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Sample records for computer-based quality-of-life monitoring

  1. Monitoring asthma in childhood: symptoms, exacerbations and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Brand, Paul L P; Mäkelä, Mika J; Szefler, Stanley J; Frischer, Thomas; Price, David

    2015-06-01

    Monitoring asthma in children in clinical practice is primarily performed by reviewing disease activity (daytime and night-time symptoms, use of reliever medication, exacerbations requiring frequent use of reliever medication and urgent visits to the healthcare professional) and the impact of the disease on children's daily activities, including sports and play, in a clinical interview. In such an interview, most task force members also discuss adherence to maintenance therapy and the patients' (and parents') views and beliefs on the goals of treatment and the amount of treatment required to achieve those goals. Composite asthma control and quality of life measures, although potentially useful in research, have limited value in clinical practice because they have a short recall window and do not cover the entire spectrum of asthma control. Telemonitoring of children with asthma cannot replace face-to-face follow-up and monitoring because there is no evidence that it is associated with improved health outcomes.

  2. TRANSFoRm eHealth solution for quality of life monitoring.

    PubMed Central

    Saganowski, Stanisław; Misiaszek, Andrzej; Bródka, Piotr; Andreasson, Anna; Curcin, Vasa; Delaney, Brendan; Frączkowski, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    Patient Recorded Outcome Measures (PROMs) are an essential part of quality of life monitoring, clinical trials, improvement studies and other medical tasks. Recently, web and mobile technologies have been explored as means of improving the response rates and quality of data collected. Despite the potential benefit of this approach, there are currently no widely accepted standards for developing or implementing PROMs in CER (Comparative Effectiveness Research). Within the European Union project Transform (Translational Research and Patient Safety in Europe) an eHealth solution for quality of life monitoring has been developed and validated. This paper presents the overall architecture of the system as well as a detailed description of the mobile and web applications. PMID:27570677

  3. TRANSFoRm eHealth solution for quality of life monitoring.

    PubMed

    Saganowski, Stanisław; Misiaszek, Andrzej; Bródka, Piotr; Andreasson, Anna; Curcin, Vasa; Delaney, Brendan; Frączkowski, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    Patient Recorded Outcome Measures (PROMs) are an essential part of quality of life monitoring, clinical trials, improvement studies and other medical tasks. Recently, web and mobile technologies have been explored as means of improving the response rates and quality of data collected. Despite the potential benefit of this approach, there are currently no widely accepted standards for developing or implementing PROMs in CER (Comparative Effectiveness Research). Within the European Union project Transform (Translational Research and Patient Safety in Europe) an eHealth solution for quality of life monitoring has been developed and validated. This paper presents the overall architecture of the system as well as a detailed description of the mobile and web applications.

  4. Towards the Implementation of Quality of Life Monitoring in Daily Clinical Routine: Methodological Issues and Clinical Implication

    PubMed Central

    Giesinger, Johannes; Kemmler, Georg; Meraner, Verena; Gamper, Eva-Maria; Oberguggenberger, Anne; Sperner-Unterweger, Barbara; Holzner, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    Summary Quality of life (QOL) has become a widely used outcome parameter in the evaluation of treatment modalities in clinical oncology research. By now, many of the practical problems associated with measuring QOL in clinical practice can be overcome by the use of computer-based assessment methods. QOL assessment in oncology is dominated by two measurement systems, the FACT scales and the EORTC QLQ-C30 with its modules. The amount of human resources required to implement routine data collection has been reduced significantly by advanced computer technology allowing data collection in busy clinical practice. Monitoring of QOL can contribute to oncologic care by facilitating detection of physical and psychological problems and tracking the course of disease and treatment over time. Furthermore, the integration of screening for psychosocial problems into QOL monitoring contributes to the identification of patients who are in need of psychooncologic interventions. Computer-based QOL monitoring does not replace the direct physician-patient communication but enables to identify specific impairments and symptoms including psychological problems. Beyond clinical practice, QOL data can be used for research purposes and may help health care planners to determine those patient services that should be maintained or ones that should be developed. PMID:20847874

  5. Towards the Implementation of Quality of Life Monitoring in Daily Clinical Routine: Methodological Issues and Clinical Implication.

    PubMed

    Giesinger, Johannes; Kemmler, Georg; Meraner, Verena; Gamper, Eva-Maria; Oberguggenberger, Anne; Sperner-Unterweger, Barbara; Holzner, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) has become a widely used outcome parameter in the evaluation of treatment modalities in clinical oncology research. By now, many of the practical problems associated with measuring QOL in clinical practice can be overcome by the use of computer-based assessment methods. QOL assessment in oncology is dominated by two measurement systems, the FACT scales and the EORTC QLQ-C30 with its modules. The amount of human resources required to implement routine data collection has been reduced significantly by advanced computer technology allowing data collection in busy clinical practice. Monitoring of QOL can contribute to oncologic care by facilitating detection of physical and psychological problems and tracking the course of disease and treatment over time. Furthermore, the integration of screening for psychosocial problems into QOL monitoring contributes to the identification of patients who are in need of psychooncologic interventions. Computer-based QOL monitoring does not replace the direct physician-patient communication but enables to identify specific impairments and symptoms including psychological problems. Beyond clinical practice, QOL data can be used for research purposes and may help health care planners to determine those patient services that should be maintained or ones that should be developed.

  6. Heart failure patients utilizing an electric home monitor: What effects does heart failure have on their quality of life?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simuel, Gloria J.

    Heart Failure continues to be a major public health problem associated with high mortality and morbidity. Heart Failure is the leading cause of hospitalization for persons older than 65 years, has a poor prognosis and is associated with poor quality of life. More than 5.3 million American adults are living with heart failure. Despite maximum medical therapy and frequent hospitalizations to stabilize their condition, one in five heart failure patients die within the first year of diagnosis. Several disease-management programs have been proposed and tested to improve the quality of heart failure care. Studies have shown that hospital admissions and emergency room visits decrease with increased nursing interventions in the home and community setting. An alternative strategy for promoting self-management of heart failure is the use of electronic home monitoring. The purpose of this study was to examine what effects heart failure has on patient's quality of life that had been monitoring on an electronic home monitor longer than 2 months. Twenty-one questionnaires were given to patients utilizing an electronic home monitor by their home health agency nurse. Eleven patients completed the questionnaire. The findings showed that there is some deterioration in quality of life with more association with the physical aspects of life than with the emotional aspects of life, which probably was due to the small sample size. There was no significant difference in readmission rates in patients utilizing an electronic home monitor. Further research is needed with a larger population of patients with chronic heart failure and other chronic diseases which may provide more data, and address issues such as patient compliance with self-care, impact of heart failure on patient's quality of life, functional capacity, and heart failure patient's utilization of the emergency rooms and hospital. Telemonitoring holds promise for improving the self-care abilities of persons with HF.

  7. Neighborhood epidemiological monitoring and adult mental health: European Quality of Life Survey, 2007-2012.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy

    2015-04-01

    Little is monitored on perceived neighborhood noise, quality of drinking water, air quality, rubbish, traffic, etc. at a continental scale. This study was aimed to examine the relationships of such neighborhood risks and mental health in adults and the very old in an international and population-based setting across Europe. Data were retrieved from the European Quality of Life Survey, 2007-2012 including demographics, living conditions, income and financial situation, housing and local environment, family, work, health, social participation and quality of social services. Adults aged 18 and above were included for statistical analysis (n = 79,270). Analysis included chi-square test, t test and logistic regression modeling. People who lived in town or city tended to indicate certain major problems for them such as noise (odds ratio (OR) 2.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.17-2.53, P < 0.001), air quality (OR 2.76, 95% CI 2.54-3.00, P < 0.001), low quality of drinking water (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.23-1.43, P < 0.001), crime and/or violence (OR 2.92, 95% CI 2.68-3.19, P < 0.001), rubbish (OR 3.68, 95% CI 3.41-3.97, P < 0.001) and traffic congestion (OR 2.64, 95% CI 2.45-2.85, P < 0.001). People who reported major problems on noise (OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.96-2.45, P < 0.001), air quality (OR 2.11, 95% CI 1.87-2.37, P < 0.001), low quality of drinking water (OR 2.40, 95% CI 2.14-2.68, P < 0.001), crime and/or violence (OR 2.13, 95% CI 1.88-2.41, P < 0.001), rubbish (OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.77-2.11, P < 0.001) and traffic congestion (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.34-1.68, P < 0.001) were also classified as having depression. Perceived neighborhood conditions were associated with adult mental health across Europe. Future neighborhood monitoring research moving from the etiological to neighborhood management would be suggested.

  8. [Patient reported outcome monitoring using a tablet PC is suitable for measuring quality of life in patients with gliomas].

    PubMed

    Holzner, Bernhard; Schauer-Maurer, Gabriele; Stockhammer, Guenter; Muigg, Armin; Hutterer, Markus; Giesinger, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    A computer-based tool for the monitoring of patient-related outcomes, the "Computer-based Health Evaluation System" (CHES) was developed at the medical university of Innsbruck. The software-generated graphic QOL profiles were found to be an important tool for screening patients for clinically relevant problems and were successfully used in oncology, geriatrics, psychiatry, and psychosomatics. The authors report their experience with CHES in 34 patients with recurrent gliomas. The computer-based QoL monitoring was repeated in median 5.4 times per patients and found feasible and well accepted by patients and personnel.

  9. Towards International and Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration for the Measurements of Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizohata, Sachie; Jadoul, Raynald

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on three main subjects: (1) monitoring quality of life (QoL) in old age; (2) international and interdisciplinary collaboration for QoL research; and (3) computer-based technology and infrastructure assisting (1) and (2). This type of computer-supported cooperative work in the social sciences has been termed eHumanities or…

  10. Quality of Life Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. New Mexico Environmental Inst.

    Comments, speeches, and questions delivered at the Quality of Life Symposium are compiled in these proceedings. As an exploratory session, the conference objectives were to (1) become better informed about New Mexico--its resource base, the economy, social and cultural base, and the environment; and (2) to evaluate and discuss the role of New…

  11. Assessing quality of life in paediatric clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Angela M; Quine, Susan; Heaton, Maria D; Craig, Jonathan C

    2010-06-01

    The rising prevalence of children with chronic conditions has made quality of life an increasingly important outcome measure in paediatric practice. The discrepancy between doctors' and patients' perceptions of quality of life makes formal assessment necessary. In this paper we use a case scenario to answer commonly asked questions. What is quality of life and who can assess it? Why assess quality of life in the clinical setting? Is it feasible to measure in routine clinical practice? How is quality of life formally assessed? We provide a basic outline of the language and methods of quality of life assessment and use the case scenario to discuss the process of choosing an appropriate instrument. We conclude that quality of life assessment in clinical practice is feasible and provides benefits for both patients and doctors. The benefits include better informed doctors, improved patient doctor communication and a means to effectively monitor quality of life as a treatment outcome.

  12. Continuous glucose monitors: use of waveform versus glycemic values in the improvements of glucose control, quality of life, and fear of hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Walker, Tomas C; Yucha, Carolyn B

    2014-05-01

    How patients are benefitting from continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) remains poorly understood. The focus on numerical glucose values persists, even though access to the glucose waveform and rate of change may contribute more to improved control. This pilot study compared outcomes of patients using CGMs with or without access to the numerical values on their CGM. Ten persons with type 1 diabetes, naïve to CGM use, enrolled in a 12-week study. Subjects were randomly assigned to either unmodified CGM receivers, or to CGM receivers that had their numerical values obscured but otherwise functioned normally. HbA1c, quality of life (QLI-D), and fear of hypoglycemia (HFS) were assessed, at baseline and at week 12. Baseline HbA1c for the entire group was 7.46 ± 1.27%. At week 12 the experimental group HbA1c reduction was 1.5 ± 0.9% (p < .05), the control group's reduction was 0.06 ± 0.61% (p > .05). Repeated measures testing revealed no significant difference in HbA1c reduction between groups. Both groups had reductions in HFS; these reductions were statistically significant within groups (p < .05), but not between groups. QLI-D indices demonstrated improvements (p < .05) in QLI-D total and the health and family subscales, but not between groups. The results of this pilot study suggest that benefits of CGM extend beyond reductions in HbA1c to reductions in fear of hypoglycemia and improvements in quality of life. The display of a numerical glucose value did not improve control when compared to numerically blinded units.

  13. [Qualities of life and happiness].

    PubMed

    Veenhoven, R

    2011-03-01

    The phrase 'quality of life' is actually misleading. The designation suggests that the issue has to do with 1 quality, whereas in fact more qualities of life are indicated. Four of these qualities are: 1. the 'livability' of the surroundings, 2. the 'life-abilities' of the individual, 3. the 'utility of life' and 4. the subjective 'satisfaction' with a person's own life. The various qualities cannot meaningfully be collected together in an index. The most comprehensive measure of quality of life is how long and happily a person lives. The relationship between that and oral health has still hardly been studied.

  14. Quality of Life: Perspectives and Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schalock, Robert L., Ed.

    The book deals with the concept of quality of life for persons with mental retardation and developmental disabilities. Part I, "Quality of Life: Personal Perspectives," contains "A Dream for Myself" (Connie Martinez); "Reflections on My Quality of Life: Then and Now" (Nancy Ward); "Quality of Life versus Quality of Life Judgments: A Parent's…

  15. Computer-Based Laboratory For Engine-System Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, Robert B.; Garcia, Raul C.

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory evaluates artificially intelligent engine-system monitors without potentially hazardous measurements on actual engines. Monitor enhances engine controller by detecting undesirable trends and counteracting them. Once proved in laboratory, monitor will then be tried on real engine.

  16. Asthma Outcomes: Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sandra R.; Rand, Cynthia S.; Cabana, Michael D.; Foggs, Michael B.; Halterman, Jill S.; Olson, Lynn; Vollmer, William M.; Wright, Rosalind J.; Taggart, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Background “Asthma-related quality of life” refers to the perceived impact that asthma has on the patient’s quality of life. Objective National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies convened an expert group to recommend standardized measures of the impact of asthma on quality of life for use in future asthma clinical research. Methods We reviewed published documentation regarding the development and psychometric evaluation; clinical research use since 2000; and extent to which the content of each existing quality of life instrument provides a unique, reliable, and valid assessment of the intended construct. We classified instruments as core (required in future studies), supplemental (used according to the study’s aims and standardized), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop convened in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results Eleven instruments for adults and 6 for children were identified for review. None qualified as core instruments because they predominantly measured indicators of asthma control (symptoms and/or functional status); failed to provide a distinct, reliable score measuring all key dimensions of the intended construct; and/or lacked adequate psychometric data. Conclusions In the absence of existing instruments that meet the stated criteria, currently available instruments are classified as either supplemental or emerging. Research is strongly recommended to develop and evaluate instruments that provide a distinct, reliable measure of the patient’s perception of the impact of asthma on all of the key dimensions of quality of life, an important outcome that is not captured in other outcome measures. PMID:22386511

  17. The Promise of Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peruniak, Geoffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Little has been written in the career development literature about quality of life, even though this concept is implied in all counselor interventions. In this article, the author suggests that the broad and subjective nature of quality of life, rather than a liability, is its very strength. Quality of life is presented as an important holistic…

  18. Thermographic monitoring of wound healing and oral health-related quality of life in patients treated with laser (aPDT) after impacted mandibular third molar removal.

    PubMed

    Batinjan, G; Zore, Z; Čelebić, A; Papić, M; Gabrić Pandurić, D; Filipović Zore, I

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of low-level laser therapy on wound swelling, wound temperature changes, and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) after surgical removal of impacted lower third molars. Forty patients with impacted lower third molars requiring surgical removal participated in this study; all were Pell-Gregory class IIB or IIC. The patients were divided randomly into two groups for post-extraction therapy. One group received antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) and the other received no additional therapy (placebo group). Temperature measurements were done using an infrared thermographic camera on days 3 and 7 postoperative. OHRQoL was assessed in both groups on day 7 using the Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire translated into Croatian (OHIP-14-CRO). Prior to surgical treatment, there was no difference in patient characteristics between the two groups. A significantly lower temperature and less wound swelling were recorded on day 3 postoperative in the aPDT group compared to the control group (P<0.001). Participants in the aPDT group also had significantly lower OHIP-14-CRO summary scores (P<0.01). The present study showed beneficial effects of the aPDT modality of low-level laser therapy: postoperative wound swelling was reduced and wound temperature decreased, and OHRQoL was better through the 7-day postoperative period in comparison to the placebo group.

  19. Bilastine and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Jáuregui, I; Bartra, J; del Cuvillo, A; Dávila, I; Ferrer, M; Montoro, J; Mullol, J; Sastre, J; Valero, A

    2011-01-01

    The evaluation of quality of life (QoL) and its modification through therapeutic interventions has become a prioritary concern in recent years and a requirement on the part of regulatory agencies for the authorization of new drugs. In clinical studies of allergic disorders, particularly allergic rhinitis and urticaria, different types of generic questionnaires have been used - especially disease specific instruments such as the Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ) or skin disease specific tools such as the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Throughout its clinical development, bilastine has been shown to be more effective than placebo and at least as effective as cetirizine, levocetirizine, fexofenadine or desloratadine in controlling the symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis and chronic urticaria. QoL has been studied as a secondary objective in three allergic rhinitis clinical trials, using the RQLQ, in a total of 2335 patients. Likewise, in chronic urticaria, QoL has been evaluated using the DLQI in a total of 525 patients, versus levocetirizine and placebo. The improvement in the QoL parameters in these studies (RQLQ or DLQI domains) at all times proved proportional to the symptoms improvement. In general, the data obtained relating to changes in QoL are concordant with the mean global visual analog scale (VAS in mm) values and their changes, from the beginning until the end of the treatment period, for all of the trials, for bilastine and all its comparators.

  20. [Quality of life in gerodontology].

    PubMed

    de Baat, C

    2011-04-01

    In clinical decision-making on whether or not to treat an oral disease and on making a choice from the spectrum of treatment options, the influence of the treatment on the physical and psycho-social well-being of the patient should play a crucial role. This awareness originates from gerodontology. To assess the value of a potential treatment, the concept quality of life has been advanced and various related questionnaires have been developed and employed. In the meantime, doubts have arisen about the value of these questionnaires. The present-day trend is to return to so-called qualitative research, which consists of systematic interviews of groups of older people using open-ended questions without making use of structured response options.

  1. Dysphagia and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Vesey, Siobhan

    2013-05-01

    Swallowing difficulties can be a symptom of many different disease processes, and are associated with adverse health outcomes; malnutrition, dehydration, pneumonia and death. The use of feeding tubes directly into the stomach as in percutaneous endoscopic gastrosomy (PEG) is an increasingly common treatment option for these patients with more and more being cared for in the community. Living with a gastrostomy tube brings physical and emotional impacts and direct consequences for quality of life. Guidance from the Royal College of Physicians recommends 'nil by mouth' should be a last resort even when swallow function is deemed unsafe. Impaired swallowing can cause increased anxiety and fear. Many patients avoid oral intake leading to malnutrition, isolation and depression. Understanding and balancing the risks and potential benefits of continuing oral intake or choosing gastrostomy makes this a complex and challenging area of health care.

  2. 2006 Navy Quality of Life Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    07-6 July 2007 2006 Navy Quality of Life Survey Gerry L. Wilcove, Ph.D. Rosemary A. Schultz, Ph.D. Geoffrey A. Patrissi...M.A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NPRST-AB-07-6 July 2007 2006 Navy Quality of Life Survey...7(/(3+21(180%(5 ,QFOXGHDUHDFRGH Fore word The 2006 Navy Quality of Life (QOL) Survey focused on QOL issues and concerns among Navy

  3. Quality of Life Measurement and Analysis (QUAILMAN).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-03-01

    satisfaction for the total Army popalation in the area of government housing quality over 2-1/2 years. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES quality of life ...Army may have declined recently, while the quality of life cost per soldier has increased. (2) There is about a 10 percent drop in the satisfaction of...selected for this study which seemed to relate to quality of life issues. Items selected either (1) expressed satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a

  4. Improving Health and Quality of Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Managing Activities and Exercise Improving Health and Quality of Life Pediatric Definition and Diagnosis Management and Treatment Factsheets Healthcare Professionals Parents Education Professionals ...

  5. Quality of life in mulptiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jaracz, K; Brola, W

    2010-01-01

    An overall aim of treatment in multiple sclerosis is to lower the negative impact of the disease on functioning and quality of life of patients. Therefore, a measurement of functioning and quality of life should be included in the evaluation of the effectiveness of treatment. In this paper the most commonly used quality of life questionnaires, either generic and specific, were presented. Information about clinical and functional status is useful in the interpretation of the quality of life assessment results. Because of that, instruments for the assessment of depression, cognitive functions, functional ability and fatigue in multiple sclerosis were also described. PMID:21254730

  6. The Burden of Structured Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose on Diabetes-Specific Quality of Life and Locus of Control in Patients with Noninsulin-Treated Type 2 Diabetes: The PRISMA Study

    PubMed Central

    Scavini, Marina; Acmet, Elena; Bonizzoni, Erminio; Bosi, Emanuele; Giorgino, Francesco; Tiengo, Antonio; Cucinotta, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: To evaluate whether structured self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is associated with changes in diabetes-specific quality of life (DSQoL) and locus of control (LOC) in patients with noninsulin-treated type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Study Design and Methods: In this analysis of the PRISMA (Prospective Randomized Trial on Intensive SMBG Management Added Value in Noninsulin-Treated T2DM Patients) Study psychosocial data, we evaluated the impact of 12 months of structured SMBG on the individual domains of DSQoL and LOC questionnaires, including the role of selected confounders. Results: The score for Satisfaction, Impact, and Worry domains (DSQoL) improved when compared with baseline, without significant differences between structured SMBG regimen (intervention group, n = 501) and active control group (n = 523). Scores for Internal, Chance, and Powerful Others domains (LOC) improved compared with baseline, with a significant between-group change in Chance (P = 0.0309). For DSQoL domain score, improvements were associated with higher number of SMBG measurements (P = 0.007), older age (P = 0.013), and male sex (P = 0.0133) for Satisfaction and with male sex (P < 0.0001) for Worry. Concerning LOC domain score, improvements were associated with longer diabetes duration (P = 0.0084) and younger age (P < 0.0001) for Chance and total number of SMBG measurements (P = 0.0036) for Internal, with the intervention group close to being significant (P = 0.06). Conclusions: Our analysis demonstrates that in patients with noninsulin-treated T2DM, structured SMBG is not associated with a deterioration of quality of life and LOC, which is strongly predicted by demographics and diabetes-related variables. These findings should be considered when tailoring educational support to SMBG for these patients. PMID:27327185

  7. Quality of Life in Macau, China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rato, Ricardo; Davey, Gareth

    2012-01-01

    We report the initial findings of an ongoing, long-term investigation into subjective quality of life in Macau, a Special Administrative Region of China. Data were collected via quarterly public surveys (2007 to 2009; n = 8,230), as part of the Macau Quality of Life Report. The main aims of the study were to: (a) ascertain the public's…

  8. Geography, and the Quality of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Norman J.

    After a brief examination of the concept of "quality of life," the paper explores research related to the concept in geography, the environmental education movement, and problems involved in implementing relevant programs. It is suggested that "quality of life" is a shifting concept. At a basic level it is concerned with conditions that make…

  9. Quality of life in shift work syndrome.

    PubMed

    Puca, F M; Perrucci, S; Prudenzano, M P; Savarese, M; Misceo, S; Perilli, S; Palumbo, M; Libro, G; Genco, S

    1996-01-01

    Air Force radar controllers represent an excellent example of night shift workers, as they are obliged to demonstrate perfect alertness during working hours. We set out: a) to assess the quality of life in these shift workers; b) to identify those with shift work syndrome and c) to evaluate the possible effects of triazolam both on their quality of life and sleep. The results reveal an impairment of the quality of life in shift workers, independently of the presence of a circadian rhythm sleep disorder. Quality of life was more severely impaired in subjects with circadian rhythm sleep disorder. Hypnotic therapy brought about an improvement both in the sleep disorder and in the quality of life of subjects affected by shift work syndrome. Selective alertness tests failed to demonstrate any "sedative carry-over" in the treated patients.

  10. The Computer-based Health Evaluation Software (CHES): a software for electronic patient-reported outcome monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patient-reported Outcomes (PROs) capturing e.g., quality of life, fatigue, depression, medication side-effects or disease symptoms, have become important outcome parameters in medical research and daily clinical practice. Electronic PRO data capture (ePRO) with software packages to administer questionnaires, storing data, and presenting results has facilitated PRO assessment in hospital settings. Compared to conventional paper-pencil versions of PRO instruments, ePRO is more economical with regard to staff resources and time, and allows immediate presentation of results to the medical staff. The objective of our project was to develop software (CHES – Computer-based Health Evaluation System) for ePRO in hospital settings and at home with a special focus on the presentation of individual patient’s results. Methods Following the Extreme Programming development approach architecture was not fixed up-front, but was done in close, continuous collaboration with software end users (medical staff, researchers and patients) to meet their specific demands. Developed features include sophisticated, longitudinal charts linking patients’ PRO data to clinical characteristics and to PRO scores from reference populations, a web-interface for questionnaire administration, and a tool for convenient creating and editing of questionnaires. Results By 2012 CHES has been implemented at various institutions in Austria, Germany, Switzerland, and the UK and about 5000 patients participated in ePRO (with around 15000 assessments in total). Data entry is done by the patients themselves via tablet PCs with a study nurse or an intern approaching patients and supervising questionnaire completion. Discussion During the last decade several software packages for ePRO have emerged for different purposes. Whereas commercial products are available primarily for ePRO in clinical trials, academic projects have focused on data collection and presentation in daily clinical practice and

  11. Quality of life in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Opara, J A; Brola, W; Leonardi, M; Błaszczyk, B

    2012-12-15

    In this review report, current possibilities of evaluation of quality of life in Parkinson's disease have been critically presented. Health Related Quality of Life (-HRQoL) comprises a wide spectrum of consequences of the disease. Measurement of quality of life has become increasingly relevant as an outcome parameter, especially in long-term trials. Most of the available QoL instruments depend on patient self-reports. The data can be collected by written questionnaires. There are universal questionnaires of QoL--for many diseases and the specific ones--specially created for one disease. Among universal questionnaires, the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) and the Short-Form Health Status Survey (SF-36) are the most popular in Parkinson's disease. As for specific questionnaires: the Parkinson`s Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) and the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (PDQL) have been described.

  12. Assessment of Quality of Life in Migraine

    PubMed Central

    TAŞKAPILIOĞLU, Özlem; KARLI, Necdet

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life is the perception of an individual’s position in life associated with his objectives, expectations, interests, and standard’s of life. Health-related quality of life, on the other hand, includes satisfaction with his health and emotional reaction to his state of health. Primary headaches are encountered commonly in adults during their most productive years like end of puberty and at the beginning of 50’s. Migraine alone is responsible for 1.3% of years with disability in the world, all headaches together being responsible for twice of this load. Headaches both worsen quality of life of individuals and place a significant burden on the society. This review will focus on the effects of primary headaches, especially migraine, on quality of life and tools used to evaluate these effects.

  13. [The quality of life in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Lecardeur, L

    2015-09-01

    The World Health Organization defines quality of life as individuals' perception of their position in life in the context of the culture and value systems in which they live and in relation to their goals, expectations, standards, and concerns. Quality of life (QoL) is a concept, which reflects multiple as well subjective as objective dimensions. In patients with schizophrenia, quality of life has been negatively correlated with depressive and anxiety symptoms (results seem more unconvincing concerning positive symptoms and cognitive deficits); the remission of positive and negative symptoms has been associated with a better quality of life, but the persistence of depressive symptoms decreases quality of life even when patients were or not in remission; second generation antipsychotics significantly increase more quality of life than first generation antipsychotics; and psychotherapies (rehabilitation, case management...) improve quality of life. Several general and disease-specific QoL scales have been developed and successfully tested in patients with schizophrenia. The most appropriate disease-specific scale is the Quality of Life Scale (Heinrichs et al., 1984) since it takes patients' cognitive deficits into account and because it allows to subtly measuring the patients' subjective feeling during a hetero-evaluation. The Quality of Life Scale is a 21-item scale based on a semi-structured interview, which is comprised of four subscales: interpersonal relations, instrumental role functioning, intra-psychic foundations, and use of common objects and activities. It has been designed initially to assess deficit symptoms in schizophrenia. It is a simple and quite short tool, which is intended for the use as an outcome criterion, a measure of change and an indicator of the efficacy of therapeutic interventions. Convincing metrological qualities have been described: content, construct and nomological validities; inter-raters and test-retest fidelities; it is sensitive

  14. "A La Recherche Du" Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    This essay examines the stages of inquiry when we seek to formulate quality of life in an era before our own. There arises the question of the extent to which today's formulation of quality of life can be applied to an era far removed from our own. Implicitly, there is the nature of the time interval, T[subscript 1]...T[subscript n], and the…

  15. Quality of Life for Marines on Okinawa.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-03-01

    well . As in any organization, and as in life in general in our society, quality of life , at least in its material and psychological aspects, increases...trying to definitively tie performance to other variables such as job satisfaction , organizational commitment, and quality of life . The fact that the... life . In addition to eliciting information on the D-T (feelings) scale, satisfaction scales, and comparison items, this section of the survey also

  16. Quality of Life in Female Epispadias.

    PubMed

    Amesty, Maria Virginia; Chocarro, Gloria; Lobato, Roberto; Monsalve, Shirley; Martinez-Urrutia, Maria Jose; Lopez-Pereira, Pedro Carlos; Jaureguizar, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    Introduction and Aim Female epispadias is a rare congenital anomaly associated with significant urinary incontinence. This study aims to evaluate the results of its treatment in terms of continence, sexuality, and impact of incontinence on quality of life. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed nine patients (5-39 years) treated of female epispadias in our hospital during the period 1976-2013. Urinary continence (ICIQ-SF), sexuality, impact of incontinence on quality of life (Potenziani-14-CI-IO-2000-QOL), and overall quality of life (SF-36) were evaluated. Results All nine women were treated by bladder neck reconstruction (Young-Dees-Leadbetter) and genitoplasty; four received 2.5 (R = 1-5) endoscopic bladder neck injections; one required enterocystoplasty, urinary diversion, and bladder neck closure because of persistent incontinence; five performed pelvic floor rehabilitation; and two took anticholinergics. Three achieved continence; five had mild urinary incontinence; and 1 had moderate urinary incontinence and was awaiting an endoscopic injection. Of the seven who were older than 18 years, five answered the questionnaires of quality of life and sexuality. All had a general quality of life (SF-36) that does not differ from the normal population and had a slight impact (7 [0-15] points) of incontinence on quality of life (Potenziani-14-CI-IO-QOL-2000). Four had a normal sex life, and the fifth had lack of self-confidence due to her incontinence. Conclusion Patients with female epispadias have good long-term results regarding quality of life and sexuality, despite having some degree of urinary incontinence.

  17. Quality of Life in Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Jonathan P.; Singer, Lianne G.

    2014-01-01

    Improving health-related quality of life is an important goal of lung transplantation. In this review, we describe background concepts including definitions, measurement and interpretation of health-related quality of life (HRQL) and other patient-reported outcomes. Lung transplantation is associated with dramatic and sustained improvements in health-related quality of life, particularly in measures of physical health and functioning. Physical rehabilitation may augment the early improvements in HRQL, while bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome and psychological conditions have a negative impact. More research is needed, particularly longitudinal, multicenter studies, to better understand the trajectory and determinants of HRQL after lung transplantation, and the impact of targeted interventions to improve HRQL. PMID:23821515

  18. Adult education and the quality of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuijnman, Albert

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the complementary role of adult education in influencing people's objective and subjective quality of life. The analytical strategy used to achieve this end is to estimate parameters in a path model which includes both objective indicators such as occupational status and earned income, and subjective indicators such as job satisfaction and perceived personal wellbeing. The investigation builds on Swedish data and employs the LISREL method in the fitting of the model to the data. The results indicate that adult education positively influences objective indicators of the quality of life. Even though adult education is found to relate to measures of perceived personal wellbeing, the hypothesis that it also influences the way men assess their life situation and evaluate their subjective quality of life cannot be confirmed.

  19. Quality of life: its definition and measurement.

    PubMed

    Felce, D; Perry, J

    1995-01-01

    A model of quality of life is proposed that integrates objective and subjective indicators, a broad range of life domains, and individual values. It takes account of concerns that externally derived norms should not be applied without reference to individual differences. It also allows for objective comparisons to be made between the situations of particular groups and what is normative. Considerable agreement exists that quality of life is multidimensional. Coverage may be categorised within five dimensions: physical wellbeing, material wellbeing, social wellbeing, emotional wellbeing, and development and activity. A research agenda is discussed as are the particular problems caused by difficulties in understanding and communicating.

  20. Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy Impairs Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Swastik; Umapathy, Sridharan; Dhiman, Radha K.

    2015-01-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the mildest form of the spectrum of neurocognitive impairment in cirrhosis. It is a frequent occurrence in patients of cirrhosis and is detectable only by specialized neurocognitive testing. MHE is a clinically significant disorder which impairs daily functioning, driving performance, work capability and learning ability. It also predisposes to the development of overt hepatic encephalopathy, increased falls and increased mortality. This results in impaired quality of life for the patient as well as significant social and economic burden for health providers and care givers. Early detection and treatment of MHE with ammonia lowering therapy can reverse MHE and improve quality of life. PMID:26041957

  1. Quality of life Metrics in Pediatric Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Angeles-Han, Sheila T

    2015-01-01

    Uveitis can lead to vision loss and blindness in children. It can significantly impact a child’s vision related quality of life and daily function. Outcome studies in pediatric uveitis focus on the clinical ocular exam and general measures of quality of life whereas in adults, measures of visual function are incorporated. Adequate vision can affect a child’s daily activities and is crucial for daily function in the home and school. A comprehensive approach that incorporates all aspects of disability could improve the assessment of outcomes and may help us better understand the impact of visual impairment on children with uveitis. PMID:25730622

  2. Epoetin alfa (Eprex) and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, Tim

    2005-01-01

    Several recently published clinical trials in anaemic patients with cancer provide convincing evidence that the quality of life of such patients is considerably impaired and that a significant improvement in quality of life can be achieved if their anaemia is corrected by treatment with recombinant erythropoietin (epoetin alfa, Eprex). Findings of some of the major studies are summarised in this issue. These summaries have been prepared to make the findings more accessible to busy clinicians who may not have time to read longer reports in specialist journals but who need to understand the important clinical implications of this research.

  3. Quality of Life: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lankhorst, Gustaaf J.

    1989-01-01

    A 12-item list of human abilities/activities was developed to measure quality of life of 9 rheumatoid arthritis adults from 2 aspects: "present condition" and "relative importance" of each item. Pilot testing indicated that importance and present condition represent different aspects. Differences between self-assessments and physicians'…

  4. [Regaining quality of life despite rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    A, Madame

    2016-01-01

    A patient aged 32 who had been living with her partner for a few years, is diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. They both needed to understand and adapt. The caregivers had a frontline role in the multidisciplinary care but addressing the impact on the patient's sexual quality of life remains difficult. The patient describes her experience and how harmony and desire were re-established.

  5. [Regaining quality of life despite rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    A, Madame

    A patient aged 32 who had been living with her partner for a few years, is diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. They both needed to understand and adapt. The caregivers had a frontline role in the multidisciplinary care but addressing the impact on the patient's sexual quality of life remains difficult. The patient describes her experience and how harmony and desire were re-established.

  6. Quality of life in vitiligo patients.

    PubMed

    Teovska Mitrevska, Natasa; Eleftheriadou, Viktoria; Guarneri, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Quality of life is defined by the World Health Organization as "individuals' perceptions of their position in life in the context of the culture and value systems in which they live and in relation to their goals, expectations, standards and concerns." Often overlooked in the past, it is nowadays considered, in a more holistic view of medicine, a decisive factor to understand the impact of diseases and improve the quality of medical care. Such evaluation is particularly relevant for dermatological diseases, because visibility of the lesions can significantly affect self-esteem and social relationships. Vitiligo represents an emblematic case: often disfiguring and located in visible areas, confused in the past (and, in many world regions, even in the present) with leprosy, often perceived by physicians as a harmless, purely cosmetic problem, it significantly decreases the quality of life of affected persons. After a brief overview on definition, usefulness and methods for the assessment of quality of life, the authors examine the peculiarities of its relationship with skin diseases, particularly vitiligo. The state of the art of knowledge and research in this field is presented, together with data showing usefulness and positive results of a multidisciplinary approach, which adequately keeps into account perceived quality of life, on patient's satisfaction, adherence to treatment protocols and, ultimately, better outcome of treatments. In this context, an important role can be played by support communities, groups of patients and dedicated associations and societies, connected through modern communication networks like the Internet.

  7. The Quality of Life in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inoguchi, Takashi; Fujii, Seiji

    2009-01-01

    This study is part of a collaborative project examining the quality of life in Confucian societies in Asia. Our major findings suggest that, when our sixteen specific life domains are grouped into three life spheres, namely, material, post-material, and public, the Japanese people tend to be most satisfied with the post-material sphere of life and…

  8. Science, Technology and the Quality of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Alexander

    In view of the changing relationship between science, technology, and the quality of life, future efforts need to be devoted to the use of new knowledge for social objectives rather than for economics and defense. The mass of problems facing society today, which to some extent are direct side effects of technological growth, appear to have three…

  9. The Quality of Life in America's Cities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Glenn R.

    In order to appraise the quality of life (Q.O.L.) in American cities, the fifty largest American cities were examined according to twenty-six socioeconomic variables. These variables were arranged under seven headings: housing, crime, education, health, social disorganization, economic status, and amenities. The results of this study, when…

  10. The Quality of Life in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sing, Ming

    2009-01-01

    The AsiaBarometer of 1,000 respondents shows that Hong Kong people have a great desire for materialistic attainment, and such an emphasis on materialism bodes ill for their quality of life. Negative assessments of the public life sphere, which encompasses the natural environment, the social welfare system, and the democratic system, also detract…

  11. Technology and Quality of Life Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Eileen Danaher

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To discuss recent technological advances in quality of life data collection and guidance for use in research and clinical practice. The use of telephone-, computer-, and web/Internet based technologies to collect quality of life data, reliability and validity issues, and cost will be discussed along with the potential pitfalls associated with these technologies. Data Sources Health care literature and web resources. Conclusion Technology has provided researchers and clinicians with an opportunity to collect QOL data from patients that were previously not accessible. Most technologies offer a variety of options, such as language choice, formatting options for the delivery of questions, and data management services. Choosing the appropriate technology for use in research and/or clinical practice primarily depends on the purpose for QOL data collection. Implications for Nursing Practice Technology is changing the way nurses assess quality of life in patients with cancer and provide care. As stakeholders in the health care delivery system and patient advocates, nurses must be intimately involved in the evaluation and use of new technologies that impact quality of life and/or the delivery of care. PMID:20152578

  12. Three Decades of Quality of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schalock, Robert L.

    2000-01-01

    This article summarizes the current understanding of the "quality of life" construct as applied to people with mental retardation. It examines previous definitions and suggests a definition involving eight life dimensions including emotional well-being, interpersonal relationships, material well-being, social inclusion, and rights. The definition…

  13. Quality of Life in Adults Who Stutter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koedoot, Caroline; Bouwmans, Clazien; Franken, Marie-Christine; Stolk, Elly

    2011-01-01

    Although persistent developmental stuttering is known to affect daily living, just how great the impact is remains unclear. Furthermore, little is known about the underlying mechanisms which lead to a diminished quality of life (QoL). The primary objective of this study is to explore to what extent QoL is impaired in adults who stutter (AWS). In…

  14. The Quality of Life in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shu, Xiaoling; Zhu, Yifei

    2009-01-01

    The Asia Barometer Survey of 2,000 respondents reveals that substantial majorities of the Chinese people experience feelings of happiness, enjoyment, and accomplishment. In fact, the proportion experiencing these indicators of a high quality of life are larger in China than in some more prosperous countries. Favorable historical comparison,…

  15. [Quality of life in women after mastectomy].

    PubMed

    Chwałczyńska, Agnieszka; Woźniewski, Marek; Rozek-Mróz, Krystyna; Malicka, Iwona

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was evaluation of quality of life of women after radical mastectomy. It was assumed that cancer of the breast, treatment and results could cause the decrease of quality of life. 107 women aged from 40 to 75 years after radical mastectomy were examined. Questionnaire made by G. Hansen at Norwegian University of Sport and Physical Education was used in all women. Questionnaire consists of 4 parts and contains 87 questions concerning general and medical data, quality of life and physical activity. Examined women had not any problems in daily activity. Most of them (about 70%) had difficulty in physical effort, particularly using upper extremities. 60% of women did not work, but they had a hobby (about 70%). Housework and daily activity were less efficient in 80% women after radical mastectomy. We observed a change in psychical status of examined women. They had some problems with concentration, irritation, irritability and sleep. These problems did not influence the family relationships and contacts with other people. Instead we noticed change in self-rating of women after radical mastectomy. Removal of breast--attribute of femininity--changed sexuality, consciousness of femininity and appearance of an image. We observed "half woman complex" in examined women. Women evaluated status of their body and quality of life from 3 to 5 in 7-gradual scale.

  16. Quality of Life for the Camberwell Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beadle-Brown, Julie; Murphy, Glynis; DiTerlizzi, Michele

    2009-01-01

    Background: Despite the acknowledged difficulties of measuring satisfaction for people with intellectual disabilities, the current study examined the quality of life (QoL) of the Camberwell Cohort, a total population sample of people with severe intellectual disability and/or autism [Wing & Gould, "Epidemiology and Classification," 9, 1979, 11].…

  17. Quality of life in short adults.

    PubMed

    Busschbach, J J; Rikken, B; Grobbee, D E; De Charro, F T; Wit, J M

    1998-01-01

    The use of (costly) growth hormone (GH) treatment in short children is often justified by the assumption that short stature considerably reduces quality of life in adults. We tested this assumption in 5 groups of short adults: 25 patients with isolated GH deficiency; 17 male patients with childhood onset renal failure; 25 women with Turner syndrome and 26 patients who were presented as a child to a paediatrician for idiopathic short stature. A group of 44 short individuals with presumably idiopathic short stature, who had not been presented to a paediatrician for short stature, was sampled from the general population ('normal shorts'). We measured quality of life in terms of socio-economic variables, the Nottingham Health Profile and time trade-off. The mean height of most groups was close to the 3rd percentile. The chance of having a partner was low for all groups, except for the normal shorts. Problems with job application were only reported in Turner syndrome. The scores on the Nottingham Health Profile were all within the normal range, but GH-deficient adults had a higher score on the domain energy than normal shorts. Women with Turner syndrome, individuals with renal failure, and those with idiopathic short stature had a wish to be taller, with an estimated reduction in quality of life of 2-4% (time trade-off). As the normal shorts did not show any sign of a reduced quality of life, we falsify the assumption of a direct relation between short stature and quality of life. The complaints of patients with idiopathic short stature around the 3rd percentile seem to be the result of unsuccessful coping strategies.

  18. Quality of Life and Health-Related Quality of Life of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Livingston, Michael H.; Palisano, Robert J.; Galuppi, Barbara E.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed quality of life (QOL) and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of 203 adolescents with cerebral palsy (111 males, 92 females; mean age 16y [SD 1y 9mo]). Participants were classified using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), as Level I (n=60), Level II (n=33), Level III (n=28), Level IV (n=50), or Level V…

  19. Quality of life: an interpersonal perspective.

    PubMed

    Peplau, H E

    1994-01-01

    Quality of life is a continuum having a higher to lower range. A person's perceptions of life quality are time-related and situation-dependent and tend to vary according to changing life circumstances. Human relationships, especially during the early years of growth and development, can be constructive or destructive influences which can color perceptions, expectations, and behavior patterns manifested in interpersonal interactions throughout the life span. Relationships define and confirm self-worth, identity, acceptance as a human being, a sense of belonging, and other essential interpersonal needs. Relationships provide social support and tend to reduce stress. The quality of interpersonal relationships has a strong bearing on perceptions of quality of life.

  20. Curriculum-Based Measurement: Developing a Computer-Based Assessment Instrument for Monitoring Student Reading Progress on Multiple Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Natalie; Souvignier, Elmar

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the technical adequacy of a computer-based assessment instrument which is based on hierarchical models of text comprehension for monitoring student reading progress following the Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM) approach. At intervals of two weeks, 120 third-grade students finished eight CBM tests. To…

  1. Quality of Life with Removable Dentures

    PubMed Central

    Hadzipasic-Nazdrajic, Amra

    2011-01-01

    Goal: To measure change in a quality of life after treatment with removable dentures and to describe differences in quality of life in patients with new and worn out dentures. Materials and methods: Measuring instrument was OHIP-49, translated from English into one of the languages in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Sample consisted of patients who wanted to make/replace mobile dentures or came to repair a broken dentures. Comprehensibility of the OHIP-BH49 was tested on a sub-sample of patients. Three measurements were made: before and after the insertion of dentu res and when patients came to repair their mobile dentures. Results: Sample consisted of 67 patients: 32 patients who sought prosthetic treatment, and 35 who came to repair their broken dentures. We received 89.7% correctly filled questionnaires. Minor changes were made in four (4) questions. Statistical analysis performed with the T-test revealed the significant differences, before and after the treatment with mobile dentures (t=39.5, p<0.001). There was a significant difference in OHIP scores in patients with a new dentures, compared to the patients who had worn out dentures (t=44.30, p<0.001). Substantial differences, between OHIP scores, regarding the time of wearing dentures or patients’ age were not observed. Discussion: Patients who wore dentures longer than 5 years, showed better quality of life, because they became accustomed to the dentures. Conclusions: Self-reported life quality improved considerably after insertion of a new dentures. Patients with a new dentures showed significantly better quality of life than patients with worn out dentures. One part of OHIP validation in Bosnia-Herzegovina has been done. PMID:23678299

  2. Quality of Life in Adults with Strabismus

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Melinda Y.; Velez, Federico G.; Demer, Joseph L.; Isenberg, Sherwin J.; Coleman, Anne L.; Pineles, Stacy L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess relative quality of life in patients with strabismus. Design Retrospective cohort study Methods The 25-item National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire (NEI VFQ-25) was performed in 42 strabismic adults over the age of 50 years at a single institution. Subscale scores were compared with those of patients with other ocular diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, cataract, cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis, and low vision. Results Median visual acuity was 20/20 (range 20/12.5 to 20/50), and 34 patients (81%) reported diplopia. Strabismic patients performed the same or worse on nearly all vision-related subscales than did patients with diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, cataract, and CMV retinitis. Additionally, strabismic patients reported significantly worse ocular pain than all comparison groups before any surgery was performed. Conclusions Strabismus impacts quality of life through both functional and psychosocial factors. Physicians treating strabismic patients should recognize these quality of life issues and address them accordingly. PMID:25498355

  3. Methodologies for defining quality of life

    SciTech Connect

    Glicken, J.; Engi, D.

    1996-10-10

    Quality of life as a concept has been used in many ways in the public policy arena. It can be used in summative evaluations to assess the impacts of policies or programs. Alternatively, it can be applied to formative evaluations to provide input to the formation of new policies. In short, it provides the context for the understanding needed to evaluate the results of choices that have been made in the public policy arena, or the potential of choices yet to be made. In either case, the public policy question revolves around the positive or negative impact the choice will have on quality of life, and the magnitude of that impact. This discussion will develop a conceptual framework that proposes that an assessment of quality of life is based on a comparison of expectations with experience. The framework defines four basic components from which these expectations arise: natural conditions, social conditions, the body, and the mind. Each one of these components is generally described, and associated with a general policy or rhetorical category which gives it its policy vocabulary--environmental quality, economic well-being, human health, and self-fulfillment.

  4. Quality of Life Among HIV-Infected Patients in Brazil after Initiation of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Lorenza Nogueira; César, Cibele Comini; Guimarães, Mark Drew Crosland

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Despite improvement in clinical treatment for HIV-infected patients, the impact of antiretroviral therapy on the overall quality of life has become a major concern. OBJECTIVE To identify factors associated with increased levels of self-reported quality of life among HIV-infected patients after four months of antiretroviral therapy. METHODS Patients were recruited at two public health referral centers for AIDS, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, for a prospective adherence study. Patients were interviewed before initiating treatment (baseline) and after one and four months. Quality of life was assessed using a psychometric instrument, and factors associated with good/very good quality of life four months after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy were assessed using a cross-sectional approach. Logistic regression was used for analysis. RESULTS Overall quality of life was classified as ‘very good/good’ by 66.4% of the participants four months after initiating treatment, while 33.6% classified it as ‘neither poor nor good/poor/very poor’. Logistic regression indicated that >8 years of education, none/mild symptoms of anxiety and depression, no antiretroviral switch, lower number of adverse reactions and better quality of life at baseline were independently associated with good/very good quality of life over four months of treatment. CONCLUSIONS Our results highlight the importance of modifiable factors such as psychiatric symptoms and treatment-related variables that may contribute to a better quality of life among patients initiating treatment. Considering that poor quality of life is related to non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy, careful clinical monitoring of these factors may contribute to ensuring the long-term effectiveness of antiretroviral regimens. PMID:19759880

  5. Cervical dystonia and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Tomic, Svetlana; Petkovic, Ivana; Pucic, Tomislav; Resan, Bojan; Juric, Stjepan; Rotim, Tatjana

    2016-12-01

    Cervical dystonia is focal dystonia characterized by involuntary movement of the neck muscle, which leads to abnormal head posture. It can be accompanied with pain and tremor. In this study, we evaluated the presence of depression and anxiety in patients with cervical dystonia and the influence of dystonia symptoms on the quality of life. Psychiatric symptoms were evaluated by use of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Beck Anxiety Inventory. Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) was used to evaluate the cervical dystonia symptoms. Quality of life was assessed by the craniocervical dystonia questionnaire (CDQ-24) and short form 36 health survey (SF-36). Nineteen patients were analyzed. Most of the patients had mild cervical dystonia (mean TWSTRS 23.89). Depression was present in 42.1 % and anxiety in 57.9 % of the patients. Disability due to cervical dystonia correlated with the occurrence of depression (ρ = 0.534) and anxiety (r = 0.652). Disability was found to significantly influence the stigma, emotional state, pain, daily activity, social life, physical function, and physical and mental disability. Pain influenced some aspects of body pain, physical function, and physical and mental disability. Being associated with disability and pain, cervical dystonia decreases the quality of life in many aspects. Disability also influenced depression and anxiety, which were present in half of study patients. In addition to follow up for cervical dystonia symptoms, patients with cervical dystonia should also be assessed for psychiatric symptoms on routine clinical check-ups. In addition to botulinum toxin, psychopharmaceuticals should be considered as a treatment option in these patients.

  6. Intermetropolitan migration and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Porell, F W

    1982-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the relative importance of economic and quality of life (QOL) factors as determinants of inter-metropolitan migration in the United States. The study is based on the generalized systemic gravity model of Alonso and on data from a sample of 25 SMSAs over the period 1965-1970. "The most striking feature of the empirical results is the apparent lack of importance of origin economic and QOL factors as determinants of outmigration.... On the other hand, the empirical results suggest both economic and QOL factors to be significant determinants of inmigration."

  7. Vision and quality-of-life.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, G C

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the relationship of visual acuity loss to quality of life. DESIGN: Three hundred twenty-five patients with visual loss to a minimum of 20/40 or greater in at least 1 eye were interviewed in a standardized fashion using a modified VF-14, questionnaire. Utility values were also obtained using both the time trade-off and standard gamble methods of utility assessment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Best-corrected visual acuity was correlated with the visual function score on the modified VF-14 questionnaire, as well as with utility values obtained using both the time trade-off and standard gamble methods. RESULTS: Decreasing levels of vision in the eye with better acuity correlated directly with decreasing visual function scores on the modified VF-14 questionnaire, as did decreasing utility values using the time trade-off method of utility evaluation. The standard gamble method of utility evaluation was not as directly correlated with vision as the time trade-off method. Age, level of education, gender, race, length of time of visual loss, and the number of associated systemic comorbidities did not significantly affect the time trade-off utility values associated with visual loss in the better eye. The level of reduced vision in the better eye, rather than the specific disease process causing reduced vision, was related to mean utility values. The average person with 20/40 vision in the better seeing eye was willing to trade 2 of every 10 years of life in return for perfect vision (utility value of 0.8), while the average person with counting fingers vision in the better eye was willing to trade approximately 5 of every 10 remaining years of life (utility value of 0.52) in return for perfect vision. CONCLUSIONS: The time trade-off method of utility evaluation appears to be an effective method for assessing quality of life associated with visual loss. Time trade-off utility values decrease in direct conjunction with decreasing vision in the better

  8. Quality of Life of Students with Disabilites Attending Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Zboon, Eman; Ahmad, Jamal Fathi; Theeb, Raied Sheikh

    2014-01-01

    In spite of increasing number of students with disabilities in universities, there is limited research on quality of life of these students. This study aimed to identify the quality of life level of undergraduate students with disabilities at Jordanian universities. The sample consisted of (147) students. A quality of life scale was constructed,…

  9. Ways that Social Change Predicts Personal Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Chau-Kiu; Leung, Kwok

    2010-01-01

    A notable way that social change affects personal quality of life would rely on the person's experience with social change. This experience may influence societal quality of life and quality of work life, which may in turn affect personal quality of life. Additionally, the experience of social change is possibly less detrimental to personal…

  10. The Impact of Financial Crisis on the Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rova, Lindita; Mano, Romeo

    2009-01-01

    The quality of life is a relatively new concept, which is continually changing and for which there is not yet a wholly satisfactory definition. The quality of life involves human, social-economic and health characteristics. The manifold nature of the quality of life led to the development of various patterns for measuring it. The quality of life…

  11. Quality of life theory III. Maslow revisited.

    PubMed

    Ventegodt, Søren; Merrick, Joav; Andersen, Niels Jørgen

    2003-10-13

    In 1962, Abraham Maslow published his book Towards a Psychology of Being, and established a theory of quality of life, which still is considered a consistent theory of quality of life. Maslow based his theory for development towards happiness and true being on the concept of human needs. He described his approach as an existentialistic psychology of self-actualization, based on personal growth. When we take more responsibility for our own life, we take more of the good qualities that we have into use, and we become more free, powerful, happy, and healthy. It seems that Maslow's concept of self-actualization can play an important role in modern medicine. As most chronic diseases often do not disappear in spite of the best biomedical treatments, it might be that the real change our patients have for betterment is understanding and living the noble path of personal development. The hidden potential for improving life really lies in helping the patient to acknowledge that his or her lust for life, his or her needs, and his or her wish to contribute, is really deep down in human existence one and the same. But you will only find this hidden meaning of life if you scrutinize your own life and existence closely enough, to come to know your innermost self.

  12. Quality of Life in Patients Following Vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Rapan, Sasa; Batrnek, Jasna; Rapan, Vjeran; Biuk, Egon; Rapan, Domagoj

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To examine the quality of life in patients who underwent vertebroplasty treatment and compare it to the preoperative quality of life. STUDY DESIGN: The Cross-sectional study conducted at the Department of Orthopaedics, Clinical Hospital Centre Osijek. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The research included 50 patients under stationary treatment in hospital at the Department of Orthopaedics. The research instruments include a questionnaire containing demographic data and the standardised EuroQuol Research Foundation Questionnaire (EQ-5D-5L) consisting of five dimensions which include mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain level and anxiety. RESULTS: The average score of the current health status before surgery was 67.5 whereas post-operative health was rated 80 (p < 0.001). After the procedure, a significantly higher number of respondents reported greater mobility levels, and lower pain intensity; fewer respondents reported feeling anxious or depressed (p < 0.001), more respondents rated their self-care abilities higher (p = 0.003), and felt improvements when performing usual activities (p = 0.031). CONCLUSION: After the vertebroplasty, a significantly higher number of respondents reported higher levels of mobility, lower pain or discomfort levels, and a smaller number of respondents felt anxious or depressed, more respondents felt they can take better care of themselves, and are better at performing usual activities when compared to the preoperative status. PMID:28293315

  13. Health-related quality-of-life scales in Parkinson's disease: critique and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Jeukens-Visser, Martine; Lyons, Kelly E; Rodriguez-Blazquez, C; Selai, Caroline; Siderowf, Andrew; Welsh, Mickie; Poewe, Werner; Rascol, Oliver; Sampaio, Cristina; Stebbins, Glenn T; Goetz, Christopher G; Schrag, Anette

    2011-11-01

    Health-related quality of life is an important patient-reported outcome used in intervention trials and for monitoring the consequences of health status on physical, mental, and social domains. Parkinson's disease is a complex disorder that strongly affects patients' quality of life. Several health-related quality of life tools have been used in Parkinson's disease. A Movement Disorder Society Task Force was commissioned to rate the psychometric quality of available health-related quality of life scales as applied to Parkinson's disease. Following the methodology adopted by previous work of the Movement Disorder Society Task Force, a review of generic and specific health-related quality of life scales applied in studies on Parkinson's disease was completed. Considering the scales from 3 perspectives-use in Parkinson's disease, use by multiple research groups, and clinimetric properties-a final classification as "recommended," "suggested," or "listed" was applied to each reviewed instrument. Four generic scales (EuroQoL, Nottingham Health Profile, 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, and Sickness Impact Profile) and 5 specific scales (39-Item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire, Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire Short Form, Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, Parkinson's Impact Scale, and Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson's Disease-Psychosocial) reached the level of "recommended." The 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire is the most thoroughly tested and applied questionnaire. Three other generic measures (Quality of Life Questionnaire 15D, Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life-Direct Weighting, and World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment Short Version) and the specific Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Scale are "suggested." With a little additional effort in completing the stipulated requirements, they could reach the "recommended" level. At present there is a wide variety of health-related quality of life measures

  14. Health, Quality of Life and Population Density: A Preliminary Study on "Contextualized" Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fassio, Omar; Rollero, Chiara; De Piccoli, Norma

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life concerns individual (physical and psychological health), interpersonal (social relationships) and contextual (environment) aspects, which are both subjective and objective. In considering contextual characteristics, empirical findings have demonstrated that people's relation to their living environment is a key issue for their…

  15. [Osteogenesis imperfecta: quality of life in children].

    PubMed

    Fano, Virginia; del Pino, Mariana; Rodríguez Celin, Mercedes; Buceta, Susana; Obregón, M Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    The impact produced by osteogenesis imperfecta in childrens' quality of life almost has not been reported; 65 children, 38 males, were evaluated according to the questionnaire PedsQL 4.0 Argentinean Spanish version. Median age was 7.76 years; 35 children with OI type I were compared with 30 type III-IV (according to Sillence Classification) finding significant difference in the physical domain in both visions, children and parents, and only in parents' vision in the social area. Multivariate analysis showed an association between better PedQL scores and treatment compliance (coef. β= 19.41 p= 0.03) in children's vision. In parental report on the other hand, the association was found with greater pamidronate doses (coef. β 1.44 p=0.037), lower height compromise (coef. β= 3.8; p= 0.039) and less number of fractures (coef. β= 0.69; p= 0.003).

  16. Quality of life of Palestinian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Thweib, Nasser

    2011-04-01

    Cancer is known to be one of the worst diseases on the planet; it highly affects Palestinians; it is the third leading cause of death in Palestine. The main purpose of the research is to highlight the concept of Quality of Life (QOL) for Palestinian cancer patients through providing an understanding about influences of cancer and chemotherapy on QOL of cancer patient. QOL was measured using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer questionnaire EORTC QLQ-C30 (version 3.0) which founded to be valid and reliable in diverse cultures, including, the United Arab Emirates, Iran, Turkey, Japan, India, China, Korea, and Nigeria. Results about QOL were low in all aspects; most of them were less than the half of full function, and, more intense symptoms and negative effects were found to be in Palestinian cancer patients.

  17. Topophilia and the Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Ogunseitan, Oladele A.

    2005-01-01

    With this research I tested the hypothesis that individual preferences for specific ecosystem components and restorative environments are significantly associated with quality of life (QOL). A total of 379 human subjects responded to a structured 18-item questionnaire on topophilia and to the 26-item World Health Organization’s Quality of Life (WHOQOL-Bref) instrument. Confirmatory factor analyses revealed four domains of topophilia (ecodiversity, synesthetic tendency, cognitive challenge, and familiarity) and four domains of QOL (physical, psychological, social, and environmental). Synesthetic tendency was the strongest domain of topophilia, whereas the psychological aspect of QOL was the strongest. Structural equation modeling was used to explore the adequacy of a theoretical model linking topophilia and QOL. The model fit the data extremely well: χ2 = 5.02, p = 0.414; correlation = 0.12 (p = 0.047). All four domains of topophilia were significantly correlated with the level of restoration experienced by respondents at their current domicile [for cognitive challenge: r = 0.19; p < 0.01; familiarity: r = 0.12; p < 0.05; synesthetic tendency: r = 0.18; p < 0.01; ecodiversity (the highest value): r = 0.28; p < 0.01]. Within ecodiversity, preferences for water and flowers were associated with high overall QOL (r = 0.162 and 0.105, respectively; p < 0.01 and 0.05, respectively). Within the familiarity domain, identifiability was associated with the environmental domain of QOL (r = 0.115; p < 0.05), but not with overall QOL. These results provide a new methodologic framework for linking environmental quality and human health and for implementing evidence-based provision of restorative environments through targeted design of built environments to enhance human QOL. PMID:15687050

  18. [Quality of life in menopause. Experimental research].

    PubMed

    Di Corrado, D; Di Nuovo, S; Catalano, D; Squatrito, R; Sciacchitano, G; Trovato, G M

    2001-01-01

    Psychophysiological relationship in menopausal women was explored by the comparison of stress level and resistance to stress and related symptoms: socio-economic and cultural variables and willingness to participate into a specific therapeutic program were taken into account. One hundred women, aged 44-59 years (54.2 +/- 5.64), that consecutively were referred to an out-patient menopausal Clinic, were studied by a questionnaire that evaluates quality of life (qol) derived and adapted from the Sickness Impact Profile and the Functional Living Test; moreover the test MSP (psychological stress measurement), translated from the original and adapted to Italy, was used. Psychological complaints of women examined are minimal: adaptation tests are substantially normal, and stress index measurements are even lower in comparison with a gender and age matched population group. Our results suggest that after a short period of psychological tension at the onset of climaterium, women acquire a positive, stable status, well different from stereotypes and prejudices around psychological disturbance associated with menopause. Minimal relevance of perceived disturbance seems the reason that limits the women's need and request for a specific therapy. Menopausal depression seems more related to life changes than to hormonal alterations. Reduced physical fitness, increased risk of parental death, difficulty to cope with new roles, apart the care of adult sons or daughters. A critical point is socio-economic level and the possibility to maintain a satisfying work. Contextual conditions, and specially degree of instruction, type of role change inside the family and number of sons, appears the most evident and relevant variables that mediate psychophysical conditions and perceived quality of life.

  19. Quality of Life, Health Status, and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Nancy A.; Evangelista, Lorraine S.; Doering, Lynn V.; Eastwood, Jo-Ann; Lewis, Alan B.; Child, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QOL) in adolescents and adults who have undergone the Fontan procedure and are living with only 1 ventricle is presumed to be diminished. Objectives This study aimed to compare QOL, health status, and prevalence of depression in adolescents/adults after the Fontan procedure with healthy counterparts and to identify predictors of QOL in the Fontan group. Methods Using a comparative, cross-sectional design, 54 adolescents and adults with single ventricle congenital heart disease who have undergone the Fontan procedure were compared with 66 age-matched healthy counterparts. Quality of life, health status, depression, and social support were measured using the Satisfaction With Life Scale, Short Form Survey Version 2, Patient Health Questionnaire Depression Module, and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Clinical variables were abstracted from medical records. Predictors of QOL were determined using multiple linear regression. Results Adolescents and adults in the Fontan group reported lower physical health status (mean [SD] = 46.5 [9.3] vs mean [SD] = 55.9 [5.1], P < .001) and were more depressed (mean [SD] = 7.3 [5.9] vs mean [SD] = 4.5 [4.3], P < .004) than their healthy counterparts. There were no differences in QOL, mental health status, or social support between the 2 groups. Functional status (New York Heart Association class), depression, and social support accounted for 55% of the variance in QOL in the Fontan group. Conclusions Despite lower levels of physical health, the QOL of Fontan patients was comparable with that of their healthy counterparts; this finding contradicts previous proxy reports, self-reports, and assumptions that QOL is lower in patients with complex single ventricle congenital heart disease. However, because Fontan patients were more depressed than their healthy counterparts, the need for early screening and detection is warranted. PMID:21912272

  20. Effect of home care service on the quality of life in patients with gynecological cancer.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Demet; Terzioglu, Fusun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to determine the effect of home care service on the quality of life in patients with gynecological cancer. This randomized case control study was carried out in a womans hospital between September 2011 and February 2012. Women undergoing gynecological cancer treatment were separated into intervention and control groups, of 35 patients each. The intervention group was provided with nursing care service through hospital and home visits (1st, 12th weeks) within the framework of a specifically developed nursing care plan. The control group was monitored without any intervention through the hospital routine protocols (1st, 12th weeks). Data were collected using An Interview Form, Home Visit Monitoring Form and Quality of Life Scale/Cancer Survivors. Effects of home care service on the quality of life in gynecological cancer patients were investigated using chi-square tests, McNemar's test, independent t-test and ANOVA. This study found that the intervention group receiving home care service had a moderately high quality of life (average mean: 6.01±0.64), while the control group had comparatively lower quality (average mean: 4.35±0.79) within the 12 week post- discharge period (p<0.05). This study found home care services to be efficient in improving the quality of life in patients with gynecological cancer.

  1. [Quality of life and oral health in children].

    PubMed

    Versloot, J; Klaassen, M A

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, research on the influence of oral health on quality of life among children has become increasingly popular Half of the children and adolescents will have had moments of diminished oral health and that can lead to functional problems, pain and decreased quality of life. While measuring oral health-related quality of life of children, reports of parents are frequently used as a proxy. Diminished oral health not only has an impact on the child's quality of life, but also on that of his family members. Results from studies on oral health-related quality of life in children may be used as the basis for useful guidance for parents and children on improving oral health and quality of life.

  2. Dimensions of Identity and Subjective Quality of Life in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Oleś, Maria

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relations between identity statuses and the perceived quality of life in adolescents aged 16-19. The research methods include the Ego Identity Process Questionnaire to assess identity status of a sample covering 233 participants (148 girls, 85 boys), and the Youth Quality of Life Instrument to assess their subjective quality of life. Diffused identity is linked to the lowest level of subjective quality of life, whereas foreclosed identity to the highest. Five patterns of the connection between identity dimensions and perceived quality of life have been distinguished through cluster analysis. The results indicate that different patterns of identity processes in adolescents coexist with different levels of quality of life.

  3. [Influence of stomatological health upon the quality of life].

    PubMed

    Simanovskaia, O E

    2008-01-01

    The parameters of quality of life of 58 stomatological patients were investigated. 3 groups of dentist health were allocated. On the basis of correlation dependence was proved that stomatological diseases sharply reduced the quality of life and health. The application for the invention is issued, allowing to define individual volume of treatment-and-prophylactic actions depending the parameters of quality of life.

  4. Quality of Life in Food Allergy Patients and Their Families.

    PubMed

    Walkner, Madeline; Warren, Christopher; Gupta, Ruchi S

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric food allergy is a growing health problem in the United States that has been found to adversely impact the quality of life of both affected children and their caregivers. This article provides a review of how food allergy affects the quality of life of patients and their families within the domains of school, social activities, relationships, and daily life. Efforts to improve food allergy-related quality of life among caregivers are also discussed.

  5. Hot Flashes and Quality of Life Among Breast Cancer Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    Quality of Life Among Breast Cancer Patients 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03-1-0264 5c. PROGRAM...used approach to manage hot flashes with 44.2% of sample currently exercising . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast Cancer , Hot Flashes, Quality of Life ... breast cancer patients who were menopausal prior to treatment, at any of the time-points. b. to examine longitudinally the quality of life

  6. Predicting reading outcomes in the classroom using a computer-based phonological awareness screening and monitoring assessment (Com-PASMA).

    PubMed

    Carson, Karyn; Boustead, Therese; Gillon, Gail

    2014-12-01

    The screening and monitoring of phonological awareness (PA) in the classroom is of great importance to the early identification and prevention of reading disorder. This study investigated whether a time-efficient computer-based PA screening and monitoring assessment (Com-PASMA) could accurately predict end-of-year reading outcomes for 5-year-old children in the first year of schooling. A longitudinal design was employed where the Com-PASMA was used to measure the PA ability of 95 5-year-old children at the start, middle, and end of the first year of school. Of this group, 21 children presented with spoken language impairment. Reading outcomes were formally measured after 1 year of schooling. School-entry measures of PA using the Com-PASMA (p < .001), in conjunction with language ability (p = .004), accounted for 68.9% of the variance in end-of-year word decoding ability. Sensitivity and specificity calculations demonstrated that the Com-PASMA was 92% accurate at school-entry, and 94% accurate by the middle of the school year in predicting reading outcomes at 6-years of age. Results suggest that a time-efficient computer-based method of screening and monitoring PA can support the early identification of reading difficulties in the first year of schooling.

  7. Quality of life of women with osteoporosis - review of literature.

    PubMed

    Baczyk, Grazyna

    2009-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disease characterized by low bone mass and architectural derangements leading to an increased fracture risk. Evaluation of the quality of life of patients with osteoporosis concerns the physical, emotional, social and pain QoL domains. Quality of life can be measured to compare the effect of different treatments of osteoporosis. The assessment of quality of life is also useful in epidemiological studies to estimate the burden of disease and to evaluate the effectiveness of different treatments. The principal goals of health care for these patients are to maintain independence and preserve good quality of life.

  8. Quality of life in contemporary nursing theory: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Marilyn; Molzahn, Anita E

    2009-04-01

    A critical appraisal of the concept, quality of life, as used in nursing theories, is presented in a historically situated context. This approach to concept analysis was selected to illuminate the subjective, contextual, and fluid nature of the concept. Based on this review, quality of life is defined as an intangible, subjective perception of one's lived experience. From a review of Peplau's, Rogers', Leininger's, King's, and Parse's conceptualizations of quality of life, it is concluded that it may be viable to replace health with quality of life as a metaparadigm concept for nursing.

  9. Reliability and Validity of Daily Self-Monitoring by Smartphone Application for Health-Related Quality-of-Life, Antiretroviral Adherence, Substance Use, and Sexual Behaviors Among People Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Comulada, W. Scott; Ramanathan, Nithya; Lazar, Maya; Estrin, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines inter-method reliability and validity of daily self-reports by smartphone application compared to 14-day recall web-surveys repeated over 6 weeks with people living with HIV (PLH). A participatory sensing framework guided participant-centered design prioritizing external validity of methods for potential applications in both research and self-management interventions. Inter-method reliability correlations were consistent with prior research for physical and mental health quality-of-life (r = 0.26–0.61), antiretroviral adherence (r = 0.70–0.73), and substance use (r = 0.65–0.92) but not for detailed sexual encounter surveys (r = 0.15–0.61). Concordant and discordant pairwise comparisons show potential trends in reporting biases, for example, lower recall reports of unprotected sex or alcohol use, and rounding up errors for frequent events. Event-based reporting likely compensated for modest response rates to daily time-based prompts, particularly for sexual and drug use behaviors that may not occur daily. Recommendations are discussed for future continuous assessment designs and analyses. PMID:25331266

  10. Quality of life assessment in haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Bullinger, Monika; von Mackensen, Sylvia

    2004-03-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is a recent focus of research in haemophilia. It can be defined--in analogy to the World Health Organization (WHO) definition of health--as patient-perceived wellbeing and function in terms of physical, emotional, mental, social and behavioural life domains. The paper describes conceptual, methodological and practical foundations of QoL research in adults and children at an international level. It then proceeds to review the QoL literature in the field of haemophilia. With regard to assessment of QoL in haemophilia patients, both generic and very recently targeted instruments have been applied. Recent publications have focused on describing QoL in adults, showing specific impairments in terms of physical function (arthropathy) and mental wellbeing (HIV infection) as well as focusing on the cost-benefit (QoL) ratio of haemophilia care. In paediatric haemophilia, research has suggested the beneficial QoL outcomes with prophylaxis and stressed the role of the family for patients' wellbeing and function. QoL research is a relevant area for haemophilia research which should be pursued further.

  11. Quality of Life in Sarcopenia and Frailty

    PubMed Central

    Rizzoli, René; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Arnal, Jean-François; Bautmans, Ivan; Beaudart, Charlotte; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike; Biver, Emmanuel; Boonen, Steven; Brandi, Maria-Luisa; Chines, Arkadi; Cooper, Cyrus; Epstein, Sol; Fielding, Roger A.; Goodpaster, Bret; Kanis, John A.; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Laslop, Andrea; Malafarina, Vincenzo; Mañas, Leocadio Rodriguez; Mitlak, Bruce H.; Oreffo, Richard O.; Petermans, Jean; Reid, Kieran; Rolland, Yves; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Tsouderos, Yannis; Visser, Marjolein; Bruyère, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The reduced muscle mass and impaired muscle performance that defines sarcopenia in older individuals is associated with increased risk of physical limitation and a variety of chronic diseases. It may also contribute to clinical frailty. A gradual erosion of quality of life (QoL) has been evidenced in these individuals, although much of this research has been done using generic QoL instruments, particularly the SF-36, which may not be ideal in older populations with significant comorbidities. This review and report of an expert meeting, presents the current definitions of these geriatric syndromes (sarcopenia and frailty). It then briefly summarises QoL concepts and specificities in older populations, examines the relevant domains of QoL and what is known concerning QoL decline with these conditions. It calls for a clearer definition of the construct of disability and argues that a disease-specific QoL instrument for sarcopenia/frailty would be an asset for future research and discusses whether there are available and validated components that could be used to this end and whether the psychometric properties of these instruments are sufficiently tested. It calls also for an approach using utility weighting to provide some cost estimates and suggests that a time trade off study could be appropriate. PMID:23828275

  12. Quality of life after tonsillectomy versus azithromycin

    PubMed Central

    El Hennawi, Diaa El Din Mohamed; Rifaat Ahmed, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Background Recurrent tonsillitis is a common disease with marked evidence of affecting children quality of life (QOL) such as their progression in school and increased burden to extended families. The aim of this study was to compare the QOL outcomes after conventional dissection tonsillectomy versus azithromycin treatment in controlling recurrent tonsillitis. Methods A double-blind, randomized clinical trial was carried out in 184 children with recurrent tonsillitis randomly divided into two groups: Group A was subjected to conventional dissection tonsillectomy, whereas Group B received single 250 mg (children ≤25 kg) and 500 mg (children ≥25 kg) of oral azithromycin once weekly. Results There were no significant differences between the groups with regard to ear, nose, and throat infections during the 5-year follow-up. Better QOL was observed in both groups when compared with the pretreatment, but similar QOL in both groups QOL after treatment. Conclusion Azithromycin is an effective method as a prophylaxis against recurrent tonsillitis with a great benefit for better QOL outcomes. PMID:28180002

  13. AD/HD Health Related Quality of Life Questionnaire Completed by Children or Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Deborah; Clarke, Simon; Kohn, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Assessing health-related quality of life (HQOL) for children or adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) to corroborate a diagnosis and monitor treatment outcomes, is usually relegated to parent, teacher and physician observation of the child/adolescent. Allowing adults to act as proxy reporters for children/adolescents…

  14. Variability of Quality of Life at Small Scales: Addis Ababa, Kirkos Sub-City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesfazghi, Elsa Sereke; Martinez, J. A.; Verplanke, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    Urban quality of life (QoL) is becoming a subject of urban research mainly for western and Asian countries. Such attention is due to an increasing awareness of the contribution of QoL studies in identifying intervention areas and in monitoring urban planning policies. However, most studies are carried out at city or country level that can average…

  15. The monitoring and managing application of cloud computing based on Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shiliang; Ren, Bin

    2016-07-01

    Cloud computing and the Internet of Things are the two hot points in the Internet application field. The application of the two new technologies is in hot discussion and research, but quite less on the field of medical monitoring and managing application. Thus, in this paper, we study and analyze the application of cloud computing and the Internet of Things on the medical field. And we manage to make a combination of the two techniques in the medical monitoring and managing field. The model architecture for remote monitoring cloud platform of healthcare information (RMCPHI) was established firstly. Then the RMCPHI architecture was analyzed. Finally an efficient PSOSAA algorithm was proposed for the medical monitoring and managing application of cloud computing. Simulation results showed that our proposed scheme can improve the efficiency about 50%.

  16. Predicting young children's quality of life.

    PubMed

    Jirojanakul, Pragai; Skevington, Suzanne M; Hudson, John

    2003-10-01

    This paper represents an investigation into the determinants of young children's quality of life (QOL) in Thailand. The empirical work is based upon a sample of 498 children (aged 5-8); 220 were urban children and 278 children of construction workers in Bangkok. Their QOL was assessed using a new self-report QOL measure for children. Multiple regression analyses indicated that the father's income and education, type of school, mode of transportation to school, and the amount of time that the child spent on extra study courses were significant explanatory variables. It was found that these factors had different influences on the QOL of urban children and those of construction workers. Extra sport-related activities and extra work (other than housework) improved the QOL of urban children, while the QOL of construction workers' children was directly linked to father's education and income. This result is consistent with income having a diminishing marginal effect on the QOL of children. There is also evidence that amongst construction workers' children, boys have a lower QOL than girls. The different causal explanations for the QOL of urban and construction workers' children suggests that it is context specific, and what impacts one group of children's QOL within a particular context may not impact another group in a different situation. This has important policy implications. Throughout the study we could find no significant impact of health on QOL-neither chronic, acute nor severe illness has any significant impact on QOL. This is consistent with the hypothesis that QOL is influenced by expectations (Social Science and Medicine 41 (10) (1995) 1403). Findings of the effects of social and environmental factors on children's QOL are new in this field and should be further investigated.

  17. Quality of life in asthma patients.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lara Noronha; Brito, Ulisses; Ferreira, Pedro Lopes

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a study whose main aim is the measurement of the Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) of patients with asthma and the presentation of a first draft of normative values as measured by the SF-6D for asthma patients. In addition, we investigate how far non-disease-specific HRQoL measures can distinguish groups in terms of sociodemographic characteristics. The Portuguese versions of the EQ-5D, SF-6D, AQLQ(S) and ACQ were administered using personal interviews to a representative sample of the Portuguese population with asthma. Most of the individuals did not report significant problems in the dimensions used, with the exception of the physical functioning, where individuals reported moderate limitations. The mean utility value was 0.86. Male gender, young, single, individuals with high educational attainment level, employed, individuals with high income and those residing in urban areas reported higher utility levels. As expected, those who were in a severe stadium of the disease reported lower mean utility levels than those who were in a less severe stadium of the disease. Normative values for the SF-6D were computed for patients with asthma by gender, age, marital status, educational attainment level, employment status, area of residence and average monthly net income. The preference-based measures used in this study distinguish patient groups with asthma in terms of socio- demographic groups. The normative values can be used in economic evaluation and clinical studies as they incorporate patients' preferences and translate the value attributed to patients' health state.

  18. What is quality of life and how do we measure it? Relevance to Parkinson's disease and movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Martin, Pablo

    2017-03-01

    Health-related quality of life is a patient-reported outcome that complements clinical evaluation and provides information about disease activity and effects of the treatment. The objective of this review is to present the conceptual framework, the measures, and some of their most relevant applications in the field of Parkinson's disease and movement disorders. Health-related quality of life is a subjective, individual, and multidimensional construct, and its main dimensions are physical, mental, and social, besides global perceptions of health and personal domains. Health-related quality of life measurement is carried out by means of questionnaires or scales, ideally self-applied by patients, and has a diversity of important applications for clinical practice, research, and health policy. Movement disorders and Parkinson's disease are complex conditions impacting all components of patients' health-related quality of life. The use of health-related quality of life tools provides important information on a variety of aspects that are important to patients while complementing clinical evaluations. In particular, studies using this kind of assessment can identify and monitor the most important health-related quality of life determinant factors, allowing tailored assistance and prioritized interventions. In addition, maintaining or improving the patients' health-related quality of life is an objective of care for chronic diseases and, therefore, it has to be monitored over time and as an outcome of clinical trials. Several methods are available for the interpretation of the change in scores of health-related quality of life measures, although a definitive agreement on the most appropriate method is yet to be determined. Presently, health-related quality of life assessment is an important outcome for research and management of chronic conditions such as Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  19. Source, Method, and Surmise: Quality of Life in History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the essay is to demonstrate that study of quality of life can explore eras before our own. There are caches of social data as early as the seventeenth century, and there were people who attempted to formulate social circumstances close to today's concepts of quality of life. Data from England and Ireland are presented and analyzed.

  20. Validity of the Family Quality of Life Survey-2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Adrienne; Isaacs, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Family Quality of Life (FQOL) is an important construct in the Intellectual Disabilities field. Several measures exist, including one developed by an international group, the Family Quality of Life Survey-2006 (FQOLS-2006; Brown et al.2006). However, the psychometric properties of this measure have yet to be fully investigated. This…

  1. Quality of Life of Older Malaysians Living Alone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahaya, Nurizan; Abdullah, Siti Suhailah; Momtaz, Yadollah Abolfathi; Hamid, Tengku Aizan

    2010-01-01

    According to the 2000 census report, about 7% of the 1.4 million people 60 years and over in Malaysia live alone. This study investigated socioeconomic factors affecting the quality of life of this vulnerable population. Data from a subsample of the study on Mental Health and Quality of Life of Older Malaysians were used in this paper. About 10%…

  2. Quality of Life in Ageing Societies: Italy, Portugal, and Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arun, Ozgur; Cevik, Aylin Cakiroglu

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and analyze the quality of life of the elderly in three aging countries: Italy, Portugal, and Turkey. This was done by using data provided by the European Quality of Life Survey completed in 2004. By doing so, we could then operationalize the conditions of the elderly in Turkey who have a rapid aging process…

  3. Reduced quality of life in very overweight Mexican American adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quality of life (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, PedsQL) was assessed for 175 Mexican American adolescents with measured height and weight used to determine body mass index (BMI) percentile/weight classification. Main effects for weight classification were detected using One-way ANOVAs (p < .05...

  4. Relationship Between Quality of Life and Depression in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Abbaszadeh, Fatemeh; Kafaei Atrian, Mahboobe; Masoudi Alavi, Negin; Bagheri, Azam; Sadat, Zohreh; Karimian, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Quality of life differs for different people in different situations and is related to one's self-satisfaction with life. Quality of life is affected by health status. Objectives: The current study examined the relationship between quality of life and depression in pregnant women in Kashan city. Patients and Methods: A Case - control study was performed on 112 depressed pregnant women (Case Group) and 353 Non-depressed pregnant women (Control Group) who referred to the prenatal health care centers of Kashan University of Medical Sciences .They completed Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) to assess the quality of life and the Beck Depression Inventory to assess the level of depressive symptoms. T-test, chi-square and Pearson correlation coefficient statistical tests were used for data analysis. Results: The findings showed that there was an inverse relationship between quality of life and depression in pregnancy (P = 0.0001). Average scores in all eight domains of quality of life were significantly lower in depressed pregnant women compared to non- depressed women. The strongest relationship was observed between depression and vitality (r =-0.52, P = 0.0001), mental health (r = -0.50, P = 0.001) and social functioning (r =-0.38, P = 0.001). Conclusion: Depressed pregnant women had a lower quality of life. The proper management of depression during pregnancy can improve the quality of life in women. It is recommended that antenatal services integrate screening for depression into routine antenatal care. PMID:25414858

  5. ON QUALITY OF LIFE AND THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The theme of the ’quality of life ’ has become a focal point in recent public discussions of social policy issues. In this case, as so often...whose presence or absence (presumably to a varying extent) could appropriately be regarded as coming upon the stage of discussion when questions of a higher or lesser quality of life are mooted.

  6. Quality of Life. Volume II: Application to Persons with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schalock, Robert L., Ed.; Siperstein, Gary N., Ed.

    This volume summarizes current policies and programmatic practices that are influencing the quality of life of persons with mental retardation and developmental disabilities. Part 1, "Service Delivery Application," contains: "Using Person-Centered Planning To Address Personal Quality of Life" (John Butterworth and others); "The Aftermath of…

  7. Quality of life and characteristics of diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Karina; Gouvêa, Giovana Renata; Silva, Marco Antonio Viera da; Possobon, Rosana de Fátima; Barbosa, Luis Fernando de Lima Nunes; Pereira, Antonio Carlos; Miranda, Luciane Guerra; Cortellazzi, Karine Laura

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to assess the association between quality of life and clinical and sociodemographic variables in type 2 diabetes patients, after they had started treatment in Primary and Specialized Health Care. This is an analytical cross-sectional study with a sampling of diabetic patients from Primary (n = 385) and Specialized (n = 385) Health Care. The dependent variable, quality of life, was evaluated by the Diabetes Quality of Life Measure - Brazil. Clinical and sociodemographic data were collected. Bivariate analysis by chi square test tested the association between the dependent variable with the independent ones. Next, we performed an analysis of multiple logistic regression. In Specialized Health Care, individuals who practice physical activity had less chance of having worse quality of life and those with less time of diagnosis presented higher chance of worse quality of life. In Primary Health Care, those who performed diets and presented glycated hemoglobin ≤ 7% had less chance of having worse quality of life. Women presented higher chances of worse quality of life than men. We concluded that with exception to the time of diagnosis and sex, other variables that influenced quality of life of diabetics were modifiable factors (glycated hemoglobin, alimentary diet and physical activity).

  8. Evaluation of a combined strategy directed towards health-care professionals and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): Information and health education feedback for improving clinical monitoring and quality-of-life

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a health problem that is becoming increasingly attended-to in Primary Care (PC). However, there is a scarcity of health-care programs and studies exploring the implementation of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG). The principal objective of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a combined strategy directed towards health-care professionals and patients to improve the grade of clinical control and the quality-of-life (QoL) of the patients via a feedback on their state-of-health. A training plan for the health-care professionals is based on CPG and health education. Method/Design Multi-centred, before-after, quasi experimental, prospective study involving an intervention group and a control group of individuals followed-up for 12 months. The patients receive attention from urban and semi-urban Primary Care Centres (PCC) within the administrative area of the Costa de Ponent (near Barcelona). All the pacients corresponding to the PCC of one sub-area were assigned to the intervention group and patients from the rest of sub-areas to the group control. The intervention includes providing data to the health-care professionals (clinician/nurse) derived from a clinical history and an interview. A course of training focused on aspects of CPG, motivational interview and health education (tobacco, inhalers, diet, physical exercise, physiotherapy). The sample random includes a total of 801 patients (≥ 40 years of age), recorded as having COPD, receiving attention in the PCC or at home, who have had at least one clinical visit, and who provided written informed consent to participation in the study. Data collected include socio-demographic characteristics, drug treatment, exacerbations and hospital admissions, evaluation of inhaler use, tobacco consumption and life-style and health-care resources consumed. The main endpoints are dyspnoea, according to the modified scale of the Medical Research Council

  9. Exploratory Study on Drug Users' Perspectives on Quality of Life: More than Health-Related Quality of Life?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Maeyer, Jessica; Vanderplasschen, Wouter; Broekaert, Eric

    2009-01-01

    In drug treatment outcome literature, a focus on objective and socially desirable indicators of change (e.g. no drug use) has predominated, while outcome indicators that are important for drug users themselves (e.g. quality of life, satisfaction with treatment) have largely been neglected. Nonetheless, Quality of Life (QoL) has become an important…

  10. Computer-based diagnostic monitoring to enhance the human-machine interface of complex processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, I.S.

    1992-02-01

    There is a growing interest in introducing an automated, on-line, diagnostic monitoring function into the human-machine interfaces (HMIs) or control rooms of complex process plants. The design of such a system should be properly integrated with other HMI systems in the control room, such as the alarms system or the Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS). This paper provides a conceptual foundation for the development of a Plant-wide Diagnostic Monitoring System (PDMS), along with functional requirements for the system and other advanced HMI systems. Insights are presented into the design of an efficient and robust PDMS, which were gained from a critical review of various methodologies developed in the nuclear power industry, the chemical process industry, and the space technological community.

  11. Socio-economical factors that influence the perception of quality of life in patients with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Abobului, M; Berghea, F; Vlad, V; Balanescu, A; Opris, D; Bojinca, V; Predeteanu, D; Ionescu, R

    2015-01-01

    The appearance of osteoporosis in elders and the growth of the frequency which it is diagnosed with as we approach patients who are older and older, makes this health problem very important in the societies in which a high number of persons reach old age. These societies, usually belonging to economically advanced jurisdictions, are the first interested in the way health expenses can balance the benefits of the quality of life acquired in these groups of population. The evaluation of the quality of life has become a very important process, which still raises methodological problems to the researchers. The aim of this study was to analyze to what extent the factors involved in defining the quality of life by the patients modified according to the existence of osteoporosis as a defined but also as a perceived disease, as far as it is considered a serious or less serious affection by each patient. 210 female patients participated in the study. The statistical analysis was done by using SPSS 22.0 (IBM Corp. - U.S.A.). p < 0,05 was used as a limit for the statistical significance. Descriptive and analytical analyses were made by following Pearson correlation index in cases of normal distributions, the comparison between groups was made by using t-Student test, respectively chi square test in the cases which required its use. The current study highlights a direct relationship between the quality of life, as it is perceived by the patients, and the quality of the health status, which is more important than the relationship between the quality of life and the other objectives measured by WHOQOL scale. This study also shows that for the Romanian patient diagnosed with osteoporosis, who is enclosed in the age limits of this study, the health status represents the main driver of monitoring the quality of life.

  12. Health-related Quality of Life in Metastatic and Adjuvant Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wallwiener, M.; Simoes, E.; Sokolov, A. N.; Brucker, S. Y.; Fasching, P. A.; Graf, J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: When cancer patients have advanced disease and a primary cure is no longer possible, the focus is on maintaining the patientʼs quality of life. Recent therapeutic advances in breast cancer treatment mean that even patients with metastatic disease can remain stable for long periods of time. The aim of this study was to look at the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of these patients and compare it with data for the general population and to show the differences in outcomes for different survey instruments used to measure quality of life. Material and Methods: A total of 96 breast cancer patients with metastatic disesae or receiving adjuvant therapy were questioned about their quality of life. Patients were investigated using the established survey instruments EORTC QLQ-C30, EORTC QLQ-BR23, EQ-5D-5L and EQ VAS. All patients filled out questionnaires. Statistical analysis was done using MS Excel and SPSS. Results: Although the questionnaires were completed at the same time, the different questionnaires showed significant differences with regard to the level of stress experienced by the patient. When the EQ VAS questionnaire was used, the patientʼs current state of health was assessed as significantly better than with the EORTC QLQ-C30. Overall, all aspects of patientsʼ quality of life were found to be in need of optimization and HRQL of patients was significantly poorer in all areas compared to the reference population. Conclusion: To improve the quality of life of patients with metastatic disease, it is necessary to continuously monitor the success of therapy. The choice of survey tools is highly relevant as assessments differ considerably depending on the choice of questionnaire. PMID:27761027

  13. The analysis, interpretation, and presentation of quality of life data.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Richard

    2004-02-01

    All too often in clinical trials the assessment of quality of life is seen as a bolt-on study. Consequently insufficient consideration is often given to its design, collection, analysis and presentation, and its impact on the trial results and on clinical practice is minimal. In many trials quality of life is a key endpoint, and it is vital that quality of life expertise is involved as soon as possible in the design. Setting a priori quality of life hypotheses will focus the decisions regarding which questionnaire to use, when to administer it, the sample size required, and the primary analyses. Nevertheless quality of life data are complex, and require much skill in determining how to deal with multi-dimensional and longitudinal data, much of which is often missing. There are no agreed standard ways of analysing and presenting quality of life data, but there are guidelines, which if followed, will add transparency to the way results have been calculated. Understanding the impact of treatments on their quality of life is vital to patients, and it is up to us, as statisticians and trialists, to present the data as clearly as we can.

  14. A Clinical Support System Based on Quality of Life Estimation.

    PubMed

    Faria, Brígida Mónica; Gonçalves, Joaquim; Reis, Luis Paulo; Rocha, Álvaro

    2015-10-01

    Quality of life is a concept influenced by social, economic, psychological, spiritual or medical state factors. More specifically, the perceived quality of an individual's daily life is an assessment of their well-being or lack of it. In this context, information technologies may help on the management of services for healthcare of chronic patients such as estimating the patient quality of life and helping the medical staff to take appropriate measures to increase each patient quality of life. This paper describes a Quality of Life estimation system developed using information technologies and the application of data mining algorithms to access the information of clinical data of patients with cancer from Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck services of an oncology institution. The system was evaluated with a sample composed of 3013 patients. The results achieved show that there are variables that may be significant predictors for the Quality of Life of the patient: years of smoking (p value 0.049) and size of the tumor (p value < 0.001). In order to assign the variables to the classification of the quality of life the best accuracy was obtained by applying the John Platt's sequential minimal optimization algorithm for training a support vector classifier. In conclusion data mining techniques allow having access to patients additional information helping the physicians to be able to know the quality of life and produce a well-informed clinical decision.

  15. Experience with a Simplified Computer Based Intensive Care Monitoring System in the Management of Acutely Ill Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, H. Roger; Rutherford, Harold G.; Smith, Louis L.; Briggs, Burton A.; Neilsen, Ivan R.; Rau, Richard

    1979-01-01

    The need exists for a simplified and ecomonical computer based monitoring system for critically ill surgical patients. Such a system would enjoy widespread use in surgical intensive care units in regional, as well as larger community hospitals. We have assembled such a system which provides digital readout of the usual physiologic parameters, and also provide computer storage of accumulated data for review and evaluation of patient care. The computer provides graphic and digital display and digital printout for subsequent inclusion in the patient records. Most frequent indications for this system include the development of acute respiratory insufficiency or acute circulatory failure due to invasive sepsis and/or severe arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Information most beneficial in patient care included measurement of cardiac output;alveolar arterial oxygen gradient. ImagesFigure 1Figure 5Figure 9Figure 11

  16. Mobile cloud-computing-based healthcare service by noncontact ECG monitoring.

    PubMed

    Fong, Ee-May; Chung, Wan-Young

    2013-12-02

    Noncontact electrocardiogram (ECG) measurement technique has gained popularity these days owing to its noninvasive features and convenience in daily life use. This paper presents mobile cloud computing for a healthcare system where a noncontact ECG measurement method is employed to capture biomedical signals from users. Healthcare service is provided to continuously collect biomedical signals from multiple locations. To observe and analyze the ECG signals in real time, a mobile device is used as a mobile monitoring terminal. In addition, a personalized healthcare assistant is installed on the mobile device; several healthcare features such as health status summaries, medication QR code scanning, and reminders are integrated into the mobile application. Health data are being synchronized into the healthcare cloud computing service (Web server system and Web server dataset) to ensure a seamless healthcare monitoring system and anytime and anywhere coverage of network connection is available. Together with a Web page application, medical data are easily accessed by medical professionals or family members. Web page performance evaluation was conducted to ensure minimal Web server latency. The system demonstrates better availability of off-site and up-to-the-minute patient data, which can help detect health problems early and keep elderly patients out of the emergency room, thus providing a better and more comprehensive healthcare cloud computing service.

  17. Mobile Cloud-Computing-Based Healthcare Service by Noncontact ECG Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Ee-May; Chung, Wan-Young

    2013-01-01

    Noncontact electrocardiogram (ECG) measurement technique has gained popularity these days owing to its noninvasive features and convenience in daily life use. This paper presents mobile cloud computing for a healthcare system where a noncontact ECG measurement method is employed to capture biomedical signals from users. Healthcare service is provided to continuously collect biomedical signals from multiple locations. To observe and analyze the ECG signals in real time, a mobile device is used as a mobile monitoring terminal. In addition, a personalized healthcare assistant is installed on the mobile device; several healthcare features such as health status summaries, medication QR code scanning, and reminders are integrated into the mobile application. Health data are being synchronized into the healthcare cloud computing service (Web server system and Web server dataset) to ensure a seamless healthcare monitoring system and anytime and anywhere coverage of network connection is available. Together with a Web page application, medical data are easily accessed by medical professionals or family members. Web page performance evaluation was conducted to ensure minimal Web server latency. The system demonstrates better availability of off-site and up-to-the-minute patient data, which can help detect health problems early and keep elderly patients out of the emergency room, thus providing a better and more comprehensive healthcare cloud computing service. PMID:24316562

  18. Quality of life and oral health in elderly

    PubMed Central

    Torrijos-Gómez, Gema; González-Serrano, José; López-Pintor-Muñoz, Rosa-María; López-Bermejo, Miguel-Ángel; Hernández-Vallejo, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    Background We want to assess quality of life in elderly patients in relation to the number of remaining teeth, the number of ingested drugs and xerostomía and to determine the correlation between an increased intake of drugs and a greater feeling of dry mouth and to know the most commonly used measures to control xerostomia. Material and Methods 30 subjects aged between 65 and 95 years (14 males, 16 females) completed the OHIP questionnaire to determine quality of life. For oral status, the number of remaining teeth according to WHO criteria and xerostomia using the xerostomia index (XI) were studied. In cases of dry mouth sensation, the measures to alleviate it were asked. Results The average quality of life according to the OHIP rate is 19.23 (Dt = 10.58), being 56 the worst quality of life. The Pearson correlation coefficient indicates that quality of life is not related to the number of remaining teeth (r = -0.046; p = 0.810) nor the number of ingested drugs (r = 0.226; p = 0.23) but a greater sensation of dry mouth is related to a poorer quality of life (r = 0.678; p = 0.230). There is no association between the number of ingested drugs and the xerostomia index (r = 0.144; p = 0.447). The most frequently measures used against dry mouth were drinking water (21 subjects) and sugarless candies (15 subjects). Conclusions Quality of life is not related to the number of remaining teeth nor the number of ingested drugs. However, a higher level of xerostomia was significantly associated with a poorer quality of life. There is no association between the number of drugs ingested and xerostomia index. Sugarless candies and drinking water are the more frequently used measures to alleviate dry mouth. Key words:Quality of life, oral health, elderly. PMID:27957276

  19. [Health and quality of life vs. occupational activity].

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Małgorzata; Szemik, Szymon

    The level of quality of life and health status of the population largely depends on the determinants related to occupational activity. The results of reviewed bibliography indicate a significant and growing importance of employment conditions on the quality of life and population health status in most countries of the world, especially in those with market economy. Of the evaluated determinants the following factors should be listed in particular: sources and the amount of income, stability of the income and employment, the nature of work and the degree of job satisfaction, as well as autonomy and career prospects. Moreover, they proved that the situation of persisting and long-term unemployment and precarious employment leads to a significant deterioration in the quality of life and health, especially among young people. In conclusion, the study of quality of life and population health status should take into consideration factors related to occupational activity. Med Pr 2016;67(5):663-671.

  20. Anxiety and quality of life in phobic dental patients.

    PubMed

    Crofts-Barnes, N P; Brough, E; Wilson, K E; Beddis, A J; Girdler, N M

    2010-03-01

    Little is known about the anxiety patients experience before attending for dental treatment. The aim of this study was to determine, in dentally phobic patients, the temporal relationship of pre-operative anxiety levels, and the disruption to daily life caused by this. Twenty-four phobic and 19 comparison (non-phobic) dental patients were recruited. Four validated questionnaires were used to assess anxiety and quality of life, which each patient completed for 5 days prior to, and on the day of, treatment. Those in the experimental group were found to have significantly greater levels of dental and general anxiety, and a significantly lower quality of life compared with those in the comparison group. Significant temporal relationships were found with all of the questionnaires. Dental and general anxiety scores were significantly correlated with quality-of-life measures. This study suggests that phobic dental patients are experiencing significant increased anxiety, and significant negative quality-of-life effects, in this period.

  1. Palliative care and quality of life in neuro-oncology

    PubMed Central

    Mummudi, Naveen

    2014-01-01

    Health-related quality of life has become an important end point in modern day clinical practice in patients with primary or secondary brain tumors. Patients have unique symptoms and problems from diagnosis till death, which require interventions that are multidisciplinary in nature. Here, we review and summarize the various key issues in palliative care, quality of life and end of life in patients with brain tumors, with the focus on primary gliomas. PMID:25165570

  2. Moving Us Toward a Theory of Individual Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Schalock, Robert L; Verdugo, Miguel A; Gomez, Laura E; Reinders, Hans S

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses three steps involved in moving us toward a theory of individual quality of life: developing a conceptual model, integrating theory components, and applying and evaluating the theory. Each of the proposed steps is guided by established standards regarding theory development and use. The article concludes with a discussion of criteria that can be used to evaluate the theory and the contribution that a theory of individual quality of life would make to the field of disability.

  3. Quality of Life and Cost Effectiveness of Prostate Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    effectiveness. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Quality of Life , Cost of Care and Satisfaction with care 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...debate on outcomes such as quality of life , satisfaction with care and cost of care continues. Our recent research indicated that type of...integrate mortality and morbidity to express health status as equivalent of well years of life . The QWB is associated with a General Health Policy Model

  4. Quality of Life in Iranian Chemical Warfare Veteran's

    PubMed Central

    Ebadi, Abbas; Moradian, Tayeb; Mollahadi, Mohsen; Saeed, Yaser; Refahi, Ali Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mustard gas has different effects on different body systems such as respiratory tract, blood, gastrointestinal, skin, eye, endocrine and peripheral nervous system. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the quality of life in chemical warfare veterans due to sulfur mustard exposure. Patients and Methods: In a cross-sectional and analytic study, 242 patients who had a chemical injury during the Iran-Iraq war (1980-1983) and their lung damage was proven were investigated in our study. The quality of life was measured in these patients using an extensively validated Iranian version of SF-36. Results: The mean age of veterans was 44.12 ± 4.9 ranging from 22 to 62 years. Our results showed that chemical warfare had a decreased quality of life in all subscales of the SF-36. The lowest scores in SF-36 subscales were related to role physical and general health. The data also showed a significant relationship between the number of organs involved and the quality of life in these patients (P < 0.001, r = − 0.33). So that the patients who had more than three organs involved had lower quality of life. 95.4% of our participants experienced another complication with respiratory complication and the ophthalmologic complications were the most frequent accompanying condition. Conclusions: The results imply that chemical warfare survivors suffering from late complications have a low health related quality of life. PMID:25031863

  5. [Factors associated with the quality of life of elderly men].

    PubMed

    Tavares, Darlene Mara dos Santos; Dias, Flavia Aparecida; de Freitas Santos, Nilce Maria; Haas, Vanderlei José; de Miranzi, Sybelle Castro Sousa

    2013-06-01

    This was an analytical, cross-sectional household survey study aimed at describing the sociodemographic characteristics, health and quality of life of elderly men, and to verify the socioeconomic and health factors related to quality of life. Participants in this study included 804 elderly men. Data were collected using the following instruments: Older Americans Resources and Services scale (OARS), the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF), and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment for Older Adults (WHOQOL-OLD). Descriptive analysis, student's t-test, Pearson correlation and multiple linear regression (p<0.05) were used. The prevalent characteristics were: individuals 60-70 years old, married, 4-8 years of education, and a minimum wage income. The lowest quality of life scores were in the physical domain and autonomy facet, and were associated with: the absence of a companion, education, low income, higher number of comorbidities, and functional disability. Functional disability had the strongest influence on the quality of life, except for the physical domain and intimacy facet.

  6. Quality of life is predictive of relapse in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to evaluate whether quality of life (QoL), as measured by the SF36 and the Quality of Life Interview (QoLI), is predictive of relapse for patients with schizophrenia. Methods Using data from a multicenter cohort study conducted in France, Germany, and the United-Kingdom (EuroSC), we performed Cox proportional-hazards models to estimate the associations between QoL at baseline and the occurrence of relapse over a 24-month period, with adjustment for age; gender; positive, negative and general psychopathology PANSS factors; functioning (GAF); medication; side-effects; and compliance measures. Results Our sample consisted of 1,024 patients; 540 (53%) had at least one period of relapse, and 484 (47%) had no relapse. QoL levels were the most important features predicting relapse. We found that a higher level of QoL predicts a lower rate of relapse at 24 months: HR = 0.82 (0.74; 0.91), p < 0.001 for the SF36-Physical Composite Score; and HR = 0.88 (0.81; 0.96), p = 0.002 for the SF36-Mental Composite Score. These results were not confirmed using the QoLI: HR = 0.91 (0.81; 1.01), p = 0.083. To a lesser extent, older age, better functioning, and a higher compliance score also predict a lower rate of relapse at 24 months (HRs from 0.97 to 0.98; p < 0.05). Conclusions QoL, as assessed by the SF36, is an independent predictor of relapse at a 24-month follow-up in schizophrenia. This finding may have implications for future use of the QoL in psychiatry. Moreover, our findings may support the development and monitoring of complementary therapeutic approaches, such as ‘recovery-oriented’ combined with traditional mental health cares to prevent relapse. PMID:23302219

  7. The Impact Of Sports Activities On Quality Of Life Of Persons With A Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Eminović, Fadilj; Dopsaj, Milivoj; Pavlović, Dragan; Arsić, Sladjana; Otašević, Jadranka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Studying the quality of life of people with a spinal cord injury is of great importance as it allows the monitoring of both functioning and adaptation to disability. The aim of this study was to determine the difference between persons with a spinal cord injury involved in sports activities and those not involved in sports activities in relation to their quality of life and the presence of secondary health conditions (pressure ulcers, urinary infections, muscle spasms, osteoporosis, pain, kidney problems-infections, calculosis and poor circulation). Methods The study included a total of 44 participants with spinal cord injury-paraplegia of both genders; 26 of them were athletes and 18 were not athletes. The athletes were training actively for the last two years, minimally 2-3 times per week. A specially designed questionnaire, medical documentation and the Spinal Cord Injury Quality of Life Questionnaire (SCI QL-23) were used for research purposes. Chi-square test was used to analyze the differences between the groups, while multiple analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used to determine the differences between the sets of variables. Results Among the participants, the athletes perceived higher quality of life than the non-athletes (male gender p<0.001 and female gender p<0.05). Regarding secondary health conditions, the athletes reported the presence of less pain (p=0.034) and a subjective feeling of better circulation (p=0.023). Conclusion The implementation of sports activities significantly improves quality of life in the population of people with spinal cord injury-paraplegia. However, sports activities only partially affect secondary health conditions. PMID:27284378

  8. The impact of cosmetic interventions on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Sadick, Neil S

    2008-08-15

    In the last decade, the number of cosmetic procedures performed in the United States has rapidly increased. While physicians historically have focused on minimizing side effects and optimizing the physical outcome, a broad spectrum of patient needs also factors in treatment success. Unfortunately, few data are available regarding the effects of cosmetic procedures on patient's self-esteem, confidence, relationships, and acceptance by others. Quality of life represents a relevant and important long-term measurement of outcomes in these patients. Studies have shown that cosmetic surgery can have a positive impact on patient quality of life. In contrast, fewer data are available regarding the effects of nonsurgical cosmetic procedures on quality of life. Much of the quality-of-life data regarding nonsurgical cosmetic procedures focuses on patients with human immunodeficiency virus-associated facial lipoatrophy, a condition associated with depression, problems with self-esteem and interpersonal relationships, in addition to nonadherence to the treatment. Recent data indicate that cosmetic treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-related facial lipoatrophy with injectable facial rejuvenators can improve quality of life in these patients. However, there is a dearth of quality-of-life data on patients who undergo facial rejuvenation procedures using the newer injectable devices, such as hyaluronic acid, calcium hydroxylapatite, and poly-L-lactic acid. Future studies should focus on developing standardized tests to assess quality of life in patients undergoing facial rejuvenation interventions. More data obtained from validated assessment tools are needed to systematically evaluate the effects specific treatments have on satisfying the needs of the cosmetic patient.

  9. Quality of life of adolescents with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Luce Marina F C; Vieira, Sandra E

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent chronic disease. Type 1 diabetes mellitus usually develops during infancy and adolescence and may affect the quality of life of adolescents. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the quality of life of adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus in a metropolitan region of western central Brazil. METHODS: Adolescents aged 10–19 years who had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus at least 1 year previously were included. Patients with verbal communication difficulties, severe disease, and symptomatic hypo- or hyperglycemic crisis as well as those without an adult companion and who were <18 years of age were excluded. The self-administered Diabetes Quality of Life for Youths instrument was applied. RESULTS: Among 96 adolescents (57% females; 47% white, and 53% nonwhite), 81% had an HbA1c level of >7%. In general, the adolescents consistently reported having a good quality of life. The median scores for the domains of the instrument were as follows: “satisfaction”: 35; “impact”: 51; and “worries“: 26. The total score for all domains was 112. Bivariate analysis showed significant associations among a lower family income, public health assistance, and insulin type in the “satisfaction” domain; and a lower family income, public health assistance, public school attendance, and a low parental education level in the “worries“ domain and for the total score. A longer time since diagnosis was associated with a lower total score. Multivariable analysis confirmed the association of a worse quality of life with public health assistance, time since diagnosis, and sedentary lifestyle in the “satisfaction” domain; female gender in the “worries” domain; and public health assistance for the total score. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the adolescents evaluated in this study viewed their quality of life as good. Specific factors that led to the deterioration of quality of life, including public assistance, time since

  10. Implementation methods for vision related quality of life questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    Wolffsohn, J; Cochrane, A; Watt, N

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To determine the most reliable and consistent method and time interval over which to implement a vision impairment quality of life assessment tool.
METHODS—117 patients with low vision aged 9-101 years were assigned into three age, sex, and visual function matched groups (n = 39 in each) to answer the Low Vision Quality of Life (LVQOL) questionnaire by post, telephone, or in person. The LVQOL questionnaire was completed on four occasions, each separated by four weeks.
RESULTS—Postal implementation was the most cost effective method, showed the highest internal consistency of LVQOL items, but resulted in a lower apparent quality of life score than either telephone or in-person interviews (p<0.001). There was no difference in test-retest reliability between the three methods of implementation (p = 0.12). The profile of LVQOL scores showed a trend towards reduced quality of life scores 3 months after the baseline measures, although this was not significant.
CONCLUSION—Posting may be the method of choice for clinical measurement of vision related quality of life. Patients with greater visual impairment were no less likely to complete a questionnaire when implemented by post and there was no apparent bias from other people assisting them. The quality of life measure can occur at any time up to 2 months after low vision rehabilitation for the progressive nature of conditions causing low vision not to cause a decreased baseline score. The LVQOL was shown to be a highly internally consistent and reliable method for measuring quality of life in the visually impaired.

 PMID:10966961

  11. Cancer Communication and Family Caregiver Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Wittenberg, Elaine; Borneman, Tami; Koczywas, Marianna; Del Ferraro, Catherine; Ferrell, Betty

    2017-01-01

    Family caregivers have enormous communication responsibilities tied to caregiving, such as sharing the patient’s medical history with providers, relaying diagnosis and prognosis to other family members, and making decisions about care with the patient. While caregiver stress and burden has been widely documented in the caregiving literature, little is known about how communication burden, real or perceived communication challenges, impacts caregiver quality of life. In family caregiving, the City of Hope (COH) Quality of Life model proposes that the caregiving experience is reciprocal to the patient experience, impacting physical, social, psychological, and spiritual quality of life. We used data from a pilot study testing a communication coaching call intervention with family caregivers of lung cancer patients to analyze caregiver reported communication burden and quality of life. We found variances in each quality of life domain, suggesting that caregiver interventions should range from self-care skill building for physical care to psycho-educational interventions that support caregiver coping and communication skill building. These findings demonstrate the importance of caregiver assessment and attention to communication burden in quality cancer care. PMID:28257110

  12. Quality of life and deglutition after total laryngectomy

    PubMed Central

    Pernambuco, Leandro de Araújo; Oliveira, Jabson Herber Profiro de; Régis, Renata Milena Freitas Lima; Lima, Leilane Maria de; Araújo, Ana Maria Bezerra de; Balata, Patrícia Maria Mendes; Cunha, Daniele Andrade da; Silva, Hilton Justino da

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Total laryngectomy creates deglutition disorders and causes a decrease in quality of life Aim: To describe the impact of swallowing and quality of life of patients after total laryngectomy. Method: A case series study. Patients completed a Swallowing and Quality of Life questionnaire composed of 44 questions assessing 11 domains related to quality of life (burden, eating duration, eating desire, frequency of symptoms, food selection, communication, fear, mental health, social functioning, sleep, and fatigue). The analysis was performed using descriptive statistics, including measures of central tendency and variability. Results: The sample comprised 15 patients who underwent total laryngectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. Of these, 66.7% classified their health as good and 73% reported no restrictions on food consistency. The domains “communication” and “fear” represented severe impact and “eating duration” represented moderate impact on quality of life. The items with lower scores were: longer time to eat than others (domain “eating duration”), cough and cough to remove the liquid or food of the mouth when they are stopped (domain “symptom frequency”), difficulties in understanding (domain “communication”) and fear of choking and having pneumonia (domain “fear”). Conclusion: After total laryngectomy, patients report that swallowing issues have moderate to severe impact in “communication,” “fear,” and “eating duration” domains. PMID:25991974

  13. Metabolic syndrome and quality of life: a systematic review 1

    PubMed Central

    Saboya, Patrícia Pozas; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos; Zimmermann, Paulo Roberto; Gustavo, Andréia da Silva; Assumpção, Caroline Melo; Londero, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: to present currently available evidence to verify the association between metabolic syndrome and quality of life. Method: Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Medline and LILACS databases were studied for all studies investigating the association with metabolic syndrome and quality of life. Two blinded reviewers extracted data and one more was chosen in case of doubt. Results: a total of 30 studies were included, considering inclusion and exclusion criteria, which involved 62.063 patients. Almost all studies suggested that metabolic syndrome is significantly associated with impaired quality of life. Some, however, found association only in women, or only if associated with depression or Body Mass Index. Merely one study did not find association after adjusted for confounding factors. Conclusion: although there are a few studies available about the relationship between metabolic syndrome and quality of life, a growing body of evidence has shown significant association between metabolic syndrome and the worsening of quality of life. However, it is necessary to carry out further longitudinal studies to confirm this association and verify whether this relationship is linear, or only an association factor. PMID:27901223

  14. Quality of Life and Gait in Elderly Group

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Carlos Kazuo; Teixeira, Jacqueline Pitanga; Alves, Lucas Vieira; Oliveira, Priscila Feliciano; Raposo, Oscar Felipe Falcão

    2015-01-01

    Introduction  The process of aging could lead to seniors being more prone to falls, which affects their quality of life. Objective  The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between quality of life and gait in the elderly. Methods  We used World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief (WHOQOL-Brief) Brazilian version and the Dynamic Gait Index to assess fifty-six volunteers from the northeast of Brazil. Ages ranged from 60 to 85 years. Results  The Dynamic Gait Index, which indicates the probability of falls, resulted in 36.3% of the sample presenting abnormal results. There was correlation between domain 2 (psychological) and domain 4 (environment) with domain 1(Physical) and domain 3 (Social); a negative correlation between age and Domain 2; correlation between Question 1 (How would you rate your quality of life?) and domains 1, 2, and 4 and no correlation between questions 1 and 2 (How satisfied are you with your health?). Question 2 was correlated with all of the domains. There was negative association between question 1 and falls, and a slight correlation between the Dynamic Gait Index scores and Question 1. Conclusion  The self-perception of the study group about their quality of life was either good or very good, even though a considerable percentage of individuals had suffered falls or reported gait disturbances. PMID:27413405

  15. Tools used for evaluation of Brazilian children's quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Souza, João Gabriel S.; Pamponet, Marcela Antunes; Souza, Tamirys Caroline S.; Pereira, Alessandra Ribeiro; Souza, Andrey George S.; Martins, Andréa Maria E. de B. L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the available tools to evaluate children's quality of life validated for Brazilian language and culture. DATA SOURCES: Search of scientific articles in Medline, Lilacs and SciELO databases using the combination of descriptors "quality of life", "child" and "questionnaires" in Portuguese and English. DATA SYNTHESIS: Among the tools designed to assess children's quality of life validated for the Brazilian language and culture, the Auto questionnaire Qualité de Vie Enfant Imagé (AUQEI), the Child Health Questionnaire - Parent Form 50 (CHQ-PF50), the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL(tm)) version 4.0 and the Kidscreen-52 are highlighted. Some tools do not include all range of ages and some lack domains that are currently considered relevant in the context of childhood, such as bullying. Moreover, due to the cultural diversity of Brazil, it may be necessary to adapt some instruments or to validate other tools. CONCLUSIONS: There are validated instruments to evaluate children's quality of life in Brazil. However, the validation or the adaptation of other international tools have to be considered in order to overcome current deficiencies. PMID:25119761

  16. Prompting Self-Monitoring of Learning in Self-Paced Computer Based Training: the Effect on Self-Regulation and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coburn, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to investigate the effects of prompting students to monitor their use of learning strategies and comprehension while completing self-paced, work-related training in a computer-based learning environment. Study participants included 94 enlisted military volunteers, randomly assigned to one of three groups in the…

  17. Assessment of quality of life in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Marcio Massao; Araújo, Ivan Luis Andrade; Castro, Martha Cavalcante; Matos, Marcos Almeida

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE : To assess the quality of life of knee osteoarthritis patients using the SF-36 questionnaire METHODS : Cross-sec-tional study with 93 knee osteoarthritis patients. The sample was categorized according to Ahlbӓck score. All individuals were interviewed with the SF-36 questionnaire RESULTS : The main finding of the study is related to the association of edu-cation level with the functional capacity, functional limitation and pain. Patients with higher education level had better functional capacity when they were compared to patients with basic level of education CONCLUSION : Individuals with osteoarthritis have a low perception of their quality of life in functional capacity, functional limitation and pain. There is a strong association between low level of education and low perception of quality of life. Level of Evidence IV, Clinical Case Series. PMID:27057143

  18. Quality of Life in Patients with Neurocysticercosis in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Rachana; Budke, Christine M.; Carabin, Hélène; Proaño, Jefferson V.; Flores-Rivera, Jose; Corona, Teresa; Cowan, Linda D.; Ivanek, Renata; Snowden, Karen F.; Flisser, Ana

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare quality of life measures in patients with neurocysticercosis (NCC) to those of a matched control group. The NCC outpatients and their controls were recruited from two neurology referral hospitals in Mexico City, Mexico during 2007–2008. The quality of life of 224 NCC patients was compared with 224 age-sex-hospital-day matched controls using the short form 12 v2 (SF-12 v2) quality of life survey. Medical chart reviews were also conducted for the NCC outpatients to evaluate presenting clinical manifestations. Compared with the controls, NCC patients had a significantly lower score for each of the eight domains of health evaluated and significantly lower Physical and Mental Component Summary scores. Chart reviews indicated that hydrocephalus (48%), severe headaches (47%), and epilepsy (31%) were the most common clinical manifestations in these NCC outpatients. PMID:21540389

  19. Quality of life in patients with neurocysticercosis in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Rachana; Budke, Christine M; Carabin, Hélène; Proaño, Jefferson V; Flores-Rivera, Jose; Corona, Teresa; Cowan, Linda D; Ivanek, Renata; Snowden, Karen F; Flisser, Ana

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to compare quality of life measures in patients with neurocysticercosis (NCC) to those of a matched control group. The NCC outpatients and their controls were recruited from two neurology referral hospitals in Mexico City, Mexico during 2007-2008. The quality of life of 224 NCC patients was compared with 224 age-sex-hospital-day matched controls using the short form 12 v2 (SF-12 v2) quality of life survey. Medical chart reviews were also conducted for the NCC outpatients to evaluate presenting clinical manifestations. Compared with the controls, NCC patients had a significantly lower score for each of the eight domains of health evaluated and significantly lower Physical and Mental Component Summary scores. Chart reviews indicated that hydrocephalus (48%), severe headaches (47%), and epilepsy (31%) were the most common clinical manifestations in these NCC outpatients.

  20. Surviving Recurrence: Psychological and Quality-of-life Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hae-Chung; Thornton, Lisa M.; Shapiro, Charles L.; Andersen, Barbara L.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND To the authors' knowledge, data characterizing patients' psychosocial experiences after a recurrence diagnosis are limited. This report provides the physical, psychological, and quality-of-life trajectories of patients with recurrent breast cancer. In addition, patients with a well–documented trajectory—patients with their initial diagnosis of breast cancer—were included as a referent group, providing a metric against which to gauge the impact and course of cancer recurrence. METHODS Patients with a newly diagnosed, recurrent (n = 69) or initial (n = 113) breast cancer were accrued. The groups did not differ with regard to age, race, education, family income, or partner status (all P values > .18). All patients were assessed shortly after diagnosis (baseline) and 4 months, 8 months, and 12 months later. Mixed-effects models were used to determine health status, stress, mood, and quality-of-life trajectories. RESULTS In the year after a recurrence diagnosis, patients' physical health and functioning showed no improvement, whereas quality of life and mood generally improved, and stress declined. Compared with patients who were coping with their first diagnosis, patients with recurrence had significantly lower anxiety and confusion. In contrast, physical functioning was poorer among recurrence patients, quality-of-life improvement was slower, and cancer-related distress was high as that of the initially diagnosed patient. Slower quality-of-life recovery was most apparent among younger patients (aged <54 years). CONCLUSIONS Despite the physical burden, patients with recurrent breast cancer exhibit considerable resilience, with steady improvements in psychological adjustment and quality of life during the year after diagnosis. Management of patients' physical symptoms is particularly important, because patients cope with recurrent breast cancer as a chronic illness. PMID:18253948

  1. [Quality of life in women after anterior pelvic exenteration].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Veliev, E I; Seregin, A V; Khachatryan, A L; Guspanov, R I; Seregin, I V

    2016-04-01

    60 women, who underwent anterior pelvic exenteration with different types of urine derivation since 2004 till 2014 years in urology department, RMAPO, S.P. Botkin city hospital, were included in retrospective investigation. Middle age of patients was 53,2+/-3 (32-68). 38 women with bladder cancer and 22 women with urinary injuries after radiation therapy underwent anterior pelvic exenteration. Aim of this work is to perform quality of life comparison of patients after anterior pelvic exenteration with different types of urine derivation. Patients were divided in 3 groups: 1-st group 39 (65%) women, who underwent Brickers operation, 2-nd group 19 (31,66% ) women, who had Studers operation and 3-rd group - 2 (3,34%), patients who underwent continent urine derivation with formation of catheterizing urinary reservoir. Questionnaire (SF-36) was used to evaluate quality of life. Observation period was from 2 to 10 years. Postsurgical lethality was 3%, 5-years survival rate was 60,9+/-15,8% and 5-years recurrence-free survival rate was 55,4+/-12,6%. We established that quality of life in women who underwent orthotopic urine derivation was higher than in patients who underwent incontinent ileoconduit formation. Better quality of life was demonstrated by women, who had catheterizing urinary reservoir, but it is difficult to compare this group with the others, because of small number of patients with heterotopic catheterizing reservoir. Regarding the results of our investigation we made next conclusions: In spite of difficult technique, high risk of postoperative complications and lethality, anterior pelvic exenteration provide 5-years survival rate for 70% of patients In locally advanced tumors of pelvic organs anterior pelvic exenteration is salvational operation and keep satisfactory quality of life Orthotopic intestinal urine derivation is better to provide satisfactory quality of life for patients with invasive bladder cancer. For women with urinary injuries after

  2. Body image and quality of life in a Spanish population

    PubMed Central

    Lobera, Ignacio Jáuregui; Ríos, Patricia Bolaños

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the current study was to analyze the psychometric properties, factor structure, and internal consistency of the Spanish version of the Body Image Quality of Life Inventory (BIQLI-SP) as well as its test–retest reliability. Further objectives were to analyze different relationships with key dimensions of psychosocial functioning (ie, self-esteem, presence of psychopathological symptoms, eating and body image-related problems, and perceived stress) and to evaluate differences in body image quality of life due to gender. Patients and methods The sample comprised 417 students without any psychiatric history, recruited from the Pablo de Olavide University and the University of Seville. There were 140 men (33.57%) and 277 women (66.43%), and the mean age was 21.62 years (standard deviation = 5.12). After obtaining informed consent from all participants, the following questionnaires were administered: BIQLI, Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2), Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ), Self-Esteem Scale (SES), and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R). Results The BIQLI-SP shows adequate psychometric properties, and it may be useful to determine the body image quality of life in different physical conditions. A more positive body image quality of life is associated with better self-esteem, better psychological wellbeing, and fewer eating-related dysfunctional attitudes, this being more evident among women. Conclusion The BIQLI-SP may be useful to determine the body image quality of life in different contexts with regard to dermatology, cosmetic and reconstructive surgery, and endocrinology, among others. In these fields of study, a new trend has emerged to assess body image-related quality of life. PMID:21403794

  3. Quality of life and cost factors in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Davidson, J R

    1996-01-01

    Quality of life encompasses domains of personal happiness, role fulfillment, and health status. Increasing attention has been paid to the relationship between quality of life and panic disorder, with accumulating evidence now available to suggest impairment in several domains among subjects with panic disorder. This review summarizes the results of community-based and treatment-seeking populations of subjects with panic disorder. Impaired personal happiness, restricted role functioning, and increased use of health services are all described. Evidence suggests that accurate diagnosis and effective treatment can significantly lessen health service utilization, resulting in substantial cost offset and also leading to increased work productivity and personal effectiveness.

  4. [Quality of life of undergraduate students in nursing].

    PubMed

    Garcia Kawakame, Patrícia Moita; Miyadahira, Ana Maria Kazue

    2005-06-01

    The object of this study was to investigate the quality of life of 264 undergraduate students in Nursing. Data was collected through a questionnaire and a tool for measuring quality of life, Ferrans and Powers' IQV. Average IQV scores of students were high and very close to those of the general population of Rockford (USA). Average IQV in the various years of the course showed a decrease in the second year, when students begin practice, thus offering subsidies for possible interventions of educators to revert this situation.

  5. Nursing home quality of life: study of an enabling garden.

    PubMed

    Raske, Martha

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct an in-depth evaluation of the impact of the construction and use of an enabling garden on resident quality of life in a rural nursing home. This qualitative study used interviews with residents, family members, staff members, and community volunteers who built the garden. Findings suggest the garden had positive effects on resident quality of life, particularly in terms of meaningful daily activities, enjoyment of daily life, resident relationships, and functional competency. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  6. [Quality of life in patients with diabetes using the Diabetes 39 (D-39) instrument].

    PubMed

    Zulian, Luana Rosas; dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; Veras, Vívian Saraiva; Rodrigues, Flávia Fernanda Luchetti; Arrelias, Clarissa Cordeiro Alves; Zanetti, Maria Lucia

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the specific quality of life of patients with diabetes mellitus. It is a cross-sectional study, which was conducted from August 2-28, 2012 in two basic health units, in the interior of São Paulo. A convenience sample, made up of 75 patients, 18 years old or older, both sexes, in a group of self-monitoring of blood glucose, was used. The Diabetes 39 (D-39) Instrument Evaluation, containing five dimensions: energy and mobility (15 items), diabetes control (12), anxiety and worry (4) social overload (5) and sexual behavior (3), was used. Quality of life proved to be highly affected in the items related to the social overload dimension, embarrassment for having diabetes, being called diabetic and diabetes interfering with family life. The elucidation of the assessed factors contributes to the planning of educational programs, insofar as they may hinder the achievement of metabolic control in patients with diabetes.

  7. Evaluation of quality of life after radical prostatectomy-experience in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Dragićević, Svetomir M; Krejović-Marić, Snežana P; Hasani, Bajram H; Soldatović, Ivan A; Bojić, Svetlana D; Canović, Predrag

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare health related quality of life (QoL) of patients with prostate cancer, who had undergone radical prostatectomy (RP), with patients who were carefully monitored. This prospective study included 56 patients who had undergone the radical prostatectomy (RP) and 48 non-operated patients (watchful waiting, WW). All patients filled EPIC questionnaire at baseline, 1th, 3rd, 6th and 12th month. At baseline, mean scores were similar in both groups, but one month after the surgery in RP group, patients had statistically significant lower score of urinary incontinency, urinary function and sexual function compared with WW patients. These scores were significantly higher in the 3rd, 6th and 12th month in operated patients, but there was no improvement in the WW group. Radical prostatectomy does not significantly improve quality of life. Prostatectomized patients had worse scores on the QoL scale, with exception of the urinary disturbance dimension.

  8. e-Health and quality of life: the role of the Wearable Motherboard.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungmee; Jayaraman, Sundaresan

    2004-01-01

    It is hard to place a price tag either on human life or on the quality of life. Technology is the key to enhancing the quality of life for everyone in the continuum of life from newborns to senior citizens--whether it is the safe delivery and care of undernourished premature babies, or extending the life of a senior citizen through exploratory treatments and procedures. Technology has the potential to rapidly transform healthcare and the practice of medicine by improving the quality and safety of patient care and increasing the efficiency of healthcare providers. Moreover, the healthcare industry must meet the challenge of balancing cost containment with maintenance of desired patient outcomes and this can be accomplished through the adoption of technology. Any technology that can minimize the loss of human life and/or enhance the quality of life has a value that is priceless. An overview of the key challenges facing the practice of medicine today is presented along with the need for technological solutions that can "prevent" problems. The paradigm of "e-Health" is discussed. Then, the development of the Wearable Motherboard as a "platform" for sensors and monitoring devices that can unobtrusively monitor the health and well-being of individuals (directly and/or remotely) is described. This is followed by a discussion of the applications and impact of this technology in the continuum of life--from preventing SIDS to facilitating independent living for senior citizens. Finally, the future advancements in the area of wearable, yet comfortable, systems that can continue the transformation of healthcare and e-Health to i-Health (for interactive health)--all aimed at enhancing the quality of life for humans--are presented.

  9. Defining quality of life in the children of parents with severe mental illness: a preliminary stakeholder-led model.

    PubMed

    Bee, Penny; Berzins, Kathryn; Calam, Rachel; Pryjmachuk, Steven; Abel, Kathryn M

    2013-01-01

    Severe parental mental illness poses a challenge to quality of life (QoL) in a substantial number of children and adolescents, and improving the lives of these children is of urgent political and public health concern. This study used a bottom-up qualitative approach to develop a new stakeholder-led model of quality of life relevant to this population. Qualitative data were collected from 19 individuals participating in focus groups or individual interviews. Participants comprised 8 clinical academics, health and social care professionals or voluntary agency representatives; 5 parents and 6 young people (aged 13-18 yrs) with lived experience of severe parental mental illness. Data underwent inductive thematic analysis for the purposes of informing a population-specific quality of life model. Fifty nine individual themes were identified and grouped into 11 key 'meta-themes'. Mapping each meta-theme against existing child-centred quality of life concepts revealed a multi-dimensional model that endorsed, to a greater or lesser degree, the core domains of generic quality of life models. Three new population-specific priorities were also observed: i) the alleviation of parental mental health symptoms, ii) improved problem-based coping skills and iii) increased mental health literacy. The identification of these priorities raises questions regarding the validity of generic quality of life measures to monitor the effectiveness of services for families and children affected by severe mental illness. New, age-appropriate instruments that better reflect the life priorities and unique challenges faced by the children of parents with severe mental illness may need to be developed. Challenges then remain in augmenting and adapting service design and delivery mechanisms better to meet these needs. Future child and adult mental health services need to work seamlessly alongside statutory education and social care services and a growing number of relevant third sector providers to

  10. Perceived Quality of Life in Mothers of Children with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Anne C.; Skinner, Debra G.; Bailey, Donald B.

    2008-01-01

    A mixed method approach was used to explore quality of life of 101 mothers of children with fragile X syndrome. Mothers completed a self-report of personal quality of life and measures of mental health and well-being. A subset was interviewed about quality of life. The distribution of scores on the Quality of Life Inventory was similar to the…

  11. Quality of Life Assessment for Physical Activity and Health Promotion: Further Psychometrics and Comparison of Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Diane L.; Reifsteck, Erin J.; Adams, Melanie M.; Shang, Ya-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Despite the clear relationship between physical activity and quality of life, few sound, relevant quality of life measures exist. Gill and colleagues developed a 32-item quality of life survey, and provided initial psychometric evidence. This study further examined that quality of life survey in comparison with the widely used short form (SF-36)…

  12. Quality of Life and its Measurement: Important Principles and Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verdugo, M. A.; Schalock, R. L.; Keith, K. D.; Stancliffe, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The importance of the valid assessment of quality of life (QOL) is heightened with the increased use of the QOL construct as a basis for policies and practices in the field of intellectual disability (ID). Method: This article discusses the principles that should guide the measurement process, the major interrogatories (i.e. who, what,…

  13. The Health-Related Quality of Life of Custodial Grandparents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neely-Barnes, Susan L.; Graff, J. Carolyn; Washington, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was explored in a sample of 119 custodial grandparents. A latent profile analysis identified three groups of grandparents along a continuum of good to poor HRQOL, with most custodial grandparents reporting Short Form-12 Health Survey (version 2) scores significantly below U.S. population means. Grandparent…

  14. 42 CFR 483.15 - Quality of life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... supervised social work experience in a health care setting working directly with individuals. (h) Environment... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Quality of life. 483.15 Section 483.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  15. 42 CFR 483.15 - Quality of life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... supervised social work experience in a health care setting working directly with individuals. (h) Environment... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Quality of life. 483.15 Section 483.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  16. 42 CFR 483.15 - Quality of life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... supervised social work experience in a health care setting working directly with individuals. (h) Environment... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Quality of life. 483.15 Section 483.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  17. Quality of Life Among Thai Workers in Textile Dyeing Factories

    PubMed Central

    Kittipichai, Wirin; Arsa, Rattanaporn; Jirapongsuwan, Ann; Singhakant, Chatchawal

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of a cross-sectional study was to investigate factors influencing the quality of life among Thai workers in textile dyeing factories. Samples included 205 Thai workers from five textile dyeing factories located in the suburban area of Bangkok in Thailand. Data were collected with a self-administered questionnaire. Scales of the questionnaire had reliability coefficients ranging from 0.70–0.91. The results revealed that the overall quality of life among workers was most likely between good and moderate levels, and the percentage-mean score was 74.77. The seven factors associated with the overall quality of life were co-worker relationships, safety at work in the dimension of accident prevention, job characteristics, supervisory relationships, welfares, marital status, and physical environment. Furthermore, co-worker relationships, accident prevention, and marital status were three considerable predictors accounted for 23% of the variance in the overall quality of life among workers in textile dyeing factories. PMID:25948458

  18. Do Non-Economic Quality of Life Factors Drive Immigration?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacheco, Gail Anne; Rossouw, Stephanie; Lewer, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    This paper contributes to the immigration literature by generating two unique non-economic quality of life (QOL) indices and testing their role on recent migration patterns. Applying the generated QOL indices in conjunction with four independent welfare measures to an augmented gravity model of immigration, this paper finds an insignificant…

  19. Burnout and Quality of Life among Healthcare Research Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enders, Felicity; West, Colin P.; Dyrbye, Liselotte; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Satele, Daniel; Sloan, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Burnout is increasingly recognized as a problem in the workplace--30% to 50% of physicians experience burnout, but no assessment of burnout has been done among healthcare research faculty. A cross-sectional survey of burnout, quality of life, and related factors was sent to all doctoral-level faculty in a large department of healthcare research.…

  20. Physical Education and Sport and the Quality of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pooley, John C.

    1984-01-01

    Physical education and sports programs have the potential to enhance the quality of life. Cheating and violence in sports have become international problems that tarnish the credibility of athletic programs. Professionals need to emphasize good sportsmanship and fair play in sports programs. (DF)

  1. Synthetic Indicators of Quality of Life in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somarriba, Noelia; Pena, Bernardo

    2009-01-01

    For more than three decades now, sociologists, politicians and economists have used a wide range of statistical and econometric techniques to analyse and measure the quality of life of individuals with the aim of obtaining useful instruments for social, political and economic decision making. The aim of this paper is to analyse the advantages and…

  2. Eastern Kentuckians View Their Quality of Life: Implications for Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coughenour, C. Milton; Coleman, A. Lee

    Data from 1961, 1971, and 1973 surveys of households and community "knowledgeables" focused on the subjective assesssments of the quality of life (QOL) of residents of Harlan, Perry, Whitley, and Wolfe counties in Eastern Kentucky, and assessed policy implications. Overall, residents assessed their counties favorably. They rated wages…

  3. Quality of Life and Resiliency: Student Development Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forde, Margaret L.

    2002-01-01

    Argues that quality of life is a vital measure when counseling students to determine their best educational pathways to success. Explains that a student's current life status and his/her projected future are useful tools for making recommendations for development and for instilling motivation. Urges college personnel to actively engage students in…

  4. Exercise and Quality of Life in Women with Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.; Dietrich, Frederick; Larson, Rebecca; White, Lesley J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate perceptions of quality of life after a 4-month progressive resistance training program for individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). A second purpose was to examine participants' views about factors that facilitated or impeded exercise behavior. Qualitative interviews were conducted with eight females…

  5. Health-Related Quality of Life in Cardiovascular Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews several current approaches to the assessment of health outcomes in cardiovascular disease, including health-related quality of life. Offers a general health policy model as a method for comparing program options in cardiovascular disease that may have very different objectives. Uses examples from hypertension screening and treatment, heart…

  6. Intimate Adult Relationships, Quality of Life and Psychological Adjusment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khaleque, Abdul

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess relations between adult intimacy, quality of life, and psychological adjustment. Data were collected in the United States from a sample of 64 college students. The measuring instruments used were Personal Information Sheet, Adult version of the Personality Assessment Questionnaire (Adult PAQ), Intimate…

  7. Health Conditions and Perceived Quality of Life in Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorfman, Lorraine T.

    1995-01-01

    Investigates the effects of specific health conditions on perceived quality of life for retirees (n=451). Pulmonary disease was a predictor of dissatisfaction for both sexes. Pulmonary disease and heart attack were the strongest predictors of dissatisfaction with health for men, followed closely by stroke. Arthritis was the strongest predictor of…

  8. 38 CFR 51.100 - Quality of life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.100 Quality of life. A facility... practicable mental and psychosocial well-being of each resident. (2) For each 120 beds, a nursing home must... qualified social worker services on a proportionate basis (for example, a nursing home with 60 beds...

  9. 38 CFR 51.100 - Quality of life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.100 Quality of life. A facility... practicable mental and psychosocial well-being of each resident. (2) For each 120 beds, a nursing home must... qualified social worker services on a proportionate basis (for example, a nursing home with 60 beds...

  10. 38 CFR 51.100 - Quality of life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.100 Quality of life. A facility... practicable mental and psychosocial well-being of each resident. (2) For each 120 beds, a nursing home must... qualified social worker services on a proportionate basis (for example, a nursing home with 60 beds...

  11. 38 CFR 51.100 - Quality of life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.100 Quality of life. A facility... practicable mental and psychosocial well-being of each resident. (2) For each 120 beds, a nursing home must... qualified social worker services on a proportionate basis (for example, a nursing home with 60 beds...

  12. Quality of Life in the Economic and Urban Economic Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambiri, Dionysia; Biagi, Bianca; Royuela, Vicente

    2007-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is increasingly becoming a concept researched empirically and theoretically in the field of economics. In urban economics in particular, this increasing interest stems mainly from the fact that QoL affects urban competitiveness and urban growth: research shows that when households and businesses decide where to locate, QoL…

  13. Quality of life related to swallowing in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Danielle; das Graças Wanderley de Sales Coriolano, Maria; Belo, Luciana Rodrigues; de Marcos Rabelo, Aneide Rocha; Asano, Amdore Guescel; Lins, Otávio Gomes

    2014-10-01

    Swallowing difficulties in Parkinson's disease can result in decreased quality of life. The swallowing quality of life questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) is an instrument for specifically assessing quality of life with respect to swallowing, which has been little explored in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The goal of this study was to evaluate the quality of life with respect to swallowing in persons with PD compared to controls and at several stages of the disease using the SWAL-QOL. The experimental group was composed of 62 persons with PD at stages 1-4. Forty-one age-matched healthy subjects constituted the control group. The SWAL-QOL scores were significantly lower for the patients with PD than for the controls in all SWAL-QOL domains. Eating duration had the largest difference in score between persons with PD and the controls and the lowest mean score, followed by communication, fatigue, fear, sleep, and food selection. The scores of most domains were lower at later stages of the disease. The scores for eating duration, symptom frequency, and sleep were significantly lower at stage 4 than stages 1 and 2. In conclusion, patients with PD have significantly lower scores in all domains of the SWAL-QOL than normal controls. This means swallowing difficulties occurring in patients with PD negatively affect their QOL. Progression of the disease worsens swallowing QOL, more specifically in the domains of eating duration, symptom frequency, and sleep. This occurs mostly at later stages of the disease.

  14. Quality of Life and Perceptions of Crime in Saskatoon, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchen, Peter; Williams, Allison

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the relationship between crime and quality of life in Saskatoon, Canada. The city has one of the highest crime rates in the country and has been referred to as the "Crime Capital of Canada", a label that comes as a surprise to many residents and causes considerable concern among others. The aim of this research…

  15. Application of Structural Equation Models to Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sik-Yum; Song, Xin-Yuan; Skevington, Suzanne; Hao, Yua-Tao

    2005-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) has become an important concept for health care. As QOL is a multidimensional concept that is best evaluated by a number of latent constructs, it is well recognized that latent variable models, such as exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) are useful tools for analyzing QOL data. Recently,…

  16. Spiritual Needs and Quality of Life in Estonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teichmann, Mare; Murdvee, Mart; Saks, Kai

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on three field studies using the WHOQOL-100 and WHOQOL-BREF instruments that utilized three different samples (N = 1,801) to get a better understanding of how important the person's spiritual needs are for quality of life. The most striking negative difference between the Estonian and World Health Organization samples was in…

  17. Arts and the Quality of Life: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalos, Alex C.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to measure the impact of the arts broadly construed on the quality of life. A randomly drawn household sample of 315 adult residents of Prince George, British Columbia served as the working data-set. Examining zero-order correlations, among other things, it was found that playing a musical instrument a number of…

  18. Objective and Subjective Quality of Life Indicators: An Exploratory Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nontasak, Tatree; Frese, Wolfgang

    Accompanying rising affluence has been a gradual, consistent decline in reported levels of happiness. Crime rates, drug addiction, violence, and alienation show widespread dissatisfaction with aspects of life. Quality of life should therefore not be measured solely in terms of material wealth; psychological indicators should also be used. Data…

  19. Innovation and Sustainability and Quality of Life: A University Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    As important current and increasing future sources of innovative economic initiatives, universities are unavoidably confronted by the challenging issues of sustainability and quality of life. The harmonization of social and economic goals will impact very significantly on their innovative activities in relation to both processes and outcomes.…

  20. Family Quality of Life: Moving from Measurement to Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuna, Nina I.; Turnbull, Ann; Summers, Jean Ann

    2009-01-01

    Noting the absence of sound theoretical underpinnings for family quality of life (FQoL) research and work, the authors note that, to guide FQoL practice, research findings must be schematically organized so as to enable practitioners to implement empirical findings effectively. One way to meet this goal is to introduce a theoretical model that…

  1. Contributions of music to aging adults' quality of life.

    PubMed

    Solé, Carme; Mercadal-Brotons, Melissa; Gallego, Sofia; Riera, Mariangels

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was: (a) To evaluate and to compare the impact of three music programs (choir, music appreciation and preventive music therapy sessions) on the quality of life of healthy older adults, and (b) to identify the motivations and the difficulties that seniors encounter when participating in activities of this type, in order to come up with recommendations and strategies for the design of appropriate programs for older adults. A pre-posttest quasi-experimental design without equivalent control group was used in this project. The sample included 83 persons over 65 years of age. The data collection was carried out through an ad hoc questionnaire that included the four aspects of the construct of quality of life (physical health, subjective health, psychological well-being and interpersonal relations), a questionnaire on motivation and another on satisfaction about the program. This questionnaire on quality of life was administered twice: at the beginning of the programs (pretest) and at the end (posttest). The results of this study indicate that the participants perceived improvements in some aspects of their quality of life. In addition, the main reasons which motivate participation in these musical activities are to broaden the social network and to acquire new knowledge. The results are discussed in the light of the challenges of active and satisfactory aging.

  2. Low health-related quality of life among abused women.

    PubMed

    Alsaker, Kjersti; Moen, Bente E; Nortvedt, Monica W; Baste, Valborg

    2006-08-01

    In a cross-sectional study, we sent a self-administered questionnaire to all the women's shelters in Norway to describe health-related quality of life among women who had experienced violence from an intimate partner. Every woman who could understand Norwegian and was staying at a women's shelter in Norway for more than 1 week from October 2002 to May 2003 was asked to participate. We described violence by intimate partners by using the Severity of Violence against Women Scale and the Psychological Maltreatment of Women Index. We used the SF-36 Health Survey to measure health-related quality of life. These women experienced a multitude of threats and actual physical and psychological violence during their partnership. Their health-related quality of life was low and significantly (p<0.001) below the norm for the female population of Norway in all dimensions. The SF-36 mental health dimension was 2.5 standard deviations below the norm. Women at women's shelters in Norway who had experienced domestic violence had very low and clinically significantly reduced health-related quality of life scores. Health care workers must give priority to developing intervention plans for victims of violence from intimate partners.

  3. WEIGHT CLASSIFICATION AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN MEXICAN AMERICAN CHILDREN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rates of childhood overweight have increased significantly in the past 20 years with even higher rates in Mexican Americans. Very overweight children experience negative outcomes for physical as well as emotional and psychosocial health. Evidence has suggested that quality of life (QOL) of ver...

  4. QALYs: incorporating the rate of change in quality of life.

    PubMed

    Katostaras, Theofanis; Katostara, Niki

    2013-01-01

    The need for comparisons and economic evaluations between various health care interventions requires the evaluation of health-related quality of life. To ensure comparability in terms of the duration of any given condition, measures of quality have to integrate the parameter of time, as is the case in measures like QALY. Usually, the rate of change of quality that results from a given intervention is not incorporated in these measures, resulting in a systematically erroneous estimation of QALYs. This estimation error may lead to either a lower QALYs' value compared to the true one, when quality of life improves with a decreasing rate or deteriorates with an increasing rate, or to a higher QALYs' value compared to the true one, when quality of life improves with an increasing rate or deteriorates with a decreasing rate. The proposed method for the estimation of QALYs takes into account the rate of change in health-related quality of life at all stages and discloses deviations up to 16.67% from currently used methods.

  5. The impact of food allergies on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Bacal, Liane R

    2013-07-01

    CME EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES 1. Recognize and appreciate the impact of food allergies on psychosocial health. 2. List the factors that have been shown to negatively affect health-related quality of life. 3. Understand how physicians can directly help to improve a child's quality of life while living with food allergies. Food allergy is a serious problem affecting a growing number of children worldwide. There is a large body of evidence supporting the detrimental effects that food allergy can have on a child's quality of life. With validated tools, we can identify these children and focus on how to protect, guide, and help them to live a safe life. Recent research articulates how food allergies impact health-related quality of life (HRQL). There are studies reported from the child's perspective, as well as studies reported from the parent's perspective. With the development of validated disease and age-specific questionnaires, researchers can reliably gather data on the psychological aspect of children with food allergies. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the literature examining the psycho-social impact of food allergies on children. This article was designed to outline suggestions to help physicians care for the whole child - both mind and body.

  6. Effect of soy isoflavone supplementation on menopausal quality of life

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent clinical trials have found an increased risk of health problems in women using menopausal hormone therapy. As a result, women are in search of alternative strategies to improve their quality of life. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of soy isoflavone supplementation on quali...

  7. Health and Quality of Life in Northern Plains Indians

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quality of life and standard of living are consistently depicted as indigent among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations. American Indians (AI) are among the most heterogeneous and impoverished ethnic groups in the U.S.,have the highest per capita suicide rate at 247% of the national...

  8. Evaluation of the quality of life and risk of suicide

    PubMed Central

    de Medeiros Alves, Verônica; de Lima Francisco, Leilane Camila Ferreira; Belo, Flaviane Maria Pereira; de-Melo-Neto, Valfrido Leão; Barros, Vinicius Gomes; Nardi, Antonio E

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the socio-demographic profiles, suicidal ideation, the presence of mental disorders and the quality of life of patients using mental health services in Arapiraca, Alagoas, Brazil. METHOD: Interviews were conducted in family health units and the Psychosocial Attention Center. The sample included 202 mental disorder patients with a risk of suicide attempts, 207 mental disorder patients without a risk of suicide attempts and 196 controls. This study used an identification questionnaire, the abbreviated World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire, Beck‘s Suicidal Ideation Scale and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. RESULTS: Patients who had a mental disorder and a risk of suicide attempts tended to be single, had less education and lower family income, were not working and showed lower scores in quality of life domains; 73 of these patients had suicidal ideation in the previous week. Depressive disorders, manic episodes, hypomanic episodes, social phobias, obsessive compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, psychotic syndromes and generalized anxiety disorder were more frequent and statistically significant for patients at risk for suicide attempts. CONCLUSION: The management of patients with a risk of suicide attempts must focus on individual patients because this risk is directly linked to changes in quality of life and the improvement of these patients' prognosis. PMID:27074173

  9. Measuring Quality of Life: A New and Practical Survey Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenley, James R.; Greenberg, Jan Steven; Brown, Roger

    1997-01-01

    Presents a new, short, self-administered questionnaire that assesses the quality of life in seven areas. Evidence for the reliability and validity of the questionnaire was based on data gathered from 971 clients; results indicate instrument reliability. The questionnaire features low-cost administration and valid psychometric properties. (RJM)

  10. Quantifying impact of mosquitoes on quality of life

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New Jersey, like many eastern states, has a persistent problem of the Asian tiger mosquito. This and other mosquitoes reduce residents’ quality of life from discomfort and possible risk of disease. To guide a comprehensive area-wide pest management project to control Aedes albopictus in two counties...

  11. The Quality of Life of Retired Reengaged Academics in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ejechi, Eucharia Onyema

    2012-01-01

    The quality of life (QL) of retired academics reengaged in some Nigerian Universities was studied using physical health, subjective happiness, life satisfaction and psychological well-being domains and a measure based on control, autonomy, self-realization and pleasure (CASP) as indicators. Satisfactory QL was indicated all respondents (greater…

  12. Children with Autism: Quality of Life and Parental Concerns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Li-Ching; Harrington, Rebecca A.; Louie, Brian B.; Newschaffer, Craig J.

    2008-01-01

    Past research has shown that children with autism and their families have compromised quality of life (QOL) in several domains. This study examined QOL and parental concerns in children with autism during early childhood, childhood, and adolescence compared to children with Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder…

  13. Quality of Life in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurcay, Eda; Bal, Ajda; Eksioglu, Emel; Cakci, Aytul

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the quality of life (QoL) in spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors. Secondary objectives were to determine the effects of various sociodemographic and clinical characteristics on QoL. This cross-sectional study included 54 patients with SCI. The Turkish version of the Short-Form-36 Health Survey was…

  14. Issues in Evaluating Importance Weighting in Quality of Life Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Chang-ming

    2013-01-01

    For most empirical research investigating the topic of importance weighting in quality of life (QoL) measures, the prevailing approach has been to use (1) a limited choice of global QoL measures as criterion variables (often a single one) to determine the performance of importance weighting, (2) a limited option of weighting methods to develop…

  15. Evaluation of quality of life related to nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Wanden-Berghe, Carmina; Sanz-Valero, Javier; Escribà-Agüir, Vicenta; Castelló-Botia, Isabel; Guardiola-Wanden-Berghe, Rocio

    2009-04-01

    The way in which the quality of life related to health (HRQoL) is affected by the nutritional status of the patient is a subject of constant interest and permanent debate. The purpose of the present paper is to review those studies that relate HRQoL to nutritional status and examine the tools (questionnaires) that they use to investigate this relationship. A critical review of published studies was carried out via an investigation of the following databases: MEDLINE (via PubMed); EMBASE; The Cochrane Library; Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL); Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science; Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS); Spanish Health Sciences Bibliographic Index (IBECS). The search was carried out from the earliest date possible until July 2007.The medical subject heading terms used were 'quality of life', 'nutritional status' and 'questionnaires'. The articles had to contain at least one questionnaire that evaluated quality of life. Twenty-eight documents fulfilling the inclusion criteria were accepted, although none of them used a specific questionnaire to evaluate HRQoL related to nutritional status. However, some of them used a combination of generic questionnaires with the intention of evaluating the same. Only three studies selectively addressed the relationship between nutritional status and quality of life, this evaluation being performed not by means of specific questionnaires but by statistical analysis of data obtained via validated questionnaires.

  16. Assessing quality of life in patients after partial laryngectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hebel, F; Mantsopoulos, K; Bohr, C

    2014-01-01

    Background In the present prospective cross-sectional clinical study, correlations between global quality of life (QoL) and coping strategies were examined in patients who had undergone partial laryngeal resection for T1-T2 laryngeal cancer.  Methods: Correlations between point scores in the “Trier Illness Coping Scales” and SF-36 were analysed in 71 patients (65 males, 6 females, mean age 62 years) at routine follow-up visits by means of linear regression and Pearson’s R. Results: The most important coping strategy was “threat control”, followed by “search for social integration”. Greater expression of “rumination” was statistically correlated with poorer quality of life, and patients with more advanced disease were more inclined to seek social integration. Conclusions: Coping strategies exert substantial influence on the quality of life of cancer survivors. Disease- or treatment-related day-to-day problems and anxieties about the oncological outcome have a greater influence on the quality of life of laryngeal cancer survivors than do voice changes. This finding should be taken into account in survivorship care planning. PMID:25336880

  17. Health-Related Quality of Life in HIV Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Ron D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The structure of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was studied in 205 symptomatic adults. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a two-factor model of HRQOL, with physical and mental health dimensions. Correlations of HRQOL with other aspects of health and support are discussed. (SLD)

  18. Family Quality of Life Following Early Identification of Deafness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Carla W.; Wegner, Jane R.; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Family members' perceptions of their quality of life were examined following early identification of deafness in children. Method: A questionnaire was used to solicit ratings of satisfaction from the family members of 207 children who were deaf and younger than 6 years of age. Results: Results indicated that families were generally…

  19. Quality of life in women with premature ovarian failure.

    PubMed

    Benetti-Pinto, Cristina L; de Almeida, Deborah M B; Makuch, Maria Y

    2011-09-01

    A cross-sectional and case-control study with a matching for age was performed to evaluate quality of life in 58 women with a diagnosis of premature ovarian failure (POF) and 58 women with normal ovarian function paired for age (± 2 years) (control group). In both groups were excluded women with chronic diseases and iatrogenic or genetic causes. Quality of life was evaluated using the WHOQOL-BREF. Although there were no statistically significant differences in quality of life in general between the two groups, there were statistically significant differences in mean scores in the physical health [61.3 ± 18.0 and 72.8 ± 16.4 for the POF and control groups, respectively (p < 0.0001)] and psychological domains [64.2 ± 16.7 and 69.3 ± 14.1, respectively (p = 0.0455)]. Having POF represented an approximately 2.5-fold greater risk of scoring poorly in the physical health and psychological domains. No statistically significant differences were found between the groups with respect to the social relationships or environment domains or for overall health. Women with POF have more difficulty with respect to their physical health and psychological aspects, indicating a need to provide adequate psychosocial and clinical support for these women to minimize the repercussion of this diagnosis on their activities and quality of life.

  20. Body image quality of life in eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jáuregui Lobera, Ignacio; Bolaños Ríos, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objective was to examine how body image affects quality of life in an eating-disorder (ED) clinical sample, a non-ED clinical sample, and a nonclinical sample. We hypothesized that ED patients would show the worst body image quality of life. We also hypothesized that body image quality of life would have a stronger negative association with specific ED-related variables than with other psychological and psychopathological variables, mainly among ED patients. On the basis of previous studies, the influence of gender on the results was explored, too. Patients and methods: The final sample comprised 70 ED patients (mean age 22.65 ± 7.76 years; 59 women and 11 men); 106 were patients with other psychiatric disorders (mean age 28.20 ± 6.52; 67 women and 39 men), and 135 were university students (mean age 21.57 ± 2.58; 81 women and 54 men), with no psychiatric history. After having obtained informed consent, the following questionnaires were administered: Body Image Quality of Life Inventory-Spanish version (BIQLI-SP), Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2), Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ), Self-Esteem Scale (SES), and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R). Results: The ED patients’ ratings on the BIQLI-SP were the lowest and negatively scored (BIQLI-SP means: +20.18, +5.14, and −6.18, in the student group, the non-ED patient group, and the ED group, respectively). The effect of body image on quality of life was more negative in the ED group in all items of the BIQLI-SP. Body image quality of life was negatively associated with specific ED-related variables, more than with other psychological and psychopathological variables, but not especially among ED patients. Conclusion: Body image quality of life was affected not only by specific pathologies related to body image disturbances, but also by other psychopathological syndromes. Nevertheless, the greatest effect was related to ED, and seemed to be more negative among men. This finding is the

  1. Quantifying pain threshold and quality of life of fibromyalgia patients.

    PubMed

    Marques, A P; Ferreira, E A G; Matsutani, L A; Pereira, C A B; Assumpção, A

    2005-06-01

    The most typical symptom of fibromyalgia (FM) is diffuse pain, and pain at specific points-tender points-is crucial for its diagnosis. By comparing healthy individuals and FM patients, this study was aimed at assessing pain and quality of life of Brazilian females with FM, while seeking for a correlation between pain threshold and quality of life. A total of 178 women were evaluated: 124 were FM patients and 54 were healthy women. Pain threshold at tender points was quantified by dolorimetry, and diffuse pain by means of the visual analogue scale (VAS); the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) was used to evaluate quality of life. Statistical treatment of the data allowed for proposing two indexes: a pain threshold index (PT) and a quality of life one (QOL). PT is the lowest value among all pain thresholds measured at the 18 tender points; QOL is the mean of responses to the FIQ and VAS. Both indexes were tested and showed significant differences between the test and control groups. By pairing pain threshold values of each tender point in the test and control groups, it was found that the most sensitive points matched between the two groups, that is, the most sensitive anatomic spots in a healthy individual are also likely to be the most sensitive points in a person with FM. This suggests that a stimulus that provokes slight discomfort to a healthy person may produce more pain in FM patients--which may bear implications for FM clinical treatment. In this sample of Brazilian women, FM patients had both lower pain threshold and worse quality of life than healthy women.

  2. Asymmetry in Keratoconus and Vision-Related Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Jones-Jordan, Lisa A.; Walline, Jeffrey J.; Sinnott, Loraine T.; Kymes, Steven M.; Zadnik, Karla

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To examine the relation of increased ocular asymmetry over time on vision-related quality of life in keratoconus. Methods Subjects were in the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Keratoconus (CLEK) Study and had complete data on a least one scale of the NEI VFQ and examination data at baseline and at least one follow-up visit. Three measures of disease asymmetry (visual acuity, corneal curvature, and refractive error) and better eye status were assessed. Multilevel models were fit to the data. Results Analyses were completed using 961 subjects. Six scales on the NEI VFQ had adequate variability to model (distance activity, driving, mental health, near activity, ocular pain, and role difficulties). Refractive error changes were not associated with statistically significant quality of life differences. Except for ocular pain, statistically significant, but not clinically meaningful, differences were found for visual acuity changes and corneal curvature changes. For a 0.1-unit logMAR visual acuity change, the quality of life scales decreased between 0.20 and 0.99 units. For a 1.00-D steepening of corneal curvature these decreases were on the order of 0.20 to 0.59 units. Changes related to asymmetry were small as well: decreases on the order of 0.20 to 0.38 units. Conclusions Increasing ocular asymmetry and decreases in visual acuity and corneal steepening in the better eye were associated with decreasing vision-related quality of life, though the magnitudes of the changes were not clinically meaningful. Of these two disease status indicators, the vision in the better eye had greater effect on vision-related quality of life. PMID:22825402

  3. Limits on quality of life in communication after total laryngectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Adriana Di Donato; Pernambuco, Leandro de Araújo; Balata, Patrícia Maria Mendes; Santos, Veridiana da Silva; de Lima, Leilane Maria; de Souza, Síntia Ribeiro; da Silva, Hilton Justino

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Among people affected by cancer, the impairment of quality of life of people affected by cancer can cause have devastating effects. The self-image of patients after post-laryngectomyzed patients may be find themselves compromised, affecting the quality of life in this population. Objective: To characterize quality of life in related to communication in people who have undergone went total laryngectomy surgery. Methods: This is an observational study, with a cross-sectional and descriptive series. Design of series study. The sample were comprised 15 patients interviewed the period from January to February of 2011. We used the Quality Protocol for Life Communication in Post-laryngectomy adapted from Bertocello (2004); which this questionnaire contains 55 questions. The protocol was organized from the nature of using responses classified as positive and negative aspects, proposals in with respect to five 5 communication domains: family relationships, social relationships, personal analysis; morphofunctional aspect, and use of writing. To promote and guarantee the autonomy of the respondents, was examiners made use of used assistive technology with the Visual Response Scale. Results: The responses that total laryngectomy compromises the quality of life in communication amounted to 463 occurrences (65.7%), and that who responses suggesting good quality of life were represented with amounted to 242 occurrences (34.3%), from a total of 705 occurrencesresponses. From Among the five 5 Communication domains, four 4 had percentages of above 63% for occurrences of negative content for impact on communication. Appearance Morphofunctional appearance gave the had the highest percentage of negative content, amounting to 77.3% of cases. Conclusions: The results showed important limitations of a personal and social nature due to poor communication with their peers. Thus, there is a need for multidisciplinary interventions that aim to minimize the

  4. The relationships among sleep efficiency, pulmonary functions, and quality of life in patients with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Akira; Kawasaki, Yuji; Takeda, Kenichi; Harada, Tomoya; Fukushima, Takehito; Takata, Miki; Hashimoto, Kiyoshi; Watanabe, Masanari; Kurai, Jun; Nishimura, Koichi; Shimizu, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Background Sleep disturbance is commonly observed in patients with asthma, especially in those with poorly controlled asthma. Evaluating sleep quality to achieve good control of asthma is important since nocturnal asthmatic symptoms such as cough, wheezing, and chest tightness may disturb sleep. Actigraphy is an objective, ambulatory monitoring method for tracking a patient’s sleep and wake activities and for assessing sleep quality, as reflected by total sleep time, sleep efficiency, duration of awakening after sleep onset (WASO), and sleep onset latency. Patients and methods Fifty patients with asthma were enrolled in this study. Sleep quality was assessed employing wristwatch-type actigraphy (Actiwatch 2). The level of asthma control was assessed by the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ), and asthma-related quality of life was assessed by the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ). The parameters for sleep quality were compared using ACQ scores, AQLQ scores, and pulmonary function test results. Results The total sleep time was 387.2 minutes, WASO was 55.8 minutes, sleep efficiency was 87.01%, sleep onset latency was 8.17 minutes, and the average ACQ was 0.36. Neither sleep efficiency nor WASO correlated with respiratory functions, ACQ scores, or AQLQ scores. Conclusion Sleep-related parameters assessed by actigraphy in well-controlled asthma do not correlate with pulmonary functions, the asthma control level, or daytime quality of life. Sleep quality should be evaluated independently when asthma is well-controlled. PMID:25419157

  5. Effect of hospitalization on rest-activity rhythm and quality of life of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Parganiha, Arti; Taj, Saba; Chandel, Priyanka; Sultan, Armiya; Choudhary, Vivek

    2014-05-01

    Rest-activity rhythm and quality of life (QoL) in three cohorts, namely (1) cancer in-patients, (2) out-patients, and (3) control subjects were studied. The patients of the former two groups were chosen randomly from the Regional Cancer Center, Raipur, India. All patients received chemotherapy for 3-4 consecutive days. The in-patients remained hospitalized for the entire period of chemotherapy plus one day post treatment. The out-patients, unlike the in-patients, went to their homes daily after treatment. Rest-activity rhythm of the patients was monitored using Actical. Quality of life (QoL) and psychological status of patients were assessed using EORTC QLQ-C30 and Hospital Anxiety & Depression Scale, respectively. Each subject exhibited significant circadian rhythm in rest-activity. The average values for Mesor, amplitude, peak activity, autocorrelation coefficient and dichotomy index of all three groups varied significantly between one group to the other in the following order: in-patient < out-patient < control. Further, quality of life, measured from responses on functional and symptom scales, was better off in cancer out-patients compared to the in-patients. It is concluded that hospitalization alters rest-activity rhythm parameters markedly and deteriorates QoL in cancer patients. Nevertheless, further extensive investigation is desirable to support the above speculation and to ascertain if hospitalization produces similar effects on patients suffering from diseases other than cancer.

  6. [Peripheral muscle strength in stable COPD patients: correlation with respiratory function variables and quality of life].

    PubMed

    Toral Marín, J; Ortega, F; Cejudo, P; Elías, T; Sánchez, H; Montemayor, T

    1999-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess peripheral muscle strength in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using a simple test and to look for correlation with function variables, physiological strength variables and quality of life parameters. Twenty-three COPD patients with moderate to severe air-flow limitation (FEV1 = 39 +/- 12%) in stable phase but displaying inability to carry out daily tasks were enrolled. Peripheral muscle strength was assessed in all patients by measuring the maximum load in a single repetition of five simple upper and lower extremity exercises performed at a multi-gymnastics station. Results were compared to respiratory function variables (FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC and gasometry), to results of an exercise test on a cycle ergometer with monitoring of respiratory gases (VEmax, VO2max and Wmax), to endurance (minutes) to dyspnea (Mahler's scale) and to quality of life (Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire-CRDQ). No relation between functional parameters and endurance in minutes was found. Minute ventilation (VE) proved to be significantly related to oxygen intake (VO) and maximum work in the stress test. Dyspnea on Mahler's scale was unrelated, but fatigue variables and emotional function variables on the CRDQ were related. We conclude that peripheral muscle strength is unrelated to level of flow limitation or exercise tolerance in COPD patients. Peripheral muscle strength is related, however, to maximum work load and some aspects of quality of life.

  7. Relationship of physical and functional independence and perceived quality of life of veteran patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Yeaman, Paul A; Kim, Dong-Yun; Alexander, Jeffrey L; Ewing, Helen; Kim, Kye Y

    2013-08-01

    Alzheimer disease not only affects the cognitive function but also impacts one's abilities to perform daily tasks. This study evaluated for correlation between the quality of life of patients with Alzheimer disease (QoL-AD) and the level of independence and to evaluate the statistical difference between patients' quality of life and proxy perception of quality of life by utilizing the Katz activities of daily living and QoL-AD on patients and QoL-AD on caregivers. There was a small positive correlation (r = .13) between the levels of physical and functional independence and the perceived QoL. Also, patient consistently had higher QoL-AD than their caregiver counterparts. These findings provide some insight into our need to acknowledge factors that may influence QoL and illustrate the importance of monitoring for executive dysfunction and the safety risk.

  8. The Relations of Sleep and Quality of Life to School Performance in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perfect, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined parent and youth self-reports to test the hypothesis that perceived insufficient sleep duration, inconsistent sleep habits, reduced quality of life, less frequent blood glucose monitoring, and higher hemoglobin A1c would predict poorer school functioning among 50 youth with type 1 diabetes. The data suggested that a delay in…

  9. Factors contributing to quality of life in COPD patients in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hye-Young; Kim, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic lung disease, and the burden of COPD is expected to increase in the rapidly aging nation of South Korea. This study aims to examine the factors contributing to health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in COPD patients. Patients and methods This study was based on 6-year-data obtained from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2012. COPD was diagnosed in 2,734 survey participants and the severity was graded according to the criteria set by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease. The EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) index was used to assess the quality of life. Results The EQ-5D index scores for COPD patients and the general population were 0.915±0.003 and 0.943±0.001, respectively. Males, younger people, and patients with higher education attainment and income levels had a higher utility score. In addition, the adjusted EQ-5D index scores for severity level IV significantly decreased by 0.100 (P=0.041), compared to the severity group I scores. No significant differences were found in stage II and III patients. Comorbidities (excluding cancer and hypertension) appeared to negatively influence HRQOL among COPD patients. In particular, depression (EQ-5D index score =−0.089, P=0.0003) and osteoporosis (EQ-5D index score=−0.062, P=0.0039) had a significant influence, while smoking status did not appear to influence patient HRQOL. Conclusion In this study, we found that the higher the severity of COPD, the lower the quality of life. In particular, patients with depression and osteoporosis had a relatively low utility score. Therefore, these comorbidities should be carefully monitored in order to improve quality of life. PMID:26834467

  10. An Internet-Based Physical Activity Intervention to Improve Quality of Life of Inactive Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Broekhuizen, Karen; de Gelder, Jelle; Wijsman, Carolien A; Wijsman, Liselotte W; Westendorp, Rudi GJ; Verhagen, Evert; Slagboom, Pieternella E; van Mechelen, Willem; van Heemst, Diana; van der Ouderaa, Frans

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing physical activity is a viable strategy for improving both the health and quality of life of older adults. Objective The aim of this study was to assess if an Internet-based intervention aimed to increase physical activity was effective in improving quality of life of inactive older adults. In addition, we analyzed the effect of the intervention on quality of life among those participants who successfully reached their individually targeted increase in daily physical activity as indicated by the intervention program, as well as the dose-response effect of increasing physical activity on quality of life. Methods The intervention was tested in a randomized controlled trial and was comprised of an Internet program—DirectLife (Philips)—aimed at increasing physical activity using monitoring and feedback by accelerometry and feedback by digital coaching (n=119). The control group received no intervention (n=116). Participants were inactive 60-70-year-olds and were recruited from the general population. Quality of life and physical activity were measured at baseline and after 3 months using the Research ANd Development 36-item health survey (RAND-36) and wrist-worn triaxial accelerometer, respectively. Results After 3 months, a significant improvement in quality of life was seen in the intervention group compared to the control group for RAND-36 subscales on emotional and mental health (2.52 vs -0.72, respectively; P=.03) and health change (8.99 vs 2.03, respectively; P=.01). A total of 50 of the 119 participants (42.0%) in the intervention group successfully reached their physical activity target and showed a significant improvement in quality of life compared to the control group for subscales on emotional and mental health (4.31 vs -0.72, respectively; P=.009) and health change (11.06 vs 2.03, respectively; P=.004). The dose-response analysis showed that there was a significant association between increase in minutes spent in moderate

  11. Sexuality and quality of life in congenital hypogonadisms.

    PubMed

    Garrido Oyarzún, María Fernanda; Castelo-Branco, Camil

    2016-12-01

    Turner syndrome and idiopathic congenital hypogonadism including Kallmann syndrome are conditions associated to a large number of widely known comorbidities that need a medical support forever. One of the characteristics shared by both conditions is the lack of sexual development that influencing the sexuality functioning and quality of life of the affected women. Few studies have been conducted to assess these topics, but they need to be considered in the treatment to all women with hypogonadism. This review on the major medical issues and psychological aspects, also focus in the present knowledge about sexual function and quality of life of women with Turner syndrome and idiopathic congenital hypogonadism, which aims to help in the comprehensive management of these patients.

  12. [Quality of life of elderly patients with nephrolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Dzeranov, N K; Baĭbarin, K A; Kazachenko, A V

    2006-01-01

    Clinical findings have been analysed for 105 presenile and senile patients with nephrolithiasis. A total of 168 operations have been made: open intervention (n=22), percutaneous nephrolitholapaxia (n=12), extracorporeal lithotripsy (n=134). Quality of life was assessed according to the questionnaire survey (an original visual graphic questionnaire on the patient's attitude to his/her disease and the treatment, questionnaire on the doses of analgetics and antibiotics, conventional questionnaire EQ-SD. It was found that elderly patients note a statistically significant fall in frequency of pains (renal colics, lumbar pains, subfebrile condition), in the dose of analgetics and antibacterial drugs 6-12 months after removal of the concrement. Removal of the concrement had a positive influence on quality of life of patients with urolithiasis. Extracorporeal lithotripsy had a weaker emotional effect on the patients than open surgical interventions. It is suggested to remove nephroliths if contraindications are absent.

  13. Urticaria: impact on quality of life and economic cost.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Brigid F

    2014-02-01

    Patients with urticaria suffer itch, swellings, fatigue caused by sleep disturbance and the side effects of medication, and disruption of many facets of their lives. Much progress has been made in formally evaluating the degree of quality-of-life (QoL) impairment suffered by patients with urticaria. This review focuses on QoL in chronic urticaria (>6 weeks duration) and examines QoL measures, including the chronic urticaria-quality of life questionnaire (CU-Q2oL). Patients with urticaria have difficulty identifying and coping with their emotions. The psychiatric comorbidity and the financial burden on the patient and society because of chronic urticaria, is also examined.

  14. Quality of Life Among Food Allergic Patients and Their Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Warren, Christopher M; Otto, Alana K; Walkner, Madeline M; Gupta, Ruchi S

    2016-05-01

    Food allergy is increasing in prevalence worldwide. This review summarizes progress made studying relationships between food allergy and quality of life (QOL), with an emphasis on recent work in the field. Early work examining QOL among food allergy patients established that stress and anxiety associated with continuous allergen avoidance and the looming threat of anaphylaxis were associated with significantly impaired food allergy quality of life (FAQOL) for children with food allergy and their caregivers. Recent clinical studies suggest that undergoing oral food challenge to confirm food allergy and oral immunotherapy to treat food allergy may each improve FAQOL among both patients and their caregivers. Other intervention modalities, such as nurse-facilitated counseling and educational workshops, also hold promise, but additional work is needed. Future work must strive to recruit more representative, population-based samples, including adult patients, in order to improve the generalizability and clinical relevance of findings.

  15. Impact of leprosy on the quality of life.

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, G. A.; Rao, P. S.

    1999-01-01

    Leprosy is considered by many as not merely a medical condition, but as a condition encompassing psychological, socioeconomic and spiritual dimensions that dehabilitate an individual progressively, unless properly cared for. The present study was undertaken to document the nature and extent of decreases in the quality of life (QOL) of an affected person. The World Health Organization questionnaire on quality of life was given to a representative random sample of 50 leprosy-affected persons and 50 unaffected individuals in the Bommasamudram Taluk of Chittoor District, Andhra Pradesh, India. This questionnaire explores the following six domains; physical; psychological; level of independence; social relationships; spiritual; and environmental. The mean QOL score of the cases was significantly lower than that of the controls with the exception of the spiritual domain. The mean total score for women was higher than that of males in each domain and age group. Males with deformities had a significantly lower score than those with no visible deformities. Although the scores for females with deformities were also lower than those without deformities, the differences were not statistically significant. Analyses of economic status versus the QOL scores clearly showed that they were positively correlated. The study revealed that quality of life decreased progressively in leprosy-affected persons. Women had a better QOL score than men in almost every domain. Given the secondary role of women in Indian rural society, this may simply imply an acceptance of their situation. The findings are discussed in comparison with other diseases and in the context of a poor socioeconomic environment. With modern amenities, better education and higher expectations, the perception of an individual regarding his or her own quality of life is bound to change. The need for frequent assessments and further studies along these lines is emphasized. PMID:10427937

  16. Quality of Life in Methadone Maintenance Treated Patients in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Aghayan, Shahrokh; Amiri, Mohammad; Chaman, Reza; Khosravi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Measurement of life quality as an index of health status has a widespread application in health care domain. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the quality of life of referents to addiction cessation centers of Iran. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 988 addicts who had referred to addiction cessation centers in Shahroud were studied through SF-36 questionnaire. The data were analyzed using linear regression in structural equation modeling and STATA 12 statistical software. Results: The mean ± SD age of the participants was 41.2 ± 11.8 years. Most of the referents used smoking followed by eating method of opium abuse. The mean ± SD score of life quality was 67.8 ± 17.2, the mean ± SD score of life quality in physical health dimension was 76.9 ± 26.7, and the mean ± SD score in mental health dimension was 64.5 ± 18.4. Univariate analysis showed a significant relationship between life quality and gender, place of residence, education, occupation, marital status, and income (P ≤ 0.05). However, in multivariate analysis a significant relationship was observed only between gender, socioeconomic status, and quality of life score. Conclusions: Although most studies have reported low and weak quality of life in addicts, the findings of this study shows that the life quality score of addicts is rather good. It seems that the maintenance treatment that addicts receive in addiction cessation centers has been effective in improving the quality of life of the patients. Hence, expanding methadone treatment centers can play a leading role in the improvement of life quality in addicts. PMID:26870708

  17. Quality of Life and Functional Status across the Life Course

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    Recovery Practices in Breast Cancer (RESTORE). This is a randomized exercise intervention trial with a lymphedema prevention program. Project 1 is...treatment and beyond. 15. SUBJECT TERMS breast cancer, quality of life, lymphedema , exercise 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...management may be a potential intervention for those at greater risk of lymphedema . • Women with swelling reported a significantly lower quality

  18. Quality of Life and Functional Status Across the Life Course

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    This is a randomized exercise intervention trial with a lymphedema prevention program. Project 1 is a continuation of a study that was initiated in...quality of life, lymphedema , exercise 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT...children in the home, balancing work and family roles, and changes in physical health as a result of cancer or its treatment, (e.g., lymphedema or

  19. Quality of life of older adults in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, Naile; Arpacı, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the factors affecting the quality of life of the elderly people in Turkey. Three-hundred community-dwelling older adults (Mage=68.35, SD=5.80 years) participated in this study. The quality of life was examined through World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire-Older Adults Module Turkish Version (WHOQOL-OLD Turkish). Analysis of Variances (ANOVA) showed significant age differences in sensory abilities, social participation, and intimacy sub-scale scores. Post hoc Scheffe Test results indicated that elderly people aged 75 years and over differed from other age groups; although their scores in social participation and intimacy were lower; they had higher scores in sensory abilities than those aged 60-65 and 66-74 years. There were significant differences between the educational levels of these elderly people in sensory abilities, autonomy, past-present-and-future activities, social participation, and death-and-dying sub-scales. The autonomy, past-present-and-future activities, social participation, and death-and-dying scores of those with high school education were higher than that of those with secondary school or less education except in sensory abilities scores. There were differences found between the variable of with whom the elderly people lived and of QOL sub-scales of the elderly people's sensory abilities, past-today-and-future activities, death-and-dying, social participation, and intimacy. In addition, the total average score of the QOL sub-scales with the sufficiency of income of the elderly people were interconnected. In conclusion, the findings revealed that gender, age, education, marital status, childbearing, social insurance, health status, living arrangement and income variables are the determinant to improving the quality of life of elderly people.

  20. Validation of the Pediatric Cardiac Quality of Life Inventory

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Bradley S.; Tomlinson, Ryan S.; Wernovsky, Gil; Drotar, Dennis; Newburger, Jane W.; Mahony, Lynn; Mussatto, Kathleen; Tong, Elizabeth; Cohen, Mitchell; Andersen, Charlotte; Shera, David; Khoury, Philip R.; Wray, Jo; Gaynor, J. William; Helfaer, Mark A.; Kazak, Anne E.; Shea, Judy A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this multicenter study was to confirm the validity and reliability of the Pediatric Cardiac Quality of Life Inventory (PCQLI). METHODS Seven centers recruited pediatric patients (8–18 years of age) with heart disease (HD) and their parents to complete the PCQLI and generic health-related quality of life (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory [PedsQL]) and non–quality of life (Self-Perception Profile for Children [SPPC]/Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents [SPPA] and Youth Self-Report [YSR]/Child Behavior Checklist [CBCL]) tools. PCQLI construct validity was assessed through correlations of PCQLI scores between patients and parents and with severity of congenital HD, medical care utilization, and PedsQL, SPPC/SPPA, and YSR/CBCL scores. PCQLI test-retest reliability was evaluated. RESULTS The study enrolled 1605 patient-parent pairs. Construct validity was substantiated by the association of lower PCQLI scores with Fontan palliation and increased numbers of cardiac operations, hospital admissions, and physician visits (P < .001); moderate to good correlations between patient and parent PCQLI scores (r = 0.41–0.61; P <.001); and fair to good correlations between PCQLI total scores and PedsQL total (r = 0.70–0.76), SPPC/SPPA global self-worth (r = 0.43–0.46), YSR/CBCL total competency (r = 0.28–0.37), and syndrome and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition-oriented scale (r = −0.58 to −0.30; P < .001) scores. Test-retest reliability correlations were excellent (r = 0.78–0.90; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS PCQLI scores are valid and reliable for children and adolescents with congenital and acquired HD and may be useful for future research and clinical management. Pediatrics 2010;126:498–508 PMID:20805147

  1. Quality of Life in Medical Students With Internet Addiction.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Farzad; Monajemi, Alireza; Sadeghi, Anahita; Mojtahedzadeh, Rita; Mirzazadeh, Azim

    2016-10-01

    The widespread use of internet has caused new psychological, social, and educational problems for the students. The aim of this study was to examine the quality of life in medical students who suffer from internet addiction. This cross-sectional survey was carried out in Tehran University of Medical Sciences, and a total of 174 fourth-to seventh-year undergraduate medical students were enrolled. The quality of life was assessed by WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire which covers four domains of physical health, psychological, social relationships, and the environment. For assessing internet addiction, we used Internet Addiction Test (IAT) of Young. The students with IAT score higher than 50 were considered as addicted. For evaluating academic performance, the students were requested to report their grade point average (GPA). The mean IA score (±SD) was 34.13±12.76. Twenty-eight students (16.90%) had IAT score above 50. The mean quality of life score in internet addicted group was 54.97±11.38 versus 61.65±11.21 in normal group (P=0.005). Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between IA score and physical domain (r=-0.18, P=0.02); psychological domain (r=-0.35, P=0.000); and social relation domain (r=-0.26, P=0.001). Mean GPA was significantly lower in the addicted group. It seems that quality of life is lower in the internet addicted medical students; moreover, such students academically perform poorer in comparison with non-addicts. Since internet addiction is increasing at a rapid pace which may provoke considerable academic, psychological and social implications; as a result, it may require screening programs to the immediate finding of such problem to give consultations to prevent unwanted complications.

  2. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms of Dementia: Consent, Quality of Life, and Dignity

    PubMed Central

    Passmore, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative forms of dementia are progressive, incurable, fatal, and likely to cause suffering in conjunction with personal incapacity. Timely diagnostic disclosure and counseling can facilitate important advance care planning. The risk of harm associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) of dementia often has to be balanced against the risk of harm associated with medication management of NPS. A palliative care framework can help preserve autonomy, quality of life, comfort, and dignity for patients with NPS. PMID:23853768

  3. Arts and the Perceived Quality of Life in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalos, Alex C.; Kahlke, P. Maurine

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this investigation were (1) to measure the impact of arts-related activities on the perceived quality of life of a representative sample of British Columbians aged 18 years or more in the spring of 2007, and (2) to compare the findings of this study with those of a sample of 1,027 adults drawn from five B.C. communities (Comox Valley,…

  4. Work and the Perceived Quality of Life. A Final Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    satisfaction , happiness , and related indices of subjective well -being. The affective beliefs assessed by such measures may be directed toward 1if0 as a whole...KEY WORDS (Continue on ,re.,. side it necessary and Identify by block m.ber) L".J ’Work. quality of life ,, work-family conflict, Job satisfaction ...quality of work life , job involvement, life satisfaction , unemployment family involvement, job importance. Ids*s" 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on revere side

  5. Quality of Life and Cost Effectiveness of Prostate Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0257 TITLE: Quality of Life and Cost Effectiveness of Prostate Cancer Treatment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ravishankar...patients across two ethnic groups, (2) analyze and compare short and long term cost-effectiveness of prostate cancer treatment across ethnic groups; and...cost-effectiveness of prostate cancer treatment across ethnic groups; and (3) analyze and compare resource utilization patterns, treatment modalities

  6. Smart homes to improve the quality of life for all.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Marco; Aloise, Fabio; Baldoni, Roberto; Cincotti, Febo; Guger, Christoph; Lazovik, Alexander; Mecella, Massimo; Pucci, Paolo; Rinsma, Johanna; Santucci, Giuseppe; Taglieri, Massimiliano

    2011-01-01

    A home is smart when, being aware of its own state and that of its users, is capable of controlling itself in order to support the user wishes and thus improving their quality of life. This holds both for users with special needs and for those with ordinary domestic needs. In this paper, we overview the Smart Homes for All project which represents the current state of the art with respect to software control and user interfaces in the smart homes arena.

  7. Counseling in Primary Care Improves Depression and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Carta, MG; Petretto, D; Adamo, S; Bhat, KM; Lecca, ME; Mura, G; Carta, V; Angermeyer, M; Moro, MF

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: To measure the effectiveness on Quality of Life of adjunctive cognitive behavioral counseling in the setting of General Practitioners (GPs) along with the treatment as usual (TAU;) for the treatment of depression. Methods: Six month-controlled trial of patients who were referred to randomly assigned GPs (four for experimental group of patients and ten for the control) was done. Experimental sample had 34 patients with DSM-IV diagnosis of Depression (Depressed Episode, Dysthymia, or Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood) receiving the TAU supplemented with counseling. Control group had 30 patients with diagnosis of Depression receiving only the TAU. Results: The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score improved in both groups. Patients in the experimental group showed greater improvement compared to the control group at T2. The World Health Organization Quality OF Life Questionnaire (WHOQOL) score also improved in the experimental group but not in the control group. The improvement in the experimental group was statistically significant in terms of both BDI and WHOQOL scores. Conclusions: Adding counseling to TAU in general medical practice settings is more effective in controlling the symptoms of depression and improving the quality of life as measured over a period of six months, than TAU alone. These results while encouraging, also calls for a larger study involving a largersample size and a longer period of time. PMID:23173011

  8. [Supportive care, cognition and quality of life in brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, É; Taillibert, S; Blonski, M; Jouniaux Delbez, N; Delgadillo, D; Taillia, H; Auquier, P; Belin, C; Bonnetain, F; Varin, D; Tallet, A; Taillandier, L

    2015-02-01

    Brain metastases impact on the survival of the patients, but on their quality of life as well. The objective of the management of these patients is then double. Currently, due to medical advances, survivals tend to improve, especially for some tumor subtypes. During the course of the disease, different neurological signs and symptoms can be observed according to the location, the number and the volume of the metastase(s). Patients and caregivers are especially worried about the loss of autonomy and cognitive impairments. A permanent dialogue, during the course of the disease, is mandatory, in order to adapt the management to the objectives determined by the patients and the medical team. These objectives may vary according to the objective response rates of the disease to anticancer therapies, according to the impact of the disease and its management in daily living. Anticancer therapies and supportive care must be appreciated according to their impact on the survival, on the preservation of the functional independence and the quality of life of the patient, on their abilities to preserve the neurological status and delay the apparition of new neurological signs and symptoms, and their adverse events. Supportive care, cognition and quality of life should be regularly evaluated and adapted according to the objectives of the management of brain metastases patients. Different approaches are described in this paper.

  9. Lower Health-Related Quality of Life in Polytrauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zwingmann, Jörn; Hagelschuer, Paul; Langenmair, Elia; Bode, Gerrit; Herget, Georg; Südkamp, Norbert P.; Hammer, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although trauma-associated mortality has fallen in recent decades, and medical care has continued to improve in many fields, the quality of life after experiencing polytrauma has attracted little attention in the literature. This group of patients suffer from persisting physical disabilities. Moreover, they experience long-term social, emotional, and psychological effects that limit/lower considerably their quality of life. We analyzed retrospective data on 147 polytraumatized patients by administering written questionnaires and conducting face-to-face interviews 6 ± 0.8 years after the trauma in consideration of the following validated scores: Glasgow Outcome Scale, European Quality of Life Score, Short Form-36, Trauma Outcome Profile, and Beck Depressions Inventory II. Our analysis of these results reveals that polytraumatized patients suffer from persistent pain and functional disabilities after >5 years. We also observed changes in their socioeconomic situation, as well as psychological after-effects. The rehabilitation of this particular group of patients should not only address their physical disabilities. The psychological after-effects of trauma must be acknowledged and addressed for an even longer period of time. PMID:27175646

  10. [Health-related quality of life in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Cano-de la Cuerda, Roberto; Vela-Desojo, Lydia; Miangolarra-Page, Juan C; Macías-Macías, Yolanda; Muñoz-Hellin, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a disabling and progressive neurological condition characterized by multiple motor and non motor symptoms that contribute to deterioration in quality of life. The diversity of symptoms associated with the disease and its management affect the patients on their physical, social and mental quality of life. The aim of this study was to identify key dimensions of health related quality of life (HRQOL) in a population affected with Parkinson's disease with a degree of mild-moderate impairment. Thirty six patients with Parkinson were recruited. The Hoehn and Yarh scale, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rate Scale, the scale of activities of daily life and Schwab & England Get Up & Go Test were applied. HRQOL was assessed with the EuroQol-5D and the specific questionnaire Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 items. The dimensions of the PDQ-39, except the PDQ-39 Pain domain and the EuroQol-5D correlated significantly with the severity of the disease. HRQOL was correlated with the functional status of patients. Only the PDQ-39 pain domain correlated with the risk of falls. Our results suggest that the HRQOL of patients with PD, in a state of mild-moderate impairment, is strongly influenced by disease severity and functional status.

  11. A Theory of Social Integration as Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Hopper, Kim; Tugenberg, Toni; Dickey, Barbara; Fisher, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Objective Quality of life, once a priority in caring for people with severe mental illness, has since been eclipsed by other concerns. This article returns attention to quality of life by offering a theory of social integration (as quality of life) for persons disabled by severe mental illness. Methods Data collection for this qualitative study consisted of 78 individual, unstructured interviews with 56 adults who have been psychiatrically disabled and field observations and interviews with staff and users that were made during eight ethnographic visits to service sites working to promote social integration. Data were analyzed with an inductive strategy based on grounded theory methodology and framed theoretically by the capabilities approach to human development. Goals were to identify personal capacities needed for integration, characterize occasions for capacity development in mental health care, and develop a working theory. Results Six personal capacities were identified: responsibility, accountability, imagination, empathy, judgment, and advocacy. Occasions were characterized in terms of their defining mechanisms: contradiction, reinterpretation, rehearsal, raising expectations, and confrontation. A working theory was constructed to characterize the process of capacity development for social integration through exposure to increasingly challenging occasions for growth in the context of mental health care. Conclusions Capacities for social integration can be effectively developed as part of the everyday routines of mental health care. Eventually, the process shifts from development to the exercise of capacities and to participation as full citizens in the social world beyond treatment. PMID:18182536

  12. Health-related quality of life in patients undergoing cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Li-Na; Shi, Hon-Yi; Wang, Tsai-Fan; Chang, Chiung-Ying; Lee, King-Teh

    2011-07-01

    This large-scale prospective cohort study of a Taiwan population applied generalized estimating equations to evaluate predictors of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after open cholecystectomy (OC) and laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) procedures performed between February 2007 and November 2008. The Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index and Short Form-36 were used in a preoperative assessment and in 3(rd) month and 6(th) month postoperative assessments of 38 OC and 259 LC patients. The HRQOL of the cholecystectomy patients were significantly improved at 3 months and 6 months postsurgery (p<0.05). At 3 months postsurgery, HRQOL improvement was significantly larger in LC patients than in OC patients. Patient characteristics, clinical characteristics, and health care quality were also significantly related to HRQOL improvement (p<0.05). Additionally, after controlling for related variables, preoperative health status was significantly and positively associated with each subscale of the Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index and Short Form-36 throughout the 6 months (p<0.05). Patients should be advised that their postoperative HRQOL may depend not only on their postoperative health care but also on their preoperative functional status.

  13. Chronic Ischemic Heart Disease Affects Health Related Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Goreishi, Abolfazl; Shajari, Zahra; Mohammadi, Zeinab

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic diseases endanger not only physical health but also psychological and social health of patient. Thus, evaluation of such patients for psychological treatment decisions is very important. Method This is a descriptive study that was performed with 50 chronic patients (ischemic heart disease) selected from Valiasr and Mousavi at cardiac wards in Zanjan Province. They were given three types of questionnaire: demographic, WHOQOL, and Zung depression and anxiety index. The information was statically analyzed by frequency chart, central indexes, dispersion, Chi-Square and t tests, Pearson’s correlation index (P < 0.05). Results The average of quality of life in all patients were calculated as was respectively 12.19, 11.98, 12.08, and 12.4 in physical, psychological, social and environmental domains respectively, 68 percent of total number of the patients had various degrees of anxiety and 78 percent of them had various degrees of depression. There was a significant relationship between the life quality average in all domains and anxiety intensity and depression intensity (P < 0.05) and there was a significant relationship between life quality average in all domains and income (P < 0.05). Conclusion As the level of depression and anxiety goes up, quality of life decreases pointing out that they have a reverse relationship. Depression and anxiety are one of the most significant factors of quality of life among other variables. Regarding specific conditions of the treatment, it is necessary to pay special attention to psychological aspects.

  14. Impact of age related macular degeneration on quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Hassell, J B; Lamoureux, E L; Keeffe, J E

    2006-01-01

    Aims To describe the impact of age related macular degeneration (AMD) on quality of life and explore the association with vision, health, and demographic variables. Methods Adult participants diagnosed with AMD and with impaired vision (visual acuity <6/12) were assessed with the Impact of Vision Impairment (IVI) questionnaire. Participants rated the extent that vision restricted participation in activities affecting quality of life and completed the Short Form General Health Survey (SF‐12) and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Results The mean age of the 106 participants (66% female) was 83.6 years (range 64–98). One quarter had mild vision impairment, (VA<6/12–6/18) and 75% had moderate or severely impaired vision. Participants reported from at least “a little” concern on 23 of the 32 IVI items including reading, emotional health, mobility, and participation in relevant activities. Those with mild and moderate vision impairment were similarly affected but significantly different from those with severe vision loss (p<0.05). Distance vision was associated with IVI scores but not age, sex, or duration of vision loss. Conclusion AMD affects many quality of life related activities and not just those related to reading. Referral to low vision care services should be considered for people with mild vision loss and worse. PMID:16622089

  15. Quality of life index in autoimmune bullous dermatosis patients*

    PubMed Central

    Penha, Mariana Álvares; Farat, Joyce Godoy; Miot, Hélio Amante; Barraviera, Sílvia Regina Catharino Sartori

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Autoimmune bullous dermatoses are complex diseases triggered by autoantibodies action against epidermal antigens or the dermoepidermal junction. Blisters and vesicles that evolve with erosion areas characterize them. Although rare, they present high morbidity, affecting the quality of life of patients. OBJECTIVES To assess the magnitude of autoimmune bullous dermatoses on life quality of patients treated in a public university service in countryside of Brazil. METHODS This cross-sectional study was based on an inquiry with autoimmune bullous dermatoses patients assisted at outpatient university referral service. Elements related to quality of life were evaluated by the Dermatology Life Quality Index, as well as clinical and demographic data. RESULTS The study evaluated 43 patients with pemphigus foliaceus, 32 with pemphigus vulgaris, 6 with bullous pemphigoid and 3 with dermatitis herpetiformis. The average age was 48 ± 16 years and 34 (40%) were female. The median score (p25-p75) of the Dermatology Life Quality Index was 16 (9-19), classified as "severe impairment" of life quality, in which the greater impact was related to symptoms and feelings, daily and leisure activities. CONCLUSIONS Autoimmune bullous dermatoses inflict severe impairment of quality of life for patients followed by a public outpatient clinic in the countryside of Brazil. PMID:25830988

  16. Social support mediates the association between benefit finding and quality of life in caregivers.

    PubMed

    Brand, Charles; Barry, Lorna; Gallagher, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    The psychosocial pathways underlying associations between benefit finding and quality of life are poorly understood. Here, we examined associations between benefit finding, social support, optimism and quality of life in a sample of 84 caregivers. Results revealed that quality of life was predicted by benefit finding, optimism and social support. Moreover, the association between benefit finding and quality of life was explained by social support, but not optimism; caregivers who reported greater benefit finding perceived their social support be higher and this, in turn, had a positive effect on their overall quality of life. These results underscore the importance of harnessing benefit finding to enhance caregiver quality of life.

  17. Assessment of Quality of Life of Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gavric, Zivana; Vukovic-Kostic, Zivana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women in 145 countries worldwide, and the success of healthcare for women with this disease is measured with the quality of life of survivors. The aim of this study was to examine how the breast cancer affects the quality of life and in what dimension of health quality of life is the least accomplished. Method: A pilot research had been performed in the period from June 10 to August 15 2011, on 100 women from Association of women with breast cancer “Iskra” in Banja Luka, aged 20-75. The survey research was based on the EORTC QLQ-C30 version 3.0 and questionnaire for assessment of quality of life of those suffering from breast cancer QLQ-BR23 with 53 questions in total. Results: The average age of women in research was 51.8 years (±11.23). Statistically important differences (χ24=221.941; p<0.01) are higher mean values of the score for the functional scale, (66.32±17.82) cognitive functions (63.50±28.00) in relation to functional role (46.83±20.88), social (37.00±27.58) and emotional (36.58 ±25.15) functioning. Mean values of the score for the symptoms scale were statistically higher for symptoms such as fatigue, insomnia and pain in relation to other symptoms. Mean values of the score for body image scale are statistically higher in relation to mean values of the score of sexual functions and enjoyment scale, and the scale for grading the future perspectives. Conclusion: Breast cancer affects all the domains of the quality of life, and in our population it is the most prominent in domains of emotional and social functions, as well as role functions. Symptoms of fatigue, insomnia and pain have the most importance influence on these domains. PMID:27157152

  18. Factors Influencing Quality of Life and Predictors of Low Quality of Life Scores in Patients on Treatment for Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Adeyeye, Olufunke O.; Coker, Ayodele; Kuyinu, Yetunde; Bamisile, Raymond T.; Ekrikpo, Udeme; Onadeko, Babatunde

    2014-01-01

    There is paucity of information on the quality of life of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Nigeria. This study assessed the factors influencing their quality of life and the independent predictors of low quality of life scores. Two hundred and sixty consecutive patients with pulmonary tuberculosis seen at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital were evaluated for health related quality of life using the World Health Organization Quality of life instrument (WHOQoL-BREF). Sociodemographic characteristics of the patients were related to the various domains of quality of life and a multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the independent predictors of low quality of life scores in the patients. The mean age of the patients was 36.7±12 years. Sex, age and marital status of patients were found to influence quality of life scores. The independent predictors of low quality of life scores were low monthly income, duration of the illness, concomitant illnesses, unemployment, advancing age and male gender. Several socio demographic and economic factors influenced the quality of life of patients with tuberculosis and are predictive of poor scores. It is important to consider these factors when treating patients with tuberculosis to optimise outcome of care. PMID:28299129

  19. Chewing ability, nutritional status and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-C; Yang, Y-H; Ho, P-S; Lee, I-C

    2014-02-01

    In the literature, most researchers evaluate individuals' nutritional status and chewing ability by types of foods chosen or blood test. However, most of previous researches enrolled small sample size and the results might be influenced by personal preference of foods as well as the individuals' response to invasive examination. In this study, researchers assessed individuals' nutritional status and chewing ability with non-invasive test and excluded the personal preference of foods. This study had two aims: first, to explore associations between chewing ability, edentulous or dentulous, self-perceived oral health and individuals' nutritional status and quality of life; second, to assess whether the association proposed by Locker's model is valid. This study used the database of Phase I 'Publicly-funded Denture Installation Plan for the Elderly' of Kaohsiung City Government. Nine hundred and fifty-four subjects aged 65 years and older completed the questionnaires for data analysis. The research results supported and verified the theoretical model proposed by Locker. Individual's chewing ability associated significantly with his/her nutritional status and quality of life. The results demonstrated that better chewing ability of the elderly leads to better nutritional status and quality of life. The appropriateness of the indicators and measurements of individual's chewing ability and nutritional status used in this study has been evaluated and presented. These indicators and measurements are suggested to be generally used for clinical or research application on future-related issues. Consequently, the maintenance or improvement in the chewing ability of the elderly is extremely beneficial to healthy ageing.

  20. Quality of Life and Optimism in Patients with Morphea.

    PubMed

    Szramka-Pawlak, Beata; Dańczak-Pazdrowska, Aleksandra; Rzepa, Teresa; Szewczyk, Aleksandra; Sadowska-Przytocka, Anna; Zaba, Ryszard

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive knowledge about quality of life of people suffering from dermatological diseases, data on patients with morphea are scarce. The aim of our study was to compare the quality of life of healthy controls and morphea patients, as well as to determine the correlation of this variable with the level of dispositional optimism. The study included 47 patients with morphea and 47 healthy controls, matched for gender and age. Cantril's Ladder and Life Orientation Test-Revised were used to assess the levels of life satisfaction and dispositional optimism, respectively. LoSSI was used for the objective assessment. The anticipated level of life quality and the level of dispositional optimism were statistically significantly lower in morphea patients (p = 0.032 and p = 0.014, respectively) when compared to controls. There were no differences in the assessment of current (p = 0.168) and past (p = 0.318) levels of life quality. Also, we proved that type of morphea did not differentiate the current (p = 0.175), past (p = 0.620) and future (p = 0.356) assessment of the quality of life. In the group of morphea patients there was a statistically significant correlation between the level of dispositional optimism and current (p = 0.002, r = 0.43), as well as anticipated (p < 0.001, r = 0.57) levels of life quality. Current level of life quality of healthy controls and morphea patients is comparable, whereas the latter anticipate their future life situation to be significantly worse than the former. Higher level of life satisfaction correlates with higher level of optimism.

  1. Vision Related Quality of Life in Patients with Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Aydin Kurna, Sevda; Altun, Ahmet; Gencaga, Tugba; Akkaya, Sezen; Sengor, Tomris

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the vision related quality of life in patients with keratoconus by using the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire-25 (NEI-VFQ-25). Methods. Thirty patients presented with keratoconus (keratoconus group) and 30 healthy patients (control group) were included in this study. Twenty patients were using rigid gas permeable and 10 patients were not using contact lenses in keratoconus group. High and low contrast visual acuity and mean K values of the patients were recorded. Each subject completed the 25-item NEI-VFQ-25. Results. All subscales of NEI-VFQ-25 were lower in the keratoconus patients. The difference was more evident in the subscales of general vision, ocular pain, near vision, vision-specific mental health, vision-specific role difficulties, and peripheral vision (P < 0.05). Overall composite score was 75.2 ± 17.2 in the keratoconus group and 93.2 ± 5.6 in the control group (P = 0.00). Contact lens wearers had higher best corrected visual acuity in comparison with noncontact lens wearers (P = 0.028). Patients with low visual acuity (logMAR > 0.4) in the better eye had lower distance vision, social functioning, mental health, and role difficulties. Meanwhile, patients with low visual acuity (logMAR > 0.4) in the worse eye had lower general health scores (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Vision related quality of life was worse in keratoconus patients. Success in the contact lens usage and maintaining higher visual acuity may improve vision related quality of life. PMID:24868455

  2. The quality of life of women of Chinese origin.

    PubMed

    Chan, Christine

    2000-05-01

    This paper draws upon qualitative data to explore the quality of life of Chinese mothers with preschool children in the central part of Manchester. In doing this it considers their own self-reported health conditions. Both semi-structured and conversational face-to-face interviews were used with mothers in their homes. The names of Chinese mothers were drawn from the immunization records of the Health Authority and Hospital Trust of Central Manchester. The final interview sample of 30 had a Chinese surname in the record. 'Lee' as a surname was excluded because it was used both by Chinese and English people. The mothers' socio-economic background and their quality of life in terms of work conditions and leisure, housing and residential environment, marital support and life satisfaction were examined. The findings indicate that since they settled in the United Kingdom, the women have been under great psychological stress from a variety of sources. These sources included hardship and overwork, poverty and deprivation, poor social support and social isolation, unhappy family relationships, gambling husbands and domestic violence, together with language and cultural difficulties. All of these contributed to poor quality of living standards as well as indirectly causing negative psychosocial health outcomes. The unsatisfactory self-reported health conditions and poor quality of life of Chinese mothers were naturally interrelated and might be determined by the disadvantages of migration. However, the mothers themselves expressed little satisfaction with the health services and it may be that improvements are necessary in this area to ameliorate some of the disadvantages of migration.

  3. Quality of life in patients with oculocutaneous albinism*

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Marcus; Volpini, Beatrice Mussio Fornazier; dos Santos, Gabriela Alves; Rujula, Maria Josefa Penon

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The social reality of the albino needs to be more studied in Brazil, as myths and social segregation regarding this illness are likely to be found in the country, with psychosocial and medical implications. OBJECTIVE As this subject has not been referenced in previous scientific articles in Brazil, this research intends to evaluate the quality of life of the albinos that treated at our medical institution. METHODS The quality of life was evaluated through the WHOQOL-BREF. Furthermore, two aspects of main relevance in the lives of the albinos were also objects of research, low vision and skin cancer. The sample consisted of forty oculocutaneous albinos and a control group of forty healthy individuals, matched by sex and age. RESULTS Among the participants, 57.7% were between 18 and 40 years old, 28.2% were between 41 and 60, and 14.1% were over 60. 42.1% had skin cancer before the study, 18.4% had skin cancer during the study and 89.5% stated visual deficit. The results obtained in the questionnaires showed a statistically significant difference in the physical domain, with P < 0.001. CONCLUSION Low vision combined with skin lesions and social stigma may contribute to disturbances in the quality of life of oculocutaneous albinos. The results presented in this study demonstrated the vulnerability of the affected individuals and the special care required by those patients, at the same time that the need for further research is highlighted in order to better elucidate the aspects related to albinism. PMID:26375220

  4. Pediatric Coccidioidomycosis Patients: Perceptions, Quality of Life and Psychosocial Factors

    PubMed Central

    Gaab, Erin Mary; Naeem, Fouzia

    2015-01-01

    Research investigating the effects of coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) on children and the psychosocial implications of this disease in general is lacking. This study reviews what is known about pediatric coccidioidomycosis patients. It documents the psychological functioning, quality of life, and illness perceptions of a sample of coccidioidomycosis patient families. Primary caregivers of pediatric patients and patients from a major hospital in the San Joaquin Valley of California were interviewed regarding their perceptions of disease detection, access to care and the patient/family experience. PMID:27417796

  5. Impact of hyperhidrosis on quality of life and its assessment.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Henning

    2014-10-01

    Hyperhidrosis is an embarrassing condition that may interfere with routine activities, cause emotional distress, and disturb both professional and social lives of patients. Objective examination is variable and unreliable, so efforts have been made in the last 15 years to substantiate the limitations of these patients, especially in primary focal hyperhidrosis. Almost all therapeutic studies use standardized or self-designed instruments to evaluate the impact of the disease on quality of life and the improvement achieved by treatment. This article gives an overview of the difficulties with which patients with hyperhidrosis are confronted and of research investigating the restrictions.

  6. Quality of Life Changes Following Surgery for Hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    de Campos, José Ribas Milanez; da Fonseca, Hugo Veiga Sampaio; Wolosker, Nelson

    2016-11-01

    The best way to evaluate the impact of primary hyperhidrosis on quality of life (QL) is through specific questionnaires, avoiding generic models that do not appropriately evaluate individuals. QL improves significantly in the short term after sympathectomy. In the longer term, a sustained and stable improvement is seen, although there is a small decline in the numbers; after 5 and even at 10 years of follow-up it shows virtually the same numerical distribution. Compensatory hyperhidrosis is a major side effect and the main aggravating factor in postoperative QL, requiring attention to its management and prevention.

  7. Tools for evaluating oral health and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Bettie, Nirmal F.; Ramachandiran, Hari; Anand, Vijay; Sathiamurthy, Anusha; Sekaran, Preethi

    2015-01-01

    The seven dimensions of quality of life are required for a healthy living. Any impairment or disability affects any one or more of these dimensions resulting in functional impairment or handicap, which indicates the presence of disease. The success of any oral treatment depends on how far the individual is relieved of his disease process. Relief of symptoms provides patient comfort and enable functional activities. This well-being is considered as a measure of oral health and reflects patient satisfaction. This article presents various instruments or tools available in the form of a questionnaire that estimates patient satisfaction and thereby oral health. PMID:26538889

  8. Psoriasis: epidemiology, clinical features, and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Langley, R; Krueger, G; Griffiths, C

    2005-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common chronic, recurrent, immune mediated disease of the skin and joints. It can have a significant negative impact on the physical, emotional, and, psychosocial wellbeing of affected patients. Psoriasis is found worldwide but the prevalence varies among different ethnic groups. It has a strong genetic component but environmental factors such as infections can play an important role in the presentation of disease. There are several clinical cutaneous manifestations of psoriasis but most commonly the disease presents as chronic, symmetrical, erythematous, scaling papules and plaques. The epidemiology, clinical features, and impact on quality of life of psoriasis are reviewed. PMID:15708928

  9. Lung Cancer Stigma, Anxiety, Depression and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Cati G.; Brodsky, Jennifer; Cataldo, Janine K.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated lung cancer stigma, anxiety, depression and quality of life (QOL), and validated variable similarities between ever and never smokers. Patients took online self-report surveys. Variable contributions to QOL were investigated using hierarchical multiple regression. Patients were primarily Caucasian females with smoking experience. Strong negative relationships emerged between QOL and anxiety, depression and lung cancer stigma. Lung cancer stigma provided significant explanation of the variance in QOL beyond covariates. No difference emerged between smoker groups for study variables. Stigma may play a role in predicting QOL. Interventions promoting social and psychological QOL may enhance stigma resistance skills. PMID:24428251

  10. Quality of life and alternate nightly nocturnal home hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Van Eps, Carolyn L; Jeffries, Janine K; Johnson, David W; Campbell, Scott B; Isbel, Nicole M; Mudge, David W; Hawley, Carmel M

    2010-01-01

    Hemodialysis has been associated with reduced quality of life (QOL). Small cohort studies of quotidian hemodialysis regimens suggest general QOL and dialysis-related symptoms may improve compared with conventional regimens. An observational cohort study was conducted on 63 patients (age 51.7 +/- 12.9 years; 79.4% male; 33.3% diabetes; duration of renal replacement therapy 1.9 [0.7-6.4] years) converted from conventional home hemodialysis (3-5 sessions weekly, 3-6 h/session) to home nocturnal home hemodialysis (NHD) (3-5 sessions weekly, 6-10 h/session). Kidney Disease Quality of Life (KDQOL) and Assessment of Quality of Life instruments and 6-minute-walk tests were applied at baseline and 6 months. Baseline and 6 month surveys were returned by 70% of patients. On KDQOL, significant improvements in general health (P=0.02) and overall health ratings (P=0.0008), physical function (P=0.003), physical role (P=0.018), and energy and fatigue (P=0.027) were documented. There was a trend toward improvement in burden of kidney disease (P=0.05) and emotional role (P=0.066). There was a significant improvement in distance covered in the 6-minute-walk test from 513 m (420.5-576.4) to 536.5 m (459-609), P=0.007. On Assessment of Quality of Life, there was a trend toward improvement in overall utility score from 0.65 (0.39-0.81) to 0.73 (0.46-0.86), P=0.096. After 86.2 patient-years of observation, 23 patients have discontinued NHD (12 transplanted, 5 deceased, 4 psychosocial problems, 1 dialysis access problem, 1 medically unsuitable). Nocturnal home hemodialysis is a sustainable therapy. In addition to improving general QOL, alternate nightly NHD can significantly improve physical functioning as measured by KDQOL and 6-minute-walk tests.

  11. Psychiatric conditions in sports: diagnosis, treatment, and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Glick, Ira D; Horsfall, Jessica L

    2009-10-01

    The social stigma surrounding psychiatric illness may prevent athletes from seeking counseling, psychotherapy, medication, or other treatment when needed. Few controlled studies on athletes exist to guide the team physician, clinician, or psychiatrist who must deal with diagnostic issues. Management involves setting realistic goals, educating as well as inducing the patient into treatment, soliciting support from family or significant others, and delivering appropriate treatment (the most difficult task). The objective is to improve performance and quality of life. Confidentiality issues are paramount during diagnosis and treatment. Physicians who understand sports and team dynamics may have more success in helping patients follow through with treatment.

  12. Validation of Italian multiple sclerosis quality of life 54 questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Solari, A.; Filippini, G.; Mendozzi, L.; Ghezzi, A.; Cifani, S.; Barbieri, E.; Baldini, S.; Salmaggi, A.; Mantia, L. L.; Farinotti, M.; Caputo, D.; Mosconi, P.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Health related quality of life (HRQOL) inventories are multi-dimensional measures of patient-centred health status developed for clinical research. The MS quality of life 54 (MSQOL-54) is an MS-specific HRQOL inventory originally devised for English speaking patients. It consists of a core measure, the 36-item short form health survey (SF-36) previously adapted into Italian, and 18 additional items exploring domains relevant to patients with MS (MS-18 module). The authors translated and culturally adapted into Italian the MS-18 module of the MSQOL-54 questionnaire, and clinically validated the whole questionnaire.
METHODS—The MS-18 module was translated following the methodology of the International Quality of Life Assessment (IQOLA) project. The MSQOL-54 was validated in 204 consecutive patients with MS seen between April and September 1997 at three participating centres. The questionnaire was explained by the physician who also administered the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) and mini mental status scale examination, and the patient filled in the MSQOL-54 and Beck depression inventory questionnaires (BDI), with assistance if required. The contribution of impairments and disabilities to MSQOL-54 scores were assessed, and mean scores were compared with normative data for the general Italian population, and with the original sample of United States MS patients.
RESULTS—The mean age of the 204 patients was 42 years; mean EDSS score was 4.5 (range 0-8.5). Patients' participation in the assessment was satisfactory, and all scales satisfied the usual psychometric standards. The characteristics of the United States sample matched those of our patients in all but gender (72% United States patients v 52% Italian patients were women), and education (90% United States patients and 44% Italian patients completed high school); MSQOL-54 profiles were also similar. The EDSS was significantly associated with the physical health composite but not with

  13. Health-related quality of life in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    1999-12-01

    This month's question addressed something that many of us perhaps still have not formally incorporated into clinical practice, although we all are interested in our patients' health-related quality of life and want our inventions to result in improvements within this area. This view is exemplified by the response from Australia, which is one of several similar, unpublished, replies from the International Panel on this month's question (others came from Germany and Sweden). As mentioned in the introduction, health-related quality of life is becoming increasingly important as an outcome measure in clinical trials of new therapeutic interventions and several new measures have been and are developed. It is interesting and encouraging to hear about the new developments within this area that are being made by neuroscience nurses in different countries and within different subspecialties around the globe. As reported from the International Panel in here, new HRQL measures are currently developed in Canada and the UK focusing on patients with brains injuries and Huntington's disease (HD), respectively. In contrast to most established measures, the Canadian study has primarily been aimed at the positive aspects of life and not merely absence of the negative ones. Steve Smith in the UK has recently started developing a scale for use in clinical management of patients with HD. As far as I have been able to determine, this is the first measure of this kind to be developed for HD. Anyone who would like to know more about Steve's work or take part thereof is encouraged to contact him at this address above. Despite the fact that there already are several HRQL measures available, there is still a need for new instruments reflecting new aspects of health and disease. In addition, tools need to be designed for challenging conditions not readily addressed by existing measures. The replies from Canada and the UK represent these needs. It will be very interesting to eventually take

  14. Quality-of-life assessment techniques for veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Alice E

    2011-05-01

    The revised veterinary oath commits the profession to the prevention and relief of animal suffering. There is a professional obligation to properly assess quality of life (QoL) and confront the issues that ruin it, such as undiagnosed suffering. There are no clinical studies in the arena of QoL assessment at the end of life for pets. This author developed a user-friendly QoL scale to help make proper assessments and decisions along the way to the conclusion of a terminal patient's life. This article discusses decision aids and establishes commonsense techniques to assess a pet's QoL.

  15. On subjective well-being and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Camfield, Laura; Skevington, Suzanne M

    2008-09-01

    We integrate the multi-disciplinary fields of quality of life (QoL) and well-being (WB) and appraise the impacts of health factors. Theoretical and methodological limitations are discussed and new conceptual and technical advances identified, These are informed by cross-cultural and community perspectives. Following a definitional review, social inequalities, and links with happiness are examined. Demographic, experiential and personal factors are outlined. Implications for poverty research are addressed. As the concept of SWB recently converged with the longstanding international QoL definition (WHOQOL Group, 1995), we discuss the separate need for SWB. Future collaborative conceptual and pragmatic research is recommended.

  16. Asthma severity in children and the quality of life of their parents.

    PubMed

    Cerdan, Noelle S; Alpert, Patricia T; Moonie, Sheniz; Cyrkiel, Dianne; Rue, Shona

    2012-08-01

    This study examines the effect of asthma severity of children aged 7-17 years and sociodemographic characteristics on the caregiver's quality of life. For parents of asthmatic children, there was a negative correlation between overall asthma severity and quality-of-life score. Measuring parental quality of life enables the development of effective asthma programs.

  17. Internet Communication versus Face-to-Face Interaction in Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Paul S. N.; Leung, Louis; Lo, Venhwei; Xiong, Chengyu; Wu, Tingjun

    2011-01-01

    This study seeks to understand the role of the Internet in quality of life (QoL). Specifically, it examines the question of whether Internet communication serves, like face-to-face interactions, to enhance quality of life. It is hypothesized that the use of the Internet for interpersonal communication can improve quality of life among Internet…

  18. Examining the Factor Structure and Hierarchical Nature of the Quality of Life Construct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Mian; Schalock, Robert L.; Verdugo, Miguel A.; Jenaro, Christina

    2010-01-01

    There is considerable debate in the area of individual quality of life research regarding the factor structure and hierarchical nature of the quality of life construct. Our purpose in this study was to test via structural equation modeling an a priori quality of life model consisting of eight first-order factors and one second-order factor. Data…

  19. Agreement in Quality of Life Assessment between Adolescents with Intellectual Disability and Their Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golubovic, Spela; Skrbic, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual disability affects different aspects of functioning and quality of life, as well as the ability to independently assess the quality of life itself. The paper examines the agreement in the quality of life assessments made by adolescents with intellectual disability and their parents compared with assessments made by adolescents without…

  20. Prospective relationships of physical activity with quality of life among colorectal cancer survivors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical activity can enhance quality of life for cancer survivors. However, few longitudinal studies have examined whether physical activity has a sustained effect on improvements in quality of life. The present study aims to examine the relationships between physical activity and quality of life o...

  1. Quality of Life and Motivation to Learn: A Study of Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, Marcus; Krageloh, Christian; Hawken, Susan; Zhao, Yipin; Doherty, Iain

    2010-01-01

    There is growing literature in the area of medical students' quality of life. As far as we know, no qualitative studies have investigated the links between students' quality of life issues and their motivation to learn. The key question that drove the present study was: Is there a correlation between students' quality of life and their motivation…

  2. The Quality of Life of Young Men with Asperger Syndrome: A Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennes-Coussens, Marieke; Magill-Evans, Joyce; Koning, Cyndie

    2006-01-01

    Factors influencing quality of life for persons with Asperger syndrome are not yet understood. Men, ages 18 to 21, completed the World Health Organization Quality Of Life measure, the Perceived Support Network Inventory, and a semi-structured interview. Asperger syndrome affects quality of life beyond the obvious social impact. The 12 men with…

  3. A Predictor of Quality of Life of the Mainstreamed Elementary Students: Cognitive Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odaci, Hatice; Kalkan, Melek; Karasu, Pinar

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the cognitive errors as predictor of quality of life of mainstreamed elementary students. Quality of life is the degree of well-being felt by an individual. The functional deficiencies, which occur due to physical, cognitive, sensory, emotional disorders, affect the quality of life of the individuals. In this…

  4. Quality of Life for Young Adults with Severe Intellectual Disability: Mothers' Thoughts and Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Laura Lee; Kraemer, Bonnie R.; Blacher, Jan; Simmerman, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Thirty mothers of transition-aged young adults (18-24 years) with severe intellectual disability were interviewed regarding their son or daughter's quality of life. All mothers completed the standardised Quality of Life Questionnaire and responded to several open-ended questions to further delineate quality of life for their child. Mothers were…

  5. Quality of Life in Autism across the Lifespan: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Heijst, Barbara F. C.; Geurts, Hilde M.

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a lifelong neurodevelopmental disorder, with a known impact on quality of life. Yet the developmental trajectory of quality of life is not well understood. First, the effect of age on quality of life was studied with a meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis included 10 studies (published between 2004 and 2012) with a combined sample size of…

  6. Quality of Life in College Students with and without Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaedi, Gholam Hossein; Tavoli, Azadeh; Bakhtiari, Maryam; Melyani, Mahdieh; Sahragard, Mahdi

    2010-01-01

    Prior studies demonstrating quality of life impairment in phobia and anxiety disorders have relied upon epidemiological samples or clinical data. Using the same quality of life scale, the Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36), in Iranian college students allowed us to study the impact of social phobia (SP) on quality of life among the college…

  7. Telehealth: Acceptability, clinical interventions and quality of life in peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Vishal; Jones, Audrey; Spalding, Elaine M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Telehealth technologies are being widely adopted across the globe for management of long-term conditions. There are limited data on its use, effectiveness and patient experience in end-stage renal disease. The aim of this pilot project was to explore patient acceptability of technology and evaluate its effect on clinical interventions and quality of life in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. Methods: Peritoneal dialysis patients were provided with computer tablets (PODs). PODs contained a knowledge database with treatment- and symptom-based questionnaires that generated alerts for the clinical team. Alerts were reviewed daily and followed up by a telephone call or clinic visit. Interventions were at the discretion of clinicians. Data were recorded prospectively and quality of life and Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology questionnaires evaluated at the start and end of the programme. Results: In all, 22 patients have participated over 15 months. The mean age was 61.6 years and PODs were utilised for an average of 341.9 days with 59.1% choosing to continue beyond the study period. We received a total of 1195 alerts with an average of 2.6 alerts per day. A total of 36 admissions were avoided and patients supported to self-manage on 154 occasions. Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology scores remained high throughout the programme although no improvement in quality of life was seen. Discussion: Telehealth is useful to monitor patients with renal failure on peritoneal dialysis. It is acceptable across age groups and provides an additional resource for patients to self-manage. Satisfaction scores and retention rates suggest a high level of acceptability. PMID:27757228

  8. Quality of Life after Surgery for Stress Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Tennstedt, S. L.; Litman, H. J.; Zimmern, P.; Ghetti, C.; Kusek, J. W.; Nager, C.W.; Mueller, E.R.; Kraus, S.R.; Varner, E.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction This study investigated changes in condition-specific quality of life (QOL) after surgery for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Methods Data from 655 women in a clinical trial comparing the Burch and fascial sling were examined. Results Improvement in QOL, measured with the IIQ (mean decrease 133.1; s.d. 109.8), was observed 6 months after surgery and persisted at 24 months. Women for whom surgery was successful (regardless of surgery type) had greater improvement in QOL (mean decrease 160.0; s.d 103.9) than did women for whom surgery was not successful (mean decrease 113.6; s.d 110.9) (p<0.0001), although not statistically significant after adjusting for covariates. Multivariable analysis showed that QOL improvement was related to decreased UI symptom bother, greater improvement in UI severity, younger age, Hispanic ethnicity and receiving Burch surgery. Among sexually active women, worsening sexual function had a negative impact on QOL. Conclusion Improved QOL was explained most by UI symptom improvement. Brief Summary Improvements in quality of life after stress incontinence surgery are significant, durable over 24 months, and associated with improvement of incontinence symptoms and symptom bother. PMID:18682875

  9. Importance of Quality of Life for Adherence to Sublingual Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Eberle, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nonperception of efficacy ranks among the most commonly cited causes for nonadherence to sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT). Quality of life (QoL) in patients is a determining factor influencing adherence. We investigated QoL and adherence separately in SLIT patients at one pediatric practice in Germany. Methods. We conducted a noninterventional, cross-sectional, retrospective, quality-of-life survey among pediatric patients treated with SLIT. QoL was assessed using the generic SF-12 health survey in German. The items contained in the SF-12 health survey are weighted, added up, and converted to obtain a physical component score (PCS) and a mental component score (MCS). Each component score ranges from 0 to 100; the higher the score, the better the QoL perceived. Results. 201 surveyed patients who had undergone SLIT showed PCS-12 of 49.3 (± 7.0) and MCS-12 of 52.6 (± 7.2). These figures correlate strongly with those reported for the German general population (n = 2453): PCS-12 of 49.6 (± 8.7) and MCS-12 of 52.3 (± 8.0). 70.2% (73) of 104 patients were adherent at this practice. Conclusions. QoL in the SLIT patients surveyed here appears as good as that of the general population. Adherence to SLIT at this practice was remarkably better than that reported elsewhere. PMID:27504453

  10. Maternal Quality of Life During the Transition to Motherhood

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Forough; Mousavi, Seyed Abbas; Chaman, Reza; Khosravi, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Background: One of the elements of the broadening focus of health care beyond its traditional and restricted concept has been the increasing adoption quality of life approach to health care research and practice. Objectives: To investigate the QOL of women in the third trimester of pregnancy and at 8 weeks postpartum and factors associated with the overall QOL. Materials and Methods: Three hundred and fifty seven pregnant women attending urban health centers in Shahroud city, located in Northeast of Iran, completed the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire (WHOQOL)-BREF and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ28) in the third trimester of pregnancy and at 8 weeks postpartum. Also, breastfeeding difficulties were assessed at 4 weeks postpartum. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 18 for descriptive statistics, paired t-test, linear regression and multiple regression analysis. Results: There were significant differences between the ante-and postnatal periods in mean scores in the physical (P < 0.001) and social relationship (P = 0.033) aspects of QOL. Multiple regression analysis revealed that factor adversely affected the global score of the QOL in the antenatal period was antepartum psychological disorders. Factors that adversely affected the global score of QOL in the postnatal period were postpartum psychological disorders, breastfeeding difficulties, multiparity, higher pregnancy weight gain, and cesarean. Conclusions: Results indicated that in this low risk group of women physical health and social relationship improved from pregnancy to postpartum. Interventions to promote psychological status during pregnancy and early postpartum should be designed. PMID:25031866

  11. Quality of life of oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Teguh, David N; Levendag, Peter C; Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine; van Rooij, Peter; Schmitz, Paul I M

    2009-03-01

    Brachytherapy (BT) is a highly conformal (accurate clinical target volume delineation, no planning target volume margin) radiotherapy technique; the radioactive source, guided by afterloading catheters, is implanted into the heart of the tumor. The localized high dose of radiation enables high tumor control rates and, because of rapid dose fall-off, sparing of the adjacent normal tissues. At the Erasmus Medical Center, excellent results were observed: 5-year local regional control of 84%, 5-year disease-free survival of 59%, and 5-year overall survival of 64%. Therefore, in the case of moderately sized tumors, for well-trained, skillful physicians, BT is the therapy of choice (if technically feasible). However, side effects are not totally negligible, partly because of the cumulative dose of BT and the first series of 46/2 Gy. However, patients treated with BT still have a better swallowing-related quality of life, which might improve further if summation of BT and the first series of 46/2 Gy, as well as autocontouring of the neck levels, are realized. So far, there is no significant relationship between the -quality index of the BT implants and local control/overall survival and/or quality of life.

  12. Implications of edentulism on quality of life among elderly.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Suely Maria; Oliveira, Ana Cristina; Vargas, Andréa Maria Duarte; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira; E Ferreira, Efigênia Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed was to test the association between quality of life and edentulism among elderly individuals in a city in southeastern Brazil. This cross-sectional study was carried out with 163 individuals aged 60 years or older, functionally independent and non-institutionalized. Data were collected with a questionnaire and oral examination. The edentulism was the dependent variable. The independent variables were sex, age, household income and quality of life (WHOQOL-Old) and their scores. To assess the association between the dependent variable and independent variables was used bivariate analysis (p < 0.10). Poisson regression model was performed, adjusting for age and sex. The average age of participants was 69 years (± 6.1), 68.7% were female and 52.8% were diagnosed as completely edentulous (90% CI: 0.33-1.24). When the independent variables were associated to the prevalence of edentulism, statistically significant associations were found for age (p = 0.03) and social participation dimension of the WHOQOL-Old (p = 0.08). In the Poisson regression, social participation remained statistically associated to edentulism {RP = 2.12 [90% CI (1.10-4.00)]}. The social participation proved to have a significant association to edentulism, thereby attesting to the negative effect of this condition on social aspects.

  13. Implications of Edentulism on Quality of Life among Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Suely Maria; Oliveira, Ana Cristina; Vargas, Andréa Maria Duarte; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira; e Ferreira, Efigênia Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed was to test the association between quality of life and edentulism among elderly individuals in a city in southeastern Brazil. This cross-sectional study was carried out with 163 individuals aged 60 years or older, functionally independent and non-institutionalized. Data were collected with a questionnaire and oral examination. The edentulism was the dependent variable. The independent variables were sex, age, household income and quality of life (WHOQOL-Old) and their scores. To assess the association between the dependent variable and independent variables was used bivariate analysis (p < 0.10). Poisson regression model was performed, adjusting for age and sex. The average age of participants was 69 years (± 6.1), 68.7% were female and 52.8% were diagnosed as completely edentulous (90% CI: 0.33–1.24). When the independent variables were associated to the prevalence of edentulism, statistically significant associations were found for age (p = 0.03) and social participation dimension of the WHOQOL-Old (p = 0.08). In the Poisson regression, social participation remained statistically associated to edentulism {RP = 2.12 [90% CI (1.10–4.00)]}. The social participation proved to have a significant association to edentulism, thereby attesting to the negative effect of this condition on social aspects. PMID:22470281

  14. Quality of life and antihypertensive drugs in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, A; Bulpitt, C

    1992-06-01

    Hypertension is common in the elderly with estimates of around 10-20% showing a sustained level of pressure, either systolic (greater than or equal to 160 mmHg), or diastolic (greater than or equal to 90 mmHg) or both. The benefits of treating subjects with raised diastolic pressure was shown by the trials of the European Working Party on High Blood Pressure in the Elderly (EWPHE), the Hypertension in Elderly Patients in Primary Care (HEP), and the Swedish Trial in Old patients with Hypertension (STOP-Hypertension). Evidence for the benefit of treating isolated systolic hypertension in the elderly was provided in one trial (SHEP: Systolic Hypertension in the Elderly Program), and the results of two others are awaited. However, it is important to provide data on all treatment effects, including adverse reactions as well as benefits. In addition to traditional measures of mortality, morbidity and side effects, the quality of life in patients on antihypertensive treatment should be considered. The methods of measuring quality of life in trials is discussed, and some results presented.

  15. Colostomy, management and quality of life for the patient.

    PubMed

    Swan, Elaine

    The aim of this article is to describe the development and use of a new and unique continence control device (CCD). The Vitala TM CCD is a pouchless ostomy device that seals against the stoma and prevents the passage of stool, while allowing the release and deodorization of flatus. This will enable many end-colostomates to control their effluent. It is the first non-invasive product to temporarily meet the colostomate's need of faecal continence. The reasons why people receive stomas and the different products available for their management will be explored in this article. Issues with regard to quality of life and the patient experience are discussed in the context of results from a VitalaTM CCD phase III 12-hour study. Two short case studies are also presented to illustrate how VitalaTM CCD can be used by ostomates experiencing functional and/or psychological problems to improve quality of life by allowing them to regain continence for up to 12 hours.

  16. Dietary phosphorus in bone health and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Eiji; Yamamoto, Hironori; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Taketani, Yutaka

    2012-06-01

    Awareness of phosphorus intake is important because both phosphorus deficiency and overloading impair bone health and quality of life. Phosphorus consumption is increasing in many countries. Most dietary phosphorus is contained in protein-rich foods such as meat, milk, cheese, poultry, fish, and processed foods that contain phosphate-based additives to improve their consistency and appearance. Elevation of extracellular phosphorus levels causes endothelial dysfunction and medial calcification, which are closely associated with the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Long-term excessive phosphorus loading, even if it does not cause hyperphosphatemia, can be a risk factor for CVD. In epidemiological studies, higher levels of phosphorus intake have been associated with reduced blood pressure. Interestingly, when examined further, phosphorus from dairy products, but not from other sources, was usually associated with lower blood pressure. A dietary approach to phosphorus reduction is particularly important to prevent bone impairment and CVD in patients with chronic kidney disease. In order to improve bone health and quality of life in the general population, the impact of phosphorous, including in processed foods, should be considered, and measures to indicate the amount of phosphorous in food products should be implemented.

  17. Quality of life in children with vesicoureteral reflux.

    PubMed

    Kiddoo, Darcie A; Ajamian, Faria; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan; Morgan, Catherine J; Pinsk, Maury N

    2012-03-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is commonly diagnosed in children presenting with urinary tract infections. Antibiotic prophylaxis and ureteric surgery are standard treatments for these children. Our aim was to investigate whether health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was altered in children treated for VUR. Children aged 1-5 years with grade III or higher VUR were identified through electronic records at the Stollery Children's Hospital. Parents of these children were mailed the TNO-AZL Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research Academic Medical Centre Quality of Life (TAPQOL) questionnaire. QOL scores for this group were compared with normative controls from the instrument's creators using the Mann-Whitney U test. Thirty-two of the 96 (33%) mailed surveys were returned. Eight children had surgery, and 19 were treated with antibiotic prophylaxis. When comparing the VUR group with the control group, we found that anxiety and social functioning scores were significantly better in patients with VUR (p < 0.01). The VUR group had worse scores in problem behavior, stomach complaints ,and communication (p < 0.01). This study reveals that children with VUR have a reasonable QOL when compared with controls. However, the diagnosis of VUR and its management does have an impact on gastrointestinal complaints, behavior, and communication, which may occur as a result of chronic medical intervention.

  18. Oral Health Related Quality of Life in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Rokhsareh; Taleghani, Ferial; Farhadi, Sareh

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Diabetic patients display an increased risk of oral disorders, and oral health related quality of life (OHRQL) might affect their management and treatment modalities. The aim of the present study was to determine OHRQL and associated parameters in patients with diabetes. Materials and methods. In this study two hundred patients were recruited from the diabetes clinic in Mustafa Khomeini Hospital in Tehran, Iran. OHRQL was assessed using Oral Health Impact Profile Questionnaire (OHIP-20). Also, another questionnaire was designed which contained questions regarding participants’ knowledge about oral complications of diabetes and oral health behavior. OHRQL was categorized as low and good. Data were analyzed using logistic regression at P = 0.05. Results. Of the diabetic patients assessed, 77.5% were in good and 22.5% were in low categories of OHRQL. This quality was significantly associated with age (OR = 4.03, 95% CI = 1.63-11.29), knowledge about diabetes oral complications (OR = 18.17 95% CI = 4.42-158.6), educational level (OR = 26.31 95% CI = 4.2-1080.3), referred for dental visit by physician (OR = 3.16 95% CI = 1.48-6.69), frequency of brushing (OR = 10.29 95% CI = 3.96-31.2) and length of time diagnosed with diabetes (OR = 6.21 95% CI = 2.86-13.63). Conclusion. Oral health related quality of life was not negatively affected by diabetes mellitus in the assessed sample. PMID:25587385

  19. Quality of life following third molar removal under conscious sedation

    PubMed Central

    Sancho-Puchades, Manuel; Berini-Aytés, Leonardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess quality of life (QoL) and degree of satisfaction among outpatients subjected to surgical extraction of all four third molars under conscious sedation. A second objective was to describe the evolution of self-reported pain measured in a visual analogue scale (VAS) in the 7 days after extraction. Study design: Fifty patients received a questionnaire assessing social isolation, working isolation, eating and speaking ability, diet modifications, sleep impairment, changes in physical appearance, discomfort at suture removal and overall satisfaction at days 4 and 7 after surgery. Pain was recorded by patients on a 100-mm pain visual analogue scale (VAS) every day after extraction until day 7. Results: Thirty-nine patients fulfilled correctly the questionnaire. Postoperative pain values suffered small fluctuations until day 5 (range: 23 to 33 mm in a 100-mm VAS), when dicreased significantly. A positive association was observed between difficult ranked surgeries and higher postoperative pain levels. The average number of days for which the patient stopped working was 4.9. Conclusion: The removal of all third molars in a single appointment causes an important deterioration of the patient’s QoL during the first postoperative week, especially due to local pain and eating discomfort. Key words:Third molar removal, quality of life, sedation. PMID:22926461

  20. Measuring quality of life: a new and practical survey instrument.

    PubMed

    Greenley, J R; Greenberg, J S; Brown, R

    1997-05-01

    Despite increasing recognition of the importance of measuring the quality of life (QOL) of people with severe mental illness, such assessments are seldom carried out because of the lack of an efficient, easy-to-use, and valid measurement instrument. To facilitate the gathering of QOL information from clients in evaluation, program improvement, or other efforts, the authors present a new short (24-item) self-administered questionnaire called the Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ). The questionnaire assesses subjective QOL in seven areas. Evidence for the reliability and validity of the QLQ is based on data gathered from 971 clients with serious mental illness who were receiving publicly funded mental health services at the time of the study. The results of a confirmatory factor analysis using a random split-half procedure indicated that a seven-factor solution fit the data well. Scores on the QLQ also correlated significantly with the client's functioning and satisfaction with services, providing support for the validity of the QLQ. The advantages of the QLQ over existing measures include low-cost administration and some superior psychometric properties.

  1. Quality of life in patients who underwent rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Zojaji, Ramin; Keshavarzmanesh, Mozhdeh; Arshadi, Hamid Reza; Mazloum Farsi Baf, Morteza; Farsi Baf, Morteza Mazloum; Esmaeelzadeh, Sarvenaz; Esmaeilzadeh, Sarvenaz

    2014-10-01

    Despite developments in the therapeutic field of cosmetic surgery, there is a little information about the effects of cosmetic procedures on quality of life (QOL), especially in Iran. Rhinoplasty is the most common cosmetic surgeries. The aim of this study was to evaluate QOL and General Health before and after rhinoplasty. Patients aged 18 to 55 years seeking cosmetic rhinoplasty were included in this study. Demographic information such as age, sex, marital status, and education of patients were recorded. General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) and World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire were completed by a single investigator for all patients, before and 3 months after rhinoplasty. A total of 50 patients were enrolled in this study. Overall, 78% were women and 22% were men. QOL did not change significantly (p < 0.05) except for its psychological domain, which did not depend on sex, age, marital, and educational status. Also, general health changes after rhinoplasty was not statistically significant (p > 0.05) and it did not depend on age, sex, and marital status. It seems that cosmetic rhinoplasty has no significant effect on general health and QOL except for its psychological health domain.

  2. Quality of life and impulsivity in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Sarah E; Johnson, Sheri L; Gotlib, Ian H

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic psychiatric illness that impairs quality of life (QoL) in numerous life domains even when mood symptoms are not present and is characterized by elevated impulsivity. Many of the comorbid conditions that are associated with diminished QoL in BD also involve impulsivity. The objective of this project was to investigate whether impulsivity might mediate the effects of these comorbid conditions on poor QoL. Methods A total of 76 participants diagnosed with bipolar I disorder by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders completed the Quality of Life in Bipolar Disorder (QoL-BD) scale, the Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11), and the Positive Urgency Measure (PUM). Participants were also assessed for comorbid DSM-IV diagnoses of anxiety, substance use, and impulse control disorders. Results Several subscales of the BIS-11 as well as the PUM total score were significantly negatively correlated with overall QoL. PUM total score remained a significant predictor of QoL after controlling for comorbid anxiety, substance use, and impulse control disorders. After controlling for impulsivity, comorbid disorders were no longer significantly related to overall QoL. Conclusions The data support the hypothesis that impulsivity, specifically positive urgency, is highly correlated with QoL in BD. Impulsivity was found to mediate the relation between QoL and several comorbidities in BD. Interventions targeting impulsivity might help to improve QoL in BD. PMID:21676133

  3. Impact of fecal incontinence on quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Lynne; Nowak, Madeleine; Ho, Yik-Hong

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To explore the impact of fecal incontinence (FI) on quality of life (QOL) of patients attending urogynecology and colorectal clinics (CCs). METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 154 patients (27 male) with FI, who attended the clinics at a regional hospital in North Queensland, Australia in 2003 and 2004, and completed the Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life Scale (FIQL: 1 = very affected; 4 = not affected). RESULTS: More than 22% of patients had their QOL affected severely by FI. Patients reported that they had not previously been asked about FI by a medical practitioner nor did they voluntarily disclose its presence. The median FIQL scores for all participants were: lifestyle = 3.24; coping = 2.23; depression = 2.42; and embarrassment = 2.33. Increasing frequency of soiling had a negative effect on all four FIQL scales (P < 0.001) as did the quantity of soiling (P < 0.01). Female CC patients had poorer FIQL scores than urogynecology clinic patients for lifestyle (P = 0.015), coping (P = 0.004) and embarrassment (P = 0.009), but not depression (P = 0.062), despite having experienced FI for a shorter period. CONCLUSION: Failure to seek treatment for FI degrades the quality of patients’ lives over time. FI assessment tools should incorporate the quantity of fecal loss. PMID:19598304

  4. The Relationship Between Focused Attention Meditation Practice Habits, Psychological Symptoms, and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Bilican, F Isil

    2016-12-01

    This study examined the relationship between focused attention meditation practice habits, psychological symptoms, and quality of life. The participants were 30 adults from New York, NY, practicing Ananda Marga spirituality. They were administered the Symptom Check List-90-R and the Quality of Life Index. The findings pointed out while Ananda Marga meditation practice habits were not associated with improvements in psychological symptoms, longer years in meditation practice was associated with improvements in overall, social and psychological/spiritual quality of life. Longer periods of meditation practice per session were related to lower levels of overall quality of life and economic quality of life.

  5. Assessment of Treatment Side Effects and Quality of Life in People with Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Blond, Benjamin N; Detyniecki, Kamil; Hirsch, Lawrence J

    2016-05-01

    Epilepsy impairs quality of life in physical, psychological, cognitive, social, and occupational domains. In people who are not seizure free, depression and adverse medication effects have a predominant role in determining quality of life. The assessment of these factors and other comorbidities is essential for maximizing quality of life in epilepsy. There are multiple tools available to assess medication effects and quality of life in a structured format. Such tools can provide superior assessments and allow clinicians to have a greater impact on their patients' quality of life.

  6. How Can We Best Assess the Quality of Life of People with Dementia? The Bath Assessment of Subjective Quality of Life in Dementia (BASQID)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trigg, Richard; Skevington, Suzanne M.; Jones, Roy W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The study aim was to develop a measure of self-reported quality of life (QoL) for people with mild to moderate dementia based on their views--the Bath Assessment of Subjective Quality of Life in Dementia (BASQID). Design and Methods: We developed the measure through multiple stages. Two field tests of the measure (ns = 60 and 150)…

  7. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis alters quality of life.

    PubMed

    Paris, G; Martinaud, O; Petit, A; Cuvelier, A; Hannequin, D; Roppeneck, P; Verin, E

    2013-03-01

    Dysphagia is one of the most important complications encountered in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Our aim was to determine whether oropharyngeal dysphagia impacted the quality of life (QoL) of patients with ALS. Thirty consecutive patients were recruited (31-82 years, 18 men). Swallowing function was evaluated using a standardised videofluoroscopic barium swallow. All the patients completed a specific questionnaire on quality of life in dysphagia (SWAL-QoL) immediately after the videofluoroscopy. The results of dysphagia outcome severity scale separated 14 patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia and 16 with normal swallowing function. There was no difference in the average age, weight and body mass index of the two groups (dysphagic patients: 68 ± 11 kg versus non-dysphagic patients: 69 ± 14 kg). Most of the dysphagic patients had a bulbar affection based on their Norris scores which determine the importance of cranial nerves illness (20 ± 8), significantly lower than those of the non-dysphagic patients (35 ± 5) (P < 0·0001). There was no difference in the neurological peripheral symptoms evaluated by Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale scores (dysphagic patients: 26 ± 7 versus non-dysphagic patients: 27 ± 8) (ns). The swallowing quality of life questionnaire revealed that the dysphagic patients had significant burden (P < 0·001). They were affected by the necessity to applied a food selection (P < 0·01), by the increase in eating duration (P < 0·05) and described a decrease in eating desire (P < 0·05). They complained of fear regarding the risk of dysphagia (P < 0·05). They also described difficulties with oral communication (P < 0·001). All of those complained about dysphagia which impacted directly mental health (P < 0·05) and social life (P < 0·05). In conclusion, oropharyngeal dysphagia is a common symptom accompanying ALS, which alters the patient's QoL, especially social health.

  8. Modeling hot flushes and quality of life in breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Rand, K. L.; Otte, J. L.; Flockhart, D.; Hayes, D.; Storniolo, A. M.; Stearns, V.; Henry, N. L.; Nguyen, A.; Lemler, S.; Hayden, J.; Jeter, S.; Carpenter, J. S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the relationships among measures of hot flushes, perceived hot flush interference, sleep disturbance, and measures of quality of life while controlling for potential covariates (patient and treatment variables). Methods Breast cancer survivors (n = 395) due to receive aromatase inhibitor therapy provided demographic information, physiological hot flush data via sternal skin conductance monitoring, hot flush frequency via written diary and electronic event marker, hot flush severity and bother via written diary, and questionnaire data via the Hot Flash Related Daily Interference Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the EuroQOL, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Results Confirmatory factor analysis supported a two-factor model for hot flush symptoms (frequency and severity). Although there was strong convergence among self-reported hot flush measures, there was a high degree of unexplained variance associated with physiological measures. This suggests that self-report and physiological measures do not overlap substantially. The structural model showed that greater hot flush frequency and severity were directly related to greater perceived interference with daily life activities. Greater perceived interference, in turn, directly predicted greater sleep disruption, which predicted lower perceived health state and more symptoms of anxiety and depression. Conclusions Findings suggest hot flush interference may be the most appropriate single measure to include in clinical trials of vasomotor symptom therapies. Measuring and ameliorating patients' perceptions of hot flush interference with life activities and subjective sleep quality may be the most direct routes to improving quality of life. PMID:20450413

  9. Thalassaemia in children: from quality of care to quality of life.

    PubMed

    Amid, Ali; Saliba, Antoine N; Taher, Ali T; Klaassen, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Over the past few decades, there has been a remarkable improvement in the survival of patients with thalassaemia in developed countries. Availability of safe blood transfusions, effective and accessible iron chelating medications, the introduction of new and non-invasive methods of tissue iron assessment and other advances in multidisciplinary care of thalassaemia patients have all contributed to better outcomes. This, however, may not be true for patients who are born in countries where the resources are limited. Unfortunately, transfusion-transmitted infections are still major concerns in these countries where paradoxically thalassaemia is most common. Moreover, oral iron chelators and MRI for monitoring of iron status may not be widely accessible or affordable, which may result in poor compliance and suboptimal iron chelation. All of these limitations will lead to reduced survival and increased thalassaemia-related complications and subsequently will affect the patient's quality of life. In countries with limited resources, together with improvement of clinical care, strategies to control the disease burden, such as public education, screening programmes and appropriate counselling, should be put in place. Much can be done to improve the situation by developing partnerships between developed countries and those with limited resources. Future research should also particularly focus on patient's quality of life as an important outcome of care.

  10. Older People’s Quality of Life and Role of Home-Based Technology

    PubMed Central

    Mckee, Kevin; Matlabi, Hossein; Parker, Stuart G

    2012-01-01

    Background: Household devices may have a positive impact on daily lives by reducing the burden of several tasks and enriching social interaction. There are varieties of assistive devices such as alarms, sensors, detectors, and life style monitoring devices, which can help in compensating for the activity limitations caused by impairments. This study aimed to review the contribution that residential technology devices can make to older people’s lives. Methods: An open-ended literature review following the guidance of the Centre for Review and Dissemination was conducted to establish the current understanding of the topics by using clear and appropriate criteria to select or reject studies. The studies entered into the review were limited by language, topic, and date of publication. Results: The research literature indicated that residential facilities which appropriately are designed and supplied can have many benefits for older people such as increasing in-dependence, maximising physical and mental health, and improving their quality of life. Conclusion: Although most of the literature has explored the positive effects of technology devices on older adults’ social networks, independence, psychological well-being, and social status, the possibilities of negative consequences have been neglected. Keywords: Quality of life, Older people, Residential technology, Computer-mediated communication PMID:24688912

  11. [Personal computer-based computer monitoring system of the anesthesiologist (2-year experience in development and use)].

    PubMed

    Buniatian, A A; Sablin, I N; Flerov, E V; Mierbekov, E M; Broĭtman, O G; Shevchenko, V V; Shitikov, I I

    1995-01-01

    Creation of computer monitoring systems (CMS) for operating rooms is one of the most important spheres of personal computer employment in anesthesiology. The authors developed a PC RS/AT-based CMS and effectively used it for more than 2 years. This system permits comprehensive monitoring in cardiosurgical operations by real time processing the values of arterial and central venous pressure, pressure in the pulmonary artery, bioelectrical activity of the brain, and two temperature values. Use of this CMS helped appreciably improve patients' safety during surgery. The possibility to assess brain function by computer monitoring the EEF simultaneously with central hemodynamics and body temperature permit the anesthesiologist to objectively assess the depth of anesthesia and to diagnose cerebral hypoxia. Automated anesthesiological chart issued by the CMS after surgery reliably reflects the patient's status and the measures taken by the anesthesiologist.

  12. Exercise and Quality of Life: Strengthening the Connections

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    Exercise improves quality of life (QOL) in people with cancer. Most oncology healthcare providers recognize the statement to be true because the research literature provides strong support for the physical and psychological benefits of exercise. Because the terms exercise, QOL, and people with cancer have different meanings, the contextual connections in which they are used are important to understanding the relationship between exercise and QOL in people with cancer. This article explores the links between exercise and QOL in people with cancer and examines issues that impact the development, implementation, and evaluation of exercise programs for people with cancer. Issues related to exercise goal development, exercise prescription, exercise testing, exercise adherence, and methods to evaluate the efficacy of exercise in relation to QOL are discussed. PMID:19193547

  13. Aircraft Noise and Quality of Life around Frankfurt Airport

    PubMed Central

    Schreckenberg, Dirk; Meis, Markus; Kahl, Cara; Peschel, Christin; Eikmann, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    In a survey of 2,312 residents living near Frankfurt Airport aircraft noise annoyance and disturbances as well as environmental (EQoL) and health-related quality of life (HQoL) were assessed and compared with data on exposure due to aircraft, road traffic, and railway noise. Results indicate higher noise annoyance than predicted from general exposure-response curves. Beside aircraft sound levels source-related attitudes were associated with reactions to aircraft noise. Furthermore, aircraft noise affected EQoL in general, although to a much smaller extent. HQoL was associated with aircraft noise annoyance, noise sensitivity and partly with aircraft noise exposure, in particular in the subgroup of multimorbid residents. The results suggest a recursive relationship between noise and health, yet this cannot be tested in cross-sectional studies. Longitudinal studies would be recommendable to get more insight in the causal paths underlying the noise-health relationship. PMID:20948931

  14. [Linguistic thinking disorders, dysphasia, and quality of life].

    PubMed

    Bernardi, M

    1993-01-01

    This study focuses on the nature and scope of thought disturbances in dysphasic children (age 6 to 10). It is a developmental and clinical study. The dysphasic child clearly manifests disturbances in language. These can be understood as disturbances of the linguistic "containers of thought". What impact do they have on the development of cognitive and affective experiences? A controlled study of logical operations involving reversibility and invariates shows some significant differences between dysphasic children and a matched group of non patient children. Findings, both, quantitative and qualitative, point to some specific difficulties in the acquisition of operative (in Piaget sense) structures of thought. Often regarded as "practical persons" dysphasic children manifest peculiar ways of integrating their affective experiences in a factual mode akin to alexithymia. Linguistic anomalies seem to be important elements of some complex "noeto linguistic" disturbances. Linguistic difficulties have a global impact on the quality of life of dysphasic children and need further investigation for developing relevant intervention programs.

  15. Exercise and quality of life: strengthening the connections.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Eileen

    2009-02-01

    Exercise improves quality of life (QOL) in people with cancer. Most oncology healthcare providers recognize the statement to be true because the research literature provides strong support for the physical and psychological benefits of exercise. Because the terms exercise, QOL, and people with cancer have different meanings, the contextual connections in which they are used are important to understanding the relationship between exercise and QOL in people with cancer. This article explores the links between exercise and QOL in people with cancer and examines issues that impact the development, implementation, and evaluation of exercise programs for people with cancer. Issues related to exercise goal development, exercise prescription, exercise testing, exercise adherence, and methods to evaluate the efficacy of exercise in relation to QOL are discussed.

  16. Quality of life before and after cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bensoussan, Jean-Charles; Bolton, Michael A; Pi, Sarah; Powell-Hicks, Allycin L; Postolova, Anna; Razani, Bahram; Reyes, Kevin; IsHak, Waguih William

    2014-08-01

    This article reviews the literature regarding the impact of cosmetic surgery on health-related quality of life (QOL). Studies were identified through PubMed/Medline and PsycINFO searches from January 1960 to December 2011. Twenty-eight studies were included in this review, according to specific selection criteria. The procedures and tools employed in cosmetic surgery research studies were remarkably diverse, thus yielding difficulties with data analysis. However, data indicate that individuals undergoing cosmetic surgery began with lower values on aspects of QOL than control subjects, and experienced significant QOL improvement post-procedurally, an effect that appeared to plateau with time. Despite the complexity of measuring QOL in cosmetic surgery patients, most studies showed an improvement in QOL after cosmetic surgery procedures. However, this finding was clouded by measurement precision as well as heterogeneity of procedures and study populations. Future research needs to focus on refining measurement techniques, including developing cosmetic surgery-specific QOL measures.

  17. Posttransplantation quality of life: more than graft function.

    PubMed

    Habwe, Violet Q

    2006-04-01

    Whereas newer immunosuppressive therapies have increased patient and graft survival, long-term treatment with these drugs has been linked to medical and physical complications that may impact on posttransplantation quality of life. Immunosuppression-related physical side effects that can alter appearance--including hirsutism, gingival hyperplasia, weight gain, cushingoid facies, hand tremors, alopecia, and skin disorders--are among the most bothersome to patients and may have serious psychosocial implications. In addition, physical side effects may influence patient adherence to their prescribed treatment regimens and result in more serious complications, such as acute rejection, graft loss, rehospitalization, and even mortality. Therefore, strategies for minimizing side effects of immunosuppressive therapy and improving medication adherence are integral to better long-term transplant recipient management.

  18. Improving quality of life using removable and fixed implant prostheses.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Jeff; Parker, Sid

    2012-04-01

    Removable and fixed implant-retained prostheses can greatly enhance patients' quality of life, improving their speech, appearance, and ability to eat and otherwise function normally. Yet patients may resist this type of treatment due to barriers, including cost, fear, and lengthy treatment times. It is, therefore, important that clinicians engage in discovering and understanding their patients' concerns and expectations in addition to making a thorough and complete diagnosis of their dental conditions. In the case presented, emphasis was placed on patient-clinician communication to correctly facilitate the desired clinical result. The final restoration consisted of a maxillary removable, implant-assisted denture and a mandibular screw-retained, fixed, implant-supported prosthesis.

  19. Update on quality of life in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Iris; Valassi, Elena; Webb, Susan M

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, health-related quality of life (QoL) has been considered an important outcome for clinical management of acromegaly. Poor QoL has been described in acromegalic patients with active disease as well as after endocrine cure. It is known that acromegaly determines many physical problems and psychological dysfunctions that unavoidably impact on patients' QoL. Moreover, there is evidence that factors, such as radiotherapy or post-treatment GH deficiency also impair QoL in patients diagnosed with acromegaly. Thus, including the assessment of QoL in daily clinical practice has become fundamental to understand the consequences of acromegaly and the impact on the patients' daily life.

  20. Aircraft noise and quality of life around Frankfurt Airport.

    PubMed

    Schreckenberg, Dirk; Meis, Markus; Kahl, Cara; Peschel, Christin; Eikmann, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    In a survey of 2,312 residents living near Frankfurt Airport aircraft noise annoyance and disturbances as well as environmental (EQoL) and health-related quality of life (HQoL) were assessed and compared with data on exposure due to aircraft, road traffic, and railway noise. Results indicate higher noise annoyance than predicted from general exposure-response curves. Beside aircraft sound levels source-related attitudes were associated with reactions to aircraft noise. Furthermore, aircraft noise affected EQoL in general, although to a much smaller extent. HQoL was associated with aircraft noise annoyance, noise sensitivity and partly with aircraft noise exposure, in particular in the subgroup of multimorbid residents. The results suggest a recursive relationship between noise and health, yet this cannot be tested in cross-sectional studies. Longitudinal studies would be recommendable to get more insight in the causal paths underlying the noise-health relationship.

  1. Aquatic training in MS: neurotherapeutic impact upon quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Frohman, Ashley N; Okuda, Darin T; Beh, Shin; Treadaway, Katherine; Mooi, Caroline; Davis, Scott L; Shah, Anjali; Frohman, Teresa C; Frohman, Elliot M

    2015-01-01

    Three fundamental principals associated with aquatic therapy differentiate it with respect to exercise on land, and in air. These are buoyancy (reduction in weight of the body within the buoyant medium of water), viscosity (a “drag force” is generated when moving within water, when compared with the same movement in air), and the thermodynamic aspect of water exercise, during which the heat capacity of water is about 1000 times greater than that of an equivalent amount of air; equating to a heat transfer from the body into water at a rate 25 times faster than that of air. Aquatic conditioning, can improve neurologic functioning, with dividends favorably impacting activities of daily living, health maintenance, safety, and ultimately quality of life. Here, we review the application of aquatic exercise training in MS patients. PMID:26339680

  2. The impact of obesity on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Valerie H; Forhan, Mary; Vigod, Simone N; McIntyre, Roger S; Morrison, Katherine M

    2013-04-01

    An important association exists between obesity and mental illness that impacts all aspects of an individual's quality of life. This association can begin early in the developmental trajectory and we do not yet completely understand all the mechanisms linking obesity and mental illness. What we e do know is that physical health factors that often occur secondary to obesity, combined with societal attitudes toward those that are obese coupled with iatrogenic treatment factors linked to psychiatric pharmacotherapy and a number of biologic mediators result in an important and increasing common comorbidity. Recognizing this association is essential for the proper management of both conditions. The following review addresses this issue and provides clinical pearls to help deal with this issue.

  3. Quality of life in patients with toenail onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Milobratović, Danica; Janković, Slavenka; Vukičević, Jelica; Marinković, Jelena; Janković, Janko; Railić, Zoran

    2013-09-01

    Onychomycosis is a common, chronic fungal nail infection that can have a significant negative impact on patients' physical and social functioning and emotional well-being. This study was undertaken to assess health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with toenail onychomycosis. The Onychomycosis QoL questionnaire (ONYCHO), as a disease-specific instrument, and the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) as a generic instrument, were applied in 140 consecutive patients affected by onychomycosis. Women and patients who were experiencing toenail onychomycosis for more than 2 years were reporting worse disease-specific HRQoL. The patients working in blue-collar occupations and patients with greater involvement of individual nails were more affected by onychomycosis regarding symptoms. The results of this study confirm that although onychomycosis is not a life-threatening disease, it can significantly reduce patients' QoL.

  4. The Roles of Embedded Monitoring Requests and Questions in Improving Mental Models of Computer-Based Scientific Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathorn, Lesley G.; Rawson, Katherine A.

    2012-01-01

    Prior research has shown that people are likely to skim information presented digitally with the resultant deleterious effect on accurate mental models of the text. Teaching monitoring strategies and presenting text with adjunct questions are effective strategies for improving the mental models of readers of scientific text, but the two strategies…

  5. A Trial of Extending Hemodialysis Hours and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Jardine, Meg J; Zuo, Li; Gray, Nicholas A; de Zoysa, Janak R; Chan, Christopher T; Gallagher, Martin P; Monaghan, Helen; Grieve, Stuart M; Puranik, Rajesh; Lin, Hongli; Eris, Josette M; Zhang, Ling; Xu, Jinsheng; Howard, Kirsten; Lo, Serigne; Cass, Alan; Perkovic, Vlado

    2017-02-01

    The relationship between increased hemodialysis hours and patient outcomes remains unclear. We randomized (1:1) 200 adult recipients of standard maintenance hemodialysis from in-center and home-based hemodialysis programs to extended weekly (≥24 hours) or standard (target 12-15 hours, maximum 18 hours) hemodialysis hours for 12 months. The primary outcome was change in quality of life from baseline assessed by the EuroQol 5 dimension instrument (3 level) (EQ-5D). Secondary outcomes included medication usage, clinical laboratory values, vascular access events, and change in left ventricular mass index. At 12 months, median weekly hemodialysis hours were 24.0 (interquartile range, 23.6-24.0) and 12.0 (interquartile range, 12.0-16.0) in the extended and standard groups, respectively. Change in EQ-5D score at study end did not differ between groups (mean difference, 0.04 [95% confidence interval, -0.03 to 0.11]; P=0.29). Extended hours were associated with lower phosphate and potassium levels and higher hemoglobin levels. Blood pressure (BP) did not differ between groups at study end. Extended hours were associated with fewer BP-lowering agents and phosphate-binding medications, but were not associated with erythropoietin dosing. In a substudy with 95 patients, we detected no difference between groups in left ventricular mass index (mean difference, -6.0 [95% confidence interval, -14.8 to 2.7] g/m(2); P=0.18). Five deaths occurred in the extended group and two in the standard group (P=0.44); two participants in each group withdrew consent. Similar numbers of patients experienced vascular access events in the two groups. Thus, extending weekly hemodialysis hours did not alter overall EQ-5D quality of life score, but was associated with improvement in some laboratory parameters and reductions in medication burden. (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00649298).

  6. Does health-related quality of life predict injury event?

    PubMed Central

    Soori, Hamid; Abachizadeh, Kambiz

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Unintentional injury is a leading threat to children's health. Some human factors have been determined as predictor of unintentional injury. Association between Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) as a human factor and unintentional injuries is unclear. The objective of study is to examine the association between HRQOL and unintentional injuries among primary school children. Methods: This study was a cross-sectional conducted in Ahwaz, a city in Iran. Overall, 3375 children aged 6-10 years were randomly selected from primary school. HRQOL was measured by 56 items taken from seven domains of Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research Academic Medical Center (TNO AZL) child quality of life (TACQOL) parent form. Parents were interviewed to collect information about incidence, cause and a brief description of injury within the past 12 months prior to the study. Results: The response rate was 3375 of 3792 (89%). There was a significant trend for increasing occurrence of injury with decreasing of HRQOL score (p was less than 0.001). Adjusted OR for injury was significantly higher in very low (2.38, 95% CI: 1.45-3.86), low (2.18, 95% CI: 1.34-3.56), and medium (1.73, 95%CI: 1.06-2.83) HRQOL groups compared to reference group (very high HRQOL). The median of total HRQOL (P less than 0.001) and all its domains (P=0.017) (except autonomous functioning) was lower in injured group compared to uninjured one. Conclusions: This study found an association between HRQOL and unintentional injury among primary school children. This is a preliminary finding and further investigations with a well-defined analytical design are needed. PMID:21483187

  7. Quality of life in spina bifida: importance of parental hope

    PubMed Central

    Kirpalani, H.; Parkin, P.; Willan, A.; Fehlings, D.; Rosenbaum, P.; King, D; Van Nie, A. J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Prognosis in spina bifida (SB) is often based only on neurological deficits present at birth. We hypothesised that both parental hope and the neurophysical examination predict quality of life in children and adolescents with SB.
METHODS—A previously validated disease and age specific health related quality of life (HRQL) instrument was posted to families of children (aged 5-12 years) and adolescents (aged 13-20 years) with SB. We measured parental hope, determined the child's current physical function, and obtained retrospective data on the neonatal neurophysical examination (NPE). Regression analysis modelled HRQL firstly as a dependent variable on parental hope and NPE ("birth status"); and secondly on parental hope and current physical function ("current function").
RESULTS—Response rates were 71% (137 of 194) for families of children, and 54% (74 of 138) for families of adolescents. NPE data were available for 121 children and 60 adolescents. In children, the birth status model predicted 26% of the variability (R2 hope 21%) compared with 23% of the variability (R2 hope 23%)in the adolescents. The current function model explained 47% of the variability (R2 hope 19%) in children compared with 31% of the variability (R2 hope 24%) in the adolescents.
CONCLUSIONS—In both age groups, parental hope was more strongly associated with the HRQL than neonatal or current physical deficits. A prospective study is required to determine whether a causal relation exists between parental hope and HRQL of children and adolescents with SB.

 PMID:10999858

  8. A comparison of verapamil and nifedipine on quality of life.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, A; Fletcher, A; Hamilton, G; Muriss, S; Bulpitt, C

    1990-01-01

    1. Aspects of quality of life (symptoms, psychological well-being and activity) were evaluated by self-administered questionnaires in a 4 month randomised double-blind trial of titrated doses of verapamil slow release (n = 41) compared with nifedipine retard (n = 40). An untreated diastolic blood pressure of 95-115 mm Hg was required for inclusion in the trial. 2. The mean age in both groups was 55 years. A significant difference between the two drugs was found in the average reporting of symptoms with an increase on nifedipine (P less than 0.01). The reporting of swollen ankles and flushing (P less than 0.05) increased on nifedipine, and nocturia (P less than 0.05) increased on verapamil. Measures of psychiatric morbidity tended to improve on verapamil and deteriorate on nifedipine. Only the change in cognitive function was significant between the drugs, being worse on nifedipine (P = 0.05). 3. There was no difference between the two groups in the fall in diastolic blood pressure (average 18 mm Hg on nifedipine and 17 mm Hg on verapamil). There was a significantly greater fall in systolic blood pressure on nifedipine (23 mm Hg) compared with verapamil (13 mm Hg) (P less than 0.01). 4. The two drugs differed in their effects on measures of quality of life. The improvements in symptomatic complaints and psychological well-being on verapamil may have been due to inclusion in a trial, although we cannot exclude the possibility of a drug effect. Conversely the increase in symptoms and self-assessed cognitive impairment on nifedipine were considered to be side-effects of the drug. PMID:2223415

  9. Quality of Life after Cesarean and Vaginal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyed Abbas; Mortazavi, Forough; Chaman, Reza; Khosravi, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cesarean rates in recent decades have been increasing and a number of studies have shown that cesarean increases maternal morbidities. The aim of this study is to compare the quality of life after cesarean and vaginal delivery. Methods This prospective study was carried out on 356 pregnant women visiting urban health centers in Shahroud City, Northeast Iran, in 2011. The subjects completed the quality of life questionnaire in the third trimester of pregnancy and at 8 weeks postpartum. Results In primiparas, the mean global QOL scores for the cesarean and vaginal delivery groups were 67.65±12.7 and 72.12±11.8, respectively. Also, the scores for the physical, psychological and social domains of QOL as well as the global score of QOL were higher in the vaginal delivery group than the cesarean group (p<0.05). In the case of primiparas, multiple regression analysis revealed that after adjusting for education, desirability of pregnancy and the General Health Questionnaire score, the delivery type remained as a predictor of the scores for the physical (R2=1.7%; B=-3.826; p=0.031; CI [-7.301, -.350]) and social (R2=2.5%; B=-5.708; p=0.017; CI [-10.392, -1.023]) domains of QOL and the global QOL score (R2=2.6%; B=-4.065; p=0.006; CI [-6.964, -1.164]). While multiparas, there was no relationship between QOL and type of delivery. Conclusion In this sample of low-risk women, cesarean negatively affected the QOL of primiparas. More studies with larger sample sizes should be conducted to examine the effects of cesarean on QOL in both primiparas and multiparas within a shorter period after delivery. PMID:23904916

  10. External validity of the pediatric cardiac quality of life inventory

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Bradley S.; Drotar, Dennis; Cassedy, Amy; Davis, Richard; Tomlinson, Ryan S.; Mellion, Katelyn; Mussatto, Kathleen; Mahony, Lynn; Newburger, Jane W.; Tong, Elizabeth; Cohen, Mitchell I.; Helfaer, Mark A.; Kazak, Anne E.; Wray, Jo; Wernovsky, Gil; Shea, Judy A.; Ittenbach, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The Pediatric Cardiac Quality of Life Inventory (PCQLI) is a disease-specific, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) measure for pediatric heart disease (HD). The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the external validity of PCQLI scores. Methods The PCQLI development site (Development sample) and six geographically diverse centers in the United States (Composite sample) recruited pediatric patients with acquired or congenital HD. Item response option variability, scores [Total (TS); Disease Impact (DI) and Psychosocial Impact (PI) subscales], patterns of correlation, and internal consistency were compared between samples. Results A total of 3,128 patients and parent participants (1,113 Development; 2,015 Composite) were analyzed. Response option variability patterns of all items in both samples were acceptable. Inter-sample score comparisons revealed no differences. Median item–total (Development, 0.57; Composite, 0.59) and item–subscale (Development, DI 0.58, PI 0.59; Composite, DI 0.58, PI 0.56) correlations were moderate. Subscale–subscale (0.79 for both samples) and subscale–total (Development, DI 0.95, PI 0.95; Composite, DI 0.95, PI 0.94) correlations and internal consistency (Development, TS 0.93, DI 0.90, PI 0.84; Composite, TS 0.93, DI 0.89, PI 0.85) were high in both samples. Conclusion PCQLI scores are externally valid across the US pediatric HD population and may be used for multi-center HRQOL studies. PMID:21188538

  11. Quality of life among parents of children with heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Arafa, Mostafa A; Zaher, Salah R; El-Dowaty, Amira A; Moneeb, Dalia E

    2008-01-01

    Background Quality of life of parents of chronically ill children has become increasingly important as the mortality rates associated with such illnesses have decreased and survival rates have increased. Aim To describe the Health related quality of life (HRQOL) of parents whose children are suffering from heart diseases and to identify the most important factors that could affect it. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted in Alexandria, Egypt in the two main hospitals that treat children with heart diseases. 400 parents of children with heart diseases were recruited and a comparison group (400) of parents of children with minor illnesses were included from both hospitals. Socioeconomic and disease related data were collected, SF36 was used to collect data regarding the QOL. MANOVA was used to compare the SF-36 scores between groups and to explore the impact of different variables. Results In all SF-36 subscales, parents of children with heart diseases reported significantly poorer HRQOL, except for pain subscale. The most striking differences were for General Health, Vitality and role limitation physical. Factors that had a significant impact of HRQOL were severity of illness, type of heart disease in addition to age of child, having multiple children, financial situation and presence of comorbid condition. The mean scores for different domains were the lowest for younger age, rheumatic heart disease and female children. Conclusion QOL of parents of children with heart diseases was significantly impaired and it was influenced by several factors; mainly related to the clinical status of the child. Psychological status, social support and reassurance of the parents should be considered when making treatment decision for their children. PMID:18980676

  12. Quality of life for chronic psychiatric illnesses and home care

    PubMed Central

    Molu, Nesibe Gunay; Ozkan, Birgul; Icel, Sema

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, mental illnesses are gradually increasing and so does chronic psychiatric patients. As a result of this increase, chronic psychiatric disorders lead the burden of patients and their families. To reduce the burden of mental illnesses on individuals and their families, treatment and care are given including psychosocial, physiological and medical support and social services. To begin with, home care enables both the patient and his or her family to stay at their own houses and not to be bothered with residents or long-term, institutional-based nursing homes. In addition, the home care providers deliver services to the patient’s at their own house. The other advantages of taking care at home is that it eases financial issues in terms of reducing the cost, reduces the patient’s symptoms and improve the individual’s quality of life (QoL). In addition to these, home care also minimizes the burden on outpatient services and provides help for the patient and the family in order to solve their problems and give support. Home care services help patients to get their freedom back and enhance the quality of their lives. Thus, it is necessary to procure and implement these services and supply both the patient and his or her family a high-quality life. Sources of data/ study selection: Literature review was done by using the keywords “home care, patient with chronic mental illness, quality of life, home care nursing” from the sources including PsychINFO, PsychARTICLES, MEDLINE, PubMED, EBSCOHOST and The COCHRANE LIBRARY in the time period of 2005- 2015. PMID:27182272

  13. Acromegaly Quality of Life Questionnaire (AcroQoL)

    PubMed Central

    Badia, Xavier; Webb, Susan M; Prieto, Luis; Lara, Nuria

    2004-01-01

    Acromegaly is a chronic disease with an important impact on patients, Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). The ability to effectively measure Health Related Quality of Life is central to describing the impacts of disease or treatment upon the patient, therefore the importance of having a disease specific questionnaire for acromegaly. For the development of the AcroQoL questionnaire different sources of information were used: first a literature search was performed to identify relevant papers describing the impact of acromegaly in HRQoL, second the main domains of impact on HRQoL were identified by 10 experts endocrinologists, and third ten in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted in acromegalic patients to identify domains and items related to the self-perceived impact of acromegaly in patients' life. After a proper qualitative analysis a preliminary 38 item questionnaire was obtained. Rasch analysis concluded with a final 22 item questionnaire. The measurement properties (validity and reliability) of the resulting final questionnaire were tested and compared using standard procedures (Cronbach's Alpha and item-total correlation). The evaluation of the item parameters confirmed the construct validity of the new instrument. Responsiveness to change was assessed in a small sample of 32 acromegalic patients with active disease in Spain who were administered the AcroQoL and the generic questionnaire EuroQoL 5-D. The results showed a statistically significant relationship between all the dimensions of AcroQoL and the VAS (visual analogic scale) of EQ-5D. An improvement in the global score of AcroQoL was related to a global improvement in the VAS of the EQ-5D. Following the current recommended standard methodology the Spanish questionnaire was translated into eleven other languages. PMID:14987332

  14. Quality of life and personality in essential tremor patients.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Delia; Schwieger, Daniel; Moises, Hans; Deuschl, Günther

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of essential tremor (ET) on quality of life and its relation with tremor severity and the personality profile of ET patients. One hundred and five patients with definite or probable ET from an outpatient population were tested with the Short-Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF36) and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-R). Compared to controls, the ET patients scored worse in all eight domains of the SF36. The physical component score (PCS) did not differ significantly from the normal population, whereas ET patients older than 40 years were significantly more affected with regard to the mental domains measured by the mental component score (MCS) with their median below the 20th percentile of the German controls. Tremor severity correlated with some of the physical domains and the PCS as well as with social function of the mental domains. ET patients showed significantly lower scores in the psychoticism (P) scale of the EPQ-R, with a median value on the 11th percentile of normal German population, indicating a more tender-minded personality type. The MCS correlated highly significant with the neuroticism (N) scale and extraversion (E) scale of EPQ-R. Multiple regression analysis identified age as the only predictive factor for the PCS and the N-scale as the only predictive factor for the MCS. Although ET is considered a pure movement disorder, the mental components of quality of life are more affected than the physical dimensions. A more controlled personality type may in part contribute to this.

  15. Health-Related Quality of Life and Appropriateness of Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, José Ma; Cabriada, Jose; Aróstegui, Inmaculada; Oribe, Victor; Perdigo, Luis; Varona, Mercedes; Bilbao, Amaia

    2005-01-01

    Ojbective: To evaluate the relationship among appropriateness of the use of cholecystectomy and outcomes. Summary Background Data: The use of cholecystectomy varies widely across regions and countries. Explicit appropriateness criteria may help identify suitable candidates for this commonly performed procedure. This study evaluates the relationship among appropriateness of the use of cholecystectomy and outcomes. Methods: Prospective observational study in 6 public hospitals in Spain of all consecutive patients on waiting lists to undergo cholecystectomy for nonmalignant disease. Explicit appropriateness criteria for the use of cholecystectomy were developed by a panel of experts using the RAND appropriateness methodology and applied to recruited patients. Patients were asked to complete 2 questionnaires that measure health-related quality of life—the Short Form 36 (SF-36) and the Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (GIQLI)—before the intervention and 3 months after it. Results: Patients judged as being appropriate candidates for cholecystectomy, using the panel's explicit appropriateness criteria, had greater improvements in the bodily pain, vitality, and social function domains of the SF-36 than those judged to be inappropriate candidates. They also demonstrated improvements in the GIQLI's physical impairment domain. Interventions judged as inappropriate were performed primarily among patients without symptoms of cholelithiasis. Those asymptomatic had a lower improvement in the bodily pain, social functioning, and physical summary scale of the SF-36 and in the symptomatology, physical impairment, and total score domains of the GIQLI. Conclusions: These results suggest a direct relationship between the application of explicit appropriateness criteria and better outcomes, as measured by health-related quality of life. They also indicate that patients without symptoms are not good candidates for cholecystectomy. PMID:15621998

  16. Electronic Quality of Life Assessment Using Computer-Adaptive Testing

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QoL) questionnaires are desirable for clinical practice but can be time-consuming to administer and interpret, making their widespread adoption difficult. Objective Our aim was to assess the performance of the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-100 questionnaire as four item banks to facilitate adaptive testing using simulated computer adaptive tests (CATs) for physical, psychological, social, and environmental QoL. Methods We used data from the UK WHOQOL-100 questionnaire (N=320) to calibrate item banks using item response theory, which included psychometric assessments of differential item functioning, local dependency, unidimensionality, and reliability. We simulated CATs to assess the number of items administered before prespecified levels of reliability was met. Results The item banks (40 items) all displayed good model fit (P>.01) and were unidimensional (fewer than 5% of t tests significant), reliable (Person Separation Index>.70), and free from differential item functioning (no significant analysis of variance interaction) or local dependency (residual correlations < +.20). When matched for reliability, the item banks were between 45% and 75% shorter than paper-based WHOQOL measures. Across the four domains, a high standard of reliability (alpha>.90) could be gained with a median of 9 items. Conclusions Using CAT, simulated assessments were as reliable as paper-based forms of the WHOQOL with a fraction of the number of items. These properties suggest that these item banks are suitable for computerized adaptive assessment. These item banks have the potential for international development using existing alternative language versions of the WHOQOL items. PMID:27694100

  17. Assessing quality of life of self-reported rheumatic patients.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Pedro L; Gonçalves, Sónia P; Ferreira, Lara N; Pereira, Luis N; Antunes, Patrícia; Gouveia, Nélia; Rodrigues, Ana; Canhão, Helena; Branco, Jaime

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with self-reported rheumatic diseases (RD), to classify self-reported rheumatic patients in groups according to their health state and to explore the associations between health status and sociodemographic variables. Data came from the Portuguese Epidemiologic study of the RD. A sample of the Portuguese population aged 18 or more (n = 10,661) stratified by region and locality dimension was interviewed by trained interviewers and answered a standardized questionnaire that included the SF-36v1, the EQ-5D-3L, medical history, identification of potential rheumatic diseases, sociodemographic characteristics, among others. Descriptive statistics and parametric tests were used to compare HRQoL of respondents with and without RD. Comparisons with normative data from the Portuguese population were also carried out. A cluster analysis was used to classify respondents into homogeneous groups. Regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with HRQoL. Respondents with self-reported RD assigned a lower self-perception to their health status. The burden of disease was observed mainly in physical function, role physical and bodily pain. The EQ-5D-3L dimensions show similar results: the intensity of problems is significantly more evident in respondents with self-reported RD. HRQoL of respondents with self-reported RD is related to sociodemographic variables and is significantly lower when compared with the Portuguese population. Four clusters of homogeneous respondents with self-reported RD were formed and characterized according to a number of variables. Factors associated with HRQoL were identified. In conclusion, suffering from a self-reported RD has a significant impact on self-perceived health status and on the quality of life.

  18. Exploring quality of life in families of children living with and without a severe food allergy.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Althea Z; Knibb, Rebecca C

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to explore the impact of food allergy on quality of life in children with food allergy and their primary caregivers, compared to a healthy non-food allergy comparison group. Food allergy children (n=34) and control children (n=15), aged 8-12, and their respective primary caregivers (n=30/n=13), completed generic quality of life scales (PedsQL™ and WHOQOLBREF) and were asked to take photographs and keep a diary about factors that they believed enhanced and/or limited their quality of life, over a one-week period. Questionnaire analysis showed that parents of children with food allergy had significantly lower quality of life in the social relationships domain and lower overall quality of life than the comparison parents. In contrast, children with food allergy had similar or higher quality of life scores compared to comparison children. Content analysis of photograph and diary data identified ten themes that influenced both child and parental quality of life. It was concluded that although food allergy influenced quality of life for some children, their parent's quality of life was hindered to a greater extent. The variability in findings highlights the importance of assessing quality of life in individual families, considering both children with allergies and their primary caregivers.

  19. Quality of life in people with Parkinson's disease: the relevance of social relationships and communication.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kayoko; Kamide, Naoto; Suzuki, Makoto; Fukuda, Michinari

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Maintaining high quality of life is crucial for the rehabilitation of patients with Parkinson's disease. The quality of life scales currently in use do not assess all quality of life domains or their importance for each individual. Therefore, a new quality of life measure, the Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life-Direct Weighting, was used to investigate quality of life in people with Parkinson's disease. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen people with idiopathic Parkinson's disaese (average age = 80.0 years, standard deviation = 10.3 years, Hoehn & Yahr stages 1-4) were interviewed using the Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life-Direct Weighting. Its quality of life constructs were tested by comparing them against disease-specific quality of life (39-items Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire), motor functioning (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III), and activities of daily living (Barthel Index). [Results] Social connections such as "family" and "friends" were revealed as important constructs of life satisfaction. The Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life-Direct Weighting was not significantly correlated with the 39-items Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III, or Barthel Index but was significantly correlated with the "communication" dimension of the 39-items Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire. [Conclusion] The Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life-Direct Weighting detected various domains of quality of life, especially social relationships with family and friends. "Being heard" was also revealed as an essential component of life satisfaction, as it provides patients with a feeling of acceptance and assurance, possibly resulting in better quality of life.

  20. Do Age and Quality of Life of the Cancer Patient Influence Quality of Life of the Caregiver?

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Varun; Lapid, Maria I.; Kung, Simon; Atherton, Pamela J.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Clark, Matthew M.; Rummans, Teresa A.

    2015-01-01

    Background There are significant burdens associated with providing care for loved ones with cancer. However, caregiver quality of life (QOL) is often overlooked. With the increasing number of older adults with cancer, it is important to determine whether a patient’s age and QOL have any association with the caregiver’s QOL. Objective The objective of our study was to describe caregiver QOL and explore whether patient age and other psychosocial factors impact caregiver QOL. Design Baseline information from patients with advanced cancer undergoing radiation and their caregivers, who were enrolled in a randomized, controlled clinical trial to test the effectiveness of a structured, multidisciplinary QOL intervention, was analyzed for this study. Measurement Caregivers completed the Caregiver Quality of Life Index—Cancer Scale (CQOLC). Both patients and caregivers completed the Linear Analogue Self-Assessment (LASA) to measure QOL, and Profile of Mood States (POMS) to measure mood states. Results Overall, 131 patient-caregiver pairs participated in the study. At baseline, caregivers of older adults (≥65 years) had higher mental (P=0.01), emotional (P=0.003), spiritual (P<0.01), and social support (P=0.03) LASA QOL scores. Caregivers of older adults also had higher baseline QOL (CQOLC, P=0.003) and mood (POMS, P=0.04) than caregivers of younger adults. Caregivers of patients with higher LASA QOL scores had higher overall (P=0.02), mental (P=0.006), physical (P=0.02), emotional (P=0.002), and spiritual LASA QOL scores (P=0.047). Conclusions Caregivers of older adults with advanced cancer demonstrated better QOL and fewer mood disturbances compared to caregivers of younger patients. When patients have good QOL, caregivers also had good QOL. PMID:24726867

  1. Individual and community quality of life in the era of electrification in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusuma, Sugiyanto Eddie

    This study examines the extent to which electrification relates to improvement of quality of life in Indonesia. In this respect, the study addresses two objectives. First, it examines the extent to which electrification accounts for differences in quality of life in Indonesia. Second, it assesses the extent to which rural-urban locations account for differences in the effects of electrification, human capital, social capital, and physical capital on quality of life. Drawing from the 1993 Indonesian Family Life Survey (IFLS), quality of life was defined as child survivability. The results indicated that access to electricity played an important role in enhancing quality of life for both rural and urban communities. Electrification, human capital, and social capital were important factors for quality of life in rural communities. For urban communities, key factors were electrification, human capital, social capital, and physical capital.

  2. The quality of life of single mothers making the transition from welfare to work.

    PubMed

    Cook, Kay; Davis, Elise; Smyth, Paul; McKenzie, Hayley

    2009-09-01

    This study examined the quality of life of single mothers making the mandatory transition from welfare to work. The Australian government purported that the benefits of making this transition would include higher incomes, better social participation, and improved wellbeing. It is currently unknown, however, how single mothers currently engaged in welfare to work programs evaluate their quality of life. Quality of life scores for 334 single mothers engaged in welfare to work in Australia were compared with normative data. Participants reported significantly lower quality of life scores than the general population for all quality of life domains, highlighting the need to carefully examine welfare to work policies to ensure they promote participants' quality of life.

  3. Using Structural Equation Modeling to Understand Child and Parent Perceptions of Asthma Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Annett, Robert D.; Turner, Charles; Brody, Janet L.; Sedillo, Donna; Dalen, Jeanne

    2010-01-01

    Objective Using structural equation modeling, test a conceptual model of associations between constructs predicting parent and child asthma quality of life. Methods Children with a confirmed asthma diagnosis and their parents completed measures of health status and independently reported on psychological functioning, family functioning, and quality of life. Results Measurement and structural models for predicting parent and child quality of life provided a good fit of data to the conceptual model. Parent and child independent reports of quality of life are dependent upon family functioning and child psychological functioning. Long-term asthma symptom control is the only health status variable that impacts quality of life. Conclusions With minor modifications, both parent and child data fit the conceptual model. Child psychological functioning and long-term asthma control jointly contribute to quality of life outcomes. Findings suggest that both acute and long-term asthma health status outcomes have different determinants. PMID:20026568

  4. The effects of food allergy on quality of life.

    PubMed

    DunnGalvin, Audrey; Dubois, A E J; Flokstra-de Blok, B M J; Hourihane, J O'B

    2015-01-01

    The majority of research on food allergy has been bio-medical in orientation, focusing on issues such as the molecular structure of allergens, or aimed at methods of diagnosis. In the last decade, there has been a growing interest in the development of questionnaires that measure the impact of food allergy on health-related quality of life (HRQL). These studies have provided insight into the everyday burden of living with food allergy and have suggested ways that HRQL can be improved. The EuroPrevall project (europrevall@bbsrc.ac.uk) has given great impetus to research in the area of HRQL. In addition to clinical research on the prevalence, mechanisms and causes of food allergy, research output in the area of psycho-social impact has included HRQL measures for all age groups and examination of the socio-economic impact of food allergy. In this chapter, we review the literature on the impact of food allergy on children, teens and their parents; the majority of this data was generated over the life of the EuroPrevall project. We then examine both quantitative and qualitative research findings to provide an in-depth picture of the impact of food allergy on the concerns and everyday lives of children, teens, adults and parents. Research on factors that are related to and impact HRQL is also discussed. There is a strong emphasis throughout the chapter on developmental considerations of food allergy, spanning from infants to adults. We conclude by discussing methodological issues in relation to the measurement of HRQL in relation to food allergy. We offer some recommendations for future research and practice on HRQL so that HRQL measures can reach their full potential in research, practice and policy, with the help of the findings in this review. Overall, the findings suggest that food allergy has a strong impact on HRQL in terms of social, dietary, and psychological factors. 'Rules' and restrictions ostensibly apply to food, but because food is such an integral part of

  5. Effects of a Meditation Program on Nurses' Power and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sun Ju; Kwak, Eun Young; Hahm, Bong-Jin; Seo, Se Hee; Lee, Da Woon; Jang, Sun Joo

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the effects of meditation programs on nurses' power and quality of life. In this study, Barrett's power theory derived from Rogers' unitary human being science was used as a theoretical framework. A randomized controlled design with 50 recruited and randomly allocated participants was used. The results demonstrated that the eight-week meditation program significantly improved nurses' power and quality of life. These results suggest that meditation has positive effects on power and quality of life.

  6. Activities of daily living and quality of life in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Opara, J A

    2012-06-12

    Alzheimer's disease is known for placing a significant burden on caregivers, which includes social, psychological, physical or economic aspects. The disease decreases patients' capacity for activities of daily living and quality of life. Information about functional status is useful in the interpretation of the quality of life assessment results. In this paper the most commonly used scales evaluating activities of daily living and quality of life in Alzheimer's disease, either generic or specific, is presented.

  7. Health Condition and Quality of Life in Older Adults: Adaptation of QOLIE-89

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efklides, Anastasia; Varsami, Maria; Mitadi, Ioanna; Economidis, Dimitrios

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed at adapting the Questionnaire Quality of Life in Epilepsy (QOLIE-89 version 1.0: Vickrey et al., 1993), Quality of Life in Epilepsy QoLIE-89 RAND (Santa Monica, CA)] so that it may be used to measure quality of life (QoL) of older adults, healthy or suffering from various chronic illnesses. The participants were 202 older adults…

  8. The Non-Economic Quality of Life on a Sub-National Level in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossouw, Stephanie; Naude, Wim

    2008-01-01

    Most research on the non-economic quality of life have been (a) on a national level or performed on cross-country comparisons, and/or (b) used subjective indicators to measure how people perceive their non-economic quality of life. In this paper, our main contribution is to construct objective indicators of the non-economic quality of life for 354…

  9. Health-related quality of life in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, Darren B; Shin, Jennifer; Hud, Laryssa; Archer-Chicko, Christine; Kaplan, Sandra; Sager, Jeffery S; Gallop, Robert; Christie, Jason; Hansen-Flaschen, John; Palevsky, Harold

    2005-01-01

    Background Improved outcomes with expanding treatment options for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension present the opportunity to consider additional end-points in approaching therapy, including factors that influence health-related quality of life. However, comparatively little is known about health-related quality of life and its determinants in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Methods Health-related quality of life was evaluated in a cross sectional study of 155 outpatients with pulmonary arterial hypertension using generic and respiratory-disease specific measurement tools. Most patients had either World Health Organization functional Class II or III symptoms. Demographic, hemodynamic and treatment variables were assessed for association with health-related quality of life scores. Results Patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension suffered severe impairments in both physical and emotional domains of health-related quality of life. Patients with idiopathic ("primary") pulmonary arterial hypertension had the best, and those with systemic sclerosis the worst health-related quality of life. Greater six-minute walk distance correlated with better health-related quality of life scores, as did functional Class II versus Class III symptoms. Hemodynamic measurements, however, did not correlate with health-related quality of life scores. No differences in health-related quality of life were found between patients who were being treated with calcium channel antagonists, bosentan or continuously infused epoprostenol at the time of quality of life assessment. Conclusion Health-related quality of life is severely impaired in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and is associated with measures of functional status. Specific associations with impaired health-related quality of life suggest potential areas for targeted intervention. PMID:16092961

  10. Health-related quality of life in migrant preschool children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Minority groups have a lower health-related quality of life (HRQOL), but there is little information if this finding also applies to children. In this study, we compared HRQOL between young children with and without migrant parents. Methods Two cross-sectional studies of culturally diverse preschool populations in Switzerland: Ballabeina (40 preschools, 258 girls and 232 boys aged 4 to 6 years) and Youp’là Bouge (58 child care centers, 453 girls and 522 boys aged 2 to 4 years). Most children were born in Switzerland (Ballabeina: 92.3%; Youp’là Bouge: 93.7%). Number of migrant parents was considered as the main exposure. HRQOL was measured using the 23-item Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory. Results Children of migrant parents had a significantly lower HRQOL total score (mean ± SD, Ballabeina: 84.2 ± 9.1; 82.7 ± 9.6 and 81.7 ± 11.7 for children with none, one or two migrant parents, respectively; Youp’là Bouge: 83.8 ± 8.6; 82.9 ± 9.5; 80.7 ± 11.7, all p < 0.05). Similar results were found in Ballabeina and Youp’là Bouge for social, school and physical functioning (all p < 0.05), but not for emotional functioning. The differences in HRQOL measures were partly mediated by children’s place of birth, parental education, paternal occupational level, children’s BMI, screen time and physical activity in one study (Ballabeina), but not in the other (Youp’là Bouge). Conclusion In preschoolers, children of migrant parents have lower HRQOL than children of non-migrant parents. These differences are only partly mediated by other sociocultural characteristics or lifestyle behavior. These families may need assistance to prevent further inequalities. PMID:23617686

  11. Religious Practice and Health-Related Quality of Life in Iranian Adolescent Girls.

    PubMed

    Mirghafourvand, Mojgan; Charandabi, Sakineh Mohammad-Alizadeh; Sharajabad, Fariba Alizadeh; Sanaati, Favziye

    2017-03-24

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between religious practice and health-related quality of life in adolescent girls in Tabriz, Iran, 2014-2015. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 520 female students who were selected using the random sampling method. Religious practice and health-related quality of life questionnaires were used for data collection. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed a significant relationship between health-related quality of life and received religious support, religiosity, father's and mother's education, father's occupation, family economic status, and the number of children. It is necessary to find ways to further promote religious practices in adolescents and ultimately their quality of life.

  12. Absent but Not Gone: Interdependence in Couples' Quality of Life Persists After a Partner's Death.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, Kyle J; Knowles, Lindsey M; Sbarra, David A; O'Connor, Mary-Frances

    2016-02-01

    Spouses influence each other's psychological functioning and quality of life. To explore whether this interdependence continues after a person becomes widowed, we tested whether deceased spouses' characteristics were associated with their widowed partners' later quality of life using couples drawn from a multinational sample of aging adults. Independent subsamples (ns = 221 and 325) were assessed before and after a spouse's death. Regressions revealed that deceased partners' quality of life prior to their death positively predicted their spouses' quality of life after the partners' death, even when we controlled for spouses' prior quality of life to account for environmental factors shared within couples. Further, widowed participants' quality of life was lower than nonwidowed couples' 2 years before and after their partners' death, but was equivalent 4 years prior. Finally, the strength of the association between partners' earlier quality of life and participants' later quality of life did not differ between widowed and nonwidowed participants. These findings suggest that interdependence in quality of life continues after one's partner has passed away.

  13. Promoting health-related quality of life in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Wong, Florence

    2017-03-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are an effective treatment to reduce mortality rates in patients who are at risk of sudden cardiac death. However, ICDs have been shown to reduce the patient's mental and physical health-related quality of life. It is essential for nurses to have an understanding of the factors associated with health-related quality of life in patients with ICDs, to develop appropriate strategies to improve patient care and optimise quality of life. A case study is included in this article to enhance understanding of the effects these devices can have on a patient's quality of life.

  14. Impact of Ego-resilience and Family Function on Quality of Life in Childhood Leukemia Survivors

    PubMed Central

    CHO, Ok-Hee; YOO, Yang-Sook; HWANG, Kyung-Hye

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to examine the impact of ego-resilience and family function on quality of life in childhood leukemia survivors. Methods: This study targeted 100 pediatric leukemia survivors, who visited the Pediatric Hemato-Oncology Center in South Korea from Aug to Dec 2011. A structured questionnaire of ego-resilience, family function and quality of life used to collect data through direct interview with the pediatric patients and their parents. The correlation between the study variables analyzed using the Pearson’s correlation coefficient, and the impact on quality of life analyzed using a stepwise multiple regression. Results: Ego-resilience (r = 0.69, P<0.001) and family function (r =0.46, P< 0.001) had a positive correlation with quality of life and all the sub-categories of quality of life. Ego-resilience was a major factor affecting quality of life in childhood leukemia survivors, with an explanatory power of 48%. The explanatory power for quality of life increased to 53% when age and family function were included. Conclusion: Ego-resilience, age, and family function affect quality of life in childhood leukemia survivors. Hence, strategies are required to construct age-matched programs to improve quality of life, in order to help restore the necessary ego-resilience and to strengthen family function in childhood leukemia survivors. PMID:28032062

  15. A review of Quality of Life studies in Nigerian patients with psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Aloba, O; Fatoye, O; Mapayi, B; Akinsulore, S

    2013-09-01

    The concept of Quality of Life is becoming an increasingly important measure of the impact of psychiatric disorders and is now recognized as useful in the healthcare evaluation of patients with psychiatric disorders. The aim of this review was to document and analyze the research data on quality of life in Nigerian patients with psychiatric disorders. The electronic databases, Medline and Pubmed were searched for published articles on quality of life in Nigerian patients with psychiatric disorders. A total of 6 studies met the inclusion criteria. All the studies employed the generic World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale - Brief version, which is the only quality of life instrument whose psychometric properties have been evaluated among Nigerian patients with psychiatric disorders. Some of the studies revealed that quality of life was significantly associated with socio demographic factors such marital and employment status and social support. Poor quality of life was reported to be associated with illness related factors such as co morbid medical problems, presence of anxiety and depressive symptoms and non adherence to medications. All the studies with the exception of two were conducted in centers located in South-western Nigeria. Quality of life in Nigerian patients suffering from psychiatric disorders is under-researched. There is need for more studies to prospectively investigate quality of life and associated factors among Nigerian patients with psychiatric disorders.

  16. Measuring asthma-specific quality of life: structured review.

    PubMed

    Apfelbacher, C J; Hankins, M; Stenner, P; Frew, A J; Smith, H E

    2011-04-01

    Measuring quality of life (QoL) has become an increasingly important dimension of assessing patient well-being and drug efficacy. As there are now several asthma QoL questionnaires to choose from, it is important to appreciate their strengths and weaknesses. To assist in this choice, we have reviewed the existing questionnaires in a structured way. Information relating to the conceptual and measurement model, reliability, validity, interpretability, burden, administration format and translations was extracted from the published literature. The instruments differ in almost all criteria considered, and therefore it cannot be assumed that they measure the same thing. We recommend the selection of questionnaires that are designed only for asthma and that do not assess symptoms as part of QoL. Only two of the questionnaires reviewed fulfill these requirements: the Sydney Asthma QoL Questionnaire (AQLQ-S) and the Living with Asthma Questionnaire (LWAQ). However, for multinational studies, it may be convenient or practical to use questionnaires that have been linguistically validated in many languages (AQLQ-J, SGRQ). It remains unclear which of these questionnaires best reflects patient perceptions of QoL. Our review did not involve patients, so for the time being choosing from existing questionnaires requires a compromise based on the rigor of the development process and the target patient group.

  17. Quality-of-life policing Do offenders get the message?

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Andrew; Johnson, Bruce D.; Taylor, Angela; Eterno, John

    2013-01-01

    In the 1990s, the New York City Police Department expanded its focus on reducing behaviors that detract from the overall quality of life (QOL) in the city. Many have credited this effort for the decline in the city’s overall crime rate. They often cite the fixing broken windows argument, which maintains that reducing disorder sets off a chain of events leading to less crime. However, systematic research has not yet documented this chain of events. Looks at one of the first linkages, whether QOL policing sends a message to offenders not to engage in disorderly behaviors in public locales. The project interviewed 539 New York City arrestees in 1999. Almost all of them were aware that police were targeting various disorderly behaviors. Among those that engaged in disorderly behaviors, about half reported that they had stopped or cut back in the past six months. They reported a police presence was the most important factor behind their behavioral changes. These findings support the idea that QOL policing has a deterrent effect. PMID:24431981

  18. [Active surveillance in prostate cancer and quality of life].

    PubMed

    Dominguez Escrig, Jose L; Romero, Rocio

    2014-06-01

    Active surveillance was born as a therapeutic strategy for a well selected group of patients with low risk prostate cancer with the aim to defer or completely avoid the negative impact of secondary effects of curative therapies. Nevertheless, the patient who chooses this treatment does it at the expense of greater anxiety and doubts about the possible progression of the disease. The main psychological features influencing the quality of life of these patients are, on one hand anxiety, due to the uncertainty and fear to disease progression, and on the other hand, the difficult decision making process. Among the factors that seem to influence the election are: urologist's recommendation, effects on urinary function, age and impact of the therapy on sexual function. In the timorous journey walked, it is recommended to apply psycho-educational programs, with the objective of increasing the perceived control and adaptive confrontation. We propose an intervention with 4 group sessions, the objectives of which would be first to improve the decision making process and diminish the fear to progression and, second to reinforce the information already given at the time of diagnosis and increase the sensation of control, e.g promoting healthy habits.

  19. Quality of life among adults with confirmed dengue in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Celina Maria Turchi; Nascimento, Nazareth Elias; Suaya, Jose A; Siqueira, Joao Bosco; Souza, Wayner Vieira; Turchi, Marilia Dalva; Guilarde, Adriana Oliveira; Peres, Joao Borges; Shepard, Donald S

    2011-10-01

    The main objective of this study was to measure the quality of life (QoL) during a dengue episode. We conducted a facility-based survey in central Brazil in 2005 and recruited 372 laboratory-confirmed dengue patients greater than 12 years of age in hospital and ambulatory settings. We administered the World Health Organization QoL instrument approximately 15 days after the onset of symptoms. We used principal component analysis with varimax rotation to identify domains related to QoL. The median age of interviewees was 36 years. Most (85%) reported their general health status as very good or good before the dengue episode. Although ambulatory patients were mainly classified as having dengue fever, 44.8% of hospitalized patients had dengue hemorrhagic fever or intermediate dengue. Principal component analysis identified five principal components related to cognition, sleep and energy, mobility, self-care, pain, and discomfort, which explained 73% of the variability of the data matrix. Hospitalized patients had significantly lower mean scores for dimensions cognition, self-care, and pain than ambulatory patients. This investigation documented the generally poor QoL during a dengue episode caused by the large number of domains affected and significant differences between health care settings.

  20. Health-related quality of life in emphysema.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Robert M; Ries, Andrew L

    2008-05-01

    Patients with emphysema may experience reduced health-related quality of life (HRQOL). HRQOL measures have evolved from two different measurement traditions: psychometric theory and decision theory. Psychometric methods typically create a profile of outcomes, whereas decision theory methods offer a summary score on a continuum ranging from 0.0 (for death or worst possible health) to 1.0 (for best possible health). Decision theory methods are better suited for cost-effectiveness studies. Generic HRQOL measures can be applied to any disease population, whereas disease-targeted measures are tailored to a specific clinical condition. Disease-targeted measures are typically more sensitive to clinical change, but cannot offer a comparison basis for different clinical conditions. This article reviews the measurement of HRQOL in patients with emphysema. The National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) offers an example of the application of both generic and disease-targeted, as well as profile and decision theory, methods. The NETT illustrates how HRQOL measures can be used to assess outcomes and estimate cost-effectiveness in a major clinical trial.

  1. Texercise Effectiveness: Impacts on Physical Functioning and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Ory, Marcia G; Smith, Matthew Lee; Jiang, Luohua; Howell, Doris; Chen, Shuai; Pulczinski, Jairus C; Stevens, Alan B

    2015-10-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of Texercise Select, a 12-week lifestyle program to improve physical functioning (as measured by gait speed) and quality of life. Baseline and 12-week follow-up assessments were collected from 220 enrollees who were older (mean = 75 years), predominantly female (85%), White (82%), and experiencing multiple comorbidities (mean = 2.4). Linear mixed-models were fitted for continuous outcome variables and GEE models with logit link function for binary outcome variables. At baseline, over 52% of participants had Timed Up-and-Go (TUG) test times of 12 s or more, which indicates below-normal performance. On average, participants showed significant reductions in TUG test scores at the postintervention (11% reduction, p < .001). Participants also showed significant improvements in general health status (p = .002), unhealthy physical days (p = .032), combined unhealthy physical and mental days (p = .006), and days limited from usual activity (p = .045). Findings suggest that performance indicators can be objectively collected and integrated into evaluation designs of community-based, activity-rich lifestyle programs.

  2. Quality of Life for Patients in Medical-Surgical Wards.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muayyad M; Al-Daken, Laila Ismae'l; Ahmad, Huthaifa M

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the quality of life (QoL) for patients in medical-surgical wards in Jordanian hospitals. A cross-sectional design was performed. The data were collected between January and April 2011 through individual interviews (n = 746) using the Medical Outcome Study 36-item Short-Form (MOS-SF-36) and Charlson's Co-morbidity Index (CCI). The private and public hospitals in the three largest cities in Jordan were represented. The MANOVA test was used to examine the health status based on patients' co-morbidity level. The results showed that QoL for patients with severe co-morbidity has been affected negatively in many aspects more than both patients with no co-morbidity and patients with mild co-morbidity. However, although it is difficult to change the demographic characteristics, it is possible to improve the health status of patients with multiple co-morbidities, which will result in having a better QoL.

  3. Quality of Life among Adults with Confirmed Dengue in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, Celina Maria Turchi; Nascimento, Nazareth Elias; Suaya, Jose A.; Siqueira, Joao Bosco; Souza, Wayner Vieira; Turchi, Marilia Dalva; Guilarde, Adriana Oliveira; Peres, Joao Borges; Shepard, Donald S.

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to measure the quality of life (QoL) during a dengue episode. We conducted a facility-based survey in central Brazil in 2005 and recruited 372 laboratory-confirmed dengue patients greater than 12 years of age in hospital and ambulatory settings. We administered the World Health Organization QoL instrument approximately 15 days after the onset of symptoms. We used principal component analysis with varimax rotation to identify domains related to QoL. The median age of interviewees was 36 years. Most (85%) reported their general health status as very good or good before the dengue episode. Although ambulatory patients were mainly classified as having dengue fever, 44.8% of hospitalized patients had dengue hemorrhagic fever or intermediate dengue. Principal component analysis identified five principal components related to cognition, sleep and energy, mobility, self-care, pain, and discomfort, which explained 73% of the variability of the data matrix. Hospitalized patients had significantly lower mean scores for dimensions cognition, self-care, and pain than ambulatory patients. This investigation documented the generally poor QoL during a dengue episode caused by the large number of domains affected and significant differences between health care settings. PMID:21976580

  4. Obstructive sleep apnea and the quality of life.

    PubMed

    Głebocka, A; Kossowska, A; Bednarek, M

    2006-09-01

    Patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are unaware of clinical symptoms, such as cessation of breathing during sleep, decrease in blood oxygen levels, severe sleep fragmentation, and excessive daytime sleepiness. Equally worrying is a low level of knowledge among physicians, psychiatrists, and psychologists of the intellectual and emotional impact of OSA. The illness may lead to anxiety, depression, psychosis, and other pathological symptoms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate relationships among OSA, quality of life, and psychological performance. STAI, UMACL, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Framingham Type A Scale, the Courtauld Emotional Control Scale (CECS), the Life Orientation Test - Revised (LOT-R), and the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) were applied. The tests were used to describe the well-being and pathological symptoms, such as depression or anxiety, in a clinical group (newly-diagnosed, untreated OSA patients) in comparison with a control group (healthy volunteers). The results of the tests failed to substantiate the presence of significant differences between the clinical and control groups. We put forward a hypothesis that the rather unexpected lack of psychological differences might stem from a rapid mood improvement in OSA patients on anticipation of being diagnosed and taken care of in the hospital setting. Followed-up studies in the same patients are required to confirm this hypothesis.

  5. The Impact of Visual Impairment on Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    KHORRAMI-NEJAD, Masoud; SARABANDI, Amin; AKBARI, Mohammad-Reza; ASKARIZADEH, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    Our goal was to identify and describe factors relating to quality of life (QOL) in subjects with low vision and blindness in Iran's Sistan and Baluchestan Province. This cross-sectional study was carried out in randomly selected subjects with vision disability who were covered by the Zahedan Welfare Organization in Zahedan, Iran. The following factors related to visual impairment were evaluated: visual field (VF), visual acuity (VA), and stereopsis. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and the Influence of Vision Impairment (IVI) questionnaire. One-hundred and twenty-one patients were enrolled for participation in the study. T-test analyses indicated that the mean QOL score for women was significantly lower than that for men (P < 0.001). Mann-Whitney U tests indicated that mean social (P = 0.003) and leisure (P = 0.009) QOL scores were significantly lower in participants without stereopsis. In addition, participants with tunnel vision scored lower on the mobility and self-care categories (P < 0.001) than others. The results of this study indicate that providing education, providing employment, improving, and expanding social programs for the blind and individuals with low vision people, especially women, are necessary. PMID:28293655

  6. Quality of life before and after septoplasty and rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    Subjective assessment of quality of life (QOL) as an important aspect of outcomes research has received increasing importance during the past decades. QOL is measured with standardized questionnaires which had been tested with regard to reliability, validity, and sensitivity. Surgical procedures of the nasal septum (septoplasty) and the external nose (rhinoplasty) are frequently performed. Since many years subjectively assessed results of these operations have been reported in the literature. However, validated QOL instruments were applied only for one decade. Beforehand, measurements were performed using retrospective assessment of satisfaction or visual analogue scales. Prospective application of validated disease-specific and general measuring instruments has to be demanded for future studies. Most of the septoplasty patients as well as most of the rhinoplasty patients evaluate the operation being successful. However, a relevant number of patients is not satisfied with the result of surgery. In this context, QOL instruments have the potential to identify further factors influencing the outcome. Especially in rhinoplasty patients, special attention has to be drawn on potential psychosocial effects of the operation. PMID:22073110

  7. Quality of life after surgery of the alimentary tract.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, Marco

    2010-10-28

    In recent decades, patient-reported outcomes have become important in clinical medicine. Nowadays, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is considered a primary outcome in many clinical trials, and it is often the major criterion for judging treatment success. At the beginning of the 21st century, morbidity and mortality rates after surgery of the alimentary tract have dropped dramatically and they can no longer be considered the only outcome measures to determine the success of a surgical procedure. QOL can yield a definitely more patient-orientated measure of outcome that provides us with a more formal measure of the patient's judgment and desires, which can influence treatment decisions. Nevertheless, despite a very large number of published papers on HRQOL, there is some skepticism on the value of HRQOL and other patient-related outcomes. Therefore, this topic highlight aims to assess how QOL after surgery of the alimentary tract is covered in the medical literature. Different reviews have analyzed the topic according to different points of view: benign and malignant disease; curative and palliative treatment; open and minimally invasive surgical approach; traditional and newly introduced surgical procedures. This topic highlight does not aim to cover all the possible diseases or different surgical procedures, but it does describe the different approaches in order to give the reader a broad spectrum of analysis of QOL after surgery. This quick overview could stimulate the reader to form his/her own opinion about how to use this primary outcome measure.

  8. Assessment of Functional Status and Quality of Life in Claudication

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Ryan J.; Casserly, Ivan P.; Kohrt, Wendy M.; Ho, P. Michael; Hiatt, William R.; Nehler, Mark R.; Regensteiner, Judith G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Treadmill walking is commonly used to evaluate walking impairment and efficacy of treatment for intermittent claudication (IC) in clinical and research settings. Although this is an important measure, it does not provide information about how patients perceive the effects of their treatments on more global measures of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Methods PubMed/Medline was searched to find publications about the most commonly used questionnaires to assess functional status and/or general and disease-specific HRQOL in patients with PAD who experience IC. Inclusion criteria for questionnaires were based on existence of a body of literature in symptomatic PAD. Results Six general questionnaires and 7 disease-specific questionnaires are included with details about the number of domains covered and how each tool is scored. The Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 item questionnaire and Walking Impairment Questionnaire are currently the most used general and disease-specific questionnaires at baseline and following treatment for IC, respectively. Conclusions The use of tools which assess functional status and HRQOL has importance in both the clinical and research areas to assess treatment efficacy from the patient perspective. Therefore, assessing HRQOL in addition to treadmill-measured walking ability provides insight as to effects of treatments on patient outcomes and may help guide therapy. PMID:21334172

  9. Children's quality of life in a noisy world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte-Fortkamp, Brigitte

    2004-05-01

    On 30 April 2003 during the International Forum Noise Awareness Day European experts from the fields of medicine, acoustics, sociology, psychology, city planning, and traffic regulation led the current discussion on the risks of noise pollution for children at the Institute of Technical Acoustics at the Berlin Technical University, Germany. Studies probing into the negative effects of noise exposure upon the psychic, cognitive, and emotional functions of children are of a quite recent date. Even the quality of life of children as auto-directed experience and functionality is only now starting to get recognized; of special interest are the changes in self-awareness, performance, and health. The Forum focused upon methodological reflections for the collection of data as well as studies regarding the living conditions of children under sound exposure from different perspectives. In this context the research of sound effects has taken initial tentative steps to break away from the tried-and-true procedures of the last 30 years. Next to applied science, investigating fundamentals will need to be considered. Aiming at a networking process is one of the goals conducting the ``Tag gegen Lrm-International Noise Awareness Day.''

  10. Comorbidities, Social Impact, and Quality of Life in Tourette Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eapen, Valsamma; Cavanna, Andrea E; Robertson, Mary M

    2016-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is more than having motor and vocal tics, and this review will examine the varied comorbidities as well as the social impact and quality of life (QoL) in individuals with TS. The relationship between any individual and his/her environment is complex, and this is further exaggerated in the case of a person with TS. For example, tics may play a significant role in shaping the person's experiences, perceptions, and interactions with the environment. Furthermore, associated clinical features, comorbidities, and coexisting psychopathologies may compound or alter this relationship. In this regard, the common comorbidities include attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and disruptive behaviors, obsessive compulsive disorder, and autism spectrum disorder, and coexistent problems include anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem, which can all lead to poorer psychosocial functioning and QoL. Thus, the symptoms of TS and the associated comorbid conditions may interact to result in a vicious cycle or a downward spiraling of negative experiences and poor QoL. The stigma and social maladjustment in TS and the social exclusion, bullying, and discrimination are considered to be caused in large part by misperceptions of the disorder by teachers, peers, and the wider community. Improved community and professional awareness about TS and related comorbidities and other psychopathologies as well as the provision of multidisciplinary services to meet the complex needs of this clinical population are critical. Future research to inform the risk and resilience factors for successful long-term outcomes is also warranted.

  11. Quality of life measurement in patients with oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Blazeby, J M; Williams, M H; Brookes, S T; Alderson, D; Farndon, J R

    1995-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) measurement may aid decision making in the treatment of patients with oesophageal cancer but must be clinically valid to be useful. This study considered if the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL questionnaire, the QLQ-C30, showed differing results in two clinically distinct groups of patients with oesophageal cancer and also investigated the correlation between dysphagia grade and various scales of QOL. Patients treated by oesophagectomy reported significantly better physical, emotional, cognitive, and global health scores than those in the palliative treatment group. Patients who received palliative treatment had significantly worse pain, fatigue, appetite loss, constipation, and dysphagia. The correlations between dysphagia grade and each of the QOL scales and items in both groups of patients were poor. This questionnaire differentiates clearly between the two clinically distinct groups of patients, but to be an entirely appropriate indicator of QOL in patients with oesophageal cancer, an additional specific oesophageal module including a dysphagia scale is required. PMID:7489936

  12. Quality of Life Following Endoscopic Resection of Skull Base Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cavel, Oren; Abergel, Avraham; Margalit, Nevo; Fliss, Dan M.; Gil, Ziv

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate patients' quality of life (QOL) after endoscopic resection of skull base tumors. We estimated the QOL of 41 patients who underwent surgery for removal of skull base tumors via the expanded endonasal approach (EEA). The Anterior Skull Base Surgery Questionnaire (ASBS-Q), a multidimensional, disease-specific instrument containing 36 items was used. The rate of meningitis and cerebrospinal fluid leak was 1.4 and 0%, respectively. There was one case of uniocular visual impairment. The internal consistency of the instrument had a correlation coefficient (α-Cronbach score) of 0.8 to 0.92. Of 41 patients, 30 (75%) reported improvement or no change in overall QOL. Improved scores were reported in the physical function domain and worse scores in the specific symptoms domain. The most significant predictor of poor QOL was female gender, which led to a significant decrease in scores of all domains. Site of surgery, histology, age and comorbidity were not significant predictors of outcome. This paper further validates the use of the ASBS-Q for patients undergoing endoscopic skull base resection. The overall QOL of patients following endoscopic extirpation of skull base tumors is good. Female patients experience a significant decline in QOL compared with males. PMID:23542557

  13. Neurofibromatosis: relinquishing the masks; a quest for quality of life.

    PubMed

    Messner, R; Smith, M N

    1986-07-01

    Neurofibromatosis (NF) or von Recklinghausen's disease is mankind's most common neurologic genetic disorder, occurring in one of every 3000 live births. While many individuals with NF suffer disfiguring, disabling, or life-threatening complications, NF is extremely variable in its symptoms, intensity, and progression. For many of its victims, NF is a pseudonym for uncertainty and physical and psychosocial havoc. John Merrick, 'The Elephant Man', endured one of the most severe cases of NF ever recorded. Merrick's rejection by post-Dickensian England forced him to become a sideshow circus attraction just to survive. The essence of nursing intervention with NF patients and their families engaged in the quest for quality of life is to restore them to optimal physical and psychosocial functioning, and, ideally, to help them utilize the experience for growth. Many individuals respond to the frustration of NF and society's reactions to the disorder by the wearing of psychological masks. Likewise, nurses may wear emotional masks as a defence against their own discomfort and fears concerning the disorders. Comprehensive nursing management of NF is realized only as nurses and patients relinquish their respective masks. This article examines the nurse's role in genetic disorders with special considerations presented by NF. Adaptation to NF involves coping with NF and its accompanying sequelae and coping with life as it is affected by NF. The concepts of 'chromosomal coping', 'genetophobia', 'genetic guilt, and 'genetic overload syndrome' are presented and analyzed utilizing the theoretical nursing frameworks of Imogene King and Sister Callista Roy.

  14. Children's quality of life in a noisy world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte-Fortkamp, Brigitte

    2001-05-01

    On 30 April 2003 during the International Forum Noise Awareness Day European experts from the fields of medicine, acoustics, sociology, psychology, city planning, and traffic regulation led the current discussion on the risks of noise pollution for children at the Institute of Technical Acoustics at the Berlin Technical University, Germany. Studies probing into the negative effects of noise exposure upon the psychic, cognitive, and emotional functions of children are of a quite recent date. Even the quality of life of children as auto-directed experience and functionality is only now starting to get recognized; of special interest are the changes in self-awareness, performance, and health. The Forum focused upon methodological reflections for the collection of data as well as studies regarding the living conditions of children under sound exposure from different perspectives. In this context the research of sound effects has taken initial tentative steps to break away from the tried-and-true procedures of the last 30 years. Next to applied science, investigating fundamentals will need to be considered. Aiming at a networking process is one of the goals conducting the ``Tag gegen Lrm-International Noise Awareness Day.''

  15. Living with diabetes: quality of care and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Pera, Pilar Isla

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of this research was to characterize the experience of living with diabetes mellitus (DM) and identify patients’ opinions of the quality of care received and the results of interventions. Methods: A descriptive, exploratory evaluation study using qualitative methodology was performed. Participants consisted of 40 adult patients diagnosed with DM and followed up in a public hospital in Barcelona, Spain. A semistructured interview and a focus group were used and a thematic content analysis was performed. Results: Patients described DM as a disease that is difficult to control and that provokes lifestyle changes requiring effort and sacrifice. Insulin treatment increased the perception of disease severity. The most frequent and dreaded complication was hypoglycemia. The main problems perceived by patients affecting the quality of care were related to a disease-centered medical approach, lack of information, limited participation in decision-making, and the administrative and bureaucratic problems of the health care system. Conclusion: The bureaucratic circuits of the health care system impair patients’ quality of life and perceived quality of care. Health professionals should foster patient participation in decision-making. However, this requires not only training and appropriate attitudes, but also adequate staffing and materials. PMID:21423590

  16. The Impact of Visual Impairment on Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Khorrami-Nejad, Masoud; Sarabandi, Amin; Akbari, Mohammad-Reza; Askarizadeh, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    Our goal was to identify and describe factors relating to quality of life (QOL) in subjects with low vision and blindness in Iran's Sistan and Baluchestan Province. This cross-sectional study was carried out in randomly selected subjects with vision disability who were covered by the Zahedan Welfare Organization in Zahedan, Iran. The following factors related to visual impairment were evaluated: visual field (VF), visual acuity (VA), and stereopsis. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and the Influence of Vision Impairment (IVI) questionnaire. One-hundred and twenty-one patients were enrolled for participation in the study. T-test analyses indicated that the mean QOL score for women was significantly lower than that for men (P < 0.001). Mann-Whitney U tests indicated that mean social (P = 0.003) and leisure (P = 0.009) QOL scores were significantly lower in participants without stereopsis. In addition, participants with tunnel vision scored lower on the mobility and self-care categories (P < 0.001) than others. The results of this study indicate that providing education, providing employment, improving, and expanding social programs for the blind and individuals with low vision people, especially women, are necessary.

  17. Systematic review of health-related quality of life models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A systematic literature review was conducted to (a) identify the most frequently used health-related quality of life (HRQOL) models and (b) critique those models. Methods Online search engines were queried using pre-determined inclusion and exclusion criteria. We reviewed titles, abstracts, and then full-text articles for their relevance to this review. Then the most commonly used models were identified, reviewed in tables, and critiqued using published criteria. Results Of 1,602 titles identified, 100 articles from 21 countries met the inclusion criteria. The most frequently used HRQOL models were: Wilson and Cleary (16%), Ferrans and colleagues (4%), or World Health Organization (WHO) (5%). Ferrans and colleagues’ model was a revision of Wilson and Cleary’s model and appeared to have the greatest potential to guide future HRQOL research and practice. Conclusions Recommendations are for researchers to use one of the three common HRQOL models unless there are compelling and clearly delineated reasons for creating new models. Disease-specific models can be derived from one of the three commonly used HRQOL models. We recommend Ferrans and colleagues’ model because they added individual and environmental characteristics to the popular Wilson and Cleary model to better explain HRQOL. Using a common HRQOL model across studies will promote a coherent body of evidence that will more quickly advance the science in the area of HRQOL. PMID:23158687

  18. Quality of life perception in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Petri, Cristian; Stefani, Laura; Bini, Vittorio; Maffulli, Nicola; Frau, Stefania; Mascherini, Gabriele; De Angelis, Massimiliano; Galanti, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lifestyle analysis is often used for primary and secondary prevention in many chronic metabolic diseases, including diabetes. Questionnaires are simple and common methods for first investigation risk of factors related to the perception of quality of life (QoL). The present study evaluates the feasibility to use questionnaires for first investigation of risk factors, and ascertain whether the results of such questionnaires are associated with the perception of QoL. Methods Validated questionnaires from the international ACSM guidelines were used to study a cohort of 142 consecutive type 2 diabetes patients (mean age: 66.1 years ± 10.9). Results QoL perception was normal; BMI was compatible with overweight in 79.1% of subjects, and obesity in 20.9%. Cognitive abilities decreased with age and low consumption of dried fruit and legumes. There was evidence of a statistically significant association between BMI and QoL (rho = −0.18; p = 0.03). Conclusions Questionnaires are useful to assess lifestyle habits and highlight risks factors. Poor knowledge of patients’ own chronic disease may contribute to a negative impact in diabetes. PMID:27896232

  19. Quality of life in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ghofrani, Hossein-Ardeschir; Mayer, Eckhard; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Nikkho, Sylvia; Simonneau, Gérald

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) experience debilitating symptoms that have a negative impact on their quality of life (QoL) in terms of physical capability, psychological wellbeing and social relationships. The use of QoL measurement tools is important in the assessment of treatment efficacy and in guiding treatment decisions. However, despite the importance of QoL, particularly to the patient, it remains under-reported in clinical studies of CTEPH therapy. CTEPH is unique in pulmonary hypertension in that it is potentially curable by surgery; however, a proportion of patients either have residual PH following surgery or are not operable. Although some patients with CTEPH have been treated off-label with pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific therapies, there have been few randomised controlled trials of these therapies in patients with CTEPH. Moreover, in these trials QoL outcomes are variably assessed, and there is little consistency in the tools used. Here we review the assessment of QoL in patients with CTEPH and the tools that have been used. We also discuss the effect of surgical intervention and medical therapies on QoL. We conclude that further studies of QoL in patients with CTEPH are needed to further validate the optimal QoL tools. PMID:27076580

  20. Quality of life measurement in gastrointestinal and liver disorders

    PubMed Central

    BORGAONKAR, M; IRVINE, E

    2000-01-01

    Modern medicine has had a considerable impact on mortality rates for serious illness. Many chronic diseases which have previously been associated with an increased mortality now have survival rates approaching those of the background population. However, chronic diseases such as cancer, chronic pain syndromes, and chronic inflammatory conditions impose a considerable burden on families, the health care system, and society. Health related quality of life (HRQOL) is a concept that has developed from the need to estimate the impact of such chronic diseases. HRQOL measurement is a conceptual framework which attempts to predict daily function and well being based on subjective attitudes and experiences of physical, social, and emotional health. It has been evaluated predominantly from the patient's viewpoint as proxy respondents appear to underestimate the full effect of chronic illness on functional status. Measuring HRQOL in clinical research is most frequently undertaken using multi-item questionnaires to estimate daily function. Factors which affect HRQOL can be broadly classed as disease related and disease independent. The use of different assessment techniques permits comparisons between and within disorders. Generic and disease specific instruments used together enhance the ability to direct treatment for individuals and patient populations. Psychometrically sound questionnaires must be used. However, the type of instrument and research methods adopted depend on the question of interest. We have attempted to catalogue and critically assess the disease specific instruments used in the assessment of chronic gastrointestinal disease.

 PMID:10940286

  1. Obesity in the Context of Aging: Quality of Life Considerations.

    PubMed

    Corica, Francesco; Bianchi, Giampaolo; Corsonello, Andrea; Mazzella, Natalia; Lattanzio, Fabrizia; Marchesini, Giulio

    2015-07-01

    The progressive increase in the prevalence of obesity and aging in the population is resulting in increased healthcare and disability spending. The burden of obesity is particularly relevant in old age, due to accumulating co-morbidities and changes in body composition. Sarcopenic obesity, a mix of over- and under-nutrition, causes frailty, disability, and problems in social and psychological areas, impacting overall health-related quality of life (HR-QOL). The relationship between obesity, aging, and HR-QOL is, however, much more complex than generally acknowledged and is difficult to disentangle. The impact of obesity on HR-QOL is particularly strong in young people, who are free of co-morbidities. It progressively attenuates, compared with the general population, with advancing age, when co-morbid conditions are diffusely present and reduce the perceived health status, independent of obesity. However, even this apparent 'obesity paradox' should not minimize the importance of obesity on HR-QOL, as other obesity-associated limitations and disabilities do impact HR-QOL in older age. A patient-centered approach aimed at reducing the disability and social isolation of advancing age is mandatory to improve HR-QOL in any class of obesity.

  2. Costs and quality of life in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Lucioni, Carlo; Finelli, Carlo; Mazzi, Silvio; Oliva, Esther N

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) encompass a range of myeloid neoplasms characterised by a defect in haematopoietic stem cell maturation, resulting in peripheral cytopenias. As a major consequence, most MDS patients become anaemic, so as to require red blood cell transfusions. To investigate the costs and the impact on quality of life (QOL) of MDS-separately in transfusion-independent (TI) and -dependent (TD) patients-a literature search was conducted. From Medline and Embase, 742 studies were identified, of which 17 were considered eligible. Total medical costs per patient/year range from $ 9,840 to $ 19,811 for the TI condition and from $ 29,608 to $ 51,066 in the TD condition, more than doubling when moving from the former condition to the latter. With regard to QOL, in the transition from TI to TD, QOL could be reduced by half depending on the studies. The TD condition negatively impacts on costs and the QOL of patients with MDS. Therapeutic strategies that reduce transfusion dependence may lead to broad benefits for patients and the community. PMID:23997987

  3. [Multiple sclerosis: socioeconomic effects and impact on quality of life].

    PubMed

    Ayuso, Guillermo Izquierdo

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that affects young adults. Survival is long, more than 35 years, and consequently the disease has a huge socioeconomic impact. The present article discusses the enormous difficulties of carrying out economic assessments in this field but also describes the advances made in research on this topic and the advantages of performing socioeconomic evaluations with increasingly sophisticated tools. We also discuss the need to quantify indirect and intangible costs to translate them into quality of life and subsequently into economic cost, expressed in euros in the case of Spain. The available data indicate that the enormous cost of the disease (1200 million euros per year) is due more to disability-related expenditure than to treatment, which-although expensive-does not represent more than 16-18% of the total expenditure (approximately 200 million euros per year). The increase represented by the cost of MS is not based on higher treatment expenditure but on an increase in the incidence and-especially-the prevalence of the disease. Above all, in the last few years, there has been a considerable rise in the percentage of patients with an indication for treatment. Reflection is therefore needed on the use of drug therapy in MS, since a saving in the most effective products seems to increase the overall cost of MS, while expenditure on these drugs represents a saving in the long-term.

  4. Physical activity, disability, and quality of life in older adults.

    PubMed

    Motl, Robert W; McAuley, Edward

    2010-05-01

    This article provides an overview of physical activity and its association with function, disability, and quality of life (QOL) outcomes among older adults. The rationale and the associated onset of chronic disease conditions that influence function, disability, and QOL is embedded in the "Graying of America". The literature reviewed in this article yielded 3 general conclusions: (1) there is an alarming rate of physical inactivity among older adults, particularly those aging with a disability; (2) there is strong evidence for the beneficial effects of physical activity on impairment, function, and health-related aspects of QOL among older adults, but there is less conclusive evidence for positive effects of physical activity on disability and global QOL; and (3) there is emerging support for self-efficacy as a mediator of the association between physical activity and disability, and QOL outcomes in older adults. Researchers should consider designing and testing programs that incorporate strategies for enhancing self-efficacy along with the promotion of physical activity as a means of preventing disablement and improving QOL among older adults. Such work will go a long way in identifying practical approaches that can be applied for improving the later years of life and is critical because many Americans will soon be affected by the aging of adults in the United States.

  5. Elderly quality of life impacted by traditional chinese medicine techniques

    PubMed Central

    Figueira, Helena A; Figueira, Olivia A; Figueira, Alan A; Figueira, Joana A; Giani, Tania S; Dantas, Estélio HM

    2010-01-01

    Background: The shift in age structure is having a profound impact, suggesting that the aged should be consulted as reporters on the quality of their own lives. Objectives: The aim of this research was to establish the possible impact of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) techniques on the quality of life (QOL) of the elderly. Sample: Two non-selected, volunteer groups of Rio de Janeiro municipality inhabitants: a control group (36 individuals), not using TCM, and an experimental group (28 individuals), using TCM at ABACO/Sohaku-in Institute, Brazil. Methods: A questionnaire on elderly QOL devised by the World Health Organization, the WHOQOL-Old, was adopted and descriptive statistical techniques were used: mean and standard deviation. The Shapiro–Wilk test checked the normality of the distribution. Furthermore, based on its normality distribution for the intergroup comparison, the Student t test was applied to facets 2, 4, 5, 6, and total score, and the Mann–Whitney U rank test to facets 1 and 3, both tests aiming to analyze the P value between experimental and control groups. The significance level utilized was 95% (P < 0.05). Results: The experimental group reported the highest QOL for every facet and the total score. Conclusions: The results suggest that TCM raises the level of QOL. PMID:21103400

  6. Insomnia risks and costs: health, safety, and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Rosekind, Mark R; Gregory, Kevin B

    2010-08-01

    The effect of insomnia on next-day functioning, health, safety, and quality of life results in a substantial societal burden and economic cost. The annual direct cost of insomnia has been estimated in the billions of US dollars and is attributed to the association of insomnia with the increased risk of certain psychiatric and medical comorbidities that result in increased healthcare service utilization. It is well known that psychiatric conditions, anxiety and depression in particular, are comorbid with insomnia. However, emerging data have shown links with several common and costly medical conditions such as heart disease and diabetes. Furthermore, studies show that patients who have insomnia have more emergency department and physician visits, laboratory tests, and prescription drug use than those who do not have insomnia, increasing direct and indirect consumption of healthcare resources. Insomnia also has been shown to negatively affect daytime functioning, including workplace productivity, as well as workplace and public safety. These daytime effects of insomnia are translated into indirect costs that are reportedly higher than the direct costs of this disorder. These observations have significant implications for managed care organizations and healthcare providers. Improvements in diagnosing and treating insomnia can significantly reduce the healthcare cost of insomnia and its comorbid disorders, while providing additional economic benefits from improved daytime functioning and from increased productivity.

  7. Politics drives human functioning, dignity, and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Barber, Brian K; Spellings, Carolyn; McNeely, Clea; Page, Paul D; Giacaman, Rita; Arafat, Cairo; Daher, Mahmoud; El Sarraj, Eyad; Mallouh, Mohammed Abu

    2014-12-01

    Too little is known about human functioning amidst chronic adversity. We addressed that need by studying adult Palestinians in the occupied Palestinian territories (oPt), a population that has experienced longstanding economic and political hardships. Fourteen group interviews were conducted in February, 2010 in Arabic by local fieldworkers with 68 participants representing the main stratifications of Palestinian society: gender, region, refugee status, and political affiliation. Interview tasks included each participant: describing someone doing well and not well, free listing domains of functioning, and prioritizing domains to the three most important. Thematic analyses highlighted the dominating role of the political domain of functioning (e.g., political structures, constraints, effects, identity, and activism) and the degree to which political conditions impacted all other realms of functioning (economic, education, family, psychological, etc.). The discussion links the findings to relevant theory and empirical work that has called attention to the need to include the political in frameworks of quality of life. It also emphasized that values, such as justice, rights, dignity and self-determination, that underlie political structures and policies, are key elements of human functioning. This is the case not only in the oPt, but in any society where power imbalances marginalize segments of the population.

  8. An Integrational Model of Quality of Life in Older Age. Results from the Esrc/mrc Hsrc Quality of Life Survey in Britain.(author Abstract)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowling, Ann; Gabriel, Zahava

    2004-01-01

    This paper is based on the results of a national survey of the quality of life of 999 randomly sampled people aged 65 and over, living at home in Britain. The survey was semi-structured, and a sample of survey respondents was followed up and interviewed in-depth in order to explore their perceptions of quality of life in full. Comparisons are made…

  9. [Quality of life in individuals exposed to cesium-137 in Goiânia, Goiás State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Fuini, Silvana Cruz; Souto, Rafael; Amaral, Geraldo Francisco do; Amaral, Rita Goreti

    2013-07-01

    This cross-sectional observational study in Goiânia, Goiás State, Brazil in a sample of 56% of 111 individuals exposed to cesium-137 aimed to evaluate their quality of life and associations with socio-demographic factors. The study used the WHOQOL-BREF and the Monitoring System for Radiation Victims. Participants were divided according to international criteria: Group I - radiation dermatitis and / or cytogenetic dosimetry above 20 rads (n = 33) and Group II - cytogenetic dosimetry ≤ 20 rads (n = 29), totaling 62 subjects. Among the WHOQOL-BREF domains, environment showed the highest mean scores (59.88, SD = 20.39) and psychological the lowest (53.02, SD = 17.98). Associations between the physical, psychological, and social domains were significant for the age variable. There was no difference between groups. The association between socio-demographic factors and quality of life was not significant. Radiation victims suffer considerable impact on quality of life, with persistent psychosocial problems, especially among those older than 41 years.

  10. The relationship between quality of life and coping strategies in polycystic ovary syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Kolahi, Leila; Asemi, Neda; Mirzaei, Mohammadreza; Adibi, Neda; Beiraghdar, Mina; Mehr, Asieh Maghami

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are many factors that affect the quality of life, for example, stress and the coping strategies. Polycystic ovary syndrome is a common hormonal disorder leading to menstrual disorders, hirsutism, acne, obesity, infertility and abortion. In such cases, the patients suffer from a variety of stresses and face problems in their coping strategies with life's problems which can affect the quality of life and cause psychological distress and low the quality of life. The quality of life is a descriptive term which points to health and emotional, social and physical promotion of individuals as well as their ability to perform daily living tasks. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between quality of life and coping strategies in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. Materials and Methods: To perform this study, randomly 200 women who had inclusion criteria and were referred to Ali Shariati Hospital in Isfahan were selected and responded DLQI questionnaire and Carver coping strategies and form of demographic characteristics. Results: The mean score of quality of life in the patients was 4.14 ± 5.57. It was shown that acne has no effective role on quality of life and coping strategies in contrast in hirsute and non-hirsute patients; there was a significant difference in quality of life P value < 0.001). Also there is a significant relationship between the quality of life and coping strategies (problem solving, cognitive, emotional and social support) (P < 0.05) and quality of life has the highest correlation with emotional strategies (r = 0.46). Conclusion: According to results of this study, patients with PCOS are at risk pcychologicla disorders that may be led to decrease of quality of life. Thus this patients need to support by oppositions strategies. Also not only physical treatment but also psychological surveillance especially social support must be done for them. PMID:26436082

  11. Measuring health-related quality of life in tuberculosis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Na; Marra, Fawziah; Marra, Carlo A

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis remains a major public health problem worldwide. In recent years, increasing efforts have been dedicated to assessing the health-related quality of life experienced by people infected with tuberculosis. The objectives of this study were to better understand the impact of tuberculosis and its treatment on people's quality of life, and to review quality of life instruments used in current tuberculosis research. Methods A systematic literature search from 1981 to 2008 was performed through a number of electronic databases as well as a manual search. Eligible studies assessed multi-dimensional quality of life in people with tuberculosis disease or infection using standardized instruments. Results of the included studies were summarized qualitatively. Results Twelve original studies met our criteria for inclusion. A wide range of quality of life instruments were involved, and the Short-Form 36 was most commonly used. A validated tuberculosis-specific quality of life instrument was not located. The findings showed that tuberculosis had a substantial and encompassing impact on patients' quality of life. Overall, the anti-tuberculosis treatment had a positive effect of improving patients' quality of life; their physical health tended to recover more quickly than the mental well-being. However, after the patients successfully completed treatment and were microbiologically 'cured', their quality of life remained significantly worse than the general population. Conclusion Tuberculosis has substantially adverse impacts on patients' quality of life, which persist after microbiological 'cure'. A variety of instruments were used to assess quality of life in tuberculosis and there has been no well-established tuberculosis-specific instrument, making it difficult to fully understand the impact of the illness. PMID:19224645

  12. Health-related quality of life after liver transplantation for adult recipients.

    PubMed

    Bownik, Hillary; Saab, Sammy

    2009-11-01

    1. Pretransplantation health-related quality of life scores are affected by the etiology of liver cirrhosis, with hepatocellular and cholestatic etiologies having higher health-related quality of life scores than alcohol or viral hepatitis etiologies. 2. Posttransplantation health-related quality of life scores are not affected by the etiology of the original liver cirrhosis, but transplant recipient scores continue to remain significantly lower than those of healthy patient controls. 3. During the first 6 months after liver transplantation, the majority of physical and mental components of health-related quality of life scores improve, but these increases are not sustained in the long term. 4. At 1 year after liver transplantation, emotional and mental health-related quality of life scores begin to decrease. 5. During postoperative years 1 to 5, episodes of acute cellular rejection and patient age over 60 years decrease physical function and overall general health-related quality of life scores. 6. Beyond 5 years after orthotopic liver transplantation, age over 60, osteoporosis, and episodes of chronic rejection decrease health-related quality of life scores through decreases in the physical function and bodily pain domains. 7. Hepatitis C as an indication for liver transplantation is an independent factor in decreasing posttransplantation health-related quality of life scores. 8. Further studies are necessary that include a complete evaluation of the effects of gender, socioeconomic status, education, and ethnicity in order to better understand factors influencing post-liver transplantation health-related quality of life scores. 9. The development of a health-related quality of life assessment tool specific to transplantation could help us to more accurately assess factors (such as immunosuppression) that alter posttransplantation health-related quality of life.

  13. The impact of podoconiosis on quality of life in Northern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Podoconiosis is one of the most neglected tropical diseases, which untreated, causes considerable physical disability and stigma for affected individuals. Little is known about the quality of life (QoL) of patients with podoconiosis. This study aimed to assess the QoL of patients with podoconiosis in comparison with healthy controls in Ethiopia. Methods A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted in May 2012, among 346 clinically confirmed adult patients with podoconiosis, and 349 healthy adult neighbourhood controls in Dembecha woreda (district) in northern Ethiopia. QoL was assessed using the validated Amharic version of the World Health Organisation Quality of Life questionnaire (WHOQoL-BREF) scale; in addition, mental health and stigma were assessed by the Kessler-10 scale and podoconiosis stigma scale respectively. Logistic regression analysis was done to identify factors associated with QoL. Results Patients with podoconiosis had significantly lower mean overall QoL than the controls (52.05 versus 64.39), and this was also true in all four sub domains (physical, psychological, social and environmental). Controls were 7 times more likely to have high (above median) QoL (Odds Ratio = 6.74, 95% Confidence Interval 4.62 to 9.84) than cases. Factors associated with lower QoL were: experiencing high levels of stigma, living in an urban area, being illiterate, having additional co-morbidities, and being unmarried. Mental illness was associated with lower scores in psychological and physical domains. Conclusions Programs targeting podoconiosis interventions should include QoL as an indicator for monitoring progress. Interventions targeting improvement of QoL among patients with podoconiosis should address depression, stigma and other co-morbidities. PMID:23866905

  14. Quality of life evaluation of children with sleep bruxism

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The study of potential factors associated with sleep bruxism (SB) may help in determining the etiology of such parafunction. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the quality of life (QoL) of children with SB by means of a generic scale, in addition to the association of sociodemographic characteristics and other parafunctional habits. Methods This cross-sectional study included healthy children of both genders, aged 7.18 ± 0.59 years, with (n = 25) and without (n = 69) signs and symptoms of SB. Data were collected in caries-free children from public schools by applying a translated and validated version of the Autoquestionnaire Qualite de Vie Enfant Image (AUQUEI), clinical examination and interview with the parents. The psychometric properties evaluated for the scale referred to internal consistency (ceiling and floor effects, Cronbach's Alpha coefficient, Items Correlation Matrix, and corrected Item-Total Correlation) and the discriminant validity (t-test). By means of logistic regression with stepwise backward elimination, associations were evaluated between SB and age, gender, body mass index, maternal use of alcohol/tobacco/medicine during pregnancy, maternal age at birth, parent's schooling, presence of sucking habit, nail biting, enuresis, number of children, child's order (first born), occurrence of divorce/parent's death, and AUQUEI scores. Results The results of the AUQUEI psychometric analysis showed homogeneity of items and a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.65; no negative correlations between the items were found. The mean AUQUEI scores for children with SB did not differ significantly from those of children without the parafunction. Only the independent variable "maternal age at birth" showed a significant negative association with SB. Conclusions In the studied sample, children with SB presented scores of QoL that were similar to those without the parafunction, and children from the youngest mothers were more likely to present SB. PMID

  15. Sensory Impairment and Health-Related Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    KWON, Hye-Jin; KIM, Ji-su; KIM, Yoon-jung; KWON, Su-jin; YU, Jin-Na

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sensory impairment is a common condition that exerts negative effects on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in the elderly. This study aimed to determine the relationship between sensory impairment and HRQoL and identify sensory-specific differences in the HRQoL of elderly. Methods: This study used data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey V (2010–2012), analyzing 5,260 subjects over 60 years of age who completed ophthalmic and otologic examinations. Vision and hearing impairment were measured and classified. HRQoL was determined according to the European QoL five dimension test (EQ-5D). Multivariate logistic regression analysis and analysis of covariance were performed to identify relationships between sensory impairment and HRQoL dimensions as well as differences in HRQoL scores. Results: In the final adjusted multivariate model, there was a statistically higher proportion of those with dual sensory impairment who reported problems with mobility (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.45–5.03), usual activities (aOR 2.32, 95% CI 1.16–4.64), and pain/discomfort among EQ-5D subcategories (aOR 1.79, 95% CI 1.07–2.97). In the EQ-5D dimensions, the means and standard deviations of vision impairment (0.86 [0.01]) and dual sensory impairment (0.84 [0.02]) appeared meaningfully lower than those for no sensory impairment (0.88 [0.00]) or hearing impairment (0.88 [0.01]); P = .02). Conclusion: Sensory impairment reduces HRQoL in the elderly. Improvement of HRQoL in the elderly thus requires regular screening and appropriate management of sensory impairment. PMID:26258089

  16. Health-related quality of life in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fisk, John D.; Patten, Scott B.; Tremlett, Helen; Wolfson, Christina; Warren, Sharon; Fiest, Kirsten M.; McKay, Kyla A.; Marrie, Ruth Ann

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the direct and indirect influences of physical comorbidity, symptoms of depression and anxiety, fatigue, and disability on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: A large (n = 949) sample of adults with MS was recruited from 4 Canadian MS clinics. HRQoL was assessed using the patient-reported Health Utilities Index Mark 3. Expanded Disability Status Scale scores, physical comorbidity, depression, anxiety, and fatigue were evaluated as predictors of HRQoL in a cross-sectional path analysis. Results: All predictors were significantly associated with HRQoL and together accounted for a large proportion of variance (63%). Overall, disability status most strongly affected HRQoL (β = −0.52) but it was closely followed by depressive symptoms (β = −0.50). The direct associations of physical comorbidity and anxiety with HRQoL were small (β = −0.08 and −0.10, respectively), but these associations were stronger when indirect effects through other variables (depression, fatigue) were also considered (physical comorbidity: β = −0.20; anxiety: β = −0.34). Conclusions: Increased disability, depression and anxiety symptoms, fatigue, and physical comorbidity are associated with decreased HRQoL in MS. Disability most strongly diminishes HRQoL and, thus, interventions that reduce disability are expected to yield the most substantial improvement in HRQoL. Yet, interventions targeting other factors amenable to change, particularly depression but also anxiety, fatigue, and physical comorbidities, may all result in meaningful improvements in HRQoL, as well. Our findings point to the importance of further research confirming the efficacy of such interventions. PMID:26962068

  17. Population, environment dynamics, poverty and quality of life in China.

    PubMed

    Gu, B

    1996-12-01

    This article focuses on the growth in poverty, environmental concerns, and Chinese government efforts to eliminate poverty with integrated programs. China had 1.2 billion people in February 1995, or 20% of total world population on 7% of the world's arable land. The rate of natural increase was 1.1% in 1996. China's population could double to 2.4 billion by 2060. About 14 million people are added every year. China has about 300 million women of childbearing age. Even with 1 child per woman, population would grow by 300 million. 18 provinces have population growth over the national average of 1.49%. Many of these provinces are also provinces with high population density, high poverty ratios, and higher than 2 birth orders. The highest growth is in western China. Poor households have a lower quality of life, more disabled members, high rates of endemic disease, and illiteracy. Among the very poor without adequate food or clothing, environmental protection is a meaningless concept. Poverty alleviation strategies have shifted from relief to economic development. State support combined with local resources in a pooling approach pays for poverty alleviation programs. The central government's share will increase until the year 2000. The number of poor was 80 million in 1994 (9% of total population) living in 592 poor counties in remote and mountainous areas. The number of poor was reduced to 65 million in 1996. An integrated approach of family planning and poverty alleviation operates in Jinzhai County of Anhui province. China is determined to reorient to a "service-oriented, client- centered, woman-sensitive, and rural-emphasized approach."

  18. Intensive Hemodialysis and Health-Related Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Michael A; Fluck, Richard J; Weinhandl, Eric D; Kansal, Sheru; Copland, Michael; Komenda, Paul; Finkelstein, Fredric O

    2016-11-01

    Diminished health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is common in dialysis patients and associated with increased risks for morbidity and mortality. Patients may present limitations in both physical and mental HRQoL. Poor physical HRQoL may be defined by limited physical function, role limitations due to physical health, dissatisfaction with physical ability, and impaired mobility. Sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea, restless legs, and fatigue are typical manifestations of poor physical HRQoL in dialysis patients. Poor mental HRQoL may be defined by depressive thinking, lack of positive affect, anxiety, and feelings of social isolation. The prevalence of depression is high in dialysis patients. Intensive hemodialysis (HD) can positively address HRQoL. In 3 randomized clinical trials, relative to conventional HD, intensive HD increased physical and mental component summary scores from the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), although individual treatment effects of daily nocturnal HD were not statistically significant. In another large prospective study, initiation of short daily HD therapy was followed after 12 months by improvements in all SF-36 domains, sleep quality, and restless legs symptoms. In a small study of nocturnal HD, apnea and hypopnea episodes per hour decreased by almost 70% after conversion from conventional HD. Intensive HD is also associated with a large reduction in postdialysis recovery time. In contrast, 2 randomized clinical trials failed to demonstrate statistically significant effects of intensive HD on the Beck Depression Inventory score despite a significant decrease in Beck Depression Inventory score in the prospective study of short daily HD. Furthermore, intensive HD may not improve objective physical performance and can increase burden on caregivers in the home setting. In conclusion, intensive HD potentially can address both physical and mental aspects of poor HRQoL relative to conventional HD. However, more studies

  19. Psychological symptoms and quality of life among residents ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Objective: Elevated levels of air manganese (air-Mn) exposure have been associated with adverse health effects. This study examined the relationship of air-Mn concentrations with mood and quality of life.Participants and methods: 185 residents (age mean (M)=55.13±10.88; education yrs M=13.77±2.60; residence yrs M=41.01±16.91) exposed to long-term air-Mn from two Ohio towns, and 90 residents (age M=55.53±10.96; education yrs M=15.18±3.04; residence yrs M=33.59±17.25) from an unexposed Ohio town completed the Healthy Days Measures of the BRFSS, and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R). In the SCL-90-R, “caseness” is defined as at least two symptom dimensions at or above 90th percentile of the normative population. Air-Mn concentrations were estimated over ten years using the U.S. EPA’s AERMOD dispersion model. ANCOVA, chi-square and regression analyses were used with years of residence and education as covariates.Results: The exposed towns had proportionally more residents with ≥2 elevated SCL-90-R dimensions (“cases”) than the unexposed town (χ²=3.602, p=.058). Air-Mn concentrations were associated with higher levels of Anxiety (β=.162, p=.031) and higher Positive Symptom Distress (β=.147, p=.048). Obsessive-compulsive (β=.137, p=.071) and Psychoticism (β=.136, p=.072) approached significance. Air-Mn concentrations were associated with poor mental health in the past 30 days (β=.168, p=.026). Exposed “case” residents compared to

  20. Dispositional optimism and terminal decline in global quality of life.

    PubMed

    Zaslavsky, Oleg; Palgi, Yuval; Rillamas-Sun, Eileen; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Schnall, Eliezer; Woods, Nancy F; Cochrane, Barbara B; Garcia, Lorena; Hingle, Melanie; Post, Stephen; Seguin, Rebecca; Tindle, Hilary; Shrira, Amit

    2015-06-01

    We examined whether dispositional optimism relates to change in global quality of life (QOL) as a function of either chronological age or years to impending death. We used a sample of 2,096 deceased postmenopausal women from the Women's Health Initiative clinical trials who were enrolled in the 2005-2010 Extension Study and for whom at least 1 global QOL and optimism measure were analyzed. Growth curve models were examined. Competing models were contrasted using model fit criteria. On average, levels of global QOL decreased with both higher age and closer proximity to death (e.g., M(score) = 7.7 eight years prior to death vs. M(score) = 6.1 one year prior to death). A decline in global QOL was better modeled as a function of distance to death (DtD) than as a function of chronological age (Bayesian information criterion [BIC](DtD) = 22,964.8 vs. BIC(age) = 23,322.6). Optimism was a significant correlate of both linear (estimate(DtD) = -0.01, SE(DtD) = 0.005; ρ = 0.004) and quadratic (estimate(DtD) = -0.006, SE(DtD) = 0.002; ρ = 0.004) terminal decline in global QOL so that death-related decline in global QOL was steeper among those with a high level of optimism than those with a low level of optimism. We found that dispositional optimism helps to maintain positive psychological perspective in the face of age-related decline. Optimists maintain higher QOL compared with pessimists when death-related trajectories were considered; however, the gap between those with high optimism and those with low optimism progressively attenuated with closer proximity to death, to the point that is became nonsignificant at the time of death.

  1. Measuring quality of life impairment in skeletal muscle channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, V A; Ricci, C; Montanari, M; Apolone, G; Rose, M; Meola, G

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Fatigue and pain have been previously shown to be important determinants for decreasing quality of life (QoL) in one report in patients with non-dystrophic myotonia. The aims of our study were to assess QoL in skeletal muscle channelopathies (SMC) using INQoL (individualized QoL) and SF-36 questionnaires. Methods We administered INQoL and SF-36 to 66 Italian patients with SMC (26: periodic paralysis, 36: myotonia congenita and 4: Andersen-Tawil) and compared the results in 422 patients with myotonic dystrophies (DM1: 382; and DM2: 40). Results (i) INQoL index in SMC is similar to that in DMs (P = 0.79). (ii) Patients with myotonia congenita have the worst perception of QoL. (iii) Myotonia has the most detrimental effect on patients with myotonia congenita, followed by patients with DM2 and then by patients with DM1 and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. (iv) Pain is a significant complaint in patients with myotonia congenita, hypokalemic periodic paralysis and DM2 but not in DM1. (v) Fatigue has a similar detrimental effect on all patient groups except for patients with hyperkalemic periodic paralysis in whom muscle weakness and myotonia more than fatigue affect QoL perception. (vi) Muscle symptoms considered in INQoL correlate with physical symptoms assessed by SF-36 (R from −0.34 to −0.76). Conclusions QoL perception in patients with SMC is similar to that of patients with DMs, chronic multisystem disabling conditions. Our results provide information to target treatment and health care of these patients. The sensitivity of INQoL to changes in QoL in the SMC needs to be further explored in longitudinal studies. PMID:22607270

  2. Comorbidities, Social Impact, and Quality of Life in Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eapen, Valsamma; Cavanna, Andrea E.; Robertson, Mary M.

    2016-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is more than having motor and vocal tics, and this review will examine the varied comorbidities as well as the social impact and quality of life (QoL) in individuals with TS. The relationship between any individual and his/her environment is complex, and this is further exaggerated in the case of a person with TS. For example, tics may play a significant role in shaping the person’s experiences, perceptions, and interactions with the environment. Furthermore, associated clinical features, comorbidities, and coexisting psychopathologies may compound or alter this relationship. In this regard, the common comorbidities include attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and disruptive behaviors, obsessive compulsive disorder, and autism spectrum disorder, and coexistent problems include anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem, which can all lead to poorer psychosocial functioning and QoL. Thus, the symptoms of TS and the associated comorbid conditions may interact to result in a vicious cycle or a downward spiraling of negative experiences and poor QoL. The stigma and social maladjustment in TS and the social exclusion, bullying, and discrimination are considered to be caused in large part by misperceptions of the disorder by teachers, peers, and the wider community. Improved community and professional awareness about TS and related comorbidities and other psychopathologies as well as the provision of multidisciplinary services to meet the complex needs of this clinical population are critical. Future research to inform the risk and resilience factors for successful long-term outcomes is also warranted. PMID:27375503

  3. Quality of Life Assessment in Korean Patients with Pemphigus

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Jae Yong; Roh, Mi Ryung

    2015-01-01

    Background Measuring the quality of life (QOL) is important in the evaluation of nonclinical aspects of diseases, for the discovery of functional and psychological limitations, and in choosing treatment in the initial phase of the disease. Pemphigus is a potentially fatal autoimmune bullous disease caused by autoantibodies against desmogleins (cadherin family proteins in desmosomes). Thus far, there has been no published study on QOL in Korean patients with pemphigus. Objective To study the impact of pemphigus on the QOL in a large number of Korean patients. Methods Sixty-six patients enrolled at the Gangnam Severance Hospital from March 2012 to March 2013 were assessed for QOL by using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), and for anxiety and depression by using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). Spearman's rank-order correlation, t-test, and ANOVA were used to identify the relations between the DLQI score and other clinical variables. Results Pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus significantly reduced the QOL of patients. The average DLQI score for all patients was 10.18. The mean DLQI score was 13.45 in patients in the active state and 5.15 in the patients in the remission state. The DLQI score highly correlated with disease severity, titer of anti-desmoglein 1 in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the corticosteroid dose. However, the QOL was not affected by sex, age, subtype of pemphigus, duration of disease, or comorbidities. Forty-two percent of the patients showed a positive result in the GHQ, reflecting probable minor psychiatric nonpsychotic conditions, and the GHQ score positively correlated to the DLQI score. Conclusion Pemphigus significantly impairs the QOL of patients. The QOL of Korean pemphigus patients significantly correlates with clinical severity. Therefore, considerable attention should be paid to the patients' QOL and psychological states as well as clinical status. PMID:26512162

  4. Quality of life aspects in the management of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Duan, H; Gamper, E; Becherer, A; Hoffmann, M

    2015-06-01

    While there is agreement that quality of life (QoL) is a central aim of medical treatment, the methods of its evaluation as well as its role in the patient's overall treatment experience are under continuous scrutiny. Different perspectives on patients' QoL have emerged; from the treating physician, from the psychologist, and naturally from the patient him/herself. This article provides insights into each of these views within the context of thyroid cancer where, as a consequence of increasing incidence and decreasing mortality rates, QoL aspects deserve close attention. Physicians often find themselves in situations where they perform a balancing act between what they know is best from a somatic point of view and learning about what is best for the individual patient. For psychologists in the field of oncology, a main area of interest is the incorporation of the patient's perspective into research by using patient-reported outcomes (PROs) which include QoL assessment. PROs can also be used in clinical practice as a way to start a conversation about symptoms and QoL aspects that perhaps patients might not volunteer, and this allows physicians to address QoL issues more directly. Patients usually appreciate being asked about all aspects of QoL, and need sound information about how their QoL might be affected by the disease and its treatment. By examining and understanding the different perspectives on QoL, and how QoL differs in patients with thyroid cancer compared with other cancers, it is hoped that the QoL can be enhanced in this particular patient group.

  5. Quality of life in epileptic patients compared with healthy people

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Ali; Salarilak, Shaker; Lotfabadi, Pegah; Kiani, Fereshte; Rajabi, Abdolhalim; Mansori, Kamyar; Moosavi Jahromi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is a common chronic neurological disorder that has a great impact on people’s lives. Patients with epilepsy are at increased risk for poor Quality of Life (QoL). The objective of this study was to evaluate the QoL of epileptic patients in comparison to healthy persons. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 52 epileptic patients from Golbu region in Neyshabur (a city in northeast of Iran). Using Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) scale, the data were collected between April and Jun 2012. Every patient were compared with two healthy persons. Epileptic and healthy persons were similar for age, sex and local residence. Pearson’s correlation coefficient and t-independent test applied for data analysis through SPSS v. 16 software. Results: Of 52 epileptic patients, 24 were female (46.2%) and 28 were male (53.8%). The mean±SD age of epileptic patients was 40.92±20.33yr (Rang: 15-86yr). The total mean score of SF- 36 in patient group was 55.88 and in healthy group 68.52and this difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). Among the different subscales of SF-36 in epileptic patients, the highest and the lowest mean scores were found for social functioning and general health subscales, respectively. The mean scores in patient group in comparison to healthy group were lower in all subscales of SF-36 and these differences were statistically significant in all domains (except role limitations due to physical problems domain and role limitations due to emotional problems domain). Conclusion: The study showed that epilepsy disease has an important role in QoL of patients, thus some interventional programs are necessary to improve their QOL. PMID:27493932

  6. Relationships between quality of life and family function in caregiver

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There are caregivers who see their quality of life (QoL) impaired due to the demands of their caregiving tasks, while others manage to adapt and overcome the crises successfully. The influence of the family function in the main caregiver's situation has not been the subject of much evaluation. The aim of this study is to analyse the relationship between the functionality of the family and the QoL of caregivers of dependent relatives. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study including 153 caregivers. Setting: Two health centers in the city of Salamanca(Spain). Caregiver variables analysed: demographic characteristics, care recipient features; family functionality (Family APGAR-Q) and QoL (Ruiz-Baca-Q) perceived by the caregiver. Five multiple regressions are performed considering global QoL and each of the four QoL dimensions as dependent variables. The Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) was used to study the influence of the family function questionnaire on QoL. Results Family function is the only one of the variables evaluated that presented an association both with global QoL and with each of the four individual dimensions (p < 0.05). Using the CCA, we found that the physical and mental well-being dimensions are the ones which present a closer relationship with family functionality, while social support is the quality dimension that is least influenced by the Family APGAR-Q. Conclusion We find an association between family functionality and the caregiver's QoL. This relation holds for both the global measure of QoL and each of its four individual dimensions. PMID:21496270

  7. Health-related quality of life in multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Schrag, Anette; Geser, Felix; Stampfer-Kountchev, Michaela; Seppi, Klaus; Sawires, Martin; Köllensperger, Martin; Scherfler, Christoph; Quinn, Niall; Pellecchia, Maria T; Barone, Paolo; Del Sorbo, Francesca; Albanese, Alberto; Ostergaard, Karen; Dupont, Erik; Cardozo, Adriana; Tolosa, Eduardo; Nilsson, Christer F; Widner, Håkan; Lindvall, Olle; Giladi, Nir; Gurevich, Tanya; Daniels, Christine; Deuschl, Günther; Coelho, Miguel; Sampaio, Cristina; Abele, Michael; Klockgether, Thomas; Schimke, Nicole; Eggert, Karla M; Oertel, Wolfgang; Djaldetti, Ruth; Colosimo, Carlo; Meco, Giuseppe; Poewe, Werner; Wenning, Gregor K

    2006-06-01

    Although multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a neurodegenerative disorder leading to progressive disability and decreased life expectancy, little is known about patients' own evaluation of their illness and factors associated with poor health-related quality of life (Hr-QoL). We, therefore, assessed Hr-QoL and its determinants in MSA. The following scales were applied to 115 patients in the European MSA-Study Group (EMSA-SG) Natural History Study: Medical Outcome Study Short Form (SF-36), EQ-5D, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Mini-Mental state examination (MMSE), Unified MSA Rating Scale (UMSARS), Hoehn & Yahr (H&Y) Parkinson's disease staging scale, Composite Autonomic Symptom Scale (COMPASS), and Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS). Forty-six percent of patients had moderate to severe depression (BDI > or = 17); Hr-QoL scores on the SF-36 and EQ-5D were significantly impaired. Pain, the only domain with similar scores in MSA and published PD patients, was reported more frequently in patients with MSA-P (predominantly parkinsonian motor subtype) than MSA-C (predominantly cerebellar motor subtype; 76% vs. 50%; P = 0.005). Hr-QoL scores correlated most strongly with UMSARS motor, COMPASS, and BDI scores but not with MMSE scores, age at onset, or disease duration. The COMPASS and UMSARS activities of daily living scores were moderate-to-strong predictors for the SF-36 physical summary score and the BDI and UMSARS motor scores for the SF-36 mental summary score. This report is the first study to show that Hr-QoL is significantly impaired in MSA. Although not all possible factors related to impaired Hr-QoL in MSA could be assessed, autonomic dysfunction, motor impairment, and depression were most closely associated with poor Hr-QoL, and therapeutic management, therefore, should concentrate upon these aspects of the disease.

  8. General measures and quality of life issues in psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Rashmi; Chugh, Shikha; Bansal, Shivani

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis generally does not affect survival but has significant detrimental effect on quality of life (QOL), which may be comparable to that of ischemic heart disease, diabetes, depression, and cancer. The foremost important thing in the management of psoriasis is counseling of the patient. The clinician needs to be empathetic and spend adequate time with the patient and educating the patient about psoriasis. Clinicians should make it clear to the patient that the primary goal of treatment is control of the disease rather than cure. Eating a balanced and low glycemic diet could be an important adjuvant factor in the prevention and treatment of moderate nonpustular psoriasis. Obese people are more likely to have severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis than people with an average body mass index. Dietary supplementation with oily fish, rich in n-3 fatty acids, in psoriasis had shown mixed results in trials. Promising results have been documented for parenteral application of n-3 fatty acid, but not with oral supplementation. Increased smoking or alcohol abuse increases the risk of developing psoriasis and may influence disease severity, and hence must be avoided. Soaking in warm water with bath oil can be done in extensive psoriasis for hydration and emollient effect, and bland soaps or soap substitutes should be used; antiseptics should be avoided as they may irritate the skin. Relatively small, localized patches of psoriasis may improve with occlusion, i.e., waterproof adhesive dressings. The use of emollients is an internationally accepted standard adjunctive to the treatment of psoriasis. Dermatology Life Quality Index is a psychometrically sound and responsive measure of psoriasis-specific outcomes and most comprehensively captures the impact of clinical signs and symptoms on patient's well-being. PMID:27990382

  9. Clinically important change in quality of life in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wiebe, S; Matijevic, S; Eliasziw, M; Derry, P

    2002-01-01

    Background: Health related quality of life (HRQOL) is increasingly recognised as an important outcome in epilepsy. However, interpretation of HRQOL data is difficult because there is no agreement on what constitutes a clinically important change in the scores of the various instruments. Objectives: To determine the minimum clinically important change, and small, medium, and large changes, in broadly used epilepsy specific and generic HRQOL instruments. Methods: Patients with difficult to control focal epilepsy (n = 136) completed the QOLIE-89, QOLIE-31, SF-36, and HUI-III questionnaires twice, six months apart. Patient centred estimates of minimum important change, and of small, medium, and large change, were assessed on self administered 15 point global rating scales. Using regression analysis, the change in each HRQOL instrument that corresponded to the various categories of change determined by patients was obtained. The results were validated in a subgroup of patients tested at baseline and at nine months. Results: The minimum important change was 10.1 for QOLIE-89, 11.8 for QOLIE-31, 4.6 for SF-36 MCS, 3.0 for SF-36 physical composite score, and 0.15 for HUI-III. All instruments differentiated between no change and minimum important change with precision, and QOLIE-89 and QOLIE-31 also distinguished accurately between minimum important change and medium or large change. Baseline HRQOL scores and the type of treatment (surgical or medical) had no impact on any of the estimates, and the results were replicated in the validation sample. Conclusions: These estimates of minimum important change, and small, medium, and large changes, in four HRQOL instruments in patients with epilepsy are robust and can distinguish accurately among different levels of change. The estimates allow for categorisation of patients into various levels of change in HRQOL, and will be of use in assessing the effect of interventions in individual patients. PMID:12122166

  10. Assessment of quality of life in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Torres-Carranza, Eusebio; Infante-Cossío, Pedro; Hernández-Guisado, José María; Hens-Aumente, Elena; Gutierrez-Pérez, José Luis

    2008-11-01

    Quality of life (QL) in oral cancer patients has become one of the most important parameters to consider in the diagnosis and post-treatment follow-up. The purpose of this article has been to review the papers published that study the QL in oral cancer patients, the different QL questionnaires used, the clinical results obtained, and the systematic revisions available in the indexed literature for the last 10 years. The term QL appears as a keyword in an increasing number of articles throughout the past 10 years; however, few studies focus on oral cancer. Most of them assess all head and neck cancers, which conform to a heterogeneous group with several different features depending on location (oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, hypopharynx, nasopharynx and salivary glands). Most studies evaluate QL in short periods of time, normally within the first year after the diagnosis. Series do not discern between different therapeutic options, and they generally center on Northern European or Northern American populations. There are few instruments translated and validated into Spanish that measure QL, a fundamental characteristic to link QL to own patients' socio-cultural parameters. Data related with QL are mostly related to patient (age, sex, co-morbidity), tumour (location, size), and treatment (surgical treatment, radiotherapy association, reconstruction, cervical dissection, and/or feeding tube). Nowadays QL's assessment is considered an essential component of an oral cancer patient as well as the survival, morbidity and years free of disease. Although many aspects related to QL in oral cancer patients have been published throughout the past 10 years, more systematic research is needed to be able to apply it on a daily basis.

  11. Oral Cancer Malnutrition Impacts Weight and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Handschel, Jörg; Holtmann, Henrik; Krüskemper, Gertrud

    2015-01-01

    Diet is important for both quality of life (QoL) and survival of patients with oral cancer. Their intake of food is impeded by functional restrictions in chewing and swallowing. In the DÖSAK REHAB STUDY 1652 patients from 38 hospitals within the German-language area of Germany; Austria and Switzerland were examined with regard to functional and psychological variables having an impact on diet. Chewing and swallowing are correlated with mobility of the tongue and the mandible as well as opening of the mouth. Thirty five percent of the patients lost weight; 41% maintained their weight and 24% gained weight. The QoL of patients who were able to maintain their weight and of those who gained weight was significantly better than that of patients who lost weight. A normal diet was important for maintaining weight. Mashed food; liquid food and loss of appetite were closely associated with loss of weight; although it was possible for nutritional counseling and dietary support to be implemented particularly favorably in this respect. Due to problems with eating patients’ strength deteriorated; thus restricting activity. Radiotherapy had a negative impact on diet and weight. It influenced sense of taste; dryness of the mouth; swelling and discomfort when ingesting food. Pain and scars in the region of the operation also cause patients to dislike hard; spicy and sour food. Support from a nutritional counselor in implementing a calorie-rich diet remedied this and such support needs to be integrated into patient management. The fact that a poor nutritional status is of such great importance is well-known; but what is often lacking is the systematic implementation of continued professional nutritional counseling over a long period of time; weight control and psycho-social support of the operated patients; particularly those who also have had radiotherapy. PMID:25825828

  12. Early Quality of Life in Patients with Localized Prostate Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Eton, David T.; Lepore, Stephen J.; Helgeson, Vicki S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Men with localized prostate carcinoma are faced with important treatment decisions, and quality of life (QoL) information has become a crucial element of decision making. The first objective of this study was to compare the early, health-related QoL (HRQoL) of men with localized prostate carcinoma who were treated with radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy, or brachytherapy. A second objective was to identify demographic and psychosocial variables that predict HRQoL. METHODS Two-hundred fifty-six men with localized prostate carcinoma were interviewed within 7 weeks of treatment initiation. The interview included measures of prostate-specific HRQoL (the University of California—Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index), general HRQoL (the SF-36), and psychosocial variables. RESULTS After adjusting for covariates, treatment group differences were found for both prostate specific HRQoL and general HRQoL. Men who underwent prostatectomy reported more urinary and sexual problems and more general physical dysfunction compared with men who were treated with either form of radiation therapy. Men who were treated with brachytherapy reported the fewest problems in sexual function and the least general physical dysfunction. Few treatment group differences were found in mental functioning. Both demographic factors and psychosocial factors predicted HRQoL. Older men and African-American men reported more physical problems than younger men and Caucasian men, respectively. A supportive social environment, high self-efficacy, and high self-esteem were predictive of better HRQoL. CONCLUSIONS Shortly after undergoing treatment for localized prostate carcinoma, men who underwent radical prostatectomy, older men, and African-American men are at heightened risk for experiencing prostate-specific and general deficits in HRQoL. Having psychosocial resources from which to draw may enhance HRQoL. PMID:11745222

  13. Voice perceptions and quality of life of transgender people.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Adrienne B; Krissinger, Julianne; Owen, Kelly

    2011-09-01

    Despite the plethora of research documenting that the voice and quality of life (QoL) are related, the exact nature of this relationship is vague. Studies have not addressed people who consider their voice to influence their life and identity, but would not be considered to have a voice "disorder" (e.g., transgender individuals). Individuals seeking vocal feminization may or may not have vocal pathology and often have concerns not addressed on the standard psychosocial measures of voice impact. Recent development of a voice-related QoL measure specific to the needs of transgender care (Transgender Self-Evaluation Questionnaire [TSEQ]) affords opportunity to explore relationships between self-perceived QoL and perceptions of femininity and likability associated with transgender voice. Twenty male-to-female transgender individuals living as a female 100% of the time completed the TSEQ and contributed a speech sample describing Norman Rockwell's "The Waiting Room" picture. Twenty-five undergraduate listeners rated voice femininity and voice likability after audio-only presentation of each speech sample. Speakers also self-rated their voices on these parameters. For male-to-female transgender clients, QoL is moderately correlated with how others perceive their voice. QoL ratings correlate more strongly with speaker's self-rated perception of voice compared with others' perceptions, more so for likability than femininity. This study complements previous research reports that subjective measures from clients and listeners may be valuable for evaluating the effectiveness of treatment in terms of how treatment influences voice-related QoL issues for transgender people.

  14. Tooth loss, chewing ability and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Traebert, Jefferson; Lasta, Renata; Da Rosa, Thaiany Naila; Capella, Diogo Lenzi; Presta, Andréia Antoniuk

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to observe the tooth loss over age in a sample of Brazilian patients and analyze their ability to chew, relating it to how much is the loss of oral function impact over the quality of life (QoL). Materials and Methods: This is a single center, observational study and the data were collected through clinical examination followed of questionnaires to obtain sociodemographic information, the ability to chew (through the index of chewing ability [ICA]) and QoL (through Oral Health Impact Profile, OHIP-14). Results: The sample was composed by 171 random volunteers with mean age of 47 (SD 15.2). Low number of natural teeth was associated with an increase of age (Spearman's rho correlation coefficient-0.7, P < 0.001, 2-tailed) and chew disability (ICA: chew's ability vs. disability) (Mann-Whitney U-Test, P < 0.001). Chew disability showed a negative impact over the QoL (overall OHIP; Mann-Whitney U Test P < 0.001) and in five of seven OHIP domains (Functional Limitation, Physical Pain, Psychological Discomfort, Physical Disability, Psychological Disability). Age over than 40 years, was also associated with chewing disability (Pearson Chi-Square P < 0.001) and poorer QoL (Mann-Whitney U test P = 0.01). Conclusion: This study observed that the chewing disability produces a significant and negative impact over oral-health related QoL and both, poor QoL and chewing disability are related with the decrease of the number of natural teeth. PMID:23633796

  15. Quality of life and outcomes in African Americans with CKD.

    PubMed

    Porter, Anna; Fischer, Michael J; Wang, Xuelei; Brooks, Deborah; Bruce, Marino; Charleston, Jeanne; Cleveland, William H; Dowie, Donna; Faulkner, Marquetta; Gassman, Jennifer; Hiremath, Leena; Kendrick, Cindy; Kusek, John W; Norris, Keith C; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Greene, Tom; Lash, James P

    2014-08-01

    Low health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has been associated with increased risk for hospitalization and death in ESRD. However, the relationship of HRQOL with outcomes in predialysis CKD is not well understood. We evaluated the association between HRQOL and renal and cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in 1091 African Americans with hypertensive CKD enrolled in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) trial and cohort studies. Outcomes included CKD progression (doubling of serum creatinine/ESRD), CV events/CV death, and a composite of CKD progression or death from any cause (CKD progression/death). We assessed HRQOL, including mental health composite (MHC) and physical health composite (PHC), using the Short Form-36 survey. Cox regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between outcomes and five-point decrements in MHC and PHC scores using measurements at baseline, at the most recent annual visit (time-varying), or averaged from baseline to the most recent visit (cumulative). During approximately 10 years of follow-up, lower mean PHC score was associated with increased risk of CV events/CV death and CKD progression/death across all analytic approaches, but only time-varying and cumulative decrements were associated with CKD progression. Similarly, lower mean MHC score was associated with increased risk of CV events/CV death regardless of analytic approach, while only time-varying and cumulative decrements in mean MHC score was associated with CKD progression and CKD progression or death. In conclusion, lower HRQOL is associated with a range of adverse outcomes in African Americans with hypertensive CKD.

  16. Quality of Life and Coping Strategies in Coronary Heart Disease Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdi, Seyedeh-Monavar; Hosseinian, Simin; Eslami, Mansoure; Fathi-Ashtiani, Ali

    This study aims to find the relationship between quality of life and coping strategies in coronary heart disease patients. Two hundred coronary heart disease patients at Tehran Heart Center, who had been diagnosed with the disease 3 months before, were selected and filled out The Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) and Quality of Life-SF36. Results showed a discrepancy between quality of life indices and coping strategies. Task-oriented strategy had a positive and significant relationship with total quality of life and PF indices while it had a negative and significant relationship with MH, RE and RP indices. Emotional-oriented strategy had a positive and significant relationship with RP and RE indices while it had a negative and significant relationship with PF, GH, PH, total psychological health and total quality of life indices. Avoidance-oriented strategy had a negative and significant relationship only with MH index. Furthermore, quality of life aspects (physical and psychological) had a positive and significant relationship with emotional-oriented strategy, but it did not have a significant relationship with task-oriented and avoidance-oriented strategies. Also, the social aspect of quality of life did not have a significant relationship with any of the strategies. Considering the effect of stress on decreasing the quality of life, we recommend a psychologist train coping strategies to coronary heart disease patients along with medical treatments in order to improve recovery, maintain health and reduce recurrence.

  17. Family Quality of Life: Adult School Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svraka, E.; Loga, S.; Brown, I.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: This study endeavours to provide initial data on quality of life for families with adult children who have intellectual disabilities (ID) in the Canton of Sarajevo. Methods: The principal measure used was the "Family Quality of life Survey 2006-main caregivers of people with intellectual or developmental disabilities." The sample…

  18. Determinants of Health and the Quality of Life in the Bella Coola Valley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalos, Alex C.; Thommasen, Harvey V.; Read, Rua; Anderson, Nancy; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this investigation is to obtain some baseline self-reported data of the health status and overall quality of life of all residents of the Bella Coola Valley of British Columbia aged 17 years or older, and to measure the impact of a set of designated health determinants on their health and quality of life. In the period from August to…

  19. Health-Related Quality of Life in Children Attending Special and Typical Education Greek Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadopoulou, D.; Malliou, P.; Kofotolis, N.; Vlachopoulos, S. P.; Kellis, E.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine parental perceptions about Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) of typical education and special education students in Greece. The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) was administered to the parents of 251 children from typical schools, 46 students attending integration classes (IC) within a…

  20. An Initial Look at the Quality of Life of Malaysian Families That Include Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, M.; Brown, R.; Karrapaya, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: While there is a growing body of literature in the quality of life of families that include children with disabilities, the majority of research has been conducted in western countries. The present study provides an initial exploration of the quality of life of Malaysian families that include children with developmental/intellectual…

  1. The Association between Child Autism Symptomatology, Maternal Quality of Life, and Risk for Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zablotsky, Benjamin; Anderson, Connie; Law, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Parents raising children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have been shown to experience high levels of stress and report a lower quality of life. The current study examined the association between child autism symptomatology, mother's quality of life, and mother's risk for depression in a sample of 1,110 mothers recruited from a…

  2. Grandmothers Raising Grandchildren with Disabilities: Sources of Support and Family Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kresak, Karen E.; Gallagher, Peggy A.; Kelley, Susan J.

    2014-01-01

    Sources of support and quality of life of 50 grandmother-headed families raising grandchildren with and without disabilities were examined. Comparative analyses revealed significant differences between grandmothers raising grandchildren with and without disabilities in regard to sources of support and family quality of life. Informal support was…

  3. Relationships between Leisure Participation and Quality of Life of People with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badia, Marta; Orgaz, María Begoña; Verdugo, Miguel Á.; Ullán, Ana M.; Martínez, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Background: Studies of people with developmental disabilities suggest that participation in leisure activities might be a key factor for good quality of life. This study explores the relationships between objective and subjective quality of life and leisure participation of adults with developmental disabilities. Materials and Methods: A…

  4. Effects of Internet Connectedness and Information Literacy on Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Louis

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this exploratory research is to examine the inter-linkage among Internet connectedness, information literacy, and quality of life. Results from a telephone survey, based on a probability sample of 756 Internet users, found that Internet connectedness is not related to quality of life. However, there is a significant relationship…

  5. Race, Ethnicity and the Quality of Life in America, 1972-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coverdill, James E.; Lopez, Carlos A.; Petrie, Michelle A.

    2011-01-01

    We extend research on black-white gaps in the subjective quality of life by exploring recent General Social Survey data, focusing attention on Latinos, and probing the value of partial proportional odds models for ordinal quality-of-life measures. Results indicate a declining but discernable black-white gap for four measures--marital happiness,…

  6. School Placement and Perceived Quality of Life in Youth Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schick, Brenda; Skalicky, Anne; Edwards, Todd; Kushalnagar, Poorna; Topolski, Tari; Patrick, Donald

    2013-01-01

    In the education of students who are deaf and hard of hearing (DHH), there is much debate about how placement affects educational outcomes and quality of life. This study examined the relationship between quality of life and educational placement that include and do not include other DHH youth. Participants included 221 DHH youth, ages 11-18 with…

  7. Cognitive adaptation theory and quality of life in late-stage cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Christianson, Heidi Fowell; Weis, Jo M; Fouad, Nadya A

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the question of whether using slightly illusionary, positive attributions of self, control, and meaning (e.g., cognitive adaptation theory), in the face of disconfirmatory evidence, facilitates quality of life in late-stage cancer patients was examined. Eighty late-stage cancer patients (Mean age = 59.7, SD = 12.5; 48.8% male, 51.2% female; varying cancer diagnoses) who recently failed or refused first line anti-neoplastic treatment completed questionnaires assessing meaning, control, self-esteem, and optimism, as well as physical and psychological quality of life. Findings suggest that greater self-esteem, control, and meaning predicted physical and psychological quality of life, with physical quality of life being influenced by control beliefs and psychological quality of life influenced by self-esteem. Optimism independently predicted physical quality of life and neither mediated nor moderated the relationship between cognitive adaptation and quality of life. Findings suggest that slightly positive, illusionary beliefs of self, control, and meaning predicted quality of life even in the presence of clear, disconfirmatory environmental evidence.

  8. The Impact of Globalization on a Country's Quality of Life: Toward an Integrated Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirgy, M. Joseph; Lee, Dong-Jin; Miller, Chad; Littlefield, James E.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to develop a set of theoretical propositions to explain the impact of globalization on a country's quality of life (QOL). In this paper, we describe how globalization impacts the quality of life of residents of a country by first articulating the globalization construct (in terms of inflows and outflows of goods,…

  9. Quality of Life and Quality of Support for People with Severe Intellectual Disability and Complex Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beadle-Brown, J.; Leigh, J.; Whelton, B.; Richardson, L.; Beecham, J.; Baumker, T.; Bradshaw, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: People with severe and profound intellectual disabilities often spend substantial time isolated and disengaged. The nature and quality of the support appears to be important in determining quality of life. Methods: Structured observations and staff questionnaires were used to explore the quality of life and quality of support for 110…

  10. Consumer-Based Quality of Life Assessment: The Maryland Ask Me! Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonham, Gordon Scott; Basehart, Sarah; Schalock, Robert L.; Marchand, Cristine Boswell; Kirchner, Nancy; Rumenap, Joan M.

    2004-01-01

    The concept of quality of life currently impacts program development, service delivery, management strategies, and outcome evaluation in the area of intellectual disabilities. Maryland uses peer interviewers to assess consumer-perceived quality of life among adult recipients of MR/DD services and supports. In this article we describe the survey…

  11. Health, Quality of Care and Quality of Life: A Case of Frail Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Chang-Ming

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between health, quality of care of geriatric case management and quality of life for the purpose of furthering the understanding of the relationship between quality of life and geriatric case management. Using survey data from a group of frail older adults, this study assesses the relative merit of two…

  12. Quality of Life as Medicine: Interventions that Induce Salutogenesis. A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ventegodt, Soren; Omar, Hatim A.; Merrick, Joav

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the medical (salutogenic) effect of interventions that aim to improve quality of life. Review of studies where the global quality of life in chronically ill patients was improved independently of subjective and objective factors (like physical and mental health, yearly income, education, social network, self-esteem, sexual…

  13. Symptom Management & Quality of Life Concept Design | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This video covers a variety of practical considerations for developing a symptom management concept for clinical research. Co-sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Symptom Management and Health Related Quality of Life Steering Committee & the International Society for Quality of Life Research. |

  14. Quality of Life of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy: Perspectives of Adolescents and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elise; Shelly, Amy; Waters, Elizabeth; MacKinnon, Andrew; Reddihough, Dinah; Boyd, Roslyn; Graham, H. Kerr

    2009-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) has emerged over the past 20 years as an outcome for measuring the effectiveness of health-improvement interventions. The Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life Questionnaire for Children (CPQOL-Child) is well regarded and now integrated into research internationally. We describe the results of qualitative research, using grounded…

  15. Do We Need to Weight Satisfaction Scores with Importance Ratings in Measuring Quality of Life?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Chia-Huei; Yao, Grace

    2006-01-01

    Trauer and Mackinnon (2001; Quality of life research 10, pp. 579-585) recently proposed that weighting satisfaction scores by importance ratings in measuring quality of life is undesirable and unnecessary. However, they didn't use empirical data to support their claim. In this study, different weighting algorithms developed by Cummins (1997;…

  16. Determinants of quality of life in Brazilian patients with myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Mourão, Aline Mansueto; Gomez, Rodrigo Santiago; Barbosa, Luiz Sergio Mageste; da Silva Freitas, Denise; Comini-Frota, Elizabeth Regina; Kummer, Arthur; Lemos, Stella Maris Aguiar; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aims of the current study were 1) to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Brazilian version of the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Scale and 2) to investigate the quality of life of Brazilian patients with myasthenia gravis and its determinants. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 69 patients with myasthenia gravis who underwent neurological evaluation and completed questionnaires regarding quality of life (the 36-item Short Form of the Medical Outcomes Study and the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Scale), anxiety and depressive symptoms. RESULTS: The Brazilian version of the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Scale showed high internal consistency and good concurrent validity with the 36-item Short Form of the Medical Outcomes Study and its subscales. Determinants of quality of life in Brazilian patients with myasthenia gravis included the current status of myasthenia gravis as assessed by the Myasthenia Gravis Composite, the current prednisone dose and the levels of anxiety and depression. CONCLUSION: The Brazilian version of the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Scale is a valid instrument. Symptom severity, prednisone dosage and anxiety and depression levels impact the quality of life of patients with myasthenia gravis. PMID:27464292

  17. Subjective Values of Quality of Life Dimensions in Elderly People. A SEM Preference Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elosua, Paula

    2011-01-01

    This article proposes a Thurstonian model in the framework of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) to assess preferences among quality of life dimensions for the elderly. Data were gathered by a paired comparison design in a sample comprised of 323 people aged from 65 to 94 years old. Five dimensions of quality of life were evaluated: Health,…

  18. A New Malaysian Quality of Life Index Based on Fuzzy Sets and Hierarchical Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazim, M. Abdullah; Abu Osman, M. Tap

    2009-01-01

    The Malaysian Quality of Life Index (MQLI) released by the Economic Planning Unit (EPU), has led authors to search for alternative method of expressing this index. One of the limitations in MQLI computations is the failure to recognise unequal weights for each accounted component. This paper offers a new way of expressing the quality of life index…

  19. Factors affecting the quality of life of homebound elderly hemiparetic stroke patients with cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Takemasa, Seiichi; Nakagoshi, Ryoma; Uesugi, Masayuki; Inoue, Yuri; Gotou, Makoto; Koeda, Hideki; Naruse, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the quality of life of homebound elderly hemiparetic stroke patients with cognitive impairment and the factors affecting their quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of the study were 17 home-based elderly hemiparetic stroke patients with cognitive impairment (8 males and 9 females, average age: 76.3 ± 10.5 years old). Their physical and psychological conditions, quality of life and other items were investigated. Nishimura’s Mental State Scale for the Elderly was used for the cognitive impairment assessment. The Functional Independence Measure was used to assess activities of daily living, and the Japanese Quality of Life Inventory for the Elderly with Dementia was used to assess quality of life. [Results] The subjects’ quality of life was affected by their cognitive impairment level and independence of activities of daily living. However, no correlations were observed between the quality of life of the homebound elderly hemiparetic stroke patients with cognitive impairment, age, gender or care-need level. [Conclusion] In order to improve the quality of life of homebound elderly hemiparetic stroke patients with cognitive impairment, assistance helping them to maintain their cognitive abilities and on-going rehabilitation for improving activities of daily living independence are required. PMID:28174455

  20. Child Health-Related Quality of Life and Parental Social Capital in Greece: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Dardiry, Giulia; Dimitrakaki, Christine; Tzavara, Chara; Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike; Tountas, Yannis

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we examined dimensions of child health-related quality of life in Greece in relation to parental assessments of neighbourhood social capital and social support networks. For the analysis, two main measures were used: (1) child self-reported health-related quality of life in ten dimensions, as measured by the KIDSCREEN questionnaire;…

  1. Perceptions of Neighborhood Problems and Health-Related Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Erin M.; Shepherd, Daniel; Welch, David; Dirks, Kim N.; McBride, David

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the association between perceptions of neighborhood problems and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in a sample of New Zealand residents (n = 692). A modified version of the Neighborhood Problems Scale (originally developed by Steptoe and Feldman, 2001) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) were…

  2. Health-Related Quality of Life among Abused Women One Year after Leaving a Violent Partner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsaker, Kjersti; Moen, Bente E.; Kristoffersen, Kjell

    2008-01-01

    This is the first follow up study measuring quality of life among abused women who have left their abusive partner. The women (n = 22) answered a questionnaire while staying at women's shelter and one year later. The aim was to examine long-term effects of intimate partner violence against women on health-related quality of life. Health-related…

  3. Perceptions of Quality of Life in Rural Open-Country Areas: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieper, Hanns G.; And Others

    Concerned with Southern populations of open-country rural areas, the objectives of this study were: (1) identification of changes in quality of life of the study population since 1960; (2) delineation of those aspects of quality of life considered inadequate by the residents; and (3) testing of the hypothesis that community leaders, due to their…

  4. Development and Validation of the Pediatric Oncology Quality of Life Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, David A. J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Development of a parent report measure for assessing the quality of life of children with cancer is described. The Pediatric Oncology Quality of Life Scale assesses physical function and role restriction, emotional distress, and reaction to current medical treatment. Reliability and validity assessments provide preliminary support for the…

  5. Quality of Life Indicators for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities: Extending Current Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ivan; Hatton, Chris; Emerson, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life is a social construct that is measured by what are considered to be its most appropriate indicators. Quality of life measurement in intellectual disability reflects a variety of indicators, often grouped under life domains. Subjective and objective methods of measuring indicators each have strengths and drawbacks, but it is…

  6. Effects of a Leisure Programme on Quality of Life and Stress of Individuals with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Villamisar, D. A.; Dattilo, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Even though there is research demonstrating a positive relationship between leisure participation and the two constructs of quality of life and stress reduction, current conceptualisation of leisure as a contributor to quality of life is limited. In addition, in spite of improvements in accurate diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder…

  7. The Perceived Quality of Life among School District Superintendents in Illinois Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffernan, Debra J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perception of quality of life among Illinois male and female superintendents, and to determine demographic differences. Frisch's Quality of Life Inventory (QOLI) was used, which measured perceived levels of importance, satisfaction and weighted satisfaction (importance and satisfaction) in sixteen…

  8. Quality of Life: An Orientation to Population Education. Abstract-Bibliography Series 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    This annotated bibliography cites materials dealing with the issue of quality of life as an orientation to population education. Sixty-four percent of the 63 publications cited deal with Asia and the Pacific while the rest are from other regions of the world. The time span of the publications is 1971-1980. Since quality of life encompasses every…

  9. Change in Quality of Life after Rehabilitation: Prognostic Factors for Visually Impaired Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langelaan, Maaike; de Boer, Michiel R.; van Nispen, Ruth M. A.; Wouters, Bill; Moll, Annette C.; van Rens, Ger H. M. B.

    2009-01-01

    The overall aim of rehabilitation for visually impaired adults is to improve the quality of life and (societal) participation. The objectives of this study were to obtain the short-term and long-term outcome of a comprehensive rehabilitation programme on quality of life for visually impaired adults, and prognostic baseline factors responsible for…

  10. [The concept of quality of life in healthcare, a complex definition].

    PubMed

    Debout, Christophe

    2011-10-01

    The concept of quality of life in healthcare, a complex definition. The assessment of quality of life occupies a central place in the field of healthcare. Extensive research was carried out into the subject during the 20th century. Ojectifying a subjective and multi-dimensional concept remains a difficult task. Several societal, economic and epistemological factors must be taken into account.

  11. The impact of nausea and vomiting upon quality of life measures.

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, J. M.; Robertson, B.; Selby, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    The measurement of quality of life in cancer patients has achieved prominence in recent years. This results from recognition of the limitations of available therapies and a clearer view of the goals of treatment in patients whose diseases may not be curable. Many different approaches to the measurement of quality of life have been proposed and these will be reviewed. In a recent survey of available methods, the Medical Research Council's Working Party on Quality of Life Measurement systematically analysed available instruments for measuring quality of life specifically in cancer patients and commented on a number of instruments of general purpose that may be used in oncology. It was concluded that no instrument is entirely satisfactory for all purposes and that available instruments have to be selected carefully for a particular study or a particular aspect of clinical practice. However, among the existing instruments, the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist for a general assessment of many facets of quality of life and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, for detecting psychosocial morbidity quickly and easily, were useful. In our own studies we have used a multiple linear analogue scale system to measure aspects of quality of life in breast cancer patients and have recently addressed the determinants of overall quality of life. Our studies identify the importance of evaluating the psychometric properties of measurement instruments in quality of life. Reliability and validity and the ability to discriminate changes with time and between clinically distinct groups have to be carefully assessed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1467195

  12. Quality of Life in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Who Participate in Diabetes Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Ruth; Cureton, Virginia Young; Canham, Daryl L.

    2006-01-01

    Quality of life in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes is a growing area of interest in pediatric research. The complex diabetes regimen imposes challenges for an adolescent. Adolescents diagnosed with diabetes are a group that appears to be at risk for having a poor health-related quality of life. Although research supports the positive relationship…

  13. Impact of dental caries on preschool children's quality of life: an update.

    PubMed

    Bönecker, Marcelo; Abanto, Jenny; Tello, Gustavo; Oliveira, Luciana Butini

    2012-01-01

    The literature reports that dental caries can cause functional, physical and aesthetic impairment, often with repercussions on children's general health at an early age. Moreover, recent studies have investigated how caries lesions can compromise children's quality of life. This paper aims to describe the current situation of dental caries prevalence in children and how this oral health disease can impact their quality of life.

  14. The predictors of quality of life in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aliasghari, Fatemeh; Mirghafourvand, Mojgan; Charandabi, Sakineh Mohammad-Alizadeh; Lak, Tahereh Behroozi

    2017-02-21

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorder that may be effective in reducing the quality of life. This study aimed to determine the predictors of quality of life in women with PCOS. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 174 women with PCOS who attended in public and private fertility clinics in Urmia (West Azerbaijan, Iran), 2015. The data were collected through the questionnaires of sociodemographic and obstetrics characteristics, quality of life and Beck depression inventory-II. Multivariate linear regression was used to estimate the effect rate of the independent variables (depression and sociodemographic characteristics) on the dependent variable (quality of life). In this study, the mean (standard deviation) of total score of the quality of life was obtained, 45.8 (11.3) in the range 0-100. The highest and lowest mean scores were in the subdomains of weight and hirsutism. The variables of depression, body mass index, woman's job, menstrual cycle intervals, and sexual satisfaction were predictors of the quality of life in women with PCOS. Because of various effective factors on quality of life in these women such as depression, necessary strategies must be implemented to control these factors and improve the quality of life.

  15. Self-Efficacy and Quality of Life in People with Spinal Cord Injuries in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Nan Zhang

    2000-01-01

    Explores the relationship between self-efficacy beliefs and the quality of life in Chinese individuals with spinal cord injuries. Also examines whether health status and demographic variables correlated with the quality of life in this population. Results are discussed in line with the Chinese culture and its influences on the psychosocial…

  16. A Qualitative Study of the Health-Related Quality of Life of Disabled Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Bridget; Rice, Helen; Dixon-Woods, Mary; Colver, Allan F.; Parkinson, Kathryn N.

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated what disabled children thought most important in their lives and examined how well their priorities are represented in KIDSCREEN, a generic health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instrument. Participants were a subgroup of families who had previously taken part in a study of quality of life and participation in…

  17. Quality of Life Perceptions and Directions for Urban Regeneration in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Mee Kam

    2005-01-01

    Urban regeneration can be an effective tool to promote sustainability and enhance macro-level quality of life if the principles of encouraging participation, building community character, advancing equity, improving environment and enlivening the economy are observed. Through the assessment of various quality of life indicators related to these…

  18. Changes in quality of life during orthodontic correction of midline diastema

    PubMed Central

    Nagalakshmi, S.; Sathish, R.; Priya, K.; Dhayanithi, D.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of our study is to evaluate the changes in quality of life among patients treated for maxillary midline diastema by fixed orthodontic appliances. Materials and Methods: This prospective longitudinal study consists of 40 patients of age group 20-30 years who underwent orthodontic correction of midline diastema. The patient's quality of life is evaluated using 22-item orthognathic quality of life questionnaire. They were evaluated prior to appliance therapy, 1 month after appliance fixation, 4th and 8th month during treatment and 1 month after treatment. Results: Our results showed moderate improvement in quality of life as early as at the start of orthodontic therapy. The response was equal among both sexes. The quality of life experience improved only mildly during the orthodontic treatment. However, the condition specific quality of life at the end of appliance therapy improved by nearly 50% when compared with prior to treatment. Conclusion: Our study has concluded that the correction of midline diastema has improved the quality of life among young people by nearly 50%. The acceptance to orthodontic therapy and patient perception toward fixed appliance has demonstrated remarkable improvement in quality of life during the treatment. Our study calls for additional patient counseling and motivation during the course of fixed appliance therapy. PMID:25210363

  19. A Family Quality of Life Study of Families with Children with Disabilities in Hawai'i

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranges, Phaedra E.

    2011-01-01

    Research indicates that families of children with disabilities are at risk for a lower quality of life than families of typically developing children, as the impact that a child with a disability has on a family's quality of life (FQOL) is both substantial and complex (Zuna, Selig, Summers, & Turnbull, 2009b; Zuna, Summers, Turnbull, Hu &…

  20. Methodological Validation of Quality of Life Questionnaire for Coal Mining Groups-Indian Scenario

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sen, Sayanti; Sen, Goutam; Tewary, B. K.

    2012-01-01

    Maslow's hierarchy-of-needs theory has been used to predict development of Quality of Life (QOL) in countries over time. In this paper an attempt has been taken to derive a methodological validation of quality of life questionnaire which have been prepared for the study area. The objective of the study is to standardize a questionnaire tool to…

  1. Family Quality of Life of Chinese Families of Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, X.; Wang, M.; Fei, X.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The concepts of quality of life and family quality of life (FQOL) are increasingly being studied in the field of intellectual disabilities (ID) in China as important frameworks for: (1) assessing families' need for supports and services; (2) guiding organisational and service delivery system changes; and (3) evaluating quality family…

  2. The impact of bariatric surgery on quality of life: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lindekilde, N; Gladstone, B P; Lübeck, M; Nielsen, J; Clausen, L; Vach, W; Jones, A

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to review the obesity literature in order to assess the impact of bariatric surgery on quality of life and the between-study variation by examining the standardized mean magnitude of effect in change in the levels of quality of life. The following databases EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and Web of Science were systematically searched for studies examining change in quality of life in adults receiving bariatric surgery for obesity. Seventy-two studies were included with a total of 9,433 participants treated for obesity with bariatric surgery. The average impact of bariatric surgery on quality of life corresponded to an effect size of 0.88 (95% CI: 0.80-0.96), indicating that bariatric surgery has a significant positive influence on quality of life in general. The impact varied considerably across studies with bariatric surgery showing a significantly greater positive influence on physical quality of life compared to mental quality of life. Bariatric surgery is effective in improving quality of life, especially when looking at physical well-being. Greater focus on the psychological well-being of the person undergoing surgery for obesity may lead to a better post-surgery prognosis for more people.

  3. [Implications of Alzheimer's disease for the caregiver's quality of life: a comparative study].

    PubMed

    Inouye, Keika; Pedrazzani, Elisete Silva; Pavarini, Sofia Cristina Iost

    2010-05-01

    This study aimed to compare overall and dimension-specific perceptions of quality of life between a group of caregivers of elderly patients with Alzheimer's disease and a group of non-caregivers, matched for sociodemographic variables. Quality of life was measured with the Quality of Life Evaluation Scale in Alzheimer's Disease (Caregiver Version). Statistical analyses were performed (descriptive and ordinal logistic regression). Caregivers showed significantly higher odds of negatively evaluating the dimensions of physical health, disposition, mood, memory, you in general, and the capacity to perform leisure activities as compared to non-caregivers. Mean total quality of life score was 38.83 for caregivers and 41.81 for non-caregivers. The data suggest that contact with Alzheimer's disease negatively influences the total score and some dimensions of quality of life for family caregivers.

  4. The Role of Age-Friendly Environments on Quality of Life among Thai Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tiraphat, Sariyamon; Peltzer, Karl; Thamma-Aphiphol, Kriengsak; Suthisukon, Kawinarat

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the significance of age-friendly environments towards quality of life among older adults have been limited. This study aimed to examine the association between age-friendly environments and quality of life among Thai older adults. Cross-sectional interview survey data were collected from 4183 older adults (≥60 years) using multistage stratified systematic sampling from all four regions in Thailand. The outcome variable was the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) scale, while independent variables included sociodemographic factors, having a health problem, and neighbourhood age-friendly environment variables. In multivariable logistic regression, significant age-friendly environments predictors of quality of life included walkable neighbourhood, neighbourhood aesthetics, neighbourhood service accessibility, neighbourhood criminal safety, neighbourhood social trust, neighbourhood social support, and neighbourhood social cohesion. The present study confirms the important role of age-friendly neighbourhoods in terms of physical and social environments towards the quality of life of older adults. PMID:28282942

  5. Personality and quality of life: the importance of optimism and goal adjustment.

    PubMed

    Wrosch, Carsten; Scheier, Michael F

    2003-01-01

    This article concerns the relations between personality and quality of life. In the first part, we discuss different conceptualizations of personality and quality of life. We argue that personality affects quality of life by influencing how people approach and react to critical life situations. In the second part, we address the beneficial role played by two individual difference variables in promoting quality of life: dispositional optimism and goal adjustment. Literature is reviewed demonstrating that dispositional optimism facilitates subjective well-being and good health, mediated by a person's coping behaviors. In addition, we discuss studies that examine people who confront unattainable goals. The reported evidence supports the conclusion that individual differences in people's abilities to adjust to unattainable goals are associated with a good quality of life.

  6. Evaluating the impact of wind turbine noise on health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Daniel; McBride, David; Welch, David; Dirks, Kim N; Hill, Erin M

    2011-01-01

    We report a cross-sectional study comparing the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of individuals residing in the proximity of a wind farm to those residing in a demographically matched area sufficiently displaced from wind turbines. The study employed a nonequivalent comparison group posttest-only design. Self-administered questionnaires, which included the brief version of the World Health Organization quality of life scale, were delivered to residents in two adjacent areas in semirural New Zealand. Participants were also asked to identify annoying noises, indicate their degree of noise sensitivity, and rate amenity. Statistically significant differences were noted in some HRQOL domain scores, with residents living within 2 km of a turbine installation reporting lower overall quality of life, physical quality of life, and environmental quality of life. Those exposed to turbine noise also reported significantly lower sleep quality, and rated their environment as less restful. Our data suggest that wind farm noise can negatively impact facets of HRQOL.

  7. Quality of life and nutritional assessment in peritoneal surface malignancy (PSM): recommendations for care.

    PubMed

    McQuellon, Richard; Gavazzi, Cecilia; Piso, Pompiliu; Swain, David; Levine, Edward

    2008-09-15

    Quality of life (QOL) and nutritional status of patients treated for peritoneal surface malignancy are important areas for ongoing assessment. A working group of clinicians including a dietitian, physicians, and quality of life researchers was formed as part of the Fifth International Workshop on Peritoneal Surface Malignancy. The purpose of the group was to form a consensus statement on both quality of life and nutritional assessment in PSM. The relevant literature from the quality of life and nutritional assessment in peritoneal surface malignancy was reviewed and integrated to form a consensus statement. Baseline and ongoing assessment of both quality of life and nutritional status of patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery plus hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) is recommended.

  8. Health-Related Quality of Life of Former Lead Workers in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Martha Carvalho Pereira; Carvalho, Fernando Martins; Lins, Liliane

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the health-related quality of life of former lead workers. Using the Short-Form 36 Questionnaire (SF-36), a cross-section design study evaluated the health-related quality of life of 186 former workers of a lead smelter that operated in Santo Amaro da Purificação, Brazil, from 1960 to 1993, when it closed down. The smelter had very poor occupational and environmental hygiene standards. The health-related quality of life of former lead workers was low, compared to population-based and other nosological groups from Brazil. Former lead workers who indicated metal poisoning, difficulty getting another job and who could not get another job after dismissal by the smelter presented poorer health-related quality of life. Former lead workers with poor health-related quality of life form part of the huge occupational liability left by the Santo Amaro lead smelter. PMID:26540067

  9. Health-Related Quality of Life of Former Lead Workers in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Martha Carvalho Pereira; Carvalho, Fernando Martins; Lins, Liliane

    2015-11-03

    Little is known about the health-related quality of life of former lead workers. Using the Short-Form 36 Questionnaire (SF-36), a cross-section design study evaluated the health-related quality of life of 186 former workers of a lead smelter that operated in Santo Amaro da Purificação, Brazil, from 1960 to 1993, when it closed down. The smelter had very poor occupational and environmental hygiene standards. The health-related quality of life of former lead workers was low, compared to population-based and other nosological groups from Brazil. Former lead workers who indicated metal poisoning, difficulty getting another job and who could not get another job after dismissal by the smelter presented poorer health-related quality of life. Former lead workers with poor health-related quality of life form part of the huge occupational liability left by the Santo Amaro lead smelter.

  10. Sleep disturbances, socioeconomic status, and seizure control as main predictors of quality of life in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Alanis-Guevara, I; Peña, E; Corona, T; López-Ayala, T; López-Meza, E; López-Gómez, M

    2005-11-01

    Improving quality of life is the most important goal for patients with epilepsy. To recognize the factors associated with quality of life in patients with epilepsy in Mexico, we performed a cross-sectional survey using the Quality of Life in Epilepsy 31 (QOLIE-31) inventory to assess the quality of life of 401 adult patients with epilepsy at the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico. Clinical and demographical data were collected. Multiple regression was used to determine which factors affected quality of life in our patients. The variables that most strongly predicted a lower QOLIE-31 total score after multiple regression were sleep disorders (P<0.001), socioeconomic status (P<0.001), female gender (P=0.002), and high seizure frequency (P=0.001). In our study, neither depression nor time of evolution of epilepsy had significant influence on QOLIE-31 scores.

  11. [Influence of socioeconomic factors on the quality of life of elderly hypertensive individuals].

    PubMed

    Andrade, João Marcus Oliveira; Rios, Lorena Roseli; Teixeira, Larissa Silva; Vieira, Fernanda Silva; Mendes, Danilo Cangussu; Vieira, Maria Aparecida; Silveira, Marise Fagundes

    2014-08-01

    This study sought to evaluate the association between socioeconomic variables and the quality of life of elderly hypertensive patients treated under the Family Health Program in the city of Montes Claros, Minas Gerais, Brazil. An analytical cross study was conducted in a representative sample of 294 elderly hypertensive patients. Data were collected using a questionnaire on socioeconomic characteristics and quality of life (MINICHAL). The data were analyzed using the nonparametric Mann-Whitney and Kuskall-Wallis tests. The results showed that marital status, religion and education affect the quality of life of elderly hypertensive patients in a statistically significant way. Elderly hypertensive patients who were single/divorced/widowed, evangelical, spiritualist and belonging to other religious bodies, illiterate achieved lower scores in terms of quality of life. For the remaining variables, there was no statistical association. The conclusion, drawn is that socioeconomic factors such as marital status, education and religion influence the quality of life of elderly hypertensive patients.

  12. The role of interpersonal sensitivity, social support, and quality of life in rural older adults.

    PubMed

    Wedgeworth, Monika; LaRocca, Michael A; Chaplin, William F; Scogin, Forrest

    The mental health of elderly individuals in rural areas is increasingly relevant as populations age and social structures change. While social support satisfaction is a well-established predictor of quality of life, interpersonal sensitivity symptoms may diminish this relation. The current study extends the findings of Scogin et al by investigating the relationship among interpersonal sensitivity, social support satisfaction, and quality of life among rural older adults and exploring the mediating role of social support in the relation between interpersonal sensitivity and quality of life (N = 128). Hierarchical regression revealed that interpersonal sensitivity and social support satisfaction predicted quality of life. In addition, bootstrapping resampling supported the role of social support satisfaction as a mediator between interpersonal sensitivity symptoms and quality of life. These results underscore the importance of nurses and allied health providers in assessing and attending to negative self-perceptions of clients, as well as the perceived quality of their social networks.

  13. Quality of life of nursing home residents in China: A mediation analysis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Huimin; Yoon, Ju Young; Bowers, Barbara

    2016-06-09

    We examined whether the relationship between activities of daily living and quality of life was mediated by depression, and identified differences of the mediating effects by age group. In this cross-sectional survey, 231 older adults were recruited from eight nursing homes. The path analysis indicated that depression played an important mediating role in the relationship between activities of daily living and quality of life. Depression appeared to be more significant for the mental health component as an outcome compared to the physical health component of quality of life. The impact of depression as a mediator for the older old group was greater than the young-middle group. This finding increases our understanding of the impact of age on the mediating effect of depression on the relationship between activities of daily living and quality of life. Healthcare providers should consider older adults' age differences when integrating physical or depression programs into clinical practice to enhance quality of life.

  14. [Quality of life and the healthcare system: do we know what we are doing? On the importance of quality of life from the perspective of patients].

    PubMed

    Kunz, Hans-Detlev

    2014-01-01

    "Healthcare" is not an exact term but an abstract representation of a system which itself is unable to create quality of life. The term "quality of life" is a general term. Every human being is part of the world he or she lives in (his or her "lifeworld", "Lebenswelt"). Health and disease have a direct and, through individual system components, significantly different effect. Is there a healthcare system? Which resources are available to this healthcare system and the individual persons themselves? There are numerous and quite different components influencing a patient's individual quality of life. These components also include the professional philosophy of physicians, their professional practice and their communication skills in dealing with their patients. The disease-related quality of life can be categorised into the groups "occasional diseases," "chronic, incurable diseases," "diseases leading to disability," or "fatal diseases". In each group, the factors influencing quality of life are subject to a different individual assessment. Disease does not stop at the doctor's office, but becomes an integral part of life, which is especially true of predestined, life-long chronic diseases such as, for example, psoriasis, a chronic skin condition. Diagnosis und limiting factors in treatment have an impact on the patient's quality of life, too, and must be conceived of as "indication-related". Also, support from outside the professional healthcare system, in particular from patient self-help organisations, contributes to assisting patients with maintaining a high level of individual quality of life. Self-help is not only effective, but useful as well, as has been demonstrated by initial studies in Germany.

  15. Evaluation of patients' quality of life aspects after cardiac pacemaker implantation

    PubMed Central

    de Barros, Rubens Tofano; de Carvalho, Sebastião Marcos Ribeiro; Silva, Marcos Augusto de Moraes; Borges, Juliana Bassalobre Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate patients' quality of life aspects after pacemaker implantation, relating it to gender, age, and implantation timespan. Methods A total of 107 clinically stable patients of both genders (49.5% women and 50.5% men) over 18 years old (average 69.3±12.6 years) and presenting an implantation timespan of three to 12 months (average 6.36±2.99 months) were evaluated. The evaluation included personal, clinical, and implant data as well as quality of life questionnaires (AQUAREL and SF-36). Statistical analysis was conducted using the t test and Pearson correlation, with a 5% significance level. Results The lowest SF-36 score referred to physical aspects, and the highest score referred to social aspects. In AQUAREL, the lowest score referred to dyspnea, and the highest referred to discomfort. There was a significant association between gender and quality of life in SF-36 (physical functioning and emotional aspects) and in AQUAREL (dyspnea). A negative correlation was observed between age and quality of life (functional capacity in SF-36, and discomfort in AQUAREL) in relation to implantation timespan, a correlation with vitality from SF-36. Conclusion Lower quality of life scores were found in physical aspects and dyspnea; and higher scores in social aspects and discomfort. Men presented higher quality of life scores related to physical functioning, emotional aspects and dyspnea. As age increases, quality of life worsens regarding functional capacity and discomfort; and the longer the pacemaker implantation timespan, the worse quality of life when it comes to vitality. Gender, age, and implantation timespan influence quality of life; thus, these variables must be considered in strategies for improving quality of life of patients with pacemakers. PMID:24896161

  16. Health-related quality of life in hemophilia: results of the Hemophilia-Specific Quality of Life Index (Haem-a-Qol) at a Brazilian blood center

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Adriana Aparecida; Leite, Isabel Cristina Gonçalves; Bustamante-Teixeira, Maria Teresa; Corrêa, Camila Soares Lima; da Cruz, Danielle Teles; Rodrigues, Daniela de Oliveira Werneck; Ferreira, Monica Calil Borges

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies on health-related quality of life are based on the increasingly evident need for medical care not to be limited to preventing death, but to focus instead on the value of health. Objective This study aimed to measure the health-related quality of life in hemophilia, using the Hemophilia- Specific Quality of Life (Haem-A-QoL) questionnaire and describe the socioeconomic characteristics and health conditions of these patients. Methods The Brazilian version of the Hemophilia-Specific Quality of Life questionnaire was administered to hemophiliac adults, treated in an on-demand regime at the Juiz de Fora Regional Blood Center - HEMOMINAS Foundation. The patients were interviewed about demographic and socioeconomic data and their understanding of the questionnaire. Clinical data were collected from medical records. The Mann-Whitney U test was used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set for p-values < 0.05. Statistical analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, version 15.0). Results Thirty-nine patients were evaluated. The mean age was 36.8 years. 84.6% had hemophilia A; 20.5% of the patients had hemophilia classified as mild, 41% as moderate and 38.5% as severe. The records of 10.5% of the patients registered seropositivity for anti-HIV and 57.9% for anti-HCV. Target joints were detected in 69.2%. The mean total Hemophilia-Specific Quality of Life score was 35.55. 'Sports and leisure'and 'Physical health'were the most impaired dimensions and the dimension 'Relationship and partners'was the least impaired. The Hemophilia-Specific Quality of Life scores showed good discriminant validity for hemophilia severity (p-value = 0.001), HIV-infection (p-value = 0.02), HCV-infection (p-value = 0.01) and the presence of target joints (p-value < 0.001). Conclusion Health-related quality of life in hemophilia, measured by the Hemophilia-Specific Quality of Life questionnaire, was influenced by the

  17. Quality of life in dementia: a study on proxy bias

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Measurement of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in dementia is difficult. At some point people with dementia become unable to meaningfully assess their own HRQoL. At such a point in time researchers need to rely on other types of information such as observation or assessments from informal caregivers (proxies). However, caregiver assessments may be biased by several mechanisms. The current study explores whether caregivers project part of their own HRQoL in their assessments of patient HRQoL. Methods The participants in the current study were 175 pairs, consisting of community-dwelling persons with dementia and their caregivers. The EQ-5D, the EQ-VAS and the QoL-AD were administered to collect HRQoL measurements from patients and caregivers at baseline, 6 months and 12 months. Two linear mixed models were used to investigate factors that bias proxy ratings, one with the EQ-VAS as dependent variable, and one with the EQ-5D utility as dependent variable. The independent variables were caregiver age, caregiver sex and caregiver QoL-AD items. Results The linear mixed model with EQ-VAS as dependent variable indicated that 3 caregiver characteristics, namely caregiver age, money (caregiver’s financial situation) and valuation of life as a whole were significant predictors of the patient-by-proxy VAS scores. The linear mixed model with utility value as the dependent variable showed that caregiver age and valuation of the ability to do things for fun were significant predictors of the patient-by-proxy EQ-5D utility values. Conclusions The current study was a first step in identifying factors that bias patient-by-proxy HRQoL assessments. It was discovered that caregivers project part of their own HRQoL onto patients when assessing patient HRQoL. This implies that patient-by-proxy HRQoL values should be interpreted with caution and not be used as a direct substitute for patient self-assessment, even when patients are no longer able meaningfully assess

  18. Domains that Determine Quality of Life in Vascular Amputees

    PubMed Central

    Suckow, Bjoern D.; Goodney, Philip P.; Nolan, Brian W.; Veeraswamy, Ravi K.; Gallagher, Patricia; Cronenwett, Jack L.; Kraiss, Larry W.

    2017-01-01

    Background Although patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) commonly undergo major limb amputation, the quality of life (QOL) of this group remains poorly described. Therefore, we sought to describe which domains vascular amputees consider important in determining their health-related QOL. Methods We performed 4 focus groups in patients who had major lower extremity amputations resulting from CLI. They were conducted at 4 distinct centers across the United States to ensure broad geographic, socioeconomic, and ethnic representation. Results Of 26 patients (mean age, 64 years), 19 (73%) were Caucasian, 6 (23%) were African American, and 1 (4%) was Native American. Nearly, three-quarter of patients were men (n = 19, 73%) and had a high-school education or more (n = 19, 73%). Overall, 8 (31%) were double amputees and 17 (65%) had diabetes. Time since amputation varied across patients and ranged from 3 months to more than 27 years (mean, 4.3 years). Patients stated that their current QOL was determined by impaired mobility (65%), pain (60%), progression of disease in the remaining limb (55%), and depression/frustration (54%). Across 26 patients, more than half (n = 16, 62%) described multiple prior revascularization procedures. Although most felt that their physician did his/her best to salvage the affected leg (85%), a sizable minority would have preferred an amputation earlier in their CLI treatment course (27%). Furthermore, when asked how their care might have been improved, patients reported that facilitating peer support (88%), more extensive rehabilitation and prosthetist involvement (71%), earlier mention of amputation as a possible outcome (54%), and the early discontinuation of narcotics (54%) were potential areas of improvement. Conclusions Although QOL in vascular amputees seems primarily determined by mobility impairment, pain, and emotional perturbation, our focus groups identified that physician-controlled factors such as the timing of amputation

  19. Land use and quality of life in 45 Israeli cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Sarah Jeanette

    This research tested the hypothesis that a latent construct of quality of life (QOL) in Israel is predictable from key socioeconomic and environmental variables associated with land use across 45 cities. Data were acquired from the Israel Central Bureau of Statistics, the International Policy Institute for Counter-Terrorism, and Landsat 7. The environmental variables included the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and percent of built land. Demographic and socioeconomic variables included average income per capita (between 672 and 4,569 shekels/month), percent of new motor vehicles (12.24 -- 41.15%), median age (12 -- 38 years of age), percent of students in each city between 20 and 29 years of age (0.10 -- 34.57%), percent of families with 4 or more children (2.32 -- 49.38%), population (9,302 -- 646,279 inhabitants), and the number of violent terrorist attacks per city (0 -- 52 attacks in 1999). The socioeconomic and environmental data were evaluated using correlation coefficients and principal components analysis to characterize QOL. The NDVI showed a weak positive correlation with percent of built land (r = 0.130; p = 0.361) and strong correlations with average income per capita ( r = 0.579; p = 0.000), median age (r = .388; p = 0.008), percent of new motor vehicles ( r = 0.472, p = 0.001), percent of families with 4 or more children (r = -0.480; p = 0.001), and percent of people in each city between 20 and 29 years who are students (r = 0.532; p = 0.000). Percent of built land showed a significant relationship with median age (r = 0.352; p = 0.018) and percent of new motor vehicles ( r = 0.337; p = 0.024). Principal components analysis supported the grouping of all socioeconomic variables, but interestingly, NDVI did not cluster with this group. Although NDVI correlates with specific socioeconomic variables, NDVI was not found in this study to be a predictor of QOL in the Israeli cities. These results demonstrate a quantifiable relationship between

  20. ApoE and Quality of Life in Nonagenarians

    PubMed Central

    Parsaik, Ajay K; Lapid, Maria I.; Rummans, Teresa A.; Cha, Ruth H.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Pankratz, Vernon (Shane) S.; Tangalos, Eric G.; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives ApoE ε4 is associated with adverse health conditions that negatively impact the quality of life (QOL). The relationship between ApoE ε4 and QOL has not been explored in the oldest old. Our study aimed to examine ApoE in the oldest old, and explore its association with QOL. Design Cross-sectional cohort study. Setting A medium sized community in Olmsted County, Minnesota, USA. Participants 90–99 year old individuals living independently or in long term care environments. Measurements We collected demographic information and measured cognitive function (Short Test of Mental Status [STMS], Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE], Mattis Dementia Rating Scale [DRS]), QOL (Linear Analogue Self Assessment [LASA]) and ApoE distribution. Subjects were classified as cognitively normal, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), dementia (DEM), or dementia with stroke and/or parkinsonism (DEMSP). Regression model was used to assess the predictors of QOL. Results 121 subjects (45 cognitively normal, 13 MCI, 34 DEM, 29 DEMSP) aged 90–99,106 (87.6 %) females, were included. Frequency of ApoE ε3 allele was highest [194 (80.2%): ε2/3 18, ε3/3 77, ε3/4 22] followed by ApoE ε4 [25 (10.3%): ε2/4 3, ε3/4 22] and ApoE ε2 [23 (9.5%; ε2/2 1, ε2/3 18, ε2/4 3]. None of the subjects carried ApoE ε4/4 genotype. QOL was similar between ApoE ε4 carrier and non-carriers. Physical well-being, emotional well-being, intellectual well-being, social connectedness and coping ability were positively associated with QOL, whereas male gender, DEMSP, pain frequency and pain severity were negatively associated. Conclusions The most common ApoE in the oldest old was ε3/3 genotype and ε3 allele. No association was found between ApoE ε4 and QOL. However, those with high physical, emotional and intellectual well being, social connectedness and coping ability had the highest overall QOL. PMID:22863665

  1. Integrating health profile with survival for quality of life assessment.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Wang, Jung-Der

    2004-02-01

    In cohort studies or clinical trials, measurements of quality of life (QoL) were averaged across available individuals for each group at given points in time to produce single measures for comparisons. However, estimates of these single measures may be severely biased if substantial mortality occurs over time. The objective of this study is to develop a method that integrates QoL measurement and survival for long-term evaluation of health services. We defined a mean QoL score function over time for an index population as the average QoL score of all individuals both alive and dead at each time point in the population. While a living subject's QoL can be assessed by asking one's subjective preference, the score of a decedent can be assigned a fixed value depending on the specific facet on health profile. The mean QoL score function over time is reduced to a single measure of expected cumulative QoL score, which is the area under the curve of mean QoL score function over a given time interval and can be estimated by taking a random sample from a cross-sectional survey. For the QoL score function to be extrapolated to life-long, it requires the assumption that the disease causes premature death or a long-term moderate impairment of QoL. We provided methods and computer programs for estimating mean QoL score functions and the reduced single measures for use in comparisons. A cohort of 779 breast cancer patients from Chiangmai, Thailand were followed for 12 years to demonstrate the proposed methods. The data included the 12-year complete survival records and QoL scores on 233 patients collected from a cross-sectional survey using WHOQOL questionnaire and standard gamble method. The expected cumulative QoL scores using utility and psychometric scales were compared among patients in four groups of clinical stages in this cohort for time from onset up to 12 years and life-long. We conclude that such an integration of QoL measurement with survival can be useful for the

  2. Design and development of an automated, portable and handheld tablet personal computer-based data acquisition system for monitoring electromyography signals during rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, Nizam U; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Poo, Tarn S

    2013-03-01

    This article describes the design of a robust, inexpensive, easy-to-use, small, and portable online electromyography acquisition system for monitoring electromyography signals during rehabilitation. This single-channel (one-muscle) system was connected via the universal serial bus port to a programmable Windows operating system handheld tablet personal computer for storage and analysis of the data by the end user. The raw electromyography signals were amplified in order to convert them to an observable scale. The inherent noise of 50 Hz (Malaysia) from power lines electromagnetic interference was then eliminated using a single-hybrid IC notch filter. These signals were sampled by a signal processing module and converted into 24-bit digital data. An algorithm was developed and programmed to transmit the digital data to the computer, where it was reassembled and displayed in the computer using software. Finally, the following device was furnished with the graphical user interface to display the online muscle strength streaming signal in a handheld tablet personal computer. This battery-operated system was tested on the biceps brachii muscles of 20 healthy subjects, and the results were compared to those obtained with a commercial single-channel (one-muscle) electromyography acquisition system. The results obtained using the developed device when compared to those obtained from a commercially available physiological signal monitoring system for activities involving muscle contractions were found to be comparable (the comparison of various statistical parameters) between male and female subjects. In addition, the key advantage of this developed system over the conventional desktop personal computer-based acquisition systems is its portability due to the use of a tablet personal computer in which the results are accessible graphically as well as stored in text (comma-separated value) form.

  3. Determinants of Quality of Life for Breast Cancer Patients in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Bei; Yang, Li-Ming; Hao, Li-Peng; Yang, Chen; Quan, Lei; Wang, Li-Hong; Wu, Zheng; Li, Xiao-Pan; Gao, Yu-Tang; Sun, Qiao; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the association of social support status, health insurance and clinical factors with the quality of life of Chinese women with breast cancer. Methods Information on demographics, clinical characteristics, and social support status was collected from 1,160 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer in Shanghai, China. The Perceived Social Support Scale was used to assess different sources of social support for breast cancer patients. The quality of life was evaluated using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast Cancer that consisted of five domains: breast cancer-specific, emotional, functional, physical, and social & family well-being. Multivariate linear regression models were used to evaluate the associations of demographic variables, clinical characteristics, and social support status with the quality of life measures. Results Adequate social support from family members, friends and neighbors, and higher scores of Perceived Social Support Scale were associated with significantly improved quality of life of breast cancer patients. Higher household income, medical insurance plans with low copayment, and treatment with traditional Chinese medicine for breast cancer all were associated with higher (better) scores of quality of life measures whereas patients receiving chemotherapy had significantly lower scores of quality of life. Conclusion Social support and financial aids may significantly improve the quality of life of breast cancer survivors. PMID:27082440

  4. Psychosocial factors as predictors of quality of life in chronic portuguese patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic illnesses are diseases of long duration and generally of slow progression. They cause significant quality of life impairment. The aim of this study was to analyse psychosocial predictors of quality of life and of subjective well-being in chronic Portuguese patients. Methods Chronic disease patients (n = 774) were recruited from central Portuguese Hospitals. Participants completed self-reported questionnaires assessing socio-demographic, clinical, psychosocial and outcome variables: quality of life (HRQL) and subjective well-being (SWB). MANCOVA analyses were used to test psychosocial factors as determinants of HRQL and SWB. Results After controlling for socio-demographic and clinical variables, results showed that dispositional optimism, positive affect, spirituality, social support and treatment adherence are significant predictors of HRQL and SWB. Similar predictors of quality of life, such as positive affect, treatment adherence and spirituality, were found for subgroups of disease classified by medical condition. Conclusions The work identifies psychosocial factors associated with quality of life. The predictors for the entire group of different chronic diseases are similar to the ones found in different chronic disease subgroups: positive affect, social support, treatment adherence and spirituality. Patients with more positive affect, additional social support, an adequate treatment adherence and a feel-good spirituality, felt better with the disease conditions and consequently had a better quality of life. This study contributes to understanding and improving the processes associated with quality of life, which is relevant for health care providers and chronic diseases support. PMID:24405802

  5. [Vestibular rehabilitation in the quality of life and the symptomatology of dizziness among the elderly].

    PubMed

    Rocha Júnior, Paulo Roberto; Kozan, Elton Storto; Moraes, Josué Ferreira de; Pereira, Fernando Garbi; Moreno, Adriana Bassan

    2014-08-01

    The scope of this paper was to analyze the effect of a structured protocol of vestibular rehabilitation in the symptomatology of dizziness and the quality of life among the elderly. Nine elderly individuals were attended, namely four males and five females. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) was used to assess quality of life and the dizziness quantification scale for the symptomatology of dizziness. A protocol for vestibular rehabilitation consisting of group activities was then developed. The Wilcoxon test and Student t-test were used for data analysis. The Spearman correlation coefficient was used to analyze the relationship between quality of life and the symptomology of dizziness. The significance level used was 5%. There was significant improvement in the symptomatology of dizziness, overall quality of life and physical, emotional and functional aspects after completion of the program. There was also a good positive correlation between the symptomatology of dizziness and quality of life. The conclusion reached was that program participants had a significant improvement of dizziness, general quality of life and their respective vestibular rehabilitation aspects. There was also a good correlation between symptomatology of dizziness and overall quality of life.

  6. Effect of Progressive Muscle Relaxation on the Fatigue and Quality of Life Among Iranian Aging Persons.

    PubMed

    Hassanpour-Dehkordi, Ali; Jalali, Amir

    2016-07-01

    Since the elderly population is increasing rapidly in developing countries which may decrease the physical activity and exercise and in turn could affect the elderly's quality of life, this study aimed to investigate the effect of progressive muscle relaxation on the elderly's quality of life in Iran. In a randomized clinical trial, participants were randomly divided into intervention and control groups. For the intervention group, muscular progressive relaxation was run three days per week for three months (totally 36 sessions). In relaxation, a patient contract a group of his/her muscles in each step and relaxes them after five seconds and finally loosens all muscles and takes five deep breaths. Each session lasts for 45 minutes. The instrument of data gathering consisted of questionnaires on individual's demographic data and quality of life SF-36. After intervention, quality of life increased significantly in the patients undergoing muscular progressive relaxation and fatigue severity decreased significantly in the intervention group compared to prior to intervention. In addition, there was a statistically significant difference in mean score of physical performance, restricted activity after physical problem, energy, socially function, physical pain, overall hygiene, and quality of life between intervention and control groups. By implementing regular and continuous progressive muscle relaxation, quality of life could be increased in different dimensions in the elderly and the context could be provided to age healthily and enjoy higher health and autonomy. Therefore, all of the therapeutic staffs are recommended to implement this plan to promote the elderly's quality of life.

  7. ADHERENCE AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS IN NORTHERN GREECE

    PubMed Central

    Zioga, Efrosini; Kazakos, Kyriakos; Dimopoulos, Evagelos; Koutras, Christos; Marmara, Kalliopi; Marmara, Eleni-Efrosini; Marmaras, Athanasios; Lavdaniti, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adherence as a concept includes various types of health-related behavior. Better medical adherence leads to improved disease control and fewer diabetes–related complications. Quality of life and medication adherence are interrelated. Patients with diabetes who adhere to their treatment can experience an improvement in quality of life and vice versa. Aim: To assess treatment adherence in patients with type II diabetes, as well as the connection between adherence and quality of life. Methodology: A descriptive non-experimental study was conducted in a provincial hospital in Northern Greece. The sample examined was a convenience sample consisting of 108 patients with type II diabetes mellitus. They completed the “Diabetes Self-Care Activities Questionnaire” and SF-36 “Quality of Life Questionnaire”. Results: Participants demonstrated good adherence to diet and blood test / blood glucose test routines, but did not experience high levels of quality of life. The type of treatment affected the adherence to blood tests with a statistically significant difference (p=0,000). Also, marital status affected mental health with a statistically significant difference (p=0,032). The adherence sub scales are correlated with the all domains of quality of life. Conclusions: According to our findings, it is important to plan interventions to enhance adherence to other types of treatment and to help patients to further improve their quality of life. PMID:27698597

  8. Impact of trauma and surgical treatment on the quality of life of patients with facial fractures.

    PubMed

    Conforte, J J; Alves, C P; Sánchez, M del P R; Ponzoni, D

    2016-05-01

    This study assessed the impact of oral and maxillofacial trauma and surgical treatment on the quality of life of patients. The study included 66 patients (age range 18-65 years) with facial fractures; 33 required surgical treatment and 33 required conservative (non-surgical) treatment. Quality of life was evaluated by applying the Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire (OHIP-14) immediately after diagnosis of the trauma (T1), 30 days after surgery or trauma (T2), and 90 days after surgery or trauma (T3). For the control group (conservative treatment), there was a change in quality of life at T1 and T2. A change in quality of life was found for all of the surgical patients, regardless of the type of fracture and the observation period analyzed. There was no statistical difference when T1, T2, and T3 were compared in cases of zygomatic, Le Fort I, and nasal fractures, however there was an improvement in the quality of life of patients with mandibular fractures (P=0.0102) and multiple facial fractures (P=0.0097) at T3. Facial trauma caused the greatest impact on the quality of life of surgical patients at T1. The surgical treatment significantly improved quality of life for patients with mandibular and multiple facial fractures.

  9. Health-related quality of life in children with high-functioning autism.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Marie-Christine; Snider, Laurie; Prelock, Patricia A; Wood-Dauphinee, Sharon; Kehayia, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The health-related quality of life of school-aged children with high-functioning autism is poorly understood. The objectives of this study were to compare the health-related quality of life of children with high-functioning autism to that of typically developing peers and to compare child-self and parent-proxy reports of health-related quality of life of children. A cross-sectional study of children with high-functioning autism (n = 30) and peers (n = 31) was conducted using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 Generic Core Scales. Children with high-functioning autism had significantly poorer health-related quality of life than peers whether reported by themselves (p < .001) or their parents (p < .001), although disagreement (intra-class coefficient = -.075) between children and parental scores suggested variance in points of view. This study specifically investigated health-related quality of life in children with high-functioning autism as compared to a sample of peers, from the child's perspective. It strengthens earlier findings that children with high-functioning autism experience poorer health-related quality of life than those without this disorder and points to the importance of clinicians working with families to identify areas in a child's life that promote or hinder their sense of well-being.

  10. Changes in quality of life associated with surgical risk in elderly patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Romero, Paola Severo; de Souza, Emiliane Nogueira; Rodrigues, Juliane; Moraes, Maria Antonieta

    2015-10-01

    The study aims to verify quality of life of elderly patients submitted to cardiac surgery, and correlating surgical risk to health-related quality of life instrument domains. Prospective cohort study, performed at a cardiology hospital. It included elderly patients who had undergone elective cardiac surgery. Pre- and postoperative quality of life was evaluated by applying the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Old (WHOQOL-OLD) scale and the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire. Surgical risk was stratified using the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE). Fifty-four patients, mostly men (64.8%), were included, with a mean age of 69.3 ± 5.7 years. The eight domains of the SF-36 questionnaire, and the four facets presented for the WHOQOL-OLD scale showed improved quality of life 6 months after surgery (P < 0.001). No difference was found in the association of EuroSCORE with the domains of the health-related quality of life instruments. The data showed improved quality of life of elderly people submitted to cardiac surgery, unrelated to surgical risk.

  11. Determinants of quality of life in elderly patients of a psychosocial care center in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bottan, Gabriela; Morais, Eliane Pinheiro de; Schneider, Jacó Fernando; Trentini, Clarissa; Heldt, Elizeth

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the sociodemographic, clinical, and functional determinants of quality of life in elderly (older than 60 years) patients from a Psychosocial Care Center. The sample was randomly selected patients undergoing treatment at the center during the study period. Quality of life was assessed using the brief version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment (WHOQOL-BREF) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment for older adults (WHOQOL-OLD). A total of 50 elderly individuals with a mean age of 67.5 (SD = 5.72) years were included in the study. A hierarchical linear regression showed that clinical characteristics, such as severe symptoms of depression and a higher number of comorbidities, were related to lower quality of life. Better functional capacity and more frequent visits to the center were determinants of higher quality of life. These findings underscore the importance of assessing quality of life and of taking this variable into account when planning health interventions for elderly patients at a Psychosocial Care Center.

  12. Quality of life of critically ill patients in a developing country: a prospective longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Mafra, José Marcelo e Souza; Maria da Silva, Janete; Yamada da Silveira, Leda Tomiko; Fu, Carolina; Tanaka, Clarice

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the quality of life of critical illness survivors in a developing country over the time after hospital discharge and to assess the influence of clinical variables on quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] A prospective longitudinal study was conducted in a large, tertiary, public hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil. We included patients ≥18 years old, hospitalized in the intensive care unit with ≥24 hours of invasive mechanical ventilation. Quality of life was assessed using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, which was applied by telephone interview at the first, third and sixth months after hospital discharge. [Results] 75 patients were included in the study. Quality of life improved progressively after hospital discharge; role-physical was the most compromised domain. The physical component was influenced by the age. Quality of life was not influenced by Apache II categorization, length of invasive mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit stay or hospital stay. [Conclusion] Survivors of critical illness in a developing country present poor quality of life, which improves over time. Age influenced the physical component of quality of life. PMID:27821961

  13. Participation and quality of life in children and adolescents with congenital limb deficiencies: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Michielsen, Anka; Van Wijk, Iris; Ketelaar, Marjolijn

    2010-12-01

    Children and adolescents with congenital limb deficiencies are visibly and physically different from their peers. They present limitations in activities, depending on the severity of deficiency. Therefore they are at risk for lower participation in social and leisure activities. This might negatively influence the perception on their quality of life. The aim of this narrative review is to describe participation and quality of life in children with congenital limb deficiencies. Participation and quality of life are relatively new concepts. Psychosocial functioning, being closely related to the concept of quality of life, is described as well. A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted on participation, quality of life and psychosocial functioning in children and adolescents with congenital limb deficiencies. The review involved a systematic search using multiple data sources. Fifteen cross-sectional studies were included in this review. The literature to date provides limited knowledge on how children and adolescents with congenital limb deficiencies participate and how they perceive their quality of life. The psychosocial functioning, although described as at risk, appears to be comparable to healthy peers. In conclusion, more research is needed on how children and adolescents with congenital limb deficiencies participate and how they perceive their quality of life. A broader perspective will not only help parents in making the right choices for their children, but can also have implications for health care providers, teachers and agencies funding rehabilitation services.

  14. Assessment of Questionnaires Measuring Quality of Life in Infertile Couples: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyyed Abbas; Masoumi, Seyyedeh Zahra; Keramat, Afsaneh; Pooralajal, Jalal; Shobeiri, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Background Infertility has potentially inappropriate effects on quality of life in infertile couples. Various general and specific questionnaires have been structured for assessing different aspects of quality of life in infertile men, women, or couples. The present systematic review was designed to assess these questionnaires and also identify different factors affecting infertile couples based on the aforesaid questionnaires. Methods The research strategy involved general and specific terms in relation to couples's infertility and their quality of life. A review was done for studies published from 1982 to 2012 that were indexed in Medline, ISI Web of Science and Scopus as well as abstract books on this subject. We also corresponded with the authors of the references in related studies for introducing more resources and references. Results In all reviewed studies, different aspects of the quality of life in couples were evaluated including sexual, psychological, social, communicational, environmental, occupational, medical, as well as economical ones. In total, after initial screening of all studies, 10 general and 2 specific questionnaires were retrieved. Although no meta-analysis was found in the review, infertility had a negative effect on quality of life in couples. Conclusion This study revealed that some general questionnaires such as SF-36 and WHO-QOL were mostly used for assessing quality of life in infertile couples and some specific questionnaires such as FERTI-QoL and Fertility Problem Inventory were rarely used. Thus, it seems that the evaluation of quality of life in infertile couples needs valid instruments for measurement. PMID:24163794

  15. Management of Pain and Quality of Life in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease Undergoing Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Zyga, Sofia; Alikari, Victoria; Sachlas, Athanasios; Stathoulis, John; Aroni, Adamantia; Theofilou, Paraskevi; Panoutsopoulos, Georgios

    2015-10-01

    An important dimension that influences the quality of life of hemodialysis patients is the pain they experience. Quality of life and self-efficacy in pain can play an important role in chronic kidney disease and treatment outcomes. The purpose of the study was to examine self-efficacy in pain and quality of life among patients with end stage renal disease undergoing hemodialysis. Between April 2013 and June 2013, 224 hemodialysis patients completed the Missoula-VITAS Quality of Life Index-15 and the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire. The study was conducted in four dialysis units in hospitals of the Peloponnese region. Sociodemographic data of patients and their individual medical history were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 19. The more effective the self-efficacy in pain, the lower the quality of life enjoyed by hemodialysis patients. The majority of respondents described the overall quality of life as "moderate," while the self-efficacy in pain depended on comorbidity or complications that accompany the process of hemodialysis. The findings of this study can be used in the development and improvement of health services for the management of patients. Healthcare professionals should understand the concerns and treat the symptoms of patients that affect quality of life, providing thereby holistic health care.

  16. Quality-of-life assessment in advanced lung cancer: considerations for evaluation in patients receiving chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gralla, Richard J; Thatcher, Nick

    2004-12-01

    There is increasing awareness of the need for accurate assessment of quality of life in patients with lung cancer who are on clinical trials and in patient management. Self-reported multidimensional, validated, quality-of-life instruments assess physical, functional, psychological, social, and spiritual dimensions associated with lung cancer and its treatment. Such validated instruments are now available and are being utilized more frequently in clinical trials assessing the value of particular anticancer therapies. Such findings may influence the treatment of choice for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), particularly in the advanced-disease setting where survival benefits from current treatments are modest, and the majority of patients present with three or more symptoms. Recently, a number of studies assessing quality of life in NSCLC have been published providing more insight into the effects of the disease and its treatment on the patient's perspective. Quality-of-life instruments that include patient reported outcomes ("PROS") and quality-of-life and symptom assessment are the only way to evaluate this crucial aspect of cancer care. As an example, Fossella and colleagues reported notable findings from the largest prospective evaluation (the TAX 326 trial) of quality of life using validated instruments in patients with NSCLC who received chemotherapy. Patients who received a docetaxel plus platinum combination regimen reported modest benefits in both quality of life and in disease-related parameters, such as pain control, weight loss, and performance status, compared to patients randomly assigned to the combination of vinorelbine and cisplatin. Compliance with the PRO assessment was high, supporting the feasibility of prospective quality-of-life evaluations in NSCLC. Important goals include building on these results by including quality-of-life assessment in all major clinical trials, and demonstrating feasible ways to incorporate this evaluation

  17. Scales on Quality of Life in patients with spinal cord injury: integrative review.

    PubMed

    Aquarone, Rita Lacerda; Faro, Ana Cristina Mancussi e

    2014-04-01

    Studies evaluating the Quality of Life of individuals with spinal cord injury using different research tools demonstrate that the Quality of Life scores are considered low both in national and international studies. The objective of this review was to characterize the international scientific production about the most used scales to assess Quality of Life in patients with spinal cord injury. We examined articles on Quality of Life of patients with spinal cord injury published over the last 5 years and indexed in the National Library of Medicine (PUBMED). During this period, 28 articles met the inclusion criteria. Eleven studies were conducted in the United States, five articles were published in Australia, and four in Canada. Brazil, France, Holland, India, Japan, Norway, Singapore and Switzerland contributed with one study each. The scientific articles were published in 13 high impact factor journals. Seven different instruments to assess Quality of Life were used in the studies: Satisfaction with Life Scale, Short Form (36) Health Survey, The Brief Version of the WHO Quality of Life Questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF), Comprehensive Quality of Life Scale, Life Situation Questionnaire-Revised, Quality of Well-Being Scale and the SF-12® Health Survey. The articles examined underscore the impact of spinal cord injury in the Quality of Life of patients, demonstrating how this condition impairs their lives, mainly socially, but followed by the physical aspects. Despite the studies have different goals they all acknowledge that further studies are necessary in order to determine the Quality of Life of patients with spinal cord injury. Specific instruments should be chosen or developed and validated in order to fulfill this purpose.

  18. Scales on Quality of Life in patients with spinal cord injury: integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Aquarone, Rita Lacerda; Faro, Ana Cristina Mancussi e

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Studies evaluating the Quality of Life of individuals with spinal cord injury using different research tools demonstrate that the Quality of Life scores are considered low both in national and international studies. The objective of this review was to characterize the international scientific production about the most used scales to assess Quality of Life in patients with spinal cord injury. We examined articles on Quality of Life of patients with spinal cord injury published over the last 5 years and indexed in the National Library of Medicine (PUBMED). During this period, 28 articles met the inclusion criteria. Eleven studies were conducted in the United States, five articles were published in Australia, and four in Canada. Brazil, France, Holland, India, Japan, Norway, Singapore and Switzerland contributed with one study each. The scientific articles were published in 13 high impact factor journals. Seven different instruments to assess Quality of Life were used in the studies: Satisfaction with Life Scale, Short Form (36) Health Survey, The Brief Version of the WHO Quality of Life Questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF), Comprehensive Quality of Life Scale, Life Situation Questionnaire-Revised, Quality of Well-Being Scale and the SF-12® Health Survey. The articles examined underscore the impact of spinal cord injury in the Quality of Life of patients, demonstrating how this condition impairs their lives, mainly socially, but followed by the physical aspects. Despite the studies have different goals they all acknowledge that further studies are necessary in order to determine the Quality of Life of patients with spinal cord injury. Specific instruments should be chosen or developed and validated in order to fulfill this purpose PMID:25003935

  19. Examining the Quality of Life of Farmers with Disabilities: The Ohio AgrAbility Study.

    PubMed

    Windon, S R; Jepsen, S D; Scheer, S D

    2016-01-01

    Quality of life is a broad concept that presents a challenge to measure as a scientific category. Quality of life encompasses a broad range of variables based on an individual's expression of life satisfaction, perceptions, values, feelings of subjective well-being, and happiness. This study identified and examined factors that influenced the quality of life of Ohio farmers with disabilities who were enrolled in the Ohio AgrAbility Program (OAP) (n = 55) and participated in this study (60% response rate). A 34-item questionnaire was created. The sample of OAP farmers reported stress many days a week, had a negative outlook on life, and were less satisfied with their overall quality of life because of their health. The OAP participants reported external factors, such as cost of equipment, financial pressures, and input costs, as having a negative effect on their quality of life. The participants also reported that they were not satisfied with the amount of vacation time (60.6%), managing farm work and family life (54.6%), overall health (55%), and quality of life (27%). The results showed a significant difference between the OAP participants' overall quality of life and the following variables: gender, net cash income, outlook on life, health, stress, farm work, managing farm and family, social activities, and emotional support for farmers with disabilities. The findings of this exploratory study allowed farmers to identify factors that they perceived as important to their quality of life. Moreover, the results may be helpful for stakeholders to better understand the needs of farmers with disabilities and provide appropriate educational and other services to enhance their quality of life.

  20. Factors influencing the quality of life perception in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Timar, Romulus; Velea, Iulian; Timar, Bogdan; Lungeanu, Diana; Oancea, Cristian; Roman, Deiana; Mazilu, Octavian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the impact of several factors on the patient’s perception on quality of life in a group of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients and methods In this cross-sectional study, 198 patients with T2DM were enrolled according to a consecutive-case population-based study design. In all participants, the perception on the quality of life was measured using the quality of life index – diabetes version III proposed by Ferrans and Powers. We evaluated the impact of several anthropometric and diabetes-related (ie, diabetes history and quality of glycemic control) factors on the patient’s perception on the quality of life. Results The presence of diabetes complications was associated with a decreased quality of life: retinopathy (1 vs 5 points; P<0.001), chronic kidney disease (−1 vs 5 points; P<0.001), and neuropathy (−1 vs 5 points; P<0.001). A significant reverse correlation was found between the patient’s quality of life and depression’s severity (Spearman’s r=−0.345; P<0.001) and body mass index (Spearman’s r=−0.158; P=0.026). A positive association between the quality of life and the quality of diabetes-related self-care activities was found (Spearman’s r=0.338; P<0.001). No significant association was found between the patient’s quality of life and the quality of glycemic control, diabetes duration, age, gender, or smoking status. Conclusion To improve the patient’s quality of life, special care should be given to the modifiable diabetes-related factors: the prevention and treatment of diabetes complications, treatment of depression, and weight loss in obese and overweight patients. PMID:28003741

  1. The relationship between building design and residents' quality of life in extra care housing schemes.

    PubMed

    Orrell, Alison; McKee, Kevin; Torrington, Judith; Barnes, Sarah; Darton, Robin; Netten, Ann; Lewis, Alan

    2013-05-01

    Well-designed housing is recognised as being an important factor in promoting a good quality of life. Specialised housing models incorporating care services, such as extra care housing (ECH) schemes are seen as enabling older people to maintain a good quality of life despite increasing health problems that can accompany ageing. Despite the variation in ECH building design little is known about the impact of ECH building design on the quality of life of building users. The evaluation of older people's living environments (EVOLVE) study collected cross-sectional data on building design and quality of life in 23 ECH schemes in England, UK. Residents' quality of life was assessed using the schedule for the evaluation of individual quality of life-direct weighting (SEIQoL-DW) and on the four domains of control, autonomy, self-realisation and pleasure on the CASP-19. Building design was measured on 12 user-related domains by means of a new tool; the EVOLVE tool. Using multilevel linear regression, significant associations were found between several aspects of building design and quality of life. Furthermore, there was evidence that the relationship between building design and quality of life was partly mediated by the dependency of participants and scheme size (number of living units). Our findings suggest that good quality building design in ECH can support the quality of life of residents, but that designing features that support the needs of both relatively independent and frail users is problematic, with the needs of highly dependent users not currently supported as well as could be hoped by ECH schemes.

  2. Health-related quality of life in early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Groenvold, Mogens

    2010-09-01

    The treatment of primary breast cancer usually consists of surgery often followed by adjuvant therapy (radiotherapy, chemotherapy, hormonal treatment, etc.) to reduce the risk of recurrence. The cancer diagnosis and the treatments may have significant impact on the patients' quality of life. This thesis deals with scientific aspects and clinical results of a study aimed at assessing the impact of breast cancer (and its treatment) on the patients' quality of life. Studies such as this assessing the problems and symptoms experienced by the patients are often referred to as health-related quality of life (HRQL) research. HRQL research deals with subjective experiences and raises challenging, scientific questions. Therefore, much attention was directed towards methodological issues in this clinically motivated project. The study was a prospective, longitudinal, questionnaire-based investigation of women with newly diagnosed breast cancer registered in the Danish Breast Cancer Co-operative Group's DBCG 89 Program. The patients were sub-divided into low-risk and high-risk patients. High-risk patients were offered randomisation in one of three randomised adjuvant therapy trials involving chemotherapy, ovarian ablation, and endocrine therapy. After a literature study and interviews with breast cancer patients, a questionnaire was composed that included two widely used standard questionnaires (EORTC QLQ-C30 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale) and a DBCG 89 Questionnaire developed for this study. A total of 1,898 eligible patients were invited by post to participate in the study involving six assessments over a 2-year period, and 1,713 patients (90%) completed the first questionnaire. Furthermore, a questionnaire was sent to 872 women selected at random from the general population; 608 (70%) responded. The multi-item scales of the two standard questionnaires were analysed for so-called differential item functioning (DIF) in order to investigate whether the

  3. Understanding the life experience of people on hemodialysis: adherence to treatment and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Guerrerro, Verónica; Plazas, Maria del Pilar Camargo; Cameron, Brenda L; Salas, Anna Valeria Santos; González, Carmen Gloria Cofre

    2014-01-01

    This hermeneutic-phenomenological study explores the lived experiences of patients on hemodialysis in regard to the adherence to treatment and quality of life. Fifteen patients were interviewed, including six women and nine men from three dialysis centers in Chile. Two main themes derived from the analysis: 1) embracing the disease and dialysis, and 2) preventing progression of the disease through treatment management. The findings suggest that patients recognize adherence to treatment and quality of life as conditions that derive from self-care and environmental conditions, which the healthcare provider must constantly assess for care planning to improve the adherence and quality of life in this population.

  4. Analysis of the quality of life of patients with asthma and allergic rhinitis after immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Szynkiewicz, Ewa; Cegła, Bernadeta; Bartuzi, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Aim To assess the quality of life of Polish patients with asthma and/or allergic rhinitis before the implementation and after 30–36 months of immunotherapy. Material and methods Two hundred patients have been involved in the study: 101 with allergic asthma and 99 with pollinosis. In order to collect research material, the Polish versions of AQLQ (Asthma Quality of Life) and RQLQ (Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life) questionnaires have been used. The self-administered questionnaires concerned such data as age, sex and the patients’ subjective evaluation of their quality of life. Results The average increase in quality of life of patients with asthma was 0.84 and of patients with allergic rhinitis – 1.50. A hypothesis was made that changes of quality of life in each examined group differed significantly. A test for two fractions showed that for patients with asthma it was 7.74 and for patients with allergic rhinitis – 10.38. A statistical analysis showed no such relation in the group of patients with asthma (coefficient of correlation = 0.08) and a slight correlation in the group of patients with allergic rhinitis (coefficient of correlation = 0.20). Applied tests did not show any significant differences, which means that an average increase in quality of life does not depend on sex and age of both examined groups. Conclusions On the basis of the research conducted among patients before and after a 3-year period of immunotherapy, the following conclusions have been drawn: 1) immunotherapy significantly improves the objective quality of life in both groups; 2) a slight correlation has been identified between the objective and subjective dimension of quality of life amongst patients with asthma, what contributes to a better quality of life; 3) in both study groups, no significant relationship between gender or age and improvement in quality of life has been noted; 4) immunotherapy, from the point of view of the improvement of quality of life, is a valuable

  5. Coping with psychosomatic symptoms: The buffering role of psychological flexibility and impact on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Leonidou, Chrysanthi; Panayiotou, Georgia; Bati, Aspasia; Karekla, Maria

    2016-09-05

    Individual differences in avoidant coping were hypothesized to exacerbate quality of life impairment associated with somatization and illness anxiety symptoms; psychological flexibility was expected to moderate this impairment. Individuals from a random community sample (N = 298; 182 females), who met screening criteria for somatization and illness anxiety, reported lower quality of life and psychological flexibility and greater avoidant coping compared to controls. Psychological flexibility significantly moderated the impact of somatization and illness anxiety on quality of life domains. Findings suggest that decreasing avoidant coping through therapy may be promising in mitigating the negative impact of these symptom categories.

  6. Caregivers' Illness Perceptions Contribute to Quality of Life in Head and Neck Cancer Patients at Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Amy E; Morton, Randall; Broadbent, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the contribution of patient and caregiver illness perceptions to the quality of life of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Ninety-eight patients and their caregivers (n = 80) completed questionnaires at diagnosis. Caregivers' illness perceptions were significantly more negative than patients with respect to consequences, timeline, treatment, concern, and the emotional impact of HNC. The interaction between some patient and caregiver illness perceptions explained additional variance in patient quality of life, above and beyond patients' own illness perceptions. These findings suggest that caregivers should be included in psychological interventions to improve HNC patient quality of life.

  7. [Methodology for analysing quality-of-life data in the benefit assessment of pharmaceuticals].

    PubMed

    Leverkus, Friedhelm

    2014-01-01

    Early benefit assessment aims to prove a benefit of a new pharmaceutical over the appropriate comparator based on patient-relevant endpoints. In addition to mortality and morbidity, quality of life is a patient-relevant endpoint. Thus, phase III clinical trials are the basis of evidence. But HTA and health authorities attach different importance to quality of life. Using the example of oncology, the challenges with study design and analysis will be discussed. A particular challenge to the analysis of quality-of-life data is varying observation times in treatment arms with different effectiveness. Based on the example of Crizotinib possible solutions will be presented.

  8. Study of the spiritual intelligence role in predicting university students' quality of life.

    PubMed

    Bolghan-Abadi, Mustafa; Ghofrani, Fatemeh; Abde-Khodaei, Mohammad Saeed

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the spiritual intelligence role in predicting Quchan University students' quality of life. In order to collect data, a sample of 143 students of Quechan University was selected randomly enrolled for 89-90 academic year. The instruments of the data collecting are World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL) and Spiritual Intelligence Questionnaire. For analyzing the data, the standard deviation, and Pearson's correlation coefficient in descriptive level, and in inferential level, the regression test was used. The results of the study show that the spiritual intelligence has effective role on predicting quality of life.

  9. Quality of life measures in health care. I: Applications and issues in assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, R.; Fletcher, A.; Gore, S.; Jones, D.; Spiegelhalter, D.; Cox, D.

    1992-01-01

    Many clinicians remain unsure of the relevance of measuring quality of life to their clinical practice. In health economics quality of life measures have become the standard means of assessing the results of health care interventions and, more controversially, the means of prioritising funding; but they have many other applications. This article--the first of three on measuring quality of life--reviews the instruments available and their application in screening programmes, audit, health care research, and clinical trials. Using the appropriate instrument is essential if outcome measures are to be valid and clinically meaningful. Images p1076-a PMID:1467690

  10. [Quality of life of patients before and after surgical treatment of diffuse toxic goiter].

    PubMed

    Il'icheva, E A; Zudaev, V P; Roĭ, T A; Makhutov, V N; Tarnueva, I F; Moshkova, E S

    2011-01-01

    Quality of life of 89 patients with diffuse toxic goiter was analyzed before surgical intervention and at different terms after thyroidectomy or terminal subtotal resection of the thyroid gland using questionnaire SF-36. It was found that quality of life of patients with diffuse toxic goiter was lower than that of respondents without such pathology. The indices of quality of life one year after thyroidectomy (terminal subtotal resection of the thyroid gland) remained depending on the duration of the disease and complications of thyrotoxicosis, became reliably larger as compared with preoperative level due to social activity and emotional state.

  11. The Effect of Horticultural Therapy on the Quality of Life of Palliative Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Lai, Claudia Kam-Yuk; Lau, Carmen Ka-Yan; Kan, Wai Yin; Lam, Wai Man; Fung, Connie Yuen Yee

    2017-01-27

    Palliative care patients experienced a variety of needs and perceived their quality of life as being only fair. This study adopted a single group repeated-measure design to investigate the effect of horticultural therapy on the quality of life of palliative care patients using the Quality of Life Concern in End of Life Questionnaire. Significant differences in the domains of "existential distress" and "health care concern" were observed immediately post-intervention and at four weeks post-intervention, respectively. No other significant differences were seen in the other domains or in the total mean score of the outcome measure.

  12. New therapies for treating Down syndrome require quality of life measurement.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Michael J; Brixner, Diana I

    2013-04-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of cognitive deficits. Using mouse models and therapies for Alzheimer disease, researchers are exploring therapies that may improve cognitive function in people with DS. These developments shift the health economic paradigm of understanding DS from determining the appropriate screening tool to the effect of therapy on quality of life in those with DS. To date, there are no validated quality of life instruments for DS. Research should begin to develop instruments that can evaluate changes in quality of life in therapeutic trials and beyond.

  13. Quality of life philosophy IV. The brain and consciousness.

    PubMed

    Ventegodt, Søren; Andersen, Niels Jørgen; Merrick, Joav

    2003-12-01

    consciousness about the world, provided by the brain, is not a gift that makes life better instead of getting us expelled from the Garden of Eden. We think that our real problem is the fact that we are still not in control of our consciousness. Instead of it serving us, we have become its slaves. If we come to understand brain and consciousness in order to solve this basic problem of our existence, we shall again be able to become a coherent part of the world, both as individuals and as a species. We share the vision that such an understanding of the problems of consciousness will make medical science holistic and will bring quality of life, health, and the ability to function to its patients.

  14. Costs and quality of life of multiple sclerosis in Spain.

    PubMed

    Kobelt, Gisela; Berg, J; Lindgren, P; Izquierdo, G; Sánchez-Soliño, O; Pérez-Miranda, J; Casado, M A

    2006-09-01

    This cost-of-illness analysis is based on information from 1.848 patients in Spain and is part of a Europe-wide study on the costs of multiple sclerosis. The objective was to analyze the costs and quality of life (QOL) related to the level of disease severity and progression. Patients were identified by the Asociación Española de Esclerosis Múltiple (AEDEM) and participated in the survey by answering a mail questionnaire (response rate 31.8%). In addition to details on the disease (type of disease, relapses, level of functional disability), the questionnaire asked for information on all resource consumption, medical, non-medical, work absence and informal care, as well as utility (QOL). The mean age of the cohort was 45 years, and only 5.5% of patients were 65 years of age or more. Approximately 36% of patients had mild disease (Expanded Disability Status Scale [EDSS] score of 0-3), 44.8% had moderate disease (EDSS score of 4-6.5) and 17.7% had severe disease (EDSS score > or =7). The mean EDSS score in the sample was 4.5 (median 5.0), with a utility of 0.554. Costs and utility are highly correlated with disease severity. Workforce participation decreases from around 70% in early disease to less than 5% in the very late stages. Hospitalization is very infrequent in early disease, representing less than euro 1.300 per patient per year for patients at EDSS scores <6, but increases steeply for patients at scores > or =7. Ambulatory care increases fivefold between early and late disease, while investments and services increase from basically no cost to just over euro 6.000 at EDSS scores > or =7. Productivity losses increase more than eightfold, and informal care increases from euro 593 at EDSS scores of 0-1 to nearly euro 34.228 at scores of 8-9. Hence, total mean costs per patient are driven by the distribution of the severity levels in the sample, increasing from euro 10.425 at EDSS scores of 0-1 to euro 45.264 at a score of 7, and euro 65.693 at scores of 8

  15. Quality of life after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a multiracial population.

    PubMed

    Bee, P C; Gan, G G; Sangkar, V J; Haris, A R; Chin, E

    2011-12-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) was started in Malaysia since 1993 and it has improved the survival of patients with otherwise fatal haematological diseases. This study was initiated because quality of life of these survivors is an important tool in assessing the outcome of this treatment modality. The secondary objective was to identify factors that influenced their quality of life. The European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC-30) was used to assess the quality of life of eligible patients. A total of 62 patents were recruited. The mean global health score (QoL) was 71.2. The major symptoms faced by our patients were fatigue, financial difficulty and appetite loss. Appetite loss was an independent adverse factor for lower QoL.

  16. Quality of life and people living with AIDS: relationship with sociodemographic and health aspects1

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Tadeu Lessa; de Oliveira, Denize Cristina; Gomes, Antonio Marcos Tosoli; Formozo, Gláucia Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze the relationship of sociodemographic and health dimensions with the quality of life of people living with the human immunodeficiency virus. METHOD: descriptive and quantitative study. The subjects were 131 seropositive people treated in a specialized center of the Norte-Fluminense municipality, Brazil. A form with sociodemographic and health data was applied, as well as the World Health Organization instrument for the assessment of the quality of life of people with the human immunodeficiency virus. RESULTS: the statistical analysis revealed a significant difference in the assessment of the various dimensions of quality of life by the subjects for gender, education, employment, personal income, medical condition, self-perception of sickness, history of hospitalizations, and bodily alterations due to the antiretroviral drugs. CONCLUSION: professional nursing and health care, as well as public policies in the area, should valorize the quality of life approach, considering the conditions related to its configuration. PMID:25296141

  17. Parental knowledge and adolescent adjustment: substance use and health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Iglesias, Antonia; Moreno, Carmen; Granado-Alcón, M Carmen; López, Ana

    2012-03-01

    This study analyses two models (maternal and paternal) in which parental care and sources of parental knowledge moderated the relationship between parents' knowledge about their adolescents' lives and adolescents' substance use and health-related quality of life. The sample was made up of 15942 Spanish adolescents who participated in the 2006 edition of Health Behavior in School-aged Children Study. Results showed that increased parents' knowledge about their adolescents' lives reduced adolescents' substance use and increased their quality of life. With respect to the moderation relationship, a limited effect was found. However, parental care and sources of parental knowledge used by both parents generally had main effects on adolescents' substance use and health-related quality of life, with care being the most relevant variable in the health-related quality of life, while knowledge was the most relevant one for substance use.

  18. Subjective estimation of the quality of life in relation to neuroticism.

    PubMed

    Bobić, Jasminka

    2012-01-01

    It is generally agreed that personality variables have a relatively consistent influence on the subjective estimation of different situations in everyday life and the way people react to them. The aim of this review was to summarise our previously published findings on the relationship between subjective estimation of one's quality of life and the personality trait neuroticism-emotional stability. We used the WHO Quality of Life--BREF or SF-36 questionnaires for the assessment of the quality of life, Cornell Index for the assessment of neuroticism, and The Social Readjustment Rating Scale for the evaluation of common stressors. Our results have shown that more emotionally stable participants (lower neuroticism) perceive their life better in quality and are more satisfied with their work environment. In addition, our results support the findings from other studies that women have higher neuroticism and lower quality of life scores than men.

  19. Self-perceived quality of life of people with physical disabilities and labour force participation.

    PubMed

    Pawłowska-Cyprysiak, Karolina; Konarska, Maria; Zołnierczyk-Zreda, Dorota

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess self-perceived quality of life of people with physical disabilities from the perspective of work. The following tools were used in the study: a personal questionnaire, an SF-36v2 questionnaire, an I-E Scale at Work and a Polish adaptation of the Ferrans and Powers Quality of Life Index. The study involved 426 disabled persons aged 18-65. It demonstrated that quality of life depends, to a large extent, on factors such as age and labour force participation. Duration of looking for work had a significant influence on the satisfaction from the psychological perspective and on the perception of general health. For the respondents who were unemployed and not looking for work, quality of life decreased with increased duration of professional inactivity.

  20. Anxiety, stress, and quality of life among Iraqi refugees in Jordan: A cross sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Al-Smadi, Ahmed Mohammad; Tawalbeh, Loai Issa; Gammoh, Omar Salem; Ashour, Ala Fawzi; Alshraifeen, Ali; Gougazeh, Yazeed Mohammed

    2017-03-01

    This study was conducted to identify the predictors, levels, and prevalence of anxiety and stress and to assess the relationship between these factors and quality of life in recently displaced Iraqis. A cross-sectional design was used. A convenience sample of 171 Iraqi refugees was recruited. The results indicated that more than half of the sample suffered from high anxiety levels, while 42.8% reported high stress. The regression model explained 46.3% of the variance in levels of quality of life. Unemployment, fewer than three family members, and high anxiety significantly predicted low-level quality of life. These three predictors need to be taken into consideration when developing health-related interventions to improve the quality of life of Iraqi refugees.