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Sample records for computer-based anti-bullying intervention

  1. Inter-Cultural Differences in Response to a Computer-Based Anti-Bullying Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Scott E. J.; Vannini, Natalie; Woods, Sarah; Dautenhahn, Kerstin; Sapouna, Maria; Enz, Sibylle; Schneider, Wolfgang; Wolke, Dieter; Hall, Lynne; Paiva, Ana; Andre, Elizabeth; Aylett, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Many holistic anti-bullying interventions have been attempted, with mixed success, while little work has been done to promote a "self-help" approach to victimisation. The rise of the ICT curriculum and computer support in schools now allows for approaches that benefit from technology to be implemented. This study evaluates…

  2. "FearNot!": A Computer-Based Anti-Bullying-Programme Designed to Foster Peer Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannini, Natalie; Enz, Sibylle; Sapouna, Maria; Wolke, Dieter; Watson, Scott; Woods, Sarah; Dautenhahn, Kerstin; Hall, Lynne; Paiva, Ana; Andre, Elizabeth; Aylett, Ruth; Schneider, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Bullying is widespread in European schools, despite multiple intervention strategies having been proposed over the years. The present study investigates the effects of a novel virtual learning strategy ("FearNot!") to tackle bullying in both UK and German samples. The approach is intended primarily for victims to increase their coping skills and…

  3. Middle School Students' Preferences for Anti-Bullying Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crothers, Laura M.; Kolbert, Jered B.; Barker, William F.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, 285 middle school students in the United States were surveyed to obtain their preferences regarding anti-bullying intervention strategies. Participants rated their preferences for 15 common anti-bullying intervention strategies involving teachers, students, and non-teaching staff. The strategies were generated based on a review of…

  4. Outcomes of a Curriculum-Based Anti-Bullying Intervention Program on Students' Attitudes and Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreou, Eleni; Didaskalou, Eleni; Vlachou, Anastasia

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to examine the short-term and long-term effects of a curriculum-based anti-bullying intervention program on students' attitudes towards bullying, intentions to intervene in bully-victim problems, perceived efficacy of intervening and actual intervening behavior. The intervention program was applied in primary schools and…

  5. High School Anti-Bullying Interventions: An Evaluation of Curriculum Approaches and the Method of Shared Concern in Four Hong Kong International Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurf, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    The challenge for high schools to adopt effective measures to reduce bullying has been underscored by international media coverage highlighting the consequences of school bullying. Despite whole-school anti-bullying programs being accepted as the best evidence-based approaches to intervention, research continues to yield ambiguous findings, and…

  6. The Behavioral Ecological Model as a Framework for School-Based Anti-Bullying Health Promotion Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresler-Hawke, Emma; Whitehead, Dean

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a conceptual strategy which uses the Behavioral Ecological Model (BEM) as a health promotion framework to guide school-based bullying awareness programs and subsequent anti-bullying strategies for school nursing practice. Anti-bullying frameworks and tools are scarce despite the extent of the problem of bullying. This article…

  7. Outcomes of anti-bullying intervention for adults with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Linda; Jones, Robert S P; Hastings, Richard P

    2010-01-01

    Although existing research is scarce, evidence suggests that children and adults with intellectual disabilities may be at increased risk of being bullied (as they are for maltreatment generally) and possibly more likely than those without disabilities to also engage in bullying behavior. Despite significant clinical interest in bullying, we could find no published research on the outcomes of bullying intervention for individuals with intellectual disabilities. Adults with intellectual disabilities in three work center settings participated in one of two interventions for perpetrators and/or victims of bullying: (a) psychoeducational intervention with a cognitive behavioral orientation (n=20), or (b) the same intervention but with additional involvement of community stakeholders such as parents, the police, and local schools (n=22). A third work center (n=18) acted as a waiting list control comparison. Pre-intervention, 43% of participants reported that they had been bullied within the preceding three months and 28% identified themselves as having bullied others. Reports of being bullied decreased significantly within the two intervention groups over time but not in the control group. There were no differences between the two intervention groups, and no statistically significant reduction in self-reported bullying behavior. Initial data on this intervention suggest that its effects might be clinically meaningful with an associated Numbers Needed to Treat for reduction in exposure to bullying of 5.55. PMID:19897338

  8. Resistant to the Message: Are Pupils Unreceptive to Teachers' Anti-Bullying Initiatives and If so Why?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulton, Michael J.; Boulton, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Despite three decades of research and development of anti-bullying intervention, this form of systematic aggression continues to be common in schools. The present study investigated if a contributing factor might be that some pupils are unreceptive to teachers' anti-bullying lessons. It invited 8-11-year-old junior school pupils (N = 227) to…

  9. Structural Liberalism and Anti-Bullying Legislation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaught, Sabina E.

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the legal, semantic, and material implications of Massachusetts' anti-bullying law through an analytic framework of structural liberalism. Specifically, this article asks how the law produces categories of fit and unfit subjects of the state through raced and gendered practices of individualism, paternalism,…

  10. Anti-Bullying Intervention: Implementation and Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmivalli, Christina; Kaukiainen, Ari; Voeten, Marinus

    2005-01-01

    Background: The participant role approach represents a view of bullying as a group process in which bystanders often encourage the bullying or silently witness it, while little support is given to the victim (e.g. Salmivalli, Lagerspetz, Bjorkqvist, Osterman, & Kaukiainen, 1996). There is a discrepancy between students' attitudes (which are often…

  11. Addressing Social Aggression in State Anti-Bullying Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temkin, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Social aggression, or victimization using social exclusion, rumors, and body language, has been overlooked in state anti-bullying policies since the policy surge following the 1999 Columbine Massacres. Social aggression has been associated with social anxiety disorder, depression and suicide, and lowered academic achievement and involvement. An…

  12. Teachers' Perspectives about an Anti-Bullying Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Robin Rawlings; Maldonado, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Bullying has become a nationwide concern at the K-12 level. Guided by the theoretical framework of social learning theory, this study explored the perceptions of secondary education teachers about the bully-proofing program in place at one target middle school. Despite the target middle school's anti-bullying program, the incidence of…

  13. Creating an Anti-Bullying Culture in Secondary Schools: Characteristics to Consider When Constructing Appropriate Anti-Bullying Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Joseph R.; Augustine, Sharon Murphy

    2015-01-01

    Bullying in schools is a tremendous challenge that many secondary educators are attempting to address within their school environments. However, educators are often unsure of the attributes of an effective anti-bullying program; thus, they tend to create programs on a "trial and error" basis. This article provides an overview of the…

  14. A review of computer-based interventions used in the assessment, treatment, and research of drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Warren K; Christensen, Darren R; Marsch, Lisa A

    2011-01-01

    Computer-based interventions are cost-efficient methods that may result in greater access to drug addiction treatment. We review recent findings from our laboratory where computer-based interventions have produced outcomes that are comparable to therapist-delivered interventions. We also examine how computer-based interventions targeting substance abuse disorders relate to cognitive functioning. This review will suggest that not only are computer-based interventions cost-efficient and accessible but that they are also effective methods for the motivation, engagement, and treatment of drug-dependent individuals. Moreover, computer-based interventions are compatible with a recently proposed biological mechanism implicated as the basis for drug addiction.

  15. Toward Effective Program Implementation: The Stanford Computer-Based Educator Training Intervention (SCETI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmonds, Beverly A.; And Others

    The Stanford Computer-Based Educator Training Intervention (SCETI) was designed to provide teachers with extensive instruction in cardiovascular disease risk factor concepts and to assess the intervention's effects on a number of teacher variables mediating program implementation. The SCETI program was an interactive computer program which used…

  16. Evaluating a Computer-Based Sight-Word Reading Intervention in a Student with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaw, Jared; Skinner, Christopher H.; Orsega, Michael C.; Parkhurst, John; Booher, Joshua; Chambers, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The authors used a multiple-baseline-across-behaviors (i.e., word lists) design to evaluate a computer-based flashcard intervention on automatic sight-word reading in a 4th-grade student with moderate to severe intellectual disabilities. Immediately after the intervention was applied to each of three lists of sight words, the student made rapid…

  17. Young Adult Literature as the Centerpiece of an Anti-Bullying Program in Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillsberg, Carol; Spak, Helene

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an anti-bullying program with young adult literature as its centerpiece that the authors created. It explores the nature of bullying and its emotional impact on the victims, focusing on its prevalence in schools, and then describes the comprehensive anti-bullying program instituted in grades 6 to 8 at Wood Oaks Junior High…

  18. A Content Analysis of School Anti-Bullying Policies: Progress and Limitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter K.; Smith, Cherise; Osborn, Rob; Samara, Muthanna

    2008-01-01

    Schools in England are legally required to have an anti-bullying policy, but the little research so far suggests that they may lack coverage in important areas. An analysis of 142 school anti-bullying policies, from 115 primary schools and 27 secondary schools in one county was undertaken. A 31-item scoring scheme was devised to assess policy.…

  19. A Child's Right to Human Dignity: Reforming Anti-Bullying Laws in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dayton, John; Dupre, Anne Proffitt

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the findings of research into the bullying laws in the United States. Against the backdrop of international law, it addresses children's rights to protection from bullying in US schools. It includes recommendations for improving anti-bullying legislation based on state anti-bullying legislation in the United States, and…

  20. Depression Experience Journal: A Computer-Based Intervention For Families Facing Childhood Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demaso, David Ray; Marcus, Nicole Eldridge; Kinnamon, Carolyn; Gonzalez-Heydrich, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study tested the feasibility and safety of a computer-based application for families facing childhood depression. The Depression Experience Journal (EJ) is a psychoeducational intervention based on a narrative model involving the sharing of personal stories about childhood depression. Method: Semistructured interviews assessed…

  1. A Computer Based Education (CBE) Program for Middle School Mathematics Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulley, Bill

    2009-01-01

    A Computer Based Education (CBE) program for intervention mathematics was developed, used, and modified over a period of three years in a computer lab at an Arizona Title I middle school. The program is described along with a rationale for the need, design, and use of such a program. Data was collected in the third year and results of the program…

  2. A Randomized, Controlled Study of Computer-Based Intervention in Middle School Struggling Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Given, Barbara K.; Wasserman, John D.; Chari, Sharmila A.; Beattie, Karen; Eden, Guinevere F.

    2008-01-01

    The current study was conducted to test the premise that computer-based intervention that targets auditory temporal processing combined with language exercises (Fast ForWord[R]) is effective in remediating children with disorders of language and reading. Sixty-five middle school struggling readers were randomly assigned to one of five groups and…

  3. Computer-based interventions for sexual health promotion: systematic review and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J V; Murray, E; Rait, G; Mercer, C H; Morris, R W; Peacock, R; Cassell, J; Nazareth, I

    2012-06-01

    This systematic review was conducted to determine the effects of self-help interactive computer-based interventions (ICBIs) for sexual health promotion. We searched 40 databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of computer-based interventions, defining 'interactive' as programmes that require contributions from users to produce personally relevant material. We conducted searches and analysed data using Cochrane Collaboration methods. Results of RCTs were pooled using a random-effects model with standardized mean differences for continuous outcomes and odds ratios (ORs) for binary outcomes, with heterogeneity assessed using the I(2) statistic. We identified 15 RCTs of ICBIs (3917 participants). Comparing ICBIs to minimal interventions, there were significant effects on sexual health knowledge (standardized mean difference [SMD] 0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.27-1.18); safer sex self-efficacy (SMD 0.17, 95% CI 0.05-0.29); safer-sex intentions (SMD 0.16, 95% CI 0.02-0.30); and sexual behaviour (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.18-2.59). ICBIs had a greater impact on sexual health knowledge than face-to-face interventions did (SMD 0.36, 95% CI 0.13-0.58). ICBIs are effective tools for learning about sexual health, and show promising effects on self-efficacy, intention and sexual behaviour. More data are needed to analyse biological outcomes and cost-effectiveness.

  4. Effect of a computer-based intervention on social support for chronically ill rural women.

    PubMed

    Hill, Wade; Schillo, Leah; Weinert, Clarann

    2004-01-01

    Social support is a key factor in illness management. Despite the positive effects of support groups, there are barriers to participation by rural dwellers in face-to-face groups. To address these barriers, a computer-based support group intervention, the Women to Women Project, was designed to provide peer support and health information through a computer-based intervention. Data from three groups (intervention, information, comparison) of woman who participated in the program were analyzed. The pattern of improvement in social support was in the anticipated direction, but not significant in the main analysis. Exploratory analysis was conducted on a vulnerable subsample of women reporting low social support and high psychosocial distress. Results suggest that improvement in social support, based on the intervention, was greater for the vulnerable subsample as compared with the sample as a whole. An effective and efficient means of providing social support and facilitating the mobilization of this support is through self-help groups; this study demonstrates that virtual support groups can increase perceived social support.

  5. An Evaluation of Computer Based Activities in an Early Intervention Program. A Report to the Early Special Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Alison; Hall, Neil

    This study investigated ways of using computer-based learning activities to complement curriculum practices in preschool programs with an early intervention component through the use of computer-based learning activities. Particular attention was given to supporting the development of young children's early mathematical skills. The study took…

  6. A randomized, controlled study of computer-based intervention in middle school struggling readers.

    PubMed

    Given, Barbara K; Wasserman, John D; Chari, Sharmila A; Beattie, Karen; Eden, Guinevere F

    2008-08-01

    The current study was conducted to test the premise that computer-based intervention that targets auditory temporal processing combined with language exercises (Fast ForWord) is effective in remediating children with disorders of language and reading. Sixty-five middle school struggling readers were randomly assigned to one of five groups and over a 12-week-period received one of the following interventions: (1) two phases of intervention with Fast ForWord (FFW, experimental group), (2) two phases of intervention with SuccessMaker (SM, active control group), (3) FFW followed by SM, (4) SM followed by FFW, or (5) no intervention beyond the regular class curriculum (developmental control group). Changes in reading, phonemic awareness, spelling and language skills were assessed via a repeated measures MANOVA. Results indicated significant within-subjects effects (i.e., change for all participants over time), but no between-subject group differences, failing to show that Fast ForWord resulted in any gains over and above those seen in the other groups.

  7. Inclusive Anti-Bullying Policies and Reduced Risk of Suicide Attempts in Lesbian and Gay Youth

    PubMed Central

    Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; Keyes, Katherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether anti-bullying policies that are inclusive of sexual orientation are associated with a reduced prevalence of suicide attempts among lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youths. Methods 31,852 11th grade public school students (1,413 LGB individuals; 4.4%) in Oregon completed the Oregon Healthy Teens (OHT) survey in 2006–2008. The independent variable was the proportion of school districts in the 34 counties participating in the OHT survey that adopted anti-bullying policies inclusive of sexual orientation. The outcome measure was any self-reported suicide attempt in the past 12 months. Results were stratified by sexual orientation. Results Lesbian and gay youths living in counties with fewer school districts with inclusive anti-bullying policies were 2.25 times (95% C.I.: 1.13, 4.49) more likely to have attempted suicide in the past year compared to those living in counties where more districts had these policies. Inclusive anti-bullying policies were significantly associated with a reduced risk for suicide attempts among lesbian and gay youths even after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics (sex, race/ethnicity) and exposure to peer victimization (OR=0.18, 95% CI: 0.03–0.92). In contrast, anti-bullying policies that did not include sexual orientation were not associated with lower suicide attempts among lesbian and gay youths (OR=0.38, 95% CI: 0.02–7.33). Conclusions Inclusive anti-bullying policies may exert protective effects for the mental health of lesbian and gay youths, including reducing their risk for suicide attempts. PMID:23790196

  8. Use of Computer-Based Interventions to Teach Communication Skills to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramdoss, Sathiyaprakash; Lang, Russell; Mulloy, Austin; Franco, Jessica; O'Reilly, Mark; Didden, Robert; Lancioni, Giulio

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a systematic analysis of studies involving the use of computer-based interventions (CBI) to teach communication skills to children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This review evaluates intervention outcomes, appraises the certainty of evidence, and describes software and system requirements for each…

  9. Improving Anti-Bullying Initiatives: The Role of an Expanded Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertesvåg, Sigrun K.

    2015-01-01

    Bullying is one of the most challenging issues facing students and schools worldwide. The disastrous consequences for victims and offenders are experienced daily by teachers and students and documented by numerous studies. The demand for evidence-based practice (EBP) in schools' anti-bullying work has increased in the last decade, consequently…

  10. Evaluation of an Anti-Bullying Program: Student Reports of Knowledge and Confidence to Manage Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beran, Tanya; Shapiro, Bonnie

    2005-01-01

    This research evaluates the effectiveness of an anti-bullying program, Project Ploughshares Puppets for Peace (Woodfine, Lubimiv, & Langlois, 1995). Students in grades 3 and 4 (N = 129, 69 boys, 60 girls) from two public elementary schools completed a questionnaire on bullying at both pretest/post-test. Although Chi-square results showed no…

  11. We're Not Gonna Take It: A Student Driven Anti-Bullying Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packman, Jill; Lepkowski, William J.; Overton, Christian C.; Smaby, Marlowe

    2005-01-01

    Bullying is a serious problem in schools today. Most programs that deal with bullying are adult-driven and dependent. Inspired by the students in one middle school, the authors ask if student-driven anti-bullying programs exist and are effective. The scope and consequences of bullying is reported. Research-based responses to bullying are explored…

  12. Anti-Bullying Practices in American Schools: Perspectives of School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherer, Yiping C.; Nickerson, Amanda B.

    2010-01-01

    A random sample of 213 school psychologists working in a school setting completed a survey on their schools' current anti-bullying practices. Talking with bullies following bullying incidents, disciplinary consequences for bullies, and increasing adult supervision were the three most frequently used strategies. Peer juries/court, an anti-bullying…

  13. An Analysis of School Anti-Bullying Laws in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kueny, Maryellen T.; Zirkel, Perry A.

    2012-01-01

    Bullying, a pattern of physical or emotional abuse that students intentionally inflict on their peers, exists throughout secondary education, but is most prevalent during the middle grades. To inform the practice of middle level educators, this study canvassed school anti-bullying laws in each state and compared them with relevant research…

  14. A Content Analysis of School Anti-Bullying Policies in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdy, Noel; Smith, Peter K.

    2016-01-01

    This original study presents a content analysis of 100 primary and post-primary school anti-bullying policies in Northern Ireland using a 36-item scoring scheme. Overall schools had 52% of the items in their policies. Most schools included reference to physical, verbal, relational, material and cyberbullying but a minority mentioned racist,…

  15. A Descriptive Analysis of Louisiana Public School Districts' Anti-Bullying Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Brandy Elise Robinson

    2013-01-01

    The researcher proposed to determine the expansiveness of Louisiana's public school districts' anti-bullying policies. Specifically, student codes of conduct and board polices were analyzed to determine the extent to which schools define, outline reporting procedures, keep written records of, investigate, and render disciplinary sanctions against…

  16. A Review of the Use of Social Support in Anti-Bullying Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilpatrick, Michelle; Christine, Demaray; Malecki, Kerres

    2006-01-01

    Bullying is a significant problem in schools across America. Educators are dealing with the problem of bullying through the implementation of various anti-bullying programs. Additionally, researchers are studying the problem and have begun to focus on the importance of contextual factors surrounding bullying such as social support (Beran & Tutty,…

  17. A Computer-based Training Intervention for Work Supervisors to Respond to Intimate Partner Violence

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Nancy; Bloom, Tina; Perrin, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Intimate partner violence (IPV), commonly known as domestic violence is a problem throughout the world. An estimated 36% to 75% of employed abused woman are monitored, harassed and physically assaulted by their partners or ex-partners while trying to get to work and while at work. The objective of this research is to evaluate the effectiveness of interactive training to increase knowledge, change perceptions and develop an intention to address domestic violence that spills over into the workplace. Methods Community-based participatory research approaches were employed to develop and evaluate an interactive computer-based training (CBT) intervention, aimed to teach supervisors how to create supportive and safe workplaces for victims of IPV. Results The CBT intervention was administered to 53 supervisors. All participants reacted positively to the training, and there was a significant improvement in knowledge between pre- and post-training test performance (72% versus 96% correct), effect size (d) = 3.56. Feedback from focus groups was more productive than written feedback solicited from the same participants at the end of the training. Conclusion Effective training on the impacts of IPV can improve knowledge, achieving a large effect size, and produce changes in perspective about domestic violence and motivation to address domestic violence in the workplace, based on questionnaire responses. PMID:22953177

  18. Testing the Efficacy of a Computer-Based Parent-Adolescent Sexual Communication Intervention for Latino Parents

    PubMed Central

    Villarruel, Antonia M.; Loveland-Cherry, Carol J.; Ronis, David L.

    2010-01-01

    The efficacy of a computer-based intervention to increase parent-adolescent communication among Latino parents and adolescents was tested in a randomized controlled trial. Parents assigned to receive the 2-session intervention reported greater general communication, sexual communication, and comfort with communication at 3 month follow-up than did parents assigned to the wait-list control condition. Adolescents, whose parents received the intervention, reported higher sexual communication than did adolescents whose parents were in the wait-list control condition. Results provide support for the efficacy of brief parent interventions designed to maximize adolescent support systems. The acceptability of the computer-based format for an underserved population provides an important venue for the delivery and use of health information. PMID:21116466

  19. A meta-analysis of the effect of school-based anti-bullying programs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunhee; Kim, Chun-Ja; Kim, Dong Hee

    2015-06-01

    Bullying is a serious public health problem, and many studies have examined the effect of school-based anti-bullying programs. However, these programs and those outcomes are complex, broad, and diverse. Research is needed into the optimal strategies for these comprehensive programs, which consider both the effectiveness and cost of programs. We performed a meta-analysis of 13 studies using the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software package to calculate effect size (ES) and the Q statistic. We conducted subgroup analyses to examine the differences based on student grade level, program duration, and program strategy. The pooled ES calculation indicated that school-based anti-bullying programs have a small to moderate effect on victimization. The results of the Q test indicated significant heterogeneity across studies of victimization (Q = 39.625; I (2) = 69.7%; p < .001). Studies involving training in emotional control (p < .01), peer counseling (p < .05), or the establishment of a school policy on bullying (p < .05) showed significantly larger ESs on victimization than did studies that did not involve these strategies. Effective school-based anti-bullying programs should include training in emotional control, peer counseling, and the establishment of a school policy on bullying.

  20. Public attitudes about different types of anti-bullying laws: results from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Puhl, Rebecca M; Luedicke, Joerg; King, Kelly M

    2015-02-01

    State anti-bullying laws have been enacted across the United States to address bullying both by and of youths. Although these statutes can provide critical protection to youth, there is debate about whether such laws should enumerate protected classes of youth. Weight-based bullying is an increasingly prevalent form of harassment and it has been overlooked in policy initiatives. Enumeration in existing laws might help protect overweight victims. As no research has examined this issue, we conducted a national survey of American adults (N=1155) to assess public opinion about enactment of anti-bullying laws that vary according to whether or not they enumerate distinguishing characteristics. Our results demonstrated substantial public agreement (ranging from 2/3 to 3/4 of participants) with enactment of state and federal anti-bullying laws that enumerate distinguishing characteristics, including physical appearance and weight, which are currently absent in most statutes. Our evidence can inform policy and legal approaches to protect youth effectively from bullying. PMID:25393213

  1. Extending Research on a Computer-Based Sight-Word Reading Intervention to a Student with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaw, Jared S.; Skinner, Christopher H.; Parkhurst, John; Taylor, Cora M.; Booher, Joshua; Chambers, Karen

    2011-01-01

    A multiple-baseline design across tasks (i.e., word lists) was used to evaluate the effects of a computer-based sight-word reading intervention (CBSWRI) on the sight-word reading of a sixth-grade student with Autism. Across 3 lists of primer and first-grade Dolch words, the student showed immediate increases in sight-word reading after the CBSWRI…

  2. Avatar Assistant: Improving Social Skills in Students with an ASD through a Computer-Based Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Ingrid Maria; Gower, Michael W.; Perez, Trista A.; Smith, Dana S.; Amthor, Franklin R.; Wimsatt, F. Casey; Biasini, Fred J.

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of "FaceSay," a computer-based social skills training program for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). This randomized controlled study (N = 49) indicates that providing children with low-functioning autism (LFA) and high functioning autism (HFA) opportunities to practice attending to eye gaze,…

  3. Evaluation of a Computer-based Reading Intervention in Infant and Junior Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolson, Roderick; Fawcett, Angela; Nicolson, Margaret

    2000-01-01

    Present studies using the RITA (Readers' Interactive Teaching Assistant) computer-based literacy support system. Notes that the RITA system assists, rather than replaces, the teacher in providing support tailored to each child's profile of reading attainments. Suggests that computer-assisted reading support can be effective in supporting children…

  4. A Computer-Based Intervention to Reduce Internalized Heterosexism in Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yen-Jui; Israel, Tania

    2012-01-01

    Internalized heterosexism (IH) is a strong predictor of the psychological well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual (LGB), or other same-sex attracted individuals. To respond to the call for interventions to address IH, the current study developed and tested an online intervention to reduce IH among gay, bisexual, and other same-sex attracted men. A…

  5. Computer-Based Intervention with Coaching: An Example Using the Incredible Years Program

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ted K.; Webster-Stratton, Carolyn; Feil, Edward G.; Broadbent, Berry; Widdop, Christopher S.; Severson, Herbert H.

    2007-01-01

    Increases in computer ownership and Internet use patterns provide a potential avenue for dissemination of evidence-based prevention and treatment interventions. This paper describes the use of a hybrid delivery model combining computer and web-based delivery of content with assistance of a coach through phone calls, electronic messages and home visits, to deliver a psychoeducational intervention (the Incredible Years parenting program) designed to promote behavioral change in parents and children. The model attempted to simulate many of the parent training methods shown to be successful in the original program. The intervention was implemented with 90 Head Start families who reported elevated levels of child behavior problems. Of the 45 families offered the intervention in the final year of the project, using procedures refined in light of the initial year's experience, 82% completed at least half the program and 76% completed the entire intervention. These participants reported high achievement of their self-determined goals and were highly satisfied with the intervention. The combination of technology with professional coaching represents a potential model for adapting and disseminating evidence-based interventions. PMID:18803072

  6. The initial feasibility of a computer-based motivational intervention for adherence for youth newly recommended to start antiretroviral treatment.

    PubMed

    Outlaw, Angulique Y; Naar-King, Sylvie; Tanney, Mary; Belzer, Marvin E; Aagenes, Anna; Parsons, Jeffrey T; Merlo, Lisa J

    2014-01-01

    Young people represent the largest number of new HIV infections, thus youth living with HIV (YLH) are likely to be the largest group to initiate antiretroviral treatment (ART). Adherence patterns for behaviorally infected YLH are not adequate to effectively manage the disease; therefore, novel interventions are needed to improve medication adherence. The purpose of the current study, which will precede a randomized controlled trial, was to assess the initial feasibility of an individually tailored computer-based two-session interactive motivational interviewing (MI) intervention for YLH newly recommended to start ART. Intervention development occurred in collaboration with three youth advisory groups. Ten youth (ages 18-24) were recruited to participate in this study. Participants completed the intervention online. Intervention components focused on medication adherence (rating perceived importance and confidence, and goal setting). Retention was 100% for both intervention sessions. All participants (n=10) felt medication adherence was important, but 80% felt confident they could manage their adherence to HIV medications. Ninety percent of participants set the goal of taking their HIV medications exactly as prescribed and reported success achieving this goal at follow-up. Additionally, participants were satisfied with the quality of the sessions and the amount of assistance they received for managing their adherence to HIV medications (90% participants for Session 1; 89% for Session 2). Per exit interview responses, participants felt that the intervention made them think more about their health and was a motivator for them to take better care of their health. In conclusion, the intervention was feasible for YLH enrolled in the study.

  7. The initial feasibility of a computer-based motivational intervention for adherence for youth newly recommended to start antiretroviral treatment.

    PubMed

    Outlaw, Angulique Y; Naar-King, Sylvie; Tanney, Mary; Belzer, Marvin E; Aagenes, Anna; Parsons, Jeffrey T; Merlo, Lisa J

    2014-01-01

    Young people represent the largest number of new HIV infections, thus youth living with HIV (YLH) are likely to be the largest group to initiate antiretroviral treatment (ART). Adherence patterns for behaviorally infected YLH are not adequate to effectively manage the disease; therefore, novel interventions are needed to improve medication adherence. The purpose of the current study, which will precede a randomized controlled trial, was to assess the initial feasibility of an individually tailored computer-based two-session interactive motivational interviewing (MI) intervention for YLH newly recommended to start ART. Intervention development occurred in collaboration with three youth advisory groups. Ten youth (ages 18-24) were recruited to participate in this study. Participants completed the intervention online. Intervention components focused on medication adherence (rating perceived importance and confidence, and goal setting). Retention was 100% for both intervention sessions. All participants (n=10) felt medication adherence was important, but 80% felt confident they could manage their adherence to HIV medications. Ninety percent of participants set the goal of taking their HIV medications exactly as prescribed and reported success achieving this goal at follow-up. Additionally, participants were satisfied with the quality of the sessions and the amount of assistance they received for managing their adherence to HIV medications (90% participants for Session 1; 89% for Session 2). Per exit interview responses, participants felt that the intervention made them think more about their health and was a motivator for them to take better care of their health. In conclusion, the intervention was feasible for YLH enrolled in the study. PMID:23869650

  8. Feasibility of a Computer-Based Intervention Addressing Barriers to HIV Testing Among Young Patients Who Decline Tests at Triage.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Ian David; Cleland, Charles M; Perlman, David C; Rajan, Sonali; Sun, Wendy; Bania, Theodore C

    2016-09-01

    Young people face greatly increased human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk and high rates of undiagnosed HIV, yet are unlikely to test. Many also have limited or inconsistent access to health care, including HIV testing and prevention education, and prior research has documented that youth lack knowledge necessary to understand the HIV test process and to interpret test results. Computer-based interventions have been used to increase HIV test rates and knowledge among emergency department (ED) patients, including those who decline tests offered at triage. However, patients aged 18-24 years have been less likely to test, even after completing an intervention, compared to older patients in the same ED setting. The current pilot study sought to examine the feasibility and acceptability of a new tablet-based video intervention designed to address established barriers to testing among ED patients aged 18-24 years. In particular, we examined whether young ED patients would: agree to receive the intervention; complete it quickly enough to avoid disrupting clinical workflows; accept HIV tests offered by the intervention; demonstrate increased postintervention knowledge; and report they found the intervention acceptable. Over 4 weeks, we recruited 100 patients aged 18-24 in a high-volume urban ED; all of them declined HIV tests offered at triage. Almost all (98%) completed the intervention (mean time <9 mins), 30% accepted HIV tests offered by the tablets. Knowledge was significantly higher after than before the intervention (t = -6.67, p < .001) and patients reported generally high acceptability. Additional research appears warranted to increase postintervention HIV testing. PMID:27565191

  9. A computer-based intervention to reduce internalized heterosexism in men.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Jui; Israel, Tania

    2012-07-01

    Internalized heterosexism (IH) is a strong predictor of the psychological well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual (LGB), or other same-sex attracted individuals. To respond to the call for interventions to address IH, the current study developed and tested an online intervention to reduce IH among gay, bisexual, and other same-sex attracted men. A total of 367 self-identified same-sex attracted adult males were recruited through various nationwide LGB-related sources and were assigned by birth month to either the experimental condition (focusing on IH reduction) or the control condition (a similarly structured invention focusing on stress management); 290 of these participants completed the intervention and all post-intervention measures. Mean levels of IH were compared by condition, indicating significant differences on the IH global score and 2 of the 3 IH subscale scores between the participants in the 2 conditions. The study findings support the promise of using the Internet to deliver IH interventions. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:22545801

  10. A Comparison of Computer-Based and Multisensory Interventions on At-Risk Students' Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Marissa S.

    2013-01-01

    Over thirty years of extant literature exists regarding reading instruction, yet consensus in the field continues to diverge in the area of reading intervention. Despite the establishment of research-based programs in all five areas of reading (phonemic awareness, alphabetic principle, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension), educators continue to…

  11. How Patient Interactions with a Computer-Based Video Intervention Affect Decisions to Test for HIV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Ian David; Rajan, Sonali; Marsch, Lisa A.; Bania, Theodore C.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines predictors of HIV test acceptance among emergency department patients who received an educational video intervention designed to increase HIV testing. A total of 202 patients in the main treatment areas of a high-volume, urban hospital emergency department used inexpensive netbook computers to watch brief educational…

  12. What Are We Looking for in Computer-Based Learning Interventions in Medical Education? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Patrícia; Taveira-Gomes, Isabel; Severo, Milton; Ferreira, Maria Amélia

    2016-01-01

    Background Computer-based learning (CBL) has been widely used in medical education, and reports regarding its usage and effectiveness have ranged broadly. Most work has been done on the effectiveness of CBL approaches versus traditional methods, and little has been done on the comparative effects of CBL versus CBL methodologies. These findings urged other authors to recommend such studies in hopes of improving knowledge about which CBL methods work best in which settings. Objective In this systematic review, we aimed to characterize recent studies of the development of software platforms and interventions in medical education, search for common points among studies, and assess whether recommendations for CBL research are being taken into consideration. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the literature published from 2003 through 2013. We included studies written in English, specifically in medical education, regarding either the development of instructional software or interventions using instructional software, during training or practice, that reported learner attitudes, satisfaction, knowledge, skills, or software usage. We conducted 2 latent class analyses to group articles according to platform features and intervention characteristics. In addition, we analyzed references and citations for abstracted articles. Results We analyzed 251 articles. The number of publications rose over time, and they encompassed most medical disciplines, learning settings, and training levels, totaling 25 different platforms specifically for medical education. We uncovered 4 latent classes for educational software, characteristically making use of multimedia (115/251, 45.8%), text (64/251, 25.5%), Web conferencing (54/251, 21.5%), and instructional design principles (18/251, 7.2%). We found 3 classes for intervention outcomes: knowledge and attitudes (175/212, 82.6%), knowledge, attitudes, and skills (11.8%), and online activity (12/212, 5.7%). About a quarter of the

  13. Using Computer Based Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aliee, Zeinab Shams; Jomhari, Nazean; Rezaei, Reza; Alias, Norlidah

    2013-01-01

    One of the most common problems in autistic children is split attention. Split attention prevents autism children from being able to focus attention on their learning, and tasks. As a result, it is important to identify how to make autistic individuals focus attention on learning. Considering autistic individuals have higher visual abilities in…

  14. Teachers and Students' Conceptions of Computer-Based Models in the Context of High School Chemistry: Elicitations at the Pre-Intervention Stage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waight, Noemi; Gillmeister, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    This study examined teachers' and students' initial conceptions of computer-based models--Flash and NetLogo models--and documented how teachers and students reconciled notions of multiple representations featuring macroscopic, submicroscopic and symbolic representations prior to actual intervention in eight high school chemistry…

  15. The Effectiveness of a Computer-Based Intervention and a Procedural Facilitator on the Performance of Fourth and Fifth Grade Students with Math Deficits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a computer-based intervention and a procedural facilitator on the performance of fourth and fifth grade students with deficits in mathematics. Specifically, the study compared the effectiveness of two conditions: (1) a control condition consisting of traditional classroom instruction…

  16. Peer Victimization and Anxiety in Genetically Vulnerable Youth: The Protective Roles of Teachers' Self-Efficacy and Anti-Bullying Classroom Rules.

    PubMed

    Guimond, Fanny-Alexandra; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Dionne, Ginette; Boivin, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Many victimized youngsters are at risk of developing internalizing problems, and this risk seems to be especially pronounced when they are genetically vulnerable for these problems. It is unclear, however, whether protective features of the school environment such as anti-bullying classroom policies and teacher's perceived self-efficacy in handling bullying situations can mitigate these negative outcomes. Using a genetically informed design based on twins, this study examined the potential moderating role of classroom anti-bullying policies and teachers' perceived self-efficacy in handling bullying situations in regard to the additive and interactive effects of peer victimization and genetic vulnerability on anxiety symptoms. To this end, 208 monozygotic and same-sex dizygotic twins (120 girls) rated their level of anxiety and peer victimization in grade 6 (mean age = 12.1 years, SD = 2.8). Teachers rated their self-efficacy in handling bullying situations and the extent of anti-bullying classroom policies. Multilevel regressions revealed triple interactions showing that genetic disposition for anxiety predicted actual anxiety for twins who were highly victimized by their peers, but only when their teachers had low perceived self-efficacy in handling bullying situations or when anti-bullying classroom rules were absent or rarely enforced. In contrast, for victimized youth with teachers who perceive themselves as effective or in classrooms where anti-bullying classroom policies were strongly enforced, genetic disposition for anxiety was not associated with actual anxiety symptoms. Anti-bullying programs should continue to promote teachers' involvement, as well as the enforcement of anti-bullying classroom policies, in order to diminish peer victimization and its related consequences.

  17. Outcomes of Anti-Bullying Intervention for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Linda; Jones, Robert S. P.; Hastings, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    Although existing research is scarce, evidence suggests that children and adults with intellectual disabilities may be at increased risk of being bullied (as they are for maltreatment generally) and possibly more likely than those without disabilities to also engage in bullying behavior. Despite significant clinical interest in bullying, we could…

  18. Social Skills Instruction for Urban Learners with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: A Culturally Responsive and Computer-Based Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson-Ervin, Porsha; Cartledge, Gwendolyn; Musti-Rao, Shobana; Gibson, Lenwood, Jr.; Keyes, Starr E.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of culturally relevant/responsive, computer-based social skills instruction on the social skill acquisition and generalization of 6 urban African American sixth graders with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). A multiple-probe across participants design was used to evaluate the effects of the social skills…

  19. Beyond Anti-Bullying Programs: Learn How to Foster Empathy within Your Curriculum to Increase the Emotional Intelligence of Middle Schoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaman, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Anti-bullying is much more than pointing fingers and labeling perpetrators. Teens who are labeled as bullies are unlikely to simply change their ways just because they have been accused of bullying. Preventing bullying also goes beyond hanging rules on a classroom wall. The real goal should be to undermine bullying by fostering compassion in…

  20. From Legislation to Implementation: A Distributed Leadership View of One District's Response to the Massachusetts Anti-Bullying Law of 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cron, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the leadership practice of an 11-member district team of educators assembled to respond to one of the most comprehensive bullying laws in the nation--the Massachusetts Anti-Bullying Law of 2010. This three-year case study provides school leaders and legislators with an in-depth, fine-grained…

  1. Reducing substance involvement in college students: a three-arm parallel-group randomized controlled trial of a computer-based intervention.

    PubMed

    Christoff, Adriana de Oliveira; Boerngen-Lacerda, Roseli

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of alcohol and other drug use is high among college students. Reducing their consumption will likely be beneficial for society as a whole. Computer and web-based interventions are promising for providing behaviorally based information. The present study compared the efficacy of three interventions (computerized screening and motivational intervention [ASSIST/MBIc], non-computerized screening and motivational intervention [ASSIST/MBIi], and screening only [control]) in college students in Curitiba, Brazil. A convenience sample of 458 students scored moderate and high risk on the ASSIST. They were then randomized into the three arms of the randomized controlled trial (ASSIST/MBIc, ASSIST/MBIi [interview], and assessment-only [control]) and assessed at baseline and 3 months later. The ASSIST involvement scores decreased at follow-up compared with baseline in the three groups, suggesting that any intervention is better than no intervention. For alcohol, the specific involvement scores decreased to a low level of risk in the three groups and the MBIc group showed a positive outcome compared with control, and the scores for each question were reduced in the two intervention groups compared to baseline. For tobacco, involvement scores decreased in the three groups, but they maintained moderate risk. For marijuana, a small positive effect was observed in the ASSIST/MBIi and control groups. The ASSIST/MBIc may be a good alternative to interview interventions because it is easy to administer, students frequently use such computer-based technologies, and individually tailored content can be delivered in the absence of a counselor. PMID:25679364

  2. Teachers and Students' Conceptions of Computer-Based Models in the Context of High School Chemistry: Elicitations at the Pre-intervention Stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waight, Noemi; Gillmeister, Kristina

    2014-04-01

    This study examined teachers' and students' initial conceptions of computer-based models—Flash and NetLogo models—and documented how teachers and students reconciled notions of multiple representations featuring macroscopic, submicroscopic and symbolic representations prior to actual intervention in eight high school chemistry classrooms. Individual in-depth interviews were conducted with 32 students and 6 teachers. Findings revealed an interplay of complex factors that functioned as opportunities and obstacles in the implementation of technologies in science classrooms. Students revealed preferences for the Flash models as opposed to the open-ended NetLogo models. Altogether, due to lack of content and modeling background knowledge, students experienced difficulties articulating coherent and blended understandings of multiple representations. Concurrently, while the aesthetic and interactive features of the models were of great value, they did not sustain students' initial curiosity and opportunities to improve understandings about chemistry phenomena. Most teachers recognized direct alignment of the Flash model with their existing curriculum; however, the benefits were relegated to existing procedural and passive classroom practices. The findings have implications for pedagogical approaches that address the implementation of computer-based models, function of models, models as multiple representations and the role of background knowledge and cognitive load, and the role of teacher vision and classroom practices.

  3. Comparison of Socio-Demographic Characteristics of a Computer Based Breastfeeding Educational Intervention Among Rural Hispanic Women.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Ashish; Amadi, Chioma; Meza, Jane; Aguirre, Trina; Wilhelm, Sue

    2015-10-01

    Examine association between socio-demographic characteristics and breastfeeding knowledge, self-efficacy and breastfeeding attrition prediction among rural Hispanic women. 46 rural Hispanic women, aged 18-38 years were enrolled from Regional West Medical Center, Scottsbluff, Nebraska. Intervention (n = 23) and attention control groups (n = 23) received bi-lingual breastfeeding education using touch screen computer and printed educational material. Participants were enrolled during last 6 weeks of pregnancy. Follow up assessments were at days 3 and 7, weeks 2 and 6, and months 3 and 6 postpartum. More than half of participants were single and had 10-12 years of education. Less than half of them had ever breastfed their children. No differences in knowledge, self-efficacy and intent to breastfeed scores were seen between two groups. Significant positive association was seen between self-efficacy and intent to breastfeed. Self-efficacy is an important predictor of intent to breastfeed among rural Hispanic women.

  4. Evaluation of a hand-held, computer-based intervention to promote early self-care behaviors after lung transplant

    PubMed Central

    Dabbs, Annette DeVito; Dew, Mary Amanda; Myers, Brad; Begey, Alex; Hawkins, Robert; Ren, Dianxu; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Oconnell, Erin; McCurry, Kenneth R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Lung transplant recipients are expected to perform self-care behaviors to maximize transplant-related health outcomes. Despite high non-adherence rates in performing these self-care behaviors, and the dire clinical consequences of such non-adherence, interventions are lacking. Pocket Personal Assistant for Tracking Health (Pocket PATH) is a hand-held device developed for patients to record health data, review data trends, and report condition changes to the transplant team. Methods A pilot trial was conducted to compare self-care agency, self-care behaviors, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) between recipients randomized to use Pocket PATH (n = 15) vs. standard care (n = 15) for the first two months following hospital discharge after lung transplantation. Results Baseline characteristics were equivalent across groups. Patients in the Pocket PATH group showed significantly higher ratings of self-care agency, performed self-care behaviors at significantly higher rates, and reported significantly better HRQOL than standard care controls. Conclusion Pocket PATH is more efficacious than standard care in promoting early self-care agency, self-care behaviors, and HRQOL in lung recipients. A large-scale randomized controlled trial is needed to test the impact of Pocket PATH on long-term self-care behaviors. PMID:19473201

  5. Computer-Based Career Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mau, Wei-Cheng

    The possible utilities and limitations of computer-assisted career guidance systems (CACG) have been widely discussed although the effectiveness of CACG has not been systematically considered. This paper investigates the effectiveness of a theory-based CACG program, integrating Sequential Elimination and Expected Utility strategies. Three types of…

  6. Tackling acute cases of school bullying in the KiVa anti-bullying program: a comparison of two approaches.

    PubMed

    Garandeau, Claire F; Poskiparta, Elisa; Salmivalli, Christina

    2014-08-01

    Whether cases of bullying should be handled in a direct, condemning mode or in a manner that does not involve blaming the perpetrator is a controversial issue among school professionals. This study compares the effectiveness of a Confronting Approach where the bully is openly told that his behavior must cease immediately to a Non-Confronting Approach where the adult shares his concern about the victim with the bully and invites him to provide suggestions on what could improve the situation. We analysed 339 cases of bullying involving 314 children from grades 1 to 9 (mean age = 11.95). Cases were handled in 65 schools as part of the implementation of the KiVa anti-bullying program. In each school, a team of three teachers addressed cases coming to their attention by organizing discussions with the bullies using either a Confronting or a Non-Confronting Approach; schools were randomly assigned to one of the two conditions. Victims reported that bullying stopped in 78 % of the cases. Logistic regression analyses indicated that neither approach was overall more effective than the other, controlling for grade level, duration of victimization and type of aggression. The Confronting Approach worked better than the Non-Confronting Approach in secondary school (grades 7 to 9), but not in primary school (grades 1 to 6). The Confronting Approach was more successful than the Non-Confronting Approach in cases of short-term victimization, but not in cases of long-term victimization. The type of aggression used did not moderate the effectiveness of either approach.

  7. A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial of Child-Focused Psychiatric Consultation and a School Systems-Focused Intervention to Reduce Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonagy, Peter; Twemlow, Stuart W.; Vernberg, Eric M.; Nelson, Jennifer Mize; Dill, Edward J.; Little, Todd D.; Sargent, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: While school-based anti-bullying programs are widely used, there have been few controlled trials of effectiveness. This study compared the effect of manualized School Psychiatric Consultation (SPC), CAPSLE (a systems and mentalization focused whole school intervention), and treatment-as-usual (TAU) in reducing aggression and…

  8. Computer Based Library Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machalow, Robert

    This document presents computer-based lessons used to teach basic library skills to college students at York College of the City University of New York. The information for library orientation has been entered on a disk which must be used in conjunction with a word processing program, the Applewriter IIe, and an Apple IIe microcomputer. The…

  9. An evaluation of a drama program to enhance social relationships and anti-bullying at elementary school: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Joronen, Katja; Konu, Anne; Rankin, H Sally; Astedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2012-03-01

    Drama, theater and role-playing methods are commonly used in health promotion programs, but evidence of their effectiveness is limited. This paper describes the development, implementation and evaluation of a school-based drama program to enhance social relationships and decrease bullying at school in children in grades 4-5 (mean age of 10.4 years). Students (n = 190) were recruited from two primary schools with similar demographics and socio-economics in the Southern Finland and purposively allocated either to an intervention group or a control group. The drama program included classroom drama sessions, follow-up activities at home and three parents' evenings concerning issues of social well being during the school year September 2007-May 2008. Data on social relationships in the class room and experiences of bullying were obtained before and after the program using self-completed questionnaire from the same students (n = 134). The response rate was 71%. No differences in socio-demographics existed between intervention group and control group at pretest. The positive effect on social relationships resulting from the intervention approached statistical significance (p = 0.065). Moreover, the positive effect was found to be statistically significant in the high-intensity intervention classes (p = 0.011). Bullying victimization decreased 20.7 percentage units from pretest (58.8%) to posttest (38.1%) in the intervention group (p < 0.05). The study indicates that using applied drama and theater methods in the classroom may improve children's social relationships at school.

  10. Computer-Based Instrumentation: Issues in Clinical Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    This article provides an overview of computer-based programs to assist speech-language pathologists in clinical intervention. It discusses instrumentation (sensors, signal conditioning, digitization, and parallel input); computer processing; input and output devices; and computer-based clinical applications (respiration, phonation, resonance, and…

  11. e-Motional Learning in Primary Schools: FearNot! An Anti-Bullying Intervention Based on Virtual Role-Play with Intelligent Synthetic Characters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enz, Sibylle; Zoll, Carsten; Vannini, Natalie; Schneider, Wolfgang; Hall, Lynne; Paiva, Ana; Aylett, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Addressing the problems of bullying in schools, this paper presents a novel and highly innovative pedagogical approach, building on the immersive power of virtual role-play. Educational role-play is widely accepted as a powerful instrument to change attitudes and behaviour, but faces some difficulties and disadvantages when applied to sensitive…

  12. Computer Based Virtual Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Kenneth F.; Hosticka, Alice; Schriver, Martha; Bedell, Jackie

    This paper discusses computer based virtual field trips that use technologies commonly found in public schools in the United States. The discussion focuses on the advantages of both using and creating these field trips for an instructional situation. A virtual field trip to Cumberland Island National Seashore, St. Marys, Georgia is used as a point…

  13. Index to Computer Based Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoye, Robert E., Ed.; Wang, Anastasia C., Ed.

    The computer-based programs and projects described in this index are listed under 98 different subject matter fields. Descrptions of programs include information on: subject field, program name and number, author, source, the program's curriculum content, prerequisites, level of instruction, type of student for which it is intended, total hours of…

  14. Radiological Worker Computer Based Training

    2003-02-06

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed an interactive computer based training (CBT) version of the standardized DOE Radiological Worker training program. This CD-ROM based program utilizes graphics, animation, photographs, sound and video to train users in ten topical areas: radiological fundamentals, biological effects, dose limits, ALARA, personnel monitoring, controls and postings, emergency response, contamination controls, high radiation areas, and lessons learned.

  15. Effects of an emotional literacy intervention for students identified with bullying behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Knowler, Claire; Frederickson, Norah

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of a 12-week, small group emotional literacy (EL) intervention in reducing bullying behaviour in school was evaluated. Participants were 50 primary school pupils identified through peer nomination as engaging in bullying behaviours. The intervention was implemented in schools already engaged with a universal social and emotional learning initiative, including an anti-bullying component. Within schools, participants were randomly assigned to an intervention or a wait-list comparison group. Response to the intervention was found to be dependent on baseline levels of EL. Only children whose baseline level was low showed a significant reduction in peer-rated bullying behaviour. No effect of the intervention was detected on victimisation or adjustment scores, although positive changes in adjustment were associated with increased EL. PMID:26494932

  16. CBSS Outreach Project: Computer-Based Study Strategies for Students with Learning Disabilities. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson-Inman, Lynne; Ditson, Mary

    This final report describes activities and accomplishments of the four-year Computer-Based Study Strategies (CBSS) Outreach Project at the University of Oregon. This project disseminated information about using computer-based study strategies as an intervention for students with learning disabilities and provided teachers in participating outreach…

  17. Cognitive remediation for adolescents with 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS): A preliminary study examining effectiveness, feasibility, and fidelity of a hybrid strategy, remote and computer-based intervention

    PubMed Central

    Mariano, Margaret A.; Tang, Kerri; Kurtz, Matthew; Kates, Wendy R.

    2015-01-01

    Background 22q11DS is a multiple anomaly syndrome involving intellectual and behavioral deficits, and increased risk for schizophrenia. As cognitive remediation (CR) has recently been found to improve cognition in younger patients with schizophrenia, we investigated the efficacy, feasibility, and fidelity of a remote, hybrid strategy, computerized CR program in youth with 22q11DS. Methods A longitudinal design was implemented in which 21 participants served as their own controls. Following an eight month baseline period in which no interventions were provided, cognitive coaches met with participants remotely for CR via video conferencing three times a week over a targeted 8 month timeframe and facilitated their progress through the intervention, offering task-specific strategies. A subset of strategies were examined for fidelity. Outcomes were evaluated using a neurocognitive test battery at baseline, pre-treatment and post-treatment. Results All participants adhered to the intervention. The mean length of the treatment phase was 7.96 months. A moderately high correlation (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.73) was found for amount and type of strategies offered by coaches. Participants exhibited significant improvements (ES = .36–.55, p ≤ .009) in working memory, shifting attention and cognitive flexibility. All significant models were driven by improvements in pre to post-treatment scores. Conclusions Based on our preliminary investigation, a remote, hybrid strategy, computerized CR program can be implemented with 22q11DS youth despite geographic location, health, and cognitive deficits. It appears effective in enhancing cognitive skills during the developmental period of adolescence, making this type of CR delivery useful for youth with 22q11DS transitioning into post-school environments. PMID:26044111

  18. Buyer's Guide to Computer Based Instructional Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fratini, Robert C.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the advantages and disadvantages of shared multiterminal computer based instruction (CBI) systems, dedicated multiterminal CBI systems, and stand-alone CBI systems. A series of questions guide consumers in matching a system's capabilities with an organization's needs. (MER)

  19. Does Participation in a Computer-Based Learning Program in Introductory Financial Accounting Course Lead to Choosing Accounting as a Major?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owhoso, Vincent; Malgwi, Charles A.; Akpomi, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The authors examine whether students who completed a computer-based intervention program, designed to help them develop abilities and skills in introductory accounting, later declared accounting as a major. A sample of 1,341 students participated in the study, of which 74 completed the intervention program (computer-based assisted learning [CBAL])…

  20. Understanding Computer-Based Digital Video.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martindale, Trey

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of new educational media and technology focuses on producing and delivering computer-based digital video. Highlights include video standards, including international standards and aspect ratio; camera formats and features, including costs; shooting digital video; editing software; compression; and a list of informative Web sites. (LRW)

  1. Prototyping of Computer-Based Training Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, D. E.; Black, T. R.

    1994-01-01

    Defines prototyping as an original version or model on which a completed software system for computer-based training is formed; examines the development process of a prototype; describes how prototyping can assist in facilitating communication between educational technology, software engineering, and project management; and discusses why…

  2. Computer-Based Learning in Chemistry Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietzner, Verena

    2014-01-01

    Currently not many people would doubt that computers play an essential role in both public and private life in many countries. However, somewhat surprisingly, evidence of computer use is difficult to find in German state schools although other countries have managed to implement computer-based teaching and learning in their schools. This paper…

  3. Computer-Based Instruction in Dietetics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Lois; Kent, Phyllis

    1982-01-01

    Details the development and system design of a computer-based instruction (CBI) program designed to provide tutorial training in diet modification as part of renal therapy and provides the results of a study that compared the effectiveness of the CBI program with the traditional lecture/laboratory method. (EAO)

  4. Computer Based Simulation of Laboratory Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edward, Norrie S.

    1997-01-01

    Examines computer based simulations of practical laboratory experiments in engineering. Discusses the aims and achievements of lab work (cognitive, process, psychomotor, and affective); types of simulations (model building and behavioral); and the strengths and weaknesses of simulations. Describes the development of a centrifugal pump simulation,…

  5. Educator Beliefs Regarding Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swann, D. LaDon; Branson, Floyd, Jr.; Talbert, B. Allen

    2003-01-01

    Extension educators (n=17) completed two of five technical sections from an aquaculture CD-ROM tutorial. Evidence from pre/post-training questionnaires, content assessments, and follow-up interviews reveals favorable attitudes toward computer-based inservice training. The ability to spend less time out of their county and to review materials after…

  6. Computer-based Approaches to Patient Education

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    All articles indexed in MEDLINE or CINAHL, related to the use of computer technology in patient education, and published in peer-reviewed journals between 1971 and 1998 were selected for review. Sixty-six articles, including 21 research-based reports, were identified. Forty-five percent of the studies were related to the management of chronic disease. Thirteen studies described an improvement in knowledge scores or clinical outcomes when computer-based patient education was compared with traditional instruction. Additional articles examined patients' computer experience, socioeconomic status, race, and gender and found no significant differences when compared with program outcomes. Sixteen of the 21 research-based studies had effect sizes greater than 0.5, indicating a significant change in the described outcome when the study subjects participated in computer-based patient education. The findings from this review support computer-based education as an effective strategy for transfer of knowledge and skill development for patients. The limited number of research studies (N = 21) points to the need for additional research. Recommendations for new studies include cost-benefit analysis and the impact of these new technologies on health outcomes over time. PMID:10428001

  7. Computer-Based Education for Patients with Hypertension: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saksena, Anuraag

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the benefits of using computer-based interventions to provide patient education to individuals with hypertension. Methods: MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, ERIC, EMBASE, and PsychINFO were searched from 1995 to April 2009 using keywords related to "computers," "hypertension," "education," and "clinical trial." Additional…

  8. A Computer-Based Interactive Multimedia Program to Reduce HIV Transmission for Women with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, J.; Clark, K. D.; Sarno, K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Despite recent recognition of the need for preventive sexual health materials for people with intellectual disability (ID), there have been remarkably few health-based interventions designed for people with mild to moderate ID. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computer-based interactive multimedia (CBIM)…

  9. Randomised trial of personalised computer based information for patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ray B; Atkinson, Jacqueline M; Coia, Denise A; Paterson, Lesley; Morton, A Ross; McKenna, Kate; Craig, Neil; Morrison, Jillian; Gilmour, W Harper

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To compare use, effect, and cost of personalised computer education with community psychiatric nurse education for patients with schizophrenia. Design Randomised trial of three interventions. Modelling of costs of alternatives. Participants 112 patients with schizophrenia in contact with community services; 67 completed the intervention. Interventions Three interventions of five educational sessions: (a) computer intervention combining information from patient's medical record with general information about schizophrenia; (b) sessions with a community psychiatric nurse; (c) “combination” (first and last sessions with nurse and remainder with computer). Main outcome measures Patients' attendance, opinions, change in knowledge, and psychological state; costs of interventions and patients' use of NHS community services; modelling of costs for these three, and alternative, interventions. Results Rates of completion of intervention did not differ significantly (71% for combination intervention, 61% for computer only, 46% for nurse only). Computer sessions were shorter than sessions with nurse (14 minutes v 60 minutes). More patients given nurse based education thought the information relevant. Of 20 patients in combination group, 13 preferred the sessions with the nurse and seven preferred the computer. There were no significant differences between groups in psychological outcomes. Because of the need to transport patients to the computer for their sessions, there was no difference between interventions in costs, but computer sessions combined with other patient contacts would be substantially cheaper. Conclusions The computer based patient education offered no advantage over sessions with a community psychiatric nurse. Investigation of computer use combined with other health service contacts would be worth while. What is already known on this topicEducation of patients with schizophrenia has limited but positive outcomesComputer based approaches have not

  10. Task simulation in computer-based training

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, P.R.

    1988-02-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) makes extensive use of job-task simulations in company-developed computer-based training (CBT) courseware. This courseware is different from most others because it does not simulate process control machinery or other computer programs, instead the WHC Excerises model day-to-day tasks such as physical work preparations, progress, and incident handling. These Exercises provide a higher level of motivation and enable the testing of more complex patterns of behavior than those typically measured by multiple-choice and short questions. Examples from the WHC Radiation Safety and Crane Safety courses will be used as illustrations. 3 refs.

  11. An Evaluation of Computer-based Instruction in Microbiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merkel, Susan M.; Walman, Laura B.; Leventhal, Jeremy S.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses whether computer-based instructional materials improve student learning. Evaluates a computer-based hypermedia tutorial that was delivered over a web site. (Contains 24 references.) (Author/YDS)

  12. A Comparative Evaluation of Computer Based and Non-Computer Based Instructional Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Ian

    1988-01-01

    Compares the computer assisted instruction (CAI) tutorial with its non-computerized pedagogical roots: the Socratic Dialog with Skinner's Programmed Instruction. Tests the effectiveness of a CAI tutorial on diffusion and osmosis against four other interactive and non-interactive instructional strategies. Notes computer based strategies were…

  13. Novel computer-based endoscopic camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovitz, R.; Hai, N.; Abraham, Martin D.; Adler, Doron; Nissani, M.; Fridental, Ron; Vitsnudel, Ilia

    1995-05-01

    We have introduced a computer-based endoscopic camera which includes (a) unique real-time digital image processing to optimize image visualization by reducing over exposed glared areas and brightening dark areas, and by accentuating sharpness and fine structures, and (b) patient data documentation and management. The image processing is based on i Sight's iSP1000TM digital video processor chip and Adaptive SensitivityTM patented scheme for capturing and displaying images with wide dynamic range of light, taking into account local neighborhood image conditions and global image statistics. It provides the medical user with the ability to view images under difficult lighting conditions, without losing details `in the dark' or in completely saturated areas. The patient data documentation and management allows storage of images (approximately 1 MB per image for a full 24 bit color image) to any storage device installed into the camera, or to an external host media via network. The patient data which is included with every image described essential information on the patient and procedure. The operator can assign custom data descriptors, and can search for the stored image/data by typing any image descriptor. The camera optics has extended zoom range of f equals 20 - 45 mm allowing control of the diameter of the field which is displayed on the monitor such that the complete field of view of the endoscope can be displayed on all the area of the screen. All these features provide versatile endoscopic camera with excellent image quality and documentation capabilities.

  14. Peer involvement in bullying: insights and challenges for intervention.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, P; Pepler, D; Craig, W

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the peer processes that occur during bullying episodes on the school playground. These processes were examined from a social learning perspective, allowing us to consider the effects of various types of reinforcement among bullies, victims, and peers. Fifty-three segments of video tape were examined. Each segment contained a peer group (two or more peers) that viewed bullying on the school playground. Peers were coded for actively joining or passively reinforcing the bully, and for actively intervening on behalf of the victim. On average, four peers viewed the schoolyard bullying, with a range from two to 14 peers. Averaged across all episodes, peers spent 54% of their time reinforcing bullies by passively watching, 21% of their time actively modelling bullies, and 25% of their time intervening on behalf of victims. Older boys (grades 4-6) were more likely to actively join with the bully than were younger boys (grades 1-3) and older girls. Both younger and older girls were more likely to intervene on behalf of victims than were older boys. The results were interpreted as confirming peers' central roles in the processes that unfold during playground bullying episodes. We discuss the results in terms of the challenges posed to peer-led interventions. Peers' anti-bullying initiatives must be reinforced by simultaneous whole-school interventions.

  15. Improving the dietary patterns of adolescents using a computer-based approach.

    PubMed

    Casazza, Krista; Ciccazzo, Michele

    2006-02-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently reported that 16-33% of children and adolescents in the United States are overweight or obese, making this the number one nutritional disease of this group. The prevalence appears to be increasing annually, as are the associated consequences. Moreover, the CDC estimates that less than 50% of adolescents are physically active on a regular basis. In order to improve the health of these individuals, an intervention must be focused to modify these behaviors. Facilitating the understanding of proper nutrition and need for physical activity among adolescents will likely prevent health problems such as overweight and obesity and the development of chronic diseases later in life. Despite these concerns, adolescents remain one of the most underserved populations in terms of preventive services. In the past, health education interventions have shown increases in knowledge; however, the ultimate goal of these programs is to positively impact behavior. To accomplish this, we must focus on the learning styles of "today's" adolescents. Computer-based interventions allow for individualized strategies to promote healthy lifestyles. A computer-based intervention program has the potential to elicit a greater behavior change in comparison to a traditional didactic intervention program.

  16. Demystifying the GMAT: Computer-Based Testing Terms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M.

    2012-01-01

    Computer-based testing can be a powerful means to make all aspects of test administration not only faster and more efficient, but also more accurate and more secure. While the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) exam is a computer adaptive test, there are other approaches. This installment presents a primer of computer-based testing terms.

  17. Adult Learning in a Computer-Based ESL Acquisition Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Karen Renee

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the self-efficacy of students learning English as a Second Language on the computer-based Rosetta Stone program. The research uses a qualitative approach to explore how a readily available computer-based learning program, Rosetta Stone, can help adult immigrant students gain some English competence and so acquire a greater…

  18. Computer-Based Educational Software System. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Richard C.; Davis, Bradley N.

    CBESS (Computer-Based Educational Software System) is a set of 22 programs addressing authoring, instructional delivery, and instructional management. The programs are divided into five groups: (1) Computer-Based Memorization System (CBMS), which helps students acquire and maintain declarative (factual) knowledge (11 programs); (2) Language Skills…

  19. Computer-Based Fluency Training: A Resource for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaber, Guillermo E.; Malott, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    A behavioral systems analysis approach to higher education was used to design, implement, evaluate, and recycle a computer-based fluency training component of a behavioral instructional system. This component helped 29 students achieve behavior analysis literacy. The computer-based training provided structure, immediate performance feedback, and…

  20. Widgets on the Web: Using Computer-Based Learning Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Darcy; Brown, Abbie; Robinson, LeAnne

    2002-01-01

    This article describes Widgets, computer-based learning tools designed to meet the instructional need for computer-based flexible tools that can be used across ability levels. It discusses development of three Widgets for students with mild disabilities: a multiplication with sets Widget, a number sense Widget, and a dollars and cents Widget.…

  1. TestMaker: A Computer-Based Test Development Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, William J.; Lario-Gibbs, Annette M.

    This paper discusses a computer-based prototype called TestMaker that enables educators to create computer-based tests. Given the functional needs of faculty, the host of research implications computer technology has for assessment, and current educational perspectives such as constructivism and their impact on testing, the purposes for developing…

  2. The Acceptance and Use of Computer Based Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzis, Vasileios; Economides, Anastasios A.

    2011-01-01

    The effective development of a computer based assessment (CBA) depends on students' acceptance. The purpose of this study is to build a model that demonstrates the constructs that affect students' behavioral intention to use a CBA. The proposed model, Computer Based Assessment Acceptance Model (CBAAM) is based on previous models of technology…

  3. Computer-Based Cognitive Tools: Description and Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, David; McNaught, Carmel

    With computers, tangible tools are represented by the hardware (e.g., the central processing unit, scanners, and video display unit), while intangible tools are represented by the software. There is a special category of computer-based software tools (CBSTs) that have the potential to mediate cognitive processes--computer-based cognitive tools…

  4. An Overview of Computer-Based Natural Language Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gevarter, William B.

    Computer-based Natural Language Processing (NLP) is the key to enabling humans and their computer-based creations to interact with machines using natural languages (English, Japanese, German, etc.) rather than formal computer languages. NLP is a major research area in the fields of artificial intelligence and computational linguistics. Commercial…

  5. Computer-Based Training: Capitalizing on Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedwell, Wendy L.; Salas, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Computer-based training (CBT) is a methodology for providing systematic, structured learning; a useful tool when properly designed. CBT has seen a resurgence given the serious games movement, which is at the forefront of integrating primarily entertainment computer-based games into education and training. This effort represents a multidisciplinary…

  6. Computer-Based Education: Is It a Panacea?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Janis

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the history and theory of computer-based education (CBE) and reviews five meta-analyses that investigated the effectiveness of computer-based applications on individuals by measuring student achievement on a final exam for both CBE and traditional teaching. Concludes that CBE should supplement traditional instruction, not replace it.…

  7. Evaluation of computer-based ultrasonic inservice inspection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.V. Jr.; Angel, L.J.; Doctor, S.R.; Park, W.R.; Schuster, G.J.; Taylor, T.T.

    1994-03-01

    This report presents the principles, practices, terminology, and technology of computer-based ultrasonic testing for inservice inspection (UT/ISI) of nuclear power plants, with extensive use of drawings, diagrams, and LTT images. The presentation is technical but assumes limited specific knowledge of ultrasonics or computers. The report is divided into 9 sections covering conventional LTT, computer-based LTT, and evaluation methodology. Conventional LTT topics include coordinate axes, scanning, instrument operation, RF and video signals, and A-, B-, and C-scans. Computer-based topics include sampling, digitization, signal analysis, image presentation, SAFI, ultrasonic holography, transducer arrays, and data interpretation. An evaluation methodology for computer-based LTT/ISI systems is presented, including questions, detailed procedures, and test block designs. Brief evaluations of several computer-based LTT/ISI systems are given; supplementary volumes will provide detailed evaluations of selected systems.

  8. Use of Computer-Based Instruction in Athletic Training Education

    PubMed Central

    Fincher, A. Louise; Wright, Kenneth E.

    1996-01-01

    Computer-based instruction is being widely used in the education programs of many allied health professions. However, there has been little, if any, documentation of computer-based instruction use in athletic training education. The primary purpose of this study was to determine what percentage of undergraduate and graduate NATA-approved athletic training education programs are using some form of computer-based instruction (ie, computer-assisted instruction or interactive video). We also addressed the following research questions: 1) What athletic training educational software is currently being used by athletic training students and educators? 2) What factors currently impede the use of computer-based instruction in athletic training education? 3) What instructional methods are commonly used to incorporate computer-based instruction into the athletic training curricula? and 4) What are the attitudes of athletic training program directors toward the use of computer-based instruction in athletic training education? Surveys were mailed to the program directors (n = 97) of all graduate and undergraduate NATA-approved athletic training education programs. Eighty-six (87.7%) usable surveys were returned. Forty-eight (55.8%) of the respondents reported using some form of computer-based instruction in their athletic training education program; 47 (54.7%) used computer-assisted instruction and 9 (10.6%) used interactive video. Respondents also identified the educational software they use and their method for implementing this software. Software was used most often to supplement traditional instructional methods. A lack of funds was reported to be the primary impeding factor for those programs not using computer-based instruction. Respondents reported an overall positive attitude toward computer-based instruction use in athletic training education and indicated the need for increased development of athletic training/sports medicine software. PMID:16558370

  9. Strategies to address weight-based victimization: youths' preferred support interventions from classmates, teachers, and parents.

    PubMed

    Puhl, Rebecca M; Peterson, Jamie Lee; Luedicke, Joerg

    2013-03-01

    Weight-Based Victimization is a frequent experience for adolescents who are overweight or obese, and is associated with numerous psychosocial and physical consequences for those who are targets of victimization. Assessing targets` preferences for different types of support and intervention has been absent in the context of weight-based victimization, but is needed to help inform potential interventions, motivate action, and identify strategies to help adolescents cope with experiences of weight-related teasing or bullying. Adolescents (14-18 years, N = 361, 40 % female, 71 % Caucasian) enrolled in national weight-loss camps completed an on-line survey. Participants who reported previous experiences of weight-based victimization were surveyed about their preferred interventions from peers, friends, teachers, Physical Education (PE) teachers/coaches, and parents. Participants indicated their preferences for specific strategies pertaining to target support, bullying intervention and prevention (e.g., inclusion in peer activities, confronting the bully, telling an adult, and improving anti-bullying policies). Friends (66 %) and peers (58 %) were the most highly preferred intervention agents followed by teachers (55 %), PE teachers/coaches (44 %), and parents (43 %). Participants who experienced more weight-based victimization expressed increased desire for intervention. The frequency of victimization, social support from friends and family, and perceived likelihood and helpfulness of intervention significantly influenced participant preferences for certain types of intervention, although preferences were generally consistent across participants' characteristics. The current study is the first to document youth's preferences for interventions in response to weight-based victimization. The findings have important implications for encouraging appropriate intervention and informing bystanders, which may help to reduce the prevalence, recurrence, and consequences for youth

  10. Computer-based technological applications in psychotherapy training.

    PubMed

    Berger, Thomas

    2004-03-01

    Despite obvious and documented advantages of technological applications in education, psychotherapy training based on information technology is either still rare or limited to technical innovations such as videotape recordings. This article outlines opportunities new computer-based learning technology create for psychotherapy training. First, approaches that include computer-mediated communication between trainees and teachers/supervisors are presented. Then, computer-based learning technology for self-study purposes is discussed in the context of educational approaches to learning. Computer-based tools that have been developed and evaluated in the context of psychotherapy training are described. Evaluations of the tools are discussed.

  11. An evaluation of computer-based programmed instruction for promoting teachers' greetings of parents by name.

    PubMed

    Ingvarsson, Einar T; Hanley, Gregory P

    2006-01-01

    Although greeting parents by name facilitates subsequent parent-teacher communication, baseline measures revealed that 4 preschool teachers never or rarely greeted parents by name during morning check-in. To promote frequent and accurate use of parents' names by teachers, the effects of a fully automated computerized assessment and programmed instruction (CAPI) intervention were evaluated in a multiple baseline design. The CAPI intervention involved assessment and training of relations among parents' and children's pictures and names, and produced rapid learning of parent names. The CAPI intervention also resulted in substantial improvements in the classroom use of parents' names for 3 of the 4 teachers; however, a supervisor-mediated feedback package (consisting of instructions, differential reinforcement, and error correction) was necessary to maintain name use for 2 of those teachers. The practical strengths and limitations of computer-based teacher training are discussed.

  12. A Computer-based Course in Classical Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, D.; Sherwood, B.

    1980-01-01

    Describes and illustrates the tutorial and homework exercise lessons, student routing, course organization, administration, and evaluation of a PLATO computer-based course in classical mechanics. An appendix lists 41 lessons developed for the course. (CMV)

  13. Gender and Equity Issues in Computer-Based Science Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Dennis W.; Agruso, Susan

    1995-01-01

    Suggests that computer and related technologies as tools for teaching, learning, and assessment are neither gender neutral nor benign in effect. Examines computers, equity, and access issues, computers as a technology, and the implications for computer-based assessment. (LZ)

  14. Effects of Computer-based Prescribing on Pharmacist Work Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Michael D.; Loos, Bonnie; Tu, Wanzhu; Eckert, George J.; Zhou, Xiao-Hua; Tierney, William M.

    1998-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To measure the effect of computer-based outpatient prescription writing by internal medicine physicians on pharmacist work patterns. Design: Work sampling at a hospital-based outpatient pharmacy. Data were collected from pharmacists wearing silent, random-signal generators before and after the implementation of computer-based prescribing. Measurements: The type of work performed by pharmacists (activity), the reason for their work (function), and the people they contacted (contact) were measured. Results: Total staff hours and prescriptions handled were similar before and after computer-based prescribing. Pharmacists recorded 4,687 observations before and 4,735 observations after implementation of computer-based outpatient prescription writing. After implementation, pharmacists spent 12.9 percent more time correcting prescription problems, had 3.9 percent less idle time, and spent 2.2 percent less time in discussions with others. Pharmacists also spent 34.0 percent less time filling prescriptions, 45.8 percent more time in problem-solving activities involving prescriptions, and 3.4 percent less time providing advice. Over 80 percent of pharmacist time was spent working alone both before and after computer-based outpatient prescription writing. Conclusion: Computer-based prescribing results in major changes in the type of work done by hospital-based outpatient pharmacists and in the reason for their work and small changes in the people contacted during their work. PMID:9824801

  15. PERFORMANCE OF A COMPUTER-BASED ASSESSMENT OF COGNITIVE FUNCTION MEASURES IN TWO COHORTS OF SENIORS

    PubMed Central

    Espeland, Mark A.; Katula, Jeffrey A.; Rushing, Julia; Kramer, Arthur F.; Jennings, Janine M.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Nadkarni, Neelesh K.; Reid, Kieran F.; Castro, Cynthia M.; Church, Timothy; Kerwin, Diana R.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Marottoli, Richard A.; Rushing, Scott; Marsiske, Michael; Rapp, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Computer-administered assessment of cognitive function is being increasingly incorporated in clinical trials, however its performance in these settings has not been systematically evaluated. Design The Seniors Health and Activity Research Program (SHARP) pilot trial (N=73) developed a computer-based tool for assessing memory performance and executive functioning. The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Seniors (LIFE) investigators incorporated this battery in a full scale multicenter clinical trial (N=1635). We describe relationships that test scores have with those from interviewer-administered cognitive function tests and risk factors for cognitive deficits and describe performance measures (completeness, intra-class correlations). Results Computer-based assessments of cognitive function had consistent relationships across the pilot and full scale trial cohorts with interviewer-administered assessments of cognitive function, age, and a measure of physical function. In the LIFE cohort, their external validity was further demonstrated by associations with other risk factors for cognitive dysfunction: education, hypertension, diabetes, and physical function. Acceptable levels of data completeness (>83%) were achieved on all computer-based measures, however rates of missing data were higher among older participants (odds ratio=1.06 for each additional year; p<0.001) and those who reported no current computer use (odds ratio=2.71; p<0.001). Intra-class correlations among clinics were at least as low (ICC≤0.013) as for interviewer measures (ICC≤0.023), reflecting good standardization. All cognitive measures loaded onto the first principal component (global cognitive function), which accounted for 40% of the overall variance. Conclusion Our results support the use of computer-based tools for assessing cognitive function in multicenter clinical trials of older individuals. PMID:23589390

  16. Identifying barriers for implementation of computer based nursing documentation.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Anna-Maria; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Bürkle, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken in the planning phase for the introduction of a comprehensive computer based nursing documentation system at Erlangen University Hospital. There, we expect a wide range of difficult organizational changes, because the nurses currently neither used computer based nursing documentation nor did they follow strongly the nursing process model within paper based documentation. Thus we were eager to recognize potential pitfalls early and to identify potential barriers for digital nursing documentation. In a questionnaire study we surveyed all German university hospitals for their experience with the implementation of computer based nursing documentation implementation. We received answers from 11 of the 23 hospitals. Furthermore we performed a questionnaire study about expectations and fears among the nurses of four pilot wards of our hospital. Most respondents stated a positive attitude towards the nursing process documentation, but many respondents note technical (e.g. bad performance of the software) and organizational barriers (e.g. lack of time). PMID:24943530

  17. Logistical Consideration in Computer-Based Screening of Astronaut Applicants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galarza, Laura

    2000-01-01

    This presentation reviews the logistical, ergonomic, and psychometric issues and data related to the development and operational use of a computer-based system for the psychological screening of astronaut applicants. The Behavioral Health and Performance Group (BHPG) at the Johnson Space Center upgraded its astronaut psychological screening and selection procedures for the 1999 astronaut applicants and subsequent astronaut selection cycles. The questionnaires, tests, and inventories were upgraded from a paper-and-pencil system to a computer-based system. Members of the BHPG and a computer programmer designed and developed needed interfaces (screens, buttons, etc.) and programs for the astronaut psychological assessment system. This intranet-based system included the user-friendly computer-based administration of tests, test scoring, generation of reports, the integration of test administration and test output to a single system, and a complete database for past, present, and future selection data. Upon completion of the system development phase, four beta and usability tests were conducted with the newly developed system. The first three tests included 1 to 3 participants each. The final system test was conducted with 23 participants tested simultaneously. Usability and ergonomic data were collected from the system (beta) test participants and from 1999 astronaut applicants who volunteered the information in exchange for anonymity. Beta and usability test data were analyzed to examine operational, ergonomic, programming, test administration and scoring issues related to computer-based testing. Results showed a preference for computer-based testing over paper-and -pencil procedures. The data also reflected specific ergonomic, usability, psychometric, and logistical concerns that should be taken into account in future selection cycles. Conclusion. Psychological, psychometric, human and logistical factors must be examined and considered carefully when developing and

  18. Computer-based and web-based radiation safety training

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, C., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The traditional approach to delivering radiation safety training has been to provide a stand-up lecture of the topic, with the possible aid of video, and to repeat the same material periodically. New approaches to meeting training requirements are needed to address the advent of flexible work hours and telecommuting, and to better accommodate individuals learning at their own pace. Computer- based and web-based radiation safety training can provide this alternative. Computer-based and web- based training is an interactive form of learning that the student controls, resulting in enhanced and focused learning at a time most often chosen by the student.

  19. A final-exam comparison involving computer-based instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, L. M.; Kane, Dennis; Sherwood, Bruce Arne; Avner, R. A.

    1983-06-01

    In an introductory classical mechanics course, the same final exams were given to 540 students taught in the usual way and to 486 students who received computer-based instruction. All students scored better on problems which had been made up by their own lecturer. Students in the computer-based course scored better overall. These statistically significant results are of interest not only for comparing the two forms of instruction but also for their implications on the use of exam scores for such comparisons.

  20. Computer based learning in general practice--options and implementation.

    PubMed

    Mills, K A; McGlade, K

    1992-01-01

    A survey of the 30 departments of general practice in the UK revealed that only three are currently making use of any form of computer based learning materials for teaching their undergraduate students. One of the reasons for the low level of usage is likely to be the relatively poor availability of suitable courseware and lack of guidance as to how to utilise what is available. This short paper describes the types of courseware that are available and the advantages and disadvantages of using acquired courseware as opposed to writing your own. It also considers alternative strategies for making computer based learning (CBL) courseware available to students. PMID:1608334

  1. Children's Creative Collaboration during a Computer-Based Music Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Allan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and analyse specific instances of transactive communication as children engaged in a paired melody writing task using a computer-based composing environment. Transactive communication has been identified as one of the features of general collaborative engagement that is most helpful in an educational…

  2. Computer-Based Information Services in Medicine: A Feasibility Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, P. H.; And Others

    The objectives of this study were to examine the need and potential demand for computer-based information services in the University of Otago medical libraries, to evaluate the various databases of interest, and to recommend the best means of access to such services. Data were collected through user and library surveys, an extensive literature…

  3. The Impact of Instructional Elements in Computer-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Florence; Klein, James D.; Sullivan, Howard

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of several elements of instruction (objectives, information, practice, examples and review) when they were combined in a systematic manner. College students enrolled in a computer literacy course used one of six different versions of a computer-based lesson delivered on the web to learn about input, processing,…

  4. Building Databases for the Computer-Based Memorization System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Richard C.

    The Computer-Based Memorization System (CBMS), which specifies the facts that students are to know and how well the facts are to be known, uses a compiled form of an associative network for its knowledge database. (An associative network is a knowledge representation that uses associations for its basic representation of knowledge.) The CBMS…

  5. An Intelligent Computer-Based System for Sign Language Tutoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchings, Tim; Khadragi, Ahmed; Saeb, Magdy

    2012-01-01

    A computer-based system for sign language tutoring has been developed using a low-cost data glove and a software application that processes the movement signals for signs in real-time and uses Pattern Matching techniques to decide if a trainee has closely replicated a teacher's recorded movements. The data glove provides 17 movement signals from…

  6. Computer-Based Experiment for Determining Planck's Constant Using LEDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Feng; Cloninger, Todd

    2008-01-01

    Visible light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been widely used as power indicators. However, after the power is switched off, it takes a while for the LED to go off. Many students were fascinated by this simple demonstration. In this paper, by making use of computer-based data acquisition and modeling, we show the voltage across the LED undergoing an…

  7. Levels of Evaluation for Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Thomas C.; Lent, Richard M.

    The uses and methods of four levels of evaluation which can be conducted during the development and implementation phases of computer-based instruction (CBI) programs are discussed in this paper. The levels of evaluation presented are: (1) documentation, (2) formative evaluation, (3) assessment of immediate learner effectiveness, and (4) impact…

  8. Computer-Based Inquiry into Scientific Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkowitz, Melissa S.; Szabo, Michael

    1979-01-01

    Problem solving performance of individuals was compared with that of dyads at three levels of mental ability using a computer-based inquiry into the riddle of the frozen Wooly Mammoth. Results indicated significant interactions between grouping and mental ability for certain problem solving internal measures. (RAO)

  9. Strategies in Solving Computer-Based Cloze: Is It Reading?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Vance

    This paper reports on a project aimed at finding out what students do when working cloze passages on computer. To generate data, a computer-based cloze program, "Super Cloze," was configured so that all student keypresses would be recorded. This was worked by several classes of students at Sultan Qaboos University (Oman) during their scheduled…

  10. Effects of Computer-Based Education on Elementary School Pupils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulik, Chen-Lin C.; And Others

    A meta-analysis was conducted of 29 comparative studies located primarily through computer searches of Comprehensive Dissertation Abstracts and ERIC. Studies chosen took place in actual elementary classrooms, reported measured outcomes for both computer-based education and control classes, and were free from methodological flaws. A total of 21…

  11. Centre Computer Base for Visually Handicapped Children, Students and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, S.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The Centre Computer Base is a list of hardware which can effectively operate the software of the Research Centre for the Education of the Visually Handicapped. Essential hardware contained on the list is described, along with a variety of "add-on" devices such as joysticks, touch-screens, speech synthesizers, braille embossers, etc. (Author/JDD)

  12. Computer-Based Humanities Reference Services and the University Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeHart, Florence E.; Stutzman, Margaret

    Two questions arise in regard to the computer-based humanities reference services: (1) What knowledge, abilities, and attitudes should the information specialist or librarian in the university library have in order to aid users in fully exploiting the innovative humanities information handling processes? (2) To what extent do users in the…

  13. Using Computer-Based Testing with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Susan Kubic

    2010-01-01

    In this era of increased accountability in education, there is a need for tools to use in assessing the abilities and instructional levels of young children. Computers have been used successfully to assess older children and adults. However, there is a dearth of empirical research to provide evidence that computer-based testing (CBT) is…

  14. Development of Computer-Based Resources for Textile Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Teresa; Thomas, Andrew; Bailey, Mike

    1998-01-01

    Describes the production of computer-based resources for students of textiles and engineering in the United Kingdom. Highlights include funding by the Teaching and Learning Technology Programme (TLTP), courseware author/subject expert interaction, usage test and evaluation, authoring software, graphics, computer-aided design simulation, self-test…

  15. Computer-Based Simulation Models for Community College Business Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, James

    Instructors at Lower Columbia College in Longview, Washington use computer-based simulation models in lower level business administration courses. Prior to use, teachers must select and obtain a simulation, discuss it with campus computer personnel, set an operations schedule, obtain the necessary supplementary material, and test run the program.…

  16. A Computer Based Problem Solving Environment in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilgin, Ibrahim; Karakirik, Erol

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce the Mole Solver, a computer based system that facilitates monitors and improves students' problem solving skills on mole concept. The system has three distinct modes that: (1) find step by step solutions to the word problems on the mole concept; (2) enable students to solve word problems on their own by…

  17. A Computer Based Problem Solving Environment in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilgin, Ibrahim; Karakirik, Erol

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce the Mole Solver, a computer based system that facilitates monitors and improves the students' problems solving skills on mole concept. The system has three distinct modes that: i) finds step by step solutions to the word problems on the mole concept ii) enable students' to solve word problems on their own…

  18. Testing and Computer-Based Instruction: Psychometric Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarvela, Paul D.; Noonan, John V.

    1988-01-01

    Describes measurement problems associated with computer based testing (CBT) programs when they are part of a computer assisted instruction curriculum. Topics discussed include CBT standards; selection of item types; the contamination of items that arise from test design strategies; and the non-equivalence of comparison groups in item analyses. (8…

  19. Can We Apply TAM in Computer-Based Classes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, David; Williams, Denise

    2013-01-01

    While students may struggle in any classroom and consequently require help beyond the schedule meeting time and place of the class, computer-based courses pose the additional hurdle of requiring ready access to hardware and software that may be unavailable or inconvenient for students outside of the classroom and its scheduled meeting time. This…

  20. Computer-Based Semantic Network in Molecular Biology: A Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callman, Joshua L.; And Others

    This paper analyzes the hardware and software features that would be desirable in a computer-based semantic network system for representing biology knowledge. It then describes in detail a prototype network of molecular biology knowledge that has been developed using Filevision software and a Macintosh computer. The prototype contains about 100…

  1. Computer-Based Interaction Analysis with DEGREE Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barros, B.; Verdejo, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    We review our research with "DEGREE" and analyse how our work has impacted the collaborative learning community since 2000. Our research is framed within the context of computer-based interaction analysis and the development of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) tools. We identify some aspects of our work which have been…

  2. The Effectiveness of Computer-Based Cognitive Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walcott, Christy M.; Phillips, Miranda E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to summarize empirical findings for school-age computer-based cognitive training (CCT) programs and to provide specific guidelines to practitioners who may be consulting with parents and schools about the utility of such programs. CCT programs vary in nature and in their targeted functions, but they share similar…

  3. Computer Based Medical Education: New Ways to Meet Persistent Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Robert M.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the need for alternate delivery systems in continuing medical education (CME), the benefits of using computers to deliver CME, and ways to increase the efficiency and cost effectiveness of computer based education. Current and future applications of computer techniques to CME are also examined. (Author/MER)

  4. Simple hobby computer-based off-gas analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, E.H.; Jansen, N.B.; Flickinger, M.C.; Tsao, G.T.

    1981-02-01

    An Apple II computer has been adapted to monitor fermentation offgas in laboratory and pilot scale fermentors. It can calculate oxygen uptake rates, carbon dioxide evolution rates, respiratory quotient as well as initiating recalibration procedures. In this report the computer-based off-gas analysis system is described.

  5. Computer-Based Testing: Practices and Considerations. Synthesis Report 78

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurlow, Martha; Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Albus, Debra; Hodgson, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Computer-based testing (CBT) has emerged as one of the recent "innovative" approaches to assessments most pursued by states. CBT is lauded as the answer to having cheaper and speedier test delivery for state and district-wide assessments. It is also seen by some as an avenue toward greater accessibility for students with disabilities. In this…

  6. Project IMPACT: A Computer Based Instructional Management Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Charles F.; And Others

    IMPACT is a computer-based information system designed to help school districts share materials and expertise and to implement state-mandated evaluation of student achievement. It is designed to meet local, regional, and state evaluation and reporting requirements. Based upon the diagnostic-prescriptive approach to instruction, it consists of: (1)…

  7. Helping Students Adapt to Computer-Based Encrypted Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker-Eveleth, Lori; Eveleth, Daniel M.; O'Neill, Michele; Stone, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    The College of Business and Economics at the University of Idaho conducted a pilot study that used commercially available encryption software called Securexam to deliver computer-based examinations. A multi-step implementation procedure was developed, implemented, and then evaluated on the basis of what students viewed as valuable. Two key aspects…

  8. Establishing performance requirements of computer based systems subject to uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, D.

    1997-02-01

    An organized systems design approach is dictated by the increasing complexity of computer based systems. Computer based systems are unique in many respects but share many of the same problems that have plagued design engineers for decades. The design of complex systems is difficult at best, but as a design becomes intensively dependent on the computer processing of external and internal information, the design process quickly borders chaos. This situation is exacerbated with the requirement that these systems operate with a minimal quantity of information, generally corrupted by noise, regarding the current state of the system. Establishing performance requirements for such systems is particularly difficult. This paper briefly sketches a general systems design approach with emphasis on the design of computer based decision processing systems subject to parameter and environmental variation. The approach will be demonstrated with application to an on-board diagnostic (OBD) system for automotive emissions systems now mandated by the state of California and the Federal Clean Air Act. The emphasis is on an approach for establishing probabilistically based performance requirements for computer based systems.

  9. Cognitive Effects from Process Learning with Computer-Based Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breuer, Klaus; Kummer, Ruediger

    1990-01-01

    Discusses content learning versus process learning, describes process learning with computer-based simulations, and highlights an empirical study on the effects of process learning with problem-oriented, computer-managed simulations in technical vocational education classes in West Germany. Process learning within a model of the cognitive system…

  10. Traditional Native Storytelling Using Computer-Based Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Michele; Bilan, Bohdan J.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a 4-day outdoor summer workshop for 9 Native Canadians, ages 10 to 17, which focused on traditional Native storytelling. Notes that the students learned to use computer-based multimedia and published interactive multimedia versions of their Native stories. (SR)

  11. Problem-Solving on a Computer-Based Teletype.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suppes, Patrick; And Others

    Reported is research related to the use of Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) drill-and-practice systems in the elementary schools. The investigators attempted to determine the variables related to problem difficulty by analyzing the solutions of a problem series. Students were first taught the mechanics of utilizing a computer-based teletype to…

  12. Use of Humorous Visuals To Enhance Computer-Based-Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snetsinger, Wendy; Grabowski, Barbara

    It was hypothesized that a visual strategy that incorporates a humorous theme and cartoons with humorous comments relevant to the content helps motivate students to focus on and retain computer-based instructional material. An experiment to assess this hypothesis was undertaken with 43 college students who received a humorous presentation on…

  13. Investigating Effects of Computer-Based Grammar Tutorials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolesnikova, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation study examined a broad question of whether computer-based grammar tutorials are effective and welcome tools to review grammar for language learners by investigating effects of three different modes of such tutorials on learners' knowledge and satisfaction. For this study, I developed experimental tutorials in three different…

  14. Issues in Text Design and Layout for Computer Based Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andresen, Lee W.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of computer-based communications (CBC) focuses on issues involved with screen design and layout for electronic text, based on experiences with electronic messaging, conferencing, and publishing within the Australian Open Learning Information Network (AOLIN). Recommendations for research on design and layout for printed text are also…

  15. Computer-Based Instruction in Reading: Grades K-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, John D.; Atkinson, R. C.

    A lengthy and detailed description is given of a computer-based curriculum for initial reading, with emphasis on reading as decoding. The initial curriculum, prepared for a school in Cupertino, California, was closely linked to the three basal reading texts then being used in the district's primary classrooms and was programed as three separate…

  16. A Computer-Based Instrument That Identifies Common Science Misconceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larrabee, Timothy G.; Stein, Mary; Barman, Charles

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the rationale for and development of a computer-based instrument that helps identify commonly held science misconceptions. The instrument, known as the Science Beliefs Test, is a 47-item instrument that targets topics in chemistry, physics, biology, earth science, and astronomy. The use of an online data collection system…

  17. A Software Laboratory Environment for Computer-Based Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtz, Barry L.; O'Neal, Micheal B.

    This paper describes a National Science Foundation-sponsored project at Louisiana Technological University to develop computer-based laboratories for "hands-on" introductions to major topics of computer science. The underlying strategy is to develop structured laboratory environments that present abstract concepts through the use of computer…

  18. The Mediated Museum: Computer-Based Technology and Museum Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterman, Nanette T.; Allen, Brockenbrough S.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the use of computer-based tools and techniques in museums. The integration of realia with media-based advice and interpretation is described, electronic replicas of ancient Greek vases in the J. Paul Getty Museum are explained, examples of mediated exhibits are presented, and the use of hypermedia is discussed. (five references) (LRW)

  19. Design Model for Learner-Centered, Computer-Based Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawley, Chandra L.; Duffy, Thomas M.

    This paper presents a model for designing computer-based simulation environments within a constructivist framework for the K-12 school setting. The following primary criteria for the development of simulations are proposed: (1) the problem needs to be authentic; (2) the cognitive demand in learning should be authentic; (3) scaffolding supports a…

  20. Marking Strategies in Metacognition-Evaluated Computer-Based Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Li-Ju; Ho, Rong-Guey; Yen, Yung-Chin

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of marking and metacognition-evaluated feedback (MEF) in computer-based testing (CBT) on student performance and review behavior. Marking is a strategy, in which students place a question mark next to a test item to indicate an uncertain answer. The MEF provided students with feedback on test results…

  1. Determination of Absolute Zero Using a Computer-Based Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrani, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple computer-based laboratory experiment for evaluating absolute zero in degrees Celsius, which can be performed in college and undergraduate physical sciences laboratory courses. With a computer, absolute zero apparatus can help demonstrators or students to observe the relationship between temperature and pressure and use…

  2. Managing Computer-based Training Developments in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodson, Peter

    1998-01-01

    A review of good human resource management practice outside higher education provides a framework for the academic use of computer-based training in teaching and learning. The framework acknowledges academic freedom and autonomy and builds on a platform of academic research. (SK)

  3. Problems in Conducting Research on Computer-Based Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Alice M.

    Computer-based simulation (CBS) represents a unique utilization of computers for instruction that combines some of the best features of the technologies of simulation and computer assisted instruction (CAI). CBS grew out of an interest in testing the application of CAI to procedural and perceptual motor skills. With the sophisticated graphics…

  4. Anti-Bullying Policies and Practices in Texas Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Rosemary

    2011-01-01

    For over a decade national attention to bullying in American schools has increased, fueled by publicity about suicides of severely bullied youth. Schools have the charge of maintaining the safety of all students in order to ensure a positive learning environment, but there is little information about what they are doing to prevent bullying. The…

  5. An Anti-Bullying Training Course for Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgeway, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Workplace bullying is a phenomenon that is currently affecting as many as 70% of the workforce in the United States (Lutgen-Sandvic & McDermott, 2011). This phenomenon decreases morale, increases turn-over, and could soon lead to massive and costly litigation. In response to this I have proposed a two hour training course meant to educate workers…

  6. Create an Anti-Bullying Program with Resources You Have

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trump, Kenneth S.

    2011-01-01

    Bullying has captured the news headlines and the attention of legislators, educators, and special interest advocates over the past three years at a greater rate. High-profile teen suicides have raised questions about the role bullying may have played in student deaths. School administrators and safety officials agree that bullying is a serious…

  7. Anti-Bullying and Harassment Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Davis, Danny K. [D-IL-7

    2011-03-09

    03/21/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. Development and Evaluation of a Computer-Based, Self-Management Tool for People Recently Diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Booth, Alison O; Lowis, Carole; Hunter, Steven J; Dean, Moira; Cardwell, Chris R; McKinley, Michelle C

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a computer-based, dietary, and physical activity self-management program for people recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Methods. The computer-based program was developed in conjunction with the target group and evaluated in a 12-week randomised controlled trial (RCT). Participants were randomised to the intervention (computer-program) or control group (usual care). Primary outcomes were diabetes knowledge and goal setting (ADKnowl questionnaire, Diabetes Obstacles Questionnaire (DOQ)) measured at baseline and week 12. User feedback on the program was obtained via a questionnaire and focus groups. Results. Seventy participants completed the 12-week RCT (32 intervention, 38 control, mean age 59 (SD) years). After completion there was a significant between-group difference in the "knowledge and beliefs scale" of the DOQ. Two-thirds of the intervention group rated the program as either good or very good, 92% would recommend the program to others, and 96% agreed that the information within the program was clear and easy to understand. Conclusions. The computer-program resulted in a small but statistically significant improvement in diet-related knowledge and user satisfaction was high. With some further development, this computer-based educational tool may be a useful adjunct to diabetes self-management. This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov NCT number NCT00877851. PMID:27446961

  9. Development and Evaluation of a Computer-Based, Self-Management Tool for People Recently Diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Alison O.; Lowis, Carole; Hunter, Steven J.; Dean, Moira; Cardwell, Chris R.; McKinley, Michelle C.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a computer-based, dietary, and physical activity self-management program for people recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Methods. The computer-based program was developed in conjunction with the target group and evaluated in a 12-week randomised controlled trial (RCT). Participants were randomised to the intervention (computer-program) or control group (usual care). Primary outcomes were diabetes knowledge and goal setting (ADKnowl questionnaire, Diabetes Obstacles Questionnaire (DOQ)) measured at baseline and week 12. User feedback on the program was obtained via a questionnaire and focus groups. Results. Seventy participants completed the 12-week RCT (32 intervention, 38 control, mean age 59 (SD) years). After completion there was a significant between-group difference in the “knowledge and beliefs scale” of the DOQ. Two-thirds of the intervention group rated the program as either good or very good, 92% would recommend the program to others, and 96% agreed that the information within the program was clear and easy to understand. Conclusions. The computer-program resulted in a small but statistically significant improvement in diet-related knowledge and user satisfaction was high. With some further development, this computer-based educational tool may be a useful adjunct to diabetes self-management. This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov NCT number NCT00877851. PMID:27446961

  10. A computer-based interactive game to train persons with cognitive impairments to perform recycling tasks independently.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Jen; Kang, Ya-Shu; Liu, Fang-Lin

    2014-12-01

    This study assessed the possibility of training three people with cognitive impairments using a computer-based interactive game. A game was designed to provide task prompts in recycling scenarios, identify incorrect task steps on the fly, and help users learn to make corrections. Based on a multiple baseline design, the data showed that the three participants considerably increased their target response, which improved their vocational job skills during the intervention phases and enabled them to maintain the acquired job skills after intervention. The practical and developmental implications of the results are discussed.

  11. A computer-based interactive game to train persons with cognitive impairments to perform recycling tasks independently.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Jen; Kang, Ya-Shu; Liu, Fang-Lin

    2014-12-01

    This study assessed the possibility of training three people with cognitive impairments using a computer-based interactive game. A game was designed to provide task prompts in recycling scenarios, identify incorrect task steps on the fly, and help users learn to make corrections. Based on a multiple baseline design, the data showed that the three participants considerably increased their target response, which improved their vocational job skills during the intervention phases and enabled them to maintain the acquired job skills after intervention. The practical and developmental implications of the results are discussed. PMID:25262012

  12. The Relative Effectiveness of Computer-Based and Traditional Resources for Education in Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khot, Zaid; Quinlan, Kaitlyn; Norman, Geoffrey R.; Wainman, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing use of computer-based resources to teach anatomy, although no study has compared computer-based learning to traditional. In this study, we examine the effectiveness of three formats of anatomy learning: (1) a virtual reality (VR) computer-based module, (2) a static computer-based module providing Key Views (KV), (3) a plastic…

  13. Hanford general employee training: Computer-based training instructor's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The Computer-Based Training portion of the Hanford General Employee Training course is designed to be used in a classroom setting with a live instructor. Future references to this course'' refer only to the computer-based portion of the whole. This course covers the basic Safety, Security, and Quality issues that pertain to all employees of Westinghouse Hanford Company. The topics that are covered were taken from the recommendations and requirements for General Employee Training as set forth by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) in INPO 87-004, Guidelines for General Employee Training, applicable US Department of Energy orders, and Westinghouse Hanford Company procedures and policy. Besides presenting fundamental concepts, this course also contains information on resources that are available to assist students. It does this using Interactive Videodisk technology, which combines computer-generated text and graphics with audio and video provided by a videodisk player.

  14. Overview of Computer-based Natural Language Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Gevarter, W.B.

    1983-04-01

    Computer-based Natural Language Processing (NLP) is the key to enabling humans and their computer-based creations to interact with machines in natural language (like English, Japanese, German, etc., in contrast to formal computer languages). The doors that such an achievement can open have made this a major research area in Artificial Intelligence and Computational Linguistics. Commercial natural language interfaces to computers have recently entered the market and future looks bright for other applications as well. This report reviews the basic approaches to such systems, the techniques utilized, applications, the state of the art of the technology, issues and research requirements, the major participants and finally, future trends and expectations. It is anticipated that this report will prove useful to engineering and research managers, potential users, and others who will be affected by this field as it unfolds.

  15. Overview of computer-based natural language processing

    SciTech Connect

    Gevarter, W.B.

    1983-04-01

    Computer-based Natural Language-Processing (NLP) is the key to enabling humans and their computer-based creations to interact with machines in natural language (like English, Japanese, German, etc. in contrast to formal computer languages). The doors that such an achievement can open have made this a major research area in Artificial Intelligence and Computational Linguistics. Commercial natural language interfaces to computers have recently entered the market and the future looks bright for other applications as well. This report reviews the basic approaches to such systems, the techniques utilized, applications, the state-of-the-art of the technology, issues and research requirements, the major participants, and finally, future trends and expectations. It is anticipated that this report will prove useful to engineering and research managers, potential users, and other who will be affected by this field as it unfolds.

  16. Assessment methodology for computer-based instructional simulations.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Alan; Iseli, Markus; Wainess, Richard; Lee, John J

    2013-10-01

    Computer-based instructional simulations are becoming more and more ubiquitous, particularly in military and medical domains. As the technology that drives these simulations grows ever more sophisticated, the underlying pedagogical models for how instruction, assessment, and feedback are implemented within these systems must evolve accordingly. In this article, we review some of the existing educational approaches to medical simulations, and present pedagogical methodologies that have been used in the design and development of games and simulations at the University of California, Los Angeles, Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing. In particular, we present a methodology for how automated assessments of computer-based simulations can be implemented using ontologies and Bayesian networks, and discuss their advantages and design considerations for pedagogical use.

  17. Computer-based Training in Medicine and Learning Theories.

    PubMed

    Haag, Martin; Bauch, Matthias; Garde, Sebastian; Heid, Jörn; Weires, Thorsten; Leven, Franz-Josef

    2005-01-01

    Computer-based training (CBT) systems can efficiently support modern teaching and learning environments. In this paper, we demonstrate on the basis of the case-based CBT system CAMPUS that current learning theories and design principles (Bloom's Taxonomy and practice fields) are (i) relevant to CBT and (ii) are feasible to implement using computer-based training and adequate learning environments. Not all design principles can be fulfilled by the system alone, the integration of the system in adequate teaching and learning environments therefore is essential. Adequately integrated, CBT programs become valuable means to build or support practice fields for learners that build domain knowledge and problem-solving skills. Learning theories and their design principles can support in designing these systems as well as in assessing their value.

  18. Computer-based patient record: the essential data set approach.

    PubMed Central

    Moidu, K.; Falsone, J. J.; Nair, S.

    1994-01-01

    The clamor for data to study the impact of care, to evaluate clinical performance and justify resource utilization is increasing. The data in demand normally should exist in the record of a clinical encounter. Advances in information technology and software techniques have provided us with tools to develop and implement computer-based patient record systems. The issues that constrain development are integral issues of clinical medicine, such as the variability in medical data, specialized practice of medicine, and differing demands of the numerous end-users of a medical record. This paper describes an approach to develop a computer-based patient record. The focus is on identification of the essential data set by infological data modeling and its implementation in a commercially available package for a physician's office. PMID:7949970

  19. An overview of computer-based natural language processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gevarter, W. B.

    1983-01-01

    Computer based Natural Language Processing (NLP) is the key to enabling humans and their computer based creations to interact with machines in natural language (like English, Japanese, German, etc., in contrast to formal computer languages). The doors that such an achievement can open have made this a major research area in Artificial Intelligence and Computational Linguistics. Commercial natural language interfaces to computers have recently entered the market and future looks bright for other applications as well. This report reviews the basic approaches to such systems, the techniques utilized, applications, the state of the art of the technology, issues and research requirements, the major participants and finally, future trends and expectations. It is anticipated that this report will prove useful to engineering and research managers, potential users, and others who will be affected by this field as it unfolds.

  20. Why Computer-Based Systems Should be Autonomic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterritt, Roy; Hinchey, Mike

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss why computer-based systems should be autonomic, where autonomicity implies self-managing, often conceptualized in terms of being self-configuring, self-healing, self-optimizing, self-protecting and self-aware. We look at motivations for autonomicity, examine how more and more systems are exhibiting autonomic behavior, and finally look at future directions.

  1. A Research Roadmap for Computation-Based Human Reliability Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Boring, Ronald; Mandelli, Diego; Joe, Jeffrey; Smith, Curtis; Groth, Katrina

    2015-08-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research through the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to extend the life of the currently operating fleet of commercial nuclear power plants. The Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) research pathway within LWRS looks at ways to maintain and improve the safety margins of these plants. The RISMC pathway includes significant developments in the area of thermalhydraulics code modeling and the development of tools to facilitate dynamic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). PRA is primarily concerned with the risk of hardware systems at the plant; yet, hardware reliability is often secondary in overall risk significance to human errors that can trigger or compound undesirable events at the plant. This report highlights ongoing efforts to develop a computation-based approach to human reliability analysis (HRA). This computation-based approach differs from existing static and dynamic HRA approaches in that it: (i) interfaces with a dynamic computation engine that includes a full scope plant model, and (ii) interfaces with a PRA software toolset. The computation-based HRA approach presented in this report is called the Human Unimodels for Nuclear Technology to Enhance Reliability (HUNTER) and incorporates in a hybrid fashion elements of existing HRA methods to interface with new computational tools developed under the RISMC pathway. The goal of this research effort is to model human performance more accurately than existing approaches, thereby minimizing modeling uncertainty found in current plant risk models.

  2. The educational effectiveness of computer-based instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renshaw, Carl E.; Taylor, Holly A.

    2000-07-01

    Although numerous studies have shown that computer-based education is effective for enhancing rote memorization, the impact of these tools on higher-order cognitive skills, such as critical thinking, is less clear. Existing methods for evaluating educational effectiveness, such as surveys, quizzes and pre- or post-interviews, may not be effective for evaluating impact on critical thinking skills because students are not always aware of the effects the software has on their thought processes. We review an alternative evaluation strategy whereby the student's mastery of a specific cognitive skill is directly assessed both before and after participating in a computer-based exercise. Methodologies for assessing cognitive skill are based on recent advances in the fields of cognitive science. Results from two studies show that computer-based exercises can positively impact the higher-order cognitive skills of some students. However, a given exercise will not impact all students equally. This suggests that further work is needed to understand how and why CAI software is more or less effective within a given population.

  3. Computer-based supervisory control and data acquisition system for the radioactive waste evaporator

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, N.G.; Schreiber, S.B.; Yarbro, S.L.; Gomez, B.G.; Nekimken, H.L.; Sanchez, D.E.; Bibeau, R.A.; Macdonald, J.M.

    1994-12-01

    The evaporator process at TA-55 reduces the amount of transuranic liquid radioactive waste by separating radioactive salts from relatively low-level radioactive nitric acid solution. A computer-based supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system has been installed on the process that allows the operators to easily interface with process equipment. Individual single-loop controllers in the SCADA system allow more precise process operation with less human intervention. With this system, process data can be archieved in computer files for later analysis. Data are distributed throughout the TA-55 site through a local area network so that real-time process conditions can be monitored at multiple locations. The entire system has been built using commercially available hardware and software components.

  4. Improving learning with science and social studies text using computer-based concept maps for students with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Ciullo, Stephen; Falcomata, Terry S; Pfannenstiel, Kathleen; Billingsley, Glenna

    2015-01-01

    Concept maps have been used to help students with learning disabilities (LD) improve literacy skills and content learning, predominantly in secondary school. However, despite increased access to classroom technology, no previous studies have examined the efficacy of computer-based concept maps to improve learning from informational text for students with LD in elementary school. In this study, we used a concurrent delayed multiple probe design to evaluate the interactive use of computer-based concept maps on content acquisition with science and social studies texts for Hispanic students with LD in Grades 4 and 5. Findings from this study suggest that students improved content knowledge during intervention relative to a traditional instruction baseline condition. Learning outcomes and social validity information are considered to inform recommendations for future research and the feasibility of classroom implementation.

  5. Effectiveness of a Cognitive Strategy Intervention in Improving Arithmetic Computation Based on the PASS Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naglieri, Jack A.; Johnson, Deanne

    2000-01-01

    A study investigated whether an instruction designed to facilitate planning would have differential effects depending on specific planning, attention, simultaneous, successive (PASS) cognitive characteristics of 19 students (ages 12-14) with learning disabilities and mild mental impairments. Children with a cognitive weakness in planning improved…

  6. The dangers resulting from inaccurate computer-based operative records.

    PubMed

    Knight, L; Yardley, M; Jones, A

    1991-01-01

    The accuracy of a computer-based recording system of operative procedures was audited at a major district general hospital. The system is supposed to provide accurate records of theatre activity, to allow for improved nursing resource allocation and provide surgeons with a basic record of their operations. Mistakes were present in the details of 27% of the cases entered. Such inaccuracies highlight a major danger to surgeons with regard to their accountability for operations attributed to them. Mistakes can only cause further problems with regard to audit and future resource allocation.

  7. Privacy and security requirements of distributed computer based patient records.

    PubMed

    Moehr, J R

    1994-02-01

    Privacy and security issues increase in complexity as we move from the conventional patient record to the computer based patient record (CPR) supporting patient care and to cross-institutional networked CPRs. The privacy and security issues surrounding the CPR are outlined. Measures for privacy and security protection are summarized. It is suggested that we lack a key component of an information sharing culture. We need means for semantic indexing in the form of a metadata base at the level of the instantiation of a data base rather than at the level of its schemas.

  8. Innovative computer-based learning for breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Karen Louise

    Discussions with student nurses when they have been on placement on the breast cancer surgery ward highlighted their lack of knowledge about breast cancer surgery. This lack of knowledge by student nurses necessitated the development of a computer-based learning tool. A distance-learning tool was found to be an effective way of providing education, due to lack of facilities and workload on the ward. The student nurses using this tool will have better understanding of the treatments their patients are undergoing, leading to improved patient care. PMID:17353818

  9. INFORMATION DISPLAY: CONSIDERATIONS FOR DESIGNING COMPUTER-BASED DISPLAY SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    O'HARA,J.M.; PIRUS,D.; BELTRATCCHI,L.

    2004-09-19

    This paper discussed the presentation of information in computer-based control rooms. Issues associated with the typical displays currently in use are discussed. It is concluded that these displays should be augmented with new displays designed to better meet the information needs of plant personnel and to minimize the need for interface management tasks (the activities personnel have to do to access and organize the information they need). Several approaches to information design are discussed, specifically addressing: (1) monitoring, detection, and situation assessment; (2) routine task performance; and (3) teamwork, crew coordination, collaborative work.

  10. A cloud computing based 12-lead ECG telemedicine service

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Due to the great variability of 12-lead ECG instruments and medical specialists’ interpretation skills, it remains a challenge to deliver rapid and accurate 12-lead ECG reports with senior cardiologists’ decision making support in emergency telecardiology. Methods We create a new cloud and pervasive computing based 12-lead Electrocardiography (ECG) service to realize ubiquitous 12-lead ECG tele-diagnosis. Results This developed service enables ECG to be transmitted and interpreted via mobile phones. That is, tele-consultation can take place while the patient is on the ambulance, between the onsite clinicians and the off-site senior cardiologists, or among hospitals. Most importantly, this developed service is convenient, efficient, and inexpensive. Conclusions This cloud computing based ECG tele-consultation service expands the traditional 12-lead ECG applications onto the collaboration of clinicians at different locations or among hospitals. In short, this service can greatly improve medical service quality and efficiency, especially for patients in rural areas. This service has been evaluated and proved to be useful by cardiologists in Taiwan. PMID:22838382

  11. Effects of Computer-Based Intervention on Higher Order Thinking Skills and Implications for Response to Intervention (RTI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradberry-Guest, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    Georgia Professional Standards' guidelines suggest that kindergarten (K) students should use higher order critical thinking skills (HOCTS). However, educators have noted a majority of kindergartener's lack the ability to answer the most basic "why" questions. Thus, to answer academic reasoning questions, K students need to be trained how to answer…

  12. Bullying Behaviour, Intentions and Classroom Ecology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryce, Sarah; Frederickson, Norah

    2013-01-01

    Anti-bullying commitment across school communities is seen as crucial to the effectiveness of interventions. This exploratory study used a mixed-methods design to investigate bullying behaviour, intentions and aspects of the classroom ecology within the context of an anti-bullying initiative that was launched with a declaration of commitment.…

  13. Positive effects of computer-based cognitive training in adults with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Herrera, C; Chambon, C; Michel, B F; Paban, V; Alescio-Lautier, B

    2012-07-01

    Considering the high risk for individuals with amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (A-MCI) to progress towards Alzheimer's disease (AD), we investigated the efficacy of a non-pharmacological intervention, that is, cognitive training that could reduce cognitive difficulties and delay the cognitive decline. For this, we evaluated the efficacy of a 12-week computer-based memory-attention training program based on recognition in subjects with A-MCI and compared their performances with those of A-MCI controls trained in cognitively stimulating activities. The effect of training was assessed by comparing outcome measures in pre- and post-tests 15 days before and after training. To evaluate the duration of training benefits, a follow-up test session was performed 6 months after memory and attention training or cognitively stimulating activities. Outcome measures showed that the trained group, compared to control group, improved episodic recall and recognition. Six months after training, scores remained at the level of the post-test. Since the training program was exclusively based on recognition, our results showed a generalization from recognition to recall processes, which are memory components that represent part of the core cognitive impairments in individuals at risk of converting to AD. Thus, cognitive training based on recognition holds promise as a preventive therapeutic method and could be proposed as a non-pharmacological early-intervention strategy. Future investigations need to focus on methodological constraints and delineating possible neuroplastic mechanisms of action. PMID:22525705

  14. Using Postfeedback Delays to Improve Retention of Computer-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Douglas A.; Dickinson, Alyce M.

    2012-01-01

    Self-pacing, although often seen as one of the primary benefits of computer-based instruction (CBI), can also result in an important problem, namely, computer-based racing. Computer-based racing is when learners respond so quickly within CBI that mistakes are made, even on well-known material. This study compared traditional CBI with two forms of…

  15. 18 CFR 3b.204 - Safeguarding information in manual and computer-based record systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... information in manual and computer-based record systems. 3b.204 Section 3b.204 Conservation of Power and Water... Collection of Records § 3b.204 Safeguarding information in manual and computer-based record systems. (a) The administrative and physical controls to protect the information in the manual and computer-based record...

  16. 18 CFR 3b.204 - Safeguarding information in manual and computer-based record systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... information in manual and computer-based record systems. 3b.204 Section 3b.204 Conservation of Power and Water... Collection of Records § 3b.204 Safeguarding information in manual and computer-based record systems. (a) The administrative and physical controls to protect the information in the manual and computer-based record...

  17. 18 CFR 3b.204 - Safeguarding information in manual and computer-based record systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... information in manual and computer-based record systems. 3b.204 Section 3b.204 Conservation of Power and Water... Collection of Records § 3b.204 Safeguarding information in manual and computer-based record systems. (a) The administrative and physical controls to protect the information in the manual and computer-based record...

  18. 18 CFR 3b.204 - Safeguarding information in manual and computer-based record systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... information in manual and computer-based record systems. 3b.204 Section 3b.204 Conservation of Power and Water... Collection of Records § 3b.204 Safeguarding information in manual and computer-based record systems. (a) The administrative and physical controls to protect the information in the manual and computer-based record...

  19. 18 CFR 3b.204 - Safeguarding information in manual and computer-based record systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... information in manual and computer-based record systems. 3b.204 Section 3b.204 Conservation of Power and Water... Collection of Records § 3b.204 Safeguarding information in manual and computer-based record systems. (a) The administrative and physical controls to protect the information in the manual and computer-based record...

  20. Customizable Computer-Based Interaction Analysis for Coaching and Self-Regulation in Synchronous CSCL Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonchamp, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Computer-based interaction analysis (IA) is an automatic process that aims at understanding a computer-mediated activity. In a CSCL system, computer-based IA can provide information directly to learners for self-assessment and regulation and to tutors for coaching support. This article proposes a customizable computer-based IA approach for a…

  1. Development and Evaluation of the Diagnostic Power for a Computer-Based Two-Tier Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jing-Wen

    2016-01-01

    This study adopted a quasi-experimental design with follow-up interview to develop a computer-based two-tier assessment (CBA) regarding the science topic of electric circuits and to evaluate the diagnostic power of the assessment. Three assessment formats (i.e., paper-and-pencil, static computer-based, and dynamic computer-based tests) using…

  2. Primary School Students' Attitudes towards Computer Based Testing and Assessment in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurdabakan, Irfan; Uzunkavak, Cicek

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the attitudes of primary school students towards computer based testing and assessment in terms of different variables. The sample for this research is primary school students attending a computer based testing and assessment application via CITO-OIS. The "Scale on Attitudes towards Computer Based Testing and Assessment" to…

  3. All-optical reservoir computer based on saturation of absorption.

    PubMed

    Dejonckheere, Antoine; Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Fang, Li; Oudar, Jean-Louis; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2014-05-01

    Reservoir computing is a new bio-inspired computation paradigm. It exploits a dynamical system driven by a time-dependent input to carry out computation. For efficient information processing, only a few parameters of the reservoir needs to be tuned, which makes it a promising framework for hardware implementation. Recently, electronic, opto-electronic and all-optical experimental reservoir computers were reported. In those implementations, the nonlinear response of the reservoir is provided by active devices such as optoelectronic modulators or optical amplifiers. By contrast, we propose here the first reservoir computer based on a fully passive nonlinearity, namely the saturable absorption of a semiconductor mirror. Our experimental setup constitutes an important step towards the development of ultrafast low-consumption analog computers. PMID:24921786

  4. Security considerations and recommendations in computer-based testing.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleem, Saleh M; Ullah, Hanif

    2014-01-01

    Many organizations and institutions around the globe are moving or planning to move their paper-and-pencil based testing to computer-based testing (CBT). However, this conversion will not be the best option for all kinds of exams and it will require significant resources. These resources may include the preparation of item banks, methods for test delivery, procedures for test administration, and last but not least test security. Security aspects may include but are not limited to the identification and authentication of examinee, the risks that are associated with cheating on the exam, and the procedures related to test delivery to the examinee. This paper will mainly investigate the security considerations associated with CBT and will provide some recommendations for the security of these kinds of tests. We will also propose a palm-based biometric authentication system incorporated with basic authentication system (username/password) in order to check the identity and authenticity of the examinee. PMID:25254250

  5. A Cloud Computing Based Patient Centric Medical Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ankur; Henehan, Nathan; Somashekarappa, Vivek; Pandya, A. S.; Kalva, Hari; Furht, Borko

    This chapter discusses an emerging concept of a cloud computing based Patient Centric Medical Information System framework that will allow various authorized users to securely access patient records from various Care Delivery Organizations (CDOs) such as hospitals, urgent care centers, doctors, laboratories, imaging centers among others, from any location. Such a system must seamlessly integrate all patient records including images such as CT-SCANS and MRI'S which can easily be accessed from any location and reviewed by any authorized user. In such a scenario the storage and transmission of medical records will have be conducted in a totally secure and safe environment with a very high standard of data integrity, protecting patient privacy and complying with all Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations.

  6. Security Considerations and Recommendations in Computer-Based Testing

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saleem, Saleh M.

    2014-01-01

    Many organizations and institutions around the globe are moving or planning to move their paper-and-pencil based testing to computer-based testing (CBT). However, this conversion will not be the best option for all kinds of exams and it will require significant resources. These resources may include the preparation of item banks, methods for test delivery, procedures for test administration, and last but not least test security. Security aspects may include but are not limited to the identification and authentication of examinee, the risks that are associated with cheating on the exam, and the procedures related to test delivery to the examinee. This paper will mainly investigate the security considerations associated with CBT and will provide some recommendations for the security of these kinds of tests. We will also propose a palm-based biometric authentication system incorporated with basic authentication system (username/password) in order to check the identity and authenticity of the examinee. PMID:25254250

  7. Computer-Based Coding of Occupation Codes for Epidemiological Analyses.

    PubMed

    Russ, Daniel E; Ho, Kwan-Yuet; Johnson, Calvin A; Friesen, Melissa C

    2014-05-01

    Mapping job titles to standardized occupation classification (SOC) codes is an important step in evaluating changes in health risks over time as measured in inspection databases. However, manual SOC coding is cost prohibitive for very large studies. Computer based SOC coding systems can improve the efficiency of incorporating occupational risk factors into large-scale epidemiological studies. We present a novel method of mapping verbatim job titles to SOC codes using a large table of prior knowledge available in the public domain that included detailed description of the tasks and activities and their synonyms relevant to each SOC code. Job titles are compared to our knowledge base to find the closest matching SOC code. A soft Jaccard index is used to measure the similarity between a previously unseen job title and the knowledge base. Additional information such as standardized industrial codes can be incorporated to improve the SOC code determination by providing additional context to break ties in matches. PMID:25221787

  8. Computer-based assessment for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Chambers, O; Milenković, J; Pražnikar, A; Tasič, J F

    2015-06-01

    The paper presents a computer-based assessment for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) diagnosis through characterisation of the fat and oedema percentages in the muscle region. A novel multi-slice method for the muscle-region segmentation in the T1-weighted magnetic resonance images is proposed using principles of the live-wire technique to find the path representing the muscle-region border. For this purpose, an exponential cost function is used that incorporates the edge information obtained after applying the edge-enhancement algorithm formerly designed for the fingerprint enhancement. The difference between the automatic segmentation and manual segmentation performed by a medical specialists is characterised using the Zijdenbos similarity index, indicating a high accuracy of the proposed method. Finally, the fat and oedema are quantified from the muscle region in the T1-weighted and T2-STIR magnetic resonance images, respectively, using the fuzzy c-mean clustering approach for 10 FSHD patients. PMID:25910520

  9. All-optical reservoir computer based on saturation of absorption.

    PubMed

    Dejonckheere, Antoine; Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Fang, Li; Oudar, Jean-Louis; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2014-05-01

    Reservoir computing is a new bio-inspired computation paradigm. It exploits a dynamical system driven by a time-dependent input to carry out computation. For efficient information processing, only a few parameters of the reservoir needs to be tuned, which makes it a promising framework for hardware implementation. Recently, electronic, opto-electronic and all-optical experimental reservoir computers were reported. In those implementations, the nonlinear response of the reservoir is provided by active devices such as optoelectronic modulators or optical amplifiers. By contrast, we propose here the first reservoir computer based on a fully passive nonlinearity, namely the saturable absorption of a semiconductor mirror. Our experimental setup constitutes an important step towards the development of ultrafast low-consumption analog computers.

  10. A Computer-based Tutorial on Double-Focusing Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbar, Richard R.; Browman, Andrew A.; Mead, William C.; Williams, Robert A.

    1998-10-01

    WhistleSoft is developing a set of computer-based, self-paced tutorials on particle accelerators that targets a broad audience, including undergraduate science majors and industrial technicians. (See http://www.whistlesoft.com/s~ilbar/.) We use multimedia techniques to enhance the student's rate of learning and retention of the material. The tutorials feature interactive On-Screen Laboratories and use hypertext, colored graphics, two- and three-dimensional animations, video, and sound. Parts of our Dipoles module deal with the double-focusing spectrometer and occur throughout the piece. Radial focusing occurs in the section on uniform magnets, while vertical focusing is in the non-uniform magnets section. The student can even understand the √2π bend angle on working through the (intermediate-level) discussion on the Kerst-Serber equations. This talk will present our discussion of this spectrometer, direct to you from the computer screen.

  11. A Computationally Based Approach to Homogenizing Advanced Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, P D; Cowen, C J

    2011-02-27

    We have developed a computationally based approach to optimizing the homogenization heat treatment of complex alloys. The Scheil module within the Thermo-Calc software is used to predict the as-cast segregation present within alloys, and DICTRA (Diffusion Controlled TRAnsformations) is used to model the homogenization kinetics as a function of time, temperature and microstructural scale. We will discuss this approach as it is applied to both Ni based superalloys as well as the more complex (computationally) case of alloys that solidify with more than one matrix phase as a result of segregation. Such is the case typically observed in martensitic steels. With these alloys it is doubly important to homogenize them correctly, especially at the laboratory scale, since they are austenitic at high temperature and thus constituent elements will diffuse slowly. The computationally designed heat treatment and the subsequent verification real castings are presented.

  12. Security considerations and recommendations in computer-based testing.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleem, Saleh M; Ullah, Hanif

    2014-01-01

    Many organizations and institutions around the globe are moving or planning to move their paper-and-pencil based testing to computer-based testing (CBT). However, this conversion will not be the best option for all kinds of exams and it will require significant resources. These resources may include the preparation of item banks, methods for test delivery, procedures for test administration, and last but not least test security. Security aspects may include but are not limited to the identification and authentication of examinee, the risks that are associated with cheating on the exam, and the procedures related to test delivery to the examinee. This paper will mainly investigate the security considerations associated with CBT and will provide some recommendations for the security of these kinds of tests. We will also propose a palm-based biometric authentication system incorporated with basic authentication system (username/password) in order to check the identity and authenticity of the examinee.

  13. A rural community's involvement in the design and usability testing of a computer-based informed consent process for the Personalized Medicine Research Project.

    PubMed

    Mahnke, Andrea N; Plasek, Joseph M; Hoffman, David G; Partridge, Nathan S; Foth, Wendy S; Waudby, Carol J; Rasmussen, Luke V; McManus, Valerie D; McCarty, Catherine A

    2014-01-01

    Many informed consent studies demonstrate that research subjects poorly retain and understand information in written consent documents. Previous research in multimedia consent is mixed in terms of success for improving participants' understanding, satisfaction, and retention. This failure may be due to a lack of a community-centered design approach to building the interventions. The goal of this study was to gather information from the community to determine the best way to undertake the consent process. Community perceptions regarding different computer-based consenting approaches were evaluated, and a computer-based consent was developed and tested. A second goal was to evaluate whether participants make truly informed decisions to participate in research. Simulations of an informed consent process were videotaped to document the process. Focus groups were conducted to determine community attitudes towards a computer-based informed consent process. Hybrid focus groups were conducted to determine the most acceptable hardware device. Usability testing was conducted on a computer-based consent prototype using a touch-screen kiosk. Based on feedback, a computer-based consent was developed. Representative study participants were able to easily complete the consent, and all were able to correctly answer the comprehension check questions. Community involvement in developing a computer-based consent proved valuable for a population-based genetic study. These findings may translate to other types of informed consents, including those for trials involving treatment of genetic disorders. A computer-based consent may serve to better communicate consistent, clear, accurate, and complete information regarding the risks and benefits of study participation. Additional analysis is necessary to measure the level of comprehension of the check-question answers by larger numbers of participants. The next step will involve contacting participants to measure whether understanding of

  14. Supporting the future nuclear workforce with computer-based procedures

    DOE PAGES

    Oxstrand, Johanna; Le Blanc, Katya

    2016-05-01

    Here we see that computer-based tools have dramatically increased ease and efficiency of everyday tasks. Gone are the days of paging through a paper catalog, transcribing product numbers, and calculating totals. Today, a consumer can find a product online with a simple search engine, and then purchase it in a matter of a few clicks. Paper catalogs have their place, but it is hard to imagine life without on-line shopping sites. All tasks conducted in a nuclear power plant are guided by procedures, which helps ensure safe and reliable operation of the plants. One prominent goal of the nuclear industrymore » is to minimize the risk of human errors. To achieve this goal one has to ensure tasks are correctly and consistently executed. This is partly achieved by training and by a structured approach to task execution, which is provided by procedures and work instructions. Procedures are used in the nuclear industry to direct workers' actions in a proper sequence. The governing idea is to minimize the reliance on memory and choices made in the field. However, the procedure document may not contain sufficient information to successfully complete the task. Therefore, the worker might have to carry additional documents such as turnover sheets, operation experience, drawings, and other procedures to the work site. The nuclear industry is operated with paper procedures like paper catalogs of the past. A field worker may carry a large stack of documents needed to complete a task to the field. Even though the paper process has helped keep the industry safe for decades, there are limitations to using paper. Paper procedures are static (i.e., the content does not change after the document is printed), difficult to search, and rely heavily on the field worker’s situational awareness and ability to consistently meet the high expectation of human performance excellence. With computer-based procedures (CBPs) that stack of papers may be reduced to the size of a small tablet or even

  15. Interactive, Computer-Based Training Program for Radiological Workers

    SciTech Connect

    Trinoskey, P.A.; Camacho, P.I.; Wells, L.

    2000-01-18

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is redesigning its Computer-Based Training (CBT) program for radiological workers. The redesign represents a major effort to produce a single, highly interactive and flexible CBT program that will meet the training needs of a wide range of radiological workers--from researchers and x-ray operators to individuals working in tritium, uranium, plutonium, and accelerator facilities. The new CBT program addresses the broad diversity of backgrounds found at a national laboratory. When a training audience is homogeneous in terms of education level and type of work performed, it is difficult to duplicate the effectiveness of a flexible, technically competent instructor who can tailor a course to the express needs and concerns of a course's participants. Unfortunately, such homogeneity is rare. At LLNL, they have a diverse workforce engaged in a wide range of radiological activities, from the fairly common to the quite exotic. As a result, the Laboratory must offer a wide variety of radiological worker courses. These include a general contamination-control course in addition to radioactive-material-handling courses for both low-level laboratory (i.e., bench-top) activities as well as high-level work in tritium, uranium, and plutonium facilities. They also offer training courses for employees who work with radiation-generating devices--x-ray, accelerator, and E-beam operators, for instance. However, even with the number and variety of courses the Laboratory offers, they are constrained by the diversity of backgrounds (i.e., knowledge and experience) of those to be trained. Moreover, time constraints often preclude in-depth coverage of site- and/or task-specific details. In response to this situation, several years ago LLNL began moving toward computer-based training for radiological workers. Today, that CBT effort includes a general radiological safety course developed by the Department of Energy's Hanford facility and a

  16. Computer Based Collaborative Problem Solving for Introductory Courses in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Carolina; Lee, Kevin

    2010-03-01

    We discuss collaborative problem solving computer-based recitation style. The course is designed by Lee [1], and the idea was proposed before by Christian, Belloni and Titus [2,3]. The students find the problems on a web-page containing simulations (physlets) and they write the solutions on an accompanying worksheet after discussing it with a classmate. Physlets have the advantage of being much more like real-world problems than textbook problems. We also compare two protocols for web-based instruction using simulations in an introductory physics class [1]. The inquiry protocol allowed students to control input parameters while the worked example protocol did not. We will discuss which of the two methods is more efficient in relation to Scientific Discovery Learning and Cognitive Load Theory. 1. Lee, Kevin M., Nicoll, Gayle and Brooks, Dave W. (2004). ``A Comparison of Inquiry and Worked Example Web-Based Instruction Using Physlets'', Journal of Science Education and Technology 13, No. 1: 81-88. 2. Christian, W., and Belloni, M. (2001). Physlets: Teaching Physics With Interactive Curricular Material, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ. 3. Christian,W., and Titus,A. (1998). ``Developing web-based curricula using Java Physlets.'' Computers in Physics 12: 227--232.

  17. Reliability modeling of fault-tolerant computer based systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavuso, Salvatore J.

    1987-01-01

    Digital fault-tolerant computer-based systems have become commonplace in military and commercial avionics. These systems hold the promise of increased availability, reliability, and maintainability over conventional analog-based systems through the application of replicated digital computers arranged in fault-tolerant configurations. Three tightly coupled factors of paramount importance, ultimately determining the viability of these systems, are reliability, safety, and profitability. Reliability, the major driver affects virtually every aspect of design, packaging, and field operations, and eventually produces profit for commercial applications or increased national security. However, the utilization of digital computer systems makes the task of producing credible reliability assessment a formidable one for the reliability engineer. The root of the problem lies in the digital computer's unique adaptability to changing requirements, computational power, and ability to test itself efficiently. Addressed here are the nuances of modeling the reliability of systems with large state sizes, in the Markov sense, which result from systems based on replicated redundant hardware and to discuss the modeling of factors which can reduce reliability without concomitant depletion of hardware. Advanced fault-handling models are described and methods of acquiring and measuring parameters for these models are delineated.

  18. A spread willingness computing-based information dissemination model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haojing; Cui, Zhiming; Zhang, Shukui

    2014-01-01

    This paper constructs a kind of spread willingness computing based on information dissemination model for social network. The model takes into account the impact of node degree and dissemination mechanism, combined with the complex network theory and dynamics of infectious diseases, and further establishes the dynamical evolution equations. Equations characterize the evolutionary relationship between different types of nodes with time. The spread willingness computing contains three factors which have impact on user's spread behavior: strength of the relationship between the nodes, views identity, and frequency of contact. Simulation results show that different degrees of nodes show the same trend in the network, and even if the degree of node is very small, there is likelihood of a large area of information dissemination. The weaker the relationship between nodes, the higher probability of views selection and the higher the frequency of contact with information so that information spreads rapidly and leads to a wide range of dissemination. As the dissemination probability and immune probability change, the speed of information dissemination is also changing accordingly. The studies meet social networking features and can help to master the behavior of users and understand and analyze characteristics of information dissemination in social network. PMID:25110738

  19. A Spread Willingness Computing-Based Information Dissemination Model

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhiming; Zhang, Shukui

    2014-01-01

    This paper constructs a kind of spread willingness computing based on information dissemination model for social network. The model takes into account the impact of node degree and dissemination mechanism, combined with the complex network theory and dynamics of infectious diseases, and further establishes the dynamical evolution equations. Equations characterize the evolutionary relationship between different types of nodes with time. The spread willingness computing contains three factors which have impact on user's spread behavior: strength of the relationship between the nodes, views identity, and frequency of contact. Simulation results show that different degrees of nodes show the same trend in the network, and even if the degree of node is very small, there is likelihood of a large area of information dissemination. The weaker the relationship between nodes, the higher probability of views selection and the higher the frequency of contact with information so that information spreads rapidly and leads to a wide range of dissemination. As the dissemination probability and immune probability change, the speed of information dissemination is also changing accordingly. The studies meet social networking features and can help to master the behavior of users and understand and analyze characteristics of information dissemination in social network. PMID:25110738

  20. Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis using computer-based image-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ostgaard, S E; Gottlieb, L; Toksvig-Larsen, S; Lebech, A; Talbot, A; Lund, B

    1997-09-01

    The two-dimensional position of markers in radiographs for Roentgen Stereophotogrammetric Analysis (RSA) is usually determined using a measuring table. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility and the accuracy of a new RSA system using digitized radiographs and image-processing algorithms to determine the marker position in the radiographs. Four double-RSA examinations of a phantom and 18 RSA examinations from six patients included in different RSA-studies of knee prostheses were used to test the reproducibility and the accuracy of the system. The radiographs were scanned at 600 dpi resolution and 256 gray levels. The center of each of the tantalum-markers in the radiographs was calculated by the computer program from the contour of the marker with the use of an edge-detection software algorithm after the marker was identified on a PC monitor. The study showed that computer-based image analysis can be used in RSA-examinations. The advantages of using image-processing software in RSA are that the marker positions are determined in an objective manner, and that there is no need for a systematic manual identification of all the markers on the radiograph before the actual measurement.

  1. Computer-Based Procedures for Field Workers - Identified Benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Oxstrand, Johanna; Le Blanc, Katya L.

    2014-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) computer-based procedure (CBP) research team is exploring how best to design a CBP system that will deliver the intended benefits of increased efficiency and improved human performance. It is important to note that no “off-the-shelf” technology exists for the type of CBP system that is investigated and developed by the INL researchers. As more technology is integrated into the procedure process the importance of an appropriate and methodological approach to the design of the procedure system increases. Technological advancements offer great opportunities for efficiency and safety gains, however if the system is not designed correctly there is a large risk of unintentionally introducing new opportunities for human errors. The INL research team is breaking new ground in the area of CBPs with the prototype they have developed. Current electronic procedure systems are most commonly electronic versions of the paper-based procedures with hyperlinks to other procedures, limited user input functionality, and the ability to mark steps completed. These systems do not fully exploit the advantages digital technology. It is a part of the INL researchers’ role to develop and validate new CBP technologies that greatly increase the benefits of a CBP system to the nuclear industry.

  2. Image Interpretation Instruction Via A Computer-Based-Training System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisman, Melanie

    1988-02-01

    As newer and more sophisticated imagery collection systems rapidly increase the volume of imagery requiring thorough exploitation, the need for imagery analysts to acquire and maintain expertise increases accordingly. In response, Loral Systems Group (Arizona) has produced a computer-based-training (CBT) system that presents a series of lessons on radar imaging principles and their application to the various orders of battle. The training system is composed of two host computers, four student/instructor workstations, a printer, and lesson material. The computers control the imagery presentation, deliver twenty-eight interactive lessons of computer-assisted instruction, and generate reports. Each dual-screen workstation presents lessons consisting of instructional text coupled with representative imagery annotated with color graphics. Although the system is designed for the unique characteristics of radar interpretation, alternative courseware could instruct interpretation techniques for other imagery (photographic, electro-optical, infrared). Regardless of the sensor type and amount of available imagery, both commercial and military segments of the interpretation community will benefit only if the interpreter/analyst is successfully trained to translate image information into useful terms.

  3. Assessing public perceptions of computer-based models.

    PubMed

    Cockerill, Kristan; Tidwell, Vincent; Passell, Howard

    2004-11-01

    Although there is a solid body of research on both collaborative decision-making and on processes using models, there is little research on general public attitudes about models and their use in making policy decisions. This project assessed opinions about computer models in general and attitudes about a specific model being used in water planning in the Middle Rio Grande Region of New Mexico, United States. More than 1000 individuals were surveyed about their perceptions of computer-based models in general. Additionally, more than 150 attendees at public meetings related to the Middle Rio Grande planning effort were surveyed about their perceptions of the specific Rio Grande-based model. The results reveal that the majority of respondents are confident in their ability to understand models and most believe that models are appropriate tools for education and for making policy decisions. Responses also reveal that trust in who develops a model is a key issue related to public support. Regarding the specific model highlighted in this project, the public revealed tremendous support for its usefulness as a public engagement tool as well as a tool to assist decision-makers in regional water planning. Although indicating broad support for models, the results do raise questions about the role of trust in using models in contentious decisions. PMID:15633034

  4. A systems approach to computer-based training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drape, Gaylen W.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the hardware and software systems approach used in the Automated Recertification Training System (ARTS), a Phase 2 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) project for NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The goal of this project is to optimize recertification training of technicians who process the Space Shuttle before launch by providing computer-based training courseware. The objectives of ARTS are to implement more effective CBT applications identified through a need assessment process and to provide an ehanced courseware production system. The system's capabilities are demonstrated by using five different pilot applications to convert existing classroom courses into interactive courseware. When the system is fully implemented at NASA/KSC, trainee job performance will improve and the cost of courseware development will be lower. Commercialization of the technology developed as part of this SBIR project is planned for Phase 3. Anticipated spin-off products include custom courseware for technical skills training and courseware production software for use by corporate training organizations of aerospace and other industrial companies.

  5. Computer-based mechanical design of overhead lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusinaru, D.; Bratu, C.; Dinu, R. C.; Manescu, L. G.

    2016-02-01

    Beside the performance, the safety level according to the actual standards is a compulsory condition for distribution grids’ operation. Some of the measures leading to improvement of the overhead lines reliability ask for installations’ modernization. The constraints imposed to the new lines components refer to the technical aspects as thermal stress or voltage drop, and look for economic efficiency, too. The mechanical sizing of the overhead lines is after all an optimization problem. More precisely, the task in designing of the overhead line profile is to size poles, cross-arms and stays and locate poles along a line route so that the total costs of the line's structure to be minimized and the technical and safety constraints to be fulfilled.The authors present in this paper an application for the Computer-Based Mechanical Design of the Overhead Lines and the features of the corresponding Visual Basic program, adjusted to the distribution lines. The constraints of the optimization problem are adjusted to the existing weather and loading conditions of Romania. The outputs of the software application for mechanical design of overhead lines are: the list of components chosen for the line: poles, cross-arms, stays; the list of conductor tension and forces for each pole, cross-arm and stay for different weather conditions; the line profile drawings.The main features of the mechanical overhead lines design software are interactivity, local optimization function and high-level user-interface

  6. CyberSpace: Adler's Computer-Based Gallery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, J.

    2002-05-01

    The Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum has recently opened its CyberSpace Gallery. This gallery is a radical departure from a typical museum exhibit space. It fuses all the potential that computer technology enables into one programmable museum gallery. In this entirely computer-based facility, content is flexibly updated and routed to various display/interactive stations in its three different spaces: the informal gallery, the classroom, and the distance learning studio. These spaces can be configured into individualized and theme-based exhibits, classrooms, and videoconferencing centers to host events that can be transmitted and/or received via high bandwidth internet connectivity. CyberSpace relies on more than seventy computers to drive all exhibit components, which includes 16 plasma displays, 16 computer stations, 4 immersive workstations, and 10 video projectors. All these components are used to present externally produced material as well as in-house content produced by professional staff astronomers and educators. In addition to its ``everyday" use as a multimedia gallery for museum visitors, CyberSpace has been used for teacher professional development, school field trip experiences, live demonstrations, presentations of NASA events, including launches and ISS-shuttle missions, and public astronomy classes.

  7. A computer-based frozen blood inventory and information system.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S C; Ruess, D T; Camp, F R

    1975-01-01

    A computer-based, time-sharing data processing system was developed to assist in maintaining information regarding units of red blood cells frozen for eventual transfusion. An automated system has been programmed to compile and retrieve data concerning stored units, prepare shipping documents as required, and maintain transfusion records in a retrievable manner for thawed or shipped units. Requests for frozen red blood cells are processed through this system. Units are selected by the computer to meet requirements specified by the operator of a keyboard terminal. These requirements include method of cryopreservation, specific antigenic characteristics required, and the number of units requested. The computer prints out on the keyboard terminal the units meeting the requirements and the keyboard operator then indicates to the computer the name of the requesting facility, if these units are to be shipped. This input initiates a programmed routine that generates a shipping invoice and a new file for these units in a permanent transfusion record which can by acessed by either donor number or the frozen blood cell code. PMID:1129837

  8. Computer Based Porosity Design by Multi Phase Topology Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burblies, Andreas; Busse, Matthias

    2008-02-01

    A numerical simulation technique called Multi Phase Topology Optimization (MPTO) based on finite element method has been developed and refined by Fraunhofer IFAM during the last five years. MPTO is able to determine the optimum distribution of two or more different materials in components under thermal and mechanical loads. The objective of optimization is to minimize the component's elastic energy. Conventional topology optimization methods which simulate adaptive bone mineralization have got the disadvantage that there is a continuous change of mass by growth processes. MPTO keeps all initial material concentrations and uses methods adapted from molecular dynamics to find energy minimum. Applying MPTO to mechanically loaded components with a high number of different material densities, the optimization results show graded and sometimes anisotropic porosity distributions which are very similar to natural bone structures. Now it is possible to design the macro- and microstructure of a mechanical component in one step. Computer based porosity design structures can be manufactured by new Rapid Prototyping technologies. Fraunhofer IFAM has applied successfully 3D-Printing and Selective Laser Sintering methods in order to produce very stiff light weight components with graded porosities calculated by MPTO.

  9. Computer-based production of bite mark comparison overlays.

    PubMed

    Sweet, D; Parhar, M; Wood, R E

    1998-09-01

    Bite mark comparison protocols include measurement and analysis of the pattern, size, and shape of teeth against similar characteristics observed in an injury on skin or a mark on an object. The physical comparison of tooth position often depends upon transparent acetate overlays to detect similarities or differences between the teeth and the bite mark. Several methods are used to produce life-sized comparison overlays. The perimeter of the biting edges of the anterior teeth are usually recorded to produce facsimile images called hollow volume overlays. Some investigators hand-trace these outlines from dental study casts, or from bite exemplars produced in wax, styrofoam, or similar materials. Some use hand-traced outlines from xerographic images produced with office photocopiers that are calibrated to produce life-sized final images. Others use radiographic images and toneline photography of wax exemplars filled with radio-opaque materials, such as metal filings or barium sulfate. Dependence upon subjective input by the odontologist to trace these images manually is considered problematic. This is because the errors incorporated at any production stage are increased in the final product. The authors have developed a method to generate accurate hollow volume overlays using computer-based techniques. A PowerPC Macintosh computer, flatbed scanner, and Adobe Photoshop (a popular graphical interface application) are used to acquire, select, arrange and export detailed data from class and individual characteristics of a suspect's teeth to acetate film loaded in a high-resolution laser printer. This paper describes this technique to enable the odontologist to produce high-quality, accurate comparison overlays without subjective input. PMID:9729824

  10. Computer based imaging and analysis of root gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Evans, M L; Ishikawa, H

    1997-06-01

    Two key issues in studies of the nature of the gravitropic response in roots have been the determination of the precise pattern of differential elongation responsible for downward bending and the identification of the cells that show the initial motor response. The main approach for examining patterns of differential growth during root gravitropic curvature has been to apply markers to the root surface and photograph the root at regular intervals during gravitropic curvature. Although these studies have provided valuable information on the characteristics of the gravitropic motor response in roots, their labor intensive nature limits sample size and discourages both high frequency of sampling and depth of analysis of surface expansion data. In this brief review we describe the development of computer-based video analysis systems for automated measurement of root growth and shape change and discuss some key features of the root gravitropic response that have been revealed using this methodology. We summarize the capabilities of several new pieces of software designed to measure growth and shape changes in graviresponding roots and describe recent progress in developing analysis systems for studying the small, but experimentally popular, primary roots of Arabidopsis. A key finding revealed by such studies is that the initial gravitropic response of roots of maize and Arabidopsis occurs in the distal elongation zone (DEZ) near the root apical meristem, not in the main elongation zone. Another finding is that the initiation of rapid elongation in the DEZ following gravistimulation appears to be related to rapid membrane potential changes in this region of the root. These observations have provided the incentive for ongoing studies examining possible links between potential growth modifying factors (auxin, calcium, protons) and gravistimulated changes in membrane potential and growth patterns in the DEZ. PMID:11540122

  11. Computer-based production of bite mark comparison overlays.

    PubMed

    Sweet, D; Parhar, M; Wood, R E

    1998-09-01

    Bite mark comparison protocols include measurement and analysis of the pattern, size, and shape of teeth against similar characteristics observed in an injury on skin or a mark on an object. The physical comparison of tooth position often depends upon transparent acetate overlays to detect similarities or differences between the teeth and the bite mark. Several methods are used to produce life-sized comparison overlays. The perimeter of the biting edges of the anterior teeth are usually recorded to produce facsimile images called hollow volume overlays. Some investigators hand-trace these outlines from dental study casts, or from bite exemplars produced in wax, styrofoam, or similar materials. Some use hand-traced outlines from xerographic images produced with office photocopiers that are calibrated to produce life-sized final images. Others use radiographic images and toneline photography of wax exemplars filled with radio-opaque materials, such as metal filings or barium sulfate. Dependence upon subjective input by the odontologist to trace these images manually is considered problematic. This is because the errors incorporated at any production stage are increased in the final product. The authors have developed a method to generate accurate hollow volume overlays using computer-based techniques. A PowerPC Macintosh computer, flatbed scanner, and Adobe Photoshop (a popular graphical interface application) are used to acquire, select, arrange and export detailed data from class and individual characteristics of a suspect's teeth to acetate film loaded in a high-resolution laser printer. This paper describes this technique to enable the odontologist to produce high-quality, accurate comparison overlays without subjective input.

  12. Computer based imaging and analysis of root gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, M. L.; Ishikawa, H.

    1997-01-01

    Two key issues in studies of the nature of the gravitropic response in roots have been the determination of the precise pattern of differential elongation responsible for downward bending and the identification of the cells that show the initial motor response. The main approach for examining patterns of differential growth during root gravitropic curvature has been to apply markers to the root surface and photograph the root at regular intervals during gravitropic curvature. Although these studies have provided valuable information on the characteristics of the gravitropic motor response in roots, their labor intensive nature limits sample size and discourages both high frequency of sampling and depth of analysis of surface expansion data. In this brief review we describe the development of computer-based video analysis systems for automated measurement of root growth and shape change and discuss some key features of the root gravitropic response that have been revealed using this methodology. We summarize the capabilities of several new pieces of software designed to measure growth and shape changes in graviresponding roots and describe recent progress in developing analysis systems for studying the small, but experimentally popular, primary roots of Arabidopsis. A key finding revealed by such studies is that the initial gravitropic response of roots of maize and Arabidopsis occurs in the distal elongation zone (DEZ) near the root apical meristem, not in the main elongation zone. Another finding is that the initiation of rapid elongation in the DEZ following gravistimulation appears to be related to rapid membrane potential changes in this region of the root. These observations have provided the incentive for ongoing studies examining possible links between potential growth modifying factors (auxin, calcium, protons) and gravistimulated changes in membrane potential and growth patterns in the DEZ.

  13. Improving Patient Satisfaction Through Computer-Based Questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew J; Reiter, Michael J; Crist, Brett D; Schultz, Loren G; Choma, Theodore J

    2016-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures are helping clinicians to use evidence-based medicine in decision making. The use of computer-based questionnaires to gather such data may offer advantages over traditional paper-based methods. These advantages include consistent presentation, prompts for missed questions, reliable scoring, and simple and accurate transfer of information into databases without manual data entry. The authors enrolled 308 patients over a 16-month period from 3 orthopedic clinics: spine, upper extremity, and trauma. Patients were randomized to complete either electronic or paper validated outcome forms during their first visit, and they completed the opposite modality at their second visit, which was approximately 7 weeks later. For patients with upper-extremity injuries, the Penn Shoulder Score (PSS) was used. For patients with lower-extremity injuries, the Foot Function Index (FFI) was used. For patients with lumbar spine symptoms, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was used. All patients also were asked to complete the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) Health Status Survey, version 1. The authors assessed patient satisfaction with each survey modality and determined potential advantages and disadvantages for each. No statistically significant differences were found between the paper and electronic versions for patient-reported outcome data. However, patients strongly preferred the electronic surveys. Additionally, the paper forms had significantly more missed questions for the FFI (P<.0001), ODI (P<.0001), and PSS (P=.008), and patents were significantly less likely to complete these forms (P<.0001). Future research should focus on limiting the burden on responders, individualizing forms and questions as much as possible, and offering alternative environments for completion (home or mobile platforms).

  14. Computer-Based Tools for Evaluating Graphical User Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Loretta A.

    1997-01-01

    The user interface is the component of a software system that connects two very complex system: humans and computers. Each of these two systems impose certain requirements on the final product. The user is the judge of the usability and utility of the system; the computer software and hardware are the tools with which the interface is constructed. Mistakes are sometimes made in designing and developing user interfaces because the designers and developers have limited knowledge about human performance (e.g., problem solving, decision making, planning, and reasoning). Even those trained in user interface design make mistakes because they are unable to address all of the known requirements and constraints on design. Evaluation of the user inter-face is therefore a critical phase of the user interface development process. Evaluation should not be considered the final phase of design; but it should be part of an iterative design cycle with the output of evaluation being feed back into design. The goal of this research was to develop a set of computer-based tools for objectively evaluating graphical user interfaces. The research was organized into three phases. The first phase resulted in the development of an embedded evaluation tool which evaluates the usability of a graphical user interface based on a user's performance. An expert system to assist in the design and evaluation of user interfaces based upon rules and guidelines was developed during the second phase. During the final phase of the research an automatic layout tool to be used in the initial design of graphical inter- faces was developed. The research was coordinated with NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Mission Operations Laboratory's efforts in developing onboard payload display specifications for the Space Station.

  15. Computer-based planning of optimal donor sites for autologous osseous grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Zdzislaw; Chlebiej, Michal; Zerfass, Peter; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian U.; Sader, Robert; Mikolajczak, Pawel; Keeve, Erwin

    2002-05-01

    Bone graft surgery is often necessary for reconstruction of craniofacial defects after trauma, tumor, infection or congenital malformation. In this operative technique the removed or missing bone segment is filled with a bone graft. The mainstay of the craniofacial reconstruction rests with the replacement of the defected bone by autogeneous bone grafts. To achieve sufficient incorporation of the autograft into the host bone, precise planning and simulation of the surgical intervention is required. The major problem is to determine as accurately as possible the donor site where the graft should be dissected from and to define the shape of the desired transplant. A computer-aided method for semi-automatic selection of optimal donor sites for autografts in craniofacial reconstructive surgery has been developed. The non-automatic step of graft design and constraint setting is followed by a fully automatic procedure to find the best fitting position. In extension to preceding work, a new optimization approach based on the Levenberg-Marquardt method has been implemented and embedded into our computer-based surgical planning system. This new technique enables, once the pre-processing step has been performed, selection of the optimal donor site in time less than one minute. The method has been applied during surgery planning step in more than 20 cases. The postoperative observations have shown that functional results, such as speech and chewing ability as well as restoration of bony continuity were clearly better compared to conventionally planned operations. Moreover, in most cases the duration of the surgical interventions has been distinctly reduced.

  16. Computer-Based Cognitive Training for Executive Functions after Stroke: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Renate M.; Murre, Jaap M. J.; Veltman, Dick J.; Schmand, Ben A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stroke commonly results in cognitive impairments in working memory, attention, and executive function, which may be restored with appropriate training programs. Our aim was to systematically review the evidence for computer-based cognitive training of executive dysfunctions. Methods: Studies were included if they concerned adults who had suffered stroke or other types of acquired brain injury, if the intervention was computer training of executive functions, and if the outcome was related to executive functioning. We searched in MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Web of Science, and The Cochrane Library. Study quality was evaluated based on the CONSORT Statement. Treatment effect was evaluated based on differences compared to pre-treatment and/or to a control group. Results: Twenty studies were included. Two were randomized controlled trials that used an active control group. The other studies included multiple baselines, a passive control group, or were uncontrolled. Improvements were observed in tasks similar to the training (near transfer) and in tasks dissimilar to the training (far transfer). However, these effects were not larger in trained than in active control groups. Two studies evaluated neural effects and found changes in both functional and structural connectivity. Most studies suffered from methodological limitations (e.g., lack of an active control group and no adjustment for multiple testing) hampering differentiation of training effects from spontaneous recovery, retest effects, and placebo effects. Conclusions: The positive findings of most studies, including neural changes, warrant continuation of research in this field, but only if its methodological limitations are addressed. PMID:27148007

  17. Outcomes from a pilot study using computer-based rehabilitative tools in a military population.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Katherine W; Quinn, Julia E; Pramuka, Michael; Sharkey, Laura A; French, Louis M

    2012-01-01

    Novel therapeutic approaches and outcome data are needed for cognitive rehabilitation for patients with a traumatic brain injury; computer-based programs may play a critical role in filling existing knowledge gaps. Brain-fitness computer programs can complement existing therapies, maximize neuroplasticity, provide treatment beyond the clinic, and deliver objective efficacy data. However, these approaches have not been extensively studied in the military and traumatic brain injury population. Walter Reed National Military Medical Center established its Brain Fitness Center (BFC) in 2008 as an adjunct to traditional cognitive therapies for wounded warriors. The BFC offers commercially available "brain-training" products for military Service Members to use in a supportive, structured environment. Over 250 Service Members have utilized this therapeutic intervention. Each patient receives subjective assessments pre and post BFC participation including the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory-4 (MPAI-4), the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NBSI), and the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS). A review of the first 29 BFC participants, who finished initial and repeat measures, was completed to determine the effectiveness of the BFC program. Two of the three questionnaires of self-reported symptom change completed before and after participation in the BFC revealed a statistically significant reduction in symptom severity based on MPAI and NBSI total scores (p < .05). There were no significant differences in the SWLS score. Despite the typical limitations of a retrospective chart review, such as variation in treatment procedures, preliminary results reveal a trend towards improved self-reported cognitive and functional symptoms.

  18. Dynamic tracking of elementary preservice teachers' experiences with computer-based mathematics learning environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Stephen R.

    2003-05-01

    A challenging task in educational research today is to understand the implications of recent developments in computer-based learning environments. On the other hand, questions regarding learning and mathematical cognition have long been a central focus of research in mathematics education. Adding technology compounds an already complex problematic. Fortunately, computer-based technology also provides researchers with new ways of studying cognition and instruction. This paper introduces a new method for dynamically tracking learners' experiences in computer-based learning environments. Dynamic tracking is illustrated in both a classroom and a clinical setting by drawing on two studies with elementary preservice teachers working in computer-based mathematics learning environments.

  19. Evaluation of Computer-Based Procedure System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Johanna Oxstrand; Katya Le Blanc; Seth Hays

    2012-09-01

    This research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE), performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs, to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS program serves to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The introduction of advanced technology in existing nuclear power plants may help to manage the effects of aging systems, structures, and components. In addition, the incorporation of advanced technology in the existing LWR fleet may entice the future workforce, who will be familiar with advanced technology, to work for these utilities rather than more newly built nuclear power plants. Advantages are being sought by developing and deploying technologies that will increase safety and efficiency. One significant opportunity for existing plants to increase efficiency is to phase out the paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used at most nuclear power plants and replace them, where feasible, with computer-based procedures (CBPs). PBPs have ensured safe operation of plants for decades, but limitations in paper-based systems do not allow them to reach the full potential for procedures to prevent human errors. The environment in a nuclear power plant is constantly changing depending on current plant status and operating mode. PBPs, which are static by nature, are being applied to a constantly changing context. This constraint often results in PBPs that are written in a manner that is intended to cover many potential operating scenarios. Hence, the procedure layout forces the operator to search through a large amount of irrelevant information to locate the pieces of information

  20. Randomized control trial of computer-based rehabilitation of spatial neglect syndrome: the RESPONSE trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Spatial neglect is a frequent and debilitating consequence of acquired brain injury and currently has no widely accepted standard of care. While previous interventions for spatial neglect have targeted patients’ overt spatial deficits (e.g., reduced contralesional visual scanning), far fewer have directly targeted patients’ non-spatial deficits (e.g., sustained attention deficits). Considering that non-spatial deficits have shown to be highly predictive of long-term disability, we developed a novel computer based training program that targets both sustained (tonic) and moment-to-moment (phasic) aspects of non-spatial attention (Tonic and Phasic Alertness Training, TAPAT). Preliminary studies demonstrate that TAPAT is safe and effective in improving both spatial and non-spatial attention deficits in the post-acute recovery phase in neglect patients. The purpose of the current trial (referred to as the REmediation of SPatial Neglect or RESPONSE trial) is to compare TAPAT to an active control training condition, include a larger sample of patients, and assess both cognitive and functional outcomes. Methods/Design We will employ a multi-site, longitudinal, blinded randomized controlled trial (RCT) design with a target sample of 114 patients with spatial neglect. Patients will either perform, at their home, the experimental TAPAT training program or an active control computer games condition for thirty minutes/day, five days a week, over three months. Patients will be assessed on a battery of cognitive and functional outcomes on three occasions: a) immediately before training, b) within forty-eight hours post completion of total training, and c) after a three-month no-contact period post completion of total training, to assess the longevity of potential training effects. Discussion The strengths of this protocol are that it tests an innovative, in-home administered treatment that targets a fundamental deficit in neglect, employs highly sensitive computer-based

  1. Effects of computer-based graphic organizers to solve one-step word problems for middle school students with mild intellectual disability: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, Kelli A; Boon, Richard T

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of computer-based graphic organizers, using Kidspiration 3© software, to solve one-step word problems. Participants included three students with mild intellectual disability enrolled in a functional academic skills curriculum in a self-contained classroom. A multiple probe single-subject research design (Horner & Baer, 1978) was used to evaluate the effectiveness of computer-based graphic organizers to solving mathematical one-step word problems. During the baseline phase, the students completed a teacher-generated worksheet that consisted of nine functional word problems in a traditional format using a pencil, paper, and a calculator. In the intervention and maintenance phases, the students were instructed to complete the word problems using a computer-based graphic organizer. Results indicated that all three of the students improved in their ability to solve the one-step word problems using computer-based graphic organizers compared to traditional instructional practices. Limitations of the study and recommendations for future research directions are discussed.

  2. Analyzing Log Files to Predict Students' Problem Solving Performance in a Computer-Based Physics Tutor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Young-Jin

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates whether information saved in the log files of a computer-based tutor can be used to predict the problem solving performance of students. The log files of a computer-based physics tutoring environment called Andes Physics Tutor was analyzed to build a logistic regression model that predicted success and failure of students'…

  3. Factors Influencing Junior High School Teachers' Computer-Based Instructional Practices Regarding Their Instructional Evolution Stages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Ying-Shao; Wu, Hsin-Kai; Hwang, Fu-Kwun

    2007-01-01

    Sandholtz, Ringstaff, & Dwyer (1996) list five stages in the "evolution" of a teacher's capacity for computer-based instruction--entry, adoption, adaptation, appropriation and invention--which hereafter will be called the teacher's computer-based instructional evolution. In this study of approximately six hundred junior high school science and…

  4. Development of an Interactive Computer-Based Learning Strategy to Assist in Teaching Water Quality Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigic, Sasha; Lemckert, Charles J.

    2007-01-01

    The following paper presents a computer-based learning strategy to assist in introducing and teaching water quality modelling to undergraduate civil engineering students. As part of the learning strategy, an interactive computer-based instructional (CBI) aid was specifically developed to assist students to set up, run and analyse the output from a…

  5. Selective Use of Animation and Feedback in Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Ok-choon; Gittelman, Stuart S.

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of computer-based instruction and animation focuses on a study of undergraduates that investigated the effects of two computer-based instructional strategies, visual display and feedback type, on teaching how to troubleshoot electronic circuits. Time spent on various components of the program is also examined. (35 references) (LRW)

  6. Computer Based Technology and the Language/Liberal Arts: Stepping into the Electronic Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Dennis M.

    The need for the liberal arts curriculum to incorporate new technology in order for education to reach its potential is examined in this paper, which also looks at the potential for computer-based telecommunications to extend continued education for professionals. A survey of applications of computer-based telecommunications in reading and writing…

  7. Prospective Mathematics Teachers' Views about Using Computer-Based Instructional Materials in Constructing Mathematical Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukova-Guzel, Esra; Canturk-Gunhan, Berna

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine prospective mathematics teachers' views about using computer-based instructional materials in constructing mathematical concepts and to reveal how the sample computer-based instructional materials for different mathematical concepts altered their views. This is a qualitative study involving twelve…

  8. Benefits and Drawbacks of Computer-Based Assessment and Feedback Systems: Student and Educator Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debuse, Justin C. W.; Lawley, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    Providing students with high quality feedback is important and can be achieved using computer-based systems. While student and educator perspectives of such systems have been investigated, a comprehensive multidisciplinary study has not yet been undertaken. This study examines student and educator perspectives of a computer-based assessment and…

  9. Enhancing a Computer-Based Testing Environment with Optimum Item Response Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delen, Erhan

    2015-01-01

    As technology has become more advanced and accessible in instructional settings, there has been an upward trend in computer-based testing in the last decades. The present experimental study examines students' behaviors during computer-based testing in two different conditions and explores how these conditions affect the test results. Results…

  10. A Quantitative Exploration of Preservice Teachers' Intent to Use Computer-based Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kioh; Jain, Sachin; Westhoff, Guy; Rezabek, Landra

    2008-01-01

    Based on Bandura's (1977) social learning theory, the purpose of this study is to identify the relationship of preservice teachers' perceptions of faculty modeling of computer-based technology and preservice teachers' intent of using computer-based technology in educational settings. There were 92 participants in this study; they were enrolled in…

  11. The Tenth Summative Report of the Office of Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    The University of Delaware's work with computer-based instruction since 1974 is summarized with attention to the history and development of the Office of Computer-Based Instruction, university applications, outside user applications, and research and evaluation. PLATO was the system that met the university's criteria, which included support for…

  12. The Ninth Summative Report of the Office of Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    The University of Delaware's work with computer-based instruction since 1974 is summarized, with attention to the history and development of the Office of Computer-Based Instruction, university applications, outside user applications, and research and evaluation. PLATO was the system that met the university's criteria, which included: supporting…

  13. The Eleventh Summative Report of the Office of Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    The University of Delaware's work with computer-based instruction since 1974 is summarized with attention to the history and development of the Office of Computer-Based Instruction, university applications, outside user applications, and research and evaluation. PLATO was the system that met the university's criteria, which included support for…

  14. An Evaluation-Oriented Approach to Production of Computer-Based Instructional Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avner, R. A.

    This manual provides information for the preparation of material for presentation by computer-based instructional systems. The following topics are discussed: the advantages of computer-based education (CBE); the requirements for basic learning; the importance of behavioral objectives in CBE; specific types of CBE systems; use of on-line data;…

  15. THE FUTURE OF COMPUTER-BASED TOXICITY PREDICTION: MECHANISM-BASED MODELS VS. INFORMATION MINING APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory


    The Future of Computer-Based Toxicity Prediction:
    Mechanism-Based Models vs. Information Mining Approaches

    When we speak of computer-based toxicity prediction, we are generally referring to a broad array of approaches which rely primarily upon chemical structure ...

  16. Using a Computer-Based Audiographic Telecommunication System for Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezabek, Landra L.; And Others

    By combining the use of an existing teleconferencing network with new computer-based video technologies, the University of Wyoming has enhanced its ability to provide distance educational opportunities for students at remote sites across the state. The new computer-based audiographic system was tested during the fall semester of 1988 during the…

  17. Using Computer-Based Testing as Alternative Assessment Method of Student Learning in Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapriati, Amalia; Zuhairi, Aminudin

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the use of computer-based testing in distance education, based on the experience of Universitas Terbuka (UT), Indonesia. Computer-based testing has been developed at UT for reasons of meeting the specific needs of distance students as the following: (1) students' inability to sit for the scheduled test; (2) conflicting…

  18. Improving Student Performance through Computer-Based Assessment: Insights from Recent Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricketts, C.; Wilks, S. J.

    2002-01-01

    Compared student performance on computer-based assessment to machine-graded multiple choice tests. Found that performance improved dramatically on the computer-based assessment when students were not required to scroll through the question paper. Concluded that students may be disadvantaged by the introduction of online assessment unless care is…

  19. Overview of Design, Lifecycle, and Safety for Computer-Based Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2015-01-01

    This document describes the need and justification for the development of a design guide for safety-relevant computer-based systems. This document also makes a contribution toward the design guide by presenting an overview of computer-based systems design, lifecycle, and safety.

  20. Computer-Based Grammar Instruction in an EFL Context: Improving the Effectiveness of Teaching Adverbial Clauses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiliçkaya, Ferit

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to find out whether there are any statistically significant differences in participants' achievements on three different types of instruction: computer-based instruction, teacher-driven instruction, and teacher-driven grammar supported by computer-based instruction. Each type of instruction follows the deductive approach. The…

  1. Computer-Based GED Testing: Implications for Students, Programs, and Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkley-Etzkorn, Karen E.; Ishitani, Terry T.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the process of transitioning from the 2002 version of the GED test to the new 2014 computer-based version. Specifically, this research sought to identify: (1) stakeholder attitudes regarding the new computer-based test; (2) the relationship between students' computer access/comfort and their perceptions…

  2. Operationalizing Cognitive Constructs in the Design of Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hettinger, Gary A.

    This study of the application of cognitive style theory to the development of computer-based instruction explored two questions, i.e., whether computer-based courseware can be designed to address specific learner characteristics, and, if so, which characteristics. Several factors involved in the optimization of instruction are described: learner…

  3. Providing Feedback on Computer-Based Algebra Homework in Middle-School Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fyfe, Emily R.

    2016-01-01

    Homework is transforming at a rapid rate with continuous advances in educational technology. Computer-based homework, in particular, is gaining popularity across a range of schools, with little empirical evidence on how to optimize student learning. The current aim was to test the effects of different types of feedback on computer-based homework.…

  4. An Examination of the Characteristics of Student Interaction in Computer-Based Communication Assignments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Susan A.; Vician, Chelley

    Student interaction and computer-based communication tool appropriation patterns were examined in two different communication assignments requiring active use of computer-based communication tools. University students completed either: a set of communication assignments and activities with the instructor as sole audience; or a set of communication…

  5. Computer-Based Simulations for Maintenance Training: Current ARI Research. Technical Report 544.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knerr, Bruce W.; And Others

    Three research efforts that used computer-based simulations for maintenance training were in progress when this report was written: Game-Based Learning, which investigated the use of computer-based games to train electronics diagnostic skills; Human Performance in Fault Diagnosis Tasks, which evaluated the use of context-free tasks to train…

  6. Computer-Based Science Inquiry: How Components of Metacognitive Self-Regulation Affect Problem-Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Bruce C.; McGee, Steven; Shia, Regina; Hong, Namsoo Shin

    This study sought to examine the effects of meta cognitive self-regulation on problem solving across three conditions: (1) an interactive, computer-based treatment condition; (2) a noninteractive computer-based alternative treatment condition; and (3) a control condition. Also investigated was which of five components of metacognitive…

  7. Objective and Subjective Evaluation of Computer-based Tutorial Teaching in Veterinary Pathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Describes the results of the use of computer-based tutorials to teach the pathology of the cardiovascular system in a veterinary school in the United Kingdom. Concludes that the combined worksheet and computer based learning format is suitable for teaching veterinary pathology. (LRW)

  8. Do Examinees Understand Score Reports for Alternate Methods of Scoring Computer Based Tests?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Tiffany A.; Williams, Natasha J.; Dodd, Barbara G.

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the interpretability of scaled scores based on either number correct (NC) scoring for a paper-and-pencil test or one of two methods of scoring computer-based tests: an item pattern (IP) scoring method and a method based on equated NC scoring. The equated NC scoring method for computer-based tests was proposed as an alternative…

  9. Prediction of State Mandated Assessment Mathematics Scores from Computer Based Mathematics and Reading Preview Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa-Guerra, Boris

    2012-01-01

    The study sought to understand whether MAPs computer based assessment of math and language skills using MAPs reading scores can predict student scores on the NMSBA. A key question was whether or not the prediction can be improved by including student language skill scores. The study explored the effectiveness of computer based preview assessments…

  10. Avoiding Split Attention in Computer-Based Testing: Is Neglecting Additional Information Facilitative?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarodzka, Halszka; Janssen, Noortje; Kirschner, Paul A.; Erkens, Gijsbert

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether design guidelines for computer-based learning can be applied to computer-based testing (CBT). Twenty-two students completed a CBT exam with half of the questions presented in a split-screen format that was analogous to the original paper-and-pencil version and half in an integrated format. Results show that students…

  11. Discovery Learning, Representation, and Explanation within a Computer-Based Simulation: Finding the Right Mix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieber, Lloyd P.; Tzeng, Shyh-Chii; Tribble, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore how adult users interact and learn during an interactive computer-based simulation supplemented with brief multimedia explanations of the content. A total of 52 college students interacted with a computer-based simulation of Newton's laws of motion in which they had control over the motion of a simple…

  12. A Pilot Meta-Analysis of Computer-Based Scaffolding in STEM Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belland, Brian R.; Walker, Andrew E.; Olsen, Megan Whitney; Leary, Heather

    2015-01-01

    This paper employs meta-analysis to determine the influence of computer-based scaffolding characteristics and study and test score quality on cognitive outcomes in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education at the secondary, college, graduate, and adult levels. Results indicate that (a) computer-based scaffolding positively…

  13. Development and validation of a computer-based learning module for wrist arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Obdeijn, M C; Alewijnse, J V; Mathoulin, C; Liverneaux, P; Tuijthof, G J M; Schijven, M P

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and validate a computer-based module for wrist arthroscopy to which a group of experts could consent. The need for such a module was assessed with members of the European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS). The computer-based module was developed through several rounds of consulting experts on the content. The module's learning enhancement was tested in a randomized controlled trial with 28 medical students who were assigned to the computer-based module group or lecture group. The design process led to a useful tool, which is supported by a panel of experts. Although the computer based module did not enhance learning, the participants did find the module more pleasant to use. Developing learning tools such as this computer-based module can improve the teaching of wrist arthroscopy skills.

  14. A Multilevel Modeling Approach to Examining Individual Differences in Skill Acquisition for a Computer-Based Task

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Sankaran N.; Czaja, Sara J.; Sharit, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the role of age, cognitive abilities, prior experience, and knowledge in skill acquisition for a computer-based simulated customer service task. Fifty-two participants aged 50–80 performed the task over 4 consecutive days following training. They also completed a battery that assessed prior computer experience and cognitive abilities. The data indicated that overall quality and efficiency of performance improved with practice. The predictors of initial level of performance and rate of change in performance varied according to the performance parameter assessed. Age and fluid intelligence predicted initial level and rate of improvement in overall quality, whereas crystallized intelligence and age predicted initial e-mail processing time, and crystallized intelligence predicted rate of change in e-mail processing time over days. We discuss the implications of these findings for the design of intervention strategies. PMID:17565169

  15. Exploring the effectiveness of a computer-based heart rate variability biofeedback program in reducing anxiety in college students.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Gregg; Keffer, Steven; Abrahamson, Craig; Horst, S Jeanne

    2011-06-01

    Given the pervasiveness of stress and anxiety in our culture it is important to develop and implement interventions that can be easily utilized by large numbers of people that are readily available, inexpensive and have minimal side effects. Two studies explored the effectiveness of a computer-based heart rate variability biofeedback program on reducing anxiety and negative mood in college students. A pilot project (n = 9) of highly anxious students revealed sizable decreases in anxiety and negative mood following utilizing the program for 4 weeks. A second study (n = 35) employing an immediate versus delayed treatment design replicated the results, although the magnitude of the impact was not quite as strong. Despite observing decreases in anxiety, the expected changes in psychophysiological coherence were not observed. PMID:21533678

  16. Administration and environment considerations in computer-based sports-concussion assessment.

    PubMed

    Rahman-Filipiak, Annalise A M; Woodard, John L

    2013-12-01

    Computer-based testing has become a vital tool for the assessment of sport-related concussion (SRC). An increasing number of papers have been published on this topic, focusing on subjects such as the purpose and validity of baseline testing, the performance of special populations on computer-based tests, the psychometric properties of different computerized neurocognitive tools, and considerations for valid and reliable administration of these tools. The current paper describes several considerations regarding computerized test design, input and output devices, and testing environment that should be described explicitly when administering computer-based cognitive testing, regardless of whether the assessment is used for clinical or research purposes. The paper also reviews the conclusions of recent literature (2007-2013) using computer-based testing for the assessment of SRC, with special attention to the methods used in these studies. We also present an appendix checklist for clinicians and researchers that may be helpful in ensuring proper attention to factors that could influence the reliability and validity of computer-based cognitive testing. We believe that explicit attention to these technological factors may lead to the development of standards for the development and implementation of computer-based tests. Such standards have the potential to enhance the accuracy and utility of computer-based tests in SRC.

  17. Assessment of a six-week computer-based remediation program for social cognition in chronic schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    BYRNE, Linda K; PAN, Lingyi; McCABE, Marita; MELLOR, David; XU, Yifeng

    2015-01-01

    Background Programs to remediate cognitive deficits have shown promising results in schizophrenia, but remediation of social cognition deficits is less well understood. Social cognitive deficits may cause more disability than the widely recognized neurocognitive deficits, suggesting that this is an area worthy of further investigation. Aim Implement and evaluate a brief computerized cognitive remediation program designed to improve memory, attention, and facial affect recognition (FAR) in outpatients with chronic schizophrenia. Methods Baseline assessments of FAR and of clinical, cognitive, and psychosocial functioning were completed on 20 males with schizophrenia enrolled in an outpatient rehabilitation program at the Shanghai Mental Health Center (the intervention group) and on 20 males with schizophrenia recruited from among regular outpatients at the Center (the control group). Both groups received treatment as usual, but the intervention group also completed an average of 12.7 sessions of a computer-based remediation program for neurocognitive, social, and FAR functioning over a 6-week period. The baseline measures were repeated in both groups at the end of the 6-week trial. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the changes in clinical symptoms (assessed by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, PANSS) or cognitive measures (assessed using the Hong Kong List Learning Test and the Letter-Number Sequencing Task) between the intervention and control groups over the 6-week trial, but there were modest improvements on the PANSS for the intervention group between baseline and after the intervention. There was a significantly greater improvement in the social functioning measure (the Personal and Social Performance scale, PSP) in the intervention group than in the control group. The pre-post change in the total facial recognition score in the intervention group was statistically significant (paired t-test=-2.60, p=0.018), and there was a

  18. Design and evaluation of an onboard computer-based information system for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, S. H.; Rouse, W. B.; Hammer, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Information seeking by human operators of technical systems is considered. Types of information and forms of presentation are discussed and important issues reviewed. This broad discussion provides a framework within which flight management is considered. The design of an onboard computer-based information system for aircraft is discussed. The aiding possibilities of a computer-based system are emphasized. Results of an experimental evaluation of a prototype system are presented. It is concluded that a computer-based information system can substantially lessen the frequency of human errors.

  19. Traditional versus Computer-Based Dissections in Enhancing Learning in a Tertiary Setting: A Student Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Sue; Peat, Mary; Lewis, Alison

    2002-01-01

    Describes a study that investigates both the use and usefulness of laboratory dissections and computer-based dissections in a tertiary, first-year human biology course. Explores attitudes toward dissection. (DDR)

  20. Computer-Based Education in a Developing University for a Developing Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, A. J. L.; Dennis, J. Richard

    1982-01-01

    Presents a discussion of university role in an economically disadvantaged community in South Africa, and offers five recommendations on how to implement and maintain computer based instruction in a university outreach program. (MER)

  1. A Computer-Based Subduction-Zone-Earthquake Exercise for Introductory-Geology Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, James Herbert

    1991-01-01

    Describes the author's computer-based program for a subduction-zone-earthquake exercise. Instructions for conducting the activity and obtaining the program from the author are provided. Written in IBM QuickBasic. (PR)

  2. Investigating a New Way To Teach Law: A Computer-based Commercial Law Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the successful use of an interactive, computer-based format supplemented by online chats to provide a two-credit-hour commercial law course at the University of Tennessee College of Law. (EV)

  3. The smart card: an ideal tool for a computer-based patient record.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, R; Hildebrand, C; Jung, E

    1995-01-01

    Over the past decades, technology has advanced in all areas. Medical documentation, however, has not altered considerably. This means that medical care is often below standard. This article tries to point out how healthcare could benefit from a computer-based medical record. It also discusses the use of a medical smart card as a computer-based patient record--exemplified by the European DIABCARD-project which develops a chip card for persons with diabetes.

  4. Traditional classroom education versus computer-based learning: how nurses learn about pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Esche, Carol Ann; Warren, Joan I; Woods, Anne B; Jesada, Elizabeth C; Iliuta, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the Nurse Professional Development specialist is to utilize the most effective educational strategies when educating staff nurses about pressure ulcer prevention. More information is needed about the effect of computer-based learning and traditional classroom learning on pressure ulcer education for the staff nurse. This study compares computer-based learning and traditional classroom learning on immediate and long-term knowledge while evaluating the impact of education on pressure ulcer risk assessment, staging, and documentation. PMID:25608093

  5. Traditional classroom education versus computer-based learning: how nurses learn about pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Esche, Carol Ann; Warren, Joan I; Woods, Anne B; Jesada, Elizabeth C; Iliuta, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the Nurse Professional Development specialist is to utilize the most effective educational strategies when educating staff nurses about pressure ulcer prevention. More information is needed about the effect of computer-based learning and traditional classroom learning on pressure ulcer education for the staff nurse. This study compares computer-based learning and traditional classroom learning on immediate and long-term knowledge while evaluating the impact of education on pressure ulcer risk assessment, staging, and documentation.

  6. Implementing computer-based testing in distance education for advanced practice nurses: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Caudle, Patricia; Bigness, Joanne; Daniels, Judi; Gillmor-Kahn, Mickey; Knestrick, Joyce

    2011-01-01

    A distance education program utilized by graduate nursing students worldwide faces unique problems with testing. This article presents the results of a pilot study on the implementation of computer-based testing at the Frontier Nursing University. A detailed analysis of the evaluative survey completed by students in the pilot study revealed issues of hi-directional respect and trust between faculty and students and technological anxiety among students using computer-based testing. PMID:22029246

  7. Effects of computer-based stress management training on psychological well-being and work performance in japanese employees: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Umanodan, Rino; Shimazu, Akihito; Minami, Masahide; Kawakami, Norito

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a computer-based stress management training (SMT) program in improving employees' psychological well-being and work performance. A total of 12 work units (N=263) were randomly assigned to either an intervention group (8 work units, n=142) or to a wait-list control group (4 work units, n=121). All participants were requested to answer online questionnaires assessing psychological well-being as a primary outcome, and coping style, social support, and knowledge about stress management as secondary outcomes at baseline (T0), immediately after the intervention (T1), and 2 months after the intervention (T2). The group × time interaction was tested using a mixed-model repeated measures ANOVA. Results showed a group × time interaction for "knowledge about stress management" in the entire sample. Among participants who had more than 3 d of training, a significant group × time interaction was observed for "problem-solving" and "avoidance and suppression" as well as "knowledge about stress management." Our computer-based stress management program was effective for improving knowledge about stress management. It was also effective for improving coping skills in instances where participants had enough time (at least 3 d) to complete all sessions.

  8. Evaluation of E-Rat, a Computer-based Rat Dissection in Terms of Student Learning Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Predavec, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Presents a study that used computer-based rat anatomy to compare student learning outcomes from computer-based instruction with a conventional dissection. Indicates that there was a significant relationship between the time spent on both classes and the marks gained. Shows that computer-based instruction can be a viable alternative to the use of…

  9. Interventional radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    This reference gives a step-by-step presentation of the elements of interventional radiology. CONTENTS: Introduction; Radiation protection; Embolotherapy; Interventional techniques in the management of gastrointestinal bleeding; Transluminal angioplasty; Thrombolytic therapy; Foreign body removal; Inferior vena cava filter placement; Percutaneous uroradiologic techniques; Interventional techniques in the biliary tract; Nonvascular gastrointestinal tract dilations; Percutaneous biopsy techniques; Drainage of abscess fluid collections in the abdomen.

  10. The relative effectiveness of computer-based and traditional resources for education in anatomy.

    PubMed

    Khot, Zaid; Quinlan, Kaitlyn; Norman, Geoffrey R; Wainman, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing use of computer-based resources to teach anatomy, although no study has compared computer-based learning to traditional. In this study, we examine the effectiveness of three formats of anatomy learning: (1) a virtual reality (VR) computer-based module, (2) a static computer-based module providing Key Views (KV), (3) a plastic model. We conducted a controlled trial in which 60 undergraduate students had ten minutes to study the names of 20 different pelvic structures. The outcome measure was a 25 item short answer test consisting of 15 nominal and 10 functional questions, based on a cadaveric pelvis. All subjects also took a brief mental rotations test (MRT) as a measure of spatial ability, used as a covariate in the analysis. Data were analyzed with repeated measures ANOVA. The group learning from the model performed significantly better than the other two groups on the nominal questions (Model 67%; KV 40%; VR 41%, Effect size 1.19 and 1.29, respectively). There was no difference between the KV and VR groups. There was no difference between the groups on the functional questions (Model 28%; KV, 23%, VR 25%). Computer-based learning resources appear to have significant disadvantages compared to traditional specimens in learning nominal anatomy. Consistent with previous research, virtual reality shows no advantage over static presentation of key views.

  11. Online Pestkoppenstoppen: systematic and theory-based development of a web-based tailored intervention for adolescent cyberbully victims to combat and prevent cyberbullying

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this article is to give an integrative insight into the theoretical and empirical-based development of the Online Pestkoppenstoppen (Stop Bullies Online/Stop Online Bullies). This intervention aims to reduce the number of cyberbully victims and their symptoms of depression and anxiety (program goal), by teaching cyberbully victims how to cope in an adequate and effective manner with cyberbully incidents (program’s outcomes). Method/Design In developing the program the different steps of the Intervention Mapping protocol are systematically used. In this article we describe each step of Intervention Mapping. Sources used for the development were a literature review, a Delphi study among experts, focus group interviews with the target group, and elements from a proven effective anti-bullying program. The result is a fully automated web-based tailored intervention for cyberbully victims (12-15 years) consisting of three web-based advice sessions delivered over three months. The first advice aims to teach participants how behavior is influenced by the thoughts they have, how to recognize and dispute irrational thoughts and how to form rational thoughts. In the second advice, participants will learn about the way bullying emerges, how their behavior influences bullying and how they can use effective coping strategies in order to stop (online) bullying. In the third advice, participants receive feedback and will learn how to use the Internet and mobile phones in a safe manner. Each advice is tailored to the participant’s personal characteristics (e.g., personality, self-efficacy, coping strategies used and (ir)rational thoughts). To ensure implementation of the program after testing it for effectiveness, the intervention was pretested in the target-population and an implementation plan was designed. Finally, we will elaborate on the planned randomized controlled trial in which the intervention will be compared to a general information group

  12. Production of Graphic Symbol Sentences by Individuals with Aphasia: Efficacy of a Computer-Based Augmentative and Alternative Communication Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koul, Rajinder; Corwin, Melinda; Hayes, Summer

    2005-01-01

    The study employed a single-subject multiple baseline design to examine the ability of 9 individuals with severe Broca's aphasia or global aphasia to produce graphic symbol sentences of varying syntactical complexity using a software program that turns a computer into a speech output communication device. The sentences ranged in complexity from…

  13. An Investigation of the Effects of a Computer-Based Intervention on the Social Skills of Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cipolla, Dayna Summer

    2012-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) suffer from numerous social and communicative deficits that create difficulties when interacting with their peers, adults, and their social community. An increased prevalence of problem behaviors has also been found in children with ASD, and it is likely that such problem behaviors interfere with the…

  14. Accelerating Decoding-Related Skills in Poor Readers Learning a Foreign Language: A Computer-Based Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Björn, Piia Maria; Leppänen, Paavo H. T.

    2013-01-01

    The results of Fast ForWord® training on English decoding-related skills were examined. Finnish fifth-grade students were identified as having reading fluency problems and poor skills in English as a foreign language learned at school and were randomly assigned to either a training group (TRG) or a control group. The TRG ("n"?=?13)…

  15. [Undergraduate nursing students experience of a computer-based learning course].

    PubMed

    Alves, Rosa Helena Kreutz; Cogo, Ana Luísa Petersen

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to get to know how undergraduate nursing students at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul Nursing School experienced the computer-based learning (CBL) course: "Socio-historical process in nursing education". Five female students, who had attended the course the previous semester, were interviewed. Data were analyzed according to the thematic analysis. The final categories were: "the students' experience in the use of computer technologies" and "the students in relation to the computer-based learning experience". The flexibilization of study time and venue was pointed out as a positive factor. The students realized that CBL requires more effort and dedication when compared to conventional learning activities. We concluded that computer-based learning is an inclusive modality that allows access of students who are already involved in the labor market. PMID:19320351

  16. Computer-based simulation training in emergency medicine designed in the light of malpractice cases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Using computer-based simulation systems in medical education is becoming more and more common. Although the benefits of practicing with these systems in medical education have been demonstrated, advantages of using computer-based simulation in emergency medicine education are less validated. The aim of the present study was to assess the success rates of final year medical students in doing emergency medical treatment and evaluating the effectiveness of computer-based simulation training in improving final year medical students’ knowledge. Methods Twenty four Students trained with computer-based simulation and completed at least 4 hours of simulation-based education between the dates Feb 1, 2010 - May 1, 2010. Also a control group (traditionally trained, n =24) was chosen. After the end of training, students completed an examination about 5 randomized medical simulation cases. Results In 5 cases, an average of 3.9 correct medical approaches carried out by computer-based simulation trained students, an average of 2.8 correct medical approaches carried out by traditionally trained group (t = 3.90, p < 0.005). We found that the success of students trained with simulation training in cases which required complicated medical approach, was statistically higher than the ones who didn’t take simulation training (p ≤ 0.05). Conclusions Computer-based simulation training would be significantly effective in learning of medical treatment algorithms. We thought that these programs can improve the success rate of students especially in doing adequate medical approach to complex emergency cases. PMID:25064122

  17. No free lunch: institutional preparations for computer-based patient records.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S. H.

    1999-01-01

    The Veterans Administration (VA) is aggressively pursuing computer-based medical records by deploying the Computerized Patient Record System (CPRS) across its 150 medical centers and 400 outpatient clinics. CPRS's client-server, patient-centered approach to clinical computing is a departure from VA's traditional terminal-compatible, department-centered approach. Although the CPRS software is freely distributed, institutional readiness for computer-based patient records has proven expensive. Preparations include organizational changes, human resource development, hardware deployment, physical plant upgrades, and software testing. This paper details CPRS preparations and their costs at one VA Medical Center. Lessons learned during the process are summarized. PMID:10566406

  18. The computer-based patient record and Robert Fulghum's 16 principles.

    PubMed

    Kahn, M G

    1995-01-01

    Robert Fulghum proposed 16 principles learned in kindergarten that he claimed should govern all human activities. How do these principles apply to current efforts to create a computer-based patient record? Fulghum's principles, when recast for the computer-based patient record, emphasize cooperation, privacy, security, and standardization--elements that are easily recognized as essential features of an electronic medical record. However, a number of less frequently discussed issues, such as data quality, integrity, abuse, and misuse can also be considered in terms of Fulghum's principles.

  19. Efficacy of It’s Your Game-Tech: A Computer-Based Sexual Health Education Program for Middle School Youth

    PubMed Central

    Peskin, Melissa F.; Shegog, Ross; Markham, Christine M.; Thiel, Melanie; Baumler, Elizabeth R.; Addy, Robert C.; Gabay, Efrat K.; Emery, Susan Tortolero

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Few computer-based HIV, sexually transmitted infection (STI), and pregnancy prevention programs are available, and even fewer target early adolescents. In this study, we tested the efficacy of It’s Your Game (IYG)-Tech, a completely computer-based, middle school sexual health education program. The primary hypothesis was that students who received IYG-Tech would significantly delay sexual initiation by ninth grade. Methods We evaluated IYG-Tech using a randomized, two-arm nested design among 19 schools in a large, urban school district in southeast Texas (20 schools were originally randomized). The target population was English-speaking eighth-grade students who were followed into the ninth grade. The final analytic sample included 1,374 students. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to test for differences in sexual initiation between intervention and control students, while adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, time between measures, and family structure. Results There was no significant difference in the delay of sexual activity or in any other sexual behavior between intervention and control students. However, there were significant positive between-group differences for psychosocial variables related to STI and condom knowledge, attitudes about abstinence, condom use self-efficacy, and perceived norms about sex. Post-hoc analyses conducted among intervention students revealed some significant associations: “full exposure” (completion of all 13 lessons) and “mid-exposure” (5–8 lessons) students were less likely than “low exposure” (1–4 lessons) students to initiate sex. Conclusions Collectively, our findings indicate that IYG-Tech impacts some determinants of sexual behavior, and that additional efficacy evaluation with full intervention exposure may be warranted. PMID:25739520

  20. The effects of an 8-week computer-based brain training programme on cognitive functioning, QoL and self-efficacy after stroke.

    PubMed

    Wentink, M M; Berger, M A M; de Kloet, A J; Meesters, J; Band, G P H; Wolterbeek, R; Goossens, P H; Vliet Vlieland, T P M

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive impairment after stroke has a direct impact on daily functioning and quality of life (QoL) of patients and is associated with higher mortality and healthcare costs. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a computer-based brain training programme on cognitive functioning, QoL and self-efficacy compared to a control condition in stroke patients. Stroke patients with self-perceived cognitive impairment were randomly allocated to the intervention or control group. The intervention consisted of an 8-week brain training programme (Lumosity Inc.®). The control group received general information about the brain weekly. Assessments consisted of a set of neuropsychological tests and questionnaires. In addition, adherence with trained computer tasks was recorded. No effect of the training was found on cognitive functioning, QoL or self-efficacy when compared to the control condition, except for very limited effects on working memory and speed. This study found very limited effects on neuropsychological tests that were closely related to trained computer tasks, but no transfers to other tests or self-perceived cognitive failures, QoL or self-efficacy. These findings warrant the need for further research into the value of computer-based brain training to improve cognitive functioning in the chronic phase after stroke.

  1. [Crisis intervention].

    PubMed

    Stein, Claudius

    2012-01-01

    The Austrian Program for Suicide Prevention defines as Point 2: "Support and treatment". The suicide-preventive outcome of the development of psychotherapeutic-psychosocial care in Austria has been proved. This means, that the further development of institutions with focus on crisis intervention is a central agenda of Suicide prevention Austria (SUPRA). First, in this article are defined the terms crisis and crisis intervention, also the close connection to programs of suicide prevention is pointed out. Furthermore general aims and standards for crisis intervention are defined and the current situation of crisis intervention in Austria is described. Finally recommendations for practical aims and their implementation in the context of SUPRA are made.

  2. Introducing Computer-Based Testing in High-Stakes Exams in Higher Education: Results of a Field Experiment.

    PubMed

    Boevé, Anja J; Meijer, Rob R; Albers, Casper J; Beetsma, Yta; Bosker, Roel J

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of computer-based testing in high-stakes examining in higher education is developing rather slowly due to institutional barriers (the need of extra facilities, ensuring test security) and teacher and student acceptance. From the existing literature it is unclear whether computer-based exams will result in similar results as paper-based exams and whether student acceptance can change as a result of administering computer-based exams. In this study, we compared results from a computer-based and paper-based exam in a sample of psychology students and found no differences in total scores across the two modes. Furthermore, we investigated student acceptance and change in acceptance of computer-based examining. After taking the computer-based exam, fifty percent of the students preferred paper-and-pencil exams over computer-based exams and about a quarter preferred a computer-based exam. We conclude that computer-based exam total scores are similar as paper-based exam scores, but that for the acceptance of high-stakes computer-based exams it is important that students practice and get familiar with this new mode of test administration. PMID:26641632

  3. Introducing Computer-Based Testing in High-Stakes Exams in Higher Education: Results of a Field Experiment.

    PubMed

    Boevé, Anja J; Meijer, Rob R; Albers, Casper J; Beetsma, Yta; Bosker, Roel J

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of computer-based testing in high-stakes examining in higher education is developing rather slowly due to institutional barriers (the need of extra facilities, ensuring test security) and teacher and student acceptance. From the existing literature it is unclear whether computer-based exams will result in similar results as paper-based exams and whether student acceptance can change as a result of administering computer-based exams. In this study, we compared results from a computer-based and paper-based exam in a sample of psychology students and found no differences in total scores across the two modes. Furthermore, we investigated student acceptance and change in acceptance of computer-based examining. After taking the computer-based exam, fifty percent of the students preferred paper-and-pencil exams over computer-based exams and about a quarter preferred a computer-based exam. We conclude that computer-based exam total scores are similar as paper-based exam scores, but that for the acceptance of high-stakes computer-based exams it is important that students practice and get familiar with this new mode of test administration.

  4. Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on early intervention. The four articles presented on this theme are: (1) "Deaf Infants, Hearing Mothers: A Research Report" (Kathryn P. Meadow-Orlans, and others), reporting findings on effects of auditory loss on early development; (2) "Maintaining Involvement of Inner City Families in Early Intervention Programs through…

  5. An Overview of Computer-Based Testing. Research Notes. RN-09

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patelis, Thanos

    2000-01-01

    Because different types of computerized tests exist and continue to emerge, the term "computer-based testing" does not encompass all of the various models that may exist. As a result, test delivery model (TDM) is used to describe the variety of methods that exist in delivering tests to examinees. The criterion that is used to distinguish…

  6. Using Artificial Intelligence in Education: Computer-Based Tools for Instructional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Ray S.; Seidel, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of the use of artificial intelligence in computer-based instruction focuses on training development for the U.S. Army. Topics discussed include the Systems Approach to Training (SAT); knowledge acquisition; domain expertise; intelligent computer-assisted instruction; software tools and decision aids; and expert systems. (10 references)…

  7. A Randomized Field Trial of the Fast ForWord Language Computer-Based Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Geoffrey D.; Benson, James G.; Overman, Laura

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an independent assessment of the Fast ForWord Language computer-based training program developed by Scientific Learning Corporation. Previous laboratory research involving children with language-based learning impairments showed strong effects on their abilities to recognize brief and fast sequences of nonspeech and speech…

  8. Invention Aids for Computer-Based Writing: Expanding the Horizons through Collaborative Invention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langston, M. Diane

    "Cognoter(tm)" and "CB" software, two new computer-based writing tools that rely on shared texts and real-time communication among participants and support collaborative invention, have implications for invention pedagogy and research. Cognoter improves on current invention aids by combining a brainstorming tool, a graphical linking tool, and an…

  9. Computer-Based Training for Immigrant Latinos with Limited Formal Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anger, W. Kent; Tamulinas, Alys; Uribe, Andrea; Ayala, Cesar

    2004-01-01

    Mexican immigrants working at a wholesale nursery were involved in developing user instructions for a computer-based instruction system. Sixty-one Latinos with 0 to 16 years of education completed user instructions delivered on the computer, and all but 3 completed training content about the nursery. Based on objective criteria, program use was…

  10. An Investigation of the Relationship between a Computer-Based Method and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stayner, Mindy L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate the relationship between a computer-based learning (CBL) method and academic performance, controlling for independent, non-academic and academic confounding, variables of high school GPA, college GPA, marital status, number of dependents, age, gender, race, level of education, and semester…

  11. Using Intelligent Tutoring Design Principles To Integrate Cognitive Theory into Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orey, Michael A.; Nelson, Wayne A.

    Arguing that the evolution of intelligent tutoring systems better reflects the recent theoretical developments of cognitive science than traditional computer-based instruction (CBI), this paper describes a general model for an intelligent tutoring system and suggests ways to improve CBI using design principles derived from research in cognitive…

  12. Communicative Language Testing: Implications for Computer Based Language Testing in French for Specific Purposes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García Laborda, Jesús; López Santiago, Mercedes; Otero de Juan, Nuria; Álvarez Álvarez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Current evolutions of language testing have led to integrating computers in FSP assessments both in oral and written communicative tasks. This paper deals with two main issues: learners' expectations about the types of questions in FSP computer based assessments and the relation with their own experience. This paper describes the experience…

  13. Participatory Planning Using Computer-Based Modeling. AIR 1991 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grumbles, Kent; Hinkle, Dennis

    This paper examines effects of combining long-range planning and computer-based modeling in institutions of higher education, with examples from application at Butler University (Indiana). The model was developed due to a need to obtain a 5-year forecast of revenues and expenditures and consists of eight dynamic submodels--one for each of the five…

  14. Student Sensemaking with Science Diagrams in a Computer-Based Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furberg, Anniken; Kluge, Anders; Ludvigsen, Sten

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of students' conceptual sensemaking with science diagrams within a computer-based learning environment aimed at supporting collaborative learning. Through the microanalysis of students' interactions in a project about energy and heat transfer, we demonstrate "how" representations become productive social and cognitive…

  15. Computer-Based Scaffolding to Facilitate Students' Development of Expertise in Academic Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proske, Antje; Narciss, Susanne; McNamara, Danielle S.

    2012-01-01

    Research on expert performance suggests that deliberate practice provides optimal opportunities for expertise development. This study examined whether the provision of computer-based scaffolding (CBS) guiding deliberate practice facilitates students' development of writing expertise. A CBS environment "escribo" was designed to externally support…

  16. A Comparison of Completion Times in Traditional versus Computer-Based Developmental Math Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charters, Christi R.

    2013-01-01

    Many students lack adequate mathematic skills and must enroll in developmental math programs to satisfy the math requirement to earn a college degree, but developmental programs are often problematic with high failure rates, preventing graduation. This study examined whether the emporium model, a computer-based developmental math tool, was more…

  17. Development of a Computer-Based Visualised Quantitative Learning System for Playing Violin Vibrato

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Tracy Kwei-Liang; Lin, Huann-shyang; Chen, Ching-Kong; Tsai, Jih-Long

    2015-01-01

    Traditional methods of teaching music are largely subjective, with the lack of objectivity being particularly challenging for violin students learning vibrato because of the existence of conflicting theories. By using a computer-based analysis method, this study found that maintaining temporal coincidence between the intensity peak and the target…

  18. Investigating Pre-Service Early Childhood Teachers' Attitudes towards the Computer Based Education in Science Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Nursel; Alici, Sule

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate pre-service early childhood teachers' attitudes towards using Computer Based Education (CBE) while implementing science activities. More specifically, the present study examined the effect of different variables such as gender, year in program, experience in preschool, owing a computer, and the…

  19. Measurement and Evidence of Computer-Based Task Switching and Multitasking by "Net Generation" Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judd, Terry; Kennedy, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Logs of on-campus computer and Internet usage were used to conduct a study of computer-based task switching and multitasking by undergraduate medical students. A detailed analysis of over 6000 individual sessions revealed that while a majority of students engaged in both task switching and multitasking behaviours, they did so less frequently than…

  20. The Effectiveness of Computer-Based EFL Instruction among Primary School Students in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shamir, Haya; Johnson, Erin Phinney

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an effectiveness study of a computer-based English reading program, the Waterford Early Reading Program (WERP), among first and second grade students in Israel. Students who used the program were compared to a control group only receiving English as a foreign language (EFL) instruction as part of the school curriculum. First…

  1. Assessment of Computer-Based Preferences of Students with Profound Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mechling, Linda C.; Bishop, Vanessa A.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on two studies investigating the use of computer-based stimuli that may then be used to develop activities and programming for students with profound multiple disabilities (PMD). Both studies used an alternating treatments design and systematic assessment strategy to present stimuli sequentially and to measure student…

  2. Computer-Based Systems for Increasing Information Access to School Media Center Materials. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Theodore C.; And Others

    The project presented here explored the possibility of using computer-based systems to increase information access to non-text children's materials at the pre-school through elementary (6th grade) school levels. This final report includes an indicative summary as well as ten separate papers that describe a range of applications of proven computer…

  3. A Review of Evaluative Studies of Computer-based Learning in Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Michael J.; Davies, Rebecca; Jenkins, David; Tait, Michael I.

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of the methods used in 25 reports of the evaluation of nursing computer-based learning packages revealed significant research design flaws invalidating many conclusions. Ways to improve evaluation research on the effectiveness of computer-assisted instruction were recommended. (Contains 49 references.) (SK)

  4. An Evaluation of Gender Differences in Computer-Based Case Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheuneman, Janice Dowd; And Others

    As part of the research leading to the implementation of computer-based case simulations (CCS) for the licensing examinations of the National Board of Medical Examiners, gender differences in performance were studied for one form consisting of 18 cases. A secondary purpose of the study was to note differences in style or approach that might…

  5. Computer-Based Materials: A Study of Learner Autonomy and Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figura, Klaudia; Jarvis, Huw

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a study which examines the extent to which specified cognitive, social, and metacognitive strategies, are used by language students when working with computer-based materials (CBMs), in self-study contexts outside of the language classroom; particularly in a self-access centre (SAC). Data were collected using questionnaires,…

  6. Inventing Motivates and Prepares Student Teachers for Computer-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glogger-Frey, I.; Kappich, J.; Schwonke, R.; Holzäpfel, L.; Nückles, M.; Renkl, A.

    2015-01-01

    A brief, problem-oriented phase such as an inventing activity is one potential instructional method for preparing learners not only cognitively but also motivationally for learning. Student teachers often need to overcome motivational barriers in order to use computer-based learning opportunities. In a preliminary experiment, we found that student…

  7. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Attitudes toward Computer-Based Instruction of Postsecondary Hospitality Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behnke, Carl Alan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between postsecondary students' emotional-social intelligence and attitudes toward computer-based instructional materials. Research indicated that emotions and emotional intelligence directly impact motivation, while instructional design has been shown to impact student attitudes and…

  8. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Attitudes toward Computer-Based Instruction of Postsecondary Hospitality Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behnke, Carl; Greenan, James P.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between postsecondary students' emotional-social intelligence and attitudes toward computer-based instructional materials. Research indicated that emotions and emotional intelligence directly impact motivation, while instructional design has been shown to impact student attitudes and subsequent engagement with…

  9. Beyond No Significant Differences: A Closer Look at the Educational Impact of Computer-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandernach, B. Jean

    2006-01-01

    There is a host of research examining the equivalence of alternative modes of technology-facilitated educational delivery (such as computer-based or online instruction) and traditional classroom instruction. While various studies have promoted each of these modalities for specific populations or topic areas, the bulk of research supports relative…

  10. The Effect of Emotional Feedback on Behavioral Intention to Use Computer Based Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzis, Vasileios; Moridis, Christos N.; Economides, Anastasios A.

    2012-01-01

    This study introduces emotional feedback as a construct in an acceptance model. It explores the effect of emotional feedback on behavioral intention to use Computer Based Assessment (CBA). A female Embodied Conversational Agent (ECA) with empathetic encouragement behavior was displayed as emotional feedback. More specifically, this research aims…

  11. The Effects of Integrating Computer-Based Concept Mapping for Physics Learning in Junior High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Cheng-Chieh; Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Shih, Chang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    It generally is accepted that concept mapping has a noticeable impact on learning. But literatures show the use of concept mapping is not benefit all learners. The present study explored the effects of incorporating computer-based concept mapping in physics instruction. A total of 61 9th-grade students participated in this study. By using a…

  12. A Computer-Based Gaming System for Assessing Recognition Performance (RECOG).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Glenn A.; And Others

    This report documents a computer-based gaming system for assessing recognition performance (RECOG). The game management system is programmed in a modular manner to: instruct the student on how to play the game, retrieve and display individual images, keep track of how well individuals play and provide them feedback, and link these components by…

  13. Learning Mathematics by Designing, Programming, and Investigating with Interactive, Dynamic Computer-Based Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Neil; Buteau, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    As part of their undergraduate mathematics curriculum, students at Brock University learn to create and use computer-based tools with dynamic, visual interfaces, called Exploratory Objects, developed for the purpose of conducting pure or applied mathematical investigations. A student's Development Process Model of creating and using an Exploratory…

  14. Development of a Computer-Based System for the Unobtrusive Collection of Direct Observational Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Happy; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This article describes a computer-based system, the "Direct Observation Data System" (DODS), which allows for unobtrusive collection of direct observational data in the classroom and natural settings. At present, DODS consists of event-recording and duration-recording programs which can be remotely accessed. The device has implications for…

  15. Optimizing Computer-Based Developmental Math Learning at an Arabic Women's University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havill, Dale; Hashim, Wafa Bani; Alalawi, Shaikha

    2004-01-01

    "Developmental" math courses give university students a chance to reestablish basic skills and knowledge needed in college algebra courses. Computer assisted learning can be an integral part of these developmental math courses. Colleges and universities implement computer-based courses in various ways (e.g., self-paced or supervised…

  16. A Four-Stage Model for Planning Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Gary R.; Ross, Steven M.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a flexible planning process for developing computer based instruction (CBI) in which the CBI design is implemented on paper between the lesson design and the program production. A four-stage model is explained, including (1) an initial flowchart, (2) storyboards, (3) a detailed flowchart, and (4) an evaluation. (16 references)…

  17. Computer Based Learning in FE. A Staff Development Model. A Staff Development Publication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This booklet describes the development and content of a model staff development pack for use in training teachers to incorporate the techniques of computer-based learning into their subject teaching. The guide consists of three parts. Part 1 outlines the aims and objectives, content, and use of the pack. Described next are seven curriculum samples…

  18. Computer-Based Video Instruction to Teach Students with Intellectual Disabilities to Use Public Bus Transportation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mechling, Linda; O'Brien, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of computer-based video instruction (CBVI) to teach three young adults with moderate intellectual disabilities to push a "request to stop bus signal" and exit a city bus in response to target landmarks. A multiple probe design across three students and one bus route was used to evaluate effectiveness of…

  19. Integrating Computer-Based Career Development into Your Career Planning Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Robert B.; Mack, Sharon E.

    This paper focuses on the real and theoretical usefulness of a computer-based career development system in a career planning program, based on a 2-year pilot program evaluating the DISCOVER system. The system overview discusses components and contents of DISCOVER, and describes the 11 modules which assist users in learning about their values,…

  20. The Effect of Teacher Involvement on Student Performance in a Computer-Based Science Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugh, Michael L.

    Designed to investigate whether or not science teachers can positively influence student achievement in, and attitude toward, science, this study focused on a specific teaching strategy and utilization of a computer-based simulation. The software package used in the study was the simulation, Volcanoes, by Earthware Computer Services. The sample…

  1. Learning with Computer-Based Learning Environments: A Literature Review of Computer Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moos, Daniel C.; Azevedo, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Although computer-based learning environments (CBLEs) are becoming more prevalent in the classroom, empirical research has demonstrated that some students have difficulty learning with these environments. The motivation construct of computer-self efficacy plays an integral role in learning with CBLEs. This literature review synthesizes research…

  2. Interactive Computer Based Assessment Tasks: How Problem-Solving Process Data Can Inform Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoanetti, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    This article presents key steps in the design and analysis of a computer based problem-solving assessment featuring interactive tasks. The purpose of the assessment is to support targeted instruction for students by diagnosing strengths and weaknesses at different stages of problem-solving. The first focus of this article is the task piloting…

  3. Relate@IU>>>Share@IU: A New and Different Computer-Based Communications Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Theodore W.; Roberto, Joseph; Korkmaz, Ali; Oh, Jeong-En; Twal, Riad

    The purpose of this study was to examine problems with the current computer-based electronic communication systems and to initially test and revise a new and different paradigm for e-collaboration, Relate@IU. Understanding the concept of sending links to resources, rather than sending the resource itself, is at the core of how Relate@IU differs…

  4. Effects of Concreteness and Contiguity on Learning from Computer-Based Reference Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, Sribhagyam; Lewis, Daphne D.; Crooks, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    Today's technology has reached new heights that have not been fully implemented. One of the areas where technology has not yet reached its full potential is in education. This study examined the effects of concreteness of location names and contiguity of location names with textual information on learning from computer-based reference maps. The…

  5. Improved Processing Speed: Online Computer-Based Cognitive Training in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Tamara; Camfield, David; Pipingas, Andrew; Macpherson, Helen; Stough, Con

    2012-01-01

    In an increasingly aging population, a number of adults are concerned about declines in their cognitive abilities. Online computer-based cognitive training programs have been proposed as an accessible means by which the elderly may improve their cognitive abilities; yet, more research is needed in order to assess the efficacy of these programs. In…

  6. Interaction Between Conceptual Level and Training Method in Computer Based Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sustik, Joan M.; Brown, Bobby R.

    A study of 130 undergraduate students enrolled in a course on auiovisual techniques sought to determine whether heuristic or algorithmic computer-based problem solving training would be differentially effective for students varying in cognitive complexity as measured by the Educational Set Scale (ESS). The interaction was investigated between one…

  7. Synopsis of the University of Delaware's Office of Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    This brief paper presents background information and a description of the organizational structure and educational objectives of the Office of Computer-Based Instruction, formerly the Delaware PLATO project, whose name was changed to reflect the University's ongoing commitment to providing leadership in educational computing following the…

  8. Sixth Summative Report of the Office of Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    This summary of developments and activities at the University of Delaware Office of Computer-Based Instruction (OCBI) during 1980-1981 includes: (1) a detailed account of the history and development of OCBI which covers background information, utilization rates, the organization of OCBI, the OCBI courseware development process, OCBI publications,…

  9. Computer-Based Instruction: Roots, Origins, Applications, Benefits, Features, Systems, Trends and Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    Dealing exclusively with instructional computing, this paper describes how computers are delivering instruction in a wide variety of subjects to students of all ages and explains why computer-based education is currently having a profound impact on education. After a discussion of roots and origins, computer applications are described for…

  10. Students' Mathematics Word Problem-Solving Achievement in a Computer-Based Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunbas, N.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a computer-based story, which was designed in anchored instruction framework, on sixth-grade students' mathematics word problem-solving achievement. Problems were embedded in a story presented on a computer as computer story, and then compared with the paper-based version of the same…

  11. Randomised Items in Computer-Based Tests: Russian Roulette in Assessment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Anthony M.; Cronje, Johannes C.

    2008-01-01

    Computer-based assessments are becoming more commonplace, perhaps as a necessity for faculty to cope with large class sizes. These tests often occur in large computer testing venues in which test security may be compromised. In an attempt to limit the likelihood of cheating in such venues, randomised presentation of items is automatically…

  12. Computer-Based Learning of Neuroanatomy: A Longitudinal Study of Learning, Transfer, and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chariker, Julia H.; Naaz, Farah; Pani, John R.

    2011-01-01

    A longitudinal experiment was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of new methods for learning neuroanatomy with computer-based instruction. Using a three-dimensional graphical model of the human brain and sections derived from the model, tools for exploring neuroanatomy were developed to encourage "adaptive exploration". This is an…

  13. Improving School Children's Mathematical Word Problem Solving Skills through Computer-Based Multiple Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adiguzel, Tufan; Akpinar, Yavuz

    2004-01-01

    Instructional resources that employ multiple representations have become commonplace in mathematics classrooms. This study will present computer software, LaborScale which was designed to improve seventh grade students' word problem-solving skills through computer-based multiple representations including graphic, symbolic, and audio…

  14. Automated Detection of Heuristics and Biases among Pathologists in a Computer-Based System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Rebecca S.; Legowski, Elizabeth; Medvedeva, Olga; Reitmeyer, Kayse; Tseytlin, Eugene; Castine, Melissa; Jukic, Drazen; Mello-Thoms, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is threefold: (1) to develop an automated, computer-based method to detect heuristics and biases as pathologists examine virtual slide cases, (2) to measure the frequency and distribution of heuristics and errors across three levels of training, and (3) to examine relationships of heuristics to biases, and biases to…

  15. Computer-Based Voice Recognition: Characteristics, Applications, and Guidelines for Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milheim, William D.

    1993-01-01

    Describes computer-based voice recognition technology, including disadvantages; identifies vocabulary, training requirements, and ability to understand continuous speech as the basic characteristics of voice-recognition systems; describes applications in education and industry; suggests guidelines for design and implementation; and discusses…

  16. Putting Life into Computer-Based Training: The Creation of an Epidemiologic Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gathany, Nancy C.; Stehr-Green, Jeanette K.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the design of "Pharyngitis in Louisiana," a computer-based epidemiologic case study that was created to teach students how to conduct disease outbreak investigations. Topics discussed include realistic content portrayals; graphics; interactive teaching methods; interaction between the instructional designer and the medical expert; and…

  17. Enhancing Competence and Autonomy in Computer-Based Instruction Using a Skill-Challenge Balancing Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jieun; Ryu, Hokyoung; Katuk, Norliza; Wang, Ruili; Choi, Gyunghyun

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to show if a skill-challenge balancing (SCB) instruction strategy can assist learners to motivationally engage in computer-based learning. Csikszentmihalyi's flow theory (self-control, curiosity, focus of attention, and intrinsic interest) was applied to an account of the optimal learning experience in SCB-based learning…

  18. Modeling Teaching with a Computer-Based Concordancer in a TESL Preservice Teacher Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, Siowck-Lee; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This study modeled teaching with a computer-based concordancer in a Teaching English-as-a-Second-Language program. Preservice teachers were randomly assigned to work with computer concordancing software or vocabulary exercises to develop word attack skills. Pretesting and posttesting indicated that computer concordancing was more effective in…

  19. Optimal and Nonoptimal Computer-Based Test Designs for Making Pass-Fail Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambleton, Ronald K.; Xing, Dehui

    2006-01-01

    Now that many credentialing exams are being routinely administered by computer, new computer-based test designs, along with item response theory models, are being aggressively researched to identify specific designs that can increase the decision consistency and accuracy of pass-fail decisions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the…

  20. Computer-based ST/HR slope calculation on Marquette CASE 12: development and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Kligfield, P; Okin, P M; Stumpf, T; Zachman, D

    1988-01-01

    Computer-based implementation of the ST/HR slope on Marquette CASE 12 is described. ST-segment measurement is performed with improved software for QRS detection and incremental signal updating, and on-line test calculation results from automated linear regression, leading to graphic display of the maximum ST/HR slope at the end of exercise. PMID:3216168

  1. Children's Experiences of Completing a Computer-Based Violence Survey: Ethical Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellonen, Noora; Poso, Tarja

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to contribute to the discussion about the ethics of research on children when studying sensitive issues such as violence. The empirical analysis is based on the accounts given by children (11 377) who completed a computer-based questionnaire about their experiences of violence ("The Finnish Child Victim Survey 2008") and their…

  2. Developing Computer Based Education and Self-Pacing for Introductory Sociology: A Teacher's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Susman, Mary Beth

    Drawing from personal experiences in the development of an interactive testing program for a sociology course, this paper discusses issues related to the use of computer-based education in social science classes. First, the paper describes the steps taken by the Community College of Denver to introduce interested faculty to the possibilities of…

  3. Effects of Knowledge Representation during Computer-Based Training of Console Operation Skill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farquhar, John D.; Regian, J. Wesley

    Console-operation skill is procedural knowledge of control panel actions. The console operator must select appropriate sequences of steps (e.g., setting dials, pressing buttons, etc.) as mandated by desired goals and subgoals. A computer-based training (CBT) environment can simulate an environment where knowledge acquisition is efficiently and…

  4. Strategies for Integrating Computer-Based Training in College Music Theory Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, George J., Jr.

    During the fall semester of 1993, a curriculum-based computer-based training (CBT) program was used to replace all in-class drills in intervals and chord identification for one section of freshman music theory at the University of Northern Colorado. This study was conducted to determine whether aural skills can be taught as effectively through the…

  5. The Relative Instructional Efficiency of Small Group Computer-Based Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shlechter, Theodore M.

    1990-01-01

    Describes three experiments which examined the relative instructional effectiveness of using small group computer-based training (CBT) and individual CBT in a military setting. Retention abilities are tested in two of the experiments, pretests and posttests are described, cost effectiveness is discussed, and cooperative learning is considered. (25…

  6. Motivational Beliefs, Student Effort, and Feedback Behaviour in Computer-Based Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmers, Caroline F.; Braber-van den Broek, Jannie; van den Berg, Stephanie M.

    2013-01-01

    Feedback can only be effective when students seek feedback and process it. This study examines the relations between students' motivational beliefs, effort invested in a computer-based formative assessment, and feedback behaviour. Feedback behaviour is represented by whether a student seeks feedback and the time a student spends studying the…

  7. Evaluating Computer-Based Assessment in a Risk-Based Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakrzewski, Stan; Steven, Christine; Ricketts, Chris

    2009-01-01

    There are three purposes for evaluation: evaluation for action to aid the decision making process, evaluation for understanding to further enhance enlightenment and evaluation for control to ensure compliance to standards. This article argues that the primary function of evaluation in the "Catherine Wheel" computer-based assessment (CBA) cyclic…

  8. Evaluation of Computer Based Foreign Language Learning Software by Teachers and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baz, Fatih Çagatay; Tekdal, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate Computer Based Foreign Language Learning software called Dynamic Education (DYNED) by teachers and students. The study is conducted with randomly chosen ten primary schools with the participants of 522 7th grade students and 7 English teachers. Three points Likert scale for teachers and five points Likert scale…

  9. Conducting Scientific Research on Learning and Health Behavior Change with Computer-Based Health Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Richard E.; Lieberman, Debra A.

    2011-01-01

    This article is a guide for researchers interested in assessing the effectiveness of serious computer-based games (or video games, digital games, or electronic games) intended to improve health and health care. It presents a definition of health games, a rationale for their use, an overview of the current state of research, and recommendations for…

  10. Effectiveness of Interactive Computer-Based Instruction: A Review of Studies Published between 1995 and 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Douglas A.; Rubin, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Computer-based instruction (CBI) has been growing rapidly as a training tool in organizational settings, but close attention to behavioral factors has often been neglected. CBI represents a promising instructional advancement over current training methods. This review article summarizes 12 years of comparative research in interactive…

  11. Emphasizing Planning for Essay Writing with a Computer-Based Graphic Organizer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evmenova, Anya S.; Regan, Kelley; Boykin, Andrea; Good, Kevin; Hughes, Melissa; MacVittie, Nichole; Sacco, Donna; Ahn, Soo Y.; Chirinos, David

    2016-01-01

    The authors conducted a multiple-baseline study to investigate the effects of a computer-based graphic organizer (CBGO) with embedded self-regulated learning strategies on the quantity and quality of persuasive essay writing by students with high-incidence disabilities. Ten seventh- and eighth-grade students with learning disabilities, emotional…

  12. Developments and Challenges in the Use of Computer-Based Testing for Assessing Second Language Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ockey, Gary J.

    2009-01-01

    Computer-based testing (CBT) to assess second language ability has undergone remarkable development since Garret (1991) described its purpose as "the computerized administration of conventional tests" in "The Modern Language Journal." For instance, CBT has made possible the delivery of more authentic tests than traditional paper-and-pencil tests.…

  13. The Comparative Effect of Individually-Constructed vs. Collaboratively-Constructed Computer-Based Concept Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, So Young; Cifuentes, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    The researchers investigated the comparative effects of individually-constructed and collaboratively-constructed computer-based concept mapping on middle school science concept learning. One hundred and sixty one students completed the entire study. Using prior science performance scores to assure equivalence of student achievement across groups,…

  14. The Use of Computer-Based Videogames in Knowledge Acquisition and Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricci, Katrina E.

    1994-01-01

    Research conducted at the Naval Training Systems Center in Orlando, Florida, investigated the acquisition and retention of basic knowledge with subject matter presented in the forms of text, test, and game. Results are discussed in terms of the effectiveness of computer-based games for military training. (Author/AEF)

  15. Computer Assisted Instructional Design for Computer-Based Instruction. Final Report. Working Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Daniel M.; Pirolli, Peter

    Recent advances in artificial intelligence and the cognitive sciences have made it possible to develop successful intelligent computer-aided instructional systems for technical and scientific training. In addition, computer-aided design (CAD) environments that support the rapid development of such computer-based instruction have also been recently…

  16. Supporting Student Learning: The Use of Computer-Based Formative Assessment Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peat, Mary; Franklin, Sue

    2002-01-01

    Describes the development of a variety of computer-based assessment opportunities, both formative and summative, that are available to a large first-year biology class at the University of Sydney (Australia). Discusses online access to weekly quizzes, a mock exam, and special self-assessment modules that are beneficial to student learning.…

  17. Attention Paid to Feedback Provided by a Computer-Based Assessment for Learning on Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmers, Caroline; Veldkamp, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Three studies are presented on attention paid to feedback provided by a computer-based assessment for learning on information literacy. Results show that the attention paid to feedback varies greatly. In general the attention focuses on feedback of incorrectly answered questions. In each study approximately fifty percent of the respondents paid…

  18. A Computer Based Training Program for the Development of Student Handouts and Other Training Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paquin, David C.

    A computer-based training program was used to teach technical instructors at the Long Island Lighting Company how to create student handouts of textbook quality with a computer, software, and laser printer. All five learners successfully completed the course objective, which was to produce a one-page handout that contained text and graphics,…

  19. The Triarchic Theory of Intelligence and Computer-based Inquiry Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Bruce C.; McGee, Steven; Shin, Namsoo; Shia, Regina

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the triarchic theory of intelligence focuses on a study of ninth graders that explored the relationships between student abilities and the cognitive and attitudinal outcomes that resulted from student immersion in a computer-based inquiry environment. Examines outcome variables related to content understanding, problem solving, and…

  20. Effect of Gender on Computer-Based Chemistry Problem Solving: Early Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, David D.; Helgeson, Stanley L.

    2000-01-01

    Studies the effect of gender on a computer-based approach to solving stoichiometric chemical equations. Implies that the feedback provided by the software might have had an effect on reducing the gender gap. However, upon closer examination, the results showed that the correctness means for males were higher than that for females, and the rate of…

  1. Instructional Design Issues in Computer-Based Reading: Reinforcement and Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Jay S.

    1987-01-01

    This review of cognitive development research in the area of computer-based reading instruction focuses on reinforcement and instructional objectives. Differences between extrinsic and intrinsic reinforcement and motivation are discussed, types of objectives and learner characteristics are described, and implications for instructional design are…

  2. A Computer-Based Program to Teach Braille Reading to Sighted Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheithauer, Mindy C.; Tiger, Jeffrey H.

    2012-01-01

    Instructors of the visually impaired need efficient braille-training methods. This study conducted a preliminary evaluation of a computer-based program intended to teach the relation between braille characters and English letters using a matching-to-sample format with 4 sighted college students. Each participant mastered matching visual depictions…

  3. Central Issues in the Use of Computer-Based Materials for High Volume Entrepreneurship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Billy

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses issues relating to the use of computer-based learning (CBL) materials for entrepreneurship education at university level. It considers CBL as a means of addressing the increased volume and range of provision required in the current context. The issues raised in this article have importance for all forms of computer-based…

  4. Effect of Computer-Based Video Games on Children: An Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuang, Tsung-Yen; Chen, Wei-Fan

    2009-01-01

    This experimental study investigated whether computer-based video games facilitate children's cognitive learning. In comparison to traditional computer-assisted instruction (CAI), this study explored the impact of the varied types of instructional delivery strategies on children's learning achievement. One major research null hypothesis was…

  5. Designing and Introducing Ethical Dilemmas into Computer-Based Business Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumann, Paul L.; Scott, Timothy W.; Anderson, Philip H.

    2006-01-01

    This article makes two contributions to the teaching of business ethics literature. First, it describes the steps involved in developing effective ethical dilemmas to incorporate into a computer-based business simulation. Second, it illustrates these steps by presenting two ethical dilemmas that an instructor can incorporate into any business…

  6. Computer-based Instruction of Basic Nursing Utilizing Inquiry Approach: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Computer-Based Education Research Lab.

    The project sought to adapt a maternity nursing course and a series of pharmacology lessons for use on a computer-based teaching system (PLATO, Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operation) and to study the relationships of process variables to student achievement in a self-directed learning situation. A combination of tutorial-inquiry…

  7. Computer-Based Script Training for Aphasia: Emerging Themes from Post-Treatment Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherney, Leora R.; Halper, Anita S.; Kaye, Rosalind C.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents results of post-treatment interviews following computer-based script training for persons with chronic aphasia. Each of the 23 participants received 9 weeks of AphasiaScripts training. Post-treatment interviews were conducted with the person with aphasia and/or a significant other person. The 23 interviews yielded 584 coded…

  8. Teaching Spelling through Prompting and Review Procedures Using Computer-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayfield, Kristin H.; Glenn, Irene M.; Vollmer, Timothy R.

    2008-01-01

    Computer-based instruction (CBI) was used to teach 3 sets of 20 spelling words to two 6th graders in a multiple baseline design. The CBI presented a voice recording of each spelling word and prompted the students to type the word. If they spelled the word incorrectly, a training procedure was initiated that included prompt fading and systematic…

  9. Enhancing Learning Outcomes in Computer-Based Training via Self-Generated Elaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuevas, Haydee M.; Fiore, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the utility of an instructional strategy known as the "query method" for enhancing learning outcomes in computer-based training. The query method involves an embedded guided, sentence generation task requiring elaboration of key concepts in the training material that encourages learners to "stop and…

  10. Computer-Based Storage and Retrieval of Geoscience Information: Bibliography 1970-72.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burk, C. F., Jr.

    The publication of papers describing activity in computer-based storage and retrieval and geoscience information has continued at a vigorous pace since release of the last bibliography, which covered the period 1946-69 (ED 076 203). A total of 211 references are identified, nearly all of which were published during the three-year period 1970-72…

  11. Some Useful Cost-Benefit Criteria for Evaluating Computer-Based Test Delivery Models and Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luecht, Richard M.

    2005-01-01

    Computer-based testing (CBT) is typically implemented using one of three general test delivery models: (1) multiple fixed testing (MFT); (2) computer-adaptive testing (CAT); or (3) multistage testing (MSTs). This article reviews some of the real cost drivers associated with CBT implementation--focusing on item production costs, the costs…

  12. Fostering Critical Reflection in a Computer-Based, Asynchronously Delivered Diversity Training Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Givhan, Shawn T.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation study chronicles the creation of a computer-based, asynchronously delivered diversity training course for a state agency. The course format enabled efficient delivery of a mandatory curriculum to the Massachusetts Department of State Police workforce. However, the asynchronous format posed a challenge to achieving the learning…

  13. Effects of Computer-Based Instruction on Teaching Emergency Telephone Numbers to Students with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yucesoy Ozkan, Serife; Oncul, Nuray; Kaya, Ozlem

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of computer-based instruction on teaching students with intellectual disability the skills of telling which emergency services to call in specific emergency situations and reciting the correct telephone number of that specific emergency service. In this study, a multiple probe design…

  14. A Methodology for Integrating Computer-Based Learning Tools in Science Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadouris, Nicos; Constantinou, Constantinos P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a methodology for effectively integrating computer-based learning tools in science teaching and learning. This methodology provides a means of systematic analysis to identify the capabilities of particular software tools and to formulate a series of competencies relevant to physical science that could be developed by means…

  15. Component Evaluation of a Computer Based Format for Teaching Discrete Trial and Backward Chaining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nosik, Melissa R.; Williams, W. Larry

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of a multi-component computer based training package that consisted of competency based instructions, video modeling, and two forms of feedback was evaluated in terms of treatment integrity of two procedures across four staff. Treatment integrity in completing critical steps of discrete-trial and backward chaining procedures were…

  16. Net Gain? The Integration of Computer-Based Learning in Six NSW Government Schools, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Debra; Schuck, Sandy; Segal, Gilda; Dwyer, Joanne; McEwen, Celina

    This study examined the impact on learning of the integration of computer-based technology (CBT). The study focused on six New South Wales (Australia) government schools that were at different stages of development of the integration of CBT. Data were gathered through classroom observations and structured interviews with key personnel, students,…

  17. Effects of Computer Based Learning on Students' Attitudes and Achievements towards Analytical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akcay, Hüsamettin; Durmaz, Asli; Tüysüz, Cengiz; Feyzioglu, Burak

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of computer-based learning and traditional method on students' attitudes and achievement towards analytical chemistry. Students from Chemistry Education Department at Dokuz Eylul University (D.E.U) were selected randomly and divided into three groups; two experimental (Eg-1 and Eg-2) and a control…

  18. Race and Emotion in Computer-Based HIV Prevention Videos for Emergency Department Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Ian David; Bania, Theodore C.

    2011-01-01

    Computer-based video provides a valuable tool for HIV prevention in hospital emergency departments. However, the type of video content and protocol that will be most effective remain underexplored and the subject of debate. This study employs a new and highly replicable methodology that enables comparisons of multiple video segments, each based on…

  19. An Evaluation of Teaching Introductory Geomorphology Using Computer-based Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentz, Elizabeth A.; Vender, Joann C.; Brewer, Cynthia A.

    1999-01-01

    Compares student reactions to traditional teaching methods and an approach where computer-based tools (GEODe CD-ROM and GIS-based exercises) were either integrated with or replaced the traditional methods. Reveals that the students found both of these tools valuable forms of instruction when used in combination with the traditional methods. (CMK)

  20. Evaluating Preclinical Medical Students by Using Computer-Based Problem-Solving Examinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Ronald H.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A study to determine the feasibility of creating and administering computer-based problem-solving examinations for evaluating second-year medical students in immunology and to determine how students would perform on these tests relative to their performances on concurrently administered objective and essay examinations is described. (Author/MLW)

  1. Computer-Based Learning: Interleaving Whole and Sectional Representation of Neuroanatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pani, John R.; Chariker, Julia H.; Naaz, Farah

    2013-01-01

    The large volume of material to be learned in biomedical disciplines requires optimizing the efficiency of instruction. In prior work with computer-based instruction of neuroanatomy, it was relatively efficient for learners to master whole anatomy and then transfer to learning sectional anatomy. It may, however, be more efficient to continuously…

  2. Making Student Thinking Visible through a Concept Map in Computer-Based Assessment of Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Yigal; Tager, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Major educational initiatives in the world place great emphasis on fostering rich computer-based environments of assessment that make student thinking and reasoning visible. Using thinking tools engages students in a variety of critical and complex thinking, such as evaluating, analyzing, and decision making. The aim of this study was to explore…

  3. The Relationships among Measures of Intrinsic Motivation, Instructional Design, and Learning in Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezabek, Randy

    The intent of this study was to explore the intrinsic aspects of motivation, and to see if the design of instruction could positively affect learners' levels of intrinsic motivation toward the subject matter. The following questions were addressed: (1) Will different computer-based instructional treatments which have been designed to reflect…

  4. Computer-Based Graphic Organizers for Students with LD: A Systematic Review of Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciullo, Stephen; Reutebuch, Colleen

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a systematic review of the literature for studies that utilized computer-based graphic organizers for students with learning disabilities. A comprehensive search yielded 12 studies that were coded and analyzed. The authors investigated the effectiveness of the treatments on academic outcomes, and selected integral…

  5. Dynamic Scaffolding of Socially Regulated Learning in a Computer-Based Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molenaar, Inge; Roda, Claudia; van Boxtel, Carla; Sleegers, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to test the effects of dynamically scaffolding social regulation of middle school students working in a computer-based learning environment. Dyads in the scaffolding condition (N=56) are supported with computer-generated scaffolds and students in the control condition (N=54) do not receive scaffolds. The scaffolds are…

  6. Rapid Prototyping of Computer-Based Presentations Using NEAT, Version 1.1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muldner, Tomasz

    NEAT (iNtegrated Environment for Authoring in ToolBook) provides templates and various facilities for the rapid prototyping of computer-based presentations, a capability that is lacking in current authoring systems. NEAT is a specialized authoring system that can be used by authors who have a limited knowledge of computer systems and no…

  7. A Comment on Early Student Blunders on Computer-Based Adaptive Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Bert F.

    2011-01-01

    This article refutes a recent claim that computer-based tests produce biased scores for very proficient test takers who make mistakes on one or two initial items and that the "bias" can be reduced by using a four-parameter IRT model. Because the same effect occurs with pattern scores on nonadaptive tests, the effect results from IRT scoring, not…

  8. Case Studies of Auditing in a Computer-Based Systems Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    In response to a growing need for effective and efficient means for auditing computer-based systems, a number of studies dealing primarily with batch-processing type computer operations have been conducted to explore the impact of computers on auditing activities in the Federal Government. This report first presents some statistical data on…

  9. A Multiple-Sessions Interactive Computer-Based Learning Tool for Ability Cultivation in Circuit Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Q.; Lai, L. L.; Tse, N. C. F.; Ichiyanagi, K.

    2011-01-01

    An interactive computer-based learning tool with multiple sessions is proposed in this paper, which teaches students to think and helps them recognize the merits and limitations of simulation tools so as to improve their practical abilities in electrical circuit simulation based on the case of a power converter with progressive problems. The…

  10. Learner Control of Computer-Based Instruction: A Comparison to Guided Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahey, George F.

    The effects of learner control in Computer Based Instruction (CBI) were compared to learner control with advice as to what content to see next, and to programmed control. Students in training at the Basic Electricity/Electronics School, Service Command, Naval Training Center, San Diego, served as subjects in this study. Materials used were four…

  11. From Concept Maps to Computer Based Learning: The Experience of NoteCards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAleese, Ray

    This paper begins with a description of the context and background of cognitive research into knowledge acquisition and representation for computer based training. The nature of concept maps is alluded to and examples are given of the ways that maps can facilitate knowledge elicitation. It is noted that: (1) the concept knowledge in this research…

  12. Improved Attribution Recall from Diversification of Environmental Context during Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yi-Wilson, Julie C.

    Spatial context can be expected to play an important role in computer-based instruction and distance education using PC terminals because these types of computer-mediated instruction often occur in a restricted environment such as one's home or office. These settings, while convenient, are often isolated and lack diverse spatial cues. Fundamental…

  13. Performance of a computer-based assessment of cognitive function measures in two cohorts of seniors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computer-administered assessment of cognitive function is being increasingly incorporated in clinical trials, however its performance in these settings has not been systematically evaluated. The Seniors Health and Activity Research Program (SHARP) pilot trial (N=73) developed a computer-based tool f...

  14. The Effectiveness of Computer-Based Hypermedia Teaching Modules for Radiology Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azevedo, Roger; And Others

    This paper explains the rationale for utilizing computer-based, hypermedia tutorials for radiology education and presents the results of a field test of this educational technique. It discusses the development of the hypermedia tutorials at Montreal General Hospital (Quebec, Canada) in 1991-92 and their use in the radiology residency program. The…

  15. The Use of Computer-Based Simulation to Aid Comprehension and Incidental Vocabulary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohsen, Mohammed Ali

    2016-01-01

    One of the main issues in language learning is to find ways to enable learners to interact with the language input in an involved task. Given that computer-based simulation allows learners to interact with visual modes, this article examines how the interaction of students with an online video simulation affects their second language video…

  16. Effects of Varying Interactive Strategies Provided by Computer-Based Tutorials for a Software Application Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiemann, Philip W.; Markle, Susan M.

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of interaction in computer-based tutorials (CBT) focuses on a study that compared the performance of adult learners from training with three CBTs that varied the level of interactivity. The degrees of learner control, system control, and domain control are discussed, and the Lotus spreadsheet tutorials used are described. (24…

  17. Supporting Representational Competence in High School Biology with Computer-Based Biomolecular Visualizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, Anna; Brinkerhoff, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of computer-based biomolecular visualization activities on the development of high school biology students' representational competence as a means of understanding and visualizing protein structure/function relationships. Also assessed were students' attitudes toward these activities. Sixty-nine students…

  18. Gifted Students' Individual Differences in Distance-Learning Computer-Based Calculus and Linear Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Eric W.; Suppes, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Examined student performance in distance computer-based calculus and linear algebra courses offered by Stanford University to pre-college students as part of their Education Program for Gifted youth (EPGY). Puts special emphasis on modeling student performance over time and on capturing long-term trend effects using stochastic and nonlinear…

  19. Using Response Time to Detect Item Preknowledge in Computer-Based Licensure Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qian, Hong; Staniewska, Dorota; Reckase, Mark; Woo, Ada

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of how to detect item preknowledge using item response time data in two computer-based large-scale licensure examinations. Item preknowledge is indicated by an unexpected short response time and a correct response. Two samples were used for detecting item preknowledge for each examination. The first sample was from…

  20. A Review of Models for Computer-Based Testing. Research Report 2011-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luecht, Richard M.; Sireci, Stephen G.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past four decades, there has been incremental growth in computer-based testing (CBT) as a viable alternative to paper-and-pencil testing. However, the transition to CBT is neither easy nor inexpensive. As Drasgow, Luecht, and Bennett (2006) noted, many design engineering, test development, operations/logistics, and psychometric changes…

  1. Investigating the Effect of Item Position in Computer-Based Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Feiming; Cohen, Allan; Shen, Linjun

    2012-01-01

    Computer-based tests (CBTs) often use random ordering of items in order to minimize item exposure and reduce the potential for answer copying. Little research has been done, however, to examine item position effects for these tests. In this study, different versions of a Rasch model and different response time models were examined and applied to…

  2. Computer-Based Education. The Best of ERIC, June 1976-August 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Keith A.

    This bibliography contains annotations of reports, reviews, conference proceedings, other documents, and journal articles on computer based education (CBE), most of which were derived from a search of the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) system. Covering June 1976 through August 1980, this compilation serves as an update to two…

  3. A Quantitative Study of Factors Affecting Learner Acceptance of a Computer-Based Training Support Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, G. Dale; Flannery, Daniele D.

    2004-01-01

    This study identifies and empirically tests factors that may influence learners' use of a computer-based training support system (TSS). The areas of research and theory were drawn from human-computer interaction, information and business management, and adult education. The factors suggested in the literature that may affect learner's use of a TSS…

  4. Learners' Perceptions and Illusions of Adaptivity in Computer-Based Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandewaetere, Mieke; Vandercruysse, Sylke; Clarebout, Geraldine

    2012-01-01

    Research on computer-based adaptive learning environments has shown exemplary growth. Although the mechanisms of effective adaptive instruction are unraveled systematically, little is known about the relative effect of learners' perceptions of adaptivity in adaptive learning environments. As previous research has demonstrated that the learners'…

  5. Computer-Based Instruction: A Background Paper on its Status, Cost/Effectiveness and Telecommunications Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Jai P.; Morgan, Robert P.

    In the slightly over twelve years since its inception, computer-based instruction (CBI) has shown the promise of being more cost-effective than traditional instruction for certain educational applications. Pilot experiments are underway to evaluate various CBI systems. Should these tests prove successful, a major problem confronting advocates of…

  6. An Adaptive Feedback and Review Paradigm for Computer-Based Drills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Martin A.; Misselt, A. Lynn

    The Corrective Feedback Paradigm (CFP), which has been refined and expanded through use on the PLATO IV Computer-Based Education System, is based on instructional design strategies implied by stimulus-locus analyses, direct instruction, and instructional feedback methods. Features of the paradigm include adaptive feedback techniques with…

  7. Cartwheels on the Keyboard: Computer-Based Literacy Instruction in an Elementary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Maureen

    2004-01-01

    This book helps readers imagine new instructional possibilities, try new classroom activities, and question their own teaching--learning process through the use of computers to support student literacy growth. Maureen Carroll shares her study of how one teacher and her elementary-grade students integrated computer-based literacy instruction into…

  8. Encountering the Expertise Reversal Effect with a Computer-Based Environment on Electrical Circuit Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisslein, Jana; Atkinson, Robert K.; Seeling, Patrick; Reisslein, Martin

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a computer-based environment employing three example-based instructional procedures (example-problem, problem-example, and fading) to teach series and parallel electrical circuit analysis to learners classified by two levels of prior knowledge (low and high). Although no differences between the…

  9. Exploring the Presentation and Format of Help in a Computer-Based Electrical Engineering Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisslein, Jana; Atkinson, Robert K.; Reisslein, Martin

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated whether it was more beneficial to provide the learners in computer-based learning environments access to on demand (self-regulated) help after they committed an error in problem solving or for the learning environment to externally regulate the presentation of instructional help. Furthermore, two different resentational…

  10. The Effects of Study Tasks in a Computer-Based Chemistry Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urhahne, Detlef; Nick, Sabine; Poepping, Anna Christin; Schulz , Sarah Jayne

    2013-01-01

    The present study examines the effects of different study tasks on the acquisition of knowledge about acids and bases in a computer-based learning environment. Three different task formats were selected to create three treatment conditions: learning with gap-fill and matching tasks, learning with multiple-choice tasks, and learning only from text…

  11. Assessing Medical Students' Self-Regulation as Aptitude in Computer-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Hyuksoon S.; Kalet, Adina L.; Plass, Jan L.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a Self-Regulation Measure for Computer-based learning (SRMC) tailored toward medical students, by modifying Zimmerman's Self-Regulated Learning Interview Schedule (SRLIS) for K-12 learners. The SRMC's reliability and validity were examined in 2 studies. In Study 1, 109 first-year medical students were asked to complete the SRMC.…

  12. The Use of a Computer-Based Writing Program: Facilitation or Frustration?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chi-Fen Emily; Cheng, Wei-Yuan

    2006-01-01

    The invention of computer-based writing program has revolutionized the way of teaching second language writing. Embedded with artificial intelligence scoring engine, it can provide students with both immediate score and diagnostic feedback on their essays. In addition, some of such programs offer convenient writing and editing tools to facilitate…

  13. Psychological Foundations of Instructional Design for Emerging Computer-Based Instructional Technologies: Parts I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannafin, Michael J.; Rieber, Lloyd P.

    1989-01-01

    These two articles discuss the contributions of behavioral and cognitive psychology to the design of computer-based instruction (CBI) and describe an integrated meta-model for use with instructional systems design (ISD) called ROPES + (Retrieving, Orienting, Presenting, Encoding, and Sequencing). Highlights include motivation, information…

  14. Effects of Feedback in a Computer-Based Assessment for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Kleij, Fabienne M.; Eggen, Theo J. H. M.; Timmers, Caroline F.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of written feedback in a computer-based assessment for learning on students' learning outcomes were investigated in an experiment at a Higher Education institute in the Netherlands. Students were randomly assigned to three groups, and were subjected to an assessment for learning with different kinds of feedback. These are immediate…

  15. Primary School Students' Anxiety and Attitudes toward Computer-Based Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seng, SeokHoon; Choo, Mooi Lee

    The introduction and implementation of computer-based learning (CBL) in primary schools in Singapore has created both benefits and problems. This study examined the attitudes and level of anxiety of 77 students toward CBL through two scales, the Computer Programming Anxiety Scale and the Liking for Computer-Related Activities Scale. Results showed…

  16. Comparing Several Human and Computer-Based Methods for Scoring Concept Maps and Essays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koul, Ravinder; Clariana, Roy B.; Salehi, Roya

    2005-01-01

    This article reports the results of an investigation of the convergent criterion-related validity of two computer-based tools for scoring concept maps and essays as part of the ongoing formative evaluation of these tools. In pairs, participants researched a science topic online and created a concept map of the topic. Later, participants…

  17. Computer-Based Microworlds: A Bridge between Constructivism and Direct Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieber, Lloyd P.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Space Shuttle Commander software package, which utilizes the dynaturtle microworld to teach elementary and middle school students about Newton's laws of motion. Design considerations for computer-based microworlds that represent a compromise between the philosophies of constructivism and direct instruction are presented. (91…

  18. How To Produce Computer-Based Learning Materials. Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellington, Henry

    A sequel to the booklet "How Computers Can Be Used in Education," this booklet begins by looking at ways in which computer-based learning (CBL) materials can be used in different types of instructional situations, i.e., mass instruction, individualized learning, and group learning. The design and production of four types of conventional CBL…

  19. Computer-Based versus High-Fidelity Mannequin Simulation in Developing Clinical Judgment in Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Beverly J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if students learn clinical judgment as effectively using computer-based simulations as when using high-fidelity mannequin simulations. There was a single research questions for this study: What is the difference in clinical judgment between participants completing high-fidelity human simulator mannequin…

  20. Specifying and Refining a Measurement Model for a Computer-Based Interactive Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Roy; Mislevy, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    The challenges of modeling students' performance in computer-based interactive assessments include accounting for multiple aspects of knowledge and skill that arise in different situations and the conditional dependencies among multiple aspects of performance. This article describes a Bayesian approach to modeling and estimating cognitive models…

  1. Learning to Teach with Worked-out Examples: A Computer-Based Learning Environment for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilbert, T. S.; Renkl, A.; Schworm, S.; Kessler, S.; Reiss, K.

    2008-01-01

    Learning from worked-out examples has been shown to be very effective in initial cognitive skill acquisition. In order to fully exploit the potential of example-based learning, teachers should, however, know how to effectively employ such examples in classroom instruction. Therefore, we have designed a computer-based learning environment in which…

  2. A Review of Research on Intercultural Learning through Computer-Based Digital Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çiftçi, Emrullah Yasin

    2016-01-01

    Intercultural communication is now a crucial part of our globalizing lives; however, not everyone has an opportunity to engage in an intercultural interaction with people from different cultures. Computer-based technologies are promising in creating environments for people to communicate with people from diverse cultures. This qualitative…

  3. Computer-Based Basic Skills Instruction in a CETA Funded Project: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Robert M.; Hedl, John J., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on a study that (1) examined the effectiveness of computer-based education in developing literacy and mathematics skills in young adults to enable them to secure unsubsidized employment and (2) compared motivation of CETA-funded students with those who sought training voluntarily. Discusses failures of CETA training projects and makes…

  4. Tool Use of Experienced Learners in Computer-Based Learning Environments: Can Tools Be Beneficial?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juarez Collazo, Norma A.; Corradi, David; Elen, Jan; Clarebout, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    Research has documented the use of tools in computer-based learning environments as problematic, that is, learners do not use the tools and when they do, they tend to do it suboptimally. This study attempts to disentangle cause and effect of this suboptimal tool use for experienced learners. More specifically, learner variables (metacognitive and…

  5. Intention and Usage of Computer Based Information Systems in Primary Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosizah; Kuntoro; Basuki N., Hari

    2016-01-01

    The computer-based information system (CBIS) is adopted by almost all of in health care setting, including the primary health center in East Java Province Indonesia. Some of softwares available were SIMPUS, SIMPUSTRONIK, SIKDA Generik, e-puskesmas. Unfortunately they were most of the primary health center did not successfully implemented. This…

  6. Factors Affecting Learning of Vector Math from Computer-Based Practice: Feedback Complexity and Prior Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckler, Andrew F.; Mikula, Brendon D.

    2016-01-01

    In experiments including over 450 university-level students, we studied the effectiveness and time efficiency of several levels of feedback complexity in simple, computer-based training utilizing static question sequences. The learning domain was simple vector math, an essential skill in introductory physics. In a unique full factorial design, we…

  7. Instruction of Statistics via Computer-Based Tools: Effects on Statistics' Anxiety, Attitude, and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciftci, S. Koza; Karadag, Engin; Akdal, Pinar

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of statistics instruction using computer-based tools, on statistics anxiety, attitude, and achievement. This study was designed as quasi-experimental research and the pattern used was a matched pre-test/post-test with control group design. Data was collected using three scales: a Statistics…

  8. A Computer-Based Spatial Learning Strategy Approach That Improves Reading Comprehension and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponce, Hector R.; Mayer, Richard E.; Lopez, Mario J.

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the effectiveness of a computer-based spatial learning strategy approach for improving reading comprehension and writing. In reading comprehension, students received scaffolded practice in translating passages into graphic organizers. In writing, students received scaffolded practice in planning to write by filling in graphic…

  9. Instructor Based Training Versus Computer Based Training--A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malmskold, Lennart; Ortengren, Roland; Carlson, Blair E.; Nylen, Per

    2007-01-01

    This article describes two studies conducted to compare assembly performance and learning rate between computer based training and traditional training of skilled assembly operators. The studies were performed with pre-series production parts from a car cockpit and they were integrated as part of the overall training activities during a new…

  10. An Effective Computer-Based Requesting System for Persons with Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Acker, Richard; Grant, Sharon H.

    1995-01-01

    This study explored the use of a computer-based requesting system, employing animated graphics and touch-sensitive screen input, with three girls with Rett syndrome (characterized by severe motor disorder, impaired cognitive function, and language disorder). All three girls displayed increased item requesting when provided computer-based…

  11. A Computer-Based Tutorial System To Develop Listening Skills Using CD-ROM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Ernest; Heeler, Phillip

    Perceptive listening is obviously crucial to the musical experience. Developing perceptive listening in students of widely varying levels of aptitude and achievement is a great challenge for any music teacher. Efforts must be individualized to be effective, and computer-based instruction provides the necessary tools for individualization. The…

  12. A Comparison of Two Procedures for Remediating Errors during Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrell, Dudley J.

    1990-01-01

    Describes study of Army aviation students who were enrolled in training program that was designed to compare the effects of two strategies of error remediation during computer-based instruction (CBI). Treatments for the two experimental groups and a control group that had no CBI are described, and results of pretests and posttests are discussed.…

  13. Practice Makes Perfect: Using a Computer-Based Business Simulation in Entrepreneurship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armer, Gina R. M.

    2011-01-01

    This article explains the use of a specific computer-based simulation program as a successful experiential learning model and as a way to increase student motivation while augmenting conventional methods of business instruction. This model is based on established adult learning principles.

  14. Examining the Effects of Computer-Based Scaffolds on Novice Teachers' Reflective Journal Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Guolin; Calandra, Brendan

    2010-01-01

    This study employed an explanatory mixed methods design to examine the effects of two computer-based scaffolds on novice teachers' reflective journal writing. The context for the study was an attempt to refine the reflective writing component of a large scale electronic portfolio system. Quantitative results indicated that the computer-based…

  15. A Study of Perceptional Typologies on Computer Based Assessment (CBA): Instructor and Student Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jin-Young

    2015-01-01

    This study explores and describes different viewpoints on Computer Based Assessment (CBA) by using Q methodology to identify perspectives of students and instructors and classify these into perceptional typologies. Thirty undergraduate students taking CBA courses and fifteen instructors adopting CBA into their curriculum at a university in Korea,…

  16. Development of a Computer-Based Measure of Listening Comprehension of Science Talk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Sheau-Wen; Liu, Yu; Chen, Shin-Feng; Wang, Jing-Ru; Kao, Huey-Lien

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computer-based assessment for elementary school students' listening comprehension of science talk within an inquiry-oriented environment. The development procedure had 3 steps: a literature review to define the framework of the test, collecting and identifying key constructs of science talk, and…

  17. Acquisition and Generalization of Chained Tasks Taught with Computer Based Video Instruction to Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayres, Kevin M.; Maguire, Amy; McClimon, Desiree

    2009-01-01

    Three elementary aged students with autism participated in an evaluation of computer based video instruction that targeted functional life skills. The effects of the software were analyzed in the context of a multiple probe design across and replicated across participants. This study represents a departure from more traditional video based…

  18. Ethical Perspectives and Practice Behaviors Involving Computer-Based Test Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMinn, Mark R.; Ellens, Brent M.; Soref, Erez

    1999-01-01

    Surveyed 364 members of the Society for Personality Assessment to determine how they use computer-based test interpretation software (CBTI) in their work, and their perspectives on the ethics of using CBTI. Psychologists commonly use CBTI for test scoring, but not to formulate a case or as an alternative to a written report. (SLD)

  19. An Evaluation of the Webquest as a Computer-Based Learning Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassanien, Ahmed

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the preparation and use of an internet activity for undergraduate learners in higher education (HE). It evaluates the effectiveness of using webquest as a computer-based learning (CBL) tool to support students to learn in HE. The evaluation undertaken offers insights into learner perceptions concerning the ease of use of the…

  20. Acquisition and Transfer of Sentence Construction in Autistic Students: Analysis by Computer-Based Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamamoto, Jun-ichi; Miya, Tomoko

    1999-01-01

    A study examined the conditions necessary to construct appropriate sentences and sequential responding in three Japanese students with autism using a computer-based training and testing procedure. Construction of the correct sentence for 24 untrained stimuli emerged after only three sentences were trained in a matrix training procedure.…

  1. Strategies, Challenges and Prospects for Active Learning in the Computer-Based Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbert, K. E.; Karady, G. G.

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of computer-equipped classrooms into engineering education has brought with it a host of opportunities and issues. Herein, some of the challenges and successes for creating an environment for active learning within computer-based classrooms are described. The particular teaching approach developed for undergraduate electrical…

  2. Development of Decision-Making Skills and Environmental Concern through Computer-Based, Scaffolded Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolaou, Christiana Th.; Korfiatis, Konstantinos; Evagorou, Maria; Constantinou, Constantinos

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the development of decision-making skills and environmental concern by 11- and 12-year-old students through computer-based, scaffolded learning activities. The enacted activities provided necessary scientific information and allowed for the consideration of multiple aspects of the problem, the study of the effects of every…

  3. The Influence of Computer-Based Text Editors on the Revision Strategies of Inexperienced Writers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Richard M.

    A study sought to determine the effect of computer-based text editing on the revision strategies of inexperienced writers. Four subjects, none of whom had experience with computers or word processors, were selected from an introductory college composition course and required to master the basic terminal functions that would be necessary for…

  4. Cognitive Abilities that Predict Success in a Computer-Based Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ownby, Raymond L.; Czaja, Sara J.; Loewenstein, David; Rubert, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were (a) to identify cognitive abilities and other factors related to successful completion of training for computer-based tasks that simulated real jobs and (b) to create a brief assessment battery useful in assessing older adults for these kinds of jobs. Design and Methods: Participants from three age groups…

  5. Computer-Based Testing in the Medical Curriculum: A Decade of Experiences at One School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNulty, John; Chandrasekhar, Arcot; Hoyt, Amy; Gruener, Gregory; Espiritu, Baltazar; Price, Ron, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes more than a decade of experiences with implementing computer-based testing across a 4-year medical curriculum. Practical considerations are given to the fields incorporated within an item database and their use in the creation and analysis of examinations, security issues in the delivery and integrity of examinations,…

  6. Investigating Uniform and Non-Uniform Gender DIF in Computer-Based ESL Writing Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breland, Hunter; Lee, Yong-Won

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to examine the comparability of writing prompts for different gender groups in the context of the computer-based Test of English as a Foreign Language[TM] (TOEFL[R]-CBT). A total of 87 prompts administered from July 1998 through March 2000 were analyzed. An extended version of logistic regression for…

  7. Computer-Based Instruction and the Web for Delivering Injury Prevention Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Bonnie L.; Harrington, Susan S.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of 10 injury prevention computer-based training modules tested by 120 participants from 65 facilities that provide care or support to elderly people needing long-term care. The training was delivered either on CD-ROM or at a Web site. A repeated measures analysis was performed with module scores on a pretest and…

  8. Classroom versus Computer-Based CPR Training: A Comparison of the Effectiveness of Two Instructional Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehberg, Robb S.; Gazzillo Diaz, Linda; Middlemas, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether computer-based CPR training is comparable to traditional classroom training. Design and Setting: This study was quantitative in design. Data was gathered from a standardized examination and skill performance evaluation which yielded numerical scores. Subjects: The subjects were 64…

  9. The Criterion-Related Validity of a Computer-Based Approach for Scoring Concept Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.; Koul, Ravinder; Salehi, Roya

    2006-01-01

    This investigation seeks to confirm a computer-based approach that can be used to score concept maps (Poindexter & Clariana, 2004) and then describes the concurrent criterion-related validity of these scores. Participants enrolled in two graduate courses (n=24) were asked to read about and research online the structure and function of the heart…

  10. Learning with Artificial Worlds: Computer-Based Modelling in the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellar, Harvey, Ed.; And Others

    With the advent of the British National Curriculum, computer-based modeling has become an integral part of the school curriculum. This book is about modeling in education and providing children with computer tools to create and explore representations of the world. Members of the London Mental Models Group contributed their research: (1)…

  11. The impact of computer-based versus "traditional" textbook science instruction on selected student learning outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, Alan H.

    This study reports the results of research designed to examine the impact of computer-based science instruction on elementary school level students' science content achievement, their attitude about science learning, their level of critical thinking-inquiry skills, and their level of cognitive and English language development. The study compared these learning outcomes resulting from a computer-based approach compared to the learning outcomes from a traditional, textbook-based approach to science instruction. The computer-based approach was inherent in a curriculum titled The Voyage of the Mimi , published by The Bank Street College Project in Science and Mathematics (1984). The study sample included 209 fifth-grade students enrolled in three schools in a suburban school district. This sample was divided into three groups, each receiving one of the following instructional treatments: (a) Mixed-instruction primarily based on the use of a hardcopy textbook in conjunction with computer-based instructional materials as one component of the science course; (b) Non-Traditional, Technology-Based -instruction fully utilizing computer-based material; and (c) Traditional, Textbook-Based-instruction utilizing only the textbook as the basis for instruction. Pre-test, or pre-treatment, data related to each of the student learning outcomes was collected at the beginning of the school year and post-test data was collected at the end of the school year. Statistical analyses of pre-test data were used as a covariate to account for possible pre-existing differences with regard to the variables examined among the three student groups. This study concluded that non-traditional, computer-based instruction in science significantly improved students' attitudes toward science learning and their level of English language development. Non-significant, positive trends were found for the following student learning outcomes: overall science achievement and development of critical thinking

  12. A randomized controlled trial of the computer-based cognitive rehabilitation program for children (CoTras-C) to examine cognitive function and visual perception in children with developmental disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Hyuck; Park, Ji-Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effects of a computer-based cognitive rehabilitation program for children with developmental disabilities. [Subjects] Subjects included 29 children with developmental disabilities. [Methods] The subjects were randomly allocated to either the experimental group or control group. Experimental group subjects received computer-based cognitive rehabilitation using the CoTras-C while control group subjects received conventional cognitive rehabilitation. All subjects received 20 sessions (2 days a week for 10 weeks) of the experimental or control intervention for 30 minutes. To compare the two groups, the Korean-Developmental Test of Visual Perception-2 and Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children were performed before and after the intervention. [Results] Both groups showed statistically significant improvement in their scores after intervention. Additionally, there were significant differences in the scores between the two groups. [Conclusion] The computer-based cognitive rehabilitation with CoTras-C may be helpful in improving the recovery of cognitive function and visual perception in children with developmental disabilities. PMID:26834318

  13. Validity of diagnostic computer-based air and forehead bone conduction audiometry.

    PubMed

    Swanepoel, De Wet; Biagio, Leigh

    2011-04-01

    Computer-based audiometry allows for novel applications, including remote testing and automation, that may improve the accessibility and efficiency of hearing assessment in various clinical and occupational health settings. This study describes the validity of computer-based, diagnostic air and forehead bone conduction audiometry when compared wtih conventional industry standard audiometry in a sound booth environment. A sample of 30 subjects (19 to 77 years of age) was assessed with computer-based (KUDUwave 5000) and industry standard conventional audiometers (GSI 61) to compare air and bone conduction thresholds and test-retest reliability. Air conduction thresholds for the two audiometers corresponded within 5 dB or less in more than 90% of instances, with an average absolute difference of 3.5 dB (3.8 SD) and a 95% confidence interval of 2.6 to 4.5 dB. Bone conduction thresholds for the two audiometers corresponded within 10 dB or less in 92% of instances, with an average absolute difference of 4.9 dB (4.9 SD) and a 95% confidence interval of 3.6 to 6.1 dB. The average absolute test-retest threshold difference for bone conduction on the industry standard audiometer was 5.1 dB (5.3 SD) and for the computer-based audiometer 7.1 dB (6.4 SD). Computer-based audiometry provided air and bone conduction thresholds within the test-retest reliability limits of industry standard audiometry.

  14. Plus Disease in Retinopathy of Prematurity: Pilot Study of Computer-Based and Expert Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Rony; Jiang, Lei; Du, Yunling E.; Martinez-Perez, M. Elena; Flynn, John T.; Chiang, Michael F.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To measure accuracy of plus disease diagnosis by recognized experts in retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), and to conduct a pilot study examining performance of a computer-based image analysis system, Retinal Image multiScale Analysis (RISA). Methods Twenty-two ROP experts independently interpreted a set of 34 wide-angle retinal images for presence of plus disease. A reference standard diagnosis based on expert consensus was defined for each image. Images were analyzed by the computer-based system using individual and linear combinations of system parameters for arterioles and venules: integrated curvature (IC), diameter, and tortuosity index (TI). Sensitivity, specificity, and receiver operating characteristic areas under the curve (AUC) for plus disease diagnosis compared to the reference standard were determined for each expert, as well as for the computer-based system. Results Expert sensitivity ranged from 0.308–1.000, specificity ranged from 0.571–1.000, and AUC ranged from 0.784–1.000. Among individual computer system parameters, venular IC had highest AUC (0.853). Among all computer system parameters, the linear combination of arteriolar IC, arteriolar TI, venular IC, venular diameter, and venular TI had highest AUC (0.967), which was greater than that of 18 (81.8%) of 22 experts. Conclusions Accuracy of ROP experts for plus disease diagnosis is imperfect. A computer-based image analysis system has potential to diagnose plus disease with high accuracy. Further research involving RISA system parameter cut-off values from this study are required to fully validate performance of this computer-based system compared to that of human experts. PMID:18029210

  15. Percutaneous Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement: Patient-specific Three-dimensional Computer-based Heart Model and Prototyping.

    PubMed

    Vaquerizo, Beatriz; Theriault-Lauzier, Pascal; Piazza, Nicolo

    2015-12-01

    Mitral regurgitation is the most prevalent valvular heart disease worldwide. Despite the widespread availability of curative surgical intervention, a considerable proportion of patients with severe mitral regurgitation are not referred for treatment, largely due to the presence of left ventricular dysfunction, advanced age, and comorbid illnesses. Transcatheter mitral valve replacement is a promising therapeutic alternative to traditional surgical valve replacement. The complex anatomical and pathophysiological nature of the mitral valvular complex, however, presents significant challenges to the successful design and implementation of novel transcatheter mitral replacement devices. Patient-specific 3-dimensional computer-based models enable accurate assessment of the mitral valve anatomy and preprocedural simulations for transcatheter therapies. Such information may help refine the design features of novel transcatheter mitral devices and enhance procedural planning. Herein, we describe a novel medical image-based processing tool that facilitates accurate, noninvasive assessment of the mitral valvular complex, by creating precise three-dimensional heart models. The 3-dimensional computer reconstructions are then converted to a physical model using 3-dimensional printing technology, thereby enabling patient-specific assessment of the interaction between device and patient. It may provide new opportunities for a better understanding of the mitral anatomy-pathophysiology-device interaction, which is of critical importance for the advancement of transcatheter mitral valve replacement.

  16. Designing Serious Game Interventions for Individuals with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whyte, Elisabeth M.; Smyth, Joshua M.; Scherf, K. Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    The design of "Serious games" that use game components (e.g., storyline, long-term goals, rewards) to create engaging learning experiences has increased in recent years. We examine of the core principles of serious game design and examine the current use of these principles in computer-based interventions for individuals with autism.…

  17. Remediation of sentence processing deficits in aphasia using a computer-based microworld.

    PubMed

    Crerar, M A; Ellis, A W; Dean, E C

    1996-01-01

    Byng (1988) has argued that some aphasic patients who show problems in sentence comprehension are unable to "map" a syntactic analysis of the sentence form onto the thematic roles specified by the verb or preposition in the sentence. In Byng's study, therapy aimed at improving the mapping process as applied to sentences containing locative prepositions led to improvements not only in the comprehension of such sentences but also in the comprehension of reversible verb sentences. In the present study, 14 aphasic patients were selected for having problems with sentence-picture matching involving reversible verb and preposition sentences. These problems were shown to be stable across three pre-intervention assessments. All assessments were computer-based and involved the matching of written sentences to pictures. A small vocabulary was used in assessment and therapy which involved a "microworld" of three characters (ball, box, and star) which could engage in a limited number of actions and could occupy a limited set of spatial relationships. Before therapy began, all the patients were given an assessment battery which included a 40-item Verb Test and a 40-item Preposition Test. The patients were then divided into two groups, A and B. Group A received two 1-hr sessions of therapy per week for 3 weeks aimed at improving the comprehension of verb sentences, then a second full assessment, followed by the same amount of therapy aimed at improving the comprehension of preposition sentences, and finally a third assessment. Group B received the preposition therapy first, followed by the verb therapy. The therapy involved the patient and therapist interacting with the computer, either assembling pictures to match written sentences ("picture-building mode") or assembling sentences to match pictures ("sentence-building mode"). Group A showed a classical "cross-over" treatment outcome. Performance on treated verb sentences improved during verb therapy and was retained when therapy

  18. Measurement Scale Influences in the Evaluation of Sight-Word Reading Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaw, Jared; Skinner, Christopher H.; Delisle, Jean; Skinner, Amy L.; Maurer, Kristin; Cihak, David; Wilhoit, Brian; Booher, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Working with elementary students with disabilities, we used alternating treatment designs to evaluate and compare the effects of 2 computer-based flash card sight-word reading interventions, 1 with 1-s response intervals and another with 5-s response intervals. In Study 1, we held instructional time constant, applying both interventions for 3?min.…

  19. Ureteral Interventions.

    PubMed

    Herr, Allen; Malhotra, Anuj; White, Mark; Siskin, Gary

    2016-09-01

    Interventional radiologists are commonly called upon to manage patients with benign and malignant ureteral pathologic conditions. Unfortunately, treatments for both cure and palliation can be fraught with problems causing patients to be undesirably maintained with lifelong catheters. This review describes outcomes for antegrade and retrograde therapeutic options and techniques for patients with most types of ureteral pathologic conditions that the interventional radiologist would encounter in practice. PMID:27641452

  20. Overview of Risk Mitigation for Safety-Critical Computer-Based Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2015-01-01

    This report presents a high-level overview of a general strategy to mitigate the risks from threats to safety-critical computer-based systems. In this context, a safety threat is a process or phenomenon that can cause operational safety hazards in the form of computational system failures. This report is intended to provide insight into the safety-risk mitigation problem and the characteristics of potential solutions. The limitations of the general risk mitigation strategy are discussed and some options to overcome these limitations are provided. This work is part of an ongoing effort to enable well-founded assurance of safety-related properties of complex safety-critical computer-based aircraft systems by developing an effective capability to model and reason about the safety implications of system requirements and design.

  1. Features of Computer-Based Decision Aids: Systematic Review, Thematic Synthesis, and Meta-Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Krömker, Dörthe; Meguerditchian, Ari N; Tamblyn, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient information and education, such as decision aids, are gradually moving toward online, computer-based environments. Considerable research has been conducted to guide content and presentation of decision aids. However, given the relatively new shift to computer-based support, little attention has been given to how multimedia and interactivity can improve upon paper-based decision aids. Objective The first objective of this review was to summarize published literature into a proposed classification of features that have been integrated into computer-based decision aids. Building on this classification, the second objective was to assess whether integration of specific features was associated with higher-quality decision making. Methods Relevant studies were located by searching MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and CENTRAL databases. The review identified studies that evaluated computer-based decision aids for adults faced with preference-sensitive medical decisions and reported quality of decision-making outcomes. A thematic synthesis was conducted to develop the classification of features. Subsequently, meta-analyses were conducted based on standardized mean differences (SMD) from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that reported knowledge or decisional conflict. Further subgroup analyses compared pooled SMDs for decision aids that incorporated a specific feature to other computer-based decision aids that did not incorporate the feature, to assess whether specific features improved quality of decision making. Results Of 3541 unique publications, 58 studies met the target criteria and were included in the thematic synthesis. The synthesis identified six features: content control, tailoring, patient narratives, explicit values clarification, feedback, and social support. A subset of 26 RCTs from the thematic synthesis was used to conduct the meta-analyses. As expected, computer-based decision aids performed better than usual care or alternative aids; however

  2. Study of ephemeris accuracy of the minor planets. [using computer based data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, D. R.; Cunningham, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    The current state of minor planet ephemerides was assessed, and the means for providing and updating these emphemerides for use by both the mission planner and the astronomer were developed. A system of obtaining data for all the numbered minor planets was planned, and computer programs for its initial mechanization were developed. The computer based system furnishes the osculating elements for all of the numbered minor planets at an adopted date of October 10, 1972, and at every 400 day interval over the years of interest. It also furnishes the perturbations in the rectangular coordinates relative to the osculating elements at every 4 day interval. Another computer program was designed and developed to integrate the perturbed motion of a group of 50 minor planets simultaneously. Sampled data resulting from the operation of the computer based systems are presented.

  3. The Comparison of Accuracy Scores on the Paper and Pencil Testing vs. Computer-Based Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Retnawati, Heri

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the accuracy of the test scores as results of Test of English Proficiency (TOEP) based on paper and pencil test (PPT) versus computer-based test (CBT). Using the participants' responses to the PPT documented from 2008-2010 and data of CBT TOEP documented in 2013-2014 on the sets of 1A, 2A, and 3A for the Listening and…

  4. Improving the learning of clinical reasoning through computer-based cognitive representation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bian; Wang, Minhong; Johnson, Janice M.; Grotzer, Tina A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Clinical reasoning is usually taught using a problem-solving approach, which is widely adopted in medical education. However, learning through problem solving is difficult as a result of the contextualization and dynamic aspects of actual problems. Moreover, knowledge acquired from problem-solving practice tends to be inert and fragmented. This study proposed a computer-based cognitive representation approach that externalizes and facilitates the complex processes in learning clinical reasoning. The approach is operationalized in a computer-based cognitive representation tool that involves argument mapping to externalize the problem-solving process and concept mapping to reveal the knowledge constructed from the problems. Methods Twenty-nine Year 3 or higher students from a medical school in east China participated in the study. Participants used the proposed approach implemented in an e-learning system to complete four learning cases in 4 weeks on an individual basis. For each case, students interacted with the problem to capture critical data, generate and justify hypotheses, make a diagnosis, recall relevant knowledge, and update their conceptual understanding of the problem domain. Meanwhile, students used the computer-based cognitive representation tool to articulate and represent the key elements and their interactions in the learning process. Results A significant improvement was found in students’ learning products from the beginning to the end of the study, consistent with students’ report of close-to-moderate progress in developing problem-solving and knowledge-construction abilities. No significant differences were found between the pretest and posttest scores with the 4-week period. The cognitive representation approach was found to provide more formative assessment. Conclusions The computer-based cognitive representation approach improved the learning of clinical reasoning in both problem solving and knowledge construction. PMID:25518871

  5. The Vicious Worm: a computer-based Taenia solium education tool.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Maria Vang; Trevisan, Chiara; Braae, Uffe Christian; Magnussen, Pascal; Ertel, Rebekka Lund; Mejer, Helena; Saarnak, Christopher F L

    2014-08-01

    Ignorance is a major obstacle for the effective control of diseases. To provide evidence-based knowledge about prevention and control of Taenia solium cysticercosis, we have developed a computer-based education tool: 'The Vicious Worm'. The tool targets policy makers, professionals, and laypeople, and comprises educational materials including illustrated short stories, videos, and scientific texts designed for the different target groups. We suggest that evidence-based health education is included as a specific control measure in any control programme.

  6. Computer-based learning for ESRD patient education: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Chambers, J K; Frisby, A J

    1995-07-01

    Computer use in everyday life has expanded human potential in virtually every possible arena. In health care, computer technology affects direct clinical care through diagnostics, treatment, monitoring, and documentation processes. Patient care systems use computer technology to manage billing, scheduling, and multiple other administrative functions. Computer technology for education of health care professionals has been primarily in selected undergraduate, graduate, and professional degree programs. Computer-based continuing education for health care professionals has been available for at least a decade, but computer-based patient education is just now beginning to emerge as a learning option. This article describes examples of patient education programs using different types of hardware and software and explores potential areas for further development of this area for end-stage renal disease patients and families. Computer technology is not a replacement for professional involvement in patient education, but rather offers a new arena of media to enhance and expand current teaching and learning resources. Computer-based learning is characterized by features representative of many highly regarded principles of adult education. Further, instructional design concepts used for program development are fundamentally sound for patient education.

  7. Definitions of database files and fields of the Personal Computer-Based Water Data Sources Directory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, J. Wayne

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the data-base files and fields of the personal computer-based Water Data Sources Directory (WDSD). The personal computer-based WDSD was derived from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) mainframe computer version. The mainframe version of the WDSD is a hierarchical data-base design. The personal computer-based WDSD is a relational data- base design. This report describes the data-base files and fields of the relational data-base design in dBASE IV (the use of brand names in this abstract is for identification purposes only and does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Geological Survey) for the personal computer. The WDSD contains information on (1) the type of organization, (2) the major orientation of water-data activities conducted by each organization, (3) the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of offices within each organization from which water data may be obtained, (4) the types of data held by each organization and the geographic locations within which these data have been collected, (5) alternative sources of an organization's data, (6) the designation of liaison personnel in matters related to water-data acquisition and indexing, (7) the volume of water data indexed for the organization, and (8) information about other types of data and services available from the organization that are pertinent to water-resources activities.

  8. Development and Evaluation of the Diagnostic Power for a Computer-Based Two-Tier Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jing-Wen

    2016-06-01

    This study adopted a quasi-experimental design with follow-up interview to develop a computer-based two-tier assessment (CBA) regarding the science topic of electric circuits and to evaluate the diagnostic power of the assessment. Three assessment formats (i.e., paper-and-pencil, static computer-based, and dynamic computer-based tests) using two-tier items were conducted on Grade 4 ( n = 90) and Grade 5 ( n = 86) students, respectively. One-way ANCOVA was conducted to investigate whether the different assessment formats affected these students' posttest scores on both the phenomenon and reason tiers, and confidence rating for an answer was assessed to diagnose the nature of students' responses (i.e., scientific answer, guessing, alternative conceptions, or knowledge deficiency). Follow-up interview was adopted to explore whether and how the various CBA representations influenced both graders' responses. Results showed that the CBA, in particular the dynamic representation format, allowed students who lacked prior knowledge (Grade 4) to easily understand the question stems. The various CBA representations also potentially encouraged students who already had learning experience (Grade 5) to enhance the metacognitive judgment of their responses. Therefore, CBA could reduce students' use of test-taking strategies and provide better diagnostic power for a two-tier instrument than the traditional paper-based version.

  9. Traditional and computer-based screening and diagnosis of reading disabilities in Greek.

    PubMed

    Protopapas, Athanassios; Skaloumbakas, Christos

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we examined the characteristics of reading disability (RD) in the seventh grade of the Greek educational system and the corresponding diagnostic practice. We presented a clinically administered assessment battery, composed of typically employed tasks, and a fully automated, computer-based assessment battery that evaluates some of the same constructs. In all, 261 children ages 12 to 14 were tested. The results of the traditional assessment indicated that RD concerns primarily slow reading and secondarily poor reading and spelling accuracy. This pattern was matched in the domains most attended to in expert student evaluation. Automatic (computer-based) screening for RD in the target age range matched expert judgment in validity and reliability in the absence of a full clinical evaluation. It is proposed that the educational needs of the middle and high school population in Greece will be best served by concentrating on reading and spelling performance--particularly fluency--employing widespread computer-based screening to partially make up for expert-personnel shortage. PMID:17274545

  10. Item difficulty in the evaluation of computer-based instruction: an example from neuroanatomy.

    PubMed

    Chariker, Julia H; Naaz, Farah; Pani, John R

    2012-01-01

    This article reports large item effects in a study of computer-based learning of neuroanatomy. Outcome measures of the efficiency of learning, transfer of learning, and generalization of knowledge diverged by a wide margin across test items, with certain sets of items emerging as particularly difficult to master. In addition, the outcomes of comparisons between instructional methods changed with the difficulty of the items to be learned. More challenging items better differentiated between instructional methods. This set of results is important for two reasons. First, it suggests that instruction may be more efficient if sets of consistently difficult items are the targets of instructional methods particularly suited to them. Second, there is wide variation in the published literature regarding the outcomes of empirical evaluations of computer-based instruction. As a consequence, many questions arise as to the factors that may affect such evaluations. The present article demonstrates that the level of challenge in the material that is presented to learners is an important factor to consider in the evaluation of a computer-based instructional system.

  11. The development of regulatory expectations for computer-based safety systems for the UK nuclear programme

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, P. J.; Westwood, R.N; Mark, R. T.; Tapping, K.

    2006-07-01

    The Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) of the UK's Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has completed a review of their Safety Assessment Principles (SAPs) for Nuclear Installations recently. During the period of the SAPs review in 2004-2005 the designers of future UK naval reactor plant were optioneering the control and protection systems that might be implemented. Because there was insufficient regulatory guidance available in the naval sector to support this activity the Defence Nuclear Safety Regulator (DNSR) invited the NII to collaborate with the production of a guidance document that provides clarity of regulatory expectations for the production of safety cases for computer based safety systems. A key part of producing regulatory expectations was identifying the relevant extant standards and sector guidance that reflect good practice. The three principal sources of such good practice were: IAEA Safety Guide NS-G-1.1 (Software for Computer Based Systems Important to Safety in Nuclear Power Plants), European Commission consensus document (Common Position of European Nuclear Regulators for the Licensing of Safety Critical Software for Nuclear Reactors) and IEC nuclear sector standards such as IEC60880. A common understanding has been achieved between the NII and DNSR and regulatory guidance developed which will be used by both NII and DNSR in the assessment of computer-based safety systems and in the further development of more detailed joint technical assessment guidance for both regulatory organisations. (authors)

  12. A Computer-Based Approach for Deriving and Measuring Individual and Team Knowledge Structure from Essay Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.; Wallace, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    This proof-of-concept investigation describes a computer-based approach for deriving the knowledge structure of individuals and of groups from their written essays, and considers the convergent criterion-related validity of the computer-based scores relative to human rater essay scores and multiple-choice test scores. After completing a…

  13. Helping Students Soar to Success on Computers: An Investigation of the Soar Study Method for Computer-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jairam, Dharmananda; Kiewra, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    This study used self-report and observation techniques to investigate how students study computer-based materials. In addition, it examined if a study method called SOAR can facilitate computer-based learning. SOAR is an acronym that stands for the method's 4 theoretically driven and empirically supported components: select (S), organize (O),…

  14. The Performance of Native Speakers of English and ESL Speakers on the Computer-based TOEFL and GRE General Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stricker, L. J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate previous research on the construct validity of the paper-based version of the TOEFL and extend it to the computer-based TOEFL. Two samples of Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test-takers were used: native speakers of English specially recruited to take the computer-based TOEFL, and ESL…

  15. Application of Cognitive Theory to the Design, Development, and Implementation of a Computer-Based Troubleshooting Tutor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Scott D.; And Others

    A study found that the troubleshooting abilities of a treatment group of college students trained conventionally in a course called Aircraft Systems II and on a computer-based "Technical Troubleshooting Tutor" were better in some ways than those of a control group who trained conventionally without using the computer-based tutor. Aviation students…

  16. Computer-Based Learning in Open and Distance Learning Institutions in Nigeria: Cautions on Use of Internet for Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okopi, Fidel Onjefu; Odeyemi, Olajumoke Janet; Adesina, Adewale

    2015-01-01

    The study has identified the areas of strengths and weaknesses in the current use of Computer Based Learning (CBL) tools in Open and Distance Learning (ODL) institutions in Nigeria. To achieve these objectives, the following research questions were proposed: (i) What are the computer-based learning tools (soft and hard ware) that are actually in…

  17. Impact of Test Design, Item Quality, and Item Bank Size on the Psychometric Properties of Computer-Based Credentialing Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xing, Dehui; Hambleton, Ronald K.

    2004-01-01

    Computer-based testing by credentialing agencies has become common; however, selecting a test design is difficult because several good ones are available - parallel forms, computer adaptive (CAT), and multistage (MST). In this study, three computer-based test designs under some common examination conditions were investigated. Item bank size and…

  18. Second Language Vocabulary Acquisition Using a Diglot Reader or a Computer-Based Drill and Practice Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Elizabeth; Merrill, Paul; Yanchar, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    This research study compares the impact of a computer-based diglot reader with that of a sophisticated, computer-based, drill and practice program on second language acquisition. The affective benefits as well as depth and breadth of vocabulary development were examined. The diglot method, originally conceived by Burling, introduces second…

  19. Pilot Studies of In-Course Assessment for a Revised Medical Curriculum: II. Computer-Based, Individual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Andrew P.; Haden, Patricia; Schwartz, Peter L.; Loten, Ernest G.

    1997-01-01

    A study investigated a computer-based testing method in an anatomic pathology course within a new, modular, systems-oriented medical curriculum at the University of Otago (New Zealand). Students (n=193) completed five biweekly criterion-referenced, computer-based quizzes incorporating digitized photographs and varied question formats. Results…

  20. Interventions to Reduce Sedentary Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Manini, Todd M.; Carr, Lucas J.; King, Abby C.; Marshall, Simon; Robinson, Thomas N.; Rejeski, W. Jack

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This paper reports on presentations and discussion from the working group on “Influences on Sedentary Behavior & Interventions” as part of the Sedentary Behavior: Identifying Research Priorities Workshop. Methods Interventions were discussed in the context of targeting sedentary behavior (SB) as a concept distinct from physical activity (PA). It was recommended that interventions targeting SB should consider a life course perspective, a position predicated on the assumption that SB is age and life stage dependent. Additionally, targeting environments where individuals have high exposure to SB— such as workplace sitting— could benefit from new technology (e.g., computer-based prompting to stand or move), environmental changes (e.g., active workstations), policies targeting reduced sedentary time (e.g., allowing employees regular desk breaks), or by changing norms surrounding prolonged sitting (e.g., standing meetings). Results & Conclusions There are limited data about the minimal amount of SB change required to produce meaningful health benefits. In addition to developing relevant scientific and public health definitions of SB, it is important to further delineate the scope of health and quality of life outcomes associated with reduced SB across the life course, and clarify what behavioral alternatives to SB can be used to optimize health gains. SB interventions will benefit from having more clarity about the potential physiological and behavioral synergies with current PA recommendations, developing multi-level interventions aimed at reducing SB across all life phases and contexts, harnessing relevant and effective strategies to extend the reach of interventions to all sectors of society, as well as applying state-of-the-science adaptive designs and methods to accelerate advances in the science of sedentary behavior interventions. PMID:25222818