching staff should not weaken efforts to develop new teaching methods in the field of anatomy. Incorporating a new curriculum requires time and patience. Student and staff satisfaction, along with utilization of the new system, will increase with the improvement of impeding factors.

  4. Dynamics of Interaction of Neural Networks in the Course of EEG Alpha Biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Kozlova, L I; Bezmaternykh, D D; Mel'nikov, M E; Savelov, A A; Petrovskii, E D; Shtark, M B

    2017-03-31

    Brain EEG-fMRI activity was studied in subjects, who had successfully completed the EEG alpha stimulating training course (20 sessions): for 14 healthy men (20-35 years) three records were obtained in the feedback loop (biofeedback with EEG alpha rhythm with sound reinforcement): in the beginning, middle and at the end of the course. During alpha training, increased functional connectivity was revealed between precuneus network and anterior salience network, left executive control network, default mode network, primary visual network; anterior salience network and executive control network, visual-spatial network. The most prominent changes were found for precuneus network and anterior salience network, which could be due to their key role in the biofeedback phenomenon. Significant changes in functional connectivity were recorded for anterior salience network and precuneus network (synchronicity increased from the first to the third trial) and right and left executive control networks (weakening from the first to the second session.

  5. Neural networks for convex hull computation.

    PubMed

    Leung, Y; Zhang, J S; Xu, Z B

    1997-01-01

    Computing convex hull is one of the central problems in various applications of computational geometry. In this paper, a convex hull computing neural network (CHCNN) is developed to solve the related problems in the N-dimensional spaces. The algorithm is based on a two-layered neural network, topologically similar to ART, with a newly developed adaptive training strategy called excited learning. The CHCNN provides a parallel online and real-time processing of data which, after training, yields two closely related approximations, one from within and one from outside, of the desired convex hull. It is shown that accuracy of the approximate convex hulls obtained is around O[K(-1)(N-1/)], where K is the number of neurons in the output layer of the CHCNN. When K is taken to be sufficiently large, the CHCNN can generate any accurate approximate convex hull. We also show that an upper bound exists such that the CHCNN will yield the precise convex hull when K is larger than or equal to this bound. A series of simulations and applications is provided to demonstrate the feasibility, effectiveness, and high efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  6. Integrating psychoeducation in a basic computer skills course for people suffering from social anxiety: participants’ experiences

    PubMed Central

    Löhr, Hildegard D; Rosenvinge, Jan H; Wynn, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    We describe a psychoeducational program integrated in a basic computer skills course for participants suffering from social anxiety. The two main aims of the course were: that the participants learn basic computer skills, and that the participants learn to cope better with social anxiety. Computer skills were taught by a qualified teacher. Psychoeducation and cognitive therapy skills, including topics such as anxiety coping, self-accept, and self-regulation, were taught by a clinical psychologist. Thirteen of 16 participants completed the course, which lasted 11 weeks. A qualitative analysis was performed, drawing on observations during the course and on interviews with the participants. The participants were positive about the integration of psychoeducation sessions in the computer course, and described positive outcomes for both elements, including improved computer skills, improved self-esteem, and reduced social anxiety. Most participants were motivated to undertake further occupational rehabilitation after the course. PMID:21966225

  7. Profiles of Motivated Self-Regulation in College Computer Science Courses: Differences in Major versus Required Non-Major Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shell, Duane F.; Soh, Leen-Kiat

    2013-12-01

    The goal of the present study was to utilize a profiling approach to understand differences in motivation and strategic self-regulation among post-secondary STEM students in major versus required non-major computer science courses. Participants were 233 students from required introductory computer science courses (194 men; 35 women; 4 unknown) at a large Midwestern state university. Cluster analysis identified five profiles: (1) a strategic profile of a highly motivated by-any-means good strategy user; (2) a knowledge-building profile of an intrinsically motivated autonomous, mastery-oriented student; (3) a surface learning profile of a utility motivated minimally engaged student; (4) an apathetic profile of an amotivational disengaged student; and (5) a learned helpless profile of a motivated but unable to effectively self-regulate student. Among CS majors and students in courses in their major field, the strategic and knowledge-building profiles were the most prevalent. Among non-CS majors and students in required non-major courses, the learned helpless, surface learning, and apathetic profiles were the most prevalent. Students in the strategic and knowledge-building profiles had significantly higher retention of computational thinking knowledge than students in other profiles. Students in the apathetic and surface learning profiles saw little instrumentality of the course for their future academic and career objectives. Findings show that students in STEM fields taking required computer science courses exhibit the same constellation of motivated strategic self-regulation profiles found in other post-secondary and K-12 settings.

  8. Program Predicts Time Courses of Human/Computer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vera, Alonso; Howes, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    CPM X is a computer program that predicts sequences of, and amounts of time taken by, routine actions performed by a skilled person performing a task. Unlike programs that simulate the interaction of the person with the task environment, CPM X predicts the time course of events as consequences of encoded constraints on human behavior. The constraints determine which cognitive and environmental processes can occur simultaneously and which have sequential dependencies. The input to CPM X comprises (1) a description of a task and strategy in a hierarchical description language and (2) a description of architectural constraints in the form of rules governing interactions of fundamental cognitive, perceptual, and motor operations. The output of CPM X is a Program Evaluation Review Technique (PERT) chart that presents a schedule of predicted cognitive, motor, and perceptual operators interacting with a task environment. The CPM X program allows direct, a priori prediction of skilled user performance on complex human-machine systems, providing a way to assess critical interfaces before they are deployed in mission contexts.

  9. Some queuing network models of computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herndon, E. S.

    1980-01-01

    Queuing network models of a computer system operating with a single workload type are presented. Program algorithms are adapted for use on the Texas Instruments SR-52 programmable calculator. By slightly altering the algorithm to process the G and H matrices row by row instead of column by column, six devices and an unlimited job/terminal population could be handled on the SR-52. Techniques are also introduced for handling a simple load dependent server and for studying interactive systems with fixed multiprogramming limits.

  10. Philosophy of Language. Course Notes for a Tutorial on Computational Semantics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilks, Yorick

    This course was part of a tutorial focusing on the state of computational semantics, i.e., the state of work on natural language within the artificial intelligence (AI) paradigm. The discussion in the course centered on the philosophers Richard Montague and Ludwig Wittgenstein. The course was divided into three sections: (1)…

  11. Building a Sense of Community for Text-Based Computer-Mediated Communication Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Harrison Hao; Liu, Yuliang

    2008-01-01

    Building a strong sense of community in text-based computer-mediated communication courses can be a challenge to instructors. This article presents how a sound practical approach called STEP is implemented into one text-based fully online course and one hybrid course at a university in the northeastern region of the United States. Students'…

  12. Use of Standardized Test Scores to Predict Success in a Computer Applications Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Robert V.

    2014-01-01

    In this educational study, the research problem was that each semester a variable number of community college students are unable to complete an introductory computer applications course at a community college in the state of Mississippi with a successful course letter grade. Course failure, or non-success, at the collegiate level is a negative…

  13. Some Specifications for a Computer-Oriented First Course in Electrical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Engineering Education, Washington, DC.

    Reported are specifications for a computer-oriented first course in electrical engineering giving new direction to the development of texts and alternative courses of study. Guidelines for choice of topics, a statement of fundamental concepts, pitfalls to avoid, and some sample course outlines are given. The study of circuits through computer…

  14. Design Principles for "Thriving in Our Digital World": A High School Computer Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veletsianos, George; Beth, Bradley; Lin, Calvin; Russell, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    "Thriving in Our Digital World" is a technology-enhanced dual enrollment course introducing high school students to computer science through project- and problem-based learning. This article describes the evolution of the course and five lessons learned during the design, development, implementation, and iteration of the course from its…

  15. Quantum computation over the butterfly network

    SciTech Connect

    Soeda, Akihito; Kinjo, Yoshiyuki; Turner, Peter S.; Murao, Mio

    2011-07-15

    In order to investigate distributed quantum computation under restricted network resources, we introduce a quantum computation task over the butterfly network where both quantum and classical communications are limited. We consider deterministically performing a two-qubit global unitary operation on two unknown inputs given at different nodes, with outputs at two distinct nodes. By using a particular resource setting introduced by M. Hayashi [Phys. Rev. A 76, 040301(R) (2007)], which is capable of performing a swap operation by adding two maximally entangled qubits (ebits) between the two input nodes, we show that unitary operations can be performed without adding any entanglement resource, if and only if the unitary operations are locally unitary equivalent to controlled unitary operations. Our protocol is optimal in the sense that the unitary operations cannot be implemented if we relax the specifications of any of the channels. We also construct protocols for performing controlled traceless unitary operations with a 1-ebit resource and for performing global Clifford operations with a 2-ebit resource.

  16. Designing for Deeper Learning in a Blended Computer Science Course for Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Shuchi; Pea, Roy; Cooper, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this research was to create and test an introductory computer science course for middle school. Titled "Foundations for Advancing Computational Thinking" (FACT), the course aims to prepare and motivate middle school learners for future engagement with algorithmic problem solving. FACT was also piloted as a seven-week course…

  17. A Computer Literacy Course at Colleges of Education: What and How.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leh, Amy S. C.

    A report recently released by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) promotes the use of technology in colleges of education. To respond to the professional call, several teacher education programs have been offering computer courses to help the future teachers. This research examined one of the computer courses, an…

  18. A Program of Computational Chemistry Exercises for the First-Semester General Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Scott E.; Dallinger, Richard F.; McKinney, Paul Caylor

    2004-01-01

    The computer systems available for molecular modeling are described, along with a discussion of a molecular modeling program created and supported by computational techniques for the first-semester general chemistry course. Various exercises are listed, which direct the learner from a beginner's course in software practice to more complex…

  19. Computer Controlled Test Systems. Introduction. A Course Based on the IEEE 488 Bus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Eric J.

    An introductory course in computer automated tests and measurement systems based on the International Test Instrument-Computer Interface Standard, the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers)-488, is presented in this study guide. This course is designed to: (1) introduce the electronics engineering technician to the functional…

  20. A Survey and Evaluation of Simulators Suitable for Teaching Courses in Computer Architecture and Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolic, B.; Radivojevic, Z.; Djordjevic, J.; Milutinovic, V.

    2009-01-01

    Courses in Computer Architecture and Organization are regularly included in Computer Engineering curricula. These courses are usually organized in such a way that students obtain not only a purely theoretical experience, but also a practical understanding of the topics lectured. This practical work is usually done in a laboratory using simulators…

  1. Computer Courses in Higher-Education: Improving Learning by Screencast Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghilay, Yaron; Ghilay, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to find out a method designated to improve the learning of computer courses by adding Screencast technology. The intention was to measure the influence of high-quality clips produced by Screencast technology, on the learning process of computer courses. It was required to find out the characteristics (pedagogical and…

  2. THE DEVELOPMENT AND PRESENTATION OF FOUR COLLEGE COURSES BY COMPUTER TELEPROCESSING. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MITZEL, HAROLD E.

    THIS IS A FINAL REPORT ON THE DEVELOPMENT AND PRESENTATION OF FOUR COLLEGE COURSES BY COMPUTER TELEPROCESSING FROM APRIL 1964 TO JUNE 1967. IT OUTLINES THE PROGRESS MADE TOWARDS THE PREPARATION, DEVELOPMENT, AND EVALUATION OF MATERIALS FOR COMPUTER PRESENTATION OF COURSES IN AUDIOLOGY, MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING, ENGINEERING ECONOMICS, AND MODERN…

  3. Visualization Techniques for Computer Network Defense

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, Justin M; Steed, Chad A; Patton, Robert M; Cui, Xiaohui; Schultz, Matthew A

    2011-01-01

    Effective visual analysis of computer network defense (CND) information is challenging due to the volume and complexity of both the raw and analyzed network data. A typical CND is comprised of multiple niche intrusion detection tools, each of which performs network data analysis and produces a unique alerting output. The state-of-the-practice in the situational awareness of CND data is the prevalent use of custom-developed scripts by Information Technology (IT) professionals to retrieve, organize, and understand potential threat events. We propose a new visual analytics framework, called the Oak Ridge Cyber Analytics (ORCA) system, for CND data that allows an operator to interact with all detection tool outputs simultaneously. Aggregated alert events are presented in multiple coordinated views with timeline, cluster, and swarm model analysis displays. These displays are complemented with both supervised and semi-supervised machine learning classifiers. The intent of the visual analytics framework is to improve CND situational awareness, to enable an analyst to quickly navigate and analyze thousands of detected events, and to combine sophisticated data analysis techniques with interactive visualization such that patterns of anomalous activities may be more easily identified and investigated.

  4. Visualization techniques for computer network defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaver, Justin M.; Steed, Chad A.; Patton, Robert M.; Cui, Xiaohui; Schultz, Matthew

    2011-06-01

    Effective visual analysis of computer network defense (CND) information is challenging due to the volume and complexity of both the raw and analyzed network data. A typical CND is comprised of multiple niche intrusion detection tools, each of which performs network data analysis and produces a unique alerting output. The state-of-the-practice in the situational awareness of CND data is the prevalent use of custom-developed scripts by Information Technology (IT) professionals to retrieve, organize, and understand potential threat events. We propose a new visual analytics framework, called the Oak Ridge Cyber Analytics (ORCA) system, for CND data that allows an operator to interact with all detection tool outputs simultaneously. Aggregated alert events are presented in multiple coordinated views with timeline, cluster, and swarm model analysis displays. These displays are complemented with both supervised and semi-supervised machine learning classifiers. The intent of the visual analytics framework is to improve CND situational awareness, to enable an analyst to quickly navigate and analyze thousands of detected events, and to combine sophisticated data analysis techniques with interactive visualization such that patterns of anomalous activities may be more easily identified and investigated.

  5. Massively Open Online Course for Educators (MOOC-Ed) Network Dataset

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, Shaun; Edelmann, Achim

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the Massively Open Online Course for Educators (MOOC-Ed) network dataset. It entails information on two online communication networks resulting from two consecutive offerings of the MOOC called "The Digital Learning Transition in K-12 Schools" in spring and fall 2013. The courses were offered to educators from the USA…

  6. Computer Modeling of Planetary Surface Temperatures in Introductory Astronomy Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Timothy; Goodman, J.

    2013-01-01

    Barker, T., and Goodman, J. C., Wheaton College, Norton, MA Computer modeling is an essential part of astronomical research, and so it is important that students be exposed to its powers and limitations in the first (and, perhaps, only) astronomy course they take in college. Building on the ideas of Walter Robinson (“Modeling Dynamic Systems,” Springer, 2002) we have found that STELLA software (ISEE Systems) allows introductory astronomy students to do sophisticated modeling by the end of two classes of instruction, with no previous experience in computer programming or calculus. STELLA’s graphical interface allows students to visualize systems in terms of “flows” in and out of “stocks,” avoiding the need to invoke differential equations. Linking flows and stocks allows feedback systems to be constructed. Students begin by building an easily understood system: a leaky bucket. This is a simple negative feedback system in which the volume in the bucket (a “stock”) depends on a fixed inflow rate and an outflow that increases in proportion to the volume in the bucket. Students explore how changing inflow rate and feedback parameters affect the steady-state volume and equilibration time of the system. This model is completed within a 50-minute class meeting. In the next class, students are given an analogous but more sophisticated problem: modeling a planetary surface temperature (“stock”) that depends on the “flow” of energy from the Sun, the planetary albedo, the outgoing flow of infrared radiation from the planet’s surface, and the infrared return from the atmosphere. Students then compare their STELLA model equilibrium temperatures to observed planetary temperatures, which agree with model ones for worlds without atmospheres, but give underestimates for planets with atmospheres, thus introducing students to the concept of greenhouse warming. We find that if we give the students part of this model at the start of a 50-minute class they are

  7. Interdisciplinary Team-Teaching Experience for a Computer and Nuclear Energy Course for Electrical and Computer Engineering Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Charles; Jackson, Deborah; Keiller, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A new, interdisciplinary, team-taught course has been designed to educate students in Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) so that they can respond to global and urgent issues concerning computer control systems in nuclear power plants. This paper discusses our experience and assessment of the interdisciplinary computer and nuclear energy…

  8. Planning and management of cloud computing networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larumbe, Federico

    The evolution of the Internet has a great impact on a big part of the population. People use it to communicate, query information, receive news, work, and as entertainment. Its extraordinary usefulness as a communication media made the number of applications and technological resources explode. However, that network expansion comes at the cost of an important power consumption. If the power consumption of telecommunication networks and data centers is considered as the power consumption of a country, it would rank at the 5 th place in the world. Furthermore, the number of servers in the world is expected to grow by a factor of 10 between 2013 and 2020. This context motivates us to study techniques and methods to allocate cloud computing resources in an optimal way with respect to cost, quality of service (QoS), power consumption, and environmental impact. The results we obtained from our test cases show that besides minimizing capital expenditures (CAPEX) and operational expenditures (OPEX), the response time can be reduced up to 6 times, power consumption by 30%, and CO2 emissions by a factor of 60. Cloud computing provides dynamic access to IT resources as a service. In this paradigm, programs are executed in servers connected to the Internet that users access from their computers and mobile devices. The first advantage of this architecture is to reduce the time of application deployment and interoperability, because a new user only needs a web browser and does not need to install software on local computers with specific operating systems. Second, applications and information are available from everywhere and with any device with an Internet access. Also, servers and IT resources can be dynamically allocated depending on the number of users and workload, a feature called elasticity. This thesis studies the resource management of cloud computing networks and is divided in three main stages. We start by analyzing the planning of cloud computing networks to get a

  9. Computational functions in biochemical reaction networks.

    PubMed Central

    Arkin, A; Ross, J

    1994-01-01

    In prior work we demonstrated the implementation of logic gates, sequential computers (universal Turing machines), and parallel computers by means of the kinetics of chemical reaction mechanisms. In the present article we develop this subject further by first investigating the computational properties of several enzymatic (single and multiple) reaction mechanisms: we show their steady states are analogous to either Boolean or fuzzy logic gates. Nearly perfect digital function is obtained only in the regime in which the enzymes are saturated with their substrates. With these enzymatic gates, we construct combinational chemical networks that execute a given truth-table. The dynamic range of a network's output is strongly affected by "input/output matching" conditions among the internal gate elements. We find a simple mechanism, similar to the interconversion of fructose-6-phosphate between its two bisphosphate forms (fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and fructose-2,6-bisphosphate), that functions analogously to an AND gate. When the simple model is supplanted with one in which the enzyme rate laws are derived from experimental data, the steady state of the mechanism functions as an asymmetric fuzzy aggregation operator with properties akin to a fuzzy AND gate. The qualitative behavior of the mechanism does not change when situated within a large model of glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and the TCA cycle. The mechanism, in this case, switches the pathway's mode from glycolysis to gluconeogenesis in response to chemical signals of low blood glucose (cAMP) and abundant fuel for the TCA cycle (acetyl coenzyme A). Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 PMID:7948674

  10. Mobile Computing and Ubiquitous Networking: Concepts, Technologies and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierre, Samuel

    2001-01-01

    Analyzes concepts, technologies and challenges related to mobile computing and networking. Defines basic concepts of cellular systems. Describes the evolution of wireless technologies that constitute the foundations of mobile computing and ubiquitous networking. Presents characterization and issues of mobile computing. Analyzes economical and…

  11. Chemical Reaction Networks for Computing Polynomials.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Sayed Ahmad; Parhi, Keshab K; Riedel, Marc D

    2017-01-20

    Chemical reaction networks (CRNs) provide a fundamental model in the study of molecular systems. Widely used as formalism for the analysis of chemical and biochemical systems, CRNs have received renewed attention as a model for molecular computation. This paper demonstrates that, with a new encoding, CRNs can compute any set of polynomial functions subject only to the limitation that these functions must map the unit interval to itself. These polynomials can be expressed as linear combinations of Bernstein basis polynomials with positive coefficients less than or equal to 1. In the proposed encoding approach, each variable is represented using two molecular types: a type-0 and a type-1. The value is the ratio of the concentration of type-1 molecules to the sum of the concentrations of type-0 and type-1 molecules. The proposed encoding naturally exploits the expansion of a power-form polynomial into a Bernstein polynomial. Molecular encoders for converting any input in a standard representation to the fractional representation as well as decoders for converting the computed output from the fractional to a standard representation are presented. The method is illustrated first for generic CRNs; then chemical reactions designed for an example are mapped to DNA strand-displacement reactions.

  12. Computational classifiers for predicting the short-term course of Multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) of clinical, imaging and motor evoked potentials (MEP) for predicting the short-term prognosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods We obtained clinical data, MRI and MEP from a prospective cohort of 51 patients and 20 matched controls followed for two years. Clinical end-points recorded were: 1) expanded disability status scale (EDSS), 2) disability progression, and 3) new relapses. We constructed computational classifiers (Bayesian, random decision-trees, simple logistic-linear regression-and neural networks) and calculated their accuracy by means of a 10-fold cross-validation method. We also validated our findings with a second cohort of 96 MS patients from a second center. Results We found that disability at baseline, grey matter volume and MEP were the variables that better correlated with clinical end-points, although their diagnostic accuracy was low. However, classifiers combining the most informative variables, namely baseline disability (EDSS), MRI lesion load and central motor conduction time (CMCT), were much more accurate in predicting future disability. Using the most informative variables (especially EDSS and CMCT) we developed a neural network (NNet) that attained a good performance for predicting the EDSS change. The predictive ability of the neural network was validated in an independent cohort obtaining similar accuracy (80%) for predicting the change in the EDSS two years later. Conclusions The usefulness of clinical variables for predicting the course of MS on an individual basis is limited, despite being associated with the disease course. By training a NNet with the most informative variables we achieved a good accuracy for predicting short-term disability. PMID:21649880

  13. The predictors of success in computer courses among high school students.

    PubMed

    Baloğlu, Mustafa; Abbassi, Amir; Cevik, Vildan

    2009-06-01

    High school students report high computer anxiety. The addition of three computer anxiety dimensions (i.e., Affective Anxiety, Damaging Anxiety, and Learning Anxiety) improved the prediction of computer course grades beyond that afforded by the differences in academic achievement. 700 Turkish high school students (386 boys, 314 girls) enrolled in high school computer courses participated. The Computer Anxiety Scale and a personal data sheet were used to collect the data in the study. Computer course grades were positively related to students' academic achievement but negatively related to the three anxiety subscales. When differences in academic achievement were controlled in multiple-regression analyses, anxiety dimensions were not significantly related to course grades. Anxiety has a more detrimental effect on students with lower academic ability than on those with higher academic ability.

  14. Network and computing infrastructure for scientific applications in Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvatadze, R.; Modebadze, Z.

    2016-09-01

    Status of network and computing infrastructure and available services for research and education community of Georgia are presented. Research and Educational Networking Association - GRENA provides the following network services: Internet connectivity, network services, cyber security, technical support, etc. Computing resources used by the research teams are located at GRENA and at major state universities. GE-01-GRENA site is included in European Grid infrastructure. Paper also contains information about programs of Learning Center and research and development projects in which GRENA is participating.

  15. Network Computer Technology. Phase I: Viability and Promise within NASA's Desktop Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paluzzi, Peter; Miller, Rosalind; Kurihara, West; Eskey, Megan

    1998-01-01

    Over the past several months, major industry vendors have made a business case for the network computer as a win-win solution toward lowering total cost of ownership. This report provides results from Phase I of the Ames Research Center network computer evaluation project. It identifies factors to be considered for determining cost of ownership; further, it examines where, when, and how network computer technology might fit in NASA's desktop computing architecture.

  16. Developing a project-based computational physics course grounded in expert practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Christopher J.; Atherton, Timothy J.

    2017-04-01

    We describe a project-based computational physics course developed using a backwards course design approach. From an initial competency-based model of problem solving in computational physics, we interviewed faculty who use these tools in their own research to determine indicators of expert practice. From these, a rubric was formulated that enabled us to design a course intended to allow students to learn these skills. We also report an initial implementation of the course and, by having the interviewees regrade student work, show that students acquired many of the expert practices identified.

  17. Distributed Computer Networks in Support of Complex Group Practices

    PubMed Central

    Wess, Bernard P.

    1978-01-01

    The economics of medical computer networks are presented in context with the patient care and administrative goals of medical networks. Design alternatives and network topologies are discussed with an emphasis on medical network design requirements in distributed data base design, telecommunications, satellite systems, and software engineering. The success of the medical computer networking technology is predicated on the ability of medical and data processing professionals to design comprehensive, efficient, and virtually impenetrable security systems to protect data bases, network access and services, and patient confidentiality.

  18. Towards a Versatile Tele-Education Platform for Computer Science Educators Based on the Greek School Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paraskevas, Michael; Zarouchas, Thomas; Angelopoulos, Panagiotis; Perikos, Isidoros

    2013-01-01

    Now days the growing need for highly qualified computer science educators in modern educational environments is commonplace. This study examines the potential use of Greek School Network (GSN) to provide a robust and comprehensive e-training course for computer science educators in order to efficiently exploit advanced IT services and establish a…

  19. LEAP: A Computer Course for Gifted Students. Manila.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scruggs, Patricia; Johnson, Paul

    1985-01-01

    Learning Enrichment Activities Program (LEAP) is designed to offer intellectually challenging computer activities for gifted and talented children (grades 7-12) in Manila. Computer enrichment activities were designed according to an adaptation of the Enrichment Triad model. (CL)

  20. Theory VI. Computational Materials Sciences Network (CMSN)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z Y

    2008-06-25

    The Computational Materials Sciences Network (CMSN) is a virtual center consisting of scientists interested in working together, across organizational and disciplinary boundaries, to formulate and pursue projects that reflect challenging and relevant computational research in the materials sciences. The projects appropriate for this center involve those problems best pursued through broad cooperative efforts, rather than those key problems best tackled by single investigator groups. CMSN operates similarly to the DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials, coordinated by George Samara at Sandia. As in the Synthesis and Processing Center, the intent of the modest funding for CMSN is to foster partnering and collective activities. All CMSN proposals undergo external peer review and are judged foremost on the quality and timeliness of the science and also on criteria relevant to the objective of the center, especially concerning a strategy for partnering. More details about CMSN can be found on the CMSN webpages at: http://cmpweb.ameslab.gov/ccms/CMSN-homepage.html.

  1. An Interdisciplinary Bibliography for Computers and the Humanities Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Heyward

    1991-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of works related to the subject of computers and the humanities. Groups items into textbooks and overviews; introductions; human and computer languages; literary and linguistic analysis; artificial intelligence and robotics; social issue debates; computers' image in fiction; anthologies; writing and the…

  2. Email networks and the spread of computer viruses.

    PubMed

    Newman, M E J; Forrest, Stephanie; Balthrop, Justin

    2002-09-01

    Many computer viruses spread via electronic mail, making use of computer users' email address books as a source for email addresses of new victims. These address books form a directed social network of connections between individuals over which the virus spreads. Here we investigate empirically the structure of this network using data drawn from a large computer installation, and discuss the implications of this structure for the understanding and prevention of computer virus epidemics.

  3. Emulation of the Active Immune Response in a Computer Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-15

    Dynamics of the Estimation Process 53 15 Dual Network Interface for concurrent execution of testbed experiments and lab management 57 16 Hardware Testbed...Two Physical Nodes 62 20 Network Security Testbed Management Software Stack 63 21 Virtual Network Topology for Worm Propagation Experiment Generated...system could be reformulated in terms of the characteristics of computer networks and interpreted as a set of instructions to a network manager . This

  4. A topology for computer networks with good survivability characteristics and low transmission delays between node computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, G. L.; Jiang, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    Various network topologies are developed which have not appeared in the literature before which result in minimum diameter graphs for computer networks having connectivity four. The topologies presented have good survivability characteristics and result in more topologies being available for computer network designers which achieve the minimum diameter resulting in small transmission delays.

  5. Network analysis of physics discussion forums and links to course success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traxler, Adrienne; Gavrin, Andrew; Lindell, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Large introductory science courses tend to isolate students, with negative consequences for long-term retention in college. Many active learning courses build collaboration and community among students as an explicit goal, and social network analysis has been used to track the development and beneficial effects of these collaborations. Here we supplement such work by conducting network analysis of online course discussion forums in two semesters of an introductory physics class. Online forums provide a tool for engaging students with each other outside of class, and offer new opportunities to commuter or non-traditional students with limited on-campus time. We look for correlations between position in the forum network (centrality) and final course grades. Preliminary investigation has shown weak correlations in the very dense full-semester network, so we will consider reduced ''backbone'' networks that highlight the most consistent links between students. Future work and implications for instruction will also be discussed.

  6. Efficiently modeling neural networks on massively parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farber, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    Neural networks are a very useful tool for analyzing and modeling complex real world systems. Applying neural network simulations to real world problems generally involves large amounts of data and massive amounts of computation. To efficiently handle the computational requirements of large problems, we have implemented at Los Alamos a highly efficient neural network compiler for serial computers, vector computers, vector parallel computers, and fine grain SIMD computers such as the CM-2 connection machine. This paper describes the mapping used by the compiler to implement feed-forward backpropagation neural networks for a SIMD (Single Instruction Multiple Data) architecture parallel computer. Thinking Machines Corporation has benchmarked our code at 1.3 billion interconnects per second (approximately 3 gigaflops) on a 64,000 processor CM-2 connection machine (Singer 1990). This mapping is applicable to other SIMD computers and can be implemented on MIMD computers such as the CM-5 connection machine. Our mapping has virtually no communications overhead with the exception of the communications required for a global summation across the processors (which has a sub-linear runtime growth on the order of O(log(number of processors)). We can efficiently model very large neural networks which have many neurons and interconnects and our mapping can extend to arbitrarily large networks (within memory limitations) by merging the memory space of separate processors with fast adjacent processor interprocessor communications. This paper will consider the simulation of only feed forward neural network although this method is extendable to recurrent networks.

  7. Talking about Code: Integrating Pedagogical Code Reviews into Early Computing Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hundhausen, Christopher D.; Agrawal, Anukrati; Agarwal, Pawan

    2013-01-01

    Given the increasing importance of soft skills in the computing profession, there is good reason to provide students withmore opportunities to learn and practice those skills in undergraduate computing courses. Toward that end, we have developed an active learning approach for computing education called the "Pedagogical Code Review"…

  8. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Collaborative Computer-Intensive Projects in an Undergraduate Psychometrics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barchard, Kimberly A.; Pace, Larry A.

    2010-01-01

    Undergraduate psychometrics classes often use computer-intensive active learning projects. However, little research has examined active learning or computer-intensive projects in psychometrics courses. We describe two computer-intensive collaborative learning projects used to teach the design and evaluation of psychological tests. Course…

  9. An Experimental Analysis of Computer-Mediated Instruction and Student Attitudes in a Principles of Financial Accounting Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basile, Anthony; D'Aquila, Jill M.

    2002-01-01

    Accounting students received either traditional instruction (n=46) or used computer-mediated communication and WebCT course management software. There were no significant differences in attitudes about the course. However, computer users were more positive about course delivery and course management tools. (Contains 17 references.) (SK)

  10. Social Studies: Application Units. Course II, Teachers. Computer-Oriented Curriculum. REACT (Relevant Educational Applications of Computer Technology).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tecnica Education Corp., San Carlos, CA.

    This book is one of a series in Course II of the Relevant Educational Applications of Computer Technology (REACT) Project. It is designed to point out to teachers two of the major applications of computers in the social sciences: simulation and data analysis. The first section contains a variety of simulation units organized under the following…

  11. An Investigation of Student Practices in Asynchronous Computer Conferencing Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Vanessa L.; Hewitt, Jim

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the online practices of students enrolled in graduate-level distance education courses. Using interviews and a questionnaire as data sources, the study sought to: (a) identify common practices that students adopt in asynchronous discussions, and (b) gain an understanding of why students adopt them. An analysis of the data…

  12. Computer-Based Semantic Network in Molecular Biology: A Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callman, Joshua L.; And Others

    This paper analyzes the hardware and software features that would be desirable in a computer-based semantic network system for representing biology knowledge. It then describes in detail a prototype network of molecular biology knowledge that has been developed using Filevision software and a Macintosh computer. The prototype contains about 100…

  13. Expanding Career Services via the Campus-Wide Computer Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Marvin J.; Jones, Deborah A.

    1991-01-01

    Describes campuswide computer network at Lafayette College and how it has allowed career services to help students search for, find, and secure careers. Describes use of computer network for interview sign-ups and on-line resumes, and plans to develop on-line services and alumni directories. (NB)

  14. Models for a National Public School Computing Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen L.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discusses a possible national education computer network that would include elementary, secondary, and higher education institutions. Topics addressed include Internet; common standards; distributed computing; open access; equity concerns; and examples of two successful public school networks in Virginia and Texas that are linked through the…

  15. Network Patch Cables Demystified: A Super Activity for Computer Networking Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Douglas L.

    2004-01-01

    This article de-mystifies network patch cable secrets so that people can connect their computers and transfer those pesky files--without screaming at the cables. It describes a network cabling activity that can offer students a great hands-on opportunity for working with the tools, techniques, and media used in computer networking. Since the…

  16. Time-course gene profiling and networks in demethylated retinoblastoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Malusa, Federico; Taranta, Monia; Zaki, Nazar; Cinti, Caterina; Capobianco, Enrico

    2015-09-15

    Retinoblastoma, a very aggressive cancer of the developing retina, initiatiates by the biallelic loss of RB1 gene, and progresses very quickly following RB1 inactivation. While its genome is stable, multiple pathways are deregulated, also epigenetically. After reviewing the main findings in relation with recently validated markers, we propose an integrative bioinformatics approach to include in the previous group new markers obtained from the analysis of a single cell line subject to epigenetic treatment. In particular, differentially expressed genes are identified from time course microarray experiments on the WERI-RB1 cell line treated with 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine; DAC). By inducing demethylation of CpG island in promoter genes that are involved in biological processes, for instance apoptosis, we performed the following main integrative analysis steps: i) Gene expression profiling at 48h, 72h and 96h after DAC treatment; ii) Time differential gene co-expression networks and iii) Context-driven marker association (transcriptional factor regulated protein networks, master regulatory paths). The observed DAC-driven temporal profiles and regulatory connectivity patterns are obtained by the application of computational tools, with support from curated literature. It is worth emphasizing the capacity of networks to reconcile multi-type evidences, thus generating testable hypotheses made available by systems scale predictive inference power. Despite our small experimental setting, we propose through such integrations valuable impacts of epigenetic treatment in terms of gene expression measurements, and then validate evidenced apoptotic effects.

  17. Time-course gene profiling and networks in demethylated retinoblastoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Malusa, Federico; Taranta, Monia; Zaki, Nazar; Cinti, Caterina; Capobianco, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma, a very aggressive cancer of the developing retina, initiatiates by the biallelic loss of RB1 gene, and progresses very quickly following RB1 inactivation. While its genome is stable, multiple pathways are deregulated, also epigenetically. After reviewing the main findings in relation with recently validated markers, we propose an integrative bioinformatics approach to include in the previous group new markers obtained from the analysis of a single cell line subject to epigenetic treatment. In particular, differentially expressed genes are identified from time course microarray experiments on the WERI-RB1 cell line treated with 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine (decitabine; DAC). By inducing demethylation of CpG island in promoter genes that are involved in biological processes, for instance apoptosis, we performed the following main integrative analysis steps: i) Gene expression profiling at 48h, 72h and 96h after DAC treatment; ii) Time differential gene co-expression networks and iii) Context-driven marker association (transcriptional factor regulated protein networks, master regulatory paths). The observed DAC-driven temporal profiles and regulatory connectivity patterns are obtained by the application of computational tools, with support from curated literature. It is worth emphasizing the capacity of networks to reconcile multi-type evidences, thus generating testable hypotheses made available by systems scale predictive inference power. Despite our small experimental setting, we propose through such integrations valuable impacts of epigenetic treatment in terms of gene expression measurements, and then validate evidenced apoptotic effects. PMID:26143641

  18. Feedback and its effectiveness in a computer-aided personalized system of instruction course.

    PubMed

    Martin, Toby L; Pear, Joseph J; Martin, Garry L

    2002-01-01

    In a computer-managed version of Keller's personalized system of instruction, students received frequent feedback from more advanced students within the course. Overall accuracy of student-provided feedback was 87%, and students complied with 61% of the feedback.

  19. Incorporating Computer Literacy into a Mathematics Course for Preservice Elementary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewar, Jacqueline M.

    1986-01-01

    Teaching computer literacy to preservice teachers is advocated. How such a component was added to a mathematics course for preservice elementary teachers at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles is described. (MNS)

  20. Affective Learning in Online Multimedia and Lecture Versions of an Introductory Computing Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moneta, Giovanni B.; Kekkonen-Moneta, Synnove S.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated students' affective learning in an introductory computing course that was taught in Hong Kong once in a lecture format and twice in a rich interactive multimedia online format to 414 college students in all. A simplified experience sampling method was used to assess affective learning at the midterm and end of each course in…

  1. Educational Impact of Digital Visualization Tools on Digital Character Production Computer Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Langeveld, Mark Christensen

    2009-01-01

    Digital character production courses have traditionally been taught in art departments. The digital character production course at the University of Utah is centered, drawing uniformly from art and engineering disciplines. Its design has evolved to include a synergy of computer science, functional art and human anatomy. It gives students an…

  2. Toward a Singleton Undergraduate Computer Graphics Course in Small and Medium-Sized Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shesh, Amit

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the evolution of a single undergraduate computer graphics course over five semesters, driven by a primary question: if one could offer only one undergraduate course in graphics, what would it include? This constraint is relevant to many small and medium-sized colleges that lack resources, adequate expertise, and enrollment…

  3. A Computational-Modeling Course for Undergraduate Students in Chemical Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hessley, Rita K.

    2004-01-01

    The PC-based software technology, a computational-modeling course, for undergraduate chemistry students helps them to understand the molecular modeling in a better way. This course would be able to accommodate a wider array of topics and a greater depth of theory as the modeling is increasingly incorporated into the chemistry curriculum.

  4. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Web-Based Learning Design for Adult Computer Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonis, Konstantinos; Daradoumis, Thanasis; Papadakis, Spyros; Simos, Christos

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on work undertaken within a pilot study concerned with the design, development, and evaluation of online computer science training courses. Drawing on recent developments in e-learning technology, these courses were structured around the principles of a learner-oriented approach for use with adult learners. The paper describes a…

  5. An Analysis of College Students' Motivation and Learning Strategies in Computer Courses: A Cognitive View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalupa, Marilyn; Chen, Catherine; Charles, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Students in a computer applications (CA) course (n=74) and business information systems (BIS) course (n=69) displayed no differences in motivation. The BIS group used rehearsal and organization learning strategies, the CA group help-seeking and effort regulation. In CA, intrinsic goal orientation and self-efficacy were related to grades. In BIS,…

  6. Teaching College Computer Courses in Saudi Arabia (Issues Concerning the Classroom and the Culture).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebhun, Herbert F.

    This report provides information concerning one teacher's experience in teaching college courses for Arkansas State University in the area of computer information systems to Saudi Arabian men employed by the Saudi Arabian Customs Automation Department. The students had spent approximately 2 years in Arkansas taking courses, and then went back to…

  7. Fostering Critical Reflection in a Computer-Based, Asynchronously Delivered Diversity Training Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Givhan, Shawn T.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation study chronicles the creation of a computer-based, asynchronously delivered diversity training course for a state agency. The course format enabled efficient delivery of a mandatory curriculum to the Massachusetts Department of State Police workforce. However, the asynchronous format posed a challenge to achieving the learning…

  8. Learning Computing Topics in Undergraduate Information Systems Courses: Managing Perceived Difficulty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Jeffrey D.; Knapp, Janice

    2014-01-01

    Learning technical computing skills is increasingly important in our technology driven society. However, learning technical skills in information systems (IS) courses can be difficult. More than 20 percent of students in some technical courses may dropout or fail. Unfortunately, little is known about students' perceptions of the difficulty of…

  9. Neural Network Design on the SRC-6 Reconfigurable Computer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    speeds of FPGA systems. This thesis explores the use of a Feed-forward, Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) Artificial Neural Network (ANN) architecture... Implementation of a Fast Artificial Neural Network Library (FANN), Graduate Project Report, Department of Computer Science, University of Copenhagen (DIKU...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited NEURAL NETWORK

  10. SNAP: A computer program for generating symbolic network functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, P. M.; Alderson, G. E.

    1970-01-01

    The computer program SNAP (symbolic network analysis program) generates symbolic network functions for networks containing R, L, and C type elements and all four types of controlled sources. The program is efficient with respect to program storage and execution time. A discussion of the basic algorithms is presented, together with user's and programmer's guides.

  11. A Study on the Korean Educational Computer Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Moon-Suk

    Future development and operations of the Korean Educational Computer Network are discussed and possible network layout and cost implications are studied. The Aloha System radio communication, telephone lines and satellite systems are considered as possible alternatives to the present network. The availability of telecommunication facilities and…

  12. A computer aided teaching course on corrosion of concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesht, M.H.; Cottis, R.A.

    1996-10-01

    Computers provide a powerful opportunity for the development of teaching materials. They provide a rich interactive environment to stimulate and engage the student. The advent of computers with multimedia capabilities allows the constructor of teaching materials to show the student material from many sources; text, chart, audio, video, animation, simulation, sound or photographs. When these are combined with interactivity, a powerful learning environment is created. There is currently no CAL (Computer Aided Learning) or CBT (Computer Based Training) material available on the subject of corrosion and corrosion protection in concrete structures for civil engineering students. This paper will describe a Computer Aided Learning package intended to introduce students to the environmental degradation of concrete structures.

  13. Analysis of proctor marking accuracy in a computer-aided personalized system of instruction course.

    PubMed

    Martin, Toby L; Pear, Joseph J; Martin, Garry L

    2002-01-01

    In a computer-aided version of Keller's personalized system of instruction (CAPSI), students within a course were assigned by a computer to be proctors for tests. Archived data from a CAPSI-taught behavior modification course were analyzed to assess proctor accuracy in marking answers as correct or incorrect. Overall accuracy was increased by having each test marked independently by two proctors, and was higher on incorrect answers when the degree of incorrectness was larger.

  14. Integrating user studies into computer graphics-related courses.

    PubMed

    Santos, B S; Dias, P; Silva, S; Ferreira, C; Madeira, J

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents computer graphics. Computer graphics and visualization are essentially about producing images for a target audience, be it the millions watching a new CG-animated movie or the small group of researchers trying to gain insight into the large amount of numerical data resulting from a scientific experiment. To ascertain the final images' effectiveness for their intended audience or the designed visualizations' accuracy and expressiveness, formal user studies are often essential. In human-computer interaction (HCI), such user studies play a similar fundamental role in evaluating the usability and applicability of interaction methods and metaphors for the various devices and software systems we use.

  15. Course Control of Underactuated Ship Based on Nonlinear Robust Neural Network Backstepping Method

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Junjia; Meng, Hao; Zhu, Qidan; Zhou, Jiajia

    2016-01-01

    The problem of course control for underactuated surface ship is addressed in this paper. Firstly, neural networks are adopted to determine the parameters of the unknown part of ideal virtual backstepping control, even the weight values of neural network are updated by adaptive technique. Then uniform stability for the convergence of course tracking errors has been proven through Lyapunov stability theory. Finally, simulation experiments are carried out to illustrate the effectiveness of proposed control method. PMID:27293422

  16. Spatiotemporal Dynamics and Reliable Computations in Recurrent Spiking Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, Ryan; Rosenbaum, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Randomly connected networks of excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons provide a parsimonious model of neural variability, but are notoriously unreliable for performing computations. We show that this difficulty is overcome by incorporating the well-documented dependence of connection probability on distance. Spatially extended spiking networks exhibit symmetry-breaking bifurcations and generate spatiotemporal patterns that can be trained to perform dynamical computations under a reservoir computing framework.

  17. Design and Implementation of a Generic Computer Network Simulation System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    send them, arbitrates for access to the communications media , transmits them, and checks for errors in all these processes. These processes will be de...3 T H H H Legend: H - host computer communications N - network node media Figure 1 Computer Network Communication Subnet scribed further in later...is certainly different from the other topologies. It is distinguished by a single communication - media . Each host computer or device is connected to

  18. LaRC local area networks to support distributed computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddle, E. P.

    1984-01-01

    The Langley Research Center's (LaRC) Local Area Network (LAN) effort is discussed. LaRC initiated the development of a LAN to support a growing distributed computing environment at the Center. The purpose of the network is to provide an improved capability (over inteactive and RJE terminal access) for sharing multivendor computer resources. Specifically, the network will provide a data highway for the transfer of files between mainframe computers, minicomputers, work stations, and personal computers. An important influence on the overall network design was the vital need of LaRC researchers to efficiently utilize the large CDC mainframe computers in the central scientific computing facility. Although there was a steady migration from a centralized to a distributed computing environment at LaRC in recent years, the work load on the central resources increased. Major emphasis in the network design was on communication with the central resources within the distributed environment. The network to be implemented will allow researchers to utilize the central resources, distributed minicomputers, work stations, and personal computers to obtain the proper level of computing power to efficiently perform their jobs.

  19. Computer analysis of general linear networks using digraphs.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclenahan, J. O.; Chan, S.-P.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of the application of digraphs in analyzing general electronic networks, and development of a computer program based on a particular digraph method developed by Chen. The Chen digraph method is a topological method for solution of networks and serves as a shortcut when hand calculations are required. The advantage offered by this method of analysis is that the results are in symbolic form. It is limited, however, by the size of network that may be handled. Usually hand calculations become too tedious for networks larger than about five nodes, depending on how many elements the network contains. Direct determinant expansion for a five-node network is a very tedious process also.

  20. A programming course in bioinformatics for computer and information science students.

    PubMed

    Altman, R B; Koza, J

    1996-01-01

    We have created a course entitled "Representations and Algorithms for Computational Molecular Biology" with three specific goals in mind. First, we want to provide a technical introduction for computer science and medical information science students to the challenges of computing with molecular biology data, particularly the advantages of having easy access to real-world data sets. Second, we want to equip the students with the skills required of productive research assistants in molecular biology computing research projects. Finally, we want to provide a showcase for local investigators to describe their work in the context of a course that provide adequate background information. In order to achieve these goals, we have created a programming course, in which three major projects and six smaller assignments are assigned during the quarter. We stress fundamental representations and algorithms during the first part of the course in lectures given by the core faculty, and then have more focused lectures in which faculty research interests are highlighted. The course stressed issues of structural molecular biology, in order to better motivate the critical issues in sequence analysis. The culmination of the course was a challenge to the students to use a version of protein threading to predict which members of a set of unknown sequences were globins. The course was well received, and has been made a core requirement in the Medical Information Sciences program.

  1. Evaluation of the Manitoba High School Computer Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haughey, D. G.; And Others

    Designed to provide information for decision making when the current 5-year contract with the supplier of computing services to the Manitoba High School Computer Network expires in 1982, this study included both an assessment of the existing situation and the identification of alternative options for the provision of computer services to the…

  2. Community readiness for a computer-based health information network.

    PubMed

    Ervin, Naomi E; Berry, Michelle M

    2006-01-01

    The need for timely and accurate communication among healthcare providers has prompted the development of computer-based health information networks that allow patient and client information to be shared among agencies. This article reports the findings of a study to assess whether residents of an upstate New York community were ready for a computer-based health information network to facilitate delivery of long term care services. Focus group sessions, which involved both consumers and professionals, revealed that security of personal information was of concern to healthcare providers, attorneys, and consumers. Physicians were the most enthusiastic about the possibility of a computer-based health information network. Consumers and other healthcare professionals, including nurses, indicated that such a network would be helpful to them personally. Nurses and other healthcare professionals need to be knowledgeable about the use of computer-based health information networks and other electronic information systems as this trend continues to spread across the U.S.

  3. Network selection, Information filtering and Scalable computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Changqing

    This dissertation explores two application scenarios of sparsity pursuit method on large scale data sets. The first scenario is classification and regression in analyzing high dimensional structured data, where predictors corresponds to nodes of a given directed graph. This arises in, for instance, identification of disease genes for the Parkinson's diseases from a network of candidate genes. In such a situation, directed graph describes dependencies among the genes, where direction of edges represent certain causal effects. Key to high-dimensional structured classification and regression is how to utilize dependencies among predictors as specified by directions of the graph. In this dissertation, we develop a novel method that fully takes into account such dependencies formulated through certain nonlinear constraints. We apply the proposed method to two applications, feature selection in large margin binary classification and in linear regression. We implement the proposed method through difference convex programming for the cost function and constraints. Finally, theoretical and numerical analyses suggest that the proposed method achieves the desired objectives. An application to disease gene identification is presented. The second application scenario is personalized information filtering which extracts the information specifically relevant to a user, predicting his/her preference over a large number of items, based on the opinions of users who think alike or its content. This problem is cast into the framework of regression and classification, where we introduce novel partial latent models to integrate additional user-specific and content-specific predictors, for higher predictive accuracy. In particular, we factorize a user-over-item preference matrix into a product of two matrices, each representing a user's preference and an item preference by users. Then we propose a likelihood method to seek a sparsest latent factorization, from a class of over

  4. HeNCE: A Heterogeneous Network Computing Environment

    DOE PAGES

    Beguelin, Adam; Dongarra, Jack J.; Geist, George Al; ...

    1994-01-01

    Network computing seeks to utilize the aggregate resources of many networked computers to solve a single problem. In so doing it is often possible to obtain supercomputer performance from an inexpensive local area network. The drawback is that network computing is complicated and error prone when done by hand, especially if the computers have different operating systems and data formats and are thus heterogeneous. The heterogeneous network computing environment (HeNCE) is an integrated graphical environment for creating and running parallel programs over a heterogeneous collection of computers. It is built on a lower level package called parallel virtual machine (PVM).more » The HeNCE philosophy of parallel programming is to have the programmer graphically specify the parallelism of a computation and to automate, as much as possible, the tasks of writing, compiling, executing, debugging, and tracing the network computation. Key to HeNCE is a graphical language based on directed graphs that describe the parallelism and data dependencies of an application. Nodes in the graphs represent conventional Fortran or C subroutines and the arcs represent data and control flow. This article describes the present state of HeNCE, its capabilities, limitations, and areas of future research.« less

  5. Instructional Material Development for Computer Applications in Adult Business Education Courses. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fort Wayne Community Schools, IN.

    The goal of this special demonstration project was to develop adult secondary business education courses related to the computer. An additional phase focused on the development of a microcomputer-based program providing the needed computer literacy and applications for its use. An advisory committee identified five areas of instructional need:…

  6. A Novel Use of Computer Simulation in an Applied Pharmacokinetics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Timothy J.

    1982-01-01

    The use of a package of interactive computer programs designed to simulate pharmacokinetic monitoring of drug therapy in a required undergraduate applied pharmacokinetics course is described. Students were assigned the problem of maintaining therapeutic drug concentrations in a computer generated "patient" as an adjunct to classroom instruction.…

  7. Happenstance and Compromise: A Gendered Analysis of Students' Computing Degree Course Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The number of students choosing to study computing at university continues to decline this century, with an even sharper decline in female students. This article presents the results of a series of interviews with university students studying computing courses in Australia that uncovered the influence of happenstance and compromise on course…

  8. The Use of a Computer Algebra System in Capstone Mathematics Courses for Undergraduate Mathematics Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Gary A.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the use of a computer algebra system in a capstone mathematics course for undergraduate mathematics majors preparing to teach secondary school mathematics. Provides sample exercises intended to demonstrate how the power of a computer algebra system such as MAPLE can contribute to desired outcomes including reinforcing and strengthening…

  9. Design and Delivery of Multiple Server-Side Computer Languages Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shouhong; Wang, Hai

    2011-01-01

    Given the emergence of service-oriented architecture, IS students need to be knowledgeable of multiple server-side computer programming languages to be able to meet the needs of the job market. This paper outlines the pedagogy of an innovative course of multiple server-side computer languages for the undergraduate IS majors. The paper discusses…

  10. Formative Questioning in Computer Learning Environments: A Course for Pre-Service Mathematics Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akkoç, Hatice

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on a specific aspect of formative assessment, namely questioning. Given that computers have gained widespread use in learning and teaching, specific attention should be made when organizing formative assessment in computer learning environments (CLEs). A course including various workshops was designed to develop knowledge and…

  11. Computer, Video, and Rapid-Cycling Plant Projects in an Undergraduate Plant Breeding Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaels, T. E.

    1993-01-01

    Studies the perceived effectiveness of four student projects involving videotape production, computer conferencing, microcomputer simulation, and rapid-cycling Brassica breeding for undergraduate plant breeding students in two course offerings in consecutive years. Linking of the computer conferencing and video projects improved the rating of the…

  12. Pedagogical Benefits of the Computer in the Foreign Language Business Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Howard

    1987-01-01

    It is beneficial to integrate the teaching of computer use into the foreign language business course through such activities as simulating business and commercial situations. Students will not only learn computer terminology in the foreign language but also expand their practical working vocabulary. (CB)

  13. Causal Attributions of Success and Failure Made by Undergraduate Students in an Introductory-Level Computer Programming Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawi, N.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify the causal attributions of business computing students in an introductory computer programming course, in the computer science department at Notre Dame University, Louaize. Forty-five male and female undergraduates who completed the computer programming course that extended for a 13-week semester…

  14. Computer Literacy Course for Teacher for the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatkovic, Nevenka; Ruzic, Maja

    2004-01-01

    The life and activities of every man in the transitional period from the second to the third millennium has been characterized by huge changes that resulted from scientific and technological revolution in which dominates a highly developed IT-Communicational Technology. This paper concludes that to attain IT-literacy and computer literacy would…

  15. Markov Algorithms for Computing the Reliability of Staged Networks.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    on an IBM Personal Computer AT, to calculated Pst for the dodecahedron network of Fig. 3 and the grid network of Fig. 4. The computation time was 41/2...network used in [1], which is in effect a dodecahedron reduced by 3 nodes and 5 arcs, Bailey and Kulkarni report timings of 54 minutes, 8 minutes and...staging reduced the computing time, from the 52 minutes quoted previously, to 1 minute 58 seconds. A similar use of overlapping stages for the dodecahedron

  16. LAN Configuration and Analysis: Projects for the Data Communications and Networking Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Fang; Brabston, Mary

    2011-01-01

    We implemented two local area network (LAN) projects in our introductory data communications and networking course. The first project required students to develop a LAN from scratch for a small imaginary organization. The second project required student groups to analyze a LAN for a real world small organization. By allowing students to apply what…

  17. High-performance neural networks. [Neural computers

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.

    1987-06-01

    The new Forth hardware architectures offer an intermediate solution to high-performance neural networks while the theory and programming details of neural networks for synthetic intelligence are developed. This approach has been used successfully to determine the parameters and run the resulting network for a synthetic insect consisting of a 200-node ''brain'' with 1760 interconnections. Both the insect's environment and its sensor input have thus far been simulated. However, the frequency-coded nature of the Browning network allows easy replacement of the simulated sensors by real-world counterparts.

  18. A programmable interface to neuromolecular computing networks.

    PubMed

    Akingbehin, K

    1995-01-01

    A programmable interface is provided to a simulated network of reaction-diffusion neurons. The interface allows special 'learn' and 'decide' syntactic constructs to be intermixed with conventional programming constructs. This hybrid combination allows the power of programmability to be combined with the power of adaptability to provide innovative solutions to complex problems. The network uses reaction-diffusion neurons instead of adaline neurons. A mesh topology is used instead of a feedforward topology. The performance of the mesh reaction-diffusion network compares favorably with that of conventional feedforward adaline networks. Enhancements to incorporate short- and long-term memory are described.

  19. Wireless Networks: New Meaning to Ubiquitous Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, Wilfred, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the use of wireless technology in academic libraries. Topics include wireless networks; standards (IEEE 802.11); wired versus wireless; why libraries implement wireless technology; wireless local area networks (WLANs); WLAN security; examples of wireless use at Indiana State University and Morrisville College (New York); and useful…

  20. CFD Optimization on Network-Based Parallel Computer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Samson H.; Holst, Terry L. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Combining multiple engineering workstations into a network-based heterogeneous parallel computer allows application of aerodynamic optimization with advance computational fluid dynamics codes, which is computationally expensive in mainframe supercomputer. This paper introduces a nonlinear quasi-Newton optimizer designed for this network-based heterogeneous parallel computer on a software called Parallel Virtual Machine. This paper will introduce the methodology behind coupling a Parabolized Navier-Stokes flow solver to the nonlinear optimizer. This parallel optimization package has been applied to reduce the wave drag of a body of revolution and a wing/body configuration with results of 5% to 6% drag reduction.

  1. Parallel CFD design on network-based computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Samson

    1995-01-01

    Combining multiple engineering workstations into a network-based heterogeneous parallel computer allows application of aerodynamic optimization with advanced computational fluid dynamics codes, which can be computationally expensive on mainframe supercomputers. This paper introduces a nonlinear quasi-Newton optimizer designed for this network-based heterogeneous parallel computing environment utilizing a software called Parallel Virtual Machine. This paper will introduce the methodology behind coupling a Parabolized Navier-Stokes flow solver to the nonlinear optimizer. This parallel optimization package is applied to reduce the wave drag of a body of revolution and a wing/body configuration with results of 5% to 6% drag reduction.

  2. Syntactic Computations in the Language Network: Characterizing Dynamic Network Properties Using Representational Similarity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Lorraine K.; Cheung, Teresa P. L.; Devereux, Barry J.; Clarke, Alex

    2013-01-01

    The core human capacity of syntactic analysis involves a left hemisphere network involving left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) and posterior middle temporal gyrus (LMTG) and the anatomical connections between them. Here we use magnetoencephalography (MEG) to determine the spatio-temporal properties of syntactic computations in this network. Listeners heard spoken sentences containing a local syntactic ambiguity (e.g., “… landing planes …”), at the offset of which they heard a disambiguating verb and decided whether it was an acceptable/unacceptable continuation of the sentence. We charted the time-course of processing and resolving syntactic ambiguity by measuring MEG responses from the onset of each word in the ambiguous phrase and the disambiguating word. We used representational similarity analysis (RSA) to characterize syntactic information represented in the LIFG and left posterior middle temporal gyrus (LpMTG) over time and to investigate their relationship to each other. Testing a variety of lexico-syntactic and ambiguity models against the MEG data, our results suggest early lexico-syntactic responses in the LpMTG and later effects of ambiguity in the LIFG, pointing to a clear differentiation in the functional roles of these two regions. Our results suggest the LpMTG represents and transmits lexical information to the LIFG, which responds to and resolves the ambiguity. PMID:23730293

  3. Spreadsheet Analysis Of Queuing In A Computer Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, David C.

    1992-01-01

    Method of analyzing responses of computer network based on simple queuing-theory mathmatical models via spreadsheet program. Effects of variations in traffic, capacities of channels, and message protocols assessed.

  4. Computers, Electronic Networking and Education: Some American Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, David

    1991-01-01

    Describes new developments in distributed educational computing at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, "Athena"), Carnegie Mellon University ("Andrew"), Brown University "Intermedia"), Electronic University Network (California), Western Behavioral Sciences Institute (California), and University of California,…

  5. Computing the Local Field Potential (LFP) from Integrate-and-Fire Network Models.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, Alberto; Lindén, Henrik; Cuntz, Hermann; Lansner, Anders; Panzeri, Stefano; Einevoll, Gaute T

    2015-12-01

    Leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) network models are commonly used to study how the spiking dynamics of neural networks changes with stimuli, tasks or dynamic network states. However, neurophysiological studies in vivo often rather measure the mass activity of neuronal microcircuits with the local field potential (LFP). Given that LFPs are generated by spatially separated currents across the neuronal membrane, they cannot be computed directly from quantities defined in models of point-like LIF neurons. Here, we explore the best approximation for predicting the LFP based on standard output from point-neuron LIF networks. To search for this best "LFP proxy", we compared LFP predictions from candidate proxies based on LIF network output (e.g, firing rates, membrane potentials, synaptic currents) with "ground-truth" LFP obtained when the LIF network synaptic input currents were injected into an analogous three-dimensional (3D) network model of multi-compartmental neurons with realistic morphology, spatial distributions of somata and synapses. We found that a specific fixed linear combination of the LIF synaptic currents provided an accurate LFP proxy, accounting for most of the variance of the LFP time course observed in the 3D network for all recording locations. This proxy performed well over a broad set of conditions, including substantial variations of the neuronal morphologies. Our results provide a simple formula for estimating the time course of the LFP from LIF network simulations in cases where a single pyramidal population dominates the LFP generation, and thereby facilitate quantitative comparison between computational models and experimental LFP recordings in vivo.

  6. Computing the Local Field Potential (LFP) from Integrate-and-Fire Network Models

    PubMed Central

    Cuntz, Hermann; Lansner, Anders; Panzeri, Stefano; Einevoll, Gaute T.

    2015-01-01

    Leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) network models are commonly used to study how the spiking dynamics of neural networks changes with stimuli, tasks or dynamic network states. However, neurophysiological studies in vivo often rather measure the mass activity of neuronal microcircuits with the local field potential (LFP). Given that LFPs are generated by spatially separated currents across the neuronal membrane, they cannot be computed directly from quantities defined in models of point-like LIF neurons. Here, we explore the best approximation for predicting the LFP based on standard output from point-neuron LIF networks. To search for this best “LFP proxy”, we compared LFP predictions from candidate proxies based on LIF network output (e.g, firing rates, membrane potentials, synaptic currents) with “ground-truth” LFP obtained when the LIF network synaptic input currents were injected into an analogous three-dimensional (3D) network model of multi-compartmental neurons with realistic morphology, spatial distributions of somata and synapses. We found that a specific fixed linear combination of the LIF synaptic currents provided an accurate LFP proxy, accounting for most of the variance of the LFP time course observed in the 3D network for all recording locations. This proxy performed well over a broad set of conditions, including substantial variations of the neuronal morphologies. Our results provide a simple formula for estimating the time course of the LFP from LIF network simulations in cases where a single pyramidal population dominates the LFP generation, and thereby facilitate quantitative comparison between computational models and experimental LFP recordings in vivo. PMID:26657024

  7. Dynamics of Bottlebrush Networks: A Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynin, Andrey; Cao, Zhen; Sheiko, Sergei

    We study dynamics of deformation of bottlebrush networks using molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical calculations. Analysis of our simulation results show that the dynamics of bottlebrush network deformation can be described by a Rouse model for polydisperse networks with effective Rouse time of the bottlebrush network strand, τR =τ0Ns2 (Nsc + 1) where, Ns is the number-average degree of polymerization of the bottlebrush backbone strands between crosslinks, Nsc is the degree of polymerization of the side chains and τ0is a characteristic monomeric relaxation time. At time scales t smaller than the Rouse time, t <τR , the time dependent network shear modulus decays with time as G (t) ~ ρkB T(τ0 / t) 1 / 2 , where ρis the monomer number density. However, at the time scale t larger than the Rouse time of the bottlebrush strands between crosslinks, the network response is pure elastic with shear modulus G (t) =G0 , where G0 is the equilibrium shear modulus at small deformation. The stress evolution in the bottlebrush networks can be described by a universal function of t /τR . NSF DMR-1409710.

  8. Phoebus: Network Middleware for Next-Generation Network Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Swany

    2012-06-16

    The Phoebus project investigated algorithms, protocols, and middleware infrastructure to improve end-to-end performance in high speed, dynamic networks. The Phoebus system essentially serves as an adaptation point for networks with disparate capabilities or provisioning. This adaptation can take a variety of forms including acting as a provisioning agent across multiple signaling domains, providing transport protocol adaptation points, and mapping between distributed resource reservation paradigms and the optical network control plane. We have successfully developed the system and demonstrated benefits. The Phoebus system was deployed in Internet2 and in ESnet, as well as in GEANT2, RNP in Brazil and over international links to Korea and Japan. Phoebus is a system that implements a new protocol and associated forwarding infrastructure for improving throughput in high-speed dynamic networks. It was developed to serve the needs of large DOE applications on high-performance networks. The idea underlying the Phoebus model is to embed Phoebus Gateways (PGs) in the network as on-ramps to dynamic circuit networks. The gateways act as protocol translators that allow legacy applications to use dedicated paths with high performance.

  9. Computationally Efficient Neural Network Intrusion Security Awareness

    SciTech Connect

    Todd Vollmer; Milos Manic

    2009-08-01

    An enhanced version of an algorithm to provide anomaly based intrusion detection alerts for cyber security state awareness is detailed. A unique aspect is the training of an error back-propagation neural network with intrusion detection rule features to provide a recognition basis. Network packet details are subsequently provided to the trained network to produce a classification. This leverages rule knowledge sets to produce classifications for anomaly based systems. Several test cases executed on ICMP protocol revealed a 60% identification rate of true positives. This rate matched the previous work, but 70% less memory was used and the run time was reduced to less than 1 second from 37 seconds.

  10. Bayesian Computational Sensor Networks for Aircraft Structural Health Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-02

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0094 Bayesian Computational Sensor Networks for Aircraft Structural Health Monitoring. Thomas Henderson UNIVERSITY OF UTAH SALT...The major goal of this work was to provide rigorous Bayesian Computational Sensor Networks to quantify uncertainty in (1) model-based state...estimates incorporating sensor data, (2) model parameters (e.g., diffusion coefficients), (3) sensor node model parameter values (e.g., location, bias

  11. Computer Network Security: Best Practices for Alberta School Jurisdictions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    This paper provides a snapshot of the computer network security industry and addresses specific issues related to network security in public education. The following topics are covered: (1) security policy, including reasons for establishing a policy, risk assessment, areas to consider, audit tools; (2) workstations, including physical security,…

  12. The Role of Computer Networks in Aerospace Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Ann Peterson

    1994-01-01

    Presents selected results from an empirical investigation into the use of computer networks in aerospace engineering based on data from a national mail survey. The need for user-based studies of electronic networking is discussed, and a copy of the questionnaire used in the survey is appended. (Contains 46 references.) (LRW)

  13. Optical processing for future computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Husain, A.; Haugen, P. R.; Hutcheson, L. D.; Warrior, J.; Murray, N.; Beatty, M.

    1986-01-01

    In the development of future data management systems, such as the NASA Space Station, a major problem represents the design and implementation of a high performance communication network which is self-correcting and repairing, flexible, and evolvable. To obtain the goal of designing such a network, it will be essential to incorporate distributed adaptive network control techniques. The present paper provides an outline of the functional and communication network requirements for the Space Station data management system. Attention is given to the mathematical representation of the operations being carried out to provide the required functionality at each layer of communication protocol on the model. The possible implementation of specific communication functions in optics is also considered.

  14. Electrooptical adaptive switching network for the hypercube computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, E.; Peterson, J.

    1988-01-01

    An all-optical network design for the hyperswitch network using regular free-space interconnects between electronic processor nodes is presented. The adaptive routing model used is described, and an adaptive routing control example is presented. The design demonstrates that existing electrooptical techniques are sufficient for implementing efficient parallel architectures without the need for more complex means of implementing arbitrary interconnection schemes. The electrooptical hyperswitch network significantly improves the communication performance of the hypercube computer.

  15. Scalable Quantum Networks for Distributed Computing and Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0007 Scalable Quantum Networks for Distributed Computing and Sensing Ian Walmsley THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD Final Report 04/01...MM-YYYY) 12/07/2015 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01-Sep-2012 to 31-Aug-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Scalable Quantum Networks...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We identified two barriers to the implementation of large-scale photonic quantum networks. First, as scalability requires

  16. Mobile game development: improving student engagement and motivation in introductory computing courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkovsky, Stan

    2013-06-01

    Computer games have been accepted as an engaging and motivating tool in the computer science (CS) curriculum. However, designing and implementing a playable game is challenging, and is best done in advanced courses. Games for mobile devices, on the other hand, offer the advantage of being simpler and, thus, easier to program for lower level students. Learning context of mobile game development can be used to reinforce many core programming topics, such as loops, classes, and arrays. Furthermore, it can also be used to expose students in introductory computing courses to a wide range of advanced topics in order to illustrate that CS can be much more than coding. This paper describes the author's experience with using mobile game development projects in CS I and II, how these projects were integrated into existing courses at several universities, and the lessons learned from this experience.

  17. Computational inference of gene regulatory networks: Approaches, limitations and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Banf, Michael; Rhee, Seung Y

    2017-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks lie at the core of cell function control. In E. coli and S. cerevisiae, the study of gene regulatory networks has led to the discovery of regulatory mechanisms responsible for the control of cell growth, differentiation and responses to environmental stimuli. In plants, computational rendering of gene regulatory networks is gaining momentum, thanks to the recent availability of high-quality genomes and transcriptomes and development of computational network inference approaches. Here, we review current techniques, challenges and trends in gene regulatory network inference and highlight challenges and opportunities for plant science. We provide plant-specific application examples to guide researchers in selecting methodologies that suit their particular research questions. Given the interdisciplinary nature of gene regulatory network inference, we tried to cater to both biologists and computer scientists to help them engage in a dialogue about concepts and caveats in network inference. Specifically, we discuss problems and opportunities in heterogeneous data integration for eukaryotic organisms and common caveats to be considered during network model evaluation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Gene Regulatory Mechanisms and Networks, edited by Dr. Erich Grotewold and Dr. Nathan Springer.

  18. Computers and Communication Networks in Educational Settings in the Twenty-First Century: Preparation for Educators' New Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kook, Joong-Kak

    1997-01-01

    Discussion of changes in classrooms as a result of communication networks focuses on teachers' roles in future educational settings. Topics include teachers as information consultants, as team collaborators, as facilitators, as course developers, and as academic advisors; and the computer and communication skills needed by teachers. (LRW)

  19. Challenges for high-performance networking for exascale computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, Brian W.; Hemmert, K. Scott; Underwood, Keith Douglas; Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2010-05-01

    Achieving the next three orders of magnitude performance increase to move from petascale to exascale computing will require a significant advancements in several fundamental areas. Recent studies have outlined many of the challenges in hardware and software that will be needed. In this paper, we examine these challenges with respect to high-performance networking. We describe the repercussions of anticipated changes to computing and networking hardware and discuss the impact that alternative parallel programming models will have on the network software stack. We also present some ideas on possible approaches that address some of these challenges.

  20. Network Analysis and Knowledge Discovery Through DNA Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    The application of computational mathematics and information science to biology has aided in the understanding of biological systems. Today biology can now aid information science . This research activity addresses this new and potentially symbiotic relationship between biology and information. In this report, a biocomputational analysis of a biologically represented network is demonstrated. A report on new DNA aqueous laboratory computing techniques is also given.

  1. An Experiment in Computer Conferencing Using a Local Area Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Patricia M.; Borer, Beatrice

    1987-01-01

    Describes various computer conferencing systems and discusses their effectiveness in terms of user acceptance and reactions to the technology. The methodology and findings of an experiment in which graduate students conducted a computer conference using a local area network and produced an electronic journal of the conference proceedings are…

  2. Topological properties of robust biological and computational networks.

    PubMed

    Navlakha, Saket; He, Xin; Faloutsos, Christos; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2014-07-06

    Network robustness is an important principle in biology and engineering. Previous studies of global networks have identified both redundancy and sparseness as topological properties used by robust networks. By focusing on molecular subnetworks, or modules, we show that module topology is tightly linked to the level of environmental variability (noise) the module expects to encounter. Modules internal to the cell that are less exposed to environmental noise are more connected and less robust than external modules. A similar design principle is used by several other biological networks. We propose a simple change to the evolutionary gene duplication model which gives rise to the rich range of module topologies observed within real networks. We apply these observations to evaluate and design communication networks that are specifically optimized for noisy or malicious environments. Combined, joint analysis of biological and computational networks leads to novel algorithms and insights benefiting both fields.

  3. Topological properties of robust biological and computational networks

    PubMed Central

    Navlakha, Saket; He, Xin; Faloutsos, Christos; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2014-01-01

    Network robustness is an important principle in biology and engineering. Previous studies of global networks have identified both redundancy and sparseness as topological properties used by robust networks. By focusing on molecular subnetworks, or modules, we show that module topology is tightly linked to the level of environmental variability (noise) the module expects to encounter. Modules internal to the cell that are less exposed to environmental noise are more connected and less robust than external modules. A similar design principle is used by several other biological networks. We propose a simple change to the evolutionary gene duplication model which gives rise to the rich range of module topologies observed within real networks. We apply these observations to evaluate and design communication networks that are specifically optimized for noisy or malicious environments. Combined, joint analysis of biological and computational networks leads to novel algorithms and insights benefiting both fields. PMID:24789562

  4. Normalizing Social Networking in a Beginners' Japanese Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morofushi, Mari; Pasfield-Neofitou, Sarah Ellen

    2014-01-01

    With the spread of the Internet, students now have greater opportunities to use Japanese outside of the classroom. For example, they can interact with other Japanese speakers through instant messaging or social networking, or utilize online dictionaries and translation tools to decipher websites in ways that would be impossible with traditional…

  5. Optical interconnection networks for high-performance computing systems.

    PubMed

    Biberman, Aleksandr; Bergman, Keren

    2012-04-01

    Enabled by silicon photonic technology, optical interconnection networks have the potential to be a key disruptive technology in computing and communication industries. The enduring pursuit of performance gains in computing, combined with stringent power constraints, has fostered the ever-growing computational parallelism associated with chip multiprocessors, memory systems, high-performance computing systems and data centers. Sustaining these parallelism growths introduces unique challenges for on- and off-chip communications, shifting the focus toward novel and fundamentally different communication approaches. Chip-scale photonic interconnection networks, enabled by high-performance silicon photonic devices, offer unprecedented bandwidth scalability with reduced power consumption. We demonstrate that the silicon photonic platforms have already produced all the high-performance photonic devices required to realize these types of networks. Through extensive empirical characterization in much of our work, we demonstrate such feasibility of waveguides, modulators, switches and photodetectors. We also demonstrate systems that simultaneously combine many functionalities to achieve more complex building blocks. We propose novel silicon photonic devices, subsystems, network topologies and architectures to enable unprecedented performance of these photonic interconnection networks. Furthermore, the advantages of photonic interconnection networks extend far beyond the chip, offering advanced communication environments for memory systems, high-performance computing systems, and data centers.

  6. Active system area networks for data intensive computations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-04-01

    The goal of the Active System Area Networks (ASAN) project is to develop hardware and software technologies for the implementation of active system area networks (ASANs). The use of the term ''active'' refers to the ability of the network interfaces to perform application-specific as well as system level computations in addition to their traditional role of data transfer. This project adopts the view that the network infrastructure should be an active computational entity capable of supporting certain classes of computations that would otherwise be performed on the host CPUs. The result is a unique network-wide programming model where computations are dynamically placed within the host CPUs or the NIs depending upon the quality of service demands and network/CPU resource availability. The projects seeks to demonstrate that such an approach is a better match for data intensive network-based applications and that the advent of low-cost powerful embedded processors and configurable hardware makes such an approach economically viable and desirable.

  7. Synchronizing computer clocks using a local area network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Judah

    1990-01-01

    Researchers completed the first tests of a method to synchronize the clocks of networked computers to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) time scale. The method uses a server computer to disseminate the time to other clients on the same local-area network. The server is synchronized to NIST using the ACTS protocol over a dial-up telephone line. The software in both the server and the parameters of this model are used to adjust the time of the local clock and the interval between calibration requests in a statistically optimum way. The algorithm maximizes the time between calibrations while at the same time keeping the time of the local clock correct within a specific tolerance. The method can be extended to synchronize computers linked over wide-area networks, and an experiment to test the performance of the algorithms over such networks is being planned.

  8. Home Care Nursing via Computer Networks: Justification and Design Specifications

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    1988-01-01

    High-tech home care includes the use of information technologies, such as computer networks, to provide direct care to patients in the home. This paper presents the justification and design of a project using a free, public access computer network to deliver home care nursing. The intervention attempts to reduce isolation and improve problem solving among home care patients and their informal caregivers. Three modules comprise the intervention: a decision module, a communications module, and an information data base. This paper describes the experimental evaluation of the project, and discusses issues in the delivery of nursing care via computers.

  9. Coherent Computing with Injection-Locked Laser Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, S.; Wen, K.; Takata, K.; Tamate, S.; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    Combinatorial optimization problems are ubiquitous in our modern life. The classic examples include the protein folding in biology and medicine, the frequency assignment in wireless communications, traffic control and routing in air and on surface, microprocessor circuit design, computer vision and graph cut in machine learning, and social network control. They often belong to NP, NP-complete and NP-hard classes, for which modern digital computers and future quantum computers cannot find solutions efficiently, i.e. in polynomial time [1].

  10. The Role of Networks in Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Geng; Devine, Mac

    The confluence of technology advancements and business developments in Broadband Internet, Web services, computing systems, and application software over the past decade has created a perfect storm for cloud computing. The "cloud model" of delivering and consuming IT functions as services is poised to fundamentally transform the IT industry and rebalance the inter-relationships among end users, enterprise IT, software companies, and the service providers in the IT ecosystem (Armbrust et al., 2009; Lin, Fu, Zhu, & Dasmalchi, 2009).

  11. [Research toward a heterogeneous networked computing cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Duke, D.W.; Green, T.P.

    1998-08-11

    Over the last year the Systems Development Group, SDG, has been involved in a number of projects. The primary projects include extending the UNIX version of DQS, a DCE version of DQS, a Java based queuing system, a Computer Aided Learning and Instruction model and working with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement in the formation of the Florida Computer Crime Center. Additionally SDG has assisted a number of state and local agencies. A synopsis of these projects is contained in this report.

  12. Research Activity in Computational Physics utilizing High Performance Computing: Co-authorship Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sul-Ah; Jung, Youngim

    2016-10-01

    The research activities of the computational physicists utilizing high performance computing are analyzed by bibliometirc approaches. This study aims at providing the computational physicists utilizing high-performance computing and policy planners with useful bibliometric results for an assessment of research activities. In order to achieve this purpose, we carried out a co-authorship network analysis of journal articles to assess the research activities of researchers for high-performance computational physics as a case study. For this study, we used journal articles of the Scopus database from Elsevier covering the time period of 2004-2013. We extracted the author rank in the physics field utilizing high-performance computing by the number of papers published during ten years from 2004. Finally, we drew the co-authorship network for 45 top-authors and their coauthors, and described some features of the co-authorship network in relation to the author rank. Suggestions for further studies are discussed.

  13. Predictive Control of Networked Multiagent Systems via Cloud Computing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Ping

    2017-01-18

    This paper studies the design and analysis of networked multiagent predictive control systems via cloud computing. A cloud predictive control scheme for networked multiagent systems (NMASs) is proposed to achieve consensus and stability simultaneously and to compensate for network delays actively. The design of the cloud predictive controller for NMASs is detailed. The analysis of the cloud predictive control scheme gives the necessary and sufficient conditions of stability and consensus of closed-loop networked multiagent control systems. The proposed scheme is verified to characterize the dynamical behavior and control performance of NMASs through simulations. The outcome provides a foundation for the development of cooperative and coordinative control of NMASs and its applications.

  14. Creation of a Course in Computer Methods and Modeling for Undergraduate Earth Science Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menking, K. M.; Dashnaw, J. M.

    2003-12-01

    In recent years computer modeling has gained importance in geological research as a means to generate and test hypotheses and to allow simulation of processes in places inaccessible to humans (e.g., outer core fluid dynamics), too slow to permit observation (e.g., erosionally-induced uplift of topography), or too large to facilitate construction of physical models (e.g., faulting on the San Andreas). Entire fields within the Earth sciences now exist in which computer modeling has become the core work of the discipline. Undergraduate geology/Earth science programs have been slow to adapt to this change, and computer science curricular offerings often do not meet geology students' needs. To address these problems, a course in Computer Methods and Modeling in the Earth Sciences is being developed at Vassar College. The course uses the STELLA iconographical box modeling software developed by High Performance Systems, Inc. to teach students the fundamentals of dynamical systems modeling and then builds on the knowledge students have constructed with STELLA to teach introductory computer programming in Fortran. Fully documented and debugged STELLA and Fortran models along with reading lists, answer keys, and course notes are being developed for distribution to anyone interested in teaching a course such as this. Modeling topics include U-Pb concordia/discordia dating techniques, the global phosphorus cycle, Earth's energy balance and temperature, the impact of climate change on a chain of lakes in eastern California, heat flow in permafrost, and flow of ice in glaciers by plastic deformation. The course has been taught twice at Vassar and has been enthusiastically received by students who reported not only that they enjoyed learning the process of modeling, but also that they had a newfound appreciation for the role of mathematics in geology and intended to enroll in more math courses in the future.

  15. Computer program for compressible flow network analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilton, M. E.; Murtaugh, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Program solves problem of an arbitrarily connected one dimensional compressible flow network with pumping in the channels and momentum balancing at flow junctions. Program includes pressure drop calculations for impingement flow and flow through pin fin arrangements, as currently found in many air cooled turbine bucket and vane cooling configurations.

  16. Network Computing for Distributed Underwater Acoustic Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-31

    a model for the OPNET environment by Llor et al. [17, 18]. 2.2 Main results We have developed a solution leveraging the simulation work of Borowski...networks with OPNET , In Proceedings of the 4th International ICST Conference on Simulation Tools and Techniques, SIMUTools ’11, pp. 19–26, ICST, Brussels

  17. Realistic computer network simulation for network intrusion detection dataset generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payer, Garrett

    2015-05-01

    The KDD-99 Cup dataset is dead. While it can continue to be used as a toy example, the age of this dataset makes it all but useless for intrusion detection research and data mining. Many of the attacks used within the dataset are obsolete and do not reflect the features important for intrusion detection in today's networks. Creating a new dataset encompassing a large cross section of the attacks found on the Internet today could be useful, but would eventually fall to the same problem as the KDD-99 Cup; its usefulness would diminish after a period of time. To continue research into intrusion detection, the generation of new datasets needs to be as dynamic and as quick as the attacker. Simply examining existing network traffic and using domain experts such as intrusion analysts to label traffic is inefficient, expensive, and not scalable. The only viable methodology is simulation using technologies including virtualization, attack-toolsets such as Metasploit and Armitage, and sophisticated emulation of threat and user behavior. Simulating actual user behavior and network intrusion events dynamically not only allows researchers to vary scenarios quickly, but enables online testing of intrusion detection mechanisms by interacting with data as it is generated. As new threat behaviors are identified, they can be added to the simulation to make quicker determinations as to the effectiveness of existing and ongoing network intrusion technology, methodology and models.

  18. Students' network integration vs. persistence in introductory physics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolak, Justyna; Brewe, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Society is constantly in flux, which demands the continuous development of our educational system to meet new challenges and impart the appropriate knowledge/skills to students. In order to improve student learning, among other things, the way we are teaching has significantly changed over the past few decades. We are moving away from traditional, lecture-based teaching towards more interactive, engagement-based strategies. A current, major challenge for universities is to increase student retention. While students' academic and social integration into an institution seems to be vital for student retention, research on the effect of interpersonal interactions is rare. I use of network analysis to investigate academic and social experiences of students in and beyond the classroom. In particular, there is a compelling case that transformed physics classes, such as Modeling Instruction (MI), promote persistence by the creation of learning communities that support the integration of students into the university. I will discuss recent results on pattern development in networks of MI students' interactions throughout the semester, as well as the effect of students' position within the network on their persistence in physics.

  19. Factors Affecting Preservice Teachers' Computer Use for General Purposes: Implications for Computer Training Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zogheib, Salah

    2014-01-01

    As the majority of educational research has focused on preservice teachers' computer use for "educational purposes," the question remains: Do preservice teachers use computer technology for daily life activities and encounters? And do preservice teachers' personality traits and motivational beliefs related to computer training provided…

  20. Methodical Approaches to Teaching of Computer Modeling in Computer Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakhimzhanova, B. Lyazzat; Issabayeva, N. Darazha; Khakimova, Tiyshtik; Bolyskhanova, J. Madina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to justify of the formation technique of representation of modeling methodology at computer science lessons. The necessity of studying computer modeling is that the current trends of strengthening of general education and worldview functions of computer science define the necessity of additional research of the…

  1. Future Operating Concept - Joint Computer Network Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-17

    of explosive vests in a central market, a beheading captured in streaming video, precise cyber/space/ missile strikes, or Know the enemy and know...cross-theater campaigns. 18 USSTRATCOM integrates space, global strike, ISR, network warfare, and missile defense into functional commands 63...These operations are ―highly dynamic and maneuverable with transitions between F2T2EA phases nearly instantaneously.‖ Integrating effects based

  2. Virtual Network Computing Testbed for Cybersecurity Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-17

    traffic on the network, either by using mathematical formulas or by replaying packet streams. As a result, simulators depend deeply on the assumptions...Summary of the most important results We obtained a powerful machine, which has 768 cores and 1.25 TB memory . RBG has been implemented on the machine...is configured with 1GB memory , 10 GB disk space, and one 100M Ethernet interface. The server nodes include web servers, database servers, email

  3. Computer Simulation of Metallo-Supramolecular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shihu; Chen, Chun-Chung; Dormidontova, Elena

    2009-03-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulation we studied formation of reversible metallo-supramolecular networks based on 3:1 ligand-metal complexes between end-functionalized oligomers and metal ions. The fraction of 1:1, 2:1 and 3:1 ligand-metal complexes was obtained and analyzed using an analytical approach as a function of oligomer concentration, c and metal-to-oligomer ratio. We found that at low concentration the maximum in the number-average molecular weight is achieved near the stoichiometric composition and it shifts to higher metal-to- oligomer ratios at larger concentrations. Predictions are made regarding the onset of network formation, which occurs in a limited range of metal-to-oligomer ratios at sufficiently large oligomer concentrations. The average molecular weight between effective crosslinks decreases with oligomer concentration and reaches its minimum at the stoichiometric composition, where the high-frequency elastic plateau modulus approaches its maximal value. At high oligomer concentrations the plateau modulus follows a c^1.8 concentration dependence, similar to recent experimental results for metallo-supramolecular networks.

  4. Cognitive Learning Styles and Academic Performance in Two Postsecondary Computer Application Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Jonathan L.; Drysdale, Maureen T. B.; Schultz, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated effects of cognitive learning style on academic performance in two university computer applications courses. Discusses use of the Gregorc Style Delineator to collect learning style information over a four-year period. Results indicated a significant effect of learning style on academic performance, and that sequential learners…

  5. A Study on the Methods of Assessment and Strategy of Knowledge Sharing in Computer Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Pat P. W.

    2014-01-01

    With the advancement of information and communication technology, collaboration and knowledge sharing through technology is facilitated which enhances the learning process and improves the learning efficiency. The purpose of this paper is to review the methods of assessment and strategy of collaboration and knowledge sharing in a computer course,…

  6. Integration of Major Computer Program Packages into Experimental Courses: A Freshman Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipschitz, Irving

    1981-01-01

    Describes the use of the Gaussian 70 computer programs to carry out quantum chemical calculations, including single calculations, geometry, optimization, and potential surface scans. Includes a summary of student activities and benefits for students in an honors freshman chemistry course. (SK)

  7. Introducing Creativity in a Design Laboratory for a Freshman Level Electrical and Computer Engineering Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkett, Susan L.; Kotru, Sushma; Lusth, John C.; McCallum, Debra; Dunlap, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Dunlap, The University of Alabama, USA ABSTRACT In the electrical and computer engineering (ECE) curriculum at The University of Alabama, freshmen are introduced to fundamental electrical concepts and units, DC circuit analysis techniques, operational amplifiers, circuit simulation, design, and professional ethics. The two credit course has both…

  8. Computer Aided Instruction for a Course in Boolean Algebra and Logic Design. Final Report (Revised).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Rob

    The use of computers to prepare deficient college and graduate students for courses that build upon previously acquired information would solve the growing problem of professors who must spend up to one third of their class time in review of material. But examination of students who were taught Boolean Algebra and Logic Design by means of Computer…

  9. WebStars: Holistic, Arts-Based College Curriculum in a Computer Applications Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karsten, Selia

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of my qualitative, action study was to gain a better understanding of the effects of an experimental college course in computer applications. This inquiry was made concerning both the teacher's and learners' points of view. A holistic, arts-based approach was used by the researcher/teacher in order to design, develop and facilitate a…

  10. A Comparison of the Educational Effectiveness of Online versus In-Class Computer Literacy Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heithecker, Julia Ann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to compare the educational effectiveness of online versus in-class computer literacy courses, and examine the impact, if any, of student demographics (delimited to gender, age, work status, father and mother education, and enrollment status). Institutions are seeking ways to produce technologically…

  11. Spiral and Project-Based Learning with Peer Assessment in a Computer Science Project Management Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaime, Arturo; Blanco, José Miguel; Domínguez, César; Sánchez, Ana; Heras, Jónathan; Usandizaga, Imanol

    2016-01-01

    Different learning methods such as project-based learning, spiral learning and peer assessment have been implemented in science disciplines with different outcomes. This paper presents a proposal for a project management course in the context of a computer science degree. Our proposal combines three well-known methods: project-based learning,…

  12. The MORPG-Based Learning System for Multiple Courses: A Case Study on Computer Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Kuo-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at developing a Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game-based (MORPG) Learning system which enabled instructors to construct a game scenario and manage sharable and reusable learning content for multiple courses. It used the curriculum of "Introduction to Computer Science" as a study case to assess students' learning…

  13. Computer-Assisted Reading and Discovery for Student-Generated Text in Massive Open Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Justin; Tingley, Dustin; Leder-Luis, Jetson; Roberts, Margaret E.; Stewart, Brandon M.

    2015-01-01

    Dealing with the vast quantities of text that students generate in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and other large-scale online learning environments is a daunting challenge. Computational tools are needed to help instructional teams uncover themes and patterns as students write in forums, assignments, and surveys. This paper introduces to the…

  14. Multimedia Instructional Tools' Impact on Student Motivation and Learning Strategies in Computer Applications Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Debra; Wang, Shuyan

    2015-01-01

    Multimedia instructional tools (MMIT) have been identified as a way effectively and economically present instructional material. MMITs are commonly used in introductory computer applications courses as MMITs should be effective in increasing student knowledge and positively impact motivation and learning strategies, without increasing costs. This…

  15. Community College Uses a Video-Game Lab to Lure Students to Computer Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    A computer lab has become one of the most popular hangouts at Northern Virginia Community College after officials decided to load its PCs with popular video games, install a PlayStation and an Xbox, and declare it "for gamers only." The goal of this lab is to entice students to take game-design and other IT courses. John Min, dean of…

  16. Development of Online Cognitive and Algorithm Tests as Assessment Tools in Introductory Computer Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avancena, Aimee Theresa; Nishihara, Akinori; Vergara, John Paul

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the online cognitive and algorithm tests, which were developed in order to determine if certain cognitive factors and fundamental algorithms correlate with the performance of students in their introductory computer science course. The tests were implemented among Management Information Systems majors from the Philippines and…

  17. Effects of Multidimensional Concept Maps on Fourth Graders' Learning in Web-Based Computer Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Hwa-Shan; Chiou, Chei-Chang; Chiang, Heien-Kun; Lai, Sung-Hsi; Huang, Chiun-Yen; Chou, Yin-Yu

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the effect of multidimensional concept mapping instruction on students' learning performance in a web-based computer course. The subjects consisted of 103 fourth graders from an elementary school in central Taiwan. They were divided into three groups: multidimensional concept map (MCM) instruction group, Novak concept map (NCM)…

  18. An Assessment of the "Diploma in Computer Engineering" Course in the Technical Education System in Nepal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basnet, Kul Bahadur; Kim, Jinsoo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the Diploma in Computer Engineering (DCE) courses offered at affiliated schools of the Council for Technical Education and Vocational Training (CTEVT) with a focus on the goals of the curriculum and employment opportunities. Document analysis, questionnaires, focus group discussions and semi-structured…

  19. Exploring Interactive and Dynamic Simulations Using a Computer Algebra System in an Advanced Placement Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    The article describes the use of Mathematica, a computer algebra system (CAS), in a high school chemistry course. Mathematica was used to generate a graph, where a slider controls the value of parameter(s) in the equation; thus, students can visualize the effect of the parameter(s) on the behavior of the system. Also, Mathematica can show the…

  20. Developing and Validating Test Items for First-Year Computer Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vahrenhold, Jan; Paul, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    We report on the development, validation, and implementation of a collection of test items designed to detect misconceptions related to first-year computer science courses. To this end, we reworked the development scheme proposed by Almstrum et al. ("SIGCSE Bulletin" 38(4):132-145, 2006) to include students' artifacts and to…

  1. An Integrated, Cooperative Learning Oriented Freshman Civil Engineering Course: Computer Analysis in Civil Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Frederick L.; Groccia, James E.

    Worcester Polytechnic Institute (Massachusetts) has developed a new freshman course titled "Computer Analysis in Civil Engineering" as part of a curriculum revision project which emphasizes critical thinking, cooperative group learning and problem solving, the integration of knowledge through projects, and student responsibility for…

  2. Distributed Training for the Reserve Component: Course Conversion and Implementation Guidelines for Computer Conferencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, H. A.; And Others

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide background and guidelines for course designers and instructional developers who will be developing Reserve Component training for the United States military using asynchronous computer conferencing techniques. The recommendations in this report are based on an international review of the literature in…

  3. The Use of Engineering Design Concept for Computer Programming Course: A Model of Blended Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tritrakan, Kasame; Kidrakarn, Pachoen; Asanok, Manit

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to develop a learning model which blends factors from learning environment and engineering design concept for learning in computer programming course. The usage of the model was also analyzed. This study presents the design, implementation, and evaluation of the model. The research methodology is divided into three…

  4. A Treatment of Computational Precision, Number Representation, and Large Integers in an Introductory Fortran Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, William H., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Computational precision is sometimes given short shrift in a first programming course. Treating this topic requires discussing integer and floating-point number representations and inaccuracies that may result from their use. An example of a moderately simple programming problem from elementary statistics was examined. It forced students to…

  5. Active and Collaborative Learning in an Introductory Electrical and Computer Engineering Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotru, Sushma; Burkett, Susan L.; Jackson, David Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Active and collaborative learning instruments were introduced into an introductory electrical and computer engineering course. These instruments were designed to assess specific learning objectives and program outcomes. Results show that students developed an understanding comparable to that of more advanced students assessed later in the…

  6. Undergraduate Taiwanese Students' Perceptions of Using Computer-Mediated Communication in a TOEIC Preparation Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tai, Shu-hui April

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate Taiwanese undergraduate students' perception of using computer-mediated communication (CMC) in a TOEIC preparation course and determine if using an online format motivates them to succeed. As a result, five factors are addressed in the study, namely, attitude, motivation, study habit, feedback, and…

  7. Teaching Web Application Development: A Case Study in a Computer Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Fabro, Marcos Didonet; de Alimeda, Eduardo Cunha; Sluzarski, Fabiano

    2012-01-01

    Teaching web development in Computer Science undergraduate courses is a difficult task. Often, there is a gap between the students' experiences and the reality in the industry. As a consequence, the students are not always well-prepared once they get the degree. This gap is due to several reasons, such as the complexity of the assignments, the…

  8. Assessing the Impact of a Computer-Based College Algebra Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ye, Ningjun

    2010-01-01

    USM piloted the Math Zone in Spring 2007, a computer-based program in teaching MAT 101 and MAT 099 in order to improve student performance. This research determined the effect of the re-design of MAT 101 on student achievements in comparison to a traditional approach to the same course. Meanwhile, the study investigated possible effects of the…

  9. Maintaining Pedagogical Integrity of a Computer Mediated Course Delivery in Social Foundations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Shelley; Cobb-Roberts, Deirdre; Shircliffe, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Transforming a face to face course to a computer mediated format in social foundations (interdisciplinary field in education), while maintaining pedagogical integrity, involves strategic collaboration between instructional technologists and content area experts. This type of planned partnership requires open dialogue and a mutual respect for prior…

  10. Computer Assisted Instruction Remediation Program for Credit Course in Bibliographic Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugranes, Maria R.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes and evaluates computer assisted instruction (CAI) remedial program used for credit course in bibliographic instruction, noting need, requirements, development, planning, and implementation. Statistics are presented to support principle that CAI can be valuable instructional methodology for bibliographic instruction programs. Test-retake…

  11. A Computer-Assisted Instruction Course in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Respiratory Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crocco, John A.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    A computer-assisted simulation of the "chart method" of teaching has been developed and was used to provide instruction in clinical decision-making in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary diseases. The course requires a student to reach and defend a diagnosis and to provide appropriate treatment for each of 10 simulated cases.…

  12. A Survey of Knowledge Management Skills Acquisition in an Online Team-Based Distributed Computing Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jennifer D. E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates students' perceptions of their acquisition of knowledge management skills, namely thinking and team-building skills, resulting from the integration of various resources and technologies into an entirely team-based, online upper level distributed computing (DC) information systems (IS) course. Results seem to indicate that…

  13. Formal Operations and Learning Style Predict Success in Statistics and Computer Science Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudak, Mary A.; Anderson, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Studies 94 undergraduate students in introductory statistics and computer science courses. Applies Formal Operations Reasoning Test (FORT) and Kolb's Learning Style Inventory (LSI). Finds that substantial numbers of students have not achieved the formal operation level of cognitive maturity. Emphasizes need to examine students learning style and…

  14. Use of Standardized Test Scores to Predict Success in a Computer Applications Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Robert V.; King, Stephanie B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to see if a relationship existed between American College Testing (ACT) scores (i.e., English, reading, mathematics, science reasoning, and composite) and student success in a computer applications course at a Mississippi community college. The study showed that while the ACT scores were excellent predictors of…

  15. An evaluation of a required computer-applications course for psychology majors.

    PubMed

    Perkins, David; Cozby, P Chris; Cassens, Michael R; Eddy, Rebecca M

    2002-04-01

    This study describes and evaluates a psychology course specifically focused on computer skills for undergraduate psychology majors. Learning by 136 undergraduates was evaluated on a 57-item objective test. Mean posttest scores were significantly higher than the mean pretest scores in all classes across all topic areas.

  16. Performance Measures in Courses Using Computer-Aided Personalized System of Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, C. R.; Pear, J. J.

    2008-01-01

    Archived data from four courses taught with computer-aided personalized system of instruction (CAPSI)--an online, self-paced, instructional program--were used to explore the relationship between objectively rescored final exam grades, peer reviewing, and progress rate--i.e., the rate at which students completed unit tests. There was a strong…

  17. A Computer-Assisted-Instruction Course in Vocabulary Building through Latin and Greek Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlan, Richard T.

    1976-01-01

    A course in the enlargement of students' English vocabulary through the study of Latin and Greek roots and their derivatives was developed by the Department of Classics at the University of Illinois. The class makes use of computer assisted instruction on the PLATO IV system. (Author/RM)

  18. Applying Computer-Assisted Musical Instruction to Music Appreciation Course: An Example with Chinese Musical Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lou, Shi-Jer; Guo, Yuan-Chang; Zhu, Yi-Zhen; Shih, Ru-Chu; Dzan, Wei-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effectiveness of computer-assisted musical instruction (CAMI) in the Learning Chinese Musical Instruments (LCMI) course. The CAMI software for Chinese musical instruments was developed and administered to 228 students in a vocational high school. A pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group design with three…

  19. Programming Languages or Generic Software Tools, for Beginners' Courses in Computer Literacy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuwirth, Erich

    1987-01-01

    Discussion of methods that can be used to teach beginner courses in computer literacy focuses on students aged 10-12. The value of using a programing language versus using a generic software package is highlighted; Logo and Prolog are reviewed; and the use of databases is discussed. (LRW)

  20. Enhancing Learning in Introductory Computer Science Courses through SCALE: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verginis, I.; Gogoulou, A.; Gouli, E.; Boubouka, M.; Grigoriadou, M.

    2011-01-01

    The work presented in this paper aims to support and promote the learning process in introductory computer science courses through the Web-based, adaptive, activity-oriented learning environment known as Supporting Collaboration and Adaptation in a Learning Environment (SCALE). The environment engages students actively in the learning process and…

  1. A computational model for cancer growth by using complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvão, Viviane; Miranda, José G. V.

    2008-09-01

    In this work we propose a computational model to investigate the proliferation of cancerous cell by using complex networks. In our model the network represents the structure of available space in the cancer propagation. The computational scheme considers a cancerous cell randomly included in the complex network. When the system evolves the cells can assume three states: proliferative, non-proliferative, and necrotic. Our results were compared with experimental data obtained from three human lung carcinoma cell lines. The computational simulations show that the cancerous cells have a Gompertzian growth. Also, our model simulates the formation of necrosis, increase of density, and resources diffusion to regions of lower nutrient concentration. We obtain that the cancer growth is very similar in random and small-world networks. On the other hand, the topological structure of the small-world network is more affected. The scale-free network has the largest rates of cancer growth due to hub formation. Finally, our results indicate that for different average degrees the rate of cancer growth is related to the available space in the network.

  2. Information Warfare: Issues Associated with the Defense of DOD Computers and Computer Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    DOD for computer network defense and computer network attack. As such, it is the trigger-puller for this new branch of warfare. It is the pathfinder ...Forces CNA Capabilit ies CINC & Unif ied Command Support JTF-CNO is the pathfinder organization for new warfare area Tailored CINC Support Teams... Lisa Hoffman, “A Surprise: Fewer Cyber-Attacks after 9-11,” Scripps Howard News Service available at URL: <www.knowstudio.com/shns/story.cfm?pk

  3. Measuring Computer Science Knowledge Level of Hungarian Students Specialized in Informatics with Romanian Students Attending a Science Course or a Mathematics-Informatics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiss, Gabor

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of Information Technology knowledge of Hungarian and Romanian students was made with the help of a self developed web based Informatics Test. The goal of this research is an analysis of the Computer Science knowledge level of Hungarian and Romanian students attending a Science course or a Mathematics-Informatics course. Analysed was…

  4. Index : A Rule Based Expert System For Computer Network Maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaganty, Srinivas; Pitchai, Anandhi; Morgan, Thomas W.

    1988-03-01

    Communications is an expert intensive discipline. The application of expert systems for maintenance of large and complex networks, mainly as an aid in trouble shooting, can simplify the task of network management. The important steps involved in troubleshooting are fault detection, fault reporting, fault interpretation and fault isolation. At present, Network Maintenance Facilities are capable of detecting and reporting the faults to network personnel. Fault interpretation refers to the next step in the process, which involves coming up with reasons for the failure. Fault interpretation can be characterized in two ways. First, it involves such a diversity of facts that it is difficult to predict. Secondly, it embodies a wealth of knowledge in the form of network management personnel. The application of expert systems in these interpretive tasks is an important step towards automation of network maintenance. In this paper, INDEX (Intelligent Network Diagnosis Expediter), a rule based production system for computer network alarm interpretation is described. It acts as an intelligent filter for people analyzing network alarms. INDEX analyzes the alarms in the network and identifies proper maintenance action to be taken.The important feature of this production system is that it is data driven. Working memory is the principal data repository of production systems and its contents represent the current state of the problem. Control is based upon which productions match the constantly changing working memory elements. Implementation of the prototype is in OPS83. Major issues in rule based system development such as rule base organization, implementation and efficiency are discussed.

  5. Computing Path Tables for Quickest Multipaths In Computer Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Grimmell, W.C.

    2004-12-21

    We consider the transmission of a message from a source node to a terminal node in a network with n nodes and m links where the message is divided into parts and each part is transmitted over a different path in a set of paths from the source node to the terminal node. Here each link is characterized by a bandwidth and delay. The set of paths together with their transmission rates used for the message is referred to as a multipath. We present two algorithms that produce a minimum-end-to-end message delay multipath path table that, for every message length, specifies a multipath that will achieve the minimum end-to-end delay. The algorithms also generate a function that maps the minimum end-to-end message delay to the message length. The time complexities of the algorithms are O(n{sup 2}((n{sup 2}/logn) + m)min(D{sub max}, C{sub max})) and O(nm(C{sub max} + nmin(D{sub max}, C{sub max}))) when the link delays and bandwidths are non-negative integers. Here D{sub max} and C{sub max} are respectively the maximum link delay and maximum link bandwidth and C{sub max} and D{sub max} are greater than zero.

  6. Six Networks on a Universal Neuromorphic Computing Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Pfeil, Thomas; Grübl, Andreas; Jeltsch, Sebastian; Müller, Eric; Müller, Paul; Petrovici, Mihai A.; Schmuker, Michael; Brüderle, Daniel; Schemmel, Johannes; Meier, Karlheinz

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we present a highly configurable neuromorphic computing substrate and use it for emulating several types of neural networks. At the heart of this system lies a mixed-signal chip, with analog implementations of neurons and synapses and digital transmission of action potentials. Major advantages of this emulation device, which has been explicitly designed as a universal neural network emulator, are its inherent parallelism and high acceleration factor compared to conventional computers. Its configurability allows the realization of almost arbitrary network topologies and the use of widely varied neuronal and synaptic parameters. Fixed-pattern noise inherent to analog circuitry is reduced by calibration routines. An integrated development environment allows neuroscientists to operate the device without any prior knowledge of neuromorphic circuit design. As a showcase for the capabilities of the system, we describe the successful emulation of six different neural networks which cover a broad spectrum of both structure and functionality. PMID:23423583

  7. Self-organized criticality in a computer network model

    PubMed

    Yuan; Ren; Shan

    2000-02-01

    We study the collective behavior of computer network nodes by using a cellular automaton model. The results show that when the load of network is constant, the throughputs and buffer contents of nodes are power-law distributed in both space and time. Also the feature of 1/f noise appears in the power spectrum of the change of the number of nodes that bear a fixed part of the system load. It can be seen as yet another example of self-organized criticality. Power-law decay in the distribution of buffer contents implies that heavy network congestion occurs with small probability. The temporal power-law distribution for throughput might be a reasonable explanation for the observed self-similarity in computer network traffic.

  8. Tactical Airborne Distributed Computing and Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    material supplied by AGARD or the authors. Published October 1981 Copyright Q AGARD 1981 All Rights Reserved ISBN 92-835-0302-3 Printed by Technical...identifiable, common goal. That goal may be the supplying of general-purpose computing support, a collection of integrated applications such as corporate...uptd in the air to air weapon system. Range of target was still being entered i.ito the system from a subjective appreciation supplied by thi pilot

  9. Computer aided nonlinear electrical networks analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slapnicar, P.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques used in simulating an electrical circuit with nonlinear elements for use in computer-aided circuit analysis programs are described. Elements of the circuit include capacitors, resistors, inductors, transistors, diodes, and voltage and current sources (constant or time varying). Simulation features are discussed for dc, ac, and/or transient circuit analysis. Calculations are based on the model approach of formulating the circuit equations. A particular solution of transient analysis for nonlinear storage elements is described.

  10. A Dynamic Network Approach to the Assessment of Terrorist Groups and the Impact of Alternative Courses of Action

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    courses of action ORA Statistical analysis of dynamic networks AutoMap Automated extraction of network from texts DyNet Simulation of dynamic...networks from texts, ORA for analyzing the extracted networks, and DyNet for what-if reasoning about the networks (see figure 1). Each of these...actors, groups, knowledge, resources, etc. that influence and are influenced by that node. DyNet is a multi-agent network simulation package for

  11. Culture, Role and Group Work: A Social Network Analysis Perspective on an Online Collaborative Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepanyan, Karen; Mather, Richard; Dalrymple, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the patterns of network dynamics within a multicultural online collaborative learning environment. It analyses the interaction of participants (both students and facilitators) within a discussion board that was established as part of a 3-month online collaborative course. The study employs longitudinal probabilistic social…

  12. Design of a Competitive and Collaborative Learning Strategy in a Communication Networks Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regueras, L. M.; Verdu, E.; Verdu, M. J.; de Castro, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, an educational methodology based on collaborative and competitive learning is proposed. The suggested approach has been successfully applied to an undergraduate communication networks course, which is part of the core curriculum of the three-year degree in telecommunications engineering at the University of Valladolid in Spain. This…

  13. Life-Course Events, Social Networks, and the Emergence of Violence among Female Gang Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleisher, Mark S.; Krienert, Jessie L.

    2004-01-01

    Using data gathered from a multi-year field study, this article identifies specific life-course events shared by gang-affiliated women. Gangs emerge as a cultural adaptation or pro-social community response to poverty and racial isolation. Through the use of a social-network approach, data show that violence dramatically increases in the period…

  14. Examining the Impact of Teacher-Generated Feedback in Online Math Courses Where Computer-Assisted Instruction Is Embedded

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoey, Rebecca Simon

    2012-01-01

    Teacher feedback and interaction are factors of success and satisfaction in online courses, but courses designed for computer-assisted instruction (CAI) require less communication between a teacher and student. The goal of this research was to examine the impact of teachers' feedback in online self-paced secondary math courses where CAI was…

  15. Designing for deeper learning in a blended computer science course for middle school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, Shuchi; Pea, Roy; Cooper, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The focus of this research was to create and test an introductory computer science course for middle school. Titled "Foundations for Advancing Computational Thinking" (FACT), the course aims to prepare and motivate middle school learners for future engagement with algorithmic problem solving. FACT was also piloted as a seven-week course on Stanford's OpenEdX MOOC platform for blended in-class learning. Unique aspects of FACT include balanced pedagogical designs that address the cognitive, interpersonal, and intrapersonal aspects of "deeper learning"; a focus on pedagogical strategies for mediating and assessing for transfer from block-based to text-based programming; curricular materials for remedying misperceptions of computing; and "systems of assessments" (including formative and summative quizzes and tests, directed as well as open-ended programming assignments, and a transfer test) to get a comprehensive picture of students' deeper computational learning. Empirical investigations, accomplished over two iterations of a design-based research effort with students (aged 11-14 years) in a public school, sought to examine student understanding of algorithmic constructs, and how well students transferred this learning from Scratch to text-based languages. Changes in student perceptions of computing as a discipline were measured. Results and mixed-method analyses revealed that students in both studies (1) achieved substantial learning gains in algorithmic thinking skills, (2) were able to transfer their learning from Scratch to a text-based programming context, and (3) achieved significant growth toward a more mature understanding of computing as a discipline. Factor analyses of prior computing experience, multivariate regression analyses, and qualitative analyses of student projects and artifact-based interviews were conducted to better understand the factors affecting learning outcomes. Prior computing experiences (as measured by a pretest) and math ability were

  16. Interactive knowledge networks for interdisciplinary course navigation within Moodle.

    PubMed

    Scherl, Andre; Dethleffsen, Kathrin; Meyer, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Web-based hypermedia learning environments are widely used in modern education and seem particularly well suited for interdisciplinary learning. Previous work has identified guidance through these complex environments as a crucial problem of their acceptance and efficiency. We reasoned that map-based navigation might provide straightforward and effortless orientation. To achieve this, we developed a clickable and user-oriented concept map-based navigation plugin. This tool is implemented as an extension of Moodle, a widely used learning management system. It visualizes inner and interdisciplinary relations between learning objects and is generated dynamically depending on user set parameters and interactions. This plugin leaves the choice of navigation type to the user and supports direct guidance. Previously developed and evaluated face-to-face interdisciplinary learning materials bridging physiology and physics courses of a medical curriculum were integrated as learning objects, the relations of which were defined by metadata. Learning objects included text pages, self-assessments, videos, animations, and simulations. In a field study, we analyzed the effects of this learning environment on physiology and physics knowledge as well as the transfer ability of third-term medical students. Data were generated from pre- and posttest questionnaires and from tracking student navigation. Use of the hypermedia environment resulted in a significant increase of knowledge and transfer capability. Furthermore, the efficiency of learning was enhanced. We conclude that hypermedia environments based on Moodle and enriched by concept map-based navigation tools can significantly support interdisciplinary learning. Implementation of adaptivity may further strengthen this approach.

  17. Computing with Competition in Biochemical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genot, Anthony J.; Fujii, Teruo; Rondelez, Yannick

    2012-11-01

    Cells rely on limited resources such as enzymes or transcription factors to process signals and make decisions. However, independent cellular pathways often compete for a common molecular resource. Competition is difficult to analyze because of its nonlinear global nature, and its role remains unclear. Here we show how decision pathways such as transcription networks may exploit competition to process information. Competition for one resource leads to the recognition of convex sets of patterns, whereas competition for several resources (overlapping or cascaded regulons) allows even more general pattern recognition. Competition also generates surprising couplings, such as correlating species that share no resource but a common competitor. The mechanism we propose relies on three primitives that are ubiquitous in cells: multiinput motifs, competition for a resource, and positive feedback loops.

  18. The hospital-physician computer communications network: an alternative application.

    PubMed

    MacStravic, R S; Covert, K; Ginsburg, D

    1992-01-01

    For more than five years hospitals have been developing computer communications networks as a physician bonding strategy because of their success in promoting hospital admissions and additional referrals to the sponsoring hospitals' specialists. An alternative, nonproprietary network may also be worthy of consideration because of the services and benefits it delivers to the total health care delivery system and to society as a whole--in addition to the advantages it offers the sponsoring hospital. An example of such a network is offered as an illustration.

  19. A local area computer network expert system framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominy, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Over the past years an expert system called LANES designed to detect and isolate faults in the Goddard-wide Hybrid Local Area Computer Network (LACN) was developed. As a result, the need for developing a more generic LACN fault isolation expert system has become apparent. An object oriented approach was explored to create a set of generic classes, objects, rules, and methods that would be necessary to meet this need. The object classes provide a convenient mechanism for separating high level information from low level network specific information. This approach yeilds a framework which can be applied to different network configurations and be easily expanded to meet new needs.

  20. Propagation of computer virus both across the Internet and external computers: A complex-network approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Chenquan; Yang, Xiaofan; Liu, Wanping; Zhu, Qingyi; Jin, Jian; He, Li

    2014-08-01

    Based on the assumption that external computers (particularly, infected external computers) are connected to the Internet, and by considering the influence of the Internet topology on computer virus spreading, this paper establishes a novel computer virus propagation model with a complex-network approach. This model possesses a unique (viral) equilibrium which is globally attractive. Some numerical simulations are also given to illustrate this result. Further study shows that the computers with higher node degrees are more susceptible to infection than those with lower node degrees. In this regard, some appropriate protective measures are suggested.

  1. Test experience on an ultrareliable computer communication network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    The dispersed sensor processing mesh (DSPM) is an experimental, ultrareliable, fault-tolerant computer communications network that exhibits an organic-like ability to regenerate itself after suffering damage. The regeneration is accomplished by two routines - grow and repair. This paper discusses the DSPM concept for achieving fault tolerance and provides a brief description of the mechanization of both the experiment and the six-node experimental network. The main topic of this paper is the system performance of the growth algorithm contained in the grow routine. The characteristics imbued to DSPM by the growth algorithm are also discussed. Data from an experimental DSPM network and software simulation of larger DSPM-type networks are used to examine the inherent limitation on growth time by the growth algorithm and the relationship of growth time to network size and topology.

  2. Test experience on an ultrareliable computer communication network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    The dispersed sensor processing mesh (DSPM) is an experimental, ultra-reliable, fault-tolerant computer communications network that exhibits an organic-like ability to regenerate itself after suffering damage. The regeneration is accomplished by two routines - grow and repair. This paper discusses the DSPM concept for achieving fault tolerance and provides a brief description of the mechanization of both the experiment and the six-node experimental network. The main topic of this paper is the system performance of the growth algorithm contained in the grow routine. The characteristics imbued to DSPM by the growth algorithm are also discussed. Data from an experimental DSPM network and software simulation of larger DSPM-type networks are used to examine the inherent limitation on growth time by the growth algorithm and the relationship of growth time to network size and topology.

  3. Building Social Networks with Computer Networks: A New Deal for Teaching and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurston, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the role of computer technology and Web sites in expanding social networks. Focuses on the New Deal Network using two examples: (1) uniting a Julia C. Lathrop Housing (Chicago, Illinois) resident with a university professor; and (2) saving the Hugo Gellert art murals at the Seward Park Coop Apartments (New York). (CMK)

  4. Navigating traditional chinese medicine network pharmacology and computational tools.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Chen, Jia-Lei; Xu, Li-Wen; Ji, Guang

    2013-01-01

    The concept of "network target" has ushered in a new era in the field of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). As a new research approach, network pharmacology is based on the analysis of network models and systems biology. Taking advantage of advancements in systems biology, a high degree of integration data analysis strategy and interpretable visualization provides deeper insights into the underlying mechanisms of TCM theories, including the principles of herb combination, biological foundations of herb or herbal formulae action, and molecular basis of TCM syndromes. In this study, we review several recent developments in TCM network pharmacology research and discuss their potential for bridging the gap between traditional and modern medicine. We briefly summarize the two main functional applications of TCM network models: understanding/uncovering and predicting/discovering. In particular, we focus on how TCM network pharmacology research is conducted and highlight different computational tools, such as network-based and machine learning algorithms, and sources that have been proposed and applied to the different steps involved in the research process. To make network pharmacology research commonplace, some basic network definitions and analysis methods are presented.

  5. Navigating Traditional Chinese Medicine Network Pharmacology and Computational Tools

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia-Lei; Xu, Li-Wen

    2013-01-01

    The concept of “network target” has ushered in a new era in the field of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). As a new research approach, network pharmacology is based on the analysis of network models and systems biology. Taking advantage of advancements in systems biology, a high degree of integration data analysis strategy and interpretable visualization provides deeper insights into the underlying mechanisms of TCM theories, including the principles of herb combination, biological foundations of herb or herbal formulae action, and molecular basis of TCM syndromes. In this study, we review several recent developments in TCM network pharmacology research and discuss their potential for bridging the gap between traditional and modern medicine. We briefly summarize the two main functional applications of TCM network models: understanding/uncovering and predicting/discovering. In particular, we focus on how TCM network pharmacology research is conducted and highlight different computational tools, such as network-based and machine learning algorithms, and sources that have been proposed and applied to the different steps involved in the research process. To make network pharmacology research commonplace, some basic network definitions and analysis methods are presented. PMID:23983798

  6. Computational properties of networks of synchronous groups of spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Dayhoff, Judith E

    2007-09-01

    We demonstrate a model in which synchronously firing ensembles of neurons are networked to produce computational results. Each ensemble is a group of biological integrate-and-fire spiking neurons, with probabilistic interconnections between groups. An analogy is drawn in which each individual processing unit of an artificial neural network corresponds to a neuronal group in a biological model. The activation value of a unit in the artificial neural network corresponds to the fraction of active neurons, synchronously firing, in a biological neuronal group. Weights of the artificial neural network correspond to the product of the interconnection density between groups, the group size of the presynaptic group, and the postsynaptic potential heights in the synchronous group model. All three of these parameters can modulate connection strengths between neuronal groups in the synchronous group models. We give an example of nonlinear classification (XOR) and a function approximation example in which the capability of the artificial neural network can be captured by a neural network model with biological integrate-and-fire neurons configured as a network of synchronously firing ensembles of such neurons. We point out that the general function approximation capability proven for feedforward artificial neural networks appears to be approximated by networks of neuronal groups that fire in synchrony, where the groups comprise integrate-and-fire neurons. We discuss the advantages of this type of model for biological systems, its possible learning mechanisms, and the associated timing relationships.

  7. The Use of a PDP-11/20 Computer in a Non-Calculus General Physics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, David U. L.

    Computer-assisted instruction supplements traditional methods in a non-calculus physics course offered at Seattle Pacific College. Thirty-five science majors enrolled in the first quarter and 32 continued in the second term. The hardware for the course consists of a PDP-11/20 computer and eight teletype terminals; additional peripheral equipment…

  8. Design and Development of a Sample "Computer Programming" Course Tool via Story-Based E-Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kose, Utku; Koc, Durmus; Yucesoy, Suleyman Anil

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces a story-based e-learning oriented course tool that was designed and developed for using within "computer programming" courses. With this tool, students can easily adapt themselves to the subjects in the context of computer programming principles, thanks to the story-based, interactive processes. By using visually…

  9. A One-Credit Hands-On Introductory Course in Electrical and Computer Engineering Using a Variety of Topic Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierre, J. W.; Tuffner, F. K.; Anderson, J. R.; Whitman, D. L.; Ula, A. H. M. S.; Kubichek, R. F.; Wright, C. H. G.; Barrett, S. F.; Cupal, J. J.; Hamann, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a one-credit laboratory course for freshmen majoring in electrical and computer engineering (ECE). The course is motivational in nature and exposes the students to a wide range of areas of electrical and computer engineering. The authors believe it is important to give freshmen a broad perspective of what ECE is all about, and…

  10. Improving Student Performance in a First-Year Geography Course: Examining the Importance of Computer-Assisted Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Kathi; Boyd, Cleo; Chen, Liwen; Jamal, Sarosh

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of computer-assisted formative assessment in a large, first-year undergraduate geography course. In particular, the paper evaluates the impact of computer-assisted multiple-choice practice tests on student performance in the course as well as student opinions of this type of…

  11. Computation and Learning in Neural Networks With Binary Weights

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-28

    Computation with Formal Neurons", IEEE Trans- actions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence , vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 87-91, 1992. Presented at...ofI pattern separation, categorization, and associative memory, exhibit variable amounts of sparsed connectivity between neurons. InI Artificial Neural...LEE, Y. C., AND CHEN, H. H. (1986), Non-linear dynamics of artificial neural systems, in "Neural Networks for Computing" (J. Denker, Ed.). Amer. Inst

  12. Performance Evaluation in Network-Based Parallel Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezhgosha, Kamyar

    1996-01-01

    Network-based parallel computing is emerging as a cost-effective alternative for solving many problems which require use of supercomputers or massively parallel computers. The primary objective of this project has been to conduct experimental research on performance evaluation for clustered parallel computing. First, a testbed was established by augmenting our existing SUNSPARCs' network with PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) which is a software system for linking clusters of machines. Second, a set of three basic applications were selected. The applications consist of a parallel search, a parallel sort, a parallel matrix multiplication. These application programs were implemented in C programming language under PVM. Third, we conducted performance evaluation under various configurations and problem sizes. Alternative parallel computing models and workload allocations for application programs were explored. The performance metric was limited to elapsed time or response time which in the context of parallel computing can be expressed in terms of speedup. The results reveal that the overhead of communication latency between processes in many cases is the restricting factor to performance. That is, coarse-grain parallelism which requires less frequent communication between processes will result in higher performance in network-based computing. Finally, we are in the final stages of installing an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switch and four ATM interfaces (each 155 Mbps) which will allow us to extend our study to newer applications, performance metrics, and configurations.

  13. Identifying failure in a tree network of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Pinnow, Kurt W.; Wallenfelt, Brian P.

    2010-08-24

    Methods, parallel computers, and products are provided for identifying failure in a tree network of a parallel computer. The parallel computer includes one or more processing sets including an I/O node and a plurality of compute nodes. For each processing set embodiments include selecting a set of test compute nodes, the test compute nodes being a subset of the compute nodes of the processing set; measuring the performance of the I/O node of the processing set; measuring the performance of the selected set of test compute nodes; calculating a current test value in dependence upon the measured performance of the I/O node of the processing set, the measured performance of the set of test compute nodes, and a predetermined value for I/O node performance; and comparing the current test value with a predetermined tree performance threshold. If the current test value is below the predetermined tree performance threshold, embodiments include selecting another set of test compute nodes. If the current test value is not below the predetermined tree performance threshold, embodiments include selecting from the test compute nodes one or more potential problem nodes and testing individually potential problem nodes and links to potential problem nodes.

  14. Small-world networks in neuronal populations: a computational perspective.

    PubMed

    Zippo, Antonio G; Gelsomino, Giuliana; Van Duin, Pieter; Nencini, Sara; Caramenti, Gian Carlo; Valente, Maurizio; Biella, Gabriele E M

    2013-08-01

    The analysis of the brain in terms of integrated neural networks may offer insights on the reciprocal relation between structure and information processing. Even with inherent technical limits, many studies acknowledge neuron spatial arrangements and communication modes as key factors. In this perspective, we investigated the functional organization of neuronal networks by explicitly assuming a specific functional topology, the small-world network. We developed two different computational approaches. Firstly, we asked whether neuronal populations actually express small-world properties during a definite task, such as a learning task. For this purpose we developed the Inductive Conceptual Network (ICN), which is a hierarchical bio-inspired spiking network, capable of learning invariant patterns by using variable-order Markov models implemented in its nodes. As a result, we actually observed small-world topologies during learning in the ICN. Speculating that the expression of small-world networks is not solely related to learning tasks, we then built a de facto network assuming that the information processing in the brain may occur through functional small-world topologies. In this de facto network, synchronous spikes reflected functional small-world network dependencies. In order to verify the consistency of the assumption, we tested the null-hypothesis by replacing the small-world networks with random networks. As a result, only small world networks exhibited functional biomimetic characteristics such as timing and rate codes, conventional coding strategies and neuronal avalanches, which are cascades of bursting activities with a power-law distribution. Our results suggest that small-world functional configurations are liable to underpin brain information processing at neuronal level.

  15. US computer research networks: Current and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kratochvil, D.; Sood, D.; Verostko, A.

    1989-01-01

    During the last decade, NASA LeRC's Communication Program has conducted a series of telecommunications forecasting studies to project trends and requirements and to identify critical telecommunications technologies that must be developed to meet future requirements. The Government Networks Division of Contel Federal Systems has assisted NASA in these studies, and the current study builds upon these earlier efforts. The current major thrust of the NASA Communications Program is aimed at developing the high risk, advanced, communications satellite and terminal technologies required to significantly increase the capacity of future communications systems. Also, major new technological, economic, and social-political events and trends are now shaping the communications industry of the future. Therefore, a re-examination of future telecommunications needs and requirements is necessary to enable NASA to make management decisions in its Communications Program and to ensure the proper technologies and systems are addressed. This study, through a series of Task Orders, is helping NASA define the likely communication service needs and requirements of the future and thereby ensuring that the most appropriate technology developments are pursued.

  16. Curriculum Reform Research of Computer Network Technology Based on School-Enterprise Cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng

    There is growing concern about falling levels of student engagement with school science, as evidenced by studies of student attitudes, and decreasing participation at the post compulsory level. College-enterprise cooperation model is a new model of cultivating application-typed talents in college by cooperating with enterprises. In the paper, we analyze the teaching problems in the course of "Computer Network Technology", propose guidelines with teaching practice. Then we explored the reform ways to enhance students' self-learning ability. Finally, the conclusion is given.

  17. Hybrid computing using a neural network with dynamic external memory.

    PubMed

    Graves, Alex; Wayne, Greg; Reynolds, Malcolm; Harley, Tim; Danihelka, Ivo; Grabska-Barwińska, Agnieszka; Colmenarejo, Sergio Gómez; Grefenstette, Edward; Ramalho, Tiago; Agapiou, John; Badia, Adrià Puigdomènech; Hermann, Karl Moritz; Zwols, Yori; Ostrovski, Georg; Cain, Adam; King, Helen; Summerfield, Christopher; Blunsom, Phil; Kavukcuoglu, Koray; Hassabis, Demis

    2016-10-27

    Artificial neural networks are remarkably adept at sensory processing, sequence learning and reinforcement learning, but are limited in their ability to represent variables and data structures and to store data over long timescales, owing to the lack of an external memory. Here we introduce a machine learning model called a differentiable neural computer (DNC), which consists of a neural network that can read from and write to an external memory matrix, analogous to the random-access memory in a conventional computer. Like a conventional computer, it can use its memory to represent and manipulate complex data structures, but, like a neural network, it can learn to do so from data. When trained with supervised learning, we demonstrate that a DNC can successfully answer synthetic questions designed to emulate reasoning and inference problems in natural language. We show that it can learn tasks such as finding the shortest path between specified points and inferring the missing links in randomly generated graphs, and then generalize these tasks to specific graphs such as transport networks and family trees. When trained with reinforcement learning, a DNC can complete a moving blocks puzzle in which changing goals are specified by sequences of symbols. Taken together, our results demonstrate that DNCs have the capacity to solve complex, structured tasks that are inaccessible to neural networks without external read-write memory.

  18. Visual field interpretation with a personal computer based neural network.

    PubMed

    Mutlukan, E; Keating, D

    1994-01-01

    The Computer Assisted Touch Screen (CATS) and Computer Assisted Moving Eye Campimeter (CAMEC) are personal computer (PC)-based video-campimeters which employ multiple and single static stimuli on a cathode ray tube respectively. Clinical studies show that CATS and CAMEC provide comparable results to more expensive conventional visual field test devices. A neural network has been designed to classify visual field data from PC-based video-campimeters to facilitate diagnostic interpretation of visual field test results by non-experts. A three-layer back propagation network was designed, with 110 units in the input layer (each unit corresponding to a test point on the visual field test grid), a hidden layer of 40 processing units, and an output layer of 27 units (each one corresponding to a particular type of visual field pattern). The network was trained by a training set of 540 simulated visual field test result patterns, including normal, glaucomatous and neuro-ophthalmic defects, for up to 20,000 cycles. The classification accuracy of the network was initially measured with a previously unseen test set of 135 simulated fields and further tested with a genuine test result set of 100 neurological and 200 glaucomatous fields. A classification accuracy of 91-97% with simulated field results and 65-100% with genuine field results were achieved. This suggests that neural networks incorporated into PC-based video-campimeters may enable correct interpretation of results in non-specialist clinics or in the community.

  19. A computational study of routing algorithms for realistic transportation networks

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, R.; Marathe, M.V.; Nagel, K.

    1998-12-01

    The authors carry out an experimental analysis of a number of shortest path (routing) algorithms investigated in the context of the TRANSIMS (Transportation Analysis and Simulation System) project. The main focus of the paper is to study how various heuristic and exact solutions, associated data structures affected the computational performance of the software developed especially for realistic transportation networks. For this purpose the authors have used Dallas Fort-Worth road network with very high degree of resolution. The following general results are obtained: (1) they discuss and experimentally analyze various one-one shortest path algorithms, which include classical exact algorithms studied in the literature as well as heuristic solutions that are designed to take into account the geometric structure of the input instances; (2) they describe a number of extensions to the basic shortest path algorithm. These extensions were primarily motivated by practical problems arising in TRANSIMS and ITS (Intelligent Transportation Systems) related technologies. Extensions discussed include--(i) time dependent networks, (ii) multi-modal networks, (iii) networks with public transportation and associated schedules. Computational results are provided to empirically compare the efficiency of various algorithms. The studies indicate that a modified Dijkstra`s algorithm is computationally fast and an excellent candidate for use in various transportation planning applications as well as ITS related technologies.

  20. Computer program for network synthesis by frequency response fit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program synthesizes a passive network by minimizing the difference in desired and actual frequency response. The program solves for the critical points of the error function /weighted least squares fit between calculated and desired frequency response/ by the multivariable Newton-Raphson method with components constrained to an admissible region.

  1. System/360 Computer Assisted Network Scheduling (CANS) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    Computer assisted scheduling techniques that produce conflict-free and efficient schedules have been developed and implemented to meet needs of the Manned Space Flight Network. CANS system provides effective management of resources in complex scheduling environment. System is automated resource scheduling, controlling, planning, information storage and retrieval tool.

  2. Business Computer Network--A "Gateway" to Multiple Databanks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Mick

    1985-01-01

    Business Computer Network (BCN) employs automatic calling and logon, multiple database access, disk search capture, and search assistance interfaces to provide single access to 15 online services. Telecommunications software (SuperScout) used to reach BCN and participating online services offers storage and message options and is accompanied by…

  3. Development of a UNIX network compatible reactivity computer

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.F.; Edwards, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    A state-of-the-art UNIX network compatible controller and UNIX host workstation with MATLAB/SIMULINK software were used to develop, implement, and validate a digital reactivity calculation. An objective of the development was to determine why a Macintosh-based reactivity computer reactivity output drifted intolerably.

  4. Network based high performance concurrent computing. Progress report, [FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderam, V.S.

    1991-12-31

    The overall objectives of this project are to investigate research issues pertaining to programming tools and efficiency issues in network based concurrent computing systems. The basis for these efforts is the PVM project that evolved during my visits to Oak Ridge Laboratories under the DOE Faculty Research Participation program; I continue to collaborate with researchers at Oak Ridge on some portions of the project.

  5. Using a Local Area Network to Teach Computer Revision Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Diane P.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the use of a local area network and video switching equipment in teaching revision skills on computer. Explains that reading stories from texts, rewriting them from differing character viewpoints, and editing them as a group exposed students to a variety of writing problems and stimulated various revision strategies. (SG)

  6. An Analysis of Attitudes toward Computer Networks and Internet Addiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Chin-Chung; Lin, Sunny S. J.

    The purpose of this study was to explore the interplay between young people's attitudes toward computer networks and Internet addiction. After analyzing questionnaire responses of an initial sample of 615 Taiwanese high school students, 78 subjects, viewed as possible Internet addicts, were selected for further explorations. It was found that…

  7. SpecialNet. A National Computer-Based Communications Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, Alfred J.

    1986-01-01

    "SpecialNet," a computer-based communications network for educators at all administrative levels, has been established and is managed by National Systems Management, Inc. Users can send and receive electronic mail, share information on electronic bulletin boards, participate in electronic conferences, and send reports and other documents to each…

  8. A three-dimensional computational model of collagen network mechanics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byoungkoo; Zhou, Xin; Riching, Kristin; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Keely, Patricia J; Guelcher, Scott A; Weaver, Alissa M; Jiang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) strongly influences cellular behaviors, including cell proliferation, adhesion, and particularly migration. In cancer, the rigidity of the stromal collagen environment is thought to control tumor aggressiveness, and collagen alignment has been linked to tumor cell invasion. While the mechanical properties of collagen at both the single fiber scale and the bulk gel scale are quite well studied, how the fiber network responds to local stress or deformation, both structurally and mechanically, is poorly understood. This intermediate scale knowledge is important to understanding cell-ECM interactions and is the focus of this study. We have developed a three-dimensional elastic collagen fiber network model (bead-and-spring model) and studied fiber network behaviors for various biophysical conditions: collagen density, crosslinker strength, crosslinker density, and fiber orientation (random vs. prealigned). We found the best-fit crosslinker parameter values using shear simulation tests in a small strain region. Using this calibrated collagen model, we simulated both shear and tensile tests in a large linear strain region for different network geometry conditions. The results suggest that network geometry is a key determinant of the mechanical properties of the fiber network. We further demonstrated how the fiber network structure and mechanics evolves with a local formation, mimicking the effect of pulling by a pseudopod during cell migration. Our computational fiber network model is a step toward a full biomechanical model of cellular behaviors in various ECM conditions.

  9. Parallelized reliability estimation of reconfigurable computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Das, Subhendu; Palumbo, Dan

    1990-01-01

    A parallelized system, ASSURE, for computing the reliability of embedded avionics flight control systems which are able to reconfigure themselves in the event of failure is described. ASSURE accepts a grammar that describes a reliability semi-Markov state-space. From this it creates a parallel program that simultaneously generates and analyzes the state-space, placing upper and lower bounds on the probability of system failure. ASSURE is implemented on a 32-node Intel iPSC/860, and has achieved high processor efficiencies on real problems. Through a combination of improved algorithms, exploitation of parallelism, and use of an advanced microprocessor architecture, ASSURE has reduced the execution time on substantial problems by a factor of one thousand over previous workstation implementations. Furthermore, ASSURE's parallel execution rate on the iPSC/860 is an order of magnitude faster than its serial execution rate on a Cray-2 supercomputer. While dynamic load balancing is necessary for ASSURE's good performance, it is needed only infrequently; the particular method of load balancing used does not substantially affect performance.

  10. Computational Neuropsychiatry – Schizophrenia as a Cognitive Brain Network Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Dauvermann, Maria R.; Whalley, Heather C.; Schmidt, André; Lee, Graham L.; Romaniuk, Liana; Roberts, Neil; Johnstone, Eve C.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Moorhead, Thomas W. J.

    2014-01-01

    Computational modeling of functional brain networks in fMRI data has advanced the understanding of higher cognitive function. It is hypothesized that functional networks mediating higher cognitive processes are disrupted in people with schizophrenia. In this article, we review studies that applied measures of functional and effective connectivity to fMRI data during cognitive tasks, in particular working memory fMRI studies. We provide a conceptual summary of the main findings in fMRI data and their relationship with neurotransmitter systems, which are known to be altered in individuals with schizophrenia. We consider possible developments in computational neuropsychiatry, which are likely to further our understanding of how key functional networks are altered in schizophrenia. PMID:24723894

  11. [Computer-assisted monitoring systems. Use of computer networks and internet technologies].

    PubMed

    Flerov, E V; Sablin, I N; Broĭtman, O G; Tolmachev, V A; Batchaev, Sh S

    2005-01-01

    The automated workplace (AWP) of anesthesiologist developed by the early 1990s provided data collection and processing, viewing of all monitors, and printing of anesthesiological chart (AC). AWP is a subject of continuous modification and adaptation to variable conditions. Computer monitoring including various measuring devises equipped with series interface RS-232 was implemented in Russian Research Center for Surgery. Rapid progress in computer network technologies made it necessary to adapt AWP to operation in computer networks. Since 1999 the computer network has been connected to the Internet. The use of computer technologies, including Internet, provides remote access to AC, thereby providing conditions for remote monitoring. AWP of anesthesiologist can be regarded as an automated control system of the patient state operated by anesthesiologist. Specific features of data processing in AWP are described. The AWP system is planed to be multiprocessor with distributed data flow. The suggested structure of computer network system for surgery rooms meeting the requirements of WWW-technology connected to the Internet is a promising approach to remote monitoring in medicine.

  12. Global tree network for computing structures enabling global processing operations

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich; Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Hoenicke, Dirk; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2010-01-19

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global tree network communications among processing nodes interconnected according to a tree network structure. The global tree network enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the tree via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual tree and sub-tree structures. The global operations performed include one or more of: broadcast operations downstream from a root node to leaf nodes of a virtual tree, reduction operations upstream from leaf nodes to the root node in the virtual tree, and point-to-point message passing from any node to the root node. The global tree network is configurable to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner, and, is physically and logically partitionable.

  13. Reduction of dynamical biochemical reactions networks in computational biology

    PubMed Central

    Radulescu, O.; Gorban, A. N.; Zinovyev, A.; Noel, V.

    2012-01-01

    Biochemical networks are used in computational biology, to model mechanistic details of systems involved in cell signaling, metabolism, and regulation of gene expression. Parametric and structural uncertainty, as well as combinatorial explosion are strong obstacles against analyzing the dynamics of large models of this type. Multiscaleness, an important property of these networks, can be used to get past some of these obstacles. Networks with many well separated time scales, can be reduced to simpler models, in a way that depends only on the orders of magnitude and not on the exact values of the kinetic parameters. The main idea used for such robust simplifications of networks is the concept of dominance among model elements, allowing hierarchical organization of these elements according to their effects on the network dynamics. This concept finds a natural formulation in tropical geometry. We revisit, in the light of these new ideas, the main approaches to model reduction of reaction networks, such as quasi-steady state (QSS) and quasi-equilibrium approximations (QE), and provide practical recipes for model reduction of linear and non-linear networks. We also discuss the application of model reduction to the problem of parameter identification, via backward pruning machine learning techniques. PMID:22833754

  14. Applying DNA computation to intractable problems in social network analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rick C S; Yang, Stephen J H

    2010-09-01

    From ancient times to the present day, social networks have played an important role in the formation of various organizations for a range of social behaviors. As such, social networks inherently describe the complicated relationships between elements around the world. Based on mathematical graph theory, social network analysis (SNA) has been developed in and applied to various fields such as Web 2.0 for Web applications and product developments in industries, etc. However, some definitions of SNA, such as finding a clique, N-clique, N-clan, N-club and K-plex, are NP-complete problems, which are not easily solved via traditional computer architecture. These challenges have restricted the uses of SNA. This paper provides DNA-computing-based approaches with inherently high information density and massive parallelism. Using these approaches, we aim to solve the three primary problems of social networks: N-clique, N-clan, and N-club. Their accuracy and feasible time complexities discussed in the paper will demonstrate that DNA computing can be used to facilitate the development of SNA.

  15. Efficient parameter sensitivity computation for spatially extended reaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, C.; Yates, C. A.; Baker, R. E.

    2017-01-01

    Reaction-diffusion models are widely used to study spatially extended chemical reaction systems. In order to understand how the dynamics of a reaction-diffusion model are affected by changes in its input parameters, efficient methods for computing parametric sensitivities are required. In this work, we focus on the stochastic models of spatially extended chemical reaction systems that involve partitioning the computational domain into voxels. Parametric sensitivities are often calculated using Monte Carlo techniques that are typically computationally expensive; however, variance reduction techniques can decrease the number of Monte Carlo simulations required. By exploiting the characteristic dynamics of spatially extended reaction networks, we are able to adapt existing finite difference schemes to robustly estimate parametric sensitivities in a spatially extended network. We show that algorithmic performance depends on the dynamics of the given network and the choice of summary statistics. We then describe a hybrid technique that dynamically chooses the most appropriate simulation method for the network of interest. Our method is tested for functionality and accuracy in a range of different scenarios.

  16. A modular architecture for transparent computation in recurrent neural networks.

    PubMed

    Carmantini, Giovanni S; Beim Graben, Peter; Desroches, Mathieu; Rodrigues, Serafim

    2017-01-01

    Computation is classically studied in terms of automata, formal languages and algorithms; yet, the relation between neural dynamics and symbolic representations and operations is still unclear in traditional eliminative connectionism. Therefore, we suggest a unique perspective on this central issue, to which we would like to refer as transparent connectionism, by proposing accounts of how symbolic computation can be implemented in neural substrates. In this study we first introduce a new model of dynamics on a symbolic space, the versatile shift, showing that it supports the real-time simulation of a range of automata. We then show that the Gödelization of versatile shifts defines nonlinear dynamical automata, dynamical systems evolving on a vectorial space. Finally, we present a mapping between nonlinear dynamical automata and recurrent artificial neural networks. The mapping defines an architecture characterized by its granular modularity, where data, symbolic operations and their control are not only distinguishable in activation space, but also spatially localizable in the network itself, while maintaining a distributed encoding of symbolic representations. The resulting networks simulate automata in real-time and are programmed directly, in the absence of network training. To discuss the unique characteristics of the architecture and their consequences, we present two examples: (i) the design of a Central Pattern Generator from a finite-state locomotive controller, and (ii) the creation of a network simulating a system of interactive automata that supports the parsing of garden-path sentences as investigated in psycholinguistics experiments.

  17. Review On Applications Of Neural Network To Computer Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Nasrabadi, Nasser M.

    1989-03-01

    Neural network models have many potential applications to computer vision due to their parallel structures, learnability, implicit representation of domain knowledge, fault tolerance, and ability of handling statistical data. This paper demonstrates the basic principles, typical models and their applications in this field. Variety of neural models, such as associative memory, multilayer back-propagation perceptron, self-stabilized adaptive resonance network, hierarchical structured neocognitron, high order correlator, network with gating control and other models, can be applied to visual signal recognition, reinforcement, recall, stereo vision, motion, object tracking and other vision processes. Most of the algorithms have been simulated on com-puters. Some have been implemented with special hardware. Some systems use features, such as edges and profiles, of images as the data form for input. Other systems use raw data as input signals to the networks. We will present some novel ideas contained in these approaches and provide a comparison of these methods. Some unsolved problems are mentioned, such as extracting the intrinsic properties of the input information, integrating those low level functions to a high-level cognitive system, achieving invariances and other problems. Perspectives of applications of some human vision models and neural network models are analyzed.

  18. Analysis of Intrusion Detection and Attack Proliferation in Computer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangan, Prahalad; Knuth, Kevin H.

    2007-11-01

    One of the popular models to describe computer worm propagation is the Susceptible-Infected (SI) model [1]. This model of worm propagation has been implemented on the simulation toolkit Network Simulator v2 (ns-2) [2]. The ns-2 toolkit has the capability to simulate networks of different topologies. The topology studied in this work, however, is that of a simple star-topology. This work introduces our initial efforts to learn the relevant quantities describing an infection given synthetic data obtained from running the ns-2 worm model. We aim to use Bayesian methods to gain a predictive understanding of how computer infections spread in real world network topologies. This understanding would greatly reinforce dissemination of targeted immunization strategies, which may prevent real-world epidemics. The data consist of reports of infection from a subset of nodes in a large network during an attack. The infection equation obtained from [1] enables us to derive a likelihood function for the infection reports. This prior information can be used in the Bayesian framework to obtain the posterior probabilities for network properties of interest, such as the rate at which nodes contact one another (also referred to as contact rate or scan rate). Our preliminary analyses indicate an effective spread rate of only 1/5th the actual scan rate used for a star-type of topology. This implies that as the population becomes saturated with infected nodes the actual spread rate will become much less than the scan rate used in the simulation.

  19. Computing Tutte polynomials of contact networks in classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hincapié, Doracelly; Ospina, Juan

    2013-05-01

    Objective: The topological complexity of contact networks in classrooms and the potential transmission of an infectious disease were analyzed by sex and age. Methods: The Tutte polynomials, some topological properties and the number of spanning trees were used to algebraically compute the topological complexity. Computations were made with the Maple package GraphTheory. Published data of mutually reported social contacts within a classroom taken from primary school, consisting of children in the age ranges of 4-5, 7-8 and 10-11, were used. Results: The algebraic complexity of the Tutte polynomial and the probability of disease transmission increases with age. The contact networks are not bipartite graphs, gender segregation was observed especially in younger children. Conclusion: Tutte polynomials are tools to understand the topology of the contact networks and to derive numerical indexes of such topologies. It is possible to establish relationships between the Tutte polynomial of a given contact network and the potential transmission of an infectious disease within such network

  20. Smart photonic networks and computer security for image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campello, Jorge; Gill, John T.; Morf, Martin; Flynn, Michael J.

    1998-02-01

    Work reported here is part of a larger project on 'Smart Photonic Networks and Computer Security for Image Data', studying the interactions of coding and security, switching architecture simulations, and basic technologies. Coding and security: coding methods that are appropriate for data security in data fusion networks were investigated. These networks have several characteristics that distinguish them form other currently employed networks, such as Ethernet LANs or the Internet. The most significant characteristics are very high maximum data rates; predominance of image data; narrowcasting - transmission of data form one source to a designated set of receivers; data fusion - combining related data from several sources; simple sensor nodes with limited buffering. These characteristics affect both the lower level network design and the higher level coding methods.Data security encompasses privacy, integrity, reliability, and availability. Privacy, integrity, and reliability can be provided through encryption and coding for error detection and correction. Availability is primarily a network issue; network nodes must be protected against failure or routed around in the case of failure. One of the more promising techniques is the use of 'secret sharing'. We consider this method as a special case of our new space-time code diversity based algorithms for secure communication. These algorithms enable us to exploit parallelism and scalable multiplexing schemes to build photonic network architectures. A number of very high-speed switching and routing architectures and their relationships with very high performance processor architectures were studied. Indications are that routers for very high speed photonic networks can be designed using the very robust and distributed TCP/IP protocol, if suitable processor architecture support is available.

  1. An Analysis of the Use of Command Line and Graphic Interface in Computer Instruction for the Communication Research Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Richard E.

    A study investigated whether the computer anxiety of novice users would be reduced more with graphic user interfaces than with command line interfaces. Computers have become an integral part of communication research, and undergraduates are being required to take research courses that necessitate the use of computers. Forty-five students enrolled…

  2. Perceptions of teaching and learning automata theory in a college-level computer science course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidmann, Phoebe Kay

    This dissertation identifies and describes student and instructor perceptions that contribute to effective teaching and learning of Automata Theory in a competitive college-level Computer Science program. Effective teaching is the ability to create an appropriate learning environment in order to provide effective learning. We define effective learning as the ability of a student to meet instructor set learning objectives, demonstrating this by passing the course, while reporting a good learning experience. We conducted our investigation through a detailed qualitative case study of two sections (118 students) of Automata Theory (CS 341) at The University of Texas at Austin taught by Dr. Lily Quilt. Because Automata Theory has a fixed curriculum in the sense that many curricula and textbooks agree on what Automata Theory contains, differences being depth and amount of material to cover in a single course, a case study would allow for generalizable findings. Automata Theory is especially problematic in a Computer Science curriculum since students are not experienced in abstract thinking before taking this course, fail to understand the relevance of the theory, and prefer classes with more concrete activities such as programming. This creates a special challenge for any instructor of Automata Theory as motivation becomes critical for student learning. Through the use of student surveys, instructor interviews, classroom observation, material and course grade analysis we sought to understand what students perceived, what instructors expected of students, and how those perceptions played out in the classroom in terms of structure and instruction. Our goal was to create suggestions that would lead to a better designed course and thus a higher student success rate in Automata Theory. We created a unique theoretical basis, pedagogical positivism, on which to study college-level courses. Pedagogical positivism states that through examining instructor and student perceptions

  3. Validation of a computer based objective structured clinical examination in the assessment of undergraduate dermatology courses.

    PubMed

    Kaliyadan, Feroze; Khan, Abdul Sattar; Kuruvilla, Joel; Feroze, Kaberi

    2014-01-01

    Many teaching centers have now adopted objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) as an assessment method for undergraduate dermatology courses. A modification of the standard OSCE in dermatology is computer based or electronic OSCE (eOSCE). We attempted to validate the use of a computer-based OSCE in dermatology in a group of fifth year medical students. The scores of the students in the computer-based OSCE showed a strong positive correlation with the scores on the clinical presentation (Pearson's co-efficient - 0.923, P value <0.000, significant at the 0.01 level) and a good correlation with overall scores of the student (Pearson's co-efficient - 0.728, P value <0.000, significant at the 0.01 level), indicating that this is a reliable method for assessment in dermatology. Generally, the students' feedback regarding the methods was positive.

  4. Biological networks 101: computational modeling for molecular biologists.

    PubMed

    Scholma, Jetse; Schivo, Stefano; Urquidi Camacho, Ricardo A; van de Pol, Jaco; Karperien, Marcel; Post, Janine N

    2014-01-01

    Computational modeling of biological networks permits the comprehensive analysis of cells and tissues to define molecular phenotypes and novel hypotheses. Although a large number of software tools have been developed, the versatility of these tools is limited by mathematical complexities that prevent their broad adoption and effective use by molecular biologists. This study clarifies the basic aspects of molecular modeling, how to convert data into useful input, as well as the number of time points and molecular parameters that should be considered for molecular regulatory models with both explanatory and predictive potential. We illustrate the necessary experimental preconditions for converting data into a computational model of network dynamics. This model requires neither a thorough background in mathematics nor precise data on intracellular concentrations, binding affinities or reaction kinetics. Finally, we show how an interactive model of crosstalk between signal transduction pathways in primary human articular chondrocytes allows insight into processes that regulate gene expression.

  5. The role of computer networks in remote sensing data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swain, P. H.; Phillips, T. L.; Lindenlaub, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that computer networks can be used to make data processing facilities available to the remote sensing community both quickly and effectively. An experiment to test this hypothesis is being conducted by the Laboratory for Applications of Remote Sensing at Purdue University, with the participation of potential users at several remote sites. Initial indications have been highly favorable, although final evaluation awaits further experience and the accumulation of usage data.

  6. Computer Implementation and Simulation of Some Neural Networks Used in Pattern Recognition and Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    I. INTRODUCTION A. W HAT IS A NEURAL NETWORK: A neural network is a highly parallel network with many interconnections between analog computational ...optimization problems, using nonlinear analog computation . * Nonlinear Mapping: Many neural networks can map a vector of analog inputs into an output vector...N rNAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL 0Monterey, California ., THESIS COMPUTER IMPLEMENTATION AND SIMU- LATION OF SOME NEURAL NETWORKS USED IN PATTERN

  7. A Computational Tool for Quantitative Analysis of Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zudaire, Enrique; Gambardella, Laure; Kurcz, Christopher; Vermeren, Sonja

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the generation of mature vascular networks from pre-existing vessels. Angiogenesis is crucial during the organism' development, for wound healing and for the female reproductive cycle. Several murine experimental systems are well suited for studying developmental and pathological angiogenesis. They include the embryonic hindbrain, the post-natal retina and allantois explants. In these systems vascular networks are visualised by appropriate staining procedures followed by microscopical analysis. Nevertheless, quantitative assessment of angiogenesis is hampered by the lack of readily available, standardized metrics and software analysis tools. Non-automated protocols are being used widely and they are, in general, time - and labour intensive, prone to human error and do not permit computation of complex spatial metrics. We have developed a light-weight, user friendly software, AngioTool, which allows for quick, hands-off and reproducible quantification of vascular networks in microscopic images. AngioTool computes several morphological and spatial parameters including the area covered by a vascular network, the number of vessels, vessel length, vascular density and lacunarity. In addition, AngioTool calculates the so-called “branching index” (branch points / unit area), providing a measurement of the sprouting activity of a specimen of interest. We have validated AngioTool using images of embryonic murine hindbrains, post-natal retinas and allantois explants. AngioTool is open source and can be downloaded free of charge. PMID:22110636

  8. Cellular computational networks--a scalable architecture for learning the dynamics of large networked systems.

    PubMed

    Luitel, Bipul; Venayagamoorthy, Ganesh Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Neural networks for implementing large networked systems such as smart electric power grids consist of multiple inputs and outputs. Many outputs lead to a greater number of parameters to be adapted. Each additional variable increases the dimensionality of the problem and hence learning becomes a challenge. Cellular computational networks (CCNs) are a class of sparsely connected dynamic recurrent networks (DRNs). By proper selection of a set of input elements for each output variable in a given application, a DRN can be modified into a CCN which significantly reduces the complexity of the neural network and allows use of simple training methods for independent learning in each cell thus making it scalable. This article demonstrates this concept of developing a CCN using dimensionality reduction in a DRN for scalability and better performance. The concept has been analytically explained and empirically verified through application.

  9. Convolutional networks for fast, energy-efficient neuromorphic computing

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Steven K.; Merolla, Paul A.; Arthur, John V.; Cassidy, Andrew S.; Appuswamy, Rathinakumar; Andreopoulos, Alexander; Berg, David J.; McKinstry, Jeffrey L.; Melano, Timothy; Barch, Davis R.; di Nolfo, Carmelo; Datta, Pallab; Amir, Arnon; Taba, Brian; Flickner, Myron D.; Modha, Dharmendra S.

    2016-01-01

    Deep networks are now able to achieve human-level performance on a broad spectrum of recognition tasks. Independently, neuromorphic computing has now demonstrated unprecedented energy-efficiency through a new chip architecture based on spiking neurons, low precision synapses, and a scalable communication network. Here, we demonstrate that neuromorphic computing, despite its novel architectural primitives, can implement deep convolution networks that (i) approach state-of-the-art classification accuracy across eight standard datasets encompassing vision and speech, (ii) perform inference while preserving the hardware’s underlying energy-efficiency and high throughput, running on the aforementioned datasets at between 1,200 and 2,600 frames/s and using between 25 and 275 mW (effectively >6,000 frames/s per Watt), and (iii) can be specified and trained using backpropagation with the same ease-of-use as contemporary deep learning. This approach allows the algorithmic power of deep learning to be merged with the efficiency of neuromorphic processors, bringing the promise of embedded, intelligent, brain-inspired computing one step closer. PMID:27651489

  10. Convolutional networks for fast, energy-efficient neuromorphic computing.

    PubMed

    Esser, Steven K; Merolla, Paul A; Arthur, John V; Cassidy, Andrew S; Appuswamy, Rathinakumar; Andreopoulos, Alexander; Berg, David J; McKinstry, Jeffrey L; Melano, Timothy; Barch, Davis R; di Nolfo, Carmelo; Datta, Pallab; Amir, Arnon; Taba, Brian; Flickner, Myron D; Modha, Dharmendra S

    2016-10-11

    Deep networks are now able to achieve human-level performance on a broad spectrum of recognition tasks. Independently, neuromorphic computing has now demonstrated unprecedented energy-efficiency through a new chip architecture based on spiking neurons, low precision synapses, and a scalable communication network. Here, we demonstrate that neuromorphic computing, despite its novel architectural primitives, can implement deep convolution networks that (i) approach state-of-the-art classification accuracy across eight standard datasets encompassing vision and speech, (ii) perform inference while preserving the hardware's underlying energy-efficiency and high throughput, running on the aforementioned datasets at between 1,200 and 2,600 frames/s and using between 25 and 275 mW (effectively >6,000 frames/s per Watt), and (iii) can be specified and trained using backpropagation with the same ease-of-use as contemporary deep learning. This approach allows the algorithmic power of deep learning to be merged with the efficiency of neuromorphic processors, bringing the promise of embedded, intelligent, brain-inspired computing one step closer.

  11. Detecting shifts in gene regulatory networks during time-course experiments at single-time-point temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Yoichi; Seno, Shigeto; Matsuda, Hideo

    2015-10-01

    Comprehensively understanding the dynamics of biological systems is one of the greatest challenges in biology. Vastly improved biological technologies have provided vast amounts of information that must be understood by bioinformatics and systems biology researchers. Gene regulations have been frequently modeled by ordinary differential equations or graphical models based on time-course gene expression profiles. The state-of-the-art computational approaches for analyzing gene regulations assume that their models are same throughout time-course experiments. However, these approaches cannot easily analyze transient changes at a time point, such as diauxic shift. We propose a score that analyzes the gene regulations at each time point. The score is based on the information gains of information criterion values. The method detects the shifts in gene regulatory networks (GRNs) during time-course experiments with single-time-point resolution. The effectiveness of the method is evaluated on the diauxic shift from glucose to lactose in Escherichia coli. Gene regulation shifts were detected at two time points: the first corresponding to the time at which the growth of E. coli ceased and the second corresponding to the end of the experiment, when the nutrient sources (glucose and lactose) had become exhausted. According to these results, the proposed score and method can appropriately detect the time of gene regulation shifts. The method based on the proposed score provides a new tool for analyzing dynamic biological systems. Because the score value indicates the strength of gene regulation at each time point in a gene expression profile, it can potentially infer hidden GRNs from time-course experiments.

  12. Deep Space Network (DSN), Network Operations Control Center (NOCC) computer-human interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellman, Alvin; Carlton, Magdi

    1993-01-01

    The Network Operations Control Center (NOCC) of the DSN is responsible for scheduling the resources of DSN, and monitoring all multi-mission spacecraft tracking activities in real-time. Operations performs this job with computer systems at JPL connected to over 100 computers at Goldstone, Australia and Spain. The old computer system became obsolete, and the first version of the new system was installed in 1991. Significant improvements for the computer-human interfaces became the dominant theme for the replacement project. Major issues required innovating problem solving. Among these issues were: How to present several thousand data elements on displays without overloading the operator? What is the best graphical representation of DSN end-to-end data flow? How to operate the system without memorizing mnemonics of hundreds of operator directives? Which computing environment will meet the competing performance requirements? This paper presents the technical challenges, engineering solutions, and results of the NOCC computer-human interface design.

  13. A Multi-Year Study of Teaching an Online Computer Literacy Course in a Medical University: A Lesson Learnt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wan, Hsu-Tien; Hsu, Kuang-Yang; Sheu, Shiow-Yunn

    2016-01-01

    In this research, we aim to understand the effectiveness of adopting educational technologies in a computer literacy course to students in a medical university. The course was organized with three core components: Open Education Resources (OER) reading, a book club, and online game competition. These components were delivered by a learning…

  14. Is It Ethical for Patents to Be Issued for the Computer Algorithms that Affect Course Management Systems for Distance Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreau, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the impact of patents for computer algorithms in course management systems. Referring to historical documents and court cases, the positive and negative aspects of software patents are presented. The key argument is the accessibility to algorithms comprising a course management software program such as Blackboard. The…

  15. Report on Computing and Networking in the Space Science Laboratory by the SSL Computer Committee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The Space Science Laboratory (SSL) at Marshall Space Flight Center is a multiprogram facility. Scientific research is conducted in four discipline areas: earth science and applications, solar-terrestrial physics, astrophysics, and microgravity science and applications. Representatives from each of these discipline areas participate in a Laboratory computer requirements committee, which developed this document. The purpose is to establish and discuss Laboratory objectives for computing and networking in support of science. The purpose is also to lay the foundation for a collective, multiprogram approach to providing these services. Special recognition is given to the importance of the national and international efforts of our research communities toward the development of interoperable, network-based computer applications.

  16. Directly executable formal models of middleware for MANET and Cloud Networking and Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashchenko, D. V.; Sadeq Jaafar, Mustafa; Zinkin, S. A.; Trokoz, D. A.; Pashchenko, T. U.; Sinev, M. P.

    2016-04-01

    The article considers some “directly executable” formal models that are suitable for the specification of computing and networking in the cloud environment and other networks which are similar to wireless networks MANET. These models can be easily programmed and implemented on computer networks.

  17. Experimental, analytical and computational investigation of bimodal elastomer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Lockette, Paris Robert

    Advances in the synthesis of macromolecular materials have led to the creation of special classes of elastomers called bimodal because of their bimodal distributions of linear starting oligomers. Numerous studies on these materials have documented anomalous increases in ultimate strength and toughness at certain mixture combinations of the constituents but have not yet identified a cause for this behavior. In addition, the ability to predict optimal mixtures still eludes polymer chemists. Constitutive models for the behavior of bimodal materials are also unable to predict material behavior, but instead tend to capture results using complicated curve fitting and iterative schemes. This thesis uncovers topological and micromechanical sources of these enhanced properties using periodic, topological simulations of chain-level network formation and develops a constitutive model of the aggregate bimodal network. Using a topological framework, in conjunction with the eight-chain averaging scheme of Arruda and Boyce, this work develops optical and mechanical constitutive models for bimodal elastomers whose results compare favorably with data in the literature. The resulting bimodal network theory is able to predict material response for a range of bimodal compositions using only two sets of data, a direct improvement over previous models. The micromechanics of elastomeric deformation and chain orientation as described by the eight-chain model are further validated by comparing optical and mechanical data generated during large deformation shear tests on unimodal materials with finite element simulations. In addition, a newly developed optical anisotropy model for the Raman tensor of polymeric materials, generated using an eight-chain unit cell model, is shown to compare favorably with tensile data in the literature. Results generated using NETSIM, a computer program developed in this thesis, have revealed naturally occurring, self-reinforcing topological features

  18. Relationship of the Gonial Angle and Inferior Alveolar Canal Course Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Anbiaee, Najmeh; Bagherpour, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Accurate localization of the inferior alveolar canal (IAC) is extremely important in some dental treatments. Anatomical variation of the canal means that it can be difficult to locate. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship of the gonial angle (GA) size and IAC position using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 61 dry adult human hemi-mandibles were used. The CBCT scans were taken of all samples and GA was measured on all CBCT scans. The samples were divided into two groups of low angle (≤125°) and high angle (>125°). The canal dimensions, length and course were evaluated. On the sagittal view, the IAC path was classified as type A, B or C. On the axial view, canal course was defined as A1 or A2 according to the mental foramen angle. Results: The average GA size was 121.8±7.05° at the right side and 123.8±6.32° at the left side. On the sagittal view, there was a significant correlation between the GA size and the canal course (P=0.04). In the high-angle group, type A was dominant; whereas in the low-angle group, type B was more common. On the axial view of IAC course, type A1 was more common (73.43%). Conclusion: The results showed that GA size was associated with IAC course. In cases with a larger GA, the canal runs in a more straightforward path, and at the same level as the mental foramen. PMID:27252759

  19. An effective method for computing the noise in biochemical networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiajun; Nie, Qing; He, Miao; Zhou, Tianshou

    2013-01-01

    We present a simple yet effective method, which is based on power series expansion, for computing exact binomial moments that can be in turn used to compute steady-state probability distributions as well as the noise in linear or nonlinear biochemical reaction networks. When the method is applied to representative reaction networks such as the ON-OFF models of gene expression, gene models of promoter progression, gene auto-regulatory models, and common signaling motifs, the exact formulae for computing the intensities of noise in the species of interest or steady-state distributions are analytically given. Interestingly, we find that positive (negative) feedback does not enlarge (reduce) noise as claimed in previous works but has a counter-intuitive effect and that the multi-OFF (or ON) mechanism always attenuates the noise in contrast to the common ON-OFF mechanism and can modulate the noise to the lowest level independently of the mRNA mean. Except for its power in deriving analytical expressions for distributions and noise, our method is programmable and has apparent advantages in reducing computational cost. PMID:23464139

  20. Application of artificial neural networks in computer-aided diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bei

    2015-01-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis is a diagnostic procedure in which a radiologist uses the outputs of computer analysis of medical images as a second opinion in the interpretation of medical images, either to help with lesion detection or to help determine if the lesion is benign or malignant. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are usually employed to formulate the statistical models for computer analysis. Receiver operating characteristic curves are used to evaluate the performance of the ANN alone, as well as the diagnostic performance of radiologists who take into account the ANN output as a second opinion. In this chapter, we use mammograms to illustrate how an ANN model is trained, tested, and evaluated, and how a radiologist should use the ANN output as a second opinion in CAD.

  1. Reconfigurable modular computer networks for spacecraft on-board processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rennels, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The core electronics subsystems on unmanned spacecraft, which have been sent over the last 20 years to investigate the moon, Mars, Venus, and Mercury, have progressed through an evolution from simple fixed controllers and analog computers in the 1960's to general-purpose digital computers in current designs. This evolution is now moving in the direction of distributed computer networks. Current Voyager spacecraft already use three on-board computers. One is used to store commands and provide overall spacecraft management. Another is used for instrument control and telemetry collection, and the third computer is used for attitude control and scientific instrument pointing. An examination of the control logic in the instruments shows that, for many, it is cost-effective to replace the sequencing logic with a microcomputer. The Unified Data System architecture considered consists of a set of standard microcomputers connected by several redundant buses. A typical self-checking computer module will contain 23 RAMs, two microprocessors, one memory interface, three bus interfaces, and one core building block.

  2. A new method for computing attention network scores and relationships between attention networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Feng; Cui, Qian; Liu, Feng; Huo, Ya-Jun; Lu, Feng-Mei; Chen, Heng; Chen, Hua-Fu

    2014-01-01

    The attention network test (ANT) is a reliable tool to detect the efficiency of alerting, orienting, and executive control networks. However, studies using the ANT obtained inconsistent relationships between attention networks due to two reasons: on the one hand, the inter-network relationships of attention subsystems were far from clear; on the other hand, ANT scores in previous studies were disturbed by possible inter-network interactions. Here we proposed a new computing method by dissecting cue-target conditions to estimate ANT scores and relationships between attention networks as pure as possible. The method was tested in 36 participants. Comparing to the original method, the new method showed a larger alerting score and a smaller executive control score, and revealed interactions between alerting and executive control and between orienting and executive control. More interestingly, the new method revealed unidirectional influences from alerting to executive control and from executive control to orienting. These findings provided useful information for better understanding attention networks and their relationships in the ANT. Finally, the relationships of attention networks should be considered with more experimental paradigms and techniques.

  3. Open Problems in Network-aware Data Management in Exa-scale Computing and Terabit Networking Era

    SciTech Connect

    Balman, Mehmet; Byna, Surendra

    2011-12-06

    Accessing and managing large amounts of data is a great challenge in collaborative computing environments where resources and users are geographically distributed. Recent advances in network technology led to next-generation high-performance networks, allowing high-bandwidth connectivity. Efficient use of the network infrastructure is necessary in order to address the increasing data and compute requirements of large-scale applications. We discuss several open problems, evaluate emerging trends, and articulate our perspectives in network-aware data management.

  4. Line-plane broadcasting in a data communications network of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Berg, Jeremy E.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-11-23

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for line-plane broadcasting in a data communications network of a parallel computer, the parallel computer comprising a plurality of compute nodes connected together through the network, the network optimized for point to point data communications and characterized by at least a first dimension, a second dimension, and a third dimension, that include: initiating, by a broadcasting compute node, a broadcast operation, including sending a message to all of the compute nodes along an axis of the first dimension for the network; sending, by each compute node along the axis of the first dimension, the message to all of the compute nodes along an axis of the second dimension for the network; and sending, by each compute node along the axis of the second dimension, the message to all of the compute nodes along an axis of the third dimension for the network.

  5. Line-plane broadcasting in a data communications network of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Berg, Jeremy E.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-06-08

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for line-plane broadcasting in a data communications network of a parallel computer, the parallel computer comprising a plurality of compute nodes connected together through the network, the network optimized for point to point data communications and characterized by at least a first dimension, a second dimension, and a third dimension, that include: initiating, by a broadcasting compute node, a broadcast operation, including sending a message to all of the compute nodes along an axis of the first dimension for the network; sending, by each compute node along the axis of the first dimension, the message to all of the compute nodes along an axis of the second dimension for the network; and sending, by each compute node along the axis of the second dimension, the message to all of the compute nodes along an axis of the third dimension for the network.

  6. The relationship among self-regulation, internet use, and academic achievement in a computer literacy course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YangKim, SungHee

    This research was a correlational study of the relationship among self-regulation, students' nonacademic internet browsing, and academic achievement in an undergraduate computer literacy class. Nonacademic internet browsing during class can be a distraction from student academic studies. There has been little research on the role of self-regulation on nonacademic internet browsing in influencing academic achievement. Undergraduate computer literacy classes were used as samples (n= 39) for measuring these variables. Data were collected during three class periods in two sections of the computer literacy course taught by one instructor. The data consisted of a demographic survey, selected and modified items from the GVU 10th WWW User Survey Questionnaire, selected items of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire, and measures of internet use. There were low correlations between self-regulation and academic grades (r= .18, p > .05) and self-regulation and internet use (r= -.14, p > .05). None of the correlations were statistically significant. Also, there was no statistically significant correlation between internet use and academic achievement (r= -.23, p >.05). Self-regulation was highly correlated to self-efficacy (r= .53, p < .05). Total internet access was highly correlated to nonacademic related internet browsing (r= .96, p < .01). Although not statistically significant, the consistent negative correlations between nonacademic internet use with both self-regulation and achievement indicate that the internet may present an attractive distraction to achievement which may be due to lack of self-regulation. The implication of embedded instruction of self-regulation in the computer literacy course was discussed to enhance self-regulated internet use. Further study of interaction of self-regulated internet use and academic achievement is recommended.

  7. Identification of driving network of cellular differentiation from single sample time course gene expression data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ye; Wolanyk, Nathaniel; Ilker, Tunc; Gao, Shouguo; Wang, Xujing

    Methods developed based on bifurcation theory have demonstrated their potential in driving network identification for complex human diseases, including the work by Chen, et al. Recently bifurcation theory has been successfully applied to model cellular differentiation. However, there one often faces a technical challenge in driving network prediction: time course cellular differentiation study often only contains one sample at each time point, while driving network prediction typically require multiple samples at each time point to infer the variation and interaction structures of candidate genes for the driving network. In this study, we investigate several methods to identify both the critical time point and the driving network through examination of how each time point affects the autocorrelation and phase locking. We apply these methods to a high-throughput sequencing (RNA-Seq) dataset of 42 subsets of thymocytes and mature peripheral T cells at multiple time points during their differentiation (GSE48138 from GEO). We compare the predicted driving genes with known transcription regulators of cellular differentiation. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of our proposed methods, as well as potential further improvements of our methods.

  8. Computer-Aided Design of Photocured Polymer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Swarnavo; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Chiang, Martin

    Light-initiated free radical polymerization is widely used for manufacturing biomaterials, scaffolds for micomolding, and is being developed as a method for fast 3D fabrication. This process has a large set of control parameters in the composition of the photocurable matrix and the photocuring conditions. But a quantitative map between the choice of parameters and the properties of the resultant polymer is currently unavailable. We present a computational approach to simulate the growth of a polymer network using the stochastic differential equations of reactions and diffusion for a photocuring system. This method allows us to sample trajectories of a growing polymer network in silico. Thus, we provide a computational alternative to synthesize and probe a polymer network for properties like the degree of conversion, structure factor, density of states, and viscosity. We present simulation results that agree with the universal features observed in photopolymerization. Our proposed method enables a thorough and systematic search over the entire parameter space to discover interesting combinations for synthesis.

  9. Social network analysis of a project-based introductory physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakley, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Research suggests that students benefit from peer interaction and active engagement in the classroom. The quality, nature, effect of these interactions is currently being explored by Physics Education Researchers. Spelman College offers an introductory physics sequence that addresses content and research skills by engaging students in open-ended research projects, a form of Project-Based Learning. Students have been surveyed at regular intervals during the second semester of trigonometry-based course to determine the frequency of interactions in and out of class. These interactions can be with current or past students, tutors, and instructors. This line of inquiry focuses on metrics of Social Network analysis, such as centrality of participants as well as segmentation of groups. Further research will refine and highlight deeper questions regarding student performance in this pedagogy and course sequence.

  10. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Network Requirements: ASCR Network Requirements Review Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Charles; Bell, Greg; Canon, Shane; Dart, Eli; Dattoria, Vince; Goodwin, Dave; Lee, Jason; Hicks, Susan; Holohan, Ed; Klasky, Scott; Lauzon, Carolyn; Rogers, Jim; Shipman, Galen; Skinner, David; Tierney, Brian

    2013-03-08

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In October 2012, ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the ASCR program office. The requirements identified at the review are summarized in the Findings section, and are described in more detail in the body of the report.

  11. Formative questioning in computer learning environments: a course for pre-service mathematics teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkoç, Hatice

    2015-11-01

    This paper focuses on a specific aspect of formative assessment, namely questioning. Given that computers have gained widespread use in learning and teaching, specific attention should be made when organizing formative assessment in computer learning environments (CLEs). A course including various workshops was designed to develop knowledge and skills of questioning in CLEs. This study investigates how pre-service mathematics teachers used formative questioning with technological tools such as Geogebra and Graphic Calculus software. Participants are 35 pre-service mathematics teachers. To analyse formative questioning, two types of questions are investigated: mathematical questions and technical questions. Data were collected through lesson plans, teaching notes, interviews and observations. Descriptive statistics of the number of questions in the lesson plans before and after the workshops are presented. Examples of two types of questions are discussed using the theoretical framework. One pre-service teacher was selected and a deeper analysis of the way he used questioning during his three lessons was also investigated. The findings indicated an improvement in using technical questions for formative purposes and that the course provided a guideline in planning and using mathematical and technical questions in CLEs.

  12. High-performance computing, high-speed networks, and configurable computing environments: progress toward fully distributed computing.

    PubMed

    Johnston, W E; Jacobson, V L; Loken, S C; Robertson, D W; Tierney, B L

    1992-01-01

    The next several years will see the maturing of a collection of technologies that will enable fully and transparently distributed computing environments. Networks will be used to configure independent computing, storage, and I/O elements into "virtual systems" that are optimal for solving a particular problem. This environment will make the most powerful computing systems those that are logically assembled from network-based components and will also make those systems available to a widespread audience. Anticipating that the necessary technology and communications infrastructure will be available in the next 3 to 5 years, we are developing and demonstrating prototype applications that test and exercise the currently available elements of this configurable environment. The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) Information and Computing Sciences and Research Medicine Divisions have collaborated with the Pittsburgh Supercomputer Center to demonstrate one distributed application that illuminates the issues and potential of using networks to configure virtual systems. This application allows the interactive visualization of large three-dimensional (3D) scalar fields (voxel data sets) by using a network-based configuration of heterogeneous supercomputers and workstations. The specific test case is visualization of 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. The virtual system architecture consists of a Connection Machine-2 (CM-2) that performs surface reconstruction from the voxel data, a Cray Y-MP that renders the resulting geometric data into an image, and a workstation that provides the display of the image and the user interface for specifying the parameters for the geometry generation and 3D viewing. These three elements are configured into a virtual system by using several different network technologies. This paper reviews the current status of the software, hardware, and communications technologies that are needed to enable this configurable environment. These

  13. Convolutional Deep Belief Networks for Single-Cell/Object Tracking in Computational Biology and Computer Vision.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Bineng; Pan, Shengnan; Zhang, Hongbo; Wang, Tian; Du, Jixiang; Chen, Duansheng; Cao, Liujuan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose deep architecture to dynamically learn the most discriminative features from data for both single-cell and object tracking in computational biology and computer vision. Firstly, the discriminative features are automatically learned via a convolutional deep belief network (CDBN). Secondly, we design a simple yet effective method to transfer features learned from CDBNs on the source tasks for generic purpose to the object tracking tasks using only limited amount of training data. Finally, to alleviate the tracker drifting problem caused by model updating, we jointly consider three different types of positive samples. Extensive experiments validate the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Convolutional Deep Belief Networks for Single-Cell/Object Tracking in Computational Biology and Computer Vision

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Shengnan; Zhang, Hongbo; Wang, Tian; Du, Jixiang; Chen, Duansheng; Cao, Liujuan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose deep architecture to dynamically learn the most discriminative features from data for both single-cell and object tracking in computational biology and computer vision. Firstly, the discriminative features are automatically learned via a convolutional deep belief network (CDBN). Secondly, we design a simple yet effective method to transfer features learned from CDBNs on the source tasks for generic purpose to the object tracking tasks using only limited amount of training data. Finally, to alleviate the tracker drifting problem caused by model updating, we jointly consider three different types of positive samples. Extensive experiments validate the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:27847827

  15. Universal quantum computation with ordered spin-chain networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Loss, Daniel

    2011-09-15

    It is shown that anisotropic spin chains with gapped bulk excitations and magnetically ordered ground states offer a promising platform for quantum computation, which bridges the conventional single-spin-based qubit concept with recently developed topological Majorana-based proposals. We show how to realize the single-qubit Hadamard, phase, and {pi}/8 gates as well as the two-qubit controlled-not (cnot) gate, which together form a fault-tolerant universal set of quantum gates. The gates are implemented by judiciously controlling Ising exchange and magnetic fields along a network of spin chains, with each individual qubit furnished by a spin-chain segment. A subset of single-qubit operations is geometric in nature, relying on control of anisotropy of spin interactions rather than their strength. We contrast topological aspects of the anisotropic spin-chain networks to those of p-wave superconducting wires discussed in the literature.

  16. [Forensic evidence-based medicine in computer communication networks].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yun-Liang; Peng, Ming-Qi

    2013-12-01

    As an important component of judicial expertise, forensic science is broad and highly specialized. With development of network technology, increasement of information resources, and improvement of people's legal consciousness, forensic scientists encounter many new problems, and have been required to meet higher evidentiary standards in litigation. In view of this, evidence-based concept should be established in forensic medicine. We should find the most suitable method in forensic science field and other related area to solve specific problems in the evidence-based mode. Evidence-based practice can solve the problems in legal medical field, and it will play a great role in promoting the progress and development of forensic science. This article reviews the basic theory of evidence-based medicine and its effect, way, method, and evaluation in the forensic medicine in order to discuss the application value of forensic evidence-based medicine in computer communication networks.

  17. A Study of the Relationship between Learner-Control Patterns and Course Completion in Computer-Assisted Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasscer, Monica Flynn; Moore, David M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a study designed to discover how community college students enrolled in algebra and English grammar courses used the available learner-control features of the TICCIT (Time-Shared Interactive Computer-Controlled Information Television) computer-assisted instruction system. Results indicate learner-control options were utilized but no…

  18. Self-Assessment and Student Improvement in an Introductory Computer Course at the Community College-Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spicer-Sutton, Jama

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine a student's computer knowledge upon course entry and if there was a difference in college students' improvement scores as measured by the difference in pretest and posttest scores of new or novice users, moderate users, and expert users at the end of a college-level introductory computing class. This…

  19. Universal quantum computation with a nonlinear oscillator network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Hayato

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically show that a nonlinear oscillator network with controllable parameters can be used for universal quantum computation. The initialization is achieved by a quantum-mechanical bifurcation based on quantum adiabatic evolution, which yields a Schrödinger cat state. All the elementary quantum gates are also achieved by quantum adiabatic evolution, in which dynamical phases accompanying the adiabatic evolutions are controlled by the system parameters. Numerical simulation results indicate that high gate fidelities can be achieved, where no dissipation is assumed.

  20. A New Stochastic Computing Methodology for Efficient Neural Network Implementation.

    PubMed

    Canals, Vincent; Morro, Antoni; Oliver, Antoni; Alomar, Miquel L; Rosselló, Josep L

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for the hardware implementation of neural networks (NNs) based on probabilistic laws. The proposed encoding scheme circumvents the limitations of classical stochastic computing (based on unipolar or bipolar encoding) extending the representation range to any real number using the ratio of two bipolar-encoded pulsed signals. Furthermore, the novel approach presents practically a total noise-immunity capability due to its specific codification. We introduce different designs for building the fundamental blocks needed to implement NNs. The validity of the present approach is demonstrated through a regression and a pattern recognition task. The low cost of the methodology in terms of hardware, along with its capacity to implement complex mathematical functions (such as the hyperbolic tangent), allows its use for building highly reliable systems and parallel computing.

  1. Complex network problems in physics, computer science and biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cojocaru, Radu Ionut

    There is a close relation between physics and mathematics and the exchange of ideas between these two sciences are well established. However until few years ago there was no such a close relation between physics and computer science. Even more, only recently biologists started to use methods and tools from statistical physics in order to study the behavior of complex system. In this thesis we concentrate on applying and analyzing several methods borrowed from computer science to biology and also we use methods from statistical physics in solving hard problems from computer science. In recent years physicists have been interested in studying the behavior of complex networks. Physics is an experimental science in which theoretical predictions are compared to experiments. In this definition, the term prediction plays a very important role: although the system is complex, it is still possible to get predictions for its behavior, but these predictions are of a probabilistic nature. Spin glasses, lattice gases or the Potts model are a few examples of complex systems in physics. Spin glasses and many frustrated antiferromagnets map exactly to computer science problems in the NP-hard class defined in Chapter 1. In Chapter 1 we discuss a common result from artificial intelligence (AI) which shows that there are some problems which are NP-complete, with the implication that these problems are difficult to solve. We introduce a few well known hard problems from computer science (Satisfiability, Coloring, Vertex Cover together with Maximum Independent Set and Number Partitioning) and then discuss their mapping to problems from physics. In Chapter 2 we provide a short review of combinatorial optimization algorithms and their applications to ground state problems in disordered systems. We discuss the cavity method initially developed for studying the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model of spin glasses. We extend this model to the study of a specific case of spin glass on the Bethe

  2. A computer lab exploring evolutionary aspects of chromatin structure and dynamics for an undergraduate chromatin course*.

    PubMed

    Eirín-López, José M

    2013-01-01

    The study of chromatin constitutes one of the most active research fields in life sciences, being subject to constant revisions that continuously redefine the state of the art in its knowledge. As every other rapidly changing field, chromatin biology requires clear and straightforward educational strategies able to efficiently translate such a vast body of knowledge to the classroom. With this aim, the present work describes a multidisciplinary computer lab designed to introduce undergraduate students to the dynamic nature of chromatin, within the context of the one semester course "Chromatin: Structure, Function and Evolution." This exercise is organized in three parts including (a) molecular evolutionary biology of histone families (using the H1 family as example), (b) histone structure and variation across different animal groups, and (c) effect of histone diversity on nucleosome structure and chromatin dynamics. By using freely available bioinformatic tools that can be run on common computers, the concept of chromatin dynamics is interactively illustrated from a comparative/evolutionary perspective. At the end of this computer lab, students are able to translate the bioinformatic information into a biochemical context in which the relevance of histone primary structure on chromatin dynamics is exposed. During the last 8 years this exercise has proven to be a powerful approach for teaching chromatin structure and dynamics, allowing students a higher degree of independence during the processes of learning and self-assessment.

  3. Efficient shortest-path-tree computation in network routing based on pulse-coupled neural networks.

    PubMed

    Qu, Hong; Yi, Zhang; Yang, Simon X

    2013-06-01

    Shortest path tree (SPT) computation is a critical issue for routers using link-state routing protocols, such as the most commonly used open shortest path first and intermediate system to intermediate system. Each router needs to recompute a new SPT rooted from itself whenever a change happens in the link state. Most commercial routers do this computation by deleting the current SPT and building a new one using static algorithms such as the Dijkstra algorithm at the beginning. Such recomputation of an entire SPT is inefficient, which may consume a considerable amount of CPU time and result in a time delay in the network. Some dynamic updating methods using the information in the updated SPT have been proposed in recent years. However, there are still many limitations in those dynamic algorithms. In this paper, a new modified model of pulse-coupled neural networks (M-PCNNs) is proposed for the SPT computation. It is rigorously proved that the proposed model is capable of solving some optimization problems, such as the SPT. A static algorithm is proposed based on the M-PCNNs to compute the SPT efficiently for large-scale problems. In addition, a dynamic algorithm that makes use of the structure of the previously computed SPT is proposed, which significantly improves the efficiency of the algorithm. Simulation results demonstrate the effective and efficient performance of the proposed approach.

  4. Universal quantum computation in a semiconductor quantum wire network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sau, Jay D.; Tewari, Sumanta; Das Sarma, S.

    2010-11-01

    Universal quantum computation (UQC) using Majorana fermions on a two-dimensional topological superconducting (TS) medium remains an outstanding open problem. This is because the quantum gate set that can be generated by braiding of the Majorana fermions does not include any two-qubit gate and also no single-qubit π/8 phase gate. In principle, it is possible to create these crucial extra gates using quantum interference of Majorana fermion currents. However, it is not clear if the motion of the various order parameter defects (vortices, domain walls, etc.), to which the Majorana fermions are bound in a TS medium, can be quantum coherent. We show that these obstacles can be overcome using a semiconductor quantum wire network in the vicinity of an s-wave superconductor, by constructing topologically protected two-qubit gates and any arbitrary single-qubit phase gate in a topologically unprotected manner, which can be error corrected using magic-state distillation. Thus our strategy, using a judicious combination of topologically protected and unprotected gate operations, realizes UQC on a quantum wire network with a remarkably high error threshold of 0.14 as compared to 10-3 to 10-4 in ordinary unprotected quantum computation.

  5. Teaching Advanced Concepts in Computer Networks: VNUML-UM Virtualization Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Pereniguez-Garcia, F.; Marin-Lopez, R.; Ruiz-Martinez, P. M.; Skarmeta-Gomez, A. F.

    2013-01-01

    In the teaching of computer networks the main problem that arises is the high price and limited number of network devices the students can work with in the laboratories. Nowadays, with virtualization we can overcome this limitation. In this paper, we present a methodology that allows students to learn advanced computer network concepts through…

  6. Brain without mind: Computer simulation of neural networks with modifiable neuronal interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, John W.; Rafelski, Johann; Winston, Jeffrey V.

    1985-07-01

    Aspects of brain function are examined in terms of a nonlinear dynamical system of highly interconnected neuron-like binary decision elements. The model neurons operate synchronously in discrete time, according to deterministic or probabilistic equations of motion. Plasticity of the nervous system, which underlies such cognitive collective phenomena as adaptive development, learning, and memory, is represented by temporal modification of interneuronal connection strengths depending on momentary or recent neural activity. A formal basis is presented for the construction of local plasticity algorithms, or connection-modification routines, spanning a large class. To build an intuitive understanding of the behavior of discrete-time network models, extensive computer simulations have been carried out (a) for nets with fixed, quasirandom connectivity and (b) for nets with connections that evolve under one or another choice of plasticity algorithm. From the former experiments, insights are gained concerning the spontaneous emergence of order in the form of cyclic modes of neuronal activity. In the course of the latter experiments, a simple plasticity routine (“brainwashing,” or “anti-learning”) was identified which, applied to nets with initially quasirandom connectivity, creates model networks which provide more felicitous starting points for computer experiments on the engramming of content-addressable memories and on learning more generally. The potential relevance of this algorithm to developmental neurobiology and to sleep states is discussed. The model considered is at the same time a synthesis of earlier synchronous neural-network models and an elaboration upon them; accordingly, the present article offers both a focused review of the dynamical properties of such systems and a selection of new findings derived from computer simulation.

  7. High-performance computing and networking as tools for accurate emission computed tomography reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Passeri, A; Formiconi, A R; De Cristofaro, M T; Pupi, A; Meldolesi, U

    1997-04-01

    It is well known that the quantitative potential of emission computed tomography (ECT) relies on the ability to compensate for resolution, attenuation and scatter effects. Reconstruction algorithms which are able to take these effects into account are highly demanding in terms of computing resources. The reported work aimed to investigate the use of a parallel high-performance computing platform for ECT reconstruction taking into account an accurate model of the acquisition of single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) data. An iterative algorithm with an accurate model of the variable system response was ported on the MIMD (Multiple Instruction Multiple Data) parallel architecture of a 64-node Cray T3D massively parallel computer. The system was organized to make it easily accessible even from low-cost PC-based workstations through standard TCP/IP networking. A complete brain study of 30 (64x64) slices could be reconstructed from a set of 90 (64x64) projections with ten iterations of the conjugate gradients algorithm in 9 s, corresponding to an actual speed-up factor of 135. This work demonstrated the possibility of exploiting remote high-performance computing and networking resources from hospital sites by means of low-cost workstations using standard communication protocols without particular problems for routine use. The achievable speed-up factors allow the assessment of the clinical benefit of advanced reconstruction techniques which require a heavy computational burden for the compensation effects such as variable spatial resolution, scatter and attenuation. The possibility of using the same software on the same hardware platform with data acquired in different laboratories with various kinds of SPET instrumentation is appealing for software quality control and for the evaluation of the clinical impact of the reconstruction methods.

  8. Eye tracking using artificial neural networks for human computer interaction.

    PubMed

    Demjén, E; Aboši, V; Tomori, Z

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an ongoing project that has the aim to develop a low cost application to replace a computer mouse for people with physical impairment. The application is based on an eye tracking algorithm and assumes that the camera and the head position are fixed. Color tracking and template matching methods are used for pupil detection. Calibration is provided by neural networks as well as by parametric interpolation methods. Neural networks use back-propagation for learning and bipolar sigmoid function is chosen as the activation function. The user's eye is scanned with a simple web camera with backlight compensation which is attached to a head fixation device. Neural networks significantly outperform parametric interpolation techniques: 1) the calibration procedure is faster as they require less calibration marks and 2) cursor control is more precise. The system in its current stage of development is able to distinguish regions at least on the level of desktop icons. The main limitation of the proposed method is the lack of head-pose invariance and its relative sensitivity to illumination (especially to incidental pupil reflections).

  9. Applied and computational harmonic analysis on graphs and networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irion, Jeff; Saito, Naoki

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, the advent of new sensor technologies and social network infrastructure has provided huge opportunities and challenges for analyzing data recorded on such networks. In the case of data on regular lattices, computational harmonic analysis tools such as the Fourier and wavelet transforms have well-developed theories and proven track records of success. It is therefore quite important to extend such tools from the classical setting of regular lattices to the more general setting of graphs and networks. In this article, we first review basics of graph Laplacian matrices, whose eigenpairs are often interpreted as the frequencies and the Fourier basis vectors on a given graph. We point out, however, that such an interpretation is misleading unless the underlying graph is either an unweighted path or cycle. We then discuss our recent effort of constructing multiscale basis dictionaries on a graph, including the Hierarchical Graph Laplacian Eigenbasis Dictionary and the Generalized Haar-Walsh Wavelet Packet Dictionary, which are viewed as generalizations of the classical hierarchical block DCTs and the Haar-Walsh wavelet packets, respectively, to the graph setting. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of our dictionaries by using them to simultaneously segment and denoise 1-D noisy signals sampled on regular lattices, a problem where classical tools have difficulty.

  10. BGRMI: A method for inferring gene regulatory networks from time-course gene expression data and its application in breast cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Martinez, Luis F.; Kolch, Walter; Santra, Tapesh

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing gene regulatory networks (GRNs) from gene expression data is a challenging problem. Existing GRN reconstruction algorithms can be broadly divided into model-free and model–based methods. Typically, model-free methods have high accuracy but are computation intensive whereas model-based methods are fast but less accurate. We propose Bayesian Gene Regulation Model Inference (BGRMI), a model-based method for inferring GRNs from time-course gene expression data. BGRMI uses a Bayesian framework to calculate the probability of different models of GRNs and a heuristic search strategy to scan the model space efficiently. Using benchmark datasets, we show that BGRMI has higher/comparable accuracy at a fraction of the computational cost of competing algorithms. Additionally, it can incorporate prior knowledge of potential gene regulation mechanisms and TF hetero-dimerization processes in the GRN reconstruction process. We incorporated existing ChIP-seq data and known protein interactions between TFs in BGRMI as sources of prior knowledge to reconstruct transcription regulatory networks of proliferating and differentiating breast cancer (BC) cells from time-course gene expression data. The reconstructed networks revealed key driver genes of proliferation and differentiation in BC cells. Some of these genes were not previously studied in the context of BC, but may have clinical relevance in BC treatment. PMID:27876826

  11. Developing and validating test items for first-year computer science courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahrenhold, Jan; Paul, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    We report on the development, validation, and implementation of a collection of test items designed to detect misconceptions related to first-year computer science courses. To this end, we reworked the development scheme proposed by Almstrum et al. (SIGCSE Bulletin 38(4):132-145, 2006) to include students' artifacts and to simultaneously incorporate think-aloud interviews and flash tests. We also investigated to what extent the practical efficiency of detecting certain misconceptions could be increased without significantly affecting the sensitivity of the instrument, and present positive and negative results regarding this goal. The results of a first transfer and implementation study suggest that it is indeed possible to use the test items in a large-scale practical setting - both as diagnostic instruments and as interventions.

  12. Computer simulations enhance experimental demonstrations in the underwater acoustics and sonar course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korman, Murray S.

    2002-11-01

    Underwater acoustics and sonar (SP411) is a 3 hour course that is offered to midshipmen in their senior year. Typically, general science and oceanography majors, totaling 110 students/yr, enroll. Since this course is offered without a lab, the ''in class'' experience has been enhanced with the development (over many years) of our demo carts and computer workstations which surround the classroom. In a studio classroom atmosphere, students perform a variety of experiments in small groups. How can scientific visualizations best develop learning of complex interactions? Two examples are presented. PC-IMAT (personal curriculum interactive multisensor analysis training) simulations of multielement array steering support the theory and enhance the experiments that are performed in class such as the two-element array. Mathematica simulations involving the programming and animation of a point source in a rigid-rigid infinite parallel wave guide are used to stress the method of images, superposition, group and phase velocity and far-field modal pattern that is observed as a function of depth and source frequency. Later, students have fun using a ripple tank with an eye dropper to generate a point source between two adjustable parallel boundaries, and their understanding of ''underwater sound'' is greatly enhanced.

  13. Supramolecular Chemistry: Computer-Assisted Instruction in Undergraduate and Graduate Chemistry Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnek, Alexandre A.; Dietrich, Bernard; Wipff, Georges; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Boldyreva, Elena V.

    2000-02-01

    An interactive electronic textbook (SC-WEB) based on Supramolecular Chemistry, by J.-M. Lehn, is described. It includes the text, which has been specially adapted for teaching, and data on the structures of molecules and supermolecules. The list includes about 100 structures retrieved from the Cambridge Structural Database (version 1997) as well as those obtained from molecular dynamics simulations in solution. The structures can be retrieved either from the text or, independently, from the list. SC-WEB uses two types of programs: the first one reads files in HTML format (Word97, Netscape, or Internet Explorer), and WebLab Viewer Lite is used for visualizing and manipulating the structures. It can run on any PC (W95/NT4.0) computer. The application of SC-WEB for a course in supramolecular chemistry, as well as in other chemical courses, is discussed. A few examples related to the binding of alkali cations by organic and inorganic receptors, and of R-NH3+ cations by organic receptors, are considered in more detail.

  14. Undergraduate Research in Physics as a course for Engineering and Computer Science Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, James; Rueckert, Franz; Sirokman, Greg

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate research has become more and more integral to the functioning of higher educational institutions. At many institutions undergraduate research is conducted as capstone projects in the pure sciences, however, science faculty at some schools (including that of the authors) face the challenge of not having science majors. Even at these institutions, a select population of high achieving engineering students will often express a keen interest in conducting pure science research. Since a foray into science research provides the student the full exposure to the scientific method and scientific collaboration, the experience can be quite rewarding and beneficial to the development of the student as a professional. To this end, the authors have been working to find new contexts in which to offer research experiences to non- science majors, including a new undergraduate research class conducted by physics and chemistry faculty. An added benefit is that these courses are inherently interdisciplinary. Students in the engineering and computer science fields step into physics and chemistry labs to solve science problems, often invoking their own relevant expertise. In this paper we start by discussing the common themes and outcomes of the course. We then discuss three particular projects that were conducted with engineering students and focus on how the undergraduate research experience enhanced their already rigorous engineering curriculum.

  15. Spiral and Project-Based Learning with Peer Assessment in a Computer Science Project Management Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaime, Arturo; Blanco, José Miguel; Domínguez, César; Sánchez, Ana; Heras, Jónathan; Usandizaga, Imanol

    2016-06-01

    Different learning methods such as project-based learning, spiral learning and peer assessment have been implemented in science disciplines with different outcomes. This paper presents a proposal for a project management course in the context of a computer science degree. Our proposal combines three well-known methods: project-based learning, spiral learning and peer assessment. Namely, the course is articulated during a semester through the structured (progressive and incremental) development of a sequence of four projects, whose duration, scope and difficulty of management increase as the student gains theoretical and instrumental knowledge related to planning, monitoring and controlling projects. Moreover, the proposal is complemented using peer assessment. The proposal has already been implemented and validated for the last 3 years in two different universities. In the first year, project-based learning and spiral learning methods were combined. Such a combination was also employed in the other 2 years; but additionally, students had the opportunity to assess projects developed by university partners and by students of the other university. A total of 154 students have participated in the study. We obtain a gain in the quality of the subsequently projects derived from the spiral project-based learning. Moreover, this gain is significantly bigger when peer assessment is introduced. In addition, high-performance students take advantage of peer assessment from the first moment, whereas the improvement in poor-performance students is delayed.

  16. Network Monitoring and Fault Detection on the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Campus Computer Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sng, Dennis Cheng-Hong

    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) has a large campus computer network serving a community of about 20,000 users. With such a large network, it is inevitable that there are a wide variety of technologies co-existing in a multi-vendor environment. Effective network monitoring tools can help monitor traffic and link usage, as well…

  17. Computationally efficient measure of topological redundancy of biological and social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Réka; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Hegde, Rashmi; Sivanathan, Gowri Sangeetha; Gitter, Anthony; Gürsoy, Gamze; Paul, Pradyut; Sontag, Eduardo

    2011-09-01

    It is well known that biological and social interaction networks have a varying degree of redundancy, though a consensus of the precise cause of this is so far lacking. In this paper, we introduce a topological redundancy measure for labeled directed networks that is formal, computationally efficient, and applicable to a variety of directed networks such as cellular signaling, and metabolic and social interaction networks. We demonstrate the computational efficiency of our measure by computing its value and statistical significance on a number of biological and social networks with up to several thousands of nodes and edges. Our results suggest a number of interesting observations: (1) Social networks are more redundant that their biological counterparts, (2) transcriptional networks are less redundant than signaling networks, (3) the topological redundancy of the C. elegans metabolic network is largely due to its inclusion of currency metabolites, and (4) the redundancy of signaling networks is highly (negatively) correlated with the monotonicity of their dynamics.

  18. Hierarchical surface code for network quantum computing with modules of arbitrary size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Benjamin, Simon C.

    2016-10-01

    The network paradigm for quantum computing involves interconnecting many modules to form a scalable machine. Typically it is assumed that the links between modules are prone to noise while operations within modules have a significantly higher fidelity. To optimize fault tolerance in such architectures we introduce a hierarchical generalization of the surface code: a small "patch" of the code exists within each module and constitutes a single effective qubit of the logic-level surface code. Errors primarily occur in a two-dimensional subspace, i.e., patch perimeters extruded over time, and the resulting noise threshold for intermodule links can exceed ˜10 % even in the absence of purification. Increasing the number of qubits within each module decreases the number of qubits necessary for encoding a logical qubit. But this advantage is relatively modest, and broadly speaking, a "fine-grained" network of small modules containing only about eight qubits is competitive in total qubit count versus a "course" network with modules containing many hundreds of qubits.

  19. 10 CFR 73.54 - Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Protection of digital computer and communication systems... computer and communication systems and networks. By November 23, 2009 each licensee currently licensed to... provide high assurance that digital computer and communication systems and networks are...

  20. 10 CFR 73.54 - Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Protection of digital computer and communication systems... computer and communication systems and networks. By November 23, 2009 each licensee currently licensed to... provide high assurance that digital computer and communication systems and networks are...

  1. 10 CFR 73.54 - Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Protection of digital computer and communication systems... computer and communication systems and networks. By November 23, 2009 each licensee currently licensed to... provide high assurance that digital computer and communication systems and networks are...

  2. 10 CFR 73.54 - Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Protection of digital computer and communication systems... computer and communication systems and networks. By November 23, 2009 each licensee currently licensed to... provide high assurance that digital computer and communication systems and networks are...

  3. 10 CFR 73.54 - Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Protection of digital computer and communication systems... computer and communication systems and networks. By November 23, 2009 each licensee currently licensed to... provide high assurance that digital computer and communication systems and networks are...

  4. Defense Data Network/TOPS-20 Tutorial. An Interative Computer Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    GRUP SB-GOUP Defense Data Network, DDN, TOPS-20, computer FIEL GRUP SB-GOUP networking. 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on roverse if necessary and identify by...switching network dedicated to meeting the data communica- tion requirements of the DoD. The network is subdivided into " two functional areas: (1) the

  5. A personal computer network system for equitable allocation of cadaver organs.

    PubMed

    Shimada, M; Akazawa, K; Moriguchi, S; Odaka, T; Nose, Y

    1991-01-01

    We developed a personal computer network system for the equitable allocation of cadaveric organs. This network consists of a host computer (IBM PS55 model 5570 T) and various kinds of personal computers manufactured by many different computer makers in Japan. The merits of our personal computer network include lower cost and an easy access to the host computer from all the centres participating in this network while using their own favourite personal computers. Among the programs made for allocating cadaveric organs, we present in this paper the program for livers. This program was developed with a modified version of the logic developed by Starzl et al. The grade modification for the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) in the United States was used as the basis for classification of medical urgency. Our program weighed the factors of medical urgency, compatibility of blood group and waiting time. Distance factors were omitted because of the smaller area of the network compared to that of UNOS. This computer network would be linked to other computer networks in creating a national organ procurement and transplant network in Japan, in order to help them to catch up with other advanced transplant countries. Such an equal and objective computer system should allow organ transplantation to become more widely accepted.

  6. Including Internet insurance as part of a hospital computer network security plan.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Ken

    2002-01-01

    Cyber attacks on a hospital's computer network is a new crime to be reckoned with. Should your hospital consider internet insurance? The author explains this new phenomenon and presents a risk assessment for determining network vulnerabilities.

  7. Students at the University of Abertay Dundee Learn Computer Hacking to Defend Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Erik

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a new cybersecurity course at the University of Abertay Dundee in Scotland. Geoffrey R. Lund, leader of the software-applications program at Abertay, says the course prepares students for a rapidly growing job market by teaching that the best defense is a good offense. Professors set up a network of 20 or so…

  8. Computational models of signalling networks for non-linear control.

    PubMed

    Fuente, Luis A; Lones, Michael A; Turner, Alexander P; Stepney, Susan; Caves, Leo S; Tyrrell, Andy M

    2013-05-01

    Artificial signalling networks (ASNs) are a computational approach inspired by the signalling processes inside cells that decode outside environmental information. Using evolutionary algorithms to induce complex behaviours, we show how chaotic dynamics in a conservative dynamical system can be controlled. Such dynamics are of particular interest as they mimic the inherent complexity of non-linear physical systems in the real world. Considering the main biological interpretations of cellular signalling, in which complex behaviours and robust cellular responses emerge from the interaction of multiple pathways, we introduce two ASN representations: a stand-alone ASN and a coupled ASN. In particular we note how sophisticated cellular communication mechanisms can lead to effective controllers, where complicated problems can be divided into smaller and independent tasks.

  9. Computer Assisted Improvement of the Estimation Mean Squared Error with Application to Back Propagation Neural Networks.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    function. Key Words and Phrases: Parametric estimation , exponential families, nonlinear models, nonlinear least squares, neural networks, Monte Carlo simulation, computer intensive statistical methods.

  10. Instrumentation for Scientific Computing in Neural Networks, Information Science, Artificial Intelligence, and Applied Mathematics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    This was an instrumentation grant to purchase equipment of support of research in neural networks, information science , artificial intelligence, and applied mathematics. Computer lab equipment, motor control and robotics lab equipment, speech analysis equipment and computational vision equipment were purchased.

  11. Formal description of aggregates of a generalised model of interaction processes in computer networks

    SciTech Connect

    Ratsin, Yu.V.

    1984-01-01

    The realisation using PL/1 of a formal description of a set of interaction process functions in computer networks using the language of discrete parallel processes is described. The formal description is intended for conducting computer modelling experiments. 4 references.

  12. Security of social network credentials for accessing course portal: Users' experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katuk, Norliza; Fong, Choo Sok; Chun, Koo Lee

    2015-12-01

    Social login (SL) has recently emerged as a solution for single sign-on (SSO) within the web and mobile environments. It allows users to use their existing social network credentials (SNC) to login to third party web applications without the need to create a new identity in the intended applications' database. Although it has been used by many web application providers, its' applicability in accessing learning materials is not yet fully investigated. Hence, this research aims to explore users' (i.e., instructors' and students') perception and experience on the security of SL for accessing learning contents. A course portal was developed for students at a higher learning institution and it provides two types of user authentications (i) traditional user authentication, and (ii) SL facility. Users comprised instructors and students evaluated the login facility of the course portal through a controlled lab experimental study following the within-subject design. The participants provided their feedback in terms of the security of SL for accessing learning contents. The study revealed that users preferred to use SL over the traditional authentication, however, they concerned on the security of SL and their privacy.

  13. Providing full point-to-point communications among compute nodes of an operational group in a global combining network of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J; Faraj, Ahmad A; Inglett, Todd A; Ratterman, Joseph D

    2013-04-16

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for providing full point-to-point communications among compute nodes of an operational group in a global combining network of a parallel computer, each compute node connected to each adjacent compute node in the global combining network through a link, that include: receiving a network packet in a compute node, the network packet specifying a destination compute node; selecting, in dependence upon the destination compute node, at least one of the links for the compute node along which to forward the network packet toward the destination compute node; and forwarding the network packet along the selected link to the adjacent compute node connected to the compute node through the selected link.

  14. Computer-Mediated Word-of-Mouth Communication: The Influence of Mixed Reviews on Student Perceptions of Instructors and Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Autumn; Edwards, Chad

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to test the influence of mixed reviews appearing as computer-mediated word-of-mouth communication (WOM) on student perceptions of instructors (attractiveness and credibility) and attitudes toward learning course content (affective learning and state motivation). Using the heuristic-systematic processing model, it…

  15. A Computer-Assisted Instruction Course on Laboratory Detection of Malarial Parasites in Human Blood. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitzel, Harold E.

    In cooperation with the United States Navy, this project was undertaken to examine the feasibility of computer assisted instruction in clinical malaria recognition, to train a small group of Naval personnel in techniques of creating and presenting such material, and to evaluate the course by giving it to a representative sample of Naval medical…

  16. Exploring Students Intentions to Study Computer Science and Identifying the Differences among ICT and Programming Based Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giannakos, Michail N.

    2014-01-01

    Computer Science (CS) courses comprise both Programming and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) issues; however these two areas have substantial differences, inter alia the attitudes and beliefs of the students regarding the intended learning content. In this research, factors from the Social Cognitive Theory and Unified Theory of…

  17. The Effect of Interactive e-Book on Students' Achievement at Najran University in Computer in Education Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebied, Mohammed Mohammed Ahmed; Rahman, Shimaa Ahmed Abdul

    2015-01-01

    The current study aims to examine the effect of interactive e-books on students' achievement at Najran University in computer in education course. Quasi-experimental study design is used in the study and to collect data the researchers built achievement test to measure the dependent variable represented in the achievement affected by experimental…

  18. Using Educational Games and Simulation Software in a Computer Science Course: Learning Achievements and Student Flow Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Tsung-Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how educational games impact on students' academic performance and multimedia flow experiences in a computer science course. A curriculum consists of five basic learning units, that is, the stack, queue, sort, tree traversal, and binary search tree, was conducted for 110 university students during one semester. Two groups…

  19. Use of a New "Moodle" Module for Improving the Teaching of a Basic Course on Computer Architecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenas, M. A.; Ramos, J.; Gutierrez, E. D.; Romero, S.; Corbera, F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes how a new "Moodle" module, called "CTPracticals", is applied to the teaching of the practical content of a basic computer organization course. In the core of the module, an automatic verification engine enables it to process the VHDL designs automatically as they are submitted. Moreover, a straightforward…

  20. Effects of Computer Assisted Instruction on Students' Attitudes towards Science Courses in Turkey: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tekbiyik, Ahmet; Birinci Konur, Kader; Pirasa, Nimet

    2008-01-01

    Many primary studies have been performed to reveal the effects of computer assisted instruction (CAI) on students' attitudes towards science courses. In determining the effectiveness of these studies, gathering and evaluating of the studies at some characteristics play an important role. The aim of this study is to determine meta-analytically the…

  1. Applying Web-Based Co-Regulated Learning to Develop Students' Learning and Involvement in a Blended Computing Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated, via quasi-experiments, the effects of web-based co-regulated learning (CRL) on developing students' computing skills. Two classes of 68 undergraduates in a one-semester course titled "Applied Information Technology: Data Processing" were chosen for this research. The first class (CRL group, n = 38) received…

  2. A Triangulated Study of Academic Language Needs of Iranian Students of Computer Engineering: Are the Courses on Track?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atai, Mahmood Reza; Shoja, Leila

    2011-01-01

    Even though English for Specific Academic Purposes (ESAP) courses constitute a significant part of the Iranian university curriculum, curriculum developers have generally developed the programs based on intuition. This study assessed the present and target situation academic language needs of undergraduate students of computer engineering. To this…

  3. Promoting CLT within a Computer Assisted Learning Environment: A Survey of the Communicative English Course of FLTC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haider, Md. Zulfeqar; Chowdhury, Takad Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    This study is based on a survey of the Communicative English Language Certificate (CELC) course run by the Foreign Language Training Center (FLTC), a Project under the Ministry of Education, Bangladesh. FLTC is working to promote the teaching and learning of English through its eleven computer-based and state of the art language laboratories. As…

  4. The Effects of Cooperative and Individualistic Learning Structures on Achievement in a College-Level Computer-Aided Drafting Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swab, A. Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    This study of cooperative learning in post-secondary engineering education investigated achievement of engineering students enrolled in two intact sections of a computer-aided drafting (CAD) course. Quasi-experimental and qualitative methods were employed in comparing student achievement resulting from out-of-class cooperative and individualistic…

  5. Development, Implementation, and Cost-Assessment of an Integrated Computer-Assisted Instruction Course on Drug Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narducci, Warren A.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the feasibility of using integrated, computer-assisted instruction in a drug interaction course revealed that despite the high initial time and financial investment, the potential educational benefits and high student acceptance of the instruction supports its application in other curriculum areas. (MSE)

  6. 'Let's You and Me Have a Little Discussion': Computer-Mediated Communication in Support of Campus-based University Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, V.; Nesbitt, E.; Light, P.; Burns, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    Reports on a study of student-student interaction via computer-mediated communication (CMC) in an undergraduate course at a British university. Analysis focused on: (1) interaction patterns within groups; (2) the influence of the tutor's "virtual absence," and (3) students' and tutors' evaluation of the experience. Most students valued…

  7. Implementation of Service Learning and Civic Engagement for Computer Information Systems Students through a Course Project at the Hashemite University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Khasawneh, Ahmad; Hammad, Bashar K.

    2013-01-01

    Service learning methodologies provide information systems students with the opportunity to create and implement systems in real-world, public service-oriented social contexts. This paper presents a case study of integrating a service learning project into an undergraduate Computer Information Systems course titled "Information Systems"…

  8. Effects of Computer-Aided Personalized System of Instruction in Developing Knowledge and Critical Thinking in Blended Learning Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svenningsen, Louis; Pear, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess an online version of Keller's personalized system of instruction, called computer-aided personalized system of instruction (CAPSI), as part of a blended learning design with regard to course knowledge and critical thinking development. In Experiment 1, two lecture sections of an introduction to University…

  9. A Study of Complex Deep Learning Networks on High Performance, Neuromorphic, and Quantum Computers

    SciTech Connect

    Potok, Thomas E; Schuman, Catherine D; Young, Steven R; Patton, Robert M; Spedalieri, Federico; Liu, Jeremy; Yao, Ke-Thia; Rose, Garrett; Chakma, Gangotree

    2016-01-01

    Current Deep Learning models use highly optimized convolutional neural networks (CNN) trained on large graphical processing units (GPU)-based computers with a fairly simple layered network topology, i.e., highly connected layers, without intra-layer connections. Complex topologies have been proposed, but are intractable to train on current systems. Building the topologies of the deep learning network requires hand tuning, and implementing the network in hardware is expensive in both cost and power. In this paper, we evaluate deep learning models using three different computing architectures to address these problems: quantum computing to train complex topologies, high performance computing (HPC) to automatically determine network topology, and neuromorphic computing for a low-power hardware implementation. Due to input size limitations of current quantum computers we use the MNIST dataset for our evaluation. The results show the possibility of using the three architectures in tandem to explore complex deep learning networks that are untrainable using a von Neumann architecture. We show that a quantum computer can find high quality values of intra-layer connections and weights, while yielding a tractable time result as the complexity of the network increases; a high performance computer can find optimal layer-based topologies; and a neuromorphic computer can represent the complex topology and weights derived from the other architectures in low power memristive hardware. This represents a new capability that is not feasible with current von Neumann architecture. It potentially enables the ability to solve very complicated problems unsolvable with current computing technologies.

  10. Elucidating dynamic metabolic physiology through network integration of quantitative time-course metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Bordbar, Aarash; Yurkovich, James T; Paglia, Giuseppe; Rolfsson, Ottar; Sigurjónsson, Ólafur E; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2017-04-07

    The increasing availability of metabolomics data necessitates novel methods for deeper data analysis and interpretation. We present a flux balance analysis method that allows for the computation of dynamic intracellular metabolic changes at the cellular scale through integration of time-course absolute quantitative metabolomics. This approach, termed "unsteady-state flux balance analysis" (uFBA), is applied to four cellular systems: three dynamic and one steady-state as a negative control. uFBA and FBA predictions are contrasted, and uFBA is found to be more accurate in predicting dynamic metabolic flux states for red blood cells, platelets, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Notably, only uFBA predicts that stored red blood cells metabolize TCA intermediates to regenerate important cofactors, such as ATP, NADH, and NADPH. These pathway usage predictions were subsequently validated through (13)C isotopic labeling and metabolic flux analysis in stored red blood cells. Utilizing time-course metabolomics data, uFBA provides an accurate method to predict metabolic physiology at the cellular scale for dynamic systems.

  11. Elucidating dynamic metabolic physiology through network integration of quantitative time-course metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Bordbar, Aarash; Yurkovich, James T.; Paglia, Giuseppe; Rolfsson, Ottar; Sigurjónsson, Ólafur E.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2017-01-01

    The increasing availability of metabolomics data necessitates novel methods for deeper data analysis and interpretation. We present a flux balance analysis method that allows for the computation of dynamic intracellular metabolic changes at the cellular scale through integration of time-course absolute quantitative metabolomics. This approach, termed “unsteady-state flux balance analysis” (uFBA), is applied to four cellular systems: three dynamic and one steady-state as a negative control. uFBA and FBA predictions are contrasted, and uFBA is found to be more accurate in predicting dynamic metabolic flux states for red blood cells, platelets, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Notably, only uFBA predicts that stored red blood cells metabolize TCA intermediates to regenerate important cofactors, such as ATP, NADH, and NADPH. These pathway usage predictions were subsequently validated through 13C isotopic labeling and metabolic flux analysis in stored red blood cells. Utilizing time-course metabolomics data, uFBA provides an accurate method to predict metabolic physiology at the cellular scale for dynamic systems. PMID:28387366

  12. Adaptation of a computer programming course to the ESHE requirements: evaluation five years later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valveny, Ernest; Benavente, Robert; Lapedriza, Àgata; Ferrer, Miquel; Garcia-Barnés, Jaume; Sànchez, Gemma

    2012-06-01

    In the academic year 2010-2011, Spain finished the process of introducing the regulatory changes derived from the Bologna Declaration and the new European Space for Higher Education (ESHE). These changes have implied the updating of university degrees' structure as well as the inclusion of the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS). This paper describes the process of adaptation of two basic first-semester core subjects of computer engineering to one of the basic aspects of the ESHE, the adoption of the ECTS. The process described in the paper was developed in the framework of the pilot plan undertaken by the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona between 2005 and 2010. The proposed course design implies a better coordination and integration of the contents of two different subjects that students follow simultaneously, and it is based on the combination of project-based learning and cooperative learning. After the experience finished, an extended quantitative and qualitative analysis of the academic results over the five-year period has shown an improvement in the students' learning outcomes.

  13. Locating hardware faults in a data communications network of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-01-12

    Hardware faults location in a data communications network of a parallel computer. Such a parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes and a data communications network that couples the compute nodes for data communications and organizes the compute node as a tree. Locating hardware faults includes identifying a next compute node as a parent node and a root of a parent test tree, identifying for each child compute node of the parent node a child test tree having the child compute node as root, running a same test suite on the parent test tree and each child test tree, and identifying the parent compute node as having a defective link connected from the parent compute node to a child compute node if the test suite fails on the parent test tree and succeeds on all the child test trees.

  14. Blogging within a Social Networking Site as a Form of Literature Response in a Teacher Education Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Amy; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to document how pre-service teachers in a children's literature course experienced blogging on a social networking site as a form of literature response. Understanding how pre-service teachers experience these tools can inform the ways we instruct them to integrate Web 2.0 tools into their teaching.…

  15. Fluid Centrality: A Social Network Analysis of Social-Technical Relations in Computer-Mediated Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enriquez, Judith Guevarra

    2010-01-01

    In this article, centrality is explored as a measure of computer-mediated communication (CMC) in networked learning. Centrality measure is quite common in performing social network analysis (SNA) and in analysing social cohesion, strength of ties and influence in CMC, and computer-supported collaborative learning research. It argues that measuring…

  16. The Effectiveness of Using Virtual Laboratories to Teach Computer Networking Skills in Zambia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampi, Evans

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of using virtual labs to train students in computer networking skills, when real equipment is limited or unavailable, is uncertain. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of using virtual labs to train students in the acquisition of computer network configuration and troubleshooting skills. The study was…

  17. Prediction of Student Course Selection in Online Higher Education Institutes Using Neural Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kardan, Ahmad A.; Sadeghi, Hamid; Ghidary, Saeed Shiry; Sani, Mohammad Reza Fani

    2013-01-01

    Students are required to choose courses they are interested in for the coming semester. Due to restrictions, including lack of sufficient resources and overheads of running several courses, some universities might not offer all of a student's desirable courses. Universities must know every student's demands for every course prior to each semester…

  18. NASF transposition network: A computing network for unscrambling p-ordered vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    The viewpoints of design, programming, and application of the transportation network (TN) is presented. The TN is a programmable combinational logic network that connects 521 memory modules to 512 processors. The unscrambling of p-ordered vectors to 1-ordered vectors in one cycle is described. The TN design is based upon the concept of cyclic groups from abstract algebra and primitive roots and indices from number theory. The programming of the TN is very simple, requiring only 20 bits: 10 bits for offset control and 10 bits for barrel switch shift control. This simple control is executed by the control unit (CU), not the processors. Any memory access by a processor must be coordinated with the CU and wait for all other processors to come to a synchronization point. These wait and synchronization events can be a degradation in performance to a computation. The TN application is for multidimensional data manipulation, matrix processing, and data sorting, and can also perform a perfect shuffle. Unlike other more complicated and powerful permutation networks, the TN cannot, if possible at all, unscramble non-p-ordered vectors in one cycle.

  19. Toward a Computer-Based Course in the History of the Russian Literary Language. Psychology and Education Series, Technical Report No. 221.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schupbach, Richard

    The course described here offers computer-based instruction (CBI) in the history of the Russian literary language. It is designed to follow an introductory CBI Slavic course. The object of the course is to introduce graduate students in Russian literature to the types of changes that language in general, and Russian literary language in…

  20. DISCRETE EVENT SIMULATION OF OPTICAL SWITCH MATRIX PERFORMANCE IN COMPUTER NETWORKS

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, Neena; Poole, Stephen W

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present application of a Discrete Event Simulator (DES) for performance modeling of optical switching devices in computer networks. Network simulators are valuable tools in situations where one cannot investigate the system directly. This situation may arise if the system under study does not exist yet or the cost of studying the system directly is prohibitive. Most available network simulators are based on the paradigm of discrete-event-based simulation. As computer networks become increasingly larger and more complex, sophisticated DES tool chains have become available for both commercial and academic research. Some well-known simulators are NS2, NS3, OPNET, and OMNEST. For this research, we have applied OMNEST for the purpose of simulating multi-wavelength performance of optical switch matrices in computer interconnection networks. Our results suggest that the application of DES to computer interconnection networks provides valuable insight in device performance and aids in topology and system optimization.