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Sample records for computer-based quality-of-life monitoring

  1. [Computer-based quality-of-life monitoring in head and neck cancer patients: a validation model using the EORTC-QLQ C30 and EORTC- H&N35 Portuguese PC-software version].

    PubMed

    Silveira, Augusta; Gonçalves, Joaquim; Sequeira, Teresa; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Lopes, Carlos; Monteiro, Eurico; Pimentel, Francisco Luís

    2011-12-01

    analysis of Quality of Life data. Computer-based quality-of-life monitoring in head and neck cancer patients is essential to get clinically meaningful data that can support clinical decisions, identify potential needs, and support a stepped-care model. This represents a fundamental step for routine Quality of Life implementation in the Oncology Portuguese Institute (IPO-Porto), ORL and C&P department services clinical practice. Finally, we propose a diagram of diagnostic performance, considerating the generalized lack of mycological diagnosis in Portugal, which emphasizes the need for a careful history, focused on quantifying the latency period. PMID:22849922

  2. [Computer-based quality-of-life monitoring in head and neck cancer patients: a validation model using the EORTC-QLQ C30 and EORTC- H&N35 Portuguese PC-software version].

    PubMed

    Silveira, Augusta; Gonçalves, Joaquim; Sequeira, Teresa; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Lopes, Carlos; Monteiro, Eurico; Pimentel, Francisco Luís

    2011-12-01

    analysis of Quality of Life data. Computer-based quality-of-life monitoring in head and neck cancer patients is essential to get clinically meaningful data that can support clinical decisions, identify potential needs, and support a stepped-care model. This represents a fundamental step for routine Quality of Life implementation in the Oncology Portuguese Institute (IPO-Porto), ORL and C&P department services clinical practice. Finally, we propose a diagram of diagnostic performance, considerating the generalized lack of mycological diagnosis in Portugal, which emphasizes the need for a careful history, focused on quantifying the latency period.

  3. Monitoring Urban Quality of Life: The Porto Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Luis Delfim; Martins, Isabel

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the monitoring system of the urban quality of life developed by the Porto City Council, a new tool being used to support urban planning and management. The two components of this system--a quantitative approach based on statistical indicators and a qualitative analysis based on the citizens' perceptions of the conditions of…

  4. Monitoring asthma in childhood: symptoms, exacerbations and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Brand, Paul L P; Mäkelä, Mika J; Szefler, Stanley J; Frischer, Thomas; Price, David

    2015-06-01

    Monitoring asthma in children in clinical practice is primarily performed by reviewing disease activity (daytime and night-time symptoms, use of reliever medication, exacerbations requiring frequent use of reliever medication and urgent visits to the healthcare professional) and the impact of the disease on children's daily activities, including sports and play, in a clinical interview. In such an interview, most task force members also discuss adherence to maintenance therapy and the patients' (and parents') views and beliefs on the goals of treatment and the amount of treatment required to achieve those goals. Composite asthma control and quality of life measures, although potentially useful in research, have limited value in clinical practice because they have a short recall window and do not cover the entire spectrum of asthma control. Telemonitoring of children with asthma cannot replace face-to-face follow-up and monitoring because there is no evidence that it is associated with improved health outcomes.

  5. TRANSFoRm eHealth solution for quality of life monitoring.

    PubMed Central

    Saganowski, Stanisław; Misiaszek, Andrzej; Bródka, Piotr; Andreasson, Anna; Curcin, Vasa; Delaney, Brendan; Frączkowski, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    Patient Recorded Outcome Measures (PROMs) are an essential part of quality of life monitoring, clinical trials, improvement studies and other medical tasks. Recently, web and mobile technologies have been explored as means of improving the response rates and quality of data collected. Despite the potential benefit of this approach, there are currently no widely accepted standards for developing or implementing PROMs in CER (Comparative Effectiveness Research). Within the European Union project Transform (Translational Research and Patient Safety in Europe) an eHealth solution for quality of life monitoring has been developed and validated. This paper presents the overall architecture of the system as well as a detailed description of the mobile and web applications. PMID:27570677

  6. Towards the Implementation of Quality of Life Monitoring in Daily Clinical Routine: Methodological Issues and Clinical Implication

    PubMed Central

    Giesinger, Johannes; Kemmler, Georg; Meraner, Verena; Gamper, Eva-Maria; Oberguggenberger, Anne; Sperner-Unterweger, Barbara; Holzner, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    Summary Quality of life (QOL) has become a widely used outcome parameter in the evaluation of treatment modalities in clinical oncology research. By now, many of the practical problems associated with measuring QOL in clinical practice can be overcome by the use of computer-based assessment methods. QOL assessment in oncology is dominated by two measurement systems, the FACT scales and the EORTC QLQ-C30 with its modules. The amount of human resources required to implement routine data collection has been reduced significantly by advanced computer technology allowing data collection in busy clinical practice. Monitoring of QOL can contribute to oncologic care by facilitating detection of physical and psychological problems and tracking the course of disease and treatment over time. Furthermore, the integration of screening for psychosocial problems into QOL monitoring contributes to the identification of patients who are in need of psychooncologic interventions. Computer-based QOL monitoring does not replace the direct physician-patient communication but enables to identify specific impairments and symptoms including psychological problems. Beyond clinical practice, QOL data can be used for research purposes and may help health care planners to determine those patient services that should be maintained or ones that should be developed. PMID:20847874

  7. Improving quality of life through ICT for the facilitation of daily activities and home medical monitoring.

    PubMed

    Klironomos, Iosif; Antona, Margherita; Stephanidis, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    The potential of Information and Communication Technologies to improve the overall quality of life of all citizens cannot be underestimated. In particular, in the context of Ambient Intelligent environments, technological developments provide a great opportunity for the integration and the improvement of quality of life of people from vulnerable groups (patients, elderly, people with disabilities). In this context, the paper presents the aims, objectives and preliminary results of a National research project in Greece, named KRIPIS "Quality of Life", implemented by three research Institutes of FORTH, targeting post-heart attack elderly patients at their home environments. PMID:26294560

  8. Heart failure patients utilizing an electric home monitor: What effects does heart failure have on their quality of life?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simuel, Gloria J.

    Heart Failure continues to be a major public health problem associated with high mortality and morbidity. Heart Failure is the leading cause of hospitalization for persons older than 65 years, has a poor prognosis and is associated with poor quality of life. More than 5.3 million American adults are living with heart failure. Despite maximum medical therapy and frequent hospitalizations to stabilize their condition, one in five heart failure patients die within the first year of diagnosis. Several disease-management programs have been proposed and tested to improve the quality of heart failure care. Studies have shown that hospital admissions and emergency room visits decrease with increased nursing interventions in the home and community setting. An alternative strategy for promoting self-management of heart failure is the use of electronic home monitoring. The purpose of this study was to examine what effects heart failure has on patient's quality of life that had been monitoring on an electronic home monitor longer than 2 months. Twenty-one questionnaires were given to patients utilizing an electronic home monitor by their home health agency nurse. Eleven patients completed the questionnaire. The findings showed that there is some deterioration in quality of life with more association with the physical aspects of life than with the emotional aspects of life, which probably was due to the small sample size. There was no significant difference in readmission rates in patients utilizing an electronic home monitor. Further research is needed with a larger population of patients with chronic heart failure and other chronic diseases which may provide more data, and address issues such as patient compliance with self-care, impact of heart failure on patient's quality of life, functional capacity, and heart failure patient's utilization of the emergency rooms and hospital. Telemonitoring holds promise for improving the self-care abilities of persons with HF.

  9. Neighborhood epidemiological monitoring and adult mental health: European Quality of Life Survey, 2007-2012.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy

    2015-04-01

    Little is monitored on perceived neighborhood noise, quality of drinking water, air quality, rubbish, traffic, etc. at a continental scale. This study was aimed to examine the relationships of such neighborhood risks and mental health in adults and the very old in an international and population-based setting across Europe. Data were retrieved from the European Quality of Life Survey, 2007-2012 including demographics, living conditions, income and financial situation, housing and local environment, family, work, health, social participation and quality of social services. Adults aged 18 and above were included for statistical analysis (n = 79,270). Analysis included chi-square test, t test and logistic regression modeling. People who lived in town or city tended to indicate certain major problems for them such as noise (odds ratio (OR) 2.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.17-2.53, P < 0.001), air quality (OR 2.76, 95% CI 2.54-3.00, P < 0.001), low quality of drinking water (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.23-1.43, P < 0.001), crime and/or violence (OR 2.92, 95% CI 2.68-3.19, P < 0.001), rubbish (OR 3.68, 95% CI 3.41-3.97, P < 0.001) and traffic congestion (OR 2.64, 95% CI 2.45-2.85, P < 0.001). People who reported major problems on noise (OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.96-2.45, P < 0.001), air quality (OR 2.11, 95% CI 1.87-2.37, P < 0.001), low quality of drinking water (OR 2.40, 95% CI 2.14-2.68, P < 0.001), crime and/or violence (OR 2.13, 95% CI 1.88-2.41, P < 0.001), rubbish (OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.77-2.11, P < 0.001) and traffic congestion (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.34-1.68, P < 0.001) were also classified as having depression. Perceived neighborhood conditions were associated with adult mental health across Europe. Future neighborhood monitoring research moving from the etiological to neighborhood management would be suggested.

  10. Neighborhood epidemiological monitoring and adult mental health: European Quality of Life Survey, 2007-2012.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy

    2015-04-01

    Little is monitored on perceived neighborhood noise, quality of drinking water, air quality, rubbish, traffic, etc. at a continental scale. This study was aimed to examine the relationships of such neighborhood risks and mental health in adults and the very old in an international and population-based setting across Europe. Data were retrieved from the European Quality of Life Survey, 2007-2012 including demographics, living conditions, income and financial situation, housing and local environment, family, work, health, social participation and quality of social services. Adults aged 18 and above were included for statistical analysis (n = 79,270). Analysis included chi-square test, t test and logistic regression modeling. People who lived in town or city tended to indicate certain major problems for them such as noise (odds ratio (OR) 2.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.17-2.53, P < 0.001), air quality (OR 2.76, 95% CI 2.54-3.00, P < 0.001), low quality of drinking water (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.23-1.43, P < 0.001), crime and/or violence (OR 2.92, 95% CI 2.68-3.19, P < 0.001), rubbish (OR 3.68, 95% CI 3.41-3.97, P < 0.001) and traffic congestion (OR 2.64, 95% CI 2.45-2.85, P < 0.001). People who reported major problems on noise (OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.96-2.45, P < 0.001), air quality (OR 2.11, 95% CI 1.87-2.37, P < 0.001), low quality of drinking water (OR 2.40, 95% CI 2.14-2.68, P < 0.001), crime and/or violence (OR 2.13, 95% CI 1.88-2.41, P < 0.001), rubbish (OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.77-2.11, P < 0.001) and traffic congestion (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.34-1.68, P < 0.001) were also classified as having depression. Perceived neighborhood conditions were associated with adult mental health across Europe. Future neighborhood monitoring research moving from the etiological to neighborhood management would be suggested. PMID:25391235

  11. Monitoring game-based motor rehabilitation of patients at home for better plans of care and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Ponte, S; Gabrielli, S; Jonsdottir, J; Morando, M; Dellepiane, S

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the biomedical, remote monitoring infrastructure developed and currently tested in the EU REHAB@HOME project to support home rehabilitation of the upper extremity of persons post-stroke and in persons with other neurological disorders, such as Multiple Sclerosis patients, in order to track their progress over therapy and improve their Quality of Life. The paper will specifically focus on describing the initial testing of the tele-rehabilitation system's components for patients' biomedical monitoring over therapy, which support the delivery and monitoring of more personalized, engaging plans of care by rehabilitation centers and services. PMID:26737156

  12. An Internet-Based Means of Monitoring Quality of Life in Post-Prostate Radiation Treatment: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Rajapakshe, Rasika; Moldovan, Andrew; Araujo, Cynthia; Crook, Juanita

    2015-01-01

    Background Widespread integration of the Internet has resulted in an increase in the feasibility of using Web-based technologies as a means of communicating with patients. It may be possible to develop secure and standardized systems that facilitate Internet-based patient-reported outcomes which could be used to improve patient care. Objective This study investigates patient interest in participating in an online post-treatment disease outcomes and quality of life monitoring program developed specifically for patients who have received radiation treatment for prostate cancer at a regional oncology center. Methods Patients treated for prostate cancer between 2007 and 2011 (N=1113) at the British Columbia Cancer Agency, Centre for the Southern Interior were invited by mail to participate in a standardized questionnaire related to their post-treatment health. Overall participation rates were calculated. In addition, demographics, access to broadband Internet services, and treatment modalities were compared between participants and nonparticipants. Results Of the 1030 eligible invitees, 358 (358/1030, 34.7%) completed the online questionnaire. Participation rates were higher in individuals younger than age 60 when compared to those age 60 or older (42% vs 31%) and also for those living in urban areas compared with rural (37% vs 29%) and in those who received brachytherapy versus external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (41% vs 31%). Better participation rates were seen in individuals who had access to Internet connectivity based on the different types of broadband services (DSL 35% for those with DSL connectivity vs 29% for those without DSL connectivity; cable 35% vs 32%; wireless 38% vs 26%). After adjusting for age, the model indicates that lack of access to wireless broadband connectivity, living in a rural area, and receiving EBRT were significant predictors of lower participation. Conclusions This study demonstrates that participation rates vary in patient populations

  13. Consideration of the use of health status, functional outcome, and quality-of-life to monitor neonatal intensive care practice.

    PubMed

    Hack, M

    1999-01-01

    Measures of health status, functional abilities, and quality-of-life are being used increasingly to evaluate health care practice, and to measure outcomes from the patient's perspective. There is thus a need to reassess the use of growth and neurodevelopmental status that have traditionally been used as measures of outcome after neonatal intensive care. The quality of neonatal intensive care constitutes only one factor among many that determine the functional health and quality-of-life of survivors of neonatal intensive care. These include genetic disposition, intrauterine events, the effects of sociodemographic factors on the health and development of the child, and on the parents' assessment of their child's functioning. To obtain health status, functional and quality-of-life measures, parents need to act as proxy for the child during infancy and childhood. The parents' cultural, social, and educational background and the specific experience of the parent with children may influence their responses. Furthermore, their perspective may differ from that of the child. Measures that have been used or have the potential to measure health status, functioning, and quality-of-life include the National Health Interview Survey, the National Health Insurance Study, the Functional Status II, the Multi-Attribute Health System, the Functional Independence Measure for Children, the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, the Adolescent Child Health and Illness Profile, and the Child Health Questionnaire for children, infants, and toddlers. Knowledge of the validity of the use of these measures among survivors of neonatal intensive care is, however, sparse. Studies have shown that the collection of a standard core of data from various national sources with specific criteria for defining severe disability at 2 years of age is feasible in Great Britain. However, questionnaires or available national databases provide global and epidemiologic information on outcomes rather than

  14. Towards International and Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration for the Measurements of Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizohata, Sachie; Jadoul, Raynald

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on three main subjects: (1) monitoring quality of life (QoL) in old age; (2) international and interdisciplinary collaboration for QoL research; and (3) computer-based technology and infrastructure assisting (1) and (2). This type of computer-supported cooperative work in the social sciences has been termed eHumanities or…

  15. [Quality of life].

    PubMed

    Volf, N

    1991-01-01

    The term "Quality of life" appeared at the end of the fifties of this century, it seems in the philosophical and sociological vocabulary at first, and soon after that it became adjusted in medical and non-medical (politics, ethology, mass media) use. In the last few years this term has been used all the more frequently in different branches of medicine because of a more extended human lifetime, due to the development of medicine, the domination of chronic diseases in the pathology of well-developed environments, and because of the growing influence of socio-psychological viewpoints in the bounds of medicine as well. Time will show whether only a transient, "fashionable" term is in question, or if a lasting survival in medical vocabulary has been ensured. This paper analyses the development and the contents of the quality of life concept, it's ethical connotation, the application in different branches of medicine, as well as the principals and problems of it's measurement for clinical purposes. The literature contributed includes 75 domestic and foreign authentic references. PMID:1921860

  16. Continuous glucose monitors: use of waveform versus glycemic values in the improvements of glucose control, quality of life, and fear of hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Walker, Tomas C; Yucha, Carolyn B

    2014-05-01

    How patients are benefitting from continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) remains poorly understood. The focus on numerical glucose values persists, even though access to the glucose waveform and rate of change may contribute more to improved control. This pilot study compared outcomes of patients using CGMs with or without access to the numerical values on their CGM. Ten persons with type 1 diabetes, naïve to CGM use, enrolled in a 12-week study. Subjects were randomly assigned to either unmodified CGM receivers, or to CGM receivers that had their numerical values obscured but otherwise functioned normally. HbA1c, quality of life (QLI-D), and fear of hypoglycemia (HFS) were assessed, at baseline and at week 12. Baseline HbA1c for the entire group was 7.46 ± 1.27%. At week 12 the experimental group HbA1c reduction was 1.5 ± 0.9% (p < .05), the control group's reduction was 0.06 ± 0.61% (p > .05). Repeated measures testing revealed no significant difference in HbA1c reduction between groups. Both groups had reductions in HFS; these reductions were statistically significant within groups (p < .05), but not between groups. QLI-D indices demonstrated improvements (p < .05) in QLI-D total and the health and family subscales, but not between groups. The results of this pilot study suggest that benefits of CGM extend beyond reductions in HbA1c to reductions in fear of hypoglycemia and improvements in quality of life. The display of a numerical glucose value did not improve control when compared to numerically blinded units.

  17. [Qualities of life and happiness].

    PubMed

    Veenhoven, R

    2011-03-01

    The phrase 'quality of life' is actually misleading. The designation suggests that the issue has to do with 1 quality, whereas in fact more qualities of life are indicated. Four of these qualities are: 1. the 'livability' of the surroundings, 2. the 'life-abilities' of the individual, 3. the 'utility of life' and 4. the subjective 'satisfaction' with a person's own life. The various qualities cannot meaningfully be collected together in an index. The most comprehensive measure of quality of life is how long and happily a person lives. The relationship between that and oral health has still hardly been studied.

  18. Examining the Effects of Remote Monitoring Systems on Activation, Self-care, and Quality of Life in Older Patients With Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Lorraine S.; Lee, Jung-Ah; Moore, Alison A.; Motie, Marjan; Ghasemzadeh, Hassan; Sarrafzadeh, Majid; Mangione, Carol M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of remote monitoring systems (RMSs) in healthcare has grown exponentially and has improved the accessibility to and ability of patients to engage in treatment intensification. However, research describing the effects of RMSs on activation, self-care, and quality of life (QOL) in older patients with heart failure (HF) is limited. Objective The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a 3-month RMS intervention on activation, self-care, and QOL of older patients versus a reference group matched on age, gender, race, and functional status (ie, New York Heart Association classification) who received standard discharge instructions after an acute episode of HF exacerbation requiring hospitalization. Methods A total of 21 patients (mean age, 72.7 ± 8.9 years; range, 58–83 years; 52.4% women) provided consent and were trained to measure their weight, blood pressure, and heart rate at home with an RMS device and transmit this information every day for 3 months to a centralized information system. The system gathered all data and dispatched alerts when certain clinical conditions were met. Results The baseline sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of the 2 groups were comparable. Over time, participants in the RMS group showed greater improvements in activation, self-care, and QOL compared with their counterparts. Data showed moderately strong associations between increased activation, self-care, and QOL. Conclusion Our preliminary data show that the use of an RMS is feasible and effective in promoting activation, self-care, and QOL. A larger-scale randomized clinical trial is warranted to show that the RMS is a new and effective method for improving clinical management of older adults with chronic HF. PMID:24365871

  19. Quality of life: but in whose judgement?

    PubMed

    McSharry, M

    1996-01-01

    Today, many renal units scientifically measure the clinical quality of care, monitor morbidity and mortality and provide care to patients based upon clinical and social norms for this client group. Implicit within these measurements is the assumption that the absence of clinical complications of End Stage Renal Failure (ESRF) will directly result in an increased level of satisfaction and quality of life for patients (1).

  20. What Is Quality of Life?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamieson, Dale; Sneed, Joseph D.

    Is the concept of "quality of life" potentially an important one for public policy analysis, or must it remain forever vague and controversial, resisting clear definition and scientific measurement? Everyday usage of the phrase is examined as well as its relation to other terms like "happiness" and "welfare." It is concluded that one reason for…

  1. [Obesity and quality of life].

    PubMed

    Da Silva, M Paes; Jorge, Z; Domingues, A; Nobre, E Lacerda; Chambel, P; De Castro, J Jácome

    2006-01-01

    Obesity is considered one of the most relevant health problems of modern societies, as it constitutes a predominant risk factor in the development of various other diseases. The negative impact of obesity on the quality of life of individuals has been the subject of diverse research. The results of a test carried out at Gothenburg University in Sweden suggest that severe obesity is a debilitating factor both for health and psychosocial functioning. Research carried out in Madrid permitted identification of a profile of obese patients with impaired quality of life, which has enabled prophylactic intervention or early treatment of these cases to be considered. The results of a study carried out in the USA propose that pain would appear to be directly related with quality of life and could be considered a covariant of obesity, and should therefore be taken into account in obesity treatments. A study carried out in Oxford concluded that obese subjects or subjects with another chronic disease presented a deterioration in physical wellbeing, however only subjects with another chronic disease (without associated obesity) presented a deterioration in psychological wellbeing. The majority of studies suggest the negative influence of obesity and overweight on health and psychosocial functioning, however it is not possible to clearly define a linear relation between obesity and diminished quality of life.

  2. Quality of life in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Loria, Anthony; Escheik, Carey; Gerber, N Lynn; Younossi, Zobair M

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life is a construct that reflects the positive and negative aspects of one's life, and is expanded upon by health-related quality of life (HRQL), which specifically address the impact of health on patients' well-being. Cirrhosis is the culmination of various pathways that leads into development of advanced hepatic fibrosis with its complications. This paper addresses the impact of cirrhosis on individuals HRQL. In addition, we will define what disease specific and general HRQL instruments aim to measure. We discuss the liver disease specific scales [Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaire (CLDQ), Liver Disease Quality of Life 1.0 (LDQOL)] and the most commonly used generic health profile [Short Form 36 Profile (SF-36)]. Furthermore, we examine recent literature which describes how to measure and what is known about quality of life of patients with cirrhosis. This information gives insight to health care providers concerning the impact of disease on patients if treatments are not only to improve health but also function and unexpected treatment outcomes.

  3. Asthma Outcomes: Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sandra R.; Rand, Cynthia S.; Cabana, Michael D.; Foggs, Michael B.; Halterman, Jill S.; Olson, Lynn; Vollmer, William M.; Wright, Rosalind J.; Taggart, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Background “Asthma-related quality of life” refers to the perceived impact that asthma has on the patient’s quality of life. Objective National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies convened an expert group to recommend standardized measures of the impact of asthma on quality of life for use in future asthma clinical research. Methods We reviewed published documentation regarding the development and psychometric evaluation; clinical research use since 2000; and extent to which the content of each existing quality of life instrument provides a unique, reliable, and valid assessment of the intended construct. We classified instruments as core (required in future studies), supplemental (used according to the study’s aims and standardized), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop convened in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results Eleven instruments for adults and 6 for children were identified for review. None qualified as core instruments because they predominantly measured indicators of asthma control (symptoms and/or functional status); failed to provide a distinct, reliable score measuring all key dimensions of the intended construct; and/or lacked adequate psychometric data. Conclusions In the absence of existing instruments that meet the stated criteria, currently available instruments are classified as either supplemental or emerging. Research is strongly recommended to develop and evaluate instruments that provide a distinct, reliable measure of the patient’s perception of the impact of asthma on all of the key dimensions of quality of life, an important outcome that is not captured in other outcome measures. PMID:22386511

  4. Quality of life in myopia

    PubMed Central

    Rose, K.; Harper, R.; Tromans, C.; Waterman, C.; Goldberg, D.; Haggerty, C.; Tullo, A.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The safety and predictability of refractive surgery for all degrees of myopia is now becoming established. It is therefore appropriate to evaluate whether there is a patient driven demand for such treatments and, if so, to establish guidelines for its provision within the National Health Service (NHS).
METHODS—A comparative study was designed to assess the effect of degree of myopia on quality of life ("high" (n = 30) -10.00D, worse eye; "moderate" (n = 40) -4.00 to -9.75D, worse eye; "low" (n = 42) <-4.00D, worse eye) compared with a group of patients with keratoconus (n = 30) treated by optical correction. Data collection included binocular logMAR visual acuity, Pelli-Robson low contrast letter sensitivity, questionnaires to assess subjective visual function (VF-14) and effect on quality of life (VQOL), and semi-structured interviews.
RESULTS—There were no significant differences in any of the measures between patients with a high degree of myopia and those with keratoconus, or between those with a low and those with a moderate degree of myopia. However, those with a high degree of myopia had highly significantly poorer logMAR, VF-14, and VQOL scores than those with low and moderate myopia (p<0.001). Interview data supported these findings with patients with a high degree of myopia and those with keratoconus reporting that psychological, cosmetic, practical, and financial factors affected their quality of life.
CONCLUSION—Compared with low and moderate myopia, patients with a high degree of myopia experience impaired quality of life similar to that of patients with keratoconus. Criteria should therefore be identified to enable those in sufficient need to obtain refractive surgical treatment under the NHS.

 PMID:10966960

  5. The Promise of Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peruniak, Geoffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Little has been written in the career development literature about quality of life, even though this concept is implied in all counselor interventions. In this article, the author suggests that the broad and subjective nature of quality of life, rather than a liability, is its very strength. Quality of life is presented as an important holistic…

  6. Use of the national quality registry to monitor health-related quality of life of children with type 1 diabetes: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Christina; Huus, Karina; Samuelsson, Ulf; Hanberger, Lena; Akesson, Karin

    2015-03-01

    The management of diabetes is complicated, as treatment affects the everyday life of both children and their families. To enable optimal care for children with type 1 diabetes, it is important to highlight health-related quality of life (HrQoL) as well as medical outcomes to detect psychological problems that otherwise could be missed. The aim was to study HrQoL in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes dependent on gender, age and co-morbidity and to study the consistency between children's self-reporting and parents' proxy reporting. The cross-sectional data were collected using the questionnaire DISABKIDS Chronic Generic Measure and the DISABKIDS diabetes module. Parents in the proxy report perceived their children's HrQoL to be lower than children themselves. Boys reported their HrQoL to be better than girls. Results show that living with an additional disease has an impact on the HrQoL, which is an important factor to consider in the quality registry. Assessing HrQoL on a routine basis may facilitate detection and discussion of HrQoL-related questions in the national quality registry.

  7. Pediatric obesity and asthma quality of life.

    PubMed

    Velsor-Friedrich, Barbara; Militello, Lisa K; Kouba, Joanne; Harrison, Patrick R; Manion, Amy; Doumit, Rita

    2013-06-01

    Widely researched as separate entities, our understanding of the comorbid effects of childhood obesity and asthma on quality of life is limited. This article discusses the effects of childhood obesity and asthma on self-reported quality of life in low-income African American teens with asthma. When controlling for the influence of symptom frequency, asthma classification, asthma self-efficacy, and asthma self-care levels, body mass index remains a most important factor in determining self-reported quality of life among teens with asthma. Although overweight and obesity did not change the effectiveness of the asthma intervention program, obesity did affect participants quality of life scores.

  8. [Quality of life in diabetes].

    PubMed

    Catalano, D; Martines, G F; Spadaro, D; Di Corrado, D; Crispi, V; Di Nuovo, S; Trovato, G M

    2004-05-01

    Different clinical features of diabetic patients and type of complications are certainly a critical components of the global individual perception of quality of life (qol); but also personal socio-cultural characteristics interfere concurrently. Qol in diabetes was assessed considering disease grade, complications and level of instruction in a population of 100 diabetic patients (30 m, 70 f), aged 66.99 +/- 13.68 years. Two questionnaires were administered to all patients; Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) and Functional Living Index (FLI). SIP is an index of psycho-social, physical and motor functionality; FLI derives from a scale devised for cancer patients and adapted to diabetic patients. Both were analysed by Spearman correlation test, and assayed vs. sociocultural profile and clinical symptoms. Neuro-muscular ailments were more prevalent in women; men experience severe limitations of working capacities an relational possibilities, with severe discomfort. In the whole, higher scores of SIP (greater disability p: ns) and lower score for FLI (scant well-being perception r = 0.29: p<0.01) are related with lower school instruction level. Global QOL score is related as well with degree of instruction (r = 0.22: p<0.03). So QOL is altered during chronic diseases: however, in diabetes, qol impairment does not seem related with severity, treatment features and complications of diabetes. Socio-cultural elements, and particularly instruction level quantified as school grades achieved, interfere with the manner of living diabetic disease.

  9. The Burden of Structured Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose on Diabetes-Specific Quality of Life and Locus of Control in Patients with Noninsulin-Treated Type 2 Diabetes: The PRISMA Study

    PubMed Central

    Scavini, Marina; Acmet, Elena; Bonizzoni, Erminio; Bosi, Emanuele; Giorgino, Francesco; Tiengo, Antonio; Cucinotta, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: To evaluate whether structured self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is associated with changes in diabetes-specific quality of life (DSQoL) and locus of control (LOC) in patients with noninsulin-treated type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Study Design and Methods: In this analysis of the PRISMA (Prospective Randomized Trial on Intensive SMBG Management Added Value in Noninsulin-Treated T2DM Patients) Study psychosocial data, we evaluated the impact of 12 months of structured SMBG on the individual domains of DSQoL and LOC questionnaires, including the role of selected confounders. Results: The score for Satisfaction, Impact, and Worry domains (DSQoL) improved when compared with baseline, without significant differences between structured SMBG regimen (intervention group, n = 501) and active control group (n = 523). Scores for Internal, Chance, and Powerful Others domains (LOC) improved compared with baseline, with a significant between-group change in Chance (P = 0.0309). For DSQoL domain score, improvements were associated with higher number of SMBG measurements (P = 0.007), older age (P = 0.013), and male sex (P = 0.0133) for Satisfaction and with male sex (P < 0.0001) for Worry. Concerning LOC domain score, improvements were associated with longer diabetes duration (P = 0.0084) and younger age (P < 0.0001) for Chance and total number of SMBG measurements (P = 0.0036) for Internal, with the intervention group close to being significant (P = 0.06). Conclusions: Our analysis demonstrates that in patients with noninsulin-treated T2DM, structured SMBG is not associated with a deterioration of quality of life and LOC, which is strongly predicted by demographics and diabetes-related variables. These findings should be considered when tailoring educational support to SMBG for these patients. PMID:27327185

  10. Quality of Life in Macau, China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rato, Ricardo; Davey, Gareth

    2012-01-01

    We report the initial findings of an ongoing, long-term investigation into subjective quality of life in Macau, a Special Administrative Region of China. Data were collected via quarterly public surveys (2007 to 2009; n = 8,230), as part of the Macau Quality of Life Report. The main aims of the study were to: (a) ascertain the public's…

  11. Quality of life measures in otitis media.

    PubMed

    Maile, E J; Youngs, R

    2013-05-01

    Disabling hearing impairment is the world's most common disability. Traditionally, hearing levels measured by pure tone audiometry have been used to define and quantify hearing loss. The effects of disabling hearing loss on patients' quality of life can be profound, and audiometric data alone may not correlate with quality of life measures. Generic measures of quality of life can be used to compare different diseases, and as such are useful in resource allocation and burden of disease studies. Their disadvantage is that they are not disease-specific and can therefore under-estimate the effects of a disease on patients' quality of life. Disease-specific measures are more sensitive. In chronic otitis media, additional factors such as discharge augment the effect of hearing loss alone on quality of life. Many of the quality of life measures developed for chronic otitis media have been used to assess improvement following reconstructive surgery. Quality of life measures have also been used to assess the effect of paediatric otitis media. Quality of life measures also have utility in the developing world, where hearing impairment is a huge burden.

  12. Quality of life in schizophrenic patients

    PubMed Central

    Bobes, Julio; Garcia-Portilla, Maria Paz; Bascaran, Maria Teresa; Saiz, Pilar Alejandra; Bouzoño, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    In the last decades, there has been increased interest in the field of quality of life in mental disorders in general, and particularly in schizophrenia. In addition, the appearance of the atypical antipsychotic drugs (amisul pride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, and ziprasidone) with different therapeutic and side-effect profiles, has promoted a greater interest in assessing the quality of life of schizophrenic patients. In this paper we will briefly summarize the difficulties in assessing quality of life in schizophrenic patients, as well as the results concerning their quality of life and the influence of psychopathology, especially negative and depressive symptoms, on it. We will also review data from recent clinical trials showing the impact of antipsychotic treatments and their side effects upon quality of life. PMID:17726919

  13. Quality of life in schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Bobes, Julio; Garcia-Portilla, Maria Paz; Bascaran, Maria Teresa; Saiz, Pilar Alejandra; Bousoño, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    In the last decades, there has been increased interest in the field of quality of life in mental disorders in general, and particularly in schizophrenia. In addition, the appearance of the atypical antipsychotic drugs (amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, and ziprasidone) with different therapeutic and side-effect profiles, has promoted a greater interest in assessing the quality of life of schizophrenic patients. In this paper we will briefly summarize the difficulties in assessing quality of life in schizophrenic patients, as well as the results concerning their quality of life and the influence of psychopathology, especially negative and depressive symptoms, on it. We will also review data from recent clinical trials showing the impact ofantipsychotic treatments and their side effects upon quality of life.

  14. Quality of life in shift work syndrome.

    PubMed

    Puca, F M; Perrucci, S; Prudenzano, M P; Savarese, M; Misceo, S; Perilli, S; Palumbo, M; Libro, G; Genco, S

    1996-01-01

    Air Force radar controllers represent an excellent example of night shift workers, as they are obliged to demonstrate perfect alertness during working hours. We set out: a) to assess the quality of life in these shift workers; b) to identify those with shift work syndrome and c) to evaluate the possible effects of triazolam both on their quality of life and sleep. The results reveal an impairment of the quality of life in shift workers, independently of the presence of a circadian rhythm sleep disorder. Quality of life was more severely impaired in subjects with circadian rhythm sleep disorder. Hypnotic therapy brought about an improvement both in the sleep disorder and in the quality of life of subjects affected by shift work syndrome. Selective alertness tests failed to demonstrate any "sedative carry-over" in the treated patients. PMID:9119269

  15. Quality of life in shift work syndrome.

    PubMed

    Puca, F M; Perrucci, S; Prudenzano, M P; Savarese, M; Misceo, S; Perilli, S; Palumbo, M; Libro, G; Genco, S

    1996-01-01

    Air Force radar controllers represent an excellent example of night shift workers, as they are obliged to demonstrate perfect alertness during working hours. We set out: a) to assess the quality of life in these shift workers; b) to identify those with shift work syndrome and c) to evaluate the possible effects of triazolam both on their quality of life and sleep. The results reveal an impairment of the quality of life in shift workers, independently of the presence of a circadian rhythm sleep disorder. Quality of life was more severely impaired in subjects with circadian rhythm sleep disorder. Hypnotic therapy brought about an improvement both in the sleep disorder and in the quality of life of subjects affected by shift work syndrome. Selective alertness tests failed to demonstrate any "sedative carry-over" in the treated patients.

  16. The Computer-based Health Evaluation Software (CHES): a software for electronic patient-reported outcome monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patient-reported Outcomes (PROs) capturing e.g., quality of life, fatigue, depression, medication side-effects or disease symptoms, have become important outcome parameters in medical research and daily clinical practice. Electronic PRO data capture (ePRO) with software packages to administer questionnaires, storing data, and presenting results has facilitated PRO assessment in hospital settings. Compared to conventional paper-pencil versions of PRO instruments, ePRO is more economical with regard to staff resources and time, and allows immediate presentation of results to the medical staff. The objective of our project was to develop software (CHES – Computer-based Health Evaluation System) for ePRO in hospital settings and at home with a special focus on the presentation of individual patient’s results. Methods Following the Extreme Programming development approach architecture was not fixed up-front, but was done in close, continuous collaboration with software end users (medical staff, researchers and patients) to meet their specific demands. Developed features include sophisticated, longitudinal charts linking patients’ PRO data to clinical characteristics and to PRO scores from reference populations, a web-interface for questionnaire administration, and a tool for convenient creating and editing of questionnaires. Results By 2012 CHES has been implemented at various institutions in Austria, Germany, Switzerland, and the UK and about 5000 patients participated in ePRO (with around 15000 assessments in total). Data entry is done by the patients themselves via tablet PCs with a study nurse or an intern approaching patients and supervising questionnaire completion. Discussion During the last decade several software packages for ePRO have emerged for different purposes. Whereas commercial products are available primarily for ePRO in clinical trials, academic projects have focused on data collection and presentation in daily clinical practice and

  17. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and the quality of life

    PubMed Central

    COMAN, ANDREEA CODRUTA; BORZAN, CRISTINA; VESA, CRISTIAN STEFAN; TODEA, DOINA ADINA

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) affects the quality of life (QOL) due to the effects on the patient’s physical and mental function. QOL in sleep apnea may improve under continuous airway positive pressure (CPAP) therapy. The purpose of this study was to assess the OSA patients QOL before and after 3 months of CPAP therapy using Calgary Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (SAQLI). Methods We conducted a study in 79 sleep apnea subjects diagnosed using cardiorespiratory portable monitoring, under CPAP therapy, monitored in our Sleep Laboratory from January 2011 to December 2014. This is a cross-sectional study, achieved through quantitative research (SAQLI questionnaire application) about the perception of quality of life in patients with sleep apnea in the moment of diagnosis and 3 months after CPAP therapy. Results Of the 79 subjects, 59 (74.7%) were men and 20 (26.3%) women; mean age was 54.13 years (SD±10.87), the mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 52.46±20.83 events/h. In all 4 domains of SAQLI: daily functioning with mean pretreatment score 4.13±0.58 versus mean post treatment score 5.43±0.52; social interactions with mean pretreatment score 3.68±0.55 versus post treatment mean score 5.36±0.57; emotional functioning with mean pretreatment score 3.83±0.53 versus mean post treatment mean 5.38±0.56 and symptoms with mean pretreatment score 0.81±0.12 versus mean post treatment score 1.15±0.14, quality of life was improved after 3 months of therapy, with significantly statistical correlation (p=0.00). Also, an improvement was seen in mean total score of SAQLI after therapy as compared to baseline 3.11±0.32 versus 4.24±0.39 (p<0.01). Conclusion The quality of life in sleep apnea was better after CPAP therapy than from baseline, according Calgary Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index. The SAQLI is a useful toll to evaluate quality of life in sleep apnea, especially to highlight the benefits of CPAP therapy, even with short time

  18. [The quality of life in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Lecardeur, L

    2015-09-01

    The World Health Organization defines quality of life as individuals' perception of their position in life in the context of the culture and value systems in which they live and in relation to their goals, expectations, standards, and concerns. Quality of life (QoL) is a concept, which reflects multiple as well subjective as objective dimensions. In patients with schizophrenia, quality of life has been negatively correlated with depressive and anxiety symptoms (results seem more unconvincing concerning positive symptoms and cognitive deficits); the remission of positive and negative symptoms has been associated with a better quality of life, but the persistence of depressive symptoms decreases quality of life even when patients were or not in remission; second generation antipsychotics significantly increase more quality of life than first generation antipsychotics; and psychotherapies (rehabilitation, case management...) improve quality of life. Several general and disease-specific QoL scales have been developed and successfully tested in patients with schizophrenia. The most appropriate disease-specific scale is the Quality of Life Scale (Heinrichs et al., 1984) since it takes patients' cognitive deficits into account and because it allows to subtly measuring the patients' subjective feeling during a hetero-evaluation. The Quality of Life Scale is a 21-item scale based on a semi-structured interview, which is comprised of four subscales: interpersonal relations, instrumental role functioning, intra-psychic foundations, and use of common objects and activities. It has been designed initially to assess deficit symptoms in schizophrenia. It is a simple and quite short tool, which is intended for the use as an outcome criterion, a measure of change and an indicator of the efficacy of therapeutic interventions. Convincing metrological qualities have been described: content, construct and nomological validities; inter-raters and test-retest fidelities; it is sensitive

  19. "A La Recherche Du" Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    This essay examines the stages of inquiry when we seek to formulate quality of life in an era before our own. There arises the question of the extent to which today's formulation of quality of life can be applied to an era far removed from our own. Implicitly, there is the nature of the time interval, T[subscript 1]...T[subscript n], and the…

  20. Quality of life: does measurement help?

    PubMed

    Bergsma, J; Engel, G L

    1988-01-01

    'Quality of life' is a very frequently applied concept nowadays. One may doubt whether everyone has the same connotation in mind while using this expression and why 'quality of life' attracts so much attention. Is the idea a very old one or is it a new and noble value? It is argued here that changes such as in the number of aged people and of chronically disabled people, combined with spectacular developments in medical technology and with a rise in knowledge and assertivity, created an increased awareness of 'quality of life' and its interaction with medicine. Moreover, limitations to budgets and technological developments trigger an interest in new arguments. 'Quality of life' plays an increasing role in all sorts of medical decisions, be it in policy decisions or in individual clinical decisions, be it formally assessed or implicitly weighted. A number of examples is briefly described to illustrate the very broad and diffuse use of quality of life as a criterion. Subsequently we have tried to operationalize the concept on 4 levels: macro, meso, personal and physical. The macro level applies to the meaning of life in a society; assessments of quality of life play a role, for instance, in discussions on euthanasia and in political decisions on medical investments. Examples of the meso level are the hospital, with its internal processes and its ties to the rest of the world, but also the patient in his social environment. On the personal level the individual's frames of reference on health, illness, future, pain and hope - both of the patient and the doctor - are being considered. It is argued that legitimation of important decisions, investments and interventions requires measurement of quality of life in an objective way and on different levels. Quantifying quality, however, appears hardly feasible. Therefore 'quality of life' is frequently measured at the fourth level only, the level of physical activities. Confining measurement to the measurable induces the

  1. Quality of life in venous disease.

    PubMed

    van Korlaar, Inez; Vossen, Carla; Rosendaal, Frits; Cameron, Linda; Bovill, Edwin; Kaptein, Adrian

    2003-07-01

    Quality of life (QOL) can be defined as the functional effect of an illness and its consequent therapy upon a patient, as perceived by the patient. Studies on the impact of chronic venous disease on quality of life are scarce compared to quality of life research in other diseases. The purpose of this paper was to describe instruments that assess the quality of life in patients with chronic venous disease and to review the literature on this topic. A computer search of the MedLine database was performed to identify papers; the bibliographies of relevant articles were reviewed to obtain additional papers. Papers were included if they described the development or use of a quality of life instrument for patients with chronic venous disease. A total of 25 papers were identified that fit the inclusion criteria. The studies described in the papers used six different generic instruments and ten disease-specific instruments. Quality of life in chronic venous disease was assessed in 12 studies. Six studies compared different types of treatment for chronic venous disease where QOL was an outcome measure. Despite the wide variety of measures used, results indicate that the quality of life of patients with chronic venous disease is affected in the physical domain mostly with regard to pain, physical functioning and mobility, and that they suffer from negative emotional reactions and social isolation. We feel that QOL should be a standard measure in future studies in patients with chronic venous disease, preferably with a combination of generic and disease-specific measures.

  2. Quality of life in venous disease.

    PubMed

    van Korlaar, Inez; Vossen, Carla; Rosendaal, Frits; Cameron, Linda; Bovill, Edwin; Kaptein, Adrian

    2003-07-01

    Quality of life (QOL) can be defined as the functional effect of an illness and its consequent therapy upon a patient, as perceived by the patient. Studies on the impact of chronic venous disease on quality of life are scarce compared to quality of life research in other diseases. The purpose of this paper was to describe instruments that assess the quality of life in patients with chronic venous disease and to review the literature on this topic. A computer search of the MedLine database was performed to identify papers; the bibliographies of relevant articles were reviewed to obtain additional papers. Papers were included if they described the development or use of a quality of life instrument for patients with chronic venous disease. A total of 25 papers were identified that fit the inclusion criteria. The studies described in the papers used six different generic instruments and ten disease-specific instruments. Quality of life in chronic venous disease was assessed in 12 studies. Six studies compared different types of treatment for chronic venous disease where QOL was an outcome measure. Despite the wide variety of measures used, results indicate that the quality of life of patients with chronic venous disease is affected in the physical domain mostly with regard to pain, physical functioning and mobility, and that they suffer from negative emotional reactions and social isolation. We feel that QOL should be a standard measure in future studies in patients with chronic venous disease, preferably with a combination of generic and disease-specific measures. PMID:12876622

  3. IDEA system--a new computer-based expert system for incorporation monitoring.

    PubMed

    Doerfel, H

    2007-01-01

    Recently, at the Karlsruhe Research Centre, a computer-based expert system, Internal Dose Equivalent Assessment System (IDEA System), has been developed for assisting dosimetrists in applying the relevant recommendations and guidelines for internal dosimetry. The expert system gives guidance to the user with respect to: (a) planning of monitoring, (b) performing routine and special monitoring, and (c) evaluation of primary monitoring results. The evaluation is done according to the IDEA System guidelines (Doerfel, H. et al., General guidelines for the estimation of committed effective dose from incorporation monitoring data. Research Report FZKA 7243, Research Center Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (2006). ISSN 0947-8260.) in a three-stage procedure according to the expected level of exposure. At the first level the evaluation is performed with default or site-specific parameter values, at the second level case-specific parameter values are applied and at the third level a special evaluation is performed with individual adjustment of model parameter values. With these well-defined procedures the expert system follows the aim, in which all recommendations and guidelines are applied properly and the results in terms of committed effective and organ doses are close to the best estimate. PMID:17827136

  4. Effects of vulvodynia on quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Ponte, Maya; Klemperer, Erika; Sahay, Anju; Chren, Mary-Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Background The experiences of women with vulvodynia are poorly understood. Objective We sought to determine the effects of vulvodynia on quality of life. Methods We conducted a survey of 280 patients in a university-based vulvar disorders clinic. Skin-related quality of life was measured with a vulvar-specific version of Skindex-29. Results The response rate was 95%; 101 patients (36%) had vulvodynia, and 179 patients (64%) had other vulvar conditions. Women with vulvodynia had significantly worse quality of life than patients with many other dermatologic conditions, and worse functioning than women with other vulvar conditions (mean functioning scores [±SD] of patients with psoriasis, other vulvar conditions, and vulvodynia were 23 ± 27, 34 ± 24, and 44 ± 22, respectively, P = .05). A diagnosis of vulvodynia was the strongest independent correlate of poor quality of life (eg, for poor functioning, odds ratio = 1.8, 95% confidence interval 1.0–3.1). Limitations Limitations are single academic medical center and comorbid illnesses determined by self-report. Conclusion Vulvodynia has broad and substantial effects on quality of life. PMID:19022532

  5. Quality of life issues in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jane; Koo, John Y M

    2003-08-01

    Psoriasis is associated with significant psychosocial morbidity and a decrease in health-related quality of life. It is important to view psoriasis as a serious disease and resist the tendency to underestimate its impact on overall patient well-being. The disability experienced by psoriasis sufferers is comparable to that of patients with other chronic illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and depression. Aggressive intervention is warranted in order to improve patient quality of life and decrease the potential for psychosocial sequelae. Health-related quality of life measures are becoming a necessary adjunct to traditional clinical assessments in the evaluation and treatment of psoriasis patients by the individual clinician. They also provide valuable information to government agencies and third party payers in the determination of resource allocation and reimbursement.

  6. Adult education and the quality of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuijnman, Albert

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the complementary role of adult education in influencing people's objective and subjective quality of life. The analytical strategy used to achieve this end is to estimate parameters in a path model which includes both objective indicators such as occupational status and earned income, and subjective indicators such as job satisfaction and perceived personal wellbeing. The investigation builds on Swedish data and employs the LISREL method in the fitting of the model to the data. The results indicate that adult education positively influences objective indicators of the quality of life. Even though adult education is found to relate to measures of perceived personal wellbeing, the hypothesis that it also influences the way men assess their life situation and evaluate their subjective quality of life cannot be confirmed.

  7. Quality of life: its definition and measurement.

    PubMed

    Felce, D; Perry, J

    1995-01-01

    A model of quality of life is proposed that integrates objective and subjective indicators, a broad range of life domains, and individual values. It takes account of concerns that externally derived norms should not be applied without reference to individual differences. It also allows for objective comparisons to be made between the situations of particular groups and what is normative. Considerable agreement exists that quality of life is multidimensional. Coverage may be categorised within five dimensions: physical wellbeing, material wellbeing, social wellbeing, emotional wellbeing, and development and activity. A research agenda is discussed as are the particular problems caused by difficulties in understanding and communicating.

  8. Quality of life in vitiligo patients.

    PubMed

    Teovska Mitrevska, Natasa; Eleftheriadou, Viktoria; Guarneri, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Quality of life is defined by the World Health Organization as "individuals' perceptions of their position in life in the context of the culture and value systems in which they live and in relation to their goals, expectations, standards and concerns." Often overlooked in the past, it is nowadays considered, in a more holistic view of medicine, a decisive factor to understand the impact of diseases and improve the quality of medical care. Such evaluation is particularly relevant for dermatological diseases, because visibility of the lesions can significantly affect self-esteem and social relationships. Vitiligo represents an emblematic case: often disfiguring and located in visible areas, confused in the past (and, in many world regions, even in the present) with leprosy, often perceived by physicians as a harmless, purely cosmetic problem, it significantly decreases the quality of life of affected persons. After a brief overview on definition, usefulness and methods for the assessment of quality of life, the authors examine the peculiarities of its relationship with skin diseases, particularly vitiligo. The state of the art of knowledge and research in this field is presented, together with data showing usefulness and positive results of a multidisciplinary approach, which adequately keeps into account perceived quality of life, on patient's satisfaction, adherence to treatment protocols and, ultimately, better outcome of treatments. In this context, an important role can be played by support communities, groups of patients and dedicated associations and societies, connected through modern communication networks like the Internet. PMID:23237035

  9. Quality of Life for the Camberwell Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beadle-Brown, Julie; Murphy, Glynis; DiTerlizzi, Michele

    2009-01-01

    Background: Despite the acknowledged difficulties of measuring satisfaction for people with intellectual disabilities, the current study examined the quality of life (QoL) of the Camberwell Cohort, a total population sample of people with severe intellectual disability and/or autism [Wing & Gould, "Epidemiology and Classification," 9, 1979, 11].…

  10. [Regaining quality of life despite rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    A, Madame

    2016-01-01

    A patient aged 32 who had been living with her partner for a few years, is diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. They both needed to understand and adapt. The caregivers had a frontline role in the multidisciplinary care but addressing the impact on the patient's sexual quality of life remains difficult. The patient describes her experience and how harmony and desire were re-established.

  11. Technology and Quality of Life Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Eileen Danaher

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To discuss recent technological advances in quality of life data collection and guidance for use in research and clinical practice. The use of telephone-, computer-, and web/Internet based technologies to collect quality of life data, reliability and validity issues, and cost will be discussed along with the potential pitfalls associated with these technologies. Data Sources Health care literature and web resources. Conclusion Technology has provided researchers and clinicians with an opportunity to collect QOL data from patients that were previously not accessible. Most technologies offer a variety of options, such as language choice, formatting options for the delivery of questions, and data management services. Choosing the appropriate technology for use in research and/or clinical practice primarily depends on the purpose for QOL data collection. Implications for Nursing Practice Technology is changing the way nurses assess quality of life in patients with cancer and provide care. As stakeholders in the health care delivery system and patient advocates, nurses must be intimately involved in the evaluation and use of new technologies that impact quality of life and/or the delivery of care. PMID:20152578

  12. Three Decades of Quality of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schalock, Robert L.

    2000-01-01

    This article summarizes the current understanding of the "quality of life" construct as applied to people with mental retardation. It examines previous definitions and suggests a definition involving eight life dimensions including emotional well-being, interpersonal relationships, material well-being, social inclusion, and rights. The definition…

  13. Science, Technology and the Quality of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Alexander

    In view of the changing relationship between science, technology, and the quality of life, future efforts need to be devoted to the use of new knowledge for social objectives rather than for economics and defense. The mass of problems facing society today, which to some extent are direct side effects of technological growth, appear to have three…

  14. The Quality of Life in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shu, Xiaoling; Zhu, Yifei

    2009-01-01

    The Asia Barometer Survey of 2,000 respondents reveals that substantial majorities of the Chinese people experience feelings of happiness, enjoyment, and accomplishment. In fact, the proportion experiencing these indicators of a high quality of life are larger in China than in some more prosperous countries. Favorable historical comparison,…

  15. Quality of life in vitiligo patients.

    PubMed

    Teovska Mitrevska, Natasa; Eleftheriadou, Viktoria; Guarneri, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Quality of life is defined by the World Health Organization as "individuals' perceptions of their position in life in the context of the culture and value systems in which they live and in relation to their goals, expectations, standards and concerns." Often overlooked in the past, it is nowadays considered, in a more holistic view of medicine, a decisive factor to understand the impact of diseases and improve the quality of medical care. Such evaluation is particularly relevant for dermatological diseases, because visibility of the lesions can significantly affect self-esteem and social relationships. Vitiligo represents an emblematic case: often disfiguring and located in visible areas, confused in the past (and, in many world regions, even in the present) with leprosy, often perceived by physicians as a harmless, purely cosmetic problem, it significantly decreases the quality of life of affected persons. After a brief overview on definition, usefulness and methods for the assessment of quality of life, the authors examine the peculiarities of its relationship with skin diseases, particularly vitiligo. The state of the art of knowledge and research in this field is presented, together with data showing usefulness and positive results of a multidisciplinary approach, which adequately keeps into account perceived quality of life, on patient's satisfaction, adherence to treatment protocols and, ultimately, better outcome of treatments. In this context, an important role can be played by support communities, groups of patients and dedicated associations and societies, connected through modern communication networks like the Internet.

  16. Conceptualizing and Measuring Family Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, J. A.; Poston, D. J.; Turnbull, A. P.; Marquis, J.; Hoffman, L.; Mannan, H.; Wang, M.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Increasing emphasis on family-centred approaches to services and supports for families of children with disabilities has surfaced the issue of accountability for family outcomes. We present a review of literature about the impacts of children with disabilities on families as a backdrop to proposing family quality of life as a concept…

  17. Quality of Life: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lankhorst, Gustaaf J.

    1989-01-01

    A 12-item list of human abilities/activities was developed to measure quality of life of 9 rheumatoid arthritis adults from 2 aspects: "present condition" and "relative importance" of each item. Pilot testing indicated that importance and present condition represent different aspects. Differences between self-assessments and physicians'…

  18. Quality of Life in Adults Who Stutter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koedoot, Caroline; Bouwmans, Clazien; Franken, Marie-Christine; Stolk, Elly

    2011-01-01

    Although persistent developmental stuttering is known to affect daily living, just how great the impact is remains unclear. Furthermore, little is known about the underlying mechanisms which lead to a diminished quality of life (QoL). The primary objective of this study is to explore to what extent QoL is impaired in adults who stutter (AWS). In…

  19. The Quality of Life in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inoguchi, Takashi; Fujii, Seiji

    2009-01-01

    This study is part of a collaborative project examining the quality of life in Confucian societies in Asia. Our major findings suggest that, when our sixteen specific life domains are grouped into three life spheres, namely, material, post-material, and public, the Japanese people tend to be most satisfied with the post-material sphere of life and…

  20. The Quality of Life in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sing, Ming

    2009-01-01

    The AsiaBarometer of 1,000 respondents shows that Hong Kong people have a great desire for materialistic attainment, and such an emphasis on materialism bodes ill for their quality of life. Negative assessments of the public life sphere, which encompasses the natural environment, the social welfare system, and the democratic system, also detract…

  1. Quality of life philosophy I. Quality of life, happiness, and meaning in life.

    PubMed

    Ventegodt, Søren; Andersen, Niels Jørgen; Merrick, Joav

    2003-12-01

    In the Danish Quality of Life Survey, we asked 10,000 people about their quality of life with the validated SEQOL questionnaire with more than 300 questions on their quality of life. How did they feel? How content were they with their lives? How happy were they? Did they feel their needs were fulfilled? And many more questions. We asked the questions we believed to be important for their quality of life (QOL). The results were quite surprising and forced us to recontemplate the following philosophical questions: What is quality of life, happiness, and meaning in life? What is a human being? Do we need a new biology? Is the brain the seat of consciousness? How do we seize the meaning of life and by doing so, will we become well again? What are the key concepts of quality of life? The meaning of life is connectedness and development. It is about realizing every opportunity and potential in one"s existence. The opportunities must be found and acknowledged. What do you find when you find yourself deep down? You find your real self and your purpose in life. You realize that you are already a part of a larger totality. Antonovsky called it "coherence". Maslow called it "transcendence". Frankl called it "meaning of life". We call it simply "being". To test if these philosophical questions are actually relevant for medicine, we looked at the consequences for patients being taught the quality of life philosophy. Quite surprisingly we learned from our pilot studies with "quality of life as medicine" that just by assimilating the basic concepts of the quality of life philosophy presented in this series of papers, patients felt better and saw their lives as more meaningful. The improvement of the patient"s personal philosophy of life seems to be the essence of holistic medicine, helping the patient to assume more responsibility for his or her own existence.

  2. Quality of Life and Health-Related Quality of Life of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Livingston, Michael H.; Palisano, Robert J.; Galuppi, Barbara E.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed quality of life (QOL) and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of 203 adolescents with cerebral palsy (111 males, 92 females; mean age 16y [SD 1y 9mo]). Participants were classified using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), as Level I (n=60), Level II (n=33), Level III (n=28), Level IV (n=50), or Level V…

  3. Greece Financial Crisis and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Mechili, Aggelos E; Kalokairinou, Athena; Kaitelidou, Dafni; Diomidous, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    The last six years the global community is facing an economic crisis that first appeared in USA. This crisis has a lot of impacts especially in health sector. Unemployment, job insecurity and the loss of disposable income have a significant impact in health too. The main objective of this research was to investigate the quality of life of the general population in Greece during the financial crisis. To collect the data it has been used the Greek version of Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36v2). In general, income, level of education, cohabitation and parenthood had a significant impact in quality of life. As a conclusion, unemployed participants' score was lower in the entire dimensions and in the two summary scales too.

  4. Livestock, ethics, and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Hodges, J

    2003-11-01

    Agricultural and animal scientists need to embrace a new vision beyond the single-minded existing pursuit of biological efficiency. The public in the West is no longer concerned solely with cheap food. Other paramount issues define quality of life, including: health and safety of foods; nutritional value; traditional, regional, locally produced, and organic foods; animal welfare; sustainable farming, environment, and rural resources. The paper provides examples of how the credibility of animal scientists has been lost due to some recent unethical behavior. Research, teaching and application of agricultural and animal science, especially of biotechnology, need to be reshaped into a new "Quality of Life Agricultural Era" to replace the "Era of Intensification." This new era will need fresh assumptions, beliefs and leadership to match the emerging social agenda of the 21st century. Animal scientists have a special role in implementing this new plausibility structure. PMID:14601893

  5. Greece Financial Crisis and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Mechili, Aggelos E; Kalokairinou, Athena; Kaitelidou, Dafni; Diomidous, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    The last six years the global community is facing an economic crisis that first appeared in USA. This crisis has a lot of impacts especially in health sector. Unemployment, job insecurity and the loss of disposable income have a significant impact in health too. The main objective of this research was to investigate the quality of life of the general population in Greece during the financial crisis. To collect the data it has been used the Greek version of Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36v2). In general, income, level of education, cohabitation and parenthood had a significant impact in quality of life. As a conclusion, unemployed participants' score was lower in the entire dimensions and in the two summary scales too. PMID:26152994

  6. Fibromyalgia, Spirituality, Coping and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Biccheri, Eliane; Roussiau, Nicolas; Mambet-Doué, Constance

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the impact of spirituality on coping strategies and on the quality of life of fibromyalgia patients. The study was carried out on 590 people suffering from fibromyalgia. The data were collected with the French version of the WCC-R (The Ways of Coping Checklist: Cousson et al. 1996), the questionnaire of spirituality (Evaluation de La Spiritualité: Renard and Roussiau, 2016) and Diener's Satisfaction with Life Scale questionnaire, translated into French (Blais et al. 1989). An analysis carried out with the software SPSS and Hayes' models showed that both problem-focused coping and coping through social support seeking are mediating variables that enable an indirect link between spirituality and quality of life.

  7. Outcome Measures in Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Tate, D G; Dijkers, M; Johnson-Greene, L

    1996-01-01

    The concept of quality of life (QOL) represents a new paradigm in rehabilitation research and cSinical care. Three measurement approaches have been used to investigate QOL of individuals: (1) evaluative or subjective, (2) objective, and (3) quality adjusted life year (QALY). QALYs represent the utility approach to measurement with emphasis on value of, desirability of, or preference for conditions or status. When the condition in question isdefined as health, health-related quality of life (HQOL) measures are employed. Very few studies are found in the literature addressing QOL of stroke patients. Among studies reviewed, HQOL measures are often used. A summary of these studies and discussion of limitations associated with QOL measures utilized are provided. PMID:27620148

  8. Quality of life in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Cristiana; Almeida, Isabel; Vasconcelos, Carlos

    2015-12-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic multi-system autoimmune disease associated with disability and reduced quality of life. There is no effective treatment or cure to SSc, so it is important improve global health of these patients and reduce morbidity and mortality associated with SSc. It was made a literature review about quality of life in patients with SSc, regarding the several factors that should be considered and evaluated when attending to SSc patients. It was also considered the validated scales and questionnaires used to measure outcomes in patients with SSc. We concluded that it is important to have an interdisciplinary approach to SSc patients considering the patient's cognitive representations of the disease and what they value most like mobility and hand function, pain, fatigue, sleep, depression and body image.

  9. [Oral kinesiology and the quality of life].

    PubMed

    Papagianni, C E; van der Meulen, M J; Naeije, M; Lobbezoo, F

    2011-03-01

    In a comparative study, the influence of oral health on the quality of life was investigated for people with temporomandibular pain, people with tooth wear and people with complete dentures. To this end, the study made use of the Oral Health Impact Profile. Both the total score and the scores on 4 of the 7 domains of the Oral Health Impact Profile were significantly higher in the research group with temporomandibular pain than in the research groups with tooth wear and complete dentures. These results suggest that among people with temporomandibular pain the influence of oral health on the quality of life is more negative than among people with tooth wear and among people with complete dentures. This result can probably be linked with the general finding that patients with temporomandibular pain bear a relatively high psycho-social burden.

  10. [Regaining quality of life despite rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    A, Madame

    2016-01-01

    A patient aged 32 who had been living with her partner for a few years, is diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. They both needed to understand and adapt. The caregivers had a frontline role in the multidisciplinary care but addressing the impact on the patient's sexual quality of life remains difficult. The patient describes her experience and how harmony and desire were re-established. PMID:27317820

  11. Psychoactive drugs and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Ventegodt, Søren; Merrick, Joav

    2003-08-18

    This study was performed on a representative sample of the Danish population in order to investigate the connection to the use of psychoactive drugs and quality of life (QOL) by way of a questionnaire-based survey. The questionnaire was mailed in February 1993 to 2,460 persons aged between 18 and 88, randomly selected from the CPR (Danish Central Register), and 7,222 persons from the Copenhagen Perinatal Birth Cohort 1959-61. A total of 1,501 persons between the ages 18 and 88 years and 4,626 persons between the ages 31 and 33 years returned the questionnaire (response rates of 61.0% and 64.1%, respectively). Variables investigated in this study were ten different psychotropic drugs and quality of life. Our study showed that over half the Danish population had used illegal psychotropic drugs. The most commonly used was cannabis (marijuana) though experience of this drug appeared not to co-vary with QOL to any significant extent. Cocaine, amphetamine, and psilocybin had been used by 1.2 to 3.3% of the population and this varied with QOL to a clear albeit small extent. LSD has been used by 1.2% of the population and the users had a QOL score 10% lower than those who had never used psychotropic drugs. The group with the lowest quality of life was found to be persons who had used heroin, morphine, methadone, and a mixture of alcohol and tranquilizers (10-20% below the group with the highest quality of life).

  12. Quality of Life in Chronic Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Megari, Kalliopi

    2013-01-01

    During the past decades there was an increasing predominance of chronic disorders, with a large number of people living with chronic diseases that can adversely affect their quality of life. The aim of the present paper is to study quality of life and especially Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in chronic diseases. HRQOL is a multidimensional construct that consists of at least three broad domains – physical, psychological, and social functioning – that are affected by one’s disease and/or treatment. HRQoL is usually measured in chronic conditions and is frequently impaired to a great extent. In addition, factors that are associated with good and poor HRQoL, as well as HRQoL assessment will be discussed. The estimation of the relative impact of chronic diseases on HRQoL is necessary in order to better plan and distribute health care resources aiming at a better HRQoL. [«All the people perceive the concept of living good or being well, that is the same as being happy». (Aristotle. 384-322 BC. Ethica Nichomachea)] PMID:26973912

  13. Quality of life--three competing views.

    PubMed

    Sandoe, P

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to describe three different attempts, which have been made by philosophers, to define what quality of life is; and to spell out some of the difficulties that faces each definition. One, Perfectionism, focuses on the capacities that human beings possess: capacities for friendship, knowledge and creative activity, for instance. It says that the good life consists in the development and use of these capacities. Another account, the Preference Theory, urges that satisfying one's preferences, or desires, is what improves one's quality of life. And a third account, Hedonism, sees life-quality as consisting in the enjoyment of pleasure and the avoidance of pain. The paper describes and evaluates objections to each of these views, thereby displaying their weaknesses and strengths. Since no view comes out as the right one there is a choice to be made. At the end of the paper it is being discussed how well each of the views cohere with different methodologies used in quality of life research. Also it is suggested that consideration about what the research is to be used for are relevant.

  14. Methodologies for defining quality of life

    SciTech Connect

    Glicken, J.; Engi, D.

    1996-10-10

    Quality of life as a concept has been used in many ways in the public policy arena. It can be used in summative evaluations to assess the impacts of policies or programs. Alternatively, it can be applied to formative evaluations to provide input to the formation of new policies. In short, it provides the context for the understanding needed to evaluate the results of choices that have been made in the public policy arena, or the potential of choices yet to be made. In either case, the public policy question revolves around the positive or negative impact the choice will have on quality of life, and the magnitude of that impact. This discussion will develop a conceptual framework that proposes that an assessment of quality of life is based on a comparison of expectations with experience. The framework defines four basic components from which these expectations arise: natural conditions, social conditions, the body, and the mind. Each one of these components is generally described, and associated with a general policy or rhetorical category which gives it its policy vocabulary--environmental quality, economic well-being, human health, and self-fulfillment.

  15. Quality of life in chronic cardiovascular illness.

    PubMed

    Wenger, N K

    1992-01-01

    Aspects of outcome that require assessment in chronic cardiovascular illness include the total consequences of both the illness and its management. Quality of life in the medical care context, addresses the resultant comfort, sense of well-being and life satisfaction; the maintenance of reasonable physical, emotional, and intellective function; and the ability to participate in valued activities in the family, workplace, and community. Factors reinforcing the validity of considering quality of life attributes relate to the contemporary marked increase in the prevalence of chronic cardiovascular illness. In chronic illness, the therapies administered are not curative but are rather designed to limit the disabling consequences of the disease; the perceptions of patients about their resultant health status thus have clinical relevance. Next is that patients, as enlightened consumers, increasingly seek information about the options available to them for treatments for chronic cardiovascular disease, with their queries relating both to the biomedical (morbidity and mortality) outcomes and to the psychosocial (life quality) outcomes. Finally, quality of life attributes are increasingly examined in evaluating the cost effectiveness of cardiovascular care, in addition to morbidity and mortality data; determining features involve the resultant functional independence of the individual as a result of care, productivity, return to remunerative work, and level of life satisfaction. PMID:1590648

  16. Quality of life--three competing views.

    PubMed

    Sandoe, P

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to describe three different attempts, which have been made by philosophers, to define what quality of life is; and to spell out some of the difficulties that faces each definition. One, Perfectionism, focuses on the capacities that human beings possess: capacities for friendship, knowledge and creative activity, for instance. It says that the good life consists in the development and use of these capacities. Another account, the Preference Theory, urges that satisfying one's preferences, or desires, is what improves one's quality of life. And a third account, Hedonism, sees life-quality as consisting in the enjoyment of pleasure and the avoidance of pain. The paper describes and evaluates objections to each of these views, thereby displaying their weaknesses and strengths. Since no view comes out as the right one there is a choice to be made. At the end of the paper it is being discussed how well each of the views cohere with different methodologies used in quality of life research. Also it is suggested that consideration about what the research is to be used for are relevant. PMID:15015520

  17. Quality of Life Among HIV-Infected Patients in Brazil after Initiation of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Lorenza Nogueira; César, Cibele Comini; Guimarães, Mark Drew Crosland

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Despite improvement in clinical treatment for HIV-infected patients, the impact of antiretroviral therapy on the overall quality of life has become a major concern. OBJECTIVE To identify factors associated with increased levels of self-reported quality of life among HIV-infected patients after four months of antiretroviral therapy. METHODS Patients were recruited at two public health referral centers for AIDS, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, for a prospective adherence study. Patients were interviewed before initiating treatment (baseline) and after one and four months. Quality of life was assessed using a psychometric instrument, and factors associated with good/very good quality of life four months after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy were assessed using a cross-sectional approach. Logistic regression was used for analysis. RESULTS Overall quality of life was classified as ‘very good/good’ by 66.4% of the participants four months after initiating treatment, while 33.6% classified it as ‘neither poor nor good/poor/very poor’. Logistic regression indicated that >8 years of education, none/mild symptoms of anxiety and depression, no antiretroviral switch, lower number of adverse reactions and better quality of life at baseline were independently associated with good/very good quality of life over four months of treatment. CONCLUSIONS Our results highlight the importance of modifiable factors such as psychiatric symptoms and treatment-related variables that may contribute to a better quality of life among patients initiating treatment. Considering that poor quality of life is related to non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy, careful clinical monitoring of these factors may contribute to ensuring the long-term effectiveness of antiretroviral regimens. PMID:19759880

  18. Early Palliative Care Improves Patients' Quality of Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160885.html Early Palliative Care Improves Patients' Quality of Life Also increases chances of having end-of-life ... incurable cancer helps patients cope and improves their quality of life, a new study shows. It also leads to ...

  19. Quality of life and health status in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    van der Steeg, A F W; De Vries, J; Roukema, J A

    2004-12-01

    Quality of life is of increasing importance in clinical oncology studies. When analysing publications concerning quality of life in breast cancer, however, the majority of the articles appear to study health status and not quality of life. Therefore five recommendations were formulated to apply reading a 'quality of life' article. With the use of these recommendations an article can be evaluated and the clinical significance can be assessed. PMID:15522550

  20. Exodus to cities and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, K

    1990-08-15

    Concerns about deterioration of the quality of life in mega-cities in India, thought to be due to in-migration, are shown to be misplaced in this essay. Not only is the deterioration due merely to rising expectations, but its causes are problems on a national level. It is true that population growth in the 12 largest cities in India, 3.35%, is more rapid than growth rates in the country as a whole, 2.22%. Bangalore is growing the fastest, 5.68% annually, but generally Indian cities are growing less rapidly that many other Asian cities, e.g. Dacca, 7.37%. Urbanization to the extent of 60.70% of the population is in fact necessary for development. The primary reason for in-migration is employment for men, and marriage accompanying employed husbands for women. Contrary to common opinion, the educational status of in- migrants is higher than that of the region, and female literacy is higher in cities than in the rest of the state, e.g., 61% for Bombay, vs. 35% in Maharashtra State. The occupational status is frequently high: production, transport equipment operator, laborer, professional, technical executive managerial, sales and service. Furthermore, as urbanization proceeds, construction laborers and service workers are in demand. Quality of life defined by infant and maternal mortality is higher in cities than in the surrounding rural area. This quality of life is the reason why people migrate to the city. Unfortunately, frustrations are also rising as expectations for improved housing, water, air, transportation and consumer-durables rise faster than they can be supplied. PMID:12343049

  1. Intermetropolitan migration and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Porell, F W

    1982-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the relative importance of economic and quality of life (QOL) factors as determinants of inter-metropolitan migration in the United States. The study is based on the generalized systemic gravity model of Alonso and on data from a sample of 25 SMSAs over the period 1965-1970. "The most striking feature of the empirical results is the apparent lack of importance of origin economic and QOL factors as determinants of outmigration.... On the other hand, the empirical results suggest both economic and QOL factors to be significant determinants of inmigration."

  2. Cross-Cultural Study of Quality of Life Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schalock, Robert L.; Verdugo, Miguel Angel; Jenaro, Christina; Wang, Mian; Wehmeyer, Mike; Jiancheng, Xu; Lachapelle, Yves

    2005-01-01

    The concept of quality of life is increasingly being used internationally in the field of intellectual disabilities. We surveyed three respondent groups representing five geographical groupings on the importance and use of the 24 core quality of life indicators most commonly reported in the international quality of life literature. Results suggest…

  3. The Impact of Financial Crisis on the Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rova, Lindita; Mano, Romeo

    2009-01-01

    The quality of life is a relatively new concept, which is continually changing and for which there is not yet a wholly satisfactory definition. The quality of life involves human, social-economic and health characteristics. The manifold nature of the quality of life led to the development of various patterns for measuring it. The quality of life…

  4. 38 CFR 52.100 - Quality of life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Quality of life. 52.100... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.100 Quality of life. Program management must provide an environment and provide or coordinate care that supports the quality of life...

  5. 38 CFR 52.100 - Quality of life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Quality of life. 52.100... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.100 Quality of life. Program management must provide an environment and provide or coordinate care that supports the quality of life...

  6. 42 CFR 483.15 - Quality of life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Quality of life. 483.15 Section 483.15 Public... Care Facilities § 483.15 Quality of life. A facility must care for its residents in a manner and in an environment that promotes maintenance or enhancement of each resident's quality of life. (a) Dignity....

  7. 42 CFR 483.15 - Quality of life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Quality of life. 483.15 Section 483.15 Public... Care Facilities § 483.15 Quality of life. A facility must care for its residents in a manner and in an environment that promotes maintenance or enhancement of each resident's quality of life. (a) Dignity....

  8. Ways that Social Change Predicts Personal Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Chau-Kiu; Leung, Kwok

    2010-01-01

    A notable way that social change affects personal quality of life would rely on the person's experience with social change. This experience may influence societal quality of life and quality of work life, which may in turn affect personal quality of life. Additionally, the experience of social change is possibly less detrimental to personal…

  9. 42 CFR 483.15 - Quality of life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Quality of life. 483.15 Section 483.15 Public... Care Facilities § 483.15 Quality of life. A facility must care for its residents in a manner and in an environment that promotes maintenance or enhancement of each resident's quality of life. (a) Dignity....

  10. 38 CFR 52.100 - Quality of life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Quality of life. 52.100... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.100 Quality of life. Program management must provide an environment and provide or coordinate care that supports the quality of life...

  11. 42 CFR 483.15 - Quality of life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Quality of life. 483.15 Section 483.15 Public... Care Facilities § 483.15 Quality of life. A facility must care for its residents in a manner and in an environment that promotes maintenance or enhancement of each resident's quality of life. (a) Dignity....

  12. 38 CFR 52.100 - Quality of life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Quality of life. 52.100... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.100 Quality of life. Program management must provide an environment and provide or coordinate care that supports the quality of life...

  13. Quality of Life of Students with Disabilites Attending Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Zboon, Eman; Ahmad, Jamal Fathi; Theeb, Raied Sheikh

    2014-01-01

    In spite of increasing number of students with disabilities in universities, there is limited research on quality of life of these students. This study aimed to identify the quality of life level of undergraduate students with disabilities at Jordanian universities. The sample consisted of (147) students. A quality of life scale was constructed,…

  14. Putting quality of life on the agenda.

    PubMed

    Kitatani, K

    1991-01-01

    At the Population and Natural Resources Workshop of the World Conservation Union (IUCN) General Assembly in Perth, Australia, December 1990, population and quality of life issues were stressed as one of the central items to be placed on the 1992 Agenda of the UN Conference on Environment. The pace of environmental degradation is quickening, the causes are becoming more entrenched, and indecision will narrow our options. Poverty and population growth are making development unsustainable. Technological miracles will not appear to restore balance. Deforestation, soil erosion, decertification and loss of water resources are fueling urbanization. Therefore the World Commission on Environment and Development, known as the Brundtland Commission, ranks human resources development as a top priority in sustainable development and quality of life. Human resources can be improved by providing maternal and child care, family planning and improving the status of women. Successful family planning programs as seen in Thailand and Malaysia can show results very quickly once national population policies, institutions and capacity are in place. PMID:12284002

  15. Putting quality of life on the agenda.

    PubMed

    Kitatani, K

    1991-01-01

    At the Population and Natural Resources Workshop of the World Conservation Union (IUCN) General Assembly in Perth, Australia, December 1990, population and quality of life issues were stressed as one of the central items to be placed on the 1992 Agenda of the UN Conference on Environment. The pace of environmental degradation is quickening, the causes are becoming more entrenched, and indecision will narrow our options. Poverty and population growth are making development unsustainable. Technological miracles will not appear to restore balance. Deforestation, soil erosion, decertification and loss of water resources are fueling urbanization. Therefore the World Commission on Environment and Development, known as the Brundtland Commission, ranks human resources development as a top priority in sustainable development and quality of life. Human resources can be improved by providing maternal and child care, family planning and improving the status of women. Successful family planning programs as seen in Thailand and Malaysia can show results very quickly once national population policies, institutions and capacity are in place.

  16. Quality of life in body dysmorphic disorder.

    PubMed

    IsHak, Waguih William; Bolton, Michael A; Bensoussan, Jean-Charles; Dous, George V; Nguyen, Trang T; Powell-Hicks, Allycin L; Gardner, Jennifer E; Ponton, Kimberly M

    2012-12-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) has a significant impact on the patients' quality of life (QOL). This is an initial literature review of QOL in patients with BDD, examining the extent of QOL impairments, the impact of psychiatric comorbidity on QOL, and the effect of treatment on QOL in BDD. Studies were identified through PubMed, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO searches from 1960-2011 using the keywords: "quality of life," "body dysmorphic disorder," "dysmorphophobia," and "body image." Studies included in this review were selected using specific criteria by two authors reaching consensus. Most BDD research studies have used symptom severity measures mainly to study BDD and its treatments. BBD with or without comorbidities is significantly associated with poor QOL and functioning. Studies show that treatment of BDD, either by psychopharmacological treatments such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or cognitive behavior therapy, might have positive effects on QOL, although these results need to be replicated in larger studies. In conclusion, QOL could add significant value to the assessment of BDD if used as one of the primary measures in research and clinical work in BDD, by providing more information and clearer understanding on the impact of the illness on satisfaction with activities of daily life and overall sense of wellbeing before and after treatment.

  17. Quality-of-Life Research on the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Soetikno, Roy M.; Mrad, Ramzi; Pao, Victoria; Lenert, Leslie A.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The World Wide Web (WWW) is a new communications medium that permits investigators to contact patients in nonmedical settings and study the effects of disease on quality of life through self-administered questionnaires. However, little is known about the feasibility and, what is more important, the validity of this approach. An on-line survey for patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and patients whose UC had been treated with surgical procedures was developed. To understand how patients on the WWW might differ from those in practice and the potential biases in conducting epidemiological research in volunteers recruited on the Internet, post-surgery patients who responded to the WWW survey were compared with those in a surgical practice. Setting: The Internet and private practice surgical clinic. Main outcomes: Scores from the Short form 36 (SF-36) Health Assessment Questionnaire and the Self-Administered Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ). Results: Over a 5-month period, 53 post-surgery patients enrolled in the Internet study; 47 patients from a surgical clinic completed the same computer-based questionnaire. Surgically treated patients on the WWW were younger than their clinic counterparts (median age category 35-44 years vs. 45-54 years, p = 0.01) but more ill with a lower summary IBDQ score (168 vs. 186, p = 0.019) and lower health status across almost all dimensions of the SF-36 (p = 0.016). Conclusions: It is feasible to conduct epidemiological research on the effects of UC on quality of life on the Web; however, systematic differences in disease activity between volunteer patients on the WWW and “in the clinic” may limit the applicability of results. PMID:9391930

  18. Health Condition and Quality of Life in Persons with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    TRGOVCEVIC, Sanja; MILICEVIC, Milena; NEDOVIC, Goran; JOVANIC, Goran

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background During the last few decades, focus of rehabilitation outcome has been redirected to the lifetime monitoring of quality of life. The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in quality of life perceptions between participants with spinal cord injury and participants of typical population. Methods This cross-sectional controlled study of 100 adults aged 18-65 years was based on two questionnaires, Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36) and Spinal Cord Injury Quality of Life Questionnaire (QL-23), completed by 23 participants with paraplegia, 21 participants with tetraplegia, and 56 participants of typical population. Mann-Whitney U-test for planned comparison between groups and χ2 test were used to analyze the differences between research groups. Results Participants from control group perceived their general quality of life at higher level in comparison to participants with spinal cord injury (U=415.000, z=-5.804, P<0.000). Negative influence of spinal cord injury was detected in six domains (physical functioning, physical role, bodily pain, vitality, social functioning, mental health). Statistical differences between participants with paraplegia and participants with tetraplegia only in domain of functional limitations (U=103.000, z=-3.256, P<0.005). Conclusion The participants with spinal cord injury perceived both health-related and general quality of life at a lower level in comparison to controls. However, the injury level only partially determined the estimated quality of life. PMID:26175977

  19. Adolescent-evaluated quality of life: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Ward-Smith, Peggy; McCaskie, Becki; Rhoton, Shannon

    2007-01-01

    Opportunities for adolescents with cancer to interact with each other are few. This project provided a weekend retreat for adolescents with cancer and obtained longitudinal self-evaluated quality of life data. Data were collected using the Adolescent Quality of Life instrument, which is a 16-item Likert-scaled survey that assesses quality of life. Twenty-two adolescents attended the weekend, and 17 participated in the study. Evaluations of the weekend retreat were positive, with "making friends" and "meeting others like me" the most frequent comments. Data from the Adolescent Quality of Life instrument revealed that for this population, quality of life was unchanged directly after the weekend and was statistically worse 1 month later. Enrollment methods skewed study participation toward individuals receiving treatment, which may explain these results. The reliability of the Adolescent Quality of Life instrument remained stable over time, and it appears to accurately assess and reflect changes in quality of life.

  20. Health, Quality of Life and Population Density: A Preliminary Study on "Contextualized" Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fassio, Omar; Rollero, Chiara; De Piccoli, Norma

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life concerns individual (physical and psychological health), interpersonal (social relationships) and contextual (environment) aspects, which are both subjective and objective. In considering contextual characteristics, empirical findings have demonstrated that people's relation to their living environment is a key issue for their…

  1. Quality of Life in Adults with an Intellectual Disability: The Evaluation of Quality of Life Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nota, L.; Soresi, S.; Perry, J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The construct of quality of life (QoL) has been the focus of a great deal of recent research and has been operationalized in the assessment of the effectiveness of biomedical and rehabilitative interventions. Consequently, the effective measurement of QoL has become a relevant issue. QoL assessment should take account of both objective…

  2. Quality of life: an international comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkinson, J.; Anderson, C.F.; Liu, B.C.

    1980-04-01

    Dissatisfaction with gross national product (GNP) as a realistic yardstick for comparing the well-being of societies has led to a quality of life (QOL) concept which considers the environment in which people live. QOL includes both the economic and noneconomic factors affecting an individual's happiness. An international comparison of energy, GNP, and QOL in 50 countries considers five major categories (social, economic, health and education, environmental, and national vitality and security) and 12 subcategories. The study indicates that substantial increases in energy consumption will be needed to raise the living standards of developing countries. QOL appears to decline beyond a certain level of GNP, while continuing a direct relationship to per capita energy consumption and electricity production. 12 references. (DCK)

  3. Hospice: enhancing the quality of life.

    PubMed

    Lamers, W M

    1990-05-01

    Hospice care is directed at the relief of the physical, social and psychologic symptoms that often accompany advanced, incurable illness. In recent years, an increasing number of physicians has come to recognize the necessity for hospice care in the treatment of some patients with cancer, HIV infection, and a number of other (as yet) incurable illnesses. Hospice care is designed to improve the quality of life through the use of medications and treatments directed at the relief of symptoms secondary to the underlying disease and its treatment. Hospice makes use of a wide range of physical, social and psychological therapies to relieve symptoms and to provide support and information for the patient's family and caregivers.

  4. Quality of life after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Braun, F; Teren, K; Wilms, P; Günther, R; Allmann, J; Broering, D C; Küchler, T

    2009-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is an outcome criterion of increasing importance after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). The background of this development is the dramatic improvement in patient survival rates over the past two decades combined with the question of the quality of this survival. Among 339 OLT performed in Kiel since 1987, 123 recipients (70 males, 53 females) of mean age 56.7 +/- 13.1 years who underwent transplantation between August 1992 and June 2007 were subjected to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ) C30 plus a liver transplant specific module to analyze QoL. In addition, we included 40 patients listed for OLT in the univariate and multivariate analyses performed using SPSS13.0. A cohort of healthy individuals served as the control group. QoL (global health) among liver recipients was reduced compared with the control group and improved compared with patients on the waiting list. Comparison of the underlying liver diseases showed a comparable QoL between postalcoholic cirrhosis and cholestatic liver diseases. Retransplantation was accompanied by a significant loss of QoL. Cyclosporine-treated recipients displayed a better QoL compared with those treated with tacrolimus. After establishing a system of continuous, systematic QoL assessment, we combined these results with survival outcomes. Further research must focus on advanced statistical methodology that combines these 2 major outcome parameters (QoL and survival). Furthermore, the influence of medical parameters, such of co-morbidity or immunosuppression, needs to be further established with reference to QoL.

  5. Quality of life and hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Khubchandani, Sapna; Iyer, Renuka

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common and rapidly fatal cancer ranking third among the leading causes of cancer-related deaths. Potentially curative therapies like surgery, transplant and ablation are not an option for most patients as they are often diagnosed when the disease is advanced. Liver directed therapy and oral targeted therapies are used in these patients to prolong life and palliate symptoms of the cancer and associated liver failure. Overall survival remains poor and hence health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is of paramount importance in these patients. As novel therapies are developed to improve outcomes, a comprehensive knowledge of available tools to assess impact on QoL is needed. Hence we reviewed all the studies in HCC patients published within the last 13 years from 2001-2013 which assessed HRQoL as a primary or secondary endpoint. A total of 45 studies and 4 meta-analysis were identified. Commonly used tools were European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) (15 studies) and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary Questionnaire (FACT-Hep) (14 studies). Of the 45 publications which incorporated HRQoL as end-point only 24 were clinical trials, 17/24 (71%) assessed systemic therapies while 7/24 (29%) assessed liver-directed therapies. Majority of the publications (trials + retrospective reviews) that had HRQoL as an endpoint in HCC patients were studies evaluating liver-directed therapies (23/45 or >50%). We discuss the measures included in the tools, their interpretation, and summarize existing QoL data that will help design future HCC trials. PMID:25083303

  6. Quality of Life, Health Status, and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Nancy A.; Evangelista, Lorraine S.; Doering, Lynn V.; Eastwood, Jo-Ann; Lewis, Alan B.; Child, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QOL) in adolescents and adults who have undergone the Fontan procedure and are living with only 1 ventricle is presumed to be diminished. Objectives This study aimed to compare QOL, health status, and prevalence of depression in adolescents/adults after the Fontan procedure with healthy counterparts and to identify predictors of QOL in the Fontan group. Methods Using a comparative, cross-sectional design, 54 adolescents and adults with single ventricle congenital heart disease who have undergone the Fontan procedure were compared with 66 age-matched healthy counterparts. Quality of life, health status, depression, and social support were measured using the Satisfaction With Life Scale, Short Form Survey Version 2, Patient Health Questionnaire Depression Module, and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Clinical variables were abstracted from medical records. Predictors of QOL were determined using multiple linear regression. Results Adolescents and adults in the Fontan group reported lower physical health status (mean [SD] = 46.5 [9.3] vs mean [SD] = 55.9 [5.1], P < .001) and were more depressed (mean [SD] = 7.3 [5.9] vs mean [SD] = 4.5 [4.3], P < .004) than their healthy counterparts. There were no differences in QOL, mental health status, or social support between the 2 groups. Functional status (New York Heart Association class), depression, and social support accounted for 55% of the variance in QOL in the Fontan group. Conclusions Despite lower levels of physical health, the QOL of Fontan patients was comparable with that of their healthy counterparts; this finding contradicts previous proxy reports, self-reports, and assumptions that QOL is lower in patients with complex single ventricle congenital heart disease. However, because Fontan patients were more depressed than their healthy counterparts, the need for early screening and detection is warranted. PMID:21912272

  7. Quality of life in children and teenagers with food hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Heather; Dean, Taraneh

    2010-08-01

    Given that food is essential for life and that there is currently no cure for food hypersensitivity (FHS), quality of life is a key outcome measure for those affected. The quality of life of children and teenagers with FHS is particularly important given that they must learn to manage their FHS while also contending with normal developmental challenges. This article will review the current state of quality of life research in this important area, and discusses the impact of FHS on the quality-of-life of children and teenagers, the availability and suitability of disease-specific health-related quality-of-life measures for this population, and the identification of factors that may influence their health-related quality of life. Two previous reviews have been conducted in this area, and this article aims to extend this work by including recent publications and qualitative studies on this topic.

  8. Quality of Life in Food Allergy Patients and Their Families.

    PubMed

    Walkner, Madeline; Warren, Christopher; Gupta, Ruchi S

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric food allergy is a growing health problem in the United States that has been found to adversely impact the quality of life of both affected children and their caregivers. This article provides a review of how food allergy affects the quality of life of patients and their families within the domains of school, social activities, relationships, and daily life. Efforts to improve food allergy-related quality of life among caregivers are also discussed. PMID:26456443

  9. Interactive Monitoring of Computer-Based Group Communication. Paper P-71.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Kathleen; And Others

    The interactive monitoring of group communication through computers is a procedure analogous to biofeedback, and small group communication computer programs have been developed with monitoring software that has been used to evaluate the impact of the medium on group communication. There is presently no technical reason that such information could…

  10. Selected conceptions of defining the quality of life.

    PubMed

    Suchorzepka, Danuta; Nasiłowska-Barud, Alicja

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the work is to present numerous conceptions defining the quality of life. Various definitions are formulated and those presented in the work seem to characterize the concept in the most specific way. They share a lot of common features. However, there are also some differences between them mainly concerning the issue whether the quality of life is a general or rather a multi-dimensional construction and what factors determine good quality of life. It has been agreed that the quality of life is variable in time, not observable or measurable, however, as a definition, it has to be precisely established and defined.

  11. Impact of claudication and its treatment on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Spronk, Sandra; White, John V; Bosch, Johanna L; Hunink, M G Myriam

    2007-03-01

    Improvement in quality of life is the ultimate goal of healthcare for the treatment of intermittent claudication. Until recently, the measures of success after therapy were those derived from the vascular laboratory, including ankle-brachial indices and ankle and toe pressures. There are now several validated and reliable survey tools that can assess patient-reported quality of life in a generic or disease-specific manner. Major survey instruments are reviewed. The information gathered through these quality-of-life assessment tools is important to all those involved in the care of patients with peripheral arterial disease. Although claudication is neither life- nor limb-threatening, it has a significant negative impact on quality of life, as measured by these instruments. Patients so afflicted report more bodily pain, worse physical function, and worse perceived health, in addition to limited walking ability. These measures of quality of life do not correlate with standard parameters of ankle-brachial index or ankle pressures. Treatment of the claudicant with exercise therapy and percutaneous or open revascularization also impacts quality of life. Each of these modalities is capable of improving quality of life, but some are associated with decline over time. The major benefits and risks to quality of life of these specific forms of treatment for the claudicant are reviewed. This data demonstrates that patients suffering from symptoms of intermittent claudication are best served by therapies that address their major self-reported impediments to quality of life.

  12. Factor structure of quality of life in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Oleś, Maria

    2014-06-01

    The goal was to present the factor structure of subjective quality of life in adolescents, investigated by means of four questionnaires: the Youth Quality of Life-Research Version (YQOL-R), the Quality of Life Profile-Adolescent Version (QOLP-AV), the KIDSCREEN-52 Questionnaire, and the Quality of Life Questionnaire for Children and Adolescents (QLQ-CA). Two exploratory factor analyses conducted on the results obtained from two samples of adolescents: healthy, N = 252 (144 girls, 108 boys), and chronically ill, suffering from several illnesses, N = 189 (118 girls, 71 boys). Both factor analyses revealed four-factor solutions, each explaining about 60% of the total variance. The factor structure for the healthy group approximately reproduced the structures of the four questionnaires: Developmental quality of life (23%), Health and Well-being (16%), Relational quality of life (14%), and Ego strength (8%). The factor structure for the chronically ill group was similar for three factors: Developmental quality of life (22%), Harmony between the self and the environment (14%), and Coping and Support (12%), but different for another one: Health-related quality of life (10%). The discussion focuses on the specific nature of four aspects of quality of life observed in the healthy sample and their similarities to and differences from the factors in the chronic patients' sample.

  13. Reliability and Validity of Daily Self-Monitoring by Smartphone Application for Health-Related Quality-of-Life, Antiretroviral Adherence, Substance Use, and Sexual Behaviors Among People Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Comulada, W. Scott; Ramanathan, Nithya; Lazar, Maya; Estrin, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines inter-method reliability and validity of daily self-reports by smartphone application compared to 14-day recall web-surveys repeated over 6 weeks with people living with HIV (PLH). A participatory sensing framework guided participant-centered design prioritizing external validity of methods for potential applications in both research and self-management interventions. Inter-method reliability correlations were consistent with prior research for physical and mental health quality-of-life (r = 0.26–0.61), antiretroviral adherence (r = 0.70–0.73), and substance use (r = 0.65–0.92) but not for detailed sexual encounter surveys (r = 0.15–0.61). Concordant and discordant pairwise comparisons show potential trends in reporting biases, for example, lower recall reports of unprotected sex or alcohol use, and rounding up errors for frequent events. Event-based reporting likely compensated for modest response rates to daily time-based prompts, particularly for sexual and drug use behaviors that may not occur daily. Recommendations are discussed for future continuous assessment designs and analyses. PMID:25331266

  14. Reliability and validity of daily self-monitoring by smartphone application for health-related quality-of-life, antiretroviral adherence, substance use, and sexual behaviors among people living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Swendeman, Dallas; Comulada, W Scott; Ramanathan, Nithya; Lazar, Maya; Estrin, Deborah

    2015-02-01

    This paper examines inter-method reliability and validity of daily self-reports by smartphone application compared to 14-day recall web-surveys repeated over 6 weeks with people living with HIV (PLH). A participatory sensing framework guided participant-centered design prioritizing external validity of methods for potential applications in both research and self-management interventions. Inter-method reliability correlations were consistent with prior research for physical and mental health quality-of-life (r = 0.26-0.61), antiretroviral adherence (r = 0.70-0.73), and substance use (r = 0.65-0.92) but not for detailed sexual encounter surveys (r = 0.15-0.61). Concordant and discordant pairwise comparisons show potential trends in reporting biases, for example, lower recall reports of unprotected sex or alcohol use, and rounding up errors for frequent events. Event-based reporting likely compensated for modest response rates to daily time-based prompts, particularly for sexual and drug use behaviors that may not occur daily. Recommendations are discussed for future continuous assessment designs and analyses.

  15. Quality of life in predialytic uremic patients.

    PubMed

    Klang, B; Björvell, H; Clyne, N

    1996-02-01

    This study describes and analyses how 38 predialytic uremic patients perceived their sense of well-being, functional ability, level of anxiety and sense of coherence. The patients in this study reported decreased sense of well-being, considerable functional disabilities, and a high level of anxiety when compared to a healthy reference group. These observations were independent of laboratory data with the exception of hemoglobin concentration which showed a significant negative correlation to the SIP scale work. There was a significant negative correlation between the scores of sense of coherence and anxiety. Patients with a weak sense of coherence and a high level of anxiety perceived their well-being as being worse than those with higher scores in the sense of coherence test and lower scores in the level of anxiety test. Sense of well-being in turn influenced functional ability in daily life. Social and marital status also affected the results. These results indicate that the investigated group of predialytic patients have a decrease in quality of life. The results obtained provide a useful instrument showing in which areas care should be concentrated and in what way patients' own resources need to be strengthened while preparing for dialysis treatment.

  16. [Quality of life and visceral surgery].

    PubMed

    Bollschweiler, E; Baltin, C; Berlth, F; Mönig, S P; Hölscher, A H

    2014-03-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is becoming more and more relevant in clinical research. An increasing number of publications each year confirmed this. The aim of this review is to summarize current data of QOL after surgical procedures. The results are represented by two examples each of malignant and benign diseases. The evaluation of QOL for patients with cancer is only possible with respect to the prognosis. Prospective randomized trials comparing laparoscopic and open surgery for early gastric cancer are only available from Asia. Data from the USA show that the QOL after gastrectomy was worse regardless of the surgical procedure. During the next 6 months the QOL improved but about one third of the patients had severe impairment during longer follow-up periods. Patients with R1 resection of pancreatic cancer showed only a slightly better prognosis but significantly better QOL compared to patients without resection. The results for the various procedures of cholecystectomy or hernia repair are not always consistent. PMID:24464336

  17. Education for a better quality of life.

    PubMed

    Kolybine, V

    1991-01-01

    UNESCO's work in the field of health promotion is aimed at improving the quality of life of the world's people through an interdisciplinary effort. Health promotion and education are defined broadly, as the provision of the skills, knowledge, and attitudes conducive to health and well-being. Similarly, health education is considered to occur in a variety of settings--from schools to field operational projects to cooperative programs with Member States to community activities. Of greatest concern is meeting the basic health and educational needs of the most disadvantaged, marginalized sectors--a goal that requires viewing health within its broader social and economic context. Poverty makes children more vulnerable to endemic diseases and nutritional disorders, and in turn undermines the effectiveness of school-based interventions, unless it is addressed directly. School feeding programs (preferably based on parent participation and indigenous foodstuffs) may be necessary to relieve children's hunger and facilitate learning. In some cases, schools themselves are sources of disease as a result of overcrowded classrooms, poor ventilation, and a lack of clean water and latrines. In regions where health services are not easily accessible, it may be necessary to train teachers to recognize health problems such as parasitic infections, malaria, and visual and hearing disorders and to provide limited first aid. Since school children in developing countries are within 5-10 years of childbearing age, investments in increasing their knowledge of health, nutrition, and family planning provide substantial returns.

  18. Quality of life in breast cancer sufferers.

    PubMed

    Shouman, Ahmed Essmat; Abou El Ezz, Nahla Fawzy; Gado, Nivine; Ibrahim Goda, Amal Mahmoud

    2016-08-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to measure health-related quality of life (QOL) among patients with early stage cancer breast under curative treatment at department of oncology and nuclear medicine at Ain Shams University Hospitals. Identify factors affecting QOL among these patients. Design/methodology/approach - A cross-sectional study measured QOL among early stage female breast cancer (BC) patients and determined the main factors affecting their QOL. Three interviewer administered questionnaires were used. Findings - The physical domain mostly affected in BC patients and the functional domain least. Socio-demographic factors that significantly affected BC patients QOL scores were patient age, education, having children and family income. Specific patient characteristics include caregiver presence - a factor that affected different QOL scores. Age at diagnosis, affection in the side of the predominant hand, post-operative chemotherapy and difficulty in obtaining the medication were the disease-related factors that affected QOL scores. Originality/value - The final model predicting QOL for early stage female BC patients included age, education and difficulty in obtaining the medication as determinants for total QOL score. Carer presence was the specific patient characteristic that affected different QOL scores. PMID:27477929

  19. The Neurology Quality of Life Measurement Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Cella, David; Nowinski, Cindy; Peterman, Amy; Victorson, David; Miller, Deborah; Lai, Jin-Shei; Moy, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Objective The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) commissioned the Neurology Quality of Life (Neuro-QOL) project to develop a bilingual (English/Spanish), clinically relevant and psychometrically robust HRQL assessment tool. This paper describes the development and calibration of these banks and scales. Design Classical and modern test construction methodologies were used, including input from essential stakeholder groups. Setting An online patient panel testing service and eleven academic medical centers and clinics from across the United States and Puerto Rico that treat major neurological disorders. Participants Adult and pediatric patients representing different neurological disorders specified in this study, proxy respondents for select conditions (stroke and pediatric conditions), and English and Spanish speaking participants from the general population. Main Outcome Measures Multiple generic and condition specific measures used to provide construct validity evidence to new Neuro-QOL tool. Results Neuro-QOL has developed 14 generic item banks and 8 targeted scales to assess HRQL in five adult (stroke, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) and two pediatric conditions (epilepsy and muscular dystrophies). Conclusions The Neuro-QOL system will continue to evolve, with validation efforts in clinical populations, and new bank development in health domains not currently included. The potential for Neuro-QOL measures in rehabilitation research and clinical settings is discussed. PMID:21958920

  20. Quality of life in sarcopenia and frailty.

    PubMed

    Rizzoli, René; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Arnal, Jean-François; Bautmans, Ivan; Beaudart, Charlotte; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike; Biver, Emmanuel; Boonen, Steven; Brandi, Maria-Luisa; Chines, Arkadi; Cooper, Cyrus; Epstein, Sol; Fielding, Roger A; Goodpaster, Bret; Kanis, John A; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Laslop, Andrea; Malafarina, Vincenzo; Mañas, Leocadio Rodriguez; Mitlak, Bruce H; Oreffo, Richard O; Petermans, Jean; Reid, Kieran; Rolland, Yves; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Tsouderos, Yannis; Visser, Marjolein; Bruyère, Olivier

    2013-08-01

    The reduced muscle mass and impaired muscle performance that define sarcopenia in older individuals are associated with increased risk of physical limitation and a variety of chronic diseases. They may also contribute to clinical frailty. A gradual erosion of quality of life (QoL) has been evidenced in these individuals, although much of this research has been done using generic QoL instruments, particularly the SF-36, which may not be ideal in older populations with significant comorbidities. This review and report of an expert meeting presents the current definitions of these geriatric syndromes (sarcopenia and frailty). It then briefly summarizes QoL concepts and specificities in older populations and examines the relevant domains of QoL and what is known concerning QoL decline with these conditions. It calls for a clearer definition of the construct of disability, argues that a disease-specific QoL instrument for sarcopenia/frailty would be an asset for future research, and discusses whether there are available and validated components that could be used to this end and whether the psychometric properties of these instruments are sufficiently tested. It calls also for an approach using utility weighting to provide some cost estimates and suggests that a time trade-off study could be appropriate.

  1. Quality of life of dengue patients.

    PubMed

    Lum, Lucy C S; Suaya, Jose A; Tan, Lian H; Sah, Binod K; Shepard, Donald S

    2008-06-01

    Although the disease burden of dengue is increasing, the impact on the quality of life (QoL) has not been investigated. A study to determine the QoL of confirmed dengue patients using the EuroQol visual thermometer scale was carried out at the University Malaya Medical Center. Of the 207 participants, 40% were ambulatory and 60% were hospitalized. Of eight health domains, 6.2 and 5.0 domains were affected in the hospitalized and ambulatory cohorts, respectively (P < 0.001), with cognition and interpersonal activities affected most. All patients experienced a drastic decrease in their QoL from the onset of symptoms. The QoL deteriorated to the lowest point (40% of healthy status) between the third and seventh days of illness. The duration of impaired QoL (9 days for ambulatory or 13 days for hospitalized patients) was longer than the duration of fever (5 and 7 days, respectively). Symptomatic dengue has major effects on patients' health.

  2. Measuring quality of life in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Abresch, Richard T.; Biesecker, Barbara; Conway, Kristin Caspers; Heatwole, Chad; Peay, Holly; Scal, Peter; Strober, Jonathan; Uzark, Karen; Wolff, Jodi; Margolis, Marjorie; Blackwell, Angela; Street, Natalie; Montesanti, Angela; Bolen, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to develop a conceptual model of quality of life (QOL) in muscular dystrophies (MDs) and review existing QOL measures for use in the MD population. Methods: Our model for QOL among individuals with MD was developed based on a modified Delphi process, literature review, and input from patients and patient advocacy organizations. Scales that have been used to measure QOL among patients with MD were identified through a literature review and evaluated using the COSMIN (Consensus-Based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement Instruments) checklist. Results: The Comprehensive Model of QOL in MD (CMQM) captures 3 broad domains of QOL (physical, psychological, and social), includes factors influencing self-reported QOL (disease-related factors, support/resources, and expectations/aspirations), and places these concepts within the context of the life course. The literature review identified 15 QOL scales (9 adult and 6 pediatric) that have been applied to patients with MD. Very few studies reported reliability data, and none included data on responsiveness of the measures to change in disease progression, a necessary psychometric property for measures included in treatment and intervention studies. No scales captured all QOL domains identified in the CMQM model. Conclusions: Additional scale development research is needed to enhance assessment of QOL for individuals with MD. Item banking and computerized adaptive assessment would be particularly beneficial by allowing the scale to be tailored to each individual, thereby minimizing respondent burden. PMID:25663223

  3. The monitoring and managing application of cloud computing based on Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shiliang; Ren, Bin

    2016-07-01

    Cloud computing and the Internet of Things are the two hot points in the Internet application field. The application of the two new technologies is in hot discussion and research, but quite less on the field of medical monitoring and managing application. Thus, in this paper, we study and analyze the application of cloud computing and the Internet of Things on the medical field. And we manage to make a combination of the two techniques in the medical monitoring and managing field. The model architecture for remote monitoring cloud platform of healthcare information (RMCPHI) was established firstly. Then the RMCPHI architecture was analyzed. Finally an efficient PSOSAA algorithm was proposed for the medical monitoring and managing application of cloud computing. Simulation results showed that our proposed scheme can improve the efficiency about 50%.

  4. The monitoring and managing application of cloud computing based on Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shiliang; Ren, Bin

    2016-07-01

    Cloud computing and the Internet of Things are the two hot points in the Internet application field. The application of the two new technologies is in hot discussion and research, but quite less on the field of medical monitoring and managing application. Thus, in this paper, we study and analyze the application of cloud computing and the Internet of Things on the medical field. And we manage to make a combination of the two techniques in the medical monitoring and managing field. The model architecture for remote monitoring cloud platform of healthcare information (RMCPHI) was established firstly. Then the RMCPHI architecture was analyzed. Finally an efficient PSOSAA algorithm was proposed for the medical monitoring and managing application of cloud computing. Simulation results showed that our proposed scheme can improve the efficiency about 50%. PMID:27208530

  5. Variability of Quality of Life at Small Scales: Addis Ababa, Kirkos Sub-City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesfazghi, Elsa Sereke; Martinez, J. A.; Verplanke, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    Urban quality of life (QoL) is becoming a subject of urban research mainly for western and Asian countries. Such attention is due to an increasing awareness of the contribution of QoL studies in identifying intervention areas and in monitoring urban planning policies. However, most studies are carried out at city or country level that can average…

  6. AD/HD Health Related Quality of Life Questionnaire Completed by Children or Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Deborah; Clarke, Simon; Kohn, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Assessing health-related quality of life (HQOL) for children or adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) to corroborate a diagnosis and monitor treatment outcomes, is usually relegated to parent, teacher and physician observation of the child/adolescent. Allowing adults to act as proxy reporters for children/adolescents…

  7. Physical activity and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Gill, Diane L; Hammond, Cara C; Reifsteck, Erin J; Jehu, Christine M; Williams, Rennae A; Adams, Melanie M; Lange, Elizabeth H; Becofsky, Katie; Rodriguez, Enid; Shang, Ya-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) professionals and participants recognize enhanced quality of life (QoL) as a benefit of and motivator for PA. However, QoL measures are often problematic and rarely consider the participants'perspective. This paper focuses on recent findings from a larger project on the role of QoL in PA and health promotion. More specifically, we focus on the views of participants and potential participants to better understand the relationship of PA and QoL. In earlier stages of the project we began with a conceptual model of QoL and developed a survey. We now focus on participants' views and ask two questions: 1) what is QoL? and 2) how does PA relate to QoL? We first asked those questions of a large sample of university students and community participants as open-ended survey items, and then asked focus groups of community participants. Overall, participants' responses reflected the multidimensional, integrative QoL model, but the responses and patterns provided information that may not be picked up with typical survey measures. Findings suggest that PA contributes to multiple aspects of QoL, that social and emotional benefits are primary motivators and outcomes for participants, and that the meaning of QoL and PA benefits is subjective and contextualized, varying across individuals and settings. Programs that directly target and highlight the multiple dimensions and integrative QoL, while considering the individual participants and contexts, may enhance both PA motivation and participants' health and QoL.

  8. Quality of life in asthma patients.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lara Noronha; Brito, Ulisses; Ferreira, Pedro Lopes

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a study whose main aim is the measurement of the Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) of patients with asthma and the presentation of a first draft of normative values as measured by the SF-6D for asthma patients. In addition, we investigate how far non-disease-specific HRQoL measures can distinguish groups in terms of sociodemographic characteristics. The Portuguese versions of the EQ-5D, SF-6D, AQLQ(S) and ACQ were administered using personal interviews to a representative sample of the Portuguese population with asthma. Most of the individuals did not report significant problems in the dimensions used, with the exception of the physical functioning, where individuals reported moderate limitations. The mean utility value was 0.86. Male gender, young, single, individuals with high educational attainment level, employed, individuals with high income and those residing in urban areas reported higher utility levels. As expected, those who were in a severe stadium of the disease reported lower mean utility levels than those who were in a less severe stadium of the disease. Normative values for the SF-6D were computed for patients with asthma by gender, age, marital status, educational attainment level, employment status, area of residence and average monthly net income. The preference-based measures used in this study distinguish patient groups with asthma in terms of socio- demographic groups. The normative values can be used in economic evaluation and clinical studies as they incorporate patients' preferences and translate the value attributed to patients' health state. PMID:20054507

  9. Explaining quality of life with crisis theory.

    PubMed

    Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Tempelaar, Reike; van den Heuvel, Wim J A; de Haes, Hanneke C J M

    2002-01-01

    Based on the premises of crisis theory, we expected cancer patients in-crisis to report a poorer quality of life (QL) and cancer patients post-crisis to report a similar level of overall QL in comparison to healthy individuals. To explain these hypothesized findings, we expected the coping resources and strategies of patients in-crisis to be equally effective and those of patients post-crisis to be more effective as compared to those of healthy individuals. The sample consisted of: (a) 217 consecutive cancer patients in the acute phases of their illness (patients in-crisis); (b) 192 disease-free cancer patients (patients post-crisis); and (c) 201 randomly selected healthy individuals. Established measures of QL, self-esteem and neuroticism (coping resources) and coping behavior (coping strategies) were mailed. As expected, patients in-crisis reported a poorer QL (p < 0.001) and patients post-crisis a similar overall QL as compared to healthy individuals. There were no significant or systematic differences between the mean levels of coping resources and strategies between the respective groups. Two-way analysis of variance indicated a group X coping resource interaction effect on overall QL for self-esteem (p < 0.01). As expected, the amount of variance of overall QL explained by self-esteem was largest for patients post-crisis (27%) and comparable for patients in-crisis and healthy individuals (10 and 11%). Patients in-crisis were not able to make their coping resources and strategies more effective, whereas patients post-crisis seemed to have enhanced the effectiveness of self-esteem in restoring their QL as compared to healthy persons.

  10. Quality of Life after Salivary Gland Surgery.

    PubMed

    Wax, Mark K; Talmi, Yoav P

    2016-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) has been recognized as an important endpoint in addition to disease-related and global survival. It is particularly important for patients with salivary gland neoplastic disease. For patients who are undergoing benign salivary gland tumor surgery, cosmetic and functional outcomes are extremely important, as these patients' psychological well-being and ability to function in society can be severely impacted. The following issues related to surgical treatment are discussed: incision, loss of local tissue sensation, development of Frey's syndrome, facial nerve function, and cosmesis. Improvements in the placement of the incision combined with additional minimally invasive procedures have improved QoL. The ultimate goal of benign parotid neoplastic surgery is complete tumor excision while avoiding cosmetic and functional damage, which includes preservation of the function of the facial nerve and its branches; this is the key to maintaining preoperative levels of QoL. There are many measures available to improve cosmesis that have minimal morbidity and that, when used, can provide significant improvements in patient outcomes. The treatment of malignant salivary gland neoplasms is primarily directed at treating the malignancy. When surgical treatment affects important neighboring structures, such as the lingual or hypoglossal nerves, as in submandibular/sublingual cancer, there is a tremendous effect on QoL if postoperative dysfunction of these structures results. Often, this treatment involves using ancillary surgical procedures, such as neck dissection, or nonsurgical treatment, such as radiation therapy. The effect of such multi-modality treatment on QoL is significant. The treatment of underlying salivary disease is often overshadowed by these adjunctive treatments. PMID:27092786

  11. Quality of life in asthma patients.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lara Noronha; Brito, Ulisses; Ferreira, Pedro Lopes

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a study whose main aim is the measurement of the Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) of patients with asthma and the presentation of a first draft of normative values as measured by the SF-6D for asthma patients. In addition, we investigate how far non-disease-specific HRQoL measures can distinguish groups in terms of sociodemographic characteristics. The Portuguese versions of the EQ-5D, SF-6D, AQLQ(S) and ACQ were administered using personal interviews to a representative sample of the Portuguese population with asthma. Most of the individuals did not report significant problems in the dimensions used, with the exception of the physical functioning, where individuals reported moderate limitations. The mean utility value was 0.86. Male gender, young, single, individuals with high educational attainment level, employed, individuals with high income and those residing in urban areas reported higher utility levels. As expected, those who were in a severe stadium of the disease reported lower mean utility levels than those who were in a less severe stadium of the disease. Normative values for the SF-6D were computed for patients with asthma by gender, age, marital status, educational attainment level, employment status, area of residence and average monthly net income. The preference-based measures used in this study distinguish patient groups with asthma in terms of socio- demographic groups. The normative values can be used in economic evaluation and clinical studies as they incorporate patients' preferences and translate the value attributed to patients' health state.

  12. Quality of Life Among Asian American Youth

    PubMed Central

    Fradkin, Chris; Wallander, Jan L.; Yamakawa, Yoshimi; Schwebel, David C.; Chienl, Alyna; Le, Yen-Chi L.; Li, Dennis H.; Elliott, Marc; Schuster, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine whether Asian American youth experience disparities in quality of life (QL) compared with Hispanic, African American, and white youth in the general population and to what extent socioeconomic status (SES) mediates any disparities among these racial/ethnic groups. Data were obtained from the Healthy Passages study, in which 4,972 Asian American (148; 3%), Hispanic (1,813; 36%), African American (1,755; 35%), and white (1,256; 25%) fifth-graders were enrolled in a population-based, cross-sectional survey conducted in three U.S. metropolitan areas. Youth reported their own QL using the PedsQL and supplemental scales. Parents reported youth’s overall health status as well as parent’s education and household income level. Asian American youth experienced worse status than white youth for three of 10 QL and well-being measures, better status than Hispanic youth on six measures, and better status than African American youth on three measures. However, the observed advantages for Asian American youth over Hispanic and African American youth disappeared when the marked SES differences that are also present among these racial/ethnic groups were taken into account. In contrast, the differences between Asian American and white youth remained after adjusting for SES. These findings suggest that the disparities in QL that favor white youth over Asian American youth exist independent of SES and warrant further examination. In contrast, the QL differences that favor Asian American over Hispanic and African American youth may be partly explained by SES. Interpretations are limited by the heterogeneity existing among Asian Americans. PMID:27087894

  13. Does Frontal EEG Beta Have Application in Anxiety Monitoring during Computer-Based Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macaulay, M.; Edmonds, E.

    2004-01-01

    One of the psychological states that can be monitored and influenced during learning in order to improve its various aspects is the state of anxiety, and one possible index of this state is frontal EEG beta. However, frontal EEG beta has also been associated with mental activities. This may imply that frontal EEG beta would not be a reliable index…

  14. Quality of Life. Volume II: Application to Persons with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schalock, Robert L., Ed.; Siperstein, Gary N., Ed.

    This volume summarizes current policies and programmatic practices that are influencing the quality of life of persons with mental retardation and developmental disabilities. Part 1, "Service Delivery Application," contains: "Using Person-Centered Planning To Address Personal Quality of Life" (John Butterworth and others); "The Aftermath of…

  15. Quality of Life in Group Homes and Older Persons' Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Laura; Mansell, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Older people with intellectual disabilities sometimes live in older people's homes rather than homes for people with intellectual disabilities. Little is known about their quality of life in these homes. A non-equivalent comparison group design was used to compare the quality of life of 59 people in three groups; older people without an…

  16. [Cosmetic camouflage for a better quality of life].

    PubMed

    Deshayes, Ph

    2009-10-01

    Cosmetic camouflage improves the quality of life of our patients without interfering with the treatment. This fact has been confirmed by many publications. However do we, dermatologists, talk enough about quality of life with our patients? The use of camouflage must be included in our medical prescription for patients with disfiguring skin diseases.

  17. Quality of life and the high-dependency unit.

    PubMed

    Brooks, N

    2000-02-01

    This study was designed to identify and measure the patients' perspective of the concept quality of life within the context of a high-dependency unit (HDU). Data were collected in two phases. In phase one, 55 patients were interviewed, which resulted in the concept clarification of quality of life as: physical, social, psychological and family/friends. In phase two, 51 patients undertook quality-of-life assessment using validated instruments the Quality of Life Index (Ferrans & Powers 1985) and the Global Quality of Life Scale (Hyland & Sodergren 1997). Post-HDU patients demonstrated improvements upon pre-admission scores in both instruments (the social domain in the quality of life index being the exception), although this only reached statistical significance P<0.05 in the overall index score and within the domains of health and family. When exploring variables of age and severity of illness (Apache 2 score, Knaus et al. 1980) it was the people who were older and physiologically compromised to an increased extent (P<0.05) who demonstrated higher levels of satisfaction with their resulting quality of life. This study has been successful in providing patients with an opportunity to participate more actively in service evaluation and has identified the need for future evaluation of HDUs to move beyond physiological measures, to incorporate the impact that illness leading to admission to an HDU has upon the patients' ability to function and their resulting quality of life. PMID:10790712

  18. Reduced quality of life in very overweight Mexican American adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quality of life (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, PedsQL) was assessed for 175 Mexican American adolescents with measured height and weight used to determine body mass index (BMI) percentile/weight classification. Main effects for weight classification were detected using One-way ANOVAs (p < .05...

  19. Parenting the Premature Infant: Balancing Vulnerability and Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiser, C.; Eiser, J. R.; Mayhew, A. G.; Gibson, A. T.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Relationships between child quality of life (QOL), maternal well-being and parenting were explored in a questionnaire study. Method: Mothers of 126 full-term (FT) and 91 pre-term (PT) infants during the child's second year of life completed measures of their own and the child's quality of life and behavioural difficulties. We developed…

  20. Quality of Life of Older Malaysians Living Alone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahaya, Nurizan; Abdullah, Siti Suhailah; Momtaz, Yadollah Abolfathi; Hamid, Tengku Aizan

    2010-01-01

    According to the 2000 census report, about 7% of the 1.4 million people 60 years and over in Malaysia live alone. This study investigated socioeconomic factors affecting the quality of life of this vulnerable population. Data from a subsample of the study on Mental Health and Quality of Life of Older Malaysians were used in this paper. About 10%…

  1. Source, Method, and Surmise: Quality of Life in History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the essay is to demonstrate that study of quality of life can explore eras before our own. There are caches of social data as early as the seventeenth century, and there were people who attempted to formulate social circumstances close to today's concepts of quality of life. Data from England and Ireland are presented and analyzed.

  2. Validity of the Family Quality of Life Survey-2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Adrienne; Isaacs, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Family Quality of Life (FQOL) is an important construct in the Intellectual Disabilities field. Several measures exist, including one developed by an international group, the Family Quality of Life Survey-2006 (FQOLS-2006; Brown et al.2006). However, the psychometric properties of this measure have yet to be fully investigated. This…

  3. Quality of Life in Ageing Societies: Italy, Portugal, and Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arun, Ozgur; Cevik, Aylin Cakiroglu

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and analyze the quality of life of the elderly in three aging countries: Italy, Portugal, and Turkey. This was done by using data provided by the European Quality of Life Survey completed in 2004. By doing so, we could then operationalize the conditions of the elderly in Turkey who have a rapid aging process…

  4. [The significance of quality of life--an ethical approach].

    PubMed

    Woopen, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Quality of life is highly appreciated as an evaluation criterion and a goal of interventions in medicine, but it is insufficiently applied. There is no unanimous definition of "quality of life". From a philosophical point of view, subjectivistic concepts can be differentiated from objectivistic ones. In medicine there are the three concepts of general, health-related and disease-specific quality of life. In this paper it is argued that a general and subjectivistic account of quality of life is of prevailing ethical significance, due to patient orientation and patient autonomy reasons. The normative function of quality of life should be given much more consideration by the responsible players in clinical research, healthcare and allocation decisions within the healthcare system.

  5. Computer-based diagnostic monitoring to enhance the human-machine interface of complex processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, I.S.

    1992-02-01

    There is a growing interest in introducing an automated, on-line, diagnostic monitoring function into the human-machine interfaces (HMIs) or control rooms of complex process plants. The design of such a system should be properly integrated with other HMI systems in the control room, such as the alarms system or the Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS). This paper provides a conceptual foundation for the development of a Plant-wide Diagnostic Monitoring System (PDMS), along with functional requirements for the system and other advanced HMI systems. Insights are presented into the design of an efficient and robust PDMS, which were gained from a critical review of various methodologies developed in the nuclear power industry, the chemical process industry, and the space technological community.

  6. Quality of life: perception of lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Montazeri, A; Milroy, R; Gillis, C R; McEwen, J

    1996-12-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine what quality of life means to lung cancer patients. 200 patients with either lung cancer (108) or chronic respiratory disease (92) were interviewed using a short open-ended questionnaire. They were asked to define quality of life in general, identify what they considered to be a good quality of life for themselves and to rank the relative importance attached to each nominated item. A content analysis was carried out and patients' responses were categorised into eight items. These were: ability to do what one wants to do/work, enjoyment of life, family life, financial security, happiness, health, living longer and social life/leisure activities. Of these, health (42%), enjoyment of life (25%) and family life (24%) were the three most nominated items as definition of quality of life in general. Patients perceived a good quality of life for themselves differently. Family life (58%), health (51%) and social life (43%) were found to be the most nominated components of a good quality of life for the patients. Overall, patients ranked family life and health as the first or second most important factors. There were no significant differences between cases and controls. The study results are challenging and serve to remind us that the term quality of life is misused in many studies. Most existing measures do not encompass the wider aspects of quality of life identified here, but rather concentrate on the "health-related" aspects of quality of life. To achieve this, the research into the best ways of measuring and assessing quality of life must continue to seek individual values and preferences and how these can be applied in a simple way in clinical studies.

  7. Quality of life in dialysis: A Malaysian perspective.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen J; Musa, Ramli; Chew, Thian F; Lim, Christopher T S; Morad, Zaki; Bujang, Adam

    2014-04-01

    There is a growing interest to use quality of life as one of the dialysis outcome measurement. Based on the Malaysian National Renal Registry data on 15 participating sites, 1569 adult subjects who were alive at December 31, 2012, aged 18 years old and above were screened. Demographic and medical data of 1332 eligible subjects were collected during the administration of the short form of World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF) in Malay, English, and Chinese language, respectively. The primary objective is to evaluate the quality of life among dialysis patients using WHOQOL-BREF. The secondary objective is to examine significant factors that affect quality of life score. Mean (SD) transformed quality of life scores were 56.2 (15.8), 59.8 (16.8), 58.2 (18.5), 59.5 (14.6), 61.0 (18.5) for (1) physical, (2) psychological, (3) social relations, (4) environment domains, and (5) combined overall quality of life and general health, respectively. Peritoneal dialysis group scored significantly higher than hemodialysis group in the mean combined overall quality of life and general health score (63.0 vs. 60.0, P < 0.001). Independent factors that were associated significantly with quality of life score in different domains include gender, body mass index, religion, education, marital status, occupation, income, mode of dialysis, hemoglobin, diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, cerebral vascular accident and leg amputation. Subjects on peritoneal dialysis modality achieved higher combined overall quality of life and general health score than those on hemodialysis. Religion and cerebral vascular accident were significantly associated with all domains and combined overall quality of life and general health.

  8. Evaluation of a combined strategy directed towards health-care professionals and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): Information and health education feedback for improving clinical monitoring and quality-of-life

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a health problem that is becoming increasingly attended-to in Primary Care (PC). However, there is a scarcity of health-care programs and studies exploring the implementation of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG). The principal objective of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a combined strategy directed towards health-care professionals and patients to improve the grade of clinical control and the quality-of-life (QoL) of the patients via a feedback on their state-of-health. A training plan for the health-care professionals is based on CPG and health education. Method/Design Multi-centred, before-after, quasi experimental, prospective study involving an intervention group and a control group of individuals followed-up for 12 months. The patients receive attention from urban and semi-urban Primary Care Centres (PCC) within the administrative area of the Costa de Ponent (near Barcelona). All the pacients corresponding to the PCC of one sub-area were assigned to the intervention group and patients from the rest of sub-areas to the group control. The intervention includes providing data to the health-care professionals (clinician/nurse) derived from a clinical history and an interview. A course of training focused on aspects of CPG, motivational interview and health education (tobacco, inhalers, diet, physical exercise, physiotherapy). The sample random includes a total of 801 patients (≥ 40 years of age), recorded as having COPD, receiving attention in the PCC or at home, who have had at least one clinical visit, and who provided written informed consent to participation in the study. Data collected include socio-demographic characteristics, drug treatment, exacerbations and hospital admissions, evaluation of inhaler use, tobacco consumption and life-style and health-care resources consumed. The main endpoints are dyspnoea, according to the modified scale of the Medical Research Council

  9. Education for a better quality of life.

    PubMed

    Kolybine, V

    1992-01-01

    Health promotion is interdisciplinary within UNESCO. This approach means the contribution of skills, knowledge, and participation of health personnel, educators, social and human science personnel, community leaders, and communications and culture personnel. The World Conference on Health captured this theme of partnership in health promotion and education. Plans must also be tailored to the beliefs and cultures of the population of concern. The experiences of UNESCO in health education reveal that a supportive family and community attitudes ad structures is necessary in addition to school health education. Relevancy and realistic options must be offered. In working to attain the objective of Education and Health for All it is important to 1) place health problems in the context of social and economic concerns. Poor people are more vulnerable to disease. 2) Successful programs must take into consideration quality of life issues and attempt to understand life context of children and their families. There have been efforts to encourage family and community involvement in health promotion. Use of local resources has provided practical knowledge. 3) Training educational personnel is necessary to provide knowledgeable role models and also not subject to the same poverty as their students. 4) Curriculum must address school issues, the environment, prevalent health problems, and provide supportive educational activities. The physical plant must be protected from overcrowding in classrooms, lack of clean water and latrines, and free from the transmission of infectious and communicable diseases. A UNESCO project is underway to document conditions of schools in sub-Saharan Africa. 5) School health services must provide immediate treatment as well as referral to the closest health center in the community. Teachers need to be knowledgeable about parasitic infections, malaria, hunger, visual and hearing disorders, and provide basic 1st Aid such as bandages aspirin, local

  10. Exploratory Study on Drug Users' Perspectives on Quality of Life: More than Health-Related Quality of Life?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Maeyer, Jessica; Vanderplasschen, Wouter; Broekaert, Eric

    2009-01-01

    In drug treatment outcome literature, a focus on objective and socially desirable indicators of change (e.g. no drug use) has predominated, while outcome indicators that are important for drug users themselves (e.g. quality of life, satisfaction with treatment) have largely been neglected. Nonetheless, Quality of Life (QoL) has become an important…

  11. Computer-based patient monitoring systems. Use in research and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Zimmet, P; Lang, A; Mazze, R S; Endersbee, R

    1988-01-01

    The use of new technologies, such as computers, in the management of diabetes has changed dramatically over the past decade. The development of the memory-based reflectance meter, telephone modems for the transmission of self-monitored blood glucose, and computer programs to aggregate and analyze data have significantly altered approaches to diabetes care. The clinical application of these systems is just now being evaluated. Initial data suggest that these systems enhance treatment, improve patient performance, assist in collection and representation of accurate and reliable data, and may be associated with improved metabolic control.

  12. Mobile Cloud-Computing-Based Healthcare Service by Noncontact ECG Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Ee-May; Chung, Wan-Young

    2013-01-01

    Noncontact electrocardiogram (ECG) measurement technique has gained popularity these days owing to its noninvasive features and convenience in daily life use. This paper presents mobile cloud computing for a healthcare system where a noncontact ECG measurement method is employed to capture biomedical signals from users. Healthcare service is provided to continuously collect biomedical signals from multiple locations. To observe and analyze the ECG signals in real time, a mobile device is used as a mobile monitoring terminal. In addition, a personalized healthcare assistant is installed on the mobile device; several healthcare features such as health status summaries, medication QR code scanning, and reminders are integrated into the mobile application. Health data are being synchronized into the healthcare cloud computing service (Web server system and Web server dataset) to ensure a seamless healthcare monitoring system and anytime and anywhere coverage of network connection is available. Together with a Web page application, medical data are easily accessed by medical professionals or family members. Web page performance evaluation was conducted to ensure minimal Web server latency. The system demonstrates better availability of off-site and up-to-the-minute patient data, which can help detect health problems early and keep elderly patients out of the emergency room, thus providing a better and more comprehensive healthcare cloud computing service. PMID:24316562

  13. Mobile cloud-computing-based healthcare service by noncontact ECG monitoring.

    PubMed

    Fong, Ee-May; Chung, Wan-Young

    2013-01-01

    Noncontact electrocardiogram (ECG) measurement technique has gained popularity these days owing to its noninvasive features and convenience in daily life use. This paper presents mobile cloud computing for a healthcare system where a noncontact ECG measurement method is employed to capture biomedical signals from users. Healthcare service is provided to continuously collect biomedical signals from multiple locations. To observe and analyze the ECG signals in real time, a mobile device is used as a mobile monitoring terminal. In addition, a personalized healthcare assistant is installed on the mobile device; several healthcare features such as health status summaries, medication QR code scanning, and reminders are integrated into the mobile application. Health data are being synchronized into the healthcare cloud computing service (Web server system and Web server dataset) to ensure a seamless healthcare monitoring system and anytime and anywhere coverage of network connection is available. Together with a Web page application, medical data are easily accessed by medical professionals or family members. Web page performance evaluation was conducted to ensure minimal Web server latency. The system demonstrates better availability of off-site and up-to-the-minute patient data, which can help detect health problems early and keep elderly patients out of the emergency room, thus providing a better and more comprehensive healthcare cloud computing service. PMID:24316562

  14. Mobile cloud-computing-based healthcare service by noncontact ECG monitoring.

    PubMed

    Fong, Ee-May; Chung, Wan-Young

    2013-12-02

    Noncontact electrocardiogram (ECG) measurement technique has gained popularity these days owing to its noninvasive features and convenience in daily life use. This paper presents mobile cloud computing for a healthcare system where a noncontact ECG measurement method is employed to capture biomedical signals from users. Healthcare service is provided to continuously collect biomedical signals from multiple locations. To observe and analyze the ECG signals in real time, a mobile device is used as a mobile monitoring terminal. In addition, a personalized healthcare assistant is installed on the mobile device; several healthcare features such as health status summaries, medication QR code scanning, and reminders are integrated into the mobile application. Health data are being synchronized into the healthcare cloud computing service (Web server system and Web server dataset) to ensure a seamless healthcare monitoring system and anytime and anywhere coverage of network connection is available. Together with a Web page application, medical data are easily accessed by medical professionals or family members. Web page performance evaluation was conducted to ensure minimal Web server latency. The system demonstrates better availability of off-site and up-to-the-minute patient data, which can help detect health problems early and keep elderly patients out of the emergency room, thus providing a better and more comprehensive healthcare cloud computing service.

  15. Experience with a Simplified Computer Based Intensive Care Monitoring System in the Management of Acutely Ill Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, H. Roger; Rutherford, Harold G.; Smith, Louis L.; Briggs, Burton A.; Neilsen, Ivan R.; Rau, Richard

    1979-01-01

    The need exists for a simplified and ecomonical computer based monitoring system for critically ill surgical patients. Such a system would enjoy widespread use in surgical intensive care units in regional, as well as larger community hospitals. We have assembled such a system which provides digital readout of the usual physiologic parameters, and also provide computer storage of accumulated data for review and evaluation of patient care. The computer provides graphic and digital display and digital printout for subsequent inclusion in the patient records. Most frequent indications for this system include the development of acute respiratory insufficiency or acute circulatory failure due to invasive sepsis and/or severe arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Information most beneficial in patient care included measurement of cardiac output;alveolar arterial oxygen gradient. ImagesFigure 1Figure 5Figure 9Figure 11

  16. Health-related Quality of Life in Metastatic and Adjuvant Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wallwiener, M.; Simoes, E.; Sokolov, A. N.; Brucker, S. Y.; Fasching, P. A.; Graf, J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: When cancer patients have advanced disease and a primary cure is no longer possible, the focus is on maintaining the patientʼs quality of life. Recent therapeutic advances in breast cancer treatment mean that even patients with metastatic disease can remain stable for long periods of time. The aim of this study was to look at the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of these patients and compare it with data for the general population and to show the differences in outcomes for different survey instruments used to measure quality of life. Material and Methods: A total of 96 breast cancer patients with metastatic disesae or receiving adjuvant therapy were questioned about their quality of life. Patients were investigated using the established survey instruments EORTC QLQ-C30, EORTC QLQ-BR23, EQ-5D-5L and EQ VAS. All patients filled out questionnaires. Statistical analysis was done using MS Excel and SPSS. Results: Although the questionnaires were completed at the same time, the different questionnaires showed significant differences with regard to the level of stress experienced by the patient. When the EQ VAS questionnaire was used, the patientʼs current state of health was assessed as significantly better than with the EORTC QLQ-C30. Overall, all aspects of patientsʼ quality of life were found to be in need of optimization and HRQL of patients was significantly poorer in all areas compared to the reference population. Conclusion: To improve the quality of life of patients with metastatic disease, it is necessary to continuously monitor the success of therapy. The choice of survey tools is highly relevant as assessments differ considerably depending on the choice of questionnaire. PMID:27761027

  17. Socio-economical factors that influence the perception of quality of life in patients with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Abobului, M; Berghea, F; Vlad, V; Balanescu, A; Opris, D; Bojinca, V; Predeteanu, D; Ionescu, R

    2015-01-01

    The appearance of osteoporosis in elders and the growth of the frequency which it is diagnosed with as we approach patients who are older and older, makes this health problem very important in the societies in which a high number of persons reach old age. These societies, usually belonging to economically advanced jurisdictions, are the first interested in the way health expenses can balance the benefits of the quality of life acquired in these groups of population. The evaluation of the quality of life has become a very important process, which still raises methodological problems to the researchers. The aim of this study was to analyze to what extent the factors involved in defining the quality of life by the patients modified according to the existence of osteoporosis as a defined but also as a perceived disease, as far as it is considered a serious or less serious affection by each patient. 210 female patients participated in the study. The statistical analysis was done by using SPSS 22.0 (IBM Corp. - U.S.A.). p < 0,05 was used as a limit for the statistical significance. Descriptive and analytical analyses were made by following Pearson correlation index in cases of normal distributions, the comparison between groups was made by using t-Student test, respectively chi square test in the cases which required its use. The current study highlights a direct relationship between the quality of life, as it is perceived by the patients, and the quality of the health status, which is more important than the relationship between the quality of life and the other objectives measured by WHOQOL scale. This study also shows that for the Romanian patient diagnosed with osteoporosis, who is enclosed in the age limits of this study, the health status represents the main driver of monitoring the quality of life.

  18. Methodological issues in the quantitative assessment of quality of life.

    PubMed

    Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Yfantopoulos, John N

    2011-10-01

    The term quality of life can be identified in Aristotle's classical writings of 330 BC. In his Nichomachian ethics he recognises the multiple relationships between happiness, well-being, "eudemonia" and quality of life. Historically the concept of quality of life has undergone various interpretations. It involves personal experience, perceptions and beliefs, attitudes concerning philosophical, cultural, spiritual, psychological, political, and financial aspects of everyday living. Quality of life has been extensively used both as an outcome and an explanatory factor in relation to human health, in various clinical trials, epidemiologic studies and health interview surveys. Because of the variations in the definition of quality of life, both in theory and in practice, there are also a wide range of procedures that are used to assess quality of life. In this paper several methodological issues regarding the tools used to evaluate quality of life is discussed. In summary, the use of components consisted of large number of classes, as well as the use of specific weights for each scale component, and the low-to-moderate inter-correlation level between the components, is evident from simulated and empirical studies.

  19. A Clinical Support System Based on Quality of Life Estimation.

    PubMed

    Faria, Brígida Mónica; Gonçalves, Joaquim; Reis, Luis Paulo; Rocha, Álvaro

    2015-10-01

    Quality of life is a concept influenced by social, economic, psychological, spiritual or medical state factors. More specifically, the perceived quality of an individual's daily life is an assessment of their well-being or lack of it. In this context, information technologies may help on the management of services for healthcare of chronic patients such as estimating the patient quality of life and helping the medical staff to take appropriate measures to increase each patient quality of life. This paper describes a Quality of Life estimation system developed using information technologies and the application of data mining algorithms to access the information of clinical data of patients with cancer from Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck services of an oncology institution. The system was evaluated with a sample composed of 3013 patients. The results achieved show that there are variables that may be significant predictors for the Quality of Life of the patient: years of smoking (p value 0.049) and size of the tumor (p value < 0.001). In order to assign the variables to the classification of the quality of life the best accuracy was obtained by applying the John Platt's sequential minimal optimization algorithm for training a support vector classifier. In conclusion data mining techniques allow having access to patients additional information helping the physicians to be able to know the quality of life and produce a well-informed clinical decision.

  20. A Clinical Support System Based on Quality of Life Estimation.

    PubMed

    Faria, Brígida Mónica; Gonçalves, Joaquim; Reis, Luis Paulo; Rocha, Álvaro

    2015-10-01

    Quality of life is a concept influenced by social, economic, psychological, spiritual or medical state factors. More specifically, the perceived quality of an individual's daily life is an assessment of their well-being or lack of it. In this context, information technologies may help on the management of services for healthcare of chronic patients such as estimating the patient quality of life and helping the medical staff to take appropriate measures to increase each patient quality of life. This paper describes a Quality of Life estimation system developed using information technologies and the application of data mining algorithms to access the information of clinical data of patients with cancer from Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck services of an oncology institution. The system was evaluated with a sample composed of 3013 patients. The results achieved show that there are variables that may be significant predictors for the Quality of Life of the patient: years of smoking (p value 0.049) and size of the tumor (p value < 0.001). In order to assign the variables to the classification of the quality of life the best accuracy was obtained by applying the John Platt's sequential minimal optimization algorithm for training a support vector classifier. In conclusion data mining techniques allow having access to patients additional information helping the physicians to be able to know the quality of life and produce a well-informed clinical decision. PMID:26277614

  1. Heart failure and health related quality of life

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Quality of life is a major goal in the context of preventive and therapeutic cardiology. It is important, both as an outcome measure in clinical trials of congestive heart failure (CHF) and as a consideration in individual physicians' therapeutic decisions. In this article, quality of life concepts are reviewed, methods of measurement are explored and clinically significant changes on prognosis are discussed. There is a need for more research which is based on carefully selected measures of quality of life chosen as being of particular importance to patients and to the hypotheses being tested. PMID:16202163

  2. [Measuring quality of life in every oncological patient].

    PubMed

    Aaronson, Neil K; Sprangers, Mirjam A G

    2011-01-01

    There are indications that in cancer patients quality of life is a better predictor of survival than clinical measures such as tumour response and stage of disease. In addition, health care professionals' expectations about the effect of a particular treatment on quality of life often do not correspond with the experience of the patient. These are all reasons for every oncological patient to complete a short questionnaire on quality of life. Using this questionnaire can improve communication between care provider and patient, and also give the care provider insight into the problems that are important to the patient at that time. This insight could subsequently lead to counseling tailored to the patient, and, if necessary, modification of treatment or referral for supportive care. A second aim is to link information on quality of life to clinical pathways and treatment guidelines.

  3. Measuring the Quality of Life: Are We Making Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, David C.; Long, Cathryn J.

    1976-01-01

    Perspective on the term, "quality of life," is developed through reading and photographic selections, and ways of measuring life quality are suggested. Statistical tables offer comparative national and global data on indicators including population, literacy, nutrition, government expenditures. (AV)

  4. Quality of life among Thai workers in textile dyeing factories.

    PubMed

    Kittipichai, Wirin; Arsa, Rattanaporn; Jirapongsuwan, Ann; Singhakant, Chatchawal

    2014-11-30

    The purpose of a cross-sectional study was to investigate factors influencing the quality of life among Thai workers in textile dyeing factories. Samples included 205 Thai workers from five textile dyeing factories located in the suburban area of Bangkok in Thailand. Data were collected with a self-administered questionnaire. Scales of the questionnaire had reliability coefficients ranging from 0.70-0.91. The results revealed that the overall quality of life among workers was most likely between good and moderate levels, and the percentage-mean score was 74.77. The seven factors associated with the overall quality of life were co-worker relationships, safety at work in the dimension of accident prevention, job characteristics, supervisory relationships, welfares, marital status, and physical environment. Furthermore, co-worker relationships, accident prevention, and marital status were three considerable predictors accounted for 23% of the variance in the overall quality of life among workers in textile dyeing factories.

  5. Moving Us Toward a Theory of Individual Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Schalock, Robert L; Verdugo, Miguel A; Gomez, Laura E; Reinders, Hans S

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses three steps involved in moving us toward a theory of individual quality of life: developing a conceptual model, integrating theory components, and applying and evaluating the theory. Each of the proposed steps is guided by established standards regarding theory development and use. The article concludes with a discussion of criteria that can be used to evaluate the theory and the contribution that a theory of individual quality of life would make to the field of disability.

  6. Quality of life in patients with ulcerative colitis treated surgically

    PubMed Central

    Kozłowska, Katarzyna A.; Krokowicz, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ulcerative colitis belongs to the group of inflammatory bowel diseases. The specific symptoms and chronic nature of the disease significantly affect the quality of patients’ lives. Quality-of-life assessment helps to define its determining factors as well as the efficiency of surgical procedures. Aim Quality-of-life evaluation of patients with ulcerative colitis treated surgically. Material and methods A retrospective review was carried out on 35 patients with ulcerative colitis, who were treated surgically in the Clinic of General and Colorectal Surgery, University of Medical Sciences in Poznan. The research tools used to assess the quality of life consisted of: the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire, a Polish version of the Short Form Health Survey-36, and a questionnaire. Results The mean of the IBDQ scale was 152.51, and the median was 161. In this scale, a higher score indicates better quality of life. The situation in the subjective SF-36 scale is reversed: a lower score indicates better quality of life. The mean of the SF-36 was 115.94, and the median was 58. Many discrepancies in the field (e.g. the influence of determining factors) create a niche for further studies. Conclusions Moreover, quality-of-life evaluation may lead to better patient care, understanding their problems or treatment modifications, and finally may become a kind of therapy efficiency parameter. PMID:25276253

  7. Junior doctors in their first year: mental health, quality of life, burnout and heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Henning, Marcus A; Sollers, John; Strom, Joanna M; Hill, Andrew G; Lyndon, Mataroria P; Cumin, David; Hawken, Susan J

    2014-04-01

    There is a burgeoning interest in, and evidence of, quality of life and burnout issues among doctors. It was hypothesized that the junior doctors in this study would experience psychosocial and physiological changes over time, and that the obtained measures would indicate psychosocial and physiological anomalies. In addition, it was hypothesized that their psychosocial perceptions would be significantly associated with their physiological measures. A total sample of 17 junior doctors in their first year of training volunteered for this study. Over four time periods separated by 6 week phases, the doctors completed a set of quality of life and psychosocial inventories and wore a Polar RS800 Heart Rate Monitor over a day and night time interval. The findings showed that this sample of doctors did not report any problems associated with depression, anxiety, stress, burnout or quality of life (psychosocial measures). In addition, their heart rate variability scores (physiological measures) did not show any significant fluctuations. Furthermore, the responses from the self-report instruments measuring stress, anxiety, depression, quality of life and burnout did not consistently correlate with the HRV information suggesting a mind-body disconnection. More work needs to be done on larger samples to investigate these findings further given that the literature shows that junior doctors are likely to be stressed and working in stress-provoking environments.

  8. Effects of Symptom Perception Interventions on Trigger Identification and Quality of Life in Children with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Thomas; Harver, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background. Management of individual triggers is suboptimal in practice. In this project, we investigated the impact of symptom perception interventions on asthma trigger identification and self-reported asthma quality of life. Methods. Children with asthma (n = 227) participated in three asthma education sessions and then were randomized first to one of three home monitoring conditions (symptom monitoring and peak flow training with feedback, peak flow training without feedback, or no peak flow training) and then subsequently to one of three resistive load discrimination training conditions (signal detection training with feedback, signal detection training without feedback, or no training). Triggers were reported at enrollment, following home monitoring, and following discrimination training; quality of life was measured after home monitoring and after resistive load testing. Results. Symptom perception interventions resulted in increases in reported triggers, which increased reliably as a function of home monitoring, and increased further in participants who completed discrimination training with feedback. Increases in the number of reported asthma triggers were associated with decreases in quality of life. Discussion. Patients may benefit from strategies that make trigger-symptom contingencies clear. Complementary strategies are needed to address changes in the perceived burden of asthma which comes from awareness of new asthma triggers. PMID:26605084

  9. The impact of cosmetic interventions on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Sadick, Neil S

    2008-08-15

    In the last decade, the number of cosmetic procedures performed in the United States has rapidly increased. While physicians historically have focused on minimizing side effects and optimizing the physical outcome, a broad spectrum of patient needs also factors in treatment success. Unfortunately, few data are available regarding the effects of cosmetic procedures on patient's self-esteem, confidence, relationships, and acceptance by others. Quality of life represents a relevant and important long-term measurement of outcomes in these patients. Studies have shown that cosmetic surgery can have a positive impact on patient quality of life. In contrast, fewer data are available regarding the effects of nonsurgical cosmetic procedures on quality of life. Much of the quality-of-life data regarding nonsurgical cosmetic procedures focuses on patients with human immunodeficiency virus-associated facial lipoatrophy, a condition associated with depression, problems with self-esteem and interpersonal relationships, in addition to nonadherence to the treatment. Recent data indicate that cosmetic treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-related facial lipoatrophy with injectable facial rejuvenators can improve quality of life in these patients. However, there is a dearth of quality-of-life data on patients who undergo facial rejuvenation procedures using the newer injectable devices, such as hyaluronic acid, calcium hydroxylapatite, and poly-L-lactic acid. Future studies should focus on developing standardized tests to assess quality of life in patients undergoing facial rejuvenation interventions. More data obtained from validated assessment tools are needed to systematically evaluate the effects specific treatments have on satisfying the needs of the cosmetic patient.

  10. Quality of life of adolescents with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Luce Marina F C; Vieira, Sandra E

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent chronic disease. Type 1 diabetes mellitus usually develops during infancy and adolescence and may affect the quality of life of adolescents. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the quality of life of adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus in a metropolitan region of western central Brazil. METHODS: Adolescents aged 10–19 years who had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus at least 1 year previously were included. Patients with verbal communication difficulties, severe disease, and symptomatic hypo- or hyperglycemic crisis as well as those without an adult companion and who were <18 years of age were excluded. The self-administered Diabetes Quality of Life for Youths instrument was applied. RESULTS: Among 96 adolescents (57% females; 47% white, and 53% nonwhite), 81% had an HbA1c level of >7%. In general, the adolescents consistently reported having a good quality of life. The median scores for the domains of the instrument were as follows: “satisfaction”: 35; “impact”: 51; and “worries“: 26. The total score for all domains was 112. Bivariate analysis showed significant associations among a lower family income, public health assistance, and insulin type in the “satisfaction” domain; and a lower family income, public health assistance, public school attendance, and a low parental education level in the “worries“ domain and for the total score. A longer time since diagnosis was associated with a lower total score. Multivariable analysis confirmed the association of a worse quality of life with public health assistance, time since diagnosis, and sedentary lifestyle in the “satisfaction” domain; female gender in the “worries” domain; and public health assistance for the total score. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the adolescents evaluated in this study viewed their quality of life as good. Specific factors that led to the deterioration of quality of life, including public assistance, time since

  11. The Impact Of Sports Activities On Quality Of Life Of Persons With A Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Eminović, Fadilj; Dopsaj, Milivoj; Pavlović, Dragan; Arsić, Sladjana; Otašević, Jadranka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Studying the quality of life of people with a spinal cord injury is of great importance as it allows the monitoring of both functioning and adaptation to disability. The aim of this study was to determine the difference between persons with a spinal cord injury involved in sports activities and those not involved in sports activities in relation to their quality of life and the presence of secondary health conditions (pressure ulcers, urinary infections, muscle spasms, osteoporosis, pain, kidney problems-infections, calculosis and poor circulation). Methods The study included a total of 44 participants with spinal cord injury-paraplegia of both genders; 26 of them were athletes and 18 were not athletes. The athletes were training actively for the last two years, minimally 2-3 times per week. A specially designed questionnaire, medical documentation and the Spinal Cord Injury Quality of Life Questionnaire (SCI QL-23) were used for research purposes. Chi-square test was used to analyze the differences between the groups, while multiple analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used to determine the differences between the sets of variables. Results Among the participants, the athletes perceived higher quality of life than the non-athletes (male gender p<0.001 and female gender p<0.05). Regarding secondary health conditions, the athletes reported the presence of less pain (p=0.034) and a subjective feeling of better circulation (p=0.023). Conclusion The implementation of sports activities significantly improves quality of life in the population of people with spinal cord injury-paraplegia. However, sports activities only partially affect secondary health conditions. PMID:27284378

  12. Expectations and quality of life of cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Koller, M; Lorenz, W; Wagner, K; Keil, A; Trott, D; Engenhart-Cabillic, R; Nies, C

    2000-01-01

    Expectations, real or false, affect the way patients respond to their illnesses. We assessed therapy-related expectations in relation to global quality of life in 55 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy. Factor analysis indicated that therapy-related expectations come into three broad categories--pain/emotional control, healing and tumour/symptom control. 35 patients expected 'healing' even though curative treatment was intended in only 19 and all patients had been fully informed. The expectation of healing was associated with high quality of life, and the same was true of perception of healing after radiotherapy. In the group as a whole, quality of life was little altered by radiotherapy, but it became substantially worse in those patients who had expected healing but perceived that this had failed, even though physician-assessed Karnofsky status did not change. These findings indicate that the expectation of healing, in cancer patients, is a component of a good global quality of life, whereas more limited expectations (pain control, tumour control) relate to lower quality of life. Patients' expectations deserve further study as a novel approach to improving care. PMID:11193059

  13. Quality of Life and Gait in Elderly Group

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Carlos Kazuo; Teixeira, Jacqueline Pitanga; Alves, Lucas Vieira; Oliveira, Priscila Feliciano; Raposo, Oscar Felipe Falcão

    2015-01-01

    Introduction  The process of aging could lead to seniors being more prone to falls, which affects their quality of life. Objective  The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between quality of life and gait in the elderly. Methods  We used World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief (WHOQOL-Brief) Brazilian version and the Dynamic Gait Index to assess fifty-six volunteers from the northeast of Brazil. Ages ranged from 60 to 85 years. Results  The Dynamic Gait Index, which indicates the probability of falls, resulted in 36.3% of the sample presenting abnormal results. There was correlation between domain 2 (psychological) and domain 4 (environment) with domain 1(Physical) and domain 3 (Social); a negative correlation between age and Domain 2; correlation between Question 1 (How would you rate your quality of life?) and domains 1, 2, and 4 and no correlation between questions 1 and 2 (How satisfied are you with your health?). Question 2 was correlated with all of the domains. There was negative association between question 1 and falls, and a slight correlation between the Dynamic Gait Index scores and Question 1. Conclusion  The self-perception of the study group about their quality of life was either good or very good, even though a considerable percentage of individuals had suffered falls or reported gait disturbances. PMID:27413405

  14. Diabetes and Quality of Life: A Ugandan Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nyanzi, Ronald; Atuhaire, Leonard K.

    2014-01-01

    Quality of life of diabetic patients is not a new concept in literature. The contentious issue however is whether factors associated in literature with quality of life apply to diabetic patients in Uganda. A sample of 219 outpatients attending Mulago diabetic clinic—a national referral hospital in Uganda—is used to provide an understanding of this issue. Quality of life is assessed in the dimensions of role limitation due to physical health, emotional health, treatment satisfaction, physical endurance, and diet satisfaction based on a five-point Likert scale. The analysis is made by patients' characteristics, medical conditions, lifestyle factors, and type of medication using frequency distributions, summary statistics, and a Poisson regression. In the results, we confirm a consensus regarding the influence of age and education level on the quality of life in the dimensions of role limitation and physical endurance (P < 0.05). A similar conclusion is reached with regards to impact of diabetic foot ulcers in the dimension of physical endurance. Thus, the factors associated with quality of life are not entirely unique to diabetic patients in the country. PMID:24724107

  15. Quality of life and deglutition after total laryngectomy

    PubMed Central

    Pernambuco, Leandro de Araújo; Oliveira, Jabson Herber Profiro de; Régis, Renata Milena Freitas Lima; Lima, Leilane Maria de; Araújo, Ana Maria Bezerra de; Balata, Patrícia Maria Mendes; Cunha, Daniele Andrade da; Silva, Hilton Justino da

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Total laryngectomy creates deglutition disorders and causes a decrease in quality of life Aim: To describe the impact of swallowing and quality of life of patients after total laryngectomy. Method: A case series study. Patients completed a Swallowing and Quality of Life questionnaire composed of 44 questions assessing 11 domains related to quality of life (burden, eating duration, eating desire, frequency of symptoms, food selection, communication, fear, mental health, social functioning, sleep, and fatigue). The analysis was performed using descriptive statistics, including measures of central tendency and variability. Results: The sample comprised 15 patients who underwent total laryngectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. Of these, 66.7% classified their health as good and 73% reported no restrictions on food consistency. The domains “communication” and “fear” represented severe impact and “eating duration” represented moderate impact on quality of life. The items with lower scores were: longer time to eat than others (domain “eating duration”), cough and cough to remove the liquid or food of the mouth when they are stopped (domain “symptom frequency”), difficulties in understanding (domain “communication”) and fear of choking and having pneumonia (domain “fear”). Conclusion: After total laryngectomy, patients report that swallowing issues have moderate to severe impact in “communication,” “fear,” and “eating duration” domains. PMID:25991974

  16. Diabetes and quality of life: a Ugandan perspective.

    PubMed

    Nyanzi, Ronald; Wamala, Robert; Atuhaire, Leonard K

    2014-01-01

    Quality of life of diabetic patients is not a new concept in literature. The contentious issue however is whether factors associated in literature with quality of life apply to diabetic patients in Uganda. A sample of 219 outpatients attending Mulago diabetic clinic--a national referral hospital in Uganda--is used to provide an understanding of this issue. Quality of life is assessed in the dimensions of role limitation due to physical health, emotional health, treatment satisfaction, physical endurance, and diet satisfaction based on a five-point Likert scale. The analysis is made by patients' characteristics, medical conditions, lifestyle factors, and type of medication using frequency distributions, summary statistics, and a Poisson regression. In the results, we confirm a consensus regarding the influence of age and education level on the quality of life in the dimensions of role limitation and physical endurance (P < 0.05). A similar conclusion is reached with regards to impact of diabetic foot ulcers in the dimension of physical endurance. Thus, the factors associated with quality of life are not entirely unique to diabetic patients in the country. PMID:24724107

  17. Quality-of-life factors in adolescent inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    MacPhee, M; Hoffenberg, E J; Feranchak, A

    1998-02-01

    Little is known about the specific psychosocial factors that influence quality of life in adolescents with newly diagnosed inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We adapted a model by Garrett and Drossman to assess adolescent adjustment to recent-onset IBD. Thirty adolescent-parent pairs completed a set of standardized questionnaires. The inclusion criteria were adolescents 12-18 years of age with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis of < 5 years' duration. Adolescents' health-related quality-of-life scores significantly correlated with satisfaction and degree of closeness with their social support members, such as parents. An unexpected finding was that the adolescents included more extended family than peers in their social support networks. Also of note was that parental coping styles rather than adolescent coping styles significantly correlated with adolescents' quality-of-life health scores. Severity of illness did not correlate with adolescent quality-of-life health scores. There was significant agreement between adolescent and parental quality-of-life health scores and stressful event ratings. Adolescents with recent-onset IBD rely more on family members than their peers for emotional support, and they depend more on their parents' coping skills than their own. These findings may indicate lags in normal adolescent development. Adolescents and parents do communicate and share concerns with each other. Support programs for adolescents with IBD should reinforce existing coping skills and parent-adolescent communication while promoting normative development.

  18. Tools used for evaluation of Brazilian children's quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Souza, João Gabriel S.; Pamponet, Marcela Antunes; Souza, Tamirys Caroline S.; Pereira, Alessandra Ribeiro; Souza, Andrey George S.; Martins, Andréa Maria E. de B. L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the available tools to evaluate children's quality of life validated for Brazilian language and culture. DATA SOURCES: Search of scientific articles in Medline, Lilacs and SciELO databases using the combination of descriptors "quality of life", "child" and "questionnaires" in Portuguese and English. DATA SYNTHESIS: Among the tools designed to assess children's quality of life validated for the Brazilian language and culture, the Auto questionnaire Qualité de Vie Enfant Imagé (AUQEI), the Child Health Questionnaire - Parent Form 50 (CHQ-PF50), the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL(tm)) version 4.0 and the Kidscreen-52 are highlighted. Some tools do not include all range of ages and some lack domains that are currently considered relevant in the context of childhood, such as bullying. Moreover, due to the cultural diversity of Brazil, it may be necessary to adapt some instruments or to validate other tools. CONCLUSIONS: There are validated instruments to evaluate children's quality of life in Brazil. However, the validation or the adaptation of other international tools have to be considered in order to overcome current deficiencies. PMID:25119761

  19. Quality services for quality of life. Interview.

    PubMed

    1993-02-01

    The health of mothers is a critical element in the health of families. All activities within the WHO Division of Family Health, such as family planning, child health and development are very closely related to the whole issue of safe motherhood and women's reproductive health. The Director of WHO's Division of Family Health identifies WHO's priorities for the Maternal Health and Safe Motherhood Program in response to questions on the importance and priorities of safe motherhood in the overall work of WHO's Division of Family Health and on the needs of countries with high maternal mortality. WHO and its partners in the Safe Motherhood Initiative have done an enormous amount of work in alerting the world, particularly policymakers, to the problem of maternal mortality. However, WHO and the Safe Motherhood Initiative need to be more active at the country level, since countries need help in developing and implementing programs, and need to monitor and evaluate their effectiveness in improving maternal health. They also need a set of tools to identify, quantify, and deal with the weaknesses in maternal health care. In this way they will be able to continue to ensure safe delivery and safe motherhood.

  20. Quality of life in adolescents and adults with CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hartshorne, Nancy; Hudson, Alexandra; MacCuspie, Jillian; Kennert, Benjamin; Nacarato, Tasha; Hartshorne, Timothy; Blake, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Health-related Quality of Life and the Impact of Childhood Neurologic Disability Scale were collected for 53 patients with CHARGE syndrome aged 13-39 years with a mean academic level of 4th grade. The most prevalent new and ongoing issues included bone health issues, sleep apnea, retinal detachment, anxiety, and aggression. Sleep issues were significantly correlated with anxiety, self-abuse, conduct problems, and autistic-like behaviors. Problems with overall health, behavior, and balance most affected the number of social activities in the individual's life. Sensory impairment most affected relationships with friends. Two contrasting case studies are presented and demonstrate that the quality of life exists on a broad spectrum in CHARGE syndrome, just as its physical features range from mild to very severe. A multitude of factors, including those beyond the physical manifestations, such as anxiety and sleep problems, influence quality of life and are important areas for intervention. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. [Determinants of the quality of life in chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Niechzial, M; Hampel, E; Grobe, T; Nagel, E; Dörning, H; Raspe, H

    1997-01-01

    Dialysis patients, waiting for kidney transplantation, were asked about their quality of life. Data from 1027 persons have been collected. Compared to a population sample by the "Nottingham Health Profile" (NHP), dialysis patients showed double the frequency of symptoms--only for the subscale "pain" no significant difference could be recognised. Duration of dialysis treatment reduces the quality of life considerably: increasing troubles have been observed through different quality of life scales. Age shows less important influence concerning "pain" and "physical mobility", even a decrease of symptoms in elder patients has been demonstrated by NHP-subscales for "emotional reaction" and "social isolation". Gender, education, kind of disease and dialysis treatment, and the fact of former transplantations had only marginal influence on some different dimensions of life quality. The study demonstrates in which way the patients perception of life quality could be operational and integrated in analysis and evaluation of therapeutic procedures. PMID:9334088

  2. Quality of life in adolescents and adults with CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hartshorne, Nancy; Hudson, Alexandra; MacCuspie, Jillian; Kennert, Benjamin; Nacarato, Tasha; Hartshorne, Timothy; Blake, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Health-related Quality of Life and the Impact of Childhood Neurologic Disability Scale were collected for 53 patients with CHARGE syndrome aged 13-39 years with a mean academic level of 4th grade. The most prevalent new and ongoing issues included bone health issues, sleep apnea, retinal detachment, anxiety, and aggression. Sleep issues were significantly correlated with anxiety, self-abuse, conduct problems, and autistic-like behaviors. Problems with overall health, behavior, and balance most affected the number of social activities in the individual's life. Sensory impairment most affected relationships with friends. Two contrasting case studies are presented and demonstrate that the quality of life exists on a broad spectrum in CHARGE syndrome, just as its physical features range from mild to very severe. A multitude of factors, including those beyond the physical manifestations, such as anxiety and sleep problems, influence quality of life and are important areas for intervention. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27273681

  3. Quality of life and anxiety disorders: a population study.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Victoria; Torgersen, Svenn; Kringlen, Einar

    2005-03-01

    The study of quality of life has increased in importance in the area of mental disorders during the last decade. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of specific anxiety disorders on specific quality of life indicators in the common population. More than 2000 individuals between 18 and 65 years old were studied by means of structured interviews. The results showed that social phobia and panic disorder within the past year and lifetime, and generalized anxiety disorder within the past year, had an independent effect on quality of life when controlling for a number of sociodemographic variables, somatic health, and other DSM-III-R Axis I mental disorders. Specific phobias and obsessive compulsive disorder had only a small effect, and agoraphobia showed no effect. The effect was strongest for self-realization and contact with friends, but anxiety disorders also influenced subjective well-being, social support, negative life events, contact with family of origin, and neighborhood quality.

  4. [Evaluation of quality of life in elders undergoing hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Angélica Yukari; Okubo, Patrícia; Bedendo, João; Carreira, Lígia

    2011-06-01

    Hemodialysis affects not only physical but psychological and social aspects, with repercussions on personal and family life. Considering the increase in the elderly population in Brazil, this study aims to evaluate the quality of life of elderly patients with chronic renal failure undergoing hemodialysis. This is a quantitative, descriptive exploratory study with elderly patients held in a facility specializing in hemodialysis in Guarapuava, Paraná, Brazil. The data were collected between May and June 2010, through a structured instrument and were submitted to the statistical software Statistica 7.1. Analyzing the domains of the questionnaire the highest score refers to the social domain (70.42) and the lowest, to the physical domain (49.37). Thus, the quality of life of these elderly had to be low, with variations according to the analyzed field. Researches aimed at assessing quality of life are relevant and instrumentalize the daily practice of care.

  5. Selected questionnaire methods studying the quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Mińko, Magdalena; Siwczyńska, Dorota; Samoliński, Bolesław

    2015-01-01

    The scientific literature is full of numerous reports dealing with the quality of life of patients suffering from different diseases. The aim of the study is to present a set of questionnaires, which are used to study the quality of the patient's life, the questionnaires, which are the most popular in Poland and all over the world as well as those which concern the children's allergy. Increasingly, the research deals with the objective and subjective feelings of patients about their condition. Currently, the European Union's priority is to improve the quality of life of patients suffering from chronic non-communicable diseases. The studies on the quality of life are an interdisciplinary area, combining the clinical significance and the psychological aspects of medical care. PMID:26161063

  6. Assessment of quality of life in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Marcio Massao; Araújo, Ivan Luis Andrade; Castro, Martha Cavalcante; Matos, Marcos Almeida

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE : To assess the quality of life of knee osteoarthritis patients using the SF-36 questionnaire METHODS : Cross-sec-tional study with 93 knee osteoarthritis patients. The sample was categorized according to Ahlbӓck score. All individuals were interviewed with the SF-36 questionnaire RESULTS : The main finding of the study is related to the association of edu-cation level with the functional capacity, functional limitation and pain. Patients with higher education level had better functional capacity when they were compared to patients with basic level of education CONCLUSION : Individuals with osteoarthritis have a low perception of their quality of life in functional capacity, functional limitation and pain. There is a strong association between low level of education and low perception of quality of life. Level of Evidence IV, Clinical Case Series. PMID:27057143

  7. [Individual medical relevance of headaches. Comorbidities and quality of life].

    PubMed

    Haag, G

    2014-08-01

    In a multitude of cases, very frequent primary headaches lead to a clear deterioration in quality of life. Particularly in patients with chronic migraine, chronic tension headache, and cluster headache, quality of life is limited. This contradicts the preconception still encountered today that headaches are not a serious illness. Comorbidities with somatic and above all mental disorders are also very frequently observed in headache patients. In the foreground are the cardiovascular diseases of arterial hypertension, stroke, and coronary heart disease, as well as the mental disorders of depression, anxiety disorders, posttraumatic stress disorders, and sleep disorders. When such comorbidities are present, the quality of life of the sufferers is significantly reduced. Therefore, headache disorders should be taken seriously and sufferers should be provided with a consistent therapy. In cases of severe types of headache and in the presence of comorbidities, it is imperative that therapy is also prophylactic and multimodal in nature.

  8. Body image and quality of life in a Spanish population

    PubMed Central

    Lobera, Ignacio Jáuregui; Ríos, Patricia Bolaños

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the current study was to analyze the psychometric properties, factor structure, and internal consistency of the Spanish version of the Body Image Quality of Life Inventory (BIQLI-SP) as well as its test–retest reliability. Further objectives were to analyze different relationships with key dimensions of psychosocial functioning (ie, self-esteem, presence of psychopathological symptoms, eating and body image-related problems, and perceived stress) and to evaluate differences in body image quality of life due to gender. Patients and methods The sample comprised 417 students without any psychiatric history, recruited from the Pablo de Olavide University and the University of Seville. There were 140 men (33.57%) and 277 women (66.43%), and the mean age was 21.62 years (standard deviation = 5.12). After obtaining informed consent from all participants, the following questionnaires were administered: BIQLI, Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2), Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ), Self-Esteem Scale (SES), and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R). Results The BIQLI-SP shows adequate psychometric properties, and it may be useful to determine the body image quality of life in different physical conditions. A more positive body image quality of life is associated with better self-esteem, better psychological wellbeing, and fewer eating-related dysfunctional attitudes, this being more evident among women. Conclusion The BIQLI-SP may be useful to determine the body image quality of life in different contexts with regard to dermatology, cosmetic and reconstructive surgery, and endocrinology, among others. In these fields of study, a new trend has emerged to assess body image-related quality of life. PMID:21403794

  9. Nightly home hemodialysis: improvement in nutrition and quality of life.

    PubMed

    McPhatter, L L; Lockridge, R S; Albert, J; Anderson, H; Craft, V; Jennings, F M; Spencer, M; Swafford, A; Barger, T; Coffey, L

    1999-10-01

    In September, 1997, we began a Nightly Home Hemodialysis Program modeled after a program in Toronto, Canada. We have assessed nutritional parameters and quality of life indicators before initiation of the program, and at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months. Data suggest that patients have improved overall quality of life as measured by the CHOICE Health Experience Questionnaire. Three-day dietary recalls at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 18 months also show patients are eating healthy and maintaining adequate kilocalorie and protein intakes, as well as maintaining adequate dry weight and protein stores.

  10. [Quality of life of neurological patients during therapy and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Musaev, A V; Guseĭnova, S G; Imamverdieva, S S; Mustafaeva, E E; Musaeva, I R

    2006-01-01

    A total of 198 neurological patients on physiotherapeutic rehabilitation participated in a questionnaire survey on their quality of life. The patients had diabetic polyneuropathy (n = 86), disorders in spinal blood circulation (n = 65), 47 patients were operated for discal hernia of the lumbar spine. It was found that all the responders suffer from physical, psychological, emotional and social sequelae of their diseases which deteriorate their quality of life. The severity of this deterioration depends on the form and stage of the disease, motor and sensitive disturbances. Rehabilitation improved subjective response, social, psychological and emotional parameters. Thus, the proposed questionnaires proved valid for assessment of physiotherapy efficacy in neurological patients. PMID:16752737

  11. e-Health and quality of life: the role of the Wearable Motherboard.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungmee; Jayaraman, Sundaresan

    2004-01-01

    It is hard to place a price tag either on human life or on the quality of life. Technology is the key to enhancing the quality of life for everyone in the continuum of life from newborns to senior citizens--whether it is the safe delivery and care of undernourished premature babies, or extending the life of a senior citizen through exploratory treatments and procedures. Technology has the potential to rapidly transform healthcare and the practice of medicine by improving the quality and safety of patient care and increasing the efficiency of healthcare providers. Moreover, the healthcare industry must meet the challenge of balancing cost containment with maintenance of desired patient outcomes and this can be accomplished through the adoption of technology. Any technology that can minimize the loss of human life and/or enhance the quality of life has a value that is priceless. An overview of the key challenges facing the practice of medicine today is presented along with the need for technological solutions that can "prevent" problems. The paradigm of "e-Health" is discussed. Then, the development of the Wearable Motherboard as a "platform" for sensors and monitoring devices that can unobtrusively monitor the health and well-being of individuals (directly and/or remotely) is described. This is followed by a discussion of the applications and impact of this technology in the continuum of life--from preventing SIDS to facilitating independent living for senior citizens. Finally, the future advancements in the area of wearable, yet comfortable, systems that can continue the transformation of healthcare and e-Health to i-Health (for interactive health)--all aimed at enhancing the quality of life for humans--are presented. PMID:15718652

  12. Quality of Life Assessment for Physical Activity and Health Promotion: Further Psychometrics and Comparison of Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Diane L.; Reifsteck, Erin J.; Adams, Melanie M.; Shang, Ya-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Despite the clear relationship between physical activity and quality of life, few sound, relevant quality of life measures exist. Gill and colleagues developed a 32-item quality of life survey, and provided initial psychometric evidence. This study further examined that quality of life survey in comparison with the widely used short form (SF-36)…

  13. Perceived Quality of Life in Mothers of Children with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Anne C.; Skinner, Debra G.; Bailey, Donald B.

    2008-01-01

    A mixed method approach was used to explore quality of life of 101 mothers of children with fragile X syndrome. Mothers completed a self-report of personal quality of life and measures of mental health and well-being. A subset was interviewed about quality of life. The distribution of scores on the Quality of Life Inventory was similar to the…

  14. Health and Quality of Life in Northern Plains Indians

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quality of life and standard of living are consistently depicted as indigent among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations. American Indians (AI) are among the most heterogeneous and impoverished ethnic groups in the U.S.,have the highest per capita suicide rate at 247% of the national...

  15. Issues in Evaluating Importance Weighting in Quality of Life Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Chang-ming

    2013-01-01

    For most empirical research investigating the topic of importance weighting in quality of life (QoL) measures, the prevailing approach has been to use (1) a limited choice of global QoL measures as criterion variables (often a single one) to determine the performance of importance weighting, (2) a limited option of weighting methods to develop…

  16. 38 CFR 51.100 - Quality of life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.100 Quality of life. A facility... practicable mental and psychosocial well-being of each resident. (2) For each 120 beds, a nursing home must... qualified social worker services on a proportionate basis (for example, a nursing home with 60 beds...

  17. 38 CFR 51.100 - Quality of life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.100 Quality of life. A facility... practicable mental and psychosocial well-being of each resident. (2) For each 120 beds, a nursing home must... qualified social worker services on a proportionate basis (for example, a nursing home with 60 beds...

  18. 38 CFR 51.100 - Quality of life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.100 Quality of life. A facility... practicable mental and psychosocial well-being of each resident. (2) For each 120 beds, a nursing home must... qualified social worker services on a proportionate basis (for example, a nursing home with 60 beds...

  19. 38 CFR 51.100 - Quality of life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.100 Quality of life. A facility... practicable mental and psychosocial well-being of each resident. (2) For each 120 beds, a nursing home must... qualified social worker services on a proportionate basis (for example, a nursing home with 60 beds...

  20. 38 CFR 51.100 - Quality of life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.100 Quality of life. A facility... practicable mental and psychosocial well-being of each resident. (2) For each 120 beds, a nursing home must... qualified social worker services on a proportionate basis (for example, a nursing home with 60 beds...

  1. Quantifying impact of mosquitoes on quality of life

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New Jersey, like many eastern states, has a persistent problem of the Asian tiger mosquito. This and other mosquitoes reduce residents’ quality of life from discomfort and possible risk of disease. To guide a comprehensive area-wide pest management project to control Aedes albopictus in two counties...

  2. Measuring health related quality of life in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Carle, Adam C.; Dewitt, E. Morgan; Seid, M.

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric researchers and clinicians increasingly recognize the importance of measuring the impact of childhood disease across many aspects of a child’s life. In this review, we describe four measures of health related quality of life (HRQOL) designed specifically for children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA). HRQOL generally refers to how an individual feels about aspects of their life in relation to their health. The World Health Organization originally described HRQOL as minimally including: physical, mental, and social health dimensions.1 Subsequent HRQOL definitions, while varied, have incorporated the notion that individuals have an important and distinct viewpoint regarding their disease and the quality of their life.2 They have also often emphasized HRQOL’s subjective nature.2 These features present unique challenges when measuring HRQOL in children. Cognizant of these issues, we review the development and psychometric properties of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) Rheumatology Module 3.0, the Juvenile Arthritis Quality of Life Questionnaire (JAQQ), the Paediatric Rheumatology Quality of Life Scale (PRQL), and the Childhood Arthritis Health Profile (CAHP). PMID:22588764

  3. Measuring the Child Quality of Life: Issues and Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arboleda, Jairo; Levinger, Beryl

    A Child Quality of Life Index (CQLI) should be developed in order to realize three objectives: (1) to raise the consciousness of decision makers, prospective donors, field workers, and community members concerning the needs of children; (2) to assist field workers and community members in planning specific programs to meet the priority needs of…

  4. The Health-Related Quality of Life of Custodial Grandparents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neely-Barnes, Susan L.; Graff, J. Carolyn; Washington, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was explored in a sample of 119 custodial grandparents. A latent profile analysis identified three groups of grandparents along a continuum of good to poor HRQOL, with most custodial grandparents reporting Short Form-12 Health Survey (version 2) scores significantly below U.S. population means. Grandparent…

  5. Quality-of-life measurements: origin and pathogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Prutkin, Jordan M.; Feinstein, Alvan R.

    2002-01-01

    Despite extensive growth in recent years, the field of "quality-of-life" appraisal still evokes debate about basic perception of the concept and is accompanied by a plethora of indexes for measurement. One prime reason for the problems is that the measurements have been transferred from two separate sources - medical health status indexes and social-science population indexes - neither of which was designed for appraising the particular personal distinctions of the way people feel about their own quality of life. When regulatory and commercial incentives were offered for measuring patients' quality of life, it became appraised with the indexes available from the medical and psychosocial sources, even though neither set of indexes was specifically intended for that purpose. They are not developed from the basic principle that a person's "quality of life" is a state of mind, not a state of health, which is uniquely perceived by that person, and which will not be appropriately appraised unless the most cogent personal components are allowed suitable expressions. An approach that lets patients state their own opinions directly can offer the "face validity" or "common sense" that now seems absent from the generally applied measurements. PMID:12230313

  6. Quality of life related to swallowing in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Danielle; das Graças Wanderley de Sales Coriolano, Maria; Belo, Luciana Rodrigues; de Marcos Rabelo, Aneide Rocha; Asano, Amdore Guescel; Lins, Otávio Gomes

    2014-10-01

    Swallowing difficulties in Parkinson's disease can result in decreased quality of life. The swallowing quality of life questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) is an instrument for specifically assessing quality of life with respect to swallowing, which has been little explored in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The goal of this study was to evaluate the quality of life with respect to swallowing in persons with PD compared to controls and at several stages of the disease using the SWAL-QOL. The experimental group was composed of 62 persons with PD at stages 1-4. Forty-one age-matched healthy subjects constituted the control group. The SWAL-QOL scores were significantly lower for the patients with PD than for the controls in all SWAL-QOL domains. Eating duration had the largest difference in score between persons with PD and the controls and the lowest mean score, followed by communication, fatigue, fear, sleep, and food selection. The scores of most domains were lower at later stages of the disease. The scores for eating duration, symptom frequency, and sleep were significantly lower at stage 4 than stages 1 and 2. In conclusion, patients with PD have significantly lower scores in all domains of the SWAL-QOL than normal controls. This means swallowing difficulties occurring in patients with PD negatively affect their QOL. Progression of the disease worsens swallowing QOL, more specifically in the domains of eating duration, symptom frequency, and sleep. This occurs mostly at later stages of the disease.

  7. A Quality of Life Framework for Special Education Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, H. Rutherford, III; Turnbull, Ann P.; Wehmeyer, Michael L.; Park, Jiyeon

    2003-01-01

    This paper offers a framework for measuring outcomes for students with disabilities using quality of life principles identified in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, namely: (1) equality of opportunity; (2) full participation; (3) independent living; and (4) economic self-sufficiency. It urges that these goals guide curriculum and…

  8. Effect of soy isoflavone supplementation on menopausal quality of life

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent clinical trials have found an increased risk of health problems in women using menopausal hormone therapy. As a result, women are in search of alternative strategies to improve their quality of life. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of soy isoflavone supplementation on quali...

  9. Intimate Adult Relationships, Quality of Life and Psychological Adjusment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khaleque, Abdul

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess relations between adult intimacy, quality of life, and psychological adjustment. Data were collected in the United States from a sample of 64 college students. The measuring instruments used were Personal Information Sheet, Adult version of the Personality Assessment Questionnaire (Adult PAQ), Intimate…

  10. The Quality of Life of Retired Reengaged Academics in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ejechi, Eucharia Onyema

    2012-01-01

    The quality of life (QL) of retired academics reengaged in some Nigerian Universities was studied using physical health, subjective happiness, life satisfaction and psychological well-being domains and a measure based on control, autonomy, self-realization and pleasure (CASP) as indicators. Satisfactory QL was indicated all respondents (greater…

  11. Quality of Life Among Thai Workers in Textile Dyeing Factories

    PubMed Central

    Kittipichai, Wirin; Arsa, Rattanaporn; Jirapongsuwan, Ann; Singhakant, Chatchawal

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of a cross-sectional study was to investigate factors influencing the quality of life among Thai workers in textile dyeing factories. Samples included 205 Thai workers from five textile dyeing factories located in the suburban area of Bangkok in Thailand. Data were collected with a self-administered questionnaire. Scales of the questionnaire had reliability coefficients ranging from 0.70–0.91. The results revealed that the overall quality of life among workers was most likely between good and moderate levels, and the percentage-mean score was 74.77. The seven factors associated with the overall quality of life were co-worker relationships, safety at work in the dimension of accident prevention, job characteristics, supervisory relationships, welfares, marital status, and physical environment. Furthermore, co-worker relationships, accident prevention, and marital status were three considerable predictors accounted for 23% of the variance in the overall quality of life among workers in textile dyeing factories. PMID:25948458

  12. Burnout and Quality of Life among Healthcare Research Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enders, Felicity; West, Colin P.; Dyrbye, Liselotte; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Satele, Daniel; Sloan, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Burnout is increasingly recognized as a problem in the workplace--30% to 50% of physicians experience burnout, but no assessment of burnout has been done among healthcare research faculty. A cross-sectional survey of burnout, quality of life, and related factors was sent to all doctoral-level faculty in a large department of healthcare research.…

  13. Defining and assessing health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Holcík, J; Koupilová, I

    1999-11-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in quality of life assessment in clinical research and practice, as well as in public health and policy analysis. Indicators of health-related quality of life are important not only for health professionals and their patients, but also for health administrators and health economists in health care planning and policy making. Most studies on the outcome of treatments and interventions now include some kind of a quality of life measure. This usually takes a form of an assessment of symptoms and physical functioning, measurement of psychological well-being, life satisfaction, or coping and adjustment. Numerous scales of psychological health, physical health status and physical functioning have been developed for use in the assessment of health outcomes and a wide range of instruments for measurement of health-related quality of life is available. These fall into two broad categories of generic and disease-specific instruments. The selection of an instrument depends upon its measurement properties but also upon the specific context in which the instrument is going to be used. Adequate attention needs to be paid to the translation and validation of instruments for use across countries and cultural contexts.

  14. The impact of food allergies on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Bacal, Liane R

    2013-07-01

    CME EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES 1. Recognize and appreciate the impact of food allergies on psychosocial health. 2. List the factors that have been shown to negatively affect health-related quality of life. 3. Understand how physicians can directly help to improve a child's quality of life while living with food allergies. Food allergy is a serious problem affecting a growing number of children worldwide. There is a large body of evidence supporting the detrimental effects that food allergy can have on a child's quality of life. With validated tools, we can identify these children and focus on how to protect, guide, and help them to live a safe life. Recent research articulates how food allergies impact health-related quality of life (HRQL). There are studies reported from the child's perspective, as well as studies reported from the parent's perspective. With the development of validated disease and age-specific questionnaires, researchers can reliably gather data on the psychological aspect of children with food allergies. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the literature examining the psycho-social impact of food allergies on children. This article was designed to outline suggestions to help physicians care for the whole child - both mind and body. PMID:23805962

  15. The impact of leg ulcers on patients' quality of life.

    PubMed

    Charles, H

    1995-06-01

    The pain of leg ulceration can dominate patients' lives and can have serious psychological and social effects on patients' quality of life. A phenomenological approach was used in this study to obtain rich data on patients' experiences. A feeling of loss of control and lack of faith in the professionals treating the condition was found. PMID:7604055

  16. Conceptual Principles of Quality of Life: An Empirical Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramston, P.; Chipuer, H.; Pretty, G.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Quality of life is a popular measure of outcomes and its widespread use has led to recent calls for a better understanding of the construct, emphasizing the need to build a substantial body of knowledge around what determines perceptions of life quality. Three widely reported and used conceptual principles are examined in this study.…

  17. Eastern Kentuckians View Their Quality of Life: Implications for Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coughenour, C. Milton; Coleman, A. Lee

    Data from 1961, 1971, and 1973 surveys of households and community "knowledgeables" focused on the subjective assesssments of the quality of life (QOL) of residents of Harlan, Perry, Whitley, and Wolfe counties in Eastern Kentucky, and assessed policy implications. Overall, residents assessed their counties favorably. They rated wages and income,…

  18. Low health-related quality of life among abused women.

    PubMed

    Alsaker, Kjersti; Moen, Bente E; Nortvedt, Monica W; Baste, Valborg

    2006-08-01

    In a cross-sectional study, we sent a self-administered questionnaire to all the women's shelters in Norway to describe health-related quality of life among women who had experienced violence from an intimate partner. Every woman who could understand Norwegian and was staying at a women's shelter in Norway for more than 1 week from October 2002 to May 2003 was asked to participate. We described violence by intimate partners by using the Severity of Violence against Women Scale and the Psychological Maltreatment of Women Index. We used the SF-36 Health Survey to measure health-related quality of life. These women experienced a multitude of threats and actual physical and psychological violence during their partnership. Their health-related quality of life was low and significantly (p<0.001) below the norm for the female population of Norway in all dimensions. The SF-36 mental health dimension was 2.5 standard deviations below the norm. Women at women's shelters in Norway who had experienced domestic violence had very low and clinically significantly reduced health-related quality of life scores. Health care workers must give priority to developing intervention plans for victims of violence from intimate partners.

  19. Quality of Life in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurcay, Eda; Bal, Ajda; Eksioglu, Emel; Cakci, Aytul

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the quality of life (QoL) in spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors. Secondary objectives were to determine the effects of various sociodemographic and clinical characteristics on QoL. This cross-sectional study included 54 patients with SCI. The Turkish version of the Short-Form-36 Health Survey was…

  20. Health-Related Quality of Life in Cardiovascular Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews several current approaches to the assessment of health outcomes in cardiovascular disease, including health-related quality of life. Offers a general health policy model as a method for comparing program options in cardiovascular disease that may have very different objectives. Uses examples from hypertension screening and treatment, heart…

  1. Asian Medical Students: Quality of Life and Motivation to Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, Marcus A.; Hawken, Susan J.; Krageloh, Christian; Zhao, Yipin; Doherty, Iain

    2011-01-01

    Issues linked with the notions of quality of life (QOL) and motivation to learn among Asian medical students have not been well documented. This is true in both the international and the New Zealand contexts. Our paper addresses this lack of research by focusing on the QOL of international and domestic Asian students studying in New Zealand, where…

  2. Exercise and Quality of Life in Women with Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.; Dietrich, Frederick; Larson, Rebecca; White, Lesley J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate perceptions of quality of life after a 4-month progressive resistance training program for individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). A second purpose was to examine participants' views about factors that facilitated or impeded exercise behavior. Qualitative interviews were conducted with eight females…

  3. Do Non-Economic Quality of Life Factors Drive Immigration?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacheco, Gail Anne; Rossouw, Stephanie; Lewer, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    This paper contributes to the immigration literature by generating two unique non-economic quality of life (QOL) indices and testing their role on recent migration patterns. Applying the generated QOL indices in conjunction with four independent welfare measures to an augmented gravity model of immigration, this paper finds an insignificant…

  4. Synthetic Indicators of Quality of Life in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somarriba, Noelia; Pena, Bernardo

    2009-01-01

    For more than three decades now, sociologists, politicians and economists have used a wide range of statistical and econometric techniques to analyse and measure the quality of life of individuals with the aim of obtaining useful instruments for social, political and economic decision making. The aim of this paper is to analyse the advantages and…

  5. Arts and the Quality of Life: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalos, Alex C.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to measure the impact of the arts broadly construed on the quality of life. A randomly drawn household sample of 315 adult residents of Prince George, British Columbia served as the working data-set. Examining zero-order correlations, among other things, it was found that playing a musical instrument a number of…

  6. Evaluation of the quality of life and risk of suicide

    PubMed Central

    de Medeiros Alves, Verônica; de Lima Francisco, Leilane Camila Ferreira; Belo, Flaviane Maria Pereira; de-Melo-Neto, Valfrido Leão; Barros, Vinicius Gomes; Nardi, Antonio E

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the socio-demographic profiles, suicidal ideation, the presence of mental disorders and the quality of life of patients using mental health services in Arapiraca, Alagoas, Brazil. METHOD: Interviews were conducted in family health units and the Psychosocial Attention Center. The sample included 202 mental disorder patients with a risk of suicide attempts, 207 mental disorder patients without a risk of suicide attempts and 196 controls. This study used an identification questionnaire, the abbreviated World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire, Beck‘s Suicidal Ideation Scale and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. RESULTS: Patients who had a mental disorder and a risk of suicide attempts tended to be single, had less education and lower family income, were not working and showed lower scores in quality of life domains; 73 of these patients had suicidal ideation in the previous week. Depressive disorders, manic episodes, hypomanic episodes, social phobias, obsessive compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, psychotic syndromes and generalized anxiety disorder were more frequent and statistically significant for patients at risk for suicide attempts. CONCLUSION: The management of patients with a risk of suicide attempts must focus on individual patients because this risk is directly linked to changes in quality of life and the improvement of these patients' prognosis. PMID:27074173

  7. Quality of Life and Perceptions of Crime in Saskatoon, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchen, Peter; Williams, Allison

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the relationship between crime and quality of life in Saskatoon, Canada. The city has one of the highest crime rates in the country and has been referred to as the "Crime Capital of Canada", a label that comes as a surprise to many residents and causes considerable concern among others. The aim of this research is to…

  8. Family Quality of Life: Moving from Measurement to Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuna, Nina I.; Turnbull, Ann; Summers, Jean Ann

    2009-01-01

    Noting the absence of sound theoretical underpinnings for family quality of life (FQoL) research and work, the authors note that, to guide FQoL practice, research findings must be schematically organized so as to enable practitioners to implement empirical findings effectively. One way to meet this goal is to introduce a theoretical model that…

  9. Family Quality of Life Following Early Identification of Deafness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Carla W.; Wegner, Jane R.; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Family members' perceptions of their quality of life were examined following early identification of deafness in children. Method: A questionnaire was used to solicit ratings of satisfaction from the family members of 207 children who were deaf and younger than 6 years of age. Results: Results indicated that families were generally…

  10. Health-Related Quality of Life in HIV Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Ron D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The structure of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was studied in 205 symptomatic adults. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a two-factor model of HRQOL, with physical and mental health dimensions. Correlations of HRQOL with other aspects of health and support are discussed. (SLD)

  11. Health Conditions and Perceived Quality of Life in Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorfman, Lorraine T.

    1995-01-01

    Investigates the effects of specific health conditions on perceived quality of life for retirees (n=451). Pulmonary disease was a predictor of dissatisfaction for both sexes. Pulmonary disease and heart attack were the strongest predictors of dissatisfaction with health for men, followed closely by stroke. Arthritis was the strongest predictor of…

  12. Physical Education and Sport and the Quality of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pooley, John C.

    1984-01-01

    Physical education and sports programs have the potential to enhance the quality of life. Cheating and violence in sports have become international problems that tarnish the credibility of athletic programs. Professionals need to emphasize good sportsmanship and fair play in sports programs. (DF)

  13. Family Quality of Life Empowered by Family-Oriented Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schippers, Alice; van Boheemen, Marleen

    2009-01-01

    Professional services for persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) have begun to attach more importance to their environment. The concept of (family-related) quality of life proved to link very well with this idea and lent itself to constructing and evaluating services. One outcome was the emergence of equal partnerships between families,…

  14. Changes in the Quality of Life of Durban's People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Durban, the busiest port and second largest industrial hub in South Africa, has a developmental vision that sees its residents living in "acceptably serviced housing" and enjoying a "generally high quality of life that can be sustained". This vision is in response to South Africa"s transitional aspirations to move from an inequitable apartheid…

  15. The Quality of Life over the Family Life Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldous, Joan; And Others

    Studies conducted in the 1960s (Aldous and Hill, 1969) examining the quality of life in families based on their affective and financial resources identified the childbearing stage and the stage when adolescents were present as especially stressful periods. Findings from the 1978 Quality of American Life survey (Campbell and Converse, 1980) were…

  16. Evaluation of quality of life related to nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Wanden-Berghe, Carmina; Sanz-Valero, Javier; Escribà-Agüir, Vicenta; Castelló-Botia, Isabel; Guardiola-Wanden-Berghe, Rocio

    2009-04-01

    The way in which the quality of life related to health (HRQoL) is affected by the nutritional status of the patient is a subject of constant interest and permanent debate. The purpose of the present paper is to review those studies that relate HRQoL to nutritional status and examine the tools (questionnaires) that they use to investigate this relationship. A critical review of published studies was carried out via an investigation of the following databases: MEDLINE (via PubMed); EMBASE; The Cochrane Library; Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL); Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science; Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS); Spanish Health Sciences Bibliographic Index (IBECS). The search was carried out from the earliest date possible until July 2007.The medical subject heading terms used were 'quality of life', 'nutritional status' and 'questionnaires'. The articles had to contain at least one questionnaire that evaluated quality of life. Twenty-eight documents fulfilling the inclusion criteria were accepted, although none of them used a specific questionnaire to evaluate HRQoL related to nutritional status. However, some of them used a combination of generic questionnaires with the intention of evaluating the same. Only three studies selectively addressed the relationship between nutritional status and quality of life, this evaluation being performed not by means of specific questionnaires but by statistical analysis of data obtained via validated questionnaires.

  17. Body image quality of life in eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jáuregui Lobera, Ignacio; Bolaños Ríos, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objective was to examine how body image affects quality of life in an eating-disorder (ED) clinical sample, a non-ED clinical sample, and a nonclinical sample. We hypothesized that ED patients would show the worst body image quality of life. We also hypothesized that body image quality of life would have a stronger negative association with specific ED-related variables than with other psychological and psychopathological variables, mainly among ED patients. On the basis of previous studies, the influence of gender on the results was explored, too. Patients and methods: The final sample comprised 70 ED patients (mean age 22.65 ± 7.76 years; 59 women and 11 men); 106 were patients with other psychiatric disorders (mean age 28.20 ± 6.52; 67 women and 39 men), and 135 were university students (mean age 21.57 ± 2.58; 81 women and 54 men), with no psychiatric history. After having obtained informed consent, the following questionnaires were administered: Body Image Quality of Life Inventory-Spanish version (BIQLI-SP), Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2), Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ), Self-Esteem Scale (SES), and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R). Results: The ED patients’ ratings on the BIQLI-SP were the lowest and negatively scored (BIQLI-SP means: +20.18, +5.14, and −6.18, in the student group, the non-ED patient group, and the ED group, respectively). The effect of body image on quality of life was more negative in the ED group in all items of the BIQLI-SP. Body image quality of life was negatively associated with specific ED-related variables, more than with other psychological and psychopathological variables, but not especially among ED patients. Conclusion: Body image quality of life was affected not only by specific pathologies related to body image disturbances, but also by other psychopathological syndromes. Nevertheless, the greatest effect was related to ED, and seemed to be more negative among men. This finding is the

  18. Spinal cord injury, exercise and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Noreau, L; Shephard, R J

    1995-10-01

    The ultimate goal of comprehensive rehabilitation in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) has shifted over time from an extension of their life expectancy to attainment of an optimal level of independent living and quality of life. After World War II, the important influence of sport and exercise upon the course of rehabilitation following SCI was recognised. Nonetheless, 5 decades later, there remains a lack of understanding of how an exercise programme can contribute to an improvement of quality of life among individuals with SCI. In future, attention should be directed toward avoidance of secondary impairments, disabilities and handicaps. The World Health Organization model of disablement provides a suitable framework for addressing this issue. The most common benefits of exercise are biological in nature. They target a reduction in secondary impairments (loss of cardiorespiratory, and muscular function, metabolic alterations and systemic dysfunctions). This in turn could minimise the development of disabilities and the appearance of such handicaps as loss of mobility, physical dependence and poor social integration. A lack of physical fitness for specific tasks can be a serious obstacle to autonomy following SCI. In a very short period of time, physical deconditioning can significantly decrease quality of life in individuals with SCI, ultimately placing them in a state of complete dependency. Quality of life is closely associated with independent living and, increasingly, it is a key outcome when measuring the success of rehabilitation. Consequently, research designs that examine the impact of exercise upon individuals with disabilities should not only include objective outcome measures, but also subjective measures relating to life-satisfaction and quality of life.

  19. Limits on quality of life in communication after total laryngectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Adriana Di Donato; Pernambuco, Leandro de Araújo; Balata, Patrícia Maria Mendes; Santos, Veridiana da Silva; de Lima, Leilane Maria; de Souza, Síntia Ribeiro; da Silva, Hilton Justino

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Among people affected by cancer, the impairment of quality of life of people affected by cancer can cause have devastating effects. The self-image of patients after post-laryngectomyzed patients may be find themselves compromised, affecting the quality of life in this population. Objective: To characterize quality of life in related to communication in people who have undergone went total laryngectomy surgery. Methods: This is an observational study, with a cross-sectional and descriptive series. Design of series study. The sample were comprised 15 patients interviewed the period from January to February of 2011. We used the Quality Protocol for Life Communication in Post-laryngectomy adapted from Bertocello (2004); which this questionnaire contains 55 questions. The protocol was organized from the nature of using responses classified as positive and negative aspects, proposals in with respect to five 5 communication domains: family relationships, social relationships, personal analysis; morphofunctional aspect, and use of writing. To promote and guarantee the autonomy of the respondents, was examiners made use of used assistive technology with the Visual Response Scale. Results: The responses that total laryngectomy compromises the quality of life in communication amounted to 463 occurrences (65.7%), and that who responses suggesting good quality of life were represented with amounted to 242 occurrences (34.3%), from a total of 705 occurrencesresponses. From Among the five 5 Communication domains, four 4 had percentages of above 63% for occurrences of negative content for impact on communication. Appearance Morphofunctional appearance gave the had the highest percentage of negative content, amounting to 77.3% of cases. Conclusions: The results showed important limitations of a personal and social nature due to poor communication with their peers. Thus, there is a need for multidisciplinary interventions that aim to minimize the

  20. [Quality of life and problems posed by hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus during oral hypoglycemic therapy].

    PubMed

    Ionova, T I; Odin, V I; Nikitina, T P; Kurbatova, K A; Shablovskaia, N E

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life characteristics, hypoglycemic episodes and patients' attitude toward them were estimated in the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus based on the modern recommendations for the patient-oriented treatment with metformin in combination with sulfonylurea derivatives (M+S) therapy, traditional approach, n = 83) and metformin in combination with vildagliptin (M+V therapy, innovative approach, n = 111). M+V therapy ensured a higher quality of life than M+S therapy based on all SF-36 scales. Quality of life parameters corresponded to population norms in most patients given M+V therapy and only in 52% of those treated with M+S. The frequency of hypoglycemic episodes, related concerns, and other problems associated with this condition were less apparent in case of M+V therapy. Transition from M+S to M+V therapy resulted in the improvement of quality of life and reduction in the frequency of hypoglycemia. Quality of life did not change after transition to M+S therapy while the frequency of hypoglycemia and the number of related problems increased. HbA1c levels were similar in both groups (0.8% difference). According to patients' reports M+V therapy is more efficient than M+S; these data allow to comprehensively evaluate the efficacy of therapy and monitor the health state of diabetic patients in the course of treatment. PMID:24437153

  1. Interferon α Therapy in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Infection: Quality of Life and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Conversano, Ciro; Carmassi, Claudia; Carlini, Marina; Casu, Giulia; Gremigni, Paola; Dell’Osso, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Health-related quality of life was examined in 49 patients with hepatitis C virus with no psychiatric history who received interferon (IFN)-α treatment. Quality of life was assessed at baseline, at 3-time points during IFN-α therapy and at 1-6 month follow-up, using SF-36. Hepatitis C virus patients showed poorer physical functioning and better social and mental functioning than a normal population. Significant decreases from baseline SF-36 scores were observed at an early phase of treatment. Six patients developed major depression during IFN-α treatment. At baseline, they had reported more bodily pain than patients who did not develop depression during treatment. Planned contrasts revealed that worsening in some dimensions of quality of life at 2 months was greater in depressed than in non-depressed patients. Results suggest that depressive symptoms should be accurately monitored during IFN-α therapy even in patients with no psychiatric history, especially if they present with bodily pain. PMID:25852845

  2. Relationship between Individual Quality of Life and Family Quality of Life for People with Intellectual Disability Living in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertelli, M.; Bianco, A.; Rossi, M.; Scuticchio, D.; Brown, I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is substantial literature investigating quality of life (QoL) of individuals with intellectual disability (ID). QoL of families of people with ID is emerging as an important field of research. Despite this, there is a lack of studies regarding their relationship. Aim: The present paper aimed to study the relationship between QoL…

  3. Factors contributing to quality of life in COPD patients in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hye-Young; Kim, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic lung disease, and the burden of COPD is expected to increase in the rapidly aging nation of South Korea. This study aims to examine the factors contributing to health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in COPD patients. Patients and methods This study was based on 6-year-data obtained from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2012. COPD was diagnosed in 2,734 survey participants and the severity was graded according to the criteria set by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease. The EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) index was used to assess the quality of life. Results The EQ-5D index scores for COPD patients and the general population were 0.915±0.003 and 0.943±0.001, respectively. Males, younger people, and patients with higher education attainment and income levels had a higher utility score. In addition, the adjusted EQ-5D index scores for severity level IV significantly decreased by 0.100 (P=0.041), compared to the severity group I scores. No significant differences were found in stage II and III patients. Comorbidities (excluding cancer and hypertension) appeared to negatively influence HRQOL among COPD patients. In particular, depression (EQ-5D index score =−0.089, P=0.0003) and osteoporosis (EQ-5D index score=−0.062, P=0.0039) had a significant influence, while smoking status did not appear to influence patient HRQOL. Conclusion In this study, we found that the higher the severity of COPD, the lower the quality of life. In particular, patients with depression and osteoporosis had a relatively low utility score. Therefore, these comorbidities should be carefully monitored in order to improve quality of life. PMID:26834467

  4. The Relations of Sleep and Quality of Life to School Performance in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perfect, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined parent and youth self-reports to test the hypothesis that perceived insufficient sleep duration, inconsistent sleep habits, reduced quality of life, less frequent blood glucose monitoring, and higher hemoglobin A1c would predict poorer school functioning among 50 youth with type 1 diabetes. The data suggested that a delay in…

  5. An Internet-Based Physical Activity Intervention to Improve Quality of Life of Inactive Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Broekhuizen, Karen; de Gelder, Jelle; Wijsman, Carolien A; Wijsman, Liselotte W; Westendorp, Rudi GJ; Verhagen, Evert; Slagboom, Pieternella E; van Mechelen, Willem; van Heemst, Diana; van der Ouderaa, Frans

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing physical activity is a viable strategy for improving both the health and quality of life of older adults. Objective The aim of this study was to assess if an Internet-based intervention aimed to increase physical activity was effective in improving quality of life of inactive older adults. In addition, we analyzed the effect of the intervention on quality of life among those participants who successfully reached their individually targeted increase in daily physical activity as indicated by the intervention program, as well as the dose-response effect of increasing physical activity on quality of life. Methods The intervention was tested in a randomized controlled trial and was comprised of an Internet program—DirectLife (Philips)—aimed at increasing physical activity using monitoring and feedback by accelerometry and feedback by digital coaching (n=119). The control group received no intervention (n=116). Participants were inactive 60-70-year-olds and were recruited from the general population. Quality of life and physical activity were measured at baseline and after 3 months using the Research ANd Development 36-item health survey (RAND-36) and wrist-worn triaxial accelerometer, respectively. Results After 3 months, a significant improvement in quality of life was seen in the intervention group compared to the control group for RAND-36 subscales on emotional and mental health (2.52 vs -0.72, respectively; P=.03) and health change (8.99 vs 2.03, respectively; P=.01). A total of 50 of the 119 participants (42.0%) in the intervention group successfully reached their physical activity target and showed a significant improvement in quality of life compared to the control group for subscales on emotional and mental health (4.31 vs -0.72, respectively; P=.009) and health change (11.06 vs 2.03, respectively; P=.004). The dose-response analysis showed that there was a significant association between increase in minutes spent in moderate

  6. Quality of Life Among Food Allergic Patients and Their Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Warren, Christopher M; Otto, Alana K; Walkner, Madeline M; Gupta, Ruchi S

    2016-05-01

    Food allergy is increasing in prevalence worldwide. This review summarizes progress made studying relationships between food allergy and quality of life (QOL), with an emphasis on recent work in the field. Early work examining QOL among food allergy patients established that stress and anxiety associated with continuous allergen avoidance and the looming threat of anaphylaxis were associated with significantly impaired food allergy quality of life (FAQOL) for children with food allergy and their caregivers. Recent clinical studies suggest that undergoing oral food challenge to confirm food allergy and oral immunotherapy to treat food allergy may each improve FAQOL among both patients and their caregivers. Other intervention modalities, such as nurse-facilitated counseling and educational workshops, also hold promise, but additional work is needed. Future work must strive to recruit more representative, population-based samples, including adult patients, in order to improve the generalizability and clinical relevance of findings. PMID:27048239

  7. Incomplete quality of life data in randomized trials: missing items.

    PubMed

    Fayers, P M; Curran, D; Machin, D

    Missing data has been a problem in many quality of life studies. This paper focuses upon the issues involved in handling forms which contain one or more missing items, and reviews the alternative procedures. One of the most widely practised approaches is imputation using the mean of all observed items in the same subscale. This, together with the related estimation of the subscale score, is based upon traditional psychometric approaches to scale design and analysis. We show that it may be an inappropriate method for many of the items in quality of life questionnaires, and would result in biased or misleading estimates. We provide examples of items and subscales which violate the psychometric foundations that underpin simple mean imputation. A checklist is proposed for examining the adequacy of simple imputation, and some alternative procedures are indicated.

  8. [IMPACT OF URANOSTAPHILOPLASTY ON QUALITY OF LIFE OF THE PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Azim, Sabrin Ali Mokhammed

    2016-02-01

    Abstract Retrospective analysis was conducted in 78 patients of various age, who suffered the inborn lip and palate fissura, for estimation of the patients quality of life after uranostaphiloplasty. The operations were performed on clinical base of The Oral Cavity Surgery and The Jaw-Facial Surgery Cathedra in Department of The Jaw-Facial Surgery of Clinical Medical Center (Baku). There was established, that application of uranostaphiloplasty procedure, as well as timely initiated rehabilitation, influences a further establishment of the patient personality. A timely refer to a speech therapeutist and the treatment began also have great significance for further establishment of the patient personality. Disorders of speech, incorrect bite hampers obtaining of education, working, interferes with a family creation, hampers the employment and worsens a quality of life. PMID:27244925

  9. Assessment of oral health related quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Allen, P Finbarr

    2003-01-01

    In Dentistry, as in other branches of Medicine, it has been recognised that objective measures of disease provide little insight into the impact of oral disorders on daily living and quality of life. A significant body of development work has been undertaken to provide health status measures for use as outcome measures in dentistry. In descriptive population studies, poor oral health related quality of life is associated with tooth loss. There is a less extensive literature of longitudinal clinical trials, and measurement of change and interpretation of change scores continues to pose a challenge. This paper reviews the literature regarding the development and use of these oral health related QoL measures and includes an appraisal of future research needs in this area. PMID:14514355

  10. Urticaria: impact on quality of life and economic cost.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Brigid F

    2014-02-01

    Patients with urticaria suffer itch, swellings, fatigue caused by sleep disturbance and the side effects of medication, and disruption of many facets of their lives. Much progress has been made in formally evaluating the degree of quality-of-life (QoL) impairment suffered by patients with urticaria. This review focuses on QoL in chronic urticaria (>6 weeks duration) and examines QoL measures, including the chronic urticaria-quality of life questionnaire (CU-Q2oL). Patients with urticaria have difficulty identifying and coping with their emotions. The psychiatric comorbidity and the financial burden on the patient and society because of chronic urticaria, is also examined. PMID:24262691

  11. Impact of leprosy on the quality of life.

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, G. A.; Rao, P. S.

    1999-01-01

    Leprosy is considered by many as not merely a medical condition, but as a condition encompassing psychological, socioeconomic and spiritual dimensions that dehabilitate an individual progressively, unless properly cared for. The present study was undertaken to document the nature and extent of decreases in the quality of life (QOL) of an affected person. The World Health Organization questionnaire on quality of life was given to a representative random sample of 50 leprosy-affected persons and 50 unaffected individuals in the Bommasamudram Taluk of Chittoor District, Andhra Pradesh, India. This questionnaire explores the following six domains; physical; psychological; level of independence; social relationships; spiritual; and environmental. The mean QOL score of the cases was significantly lower than that of the controls with the exception of the spiritual domain. The mean total score for women was higher than that of males in each domain and age group. Males with deformities had a significantly lower score than those with no visible deformities. Although the scores for females with deformities were also lower than those without deformities, the differences were not statistically significant. Analyses of economic status versus the QOL scores clearly showed that they were positively correlated. The study revealed that quality of life decreased progressively in leprosy-affected persons. Women had a better QOL score than men in almost every domain. Given the secondary role of women in Indian rural society, this may simply imply an acceptance of their situation. The findings are discussed in comparison with other diseases and in the context of a poor socioeconomic environment. With modern amenities, better education and higher expectations, the perception of an individual regarding his or her own quality of life is bound to change. The need for frequent assessments and further studies along these lines is emphasized. PMID:10427937

  12. Disability and quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Verbunt, Jeanine A; Pernot, Dia HFM; Smeets, Rob JEM

    2008-01-01

    Background Patients with fibromyalgia often feel disabled in the performance of daily activities. Psychological factors seem to play a pronounced disabling role in fibromyalgia. The objectives of the study are: Firstly, to investigate contributing factors for disability in fibromyalgia. Secondly, to study psychological distress in patients with fibromyalgia as compared to other nonspecific pain syndromes. And finally, to explore the impact of fibromyalgia on a patient's quality of life. Methods In this cross sectional study, explaining factors for disability were studied based on a regression analysis with gender, mental health, physical and social functioning as independent variables. For the assessment of disability in fibromyalgia the FIQ was used. The levels of psychological distress in patients with fibromyalgia, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) and chronic low back pain (CLBP) were compared based on scores on the Symptom Checklist (SCL90). Quality of life of patients with fibromyalgia was compared with scores (SF36) of both patients with fibromyalgia and other health conditions as derived from the literature. Results Disability in fibromyalgia seemed best explained by a patients mental health condition (β = -0.360 p = 0.02). The level of psychological distress was higher in patients with fibromyalgia as compared to patients with CRPS or CLBP (p < 0.01). The impact of fibromyalgia on quality of life appeared to be high as compared to the impact of other health conditions. Conclusion Patients with fibromyalgia report a considerable impact on their quality of life and their perceived disability level seems influenced by their mental health condition. In comparison with patients with other pain conditions psychological distress is higher. PMID:18211701

  13. Quality of Life After Laparoscopic Colectomy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karantanos, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: This review focuses on health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) assessment questionnaires and the influence of various parameters on HRQoL at distinct time points after laparoscopic colectomy for cancer. Methods: A PubMed electronic database literature search was conducted. Results: Twenty studies (7 prospective randomized, 5 nonrandomized, 2 retrospective, 1 matched, and 3 observational studies) used the following HRQoL tools: European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ)–C30 (8 studies), EORTC QLQ-CR38 (6 studies), EORTC QLQ-CR29 (1 study), Short Form 36 (8 studies), Gastrointestinal Quality Life Index (2 studies), EuroQoL-5D (1 study), Symptoms Distress Scale (2 studies), Quality of Life Index (2 studies), and global quality of life (1 study). Long-term beneficial effects on patient HRQoL after laparoscopic colectomy for cancer have not been clearly shown compared with “open” resections. A physical function deterioration and emotional function improvement are observed during the first month. Most patients have recovered at 12 months. Distinct HRQoL domains may be affected in older, female, and chemotherapy-treated patients. HRQoL-related parameters of pain and cosmesis have been assessed in few of the current studies on hand-assisted and single-incision laparoscopic colectomy. Conclusion: Studies' heterogeneity in terms of assessment tools and time points remains as the main obstacle to establish robust conclusions. The addition of more patients and extension of the follow-up period will improve our knowledge on HRQoL changes after laparoscopic colectomy for cancer. PMID:24960485

  14. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms of Dementia: Consent, Quality of Life, and Dignity

    PubMed Central

    Passmore, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative forms of dementia are progressive, incurable, fatal, and likely to cause suffering in conjunction with personal incapacity. Timely diagnostic disclosure and counseling can facilitate important advance care planning. The risk of harm associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) of dementia often has to be balanced against the risk of harm associated with medication management of NPS. A palliative care framework can help preserve autonomy, quality of life, comfort, and dignity for patients with NPS. PMID:23853768

  15. Mental health and quality of life in deaf pupils.

    PubMed

    Fellinger, Johannes; Holzinger, Daniel; Sattel, Heribert; Laucht, Manfred

    2008-10-01

    In the past decade, the living conditions of hearing impaired children have been changing due to new technologies and mainstreaming in schools. The majority of population-based studies in deaf pupils were conducted before these changes started to take place. The present study aimed to evaluate the current situation regarding aspects of mental health and, for the first time, quality of life in a representative sample of deaf pupils. The sample stems from a population of 145,000 pupils attending the first to ninth grades during the school years 2003-2005 in Upper Austria. From 186 children with bilateral hearing impairment of at least 40 dB registered at the centre for special education for children with sensory impairments, 99 with a performance IQ above 70 were included in the present study. Parents and teachers completed the strengths and difficulties questionnaire (SDQ), while parents and children were administered the inventory for the assessment of the quality of life in children and adolescents (ILC). Results indicated that deaf children scored significantly higher on the SDQ than their counterparts from normative samples according to both parent and teacher ratings. Differences were most marked with regard to conduct problems, emotional problems, and peer problems, and less marked for hyperactivity/inattention. While parents of deaf children had a generally positive view of their children's quality of life, deaf children provided a more complex picture, stressing areas of dissatisfaction. Mental health and quality of life were found to be unrelated to the child's degree of deafness. PMID:18810312

  16. Arts and the Perceived Quality of Life in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalos, Alex C.; Kahlke, P. Maurine

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this investigation were (1) to measure the impact of arts-related activities on the perceived quality of life of a representative sample of British Columbians aged 18 years or more in the spring of 2007, and (2) to compare the findings of this study with those of a sample of 1,027 adults drawn from five B.C. communities (Comox Valley,…

  17. [Sexual dysfunctions, psychiatric diseases and quality of life: a review].

    PubMed

    Bossini, Letizia; Fortini, Valentina; Casolaro, Ilaria; Caterini, Claudia; Koukouna, Despoina; Cecchini, Federica; Benbow, Jim; Fagiolini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Sexual dysfunctions may have a significant effect on the quality of life, but are unreported and under-diagnosed. A review of recent literature highlights the correlation between dysfunction and a decreased quality of life in people with psychiatric comorbidity, and explores several aspects impacting care, from following the patient to pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments. Sexual dysfunctions (SD) have been shown to be prevalent, but under-diagnosed and un-dertreated because of communication barriers between patients and physicians. Pharmacogenic and morbogenic causes of sexual problems are often difficult to differentiate. Psychiatric diseases may increase the risk of SD, and SD may further exacerbate psychiatric problems, suggesting a bi-directional relationship. Their effective treatment frequently involves combination of elements from psychotherapy, and behavioral along with pharmacotherapeutic intervention, if needed. The persistence of sexual problems has significant negative impact on patient's satisfaction and adherence with the treatment, quality of life and partnership. Routine assessment of sexual functioning needs to be integrated into ongoing care to identify and address problems early. If sexual dysfunction is ignored it may maintain the psychiatric disorder, compromise treatment outcome and lead to non-adherence and compromise treatment outcome. PMID:25314799

  18. [Health-related quality of life in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Cano-de la Cuerda, Roberto; Vela-Desojo, Lydia; Miangolarra-Page, Juan C; Macías-Macías, Yolanda; Muñoz-Hellin, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a disabling and progressive neurological condition characterized by multiple motor and non motor symptoms that contribute to deterioration in quality of life. The diversity of symptoms associated with the disease and its management affect the patients on their physical, social and mental quality of life. The aim of this study was to identify key dimensions of health related quality of life (HRQOL) in a population affected with Parkinson's disease with a degree of mild-moderate impairment. Thirty six patients with Parkinson were recruited. The Hoehn and Yarh scale, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rate Scale, the scale of activities of daily life and Schwab & England Get Up & Go Test were applied. HRQOL was assessed with the EuroQol-5D and the specific questionnaire Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 items. The dimensions of the PDQ-39, except the PDQ-39 Pain domain and the EuroQol-5D correlated significantly with the severity of the disease. HRQOL was correlated with the functional status of patients. Only the PDQ-39 pain domain correlated with the risk of falls. Our results suggest that the HRQOL of patients with PD, in a state of mild-moderate impairment, is strongly influenced by disease severity and functional status. PMID:21163736

  19. Counseling in Primary Care Improves Depression and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Carta, MG; Petretto, D; Adamo, S; Bhat, KM; Lecca, ME; Mura, G; Carta, V; Angermeyer, M; Moro, MF

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: To measure the effectiveness on Quality of Life of adjunctive cognitive behavioral counseling in the setting of General Practitioners (GPs) along with the treatment as usual (TAU;) for the treatment of depression. Methods: Six month-controlled trial of patients who were referred to randomly assigned GPs (four for experimental group of patients and ten for the control) was done. Experimental sample had 34 patients with DSM-IV diagnosis of Depression (Depressed Episode, Dysthymia, or Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood) receiving the TAU supplemented with counseling. Control group had 30 patients with diagnosis of Depression receiving only the TAU. Results: The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score improved in both groups. Patients in the experimental group showed greater improvement compared to the control group at T2. The World Health Organization Quality OF Life Questionnaire (WHOQOL) score also improved in the experimental group but not in the control group. The improvement in the experimental group was statistically significant in terms of both BDI and WHOQOL scores. Conclusions: Adding counseling to TAU in general medical practice settings is more effective in controlling the symptoms of depression and improving the quality of life as measured over a period of six months, than TAU alone. These results while encouraging, also calls for a larger study involving a largersample size and a longer period of time. PMID:23173011

  20. Quality of Life after Stapled Hemorrhoidopexy: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Kumar, Gopal; Jain, Bhupendra Kumar; Mohanty, Debajyoti

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The objective of the study was to assess the change in quality of life (QOL) of patients undergoing stapled hemorrhoidopexy (SH) using WHO Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire. Methods. The study sample comprised patients with symptomatic II, III, and IV degree hemorrhoids, undergoing SH. The patients were asked to complete WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire before and one month following the surgery. Result. There were 20 patients in the study group. The postoperative pain score measured by visual analogue scale at six hours postoperatively was 7.60 ± 1.23, which reduced to 0.70 ± 0.92 at 24 hours. The items in the WHOQOL-BREF had high-internal consistency or reliability as shown by high Cronbach's alpha coefficient which was 0.82 and 0.90 for pre- and postoperative questionnaires. There was significant improvement in the overall perception of QOL and health, and in physical and psychological domains. There was modest improvement in environmental domain, while no change was noted in social domain. Conclusion. SH improved the quality of life of patients treated for hemorrhoids. PMID:24058916

  1. [Impact of tooth loss in quality of life].

    PubMed

    Silva, Maria Elisa de Souza E; Villaça, Enio Lacerda; Magalhães, Cláudia Silami de; Ferreira, Efigênia Ferreira E

    2010-05-01

    In order to evaluate the impact of tooth loss in patient's quality of life, 50 volunteers were selected among patients who use the Public Health Services in treatment for their complete denture's placement or replacement. The Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) and a socio-demographic data collection were applied before treatment. The values were founded through the weight of each question in association with Likert's Scale. As higher was the score, higher was the impact in the quality of life. In this survey 82% were female, 52% of patients between 41 and 60 years old (average: 59.1), and 34% married. The higher values of OHIP-14 dimensions in patient's quality of life were: Psychological Discomfort (122), Physical Pain (121), Psychological Disability (113), Physical Disability (109), Functional Limitation (93), Handicap (82) and Social Disability (76). As it could be observed, the lost of teeth or the use of inadequate prosthesis could bring negative impacts in life's quality, especially regarding preoccupation, stress with mouth problems and shame, although people perceive minor impacts in social relationships and development of their daily activities. This information can be relevant to prepare dentists to raise their knowledge about edentulous people and how to work with them.

  2. Defining and applying the concept of quality of life.

    PubMed

    Felce, D

    1997-04-01

    Quality of life has been increasingly used as a scientific concept in literature embracing a wide range of target groups and populations as a whole. Conceptualizations vary, but there is much common ground concerning the domain content embraced by the term. Commentators are also clear that account needs to be taken of both objective life conditions and subjective personal appraisals, and the fact that what is important to each person varies. A synthesis of these perspectives provides a model of quality of life which integrates objective and subjective indicators and individual values across a broad range of life domains. Life domain issues may be categorized within six areas: physical, material, social, productive, emotional and civic well-being. Whatever its precise specification, the model is put forward as a framework for organizing measurement relevant to the quality of life concept rather than as a blueprint for deriving the ultimate single instrument. There is still a need for methodological flexibility. The pre-eminent aim is to relate the fine grain of the experience of individuals with disability to that of the wider world.

  3. The Quality of Life in Girls with Rett Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Lucia; Di Filippo, Teresa; Roccella, Michele

    2016-05-18

    Nowadays, quality of life is receiving an increasing attention in all scientific areas. Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurological development, affecting mainly females. The congenital disease affects the central nervous system, and is one of the most common causes of severe intellectual disability. The aim of our study is to evaluate the effect of RTT on the quality of life of people who are affected. Both parents of 18 subjects, all female, diagnosed with RTT, took part in the research. Quality of life was assessed using the Italian version of the Impact of Childhood Illness Scale. This scale consists of 30 questions that investigate the effect of illness on children, parents and families. For each question, the parent was asked to rate two variables: frequency and importance. Another questionnaire was administered to obtain medical history, diagnostic and therapeutic data of the persons with RTT. Our data show that RTT has a considerable impact on both the child's development and the entire family. Parents' answers demonstrated that their child's illness had consequences for the child and how the family coped with it. For this reason, attention should be directed at psychological and social aspects, as well as attitudes, manners, reactions and effects such disturbances can have on the entire family. PMID:27403274

  4. Lower Health-Related Quality of Life in Polytrauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zwingmann, Jörn; Hagelschuer, Paul; Langenmair, Elia; Bode, Gerrit; Herget, Georg; Südkamp, Norbert P.; Hammer, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although trauma-associated mortality has fallen in recent decades, and medical care has continued to improve in many fields, the quality of life after experiencing polytrauma has attracted little attention in the literature. This group of patients suffer from persisting physical disabilities. Moreover, they experience long-term social, emotional, and psychological effects that limit/lower considerably their quality of life. We analyzed retrospective data on 147 polytraumatized patients by administering written questionnaires and conducting face-to-face interviews 6 ± 0.8 years after the trauma in consideration of the following validated scores: Glasgow Outcome Scale, European Quality of Life Score, Short Form-36, Trauma Outcome Profile, and Beck Depressions Inventory II. Our analysis of these results reveals that polytraumatized patients suffer from persistent pain and functional disabilities after >5 years. We also observed changes in their socioeconomic situation, as well as psychological after-effects. The rehabilitation of this particular group of patients should not only address their physical disabilities. The psychological after-effects of trauma must be acknowledged and addressed for an even longer period of time. PMID:27175646

  5. [Supportive care, cognition and quality of life in brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, É; Taillibert, S; Blonski, M; Jouniaux Delbez, N; Delgadillo, D; Taillia, H; Auquier, P; Belin, C; Bonnetain, F; Varin, D; Tallet, A; Taillandier, L

    2015-02-01

    Brain metastases impact on the survival of the patients, but on their quality of life as well. The objective of the management of these patients is then double. Currently, due to medical advances, survivals tend to improve, especially for some tumor subtypes. During the course of the disease, different neurological signs and symptoms can be observed according to the location, the number and the volume of the metastase(s). Patients and caregivers are especially worried about the loss of autonomy and cognitive impairments. A permanent dialogue, during the course of the disease, is mandatory, in order to adapt the management to the objectives determined by the patients and the medical team. These objectives may vary according to the objective response rates of the disease to anticancer therapies, according to the impact of the disease and its management in daily living. Anticancer therapies and supportive care must be appreciated according to their impact on the survival, on the preservation of the functional independence and the quality of life of the patient, on their abilities to preserve the neurological status and delay the apparition of new neurological signs and symptoms, and their adverse events. Supportive care, cognition and quality of life should be regularly evaluated and adapted according to the objectives of the management of brain metastases patients. Different approaches are described in this paper.

  6. [Impact of tooth loss in quality of life].

    PubMed

    Silva, Maria Elisa de Souza E; Villaça, Enio Lacerda; Magalhães, Cláudia Silami de; Ferreira, Efigênia Ferreira E

    2010-05-01

    In order to evaluate the impact of tooth loss in patient's quality of life, 50 volunteers were selected among patients who use the Public Health Services in treatment for their complete denture's placement or replacement. The Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) and a socio-demographic data collection were applied before treatment. The values were founded through the weight of each question in association with Likert's Scale. As higher was the score, higher was the impact in the quality of life. In this survey 82% were female, 52% of patients between 41 and 60 years old (average: 59.1), and 34% married. The higher values of OHIP-14 dimensions in patient's quality of life were: Psychological Discomfort (122), Physical Pain (121), Psychological Disability (113), Physical Disability (109), Functional Limitation (93), Handicap (82) and Social Disability (76). As it could be observed, the lost of teeth or the use of inadequate prosthesis could bring negative impacts in life's quality, especially regarding preoccupation, stress with mouth problems and shame, although people perceive minor impacts in social relationships and development of their daily activities. This information can be relevant to prepare dentists to raise their knowledge about edentulous people and how to work with them. PMID:20464197

  7. Quality of life and coping in patients awaiting heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Muirhead, J; Meyerowitz, B E; Leedham, B; Eastburn, T E; Merrill, W H; Frist, W H

    1992-01-01

    The psychosocial adaptation of patients awaiting heart transplantation has not been defined. Forty-one patients (36 men, 5 women; mean age, 48 years) completed standardized questionnaires before transplantation to assess quality of life, physical symptoms, marital/social adjustment, psychiatric morbidity, coping, and compliance to medical regimens. Also, data were obtained from spouses/partners and the transplantation nurse coordinator. Unlike previously reported findings with patients after transplantation, those awaiting transplantation report moderate dissatisfaction with quality of life. Patients report physical symptoms, functional disabilities, sexual dysfunction, and psychological distress. Nonetheless, reported levels of compliance with the medical regimens and of social support were high, and both patients and spouses/partners provided marital adjustment ratings on the Dyadic Adjustment Scale that were comparable to those of well-adjusted, happily married couples. High levels of coping also were recorded. Having a positive attitude and seeking social support were the most common coping strategies, whereas confrontation, acceptance, and escapism were relatively uncommon. In conclusion, patients awaiting heart transplantation, although dissatisfied with quality of life, maintain positive psychological and social adjustment.

  8. The Quality of Life in Girls with Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Lucia; Di Filippo, Teresa; Roccella, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, quality of life is receiving an increasing attention in all scientific areas. Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurological development, affecting mainly females. The congenital disease affects the central nervous system, and is one of the most common causes of severe intellectual disability. The aim of our study is to evaluate the effect of RTT on the quality of life of people who are affected. Both parents of 18 subjects, all female, diagnosed with RTT, took part in the research. Quality of life was assessed using the Italian version of the Impact of Childhood Illness Scale. This scale consists of 30 questions that investigate the effect of illness on children, parents and families. For each question, the parent was asked to rate two variables: frequency and importance. Another questionnaire was administered to obtain medical history, diagnostic and therapeutic data of the persons with RTT. Our data show that RTT has a considerable impact on both the child’s development and the entire family. Parents’ answers demonstrated that their child’s illness had consequences for the child and how the family coped with it. For this reason, attention should be directed at psychological and social aspects, as well as attitudes, manners, reactions and effects such disturbances can have on the entire family. PMID:27403274

  9. Assessing Impact of Weight on Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Kolotkin, R L; Head, S; Hamilton, M; Tse, C K

    1995-01-01

    This paper is a preliminary report on the development of a new instrument, the Impact of Weight on Quality of Life (IWQOL) questionnaire, that assesses the effects of weight on various areas of life. We conducted two studies utilizing subjects in treatment for obesity at Duke University Diet and Fitness Center. The first study describes item development, assesses reliability, and compares pre- and post-treatment scores on the IWQOL. In the second study we examined the effects of body mass index (BMI), gender, and age on subjects' perceptions of impact of weight on quality of life. Results indicate adequate psychometric properties with test-retest reliabilities averaging .75 for single items, and .89 for scales. Scale internal consistency averaged .87. Post-treatment scores differed significantly from pre-treatment scores on all scales, indicating that treatment produced positive changes in impact of weight on quality of life. The results of the second study indicate that the impact of weight generally worsened as the patients' size increased. However for women there was no association between BMI and impact of weight on Self-Esteem and Sexual Life. Even at the lowest BMI tertile studied, women reported that weight had a substantial impact in these areas. There were also significant gender differences, with women showing greater impact of weight on Self-Esteem and Sexual Life compared with men. The impact of age was a bit surprising, with some areas showing positive changes and others showing no change.

  10. Ordinal logistic regression models: application in quality of life studies.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Mery Natali Silva; Siqueira, Arminda Lucia; Cardoso, Clareci Silva; Caiaffa, Waleska Teixeira

    2008-01-01

    Quality of life has been increasingly emphasized in public health research in recent years. Typically, the results of quality of life are measured by means of ordinal scales. In these situations, specific statistical methods are necessary because procedures such as either dichotomization or misinformation on the distribution of the outcome variable may complicate the inferential process. Ordinal logistic regression models are appropriate in many of these situations. This article presents a review of the proportional odds model, partial proportional odds model, continuation ratio model, and stereotype model. The fit, statistical inference, and comparisons between models are illustrated with data from a study on quality of life in 273 patients with schizophrenia. All tested models showed good fit, but the proportional odds or partial proportional odds models proved to be the best choice due to the nature of the data and ease of interpretation of the results. Ordinal logistic models perform differently depending on categorization of outcome, adequacy in relation to assumptions, goodness-of-fit, and parsimony.

  11. Social support mediates the association between benefit finding and quality of life in caregivers.

    PubMed

    Brand, Charles; Barry, Lorna; Gallagher, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    The psychosocial pathways underlying associations between benefit finding and quality of life are poorly understood. Here, we examined associations between benefit finding, social support, optimism and quality of life in a sample of 84 caregivers. Results revealed that quality of life was predicted by benefit finding, optimism and social support. Moreover, the association between benefit finding and quality of life was explained by social support, but not optimism; caregivers who reported greater benefit finding perceived their social support be higher and this, in turn, had a positive effect on their overall quality of life. These results underscore the importance of harnessing benefit finding to enhance caregiver quality of life.

  12. Assessment of Quality of Life of Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gavric, Zivana; Vukovic-Kostic, Zivana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women in 145 countries worldwide, and the success of healthcare for women with this disease is measured with the quality of life of survivors. The aim of this study was to examine how the breast cancer affects the quality of life and in what dimension of health quality of life is the least accomplished. Method: A pilot research had been performed in the period from June 10 to August 15 2011, on 100 women from Association of women with breast cancer “Iskra” in Banja Luka, aged 20-75. The survey research was based on the EORTC QLQ-C30 version 3.0 and questionnaire for assessment of quality of life of those suffering from breast cancer QLQ-BR23 with 53 questions in total. Results: The average age of women in research was 51.8 years (±11.23). Statistically important differences (χ24=221.941; p<0.01) are higher mean values of the score for the functional scale, (66.32±17.82) cognitive functions (63.50±28.00) in relation to functional role (46.83±20.88), social (37.00±27.58) and emotional (36.58 ±25.15) functioning. Mean values of the score for the symptoms scale were statistically higher for symptoms such as fatigue, insomnia and pain in relation to other symptoms. Mean values of the score for body image scale are statistically higher in relation to mean values of the score of sexual functions and enjoyment scale, and the scale for grading the future perspectives. Conclusion: Breast cancer affects all the domains of the quality of life, and in our population it is the most prominent in domains of emotional and social functions, as well as role functions. Symptoms of fatigue, insomnia and pain have the most importance influence on these domains. PMID:27157152

  13. Quality of life in patients with food allergy.

    PubMed

    Antolín-Amérigo, Darío; Manso, Luis; Caminati, Marco; de la Hoz Caballer, Belén; Cerecedo, Inmaculada; Muriel, Alfonso; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mercedes; Barbarroja-Escudero, José; Sánchez-González, María José; Huertas-Barbudo, Beatriz; Alvarez-Mon, Melchor

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy has increased in developed countries and can have a dramatic effect on quality of life, so as to provoke fatal reactions. We aimed to outline the socioeconomic impact that food allergy exerts in this kind of patients by performing a complete review of the literature and also describing the factors that may influence, to a greater extent, the quality of life of patients with food allergy and analyzing the different questionnaires available. Hitherto, strict avoidance of the culprit food(s) and use of emergency medications are the pillars to manage this condition. Promising approaches such as specific oral or epicutaneous immunotherapy and the use of monoclonal antibodies are progressively being investigated worldwide. However, even that an increasing number of centers fulfill those approaches, they are not fully implemented enough in clinical practice. The mean annual cost of health care has been estimated in international dollars (I$) 2016 for food-allergic adults and I$1089 for controls, a difference of I$927 (95 % confidence interval I$324-I$1530). A similar result was found for adults in each country, and for children, and interestingly, it was not sensitive to baseline demographic differences. Cost was significantly related to severity of illness in cases in nine countries. The constant threat of exposure, need for vigilance and expectation of outcome can have a tremendous impact on quality of life. Several studies have analyzed the impact of food allergy on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in adults and children in different countries. There have been described different factors that could modify HRQL in food allergic patients, the most important of them are perceived disease severity, age of the patient, peanut or soy allergy, country of origin and having allergy to two or more foods. Over the last few years, several different specific Quality of Life questionnaires for food allergic patients have been developed and translated to different

  14. Quality of life in patients with food allergy.

    PubMed

    Antolín-Amérigo, Darío; Manso, Luis; Caminati, Marco; de la Hoz Caballer, Belén; Cerecedo, Inmaculada; Muriel, Alfonso; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mercedes; Barbarroja-Escudero, José; Sánchez-González, María José; Huertas-Barbudo, Beatriz; Alvarez-Mon, Melchor

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy has increased in developed countries and can have a dramatic effect on quality of life, so as to provoke fatal reactions. We aimed to outline the socioeconomic impact that food allergy exerts in this kind of patients by performing a complete review of the literature and also describing the factors that may influence, to a greater extent, the quality of life of patients with food allergy and analyzing the different questionnaires available. Hitherto, strict avoidance of the culprit food(s) and use of emergency medications are the pillars to manage this condition. Promising approaches such as specific oral or epicutaneous immunotherapy and the use of monoclonal antibodies are progressively being investigated worldwide. However, even that an increasing number of centers fulfill those approaches, they are not fully implemented enough in clinical practice. The mean annual cost of health care has been estimated in international dollars (I$) 2016 for food-allergic adults and I$1089 for controls, a difference of I$927 (95 % confidence interval I$324-I$1530). A similar result was found for adults in each country, and for children, and interestingly, it was not sensitive to baseline demographic differences. Cost was significantly related to severity of illness in cases in nine countries. The constant threat of exposure, need for vigilance and expectation of outcome can have a tremendous impact on quality of life. Several studies have analyzed the impact of food allergy on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in adults and children in different countries. There have been described different factors that could modify HRQL in food allergic patients, the most important of them are perceived disease severity, age of the patient, peanut or soy allergy, country of origin and having allergy to two or more foods. Over the last few years, several different specific Quality of Life questionnaires for food allergic patients have been developed and translated to different

  15. Quality of life in children with cerebral palsy: implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Kim-Michelle; Davis, Elise; Reddihough, Dinah; Graham, Kerr; Waters, Elizabeth

    2014-08-01

    The ability to assess the quality of life of children with cerebral palsy to inform and evaluate individual care plans, service planning, interventions, and policies is crucial. In this article, the recent evidence on quality of life in children with cerebral palsy is reviewed, with attention to the determinants of quality of life and role of this construct as a practical outcome indicator in clinical trials. Quality of life measurement advances for children with cerebral palsy are discussed with a focus on condition-specific quality of life measures, particularly, the Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life-Child, which is the first condition-specific quality of life measure for children with cerebral palsy. The article presents an overview for clinicians and researchers intending to use quality of life measures on children with cerebral palsy and provides recommendations for future research that will better inform practice in the field.

  16. Quality of Life in Survivors of Peripartum Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Koutrolou-Sotiropoulou, Paraskevi; Lima, Fabio Vasconcelos; Stergiopoulos, Kathleen

    2016-07-15

    Little data exist with regard to the effect of peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) on quality of life. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of PPCM on quality of life and emotional well-being. We sought to determine the feasibility of using social media to perform quality of life research. We conducted a study using a survey distributed to established members of "Peripartum Cardiomyopathy Survivors" support group on the social networking site Facebook. A total of 116 women completed the survey (age 36 ± 6.4 years; 91% white, 75% married, 46% college educated), with 4.9 ± 0.5 years (range 0.02 to 24 years) since the initial diagnosis. Most women (41%) never returned to their baseline level of activity, and 28% discontinued their job because of the diagnosis. Most respondents (56%) were not limited or only slightly limited by heart failure symptoms over the past 2 months. Most respondents (56%) never returned to their baseline emotionally after the diagnosis of PPCM, and most patients (73%) were dissatisfied with their current level of heart failure symptoms. Most patients (67%) felt discouraged frequently (more than several times per month) because of heart failure. Only 26% of women were satisfied with the counseling they received from their providers. The emotional and physical burden of PPCM on young mothers with PPCM years after the diagnosis is striking. Identifying strategies that promote better emotional health and potential treatment strategies may be required. PMID:27239023

  17. Effect of lung cancer surgery on quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Win, T; Sharples, L; Wells, F; Ritchie, A; Munday, H; Laroche, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: Health related quality of life (HRQOL) after surgery is important, although very limited data are available on the QOL after lung cancer surgery. Methods: The effect of surgery on HRQOL was assessed in a prospective study of 110 patients undergoing potentially curative lung cancer surgery at Papworth Hospital, 30% of whom had borderline lung function as judged by forced expiratory volume in 1 second. All patients completed the EORTC QLQ-C30 and LC13 lung cancer module before surgery and again at 1, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Results: On average, patients had high levels of functioning and low levels of symptoms. Global QOL had deteriorated significantly 1 month after surgery (p = 0.001) but had returned to preoperative levels by 3 months (p = 0.93). Symptoms had worsened significantly at 1 month after surgery but had returned to baseline levels by 6 months. Low values on the preoperative HRQOL scales were not significantly associated with poor surgical outcome. However, patients with low preoperative HRQOL functioning scales and high preoperative symptom scores were more likely to have poor postoperative (6 months) QOL. The only lung function measurement to show a marginally statistically significant association with quality of life at 6 months after surgery was percentage predicted carbon monoxide transfer factor (TLCO). Conclusion: Although surgery had short term negative effects on quality of life, by 6 months HRQOL had returned to preoperative values. Patients with low HRQOL functioning scales, high preoperative symptom scores, and preoperative percentage predicted TLCO may be associated with worse postoperative HRQOL. PMID:15741442

  18. Quality of life in Croatian metastatic melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Dubravcić, Iva Dumbović; Brozić, Jasmina Marić; Aljinović, Ana; Sindik, Josko

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the quality of life (QoL) in 40 Croatian metastatic melanoma patients who had completed at least first-line treatment and to see if there was a correlation between QoL parameters and serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). LDH levels were measured and all patients clinically examined between April and September 2013. Two QoL questionnaires were used for patient self-evaluation: the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the Dartmouth Primary Care Cooperative Research Network and the World Organization of National Colleges, Academies, and Academic Associations of General Practitioners/Family Physicians (COOP/WONCA) charts. The average EORTC QLQ-C30 score for global health status (GHS) was 41.204. The average scores for functional scales were high, with the exception of emotional functioning (65.02). Blood LDH levels positively correlated with the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) status (r = 0.415; p < 0.01) and pain (r = 0.345; p < 0.05), but not with any functional or COOP/WONCA scores. Global health status (GHS) positively correlated with patient age at the time of evaluation (r = 0.386; p < 0.05) and age at the time when metastatic disease had been diagnosed (r = 0.366; p < 0.05). Quality of life for the studied group of metastatic melanoma patients in Croatia can be considered generally good, with the exception of emotional functioning and symptoms of fatigue, dispnoea, insomnia, and financial difficulties. PMID:24851599

  19. Disability and quality of life in spina bifida and hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Cate, Ineke M Pit-ten; Kennedy, Colin; Stevenson, Jim

    2002-05-01

    This study examined the impact of severity and type of condition and family resources on quality of life in children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus. A national UK sample of children aged between 6 and 13 years with spina bifida (n=62), hydrocephalus (n=354), and spina bifida plus hydrocephalus (n=128) were identified via the register of the Association for Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus (ASBAH). Parents completed standardized measures of Child Health Related Quality Of Life (CQOL), family needs survey (FNS), and caregiving self-efficacy scale (CSES) as well as questions on children's health and physical ability. Results showed there were no significant differences in the overall quality of life for the three disability conditions. The overall CQOL was over 1 SD lower for those with spina bifida and hydrocephalus than for children with other physical conditions. Sex and age were not related to overall CQOL. Specific aspects of CQOL differentiated the three groups. Children with spina bifida had poorer CQOL scores on self-care, continence, and mobility/activities whilst those with hydrocephalus had poorer scores on school activities, worries, sight, and communication. Severity of condition and family resources, i.e. CSES and FNS, predicted 32% of the variance in CQOL. Associations were also found between overall CQOL and problems discernible at birth as well as epilepsy. Other factors, including those related to shunts, were not significantly related to CQOL. It was concluded that hydrocephalus is just as great a threat to CQOL as spina bifida. Beyond the general effect of condition severity on CQOL, family resources (as measured by the CSES and FNS) represent an additional influence on CQOL.

  20. Quality of life in children with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Rabbett, H; Elbadri, A; Thwaites, R; Northover, H; Dady, I; Firth, D; Hillier, V F; Miller, V; Thomas, A G

    1996-12-01

    In a 10-week randomised cross-sectional study we used an 88-item questionnaire to assess the quality of life in 16 children (ages 8-17 years) with Crohn's disease and their families. The questionnaire covered six domains of health-related quality of life, including disease and its treatment, social, emotional, family, education, and future aspects. Crohn's disease affected education, with absenteeism in 12 and distraction during school work in six. Three children had had a home tutor, and five stated their need for one. Engaging in sports was a problem for eight children, mainly because of a lack of energy in five and the presence of a stoma in three children. Three children had missed every PE lesson in 1 year. Five children cited the social problem of being unable to stay over at friends' houses. Bullying concerned parents more than the children. Holiday difficulties included long distance traveling or lack of toilet facilities during school trips. Elemental diet was the preferred treatment, although the majority complained about the taste. Surgery was the most effective method of symptom control, though the resulting stoma was upsetting and restricted sports activities. Children on steroids had more depressive symptoms. Using the Rutter A Questionnaire, five children were designated "neurotic." Parents' views of the severity of symptoms significantly correlated with their children's views regarding rectal bleeding, poor growth, lack of energy, and poor appetite (p < 0.01). The main parental concerns were the side effects of medications and issues concerning their children's future, including schooling, job prospects, and marriage. The parents of 11 children cited problems with children's behaviour. The parents of seven cited disruption of work, and those of six named taking holidays. Crohn's disease in children, in addition to being a symptomatically disabling condition, has a great impact on the health-related quality of life of both sufferers and their parents

  1. Burden and quality of life of caregivers for hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Belasco, Angelica G; Sesso, Ricardo

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the characteristics of caregivers of chronic hemodialysis patients, assess their perceived burden and health-related quality of life, and investigate factors influencing this burden. We studied 100 hemodialysis patients and their respective primary caregivers for more than 4 months, measuring quality of life by the Medical Outcomes Survey 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Subjective burden on caregivers was assessed by the Caregiver Burden scale (score range, 1 to 4; higher values indicate a greater effect). The majority of caregivers were women (84%), married (66%), with a mean age of 46 +/- 2 (SE) years, and of low socioeconomic level. Their main types of relationship with patients were wives (38%) and sons or daughters (27%). Caregiver Mental Health and Vitality were the most affected emotional dimensions on the SF-36 (mean scores, 64.4 +/- 1.8 and 66.6 +/- 1.7, respectively). Mean score of total burden experienced was 2.07 +/- 0.05. Multiple regression analysis showed that independent and significant predictors of burden were Mental Health of the caregiver (R2 = 24%), Vitality of the patient (R2 = 10%), type of relationship of the caregiver (female spouse) (R2 = 5%), and Pain of the caregiver (R2 = 3%). Caregivers of hemodialysis patients may experience a significant burden and an adverse effect on their quality of life. Emotional aspects of caregivers (particularly female spouses) and patients are important predictors of burden. Social support and psychological interventions should be considered to improve caregiver life and patient outcomes. PMID:11920347

  2. Quality of life in patients with oculocutaneous albinism*

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Marcus; Volpini, Beatrice Mussio Fornazier; dos Santos, Gabriela Alves; Rujula, Maria Josefa Penon

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The social reality of the albino needs to be more studied in Brazil, as myths and social segregation regarding this illness are likely to be found in the country, with psychosocial and medical implications. OBJECTIVE As this subject has not been referenced in previous scientific articles in Brazil, this research intends to evaluate the quality of life of the albinos that treated at our medical institution. METHODS The quality of life was evaluated through the WHOQOL-BREF. Furthermore, two aspects of main relevance in the lives of the albinos were also objects of research, low vision and skin cancer. The sample consisted of forty oculocutaneous albinos and a control group of forty healthy individuals, matched by sex and age. RESULTS Among the participants, 57.7% were between 18 and 40 years old, 28.2% were between 41 and 60, and 14.1% were over 60. 42.1% had skin cancer before the study, 18.4% had skin cancer during the study and 89.5% stated visual deficit. The results obtained in the questionnaires showed a statistically significant difference in the physical domain, with P < 0.001. CONCLUSION Low vision combined with skin lesions and social stigma may contribute to disturbances in the quality of life of oculocutaneous albinos. The results presented in this study demonstrated the vulnerability of the affected individuals and the special care required by those patients, at the same time that the need for further research is highlighted in order to better elucidate the aspects related to albinism. PMID:26375220

  3. Welfare, Quality of Life, and Euthanasia of Aged Horses.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Catherine M; Ireland, Joanne L

    2016-08-01

    Duration of ownership strengthens the human-horse bond, affecting decision-making about the horse's welfare, quality of life (QoL), and euthanasia. Most owners consider their geriatric horses to have good or excellent QoL; however, increasing age is negatively associated with QoL. Management factors are important. The most common reasons for euthanasia include musculoskeletal disorders or lameness, colic, and nonspecific chronic diseases. The decision to euthanize is difficult, so the advice of the veterinarian and QoL are important. This article focuses on the human-horse bond, assessment of QoL, reasons for euthanasia, and owner experiences of mortality. PMID:27449393

  4. Quality of life for families with spina bifida in Kenya.

    PubMed

    van't Veer, Toos; Meester, Hanneke; Poenaru, Dan; Kogei, Agnes; Augenstein, Kimberly; Bransford, Richard

    2008-07-01

    Spina bifida (SB) affects children worldwide. Studies from developed nations have explored the impact of SB on the quality of life of children and their parents. However, there are no such studies available from developing countries. We have therefore undertaken to document the impact of the disability on the families of affected children in Kenya. A questionnaire was administered to 40 mothers and their children, who were receiving treatment for SB at our institution. The results of this study should indicate where community and governmental resources and educational efforts for the disabled should be directed.

  5. Health-related quality of life in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    1999-12-01

    This month's question addressed something that many of us perhaps still have not formally incorporated into clinical practice, although we all are interested in our patients' health-related quality of life and want our inventions to result in improvements within this area. This view is exemplified by the response from Australia, which is one of several similar, unpublished, replies from the International Panel on this month's question (others came from Germany and Sweden). As mentioned in the introduction, health-related quality of life is becoming increasingly important as an outcome measure in clinical trials of new therapeutic interventions and several new measures have been and are developed. It is interesting and encouraging to hear about the new developments within this area that are being made by neuroscience nurses in different countries and within different subspecialties around the globe. As reported from the International Panel in here, new HRQL measures are currently developed in Canada and the UK focusing on patients with brains injuries and Huntington's disease (HD), respectively. In contrast to most established measures, the Canadian study has primarily been aimed at the positive aspects of life and not merely absence of the negative ones. Steve Smith in the UK has recently started developing a scale for use in clinical management of patients with HD. As far as I have been able to determine, this is the first measure of this kind to be developed for HD. Anyone who would like to know more about Steve's work or take part thereof is encouraged to contact him at this address above. Despite the fact that there already are several HRQL measures available, there is still a need for new instruments reflecting new aspects of health and disease. In addition, tools need to be designed for challenging conditions not readily addressed by existing measures. The replies from Canada and the UK represent these needs. It will be very interesting to eventually take

  6. Validation of Italian multiple sclerosis quality of life 54 questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Solari, A.; Filippini, G.; Mendozzi, L.; Ghezzi, A.; Cifani, S.; Barbieri, E.; Baldini, S.; Salmaggi, A.; Mantia, L. L.; Farinotti, M.; Caputo, D.; Mosconi, P.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Health related quality of life (HRQOL) inventories are multi-dimensional measures of patient-centred health status developed for clinical research. The MS quality of life 54 (MSQOL-54) is an MS-specific HRQOL inventory originally devised for English speaking patients. It consists of a core measure, the 36-item short form health survey (SF-36) previously adapted into Italian, and 18 additional items exploring domains relevant to patients with MS (MS-18 module). The authors translated and culturally adapted into Italian the MS-18 module of the MSQOL-54 questionnaire, and clinically validated the whole questionnaire.
METHODS—The MS-18 module was translated following the methodology of the International Quality of Life Assessment (IQOLA) project. The MSQOL-54 was validated in 204 consecutive patients with MS seen between April and September 1997 at three participating centres. The questionnaire was explained by the physician who also administered the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) and mini mental status scale examination, and the patient filled in the MSQOL-54 and Beck depression inventory questionnaires (BDI), with assistance if required. The contribution of impairments and disabilities to MSQOL-54 scores were assessed, and mean scores were compared with normative data for the general Italian population, and with the original sample of United States MS patients.
RESULTS—The mean age of the 204 patients was 42 years; mean EDSS score was 4.5 (range 0-8.5). Patients' participation in the assessment was satisfactory, and all scales satisfied the usual psychometric standards. The characteristics of the United States sample matched those of our patients in all but gender (72% United States patients v 52% Italian patients were women), and education (90% United States patients and 44% Italian patients completed high school); MSQOL-54 profiles were also similar. The EDSS was significantly associated with the physical health composite but not with

  7. Quality of life and alternate nightly nocturnal home hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Van Eps, Carolyn L; Jeffries, Janine K; Johnson, David W; Campbell, Scott B; Isbel, Nicole M; Mudge, David W; Hawley, Carmel M

    2010-01-01

    Hemodialysis has been associated with reduced quality of life (QOL). Small cohort studies of quotidian hemodialysis regimens suggest general QOL and dialysis-related symptoms may improve compared with conventional regimens. An observational cohort study was conducted on 63 patients (age 51.7 +/- 12.9 years; 79.4% male; 33.3% diabetes; duration of renal replacement therapy 1.9 [0.7-6.4] years) converted from conventional home hemodialysis (3-5 sessions weekly, 3-6 h/session) to home nocturnal home hemodialysis (NHD) (3-5 sessions weekly, 6-10 h/session). Kidney Disease Quality of Life (KDQOL) and Assessment of Quality of Life instruments and 6-minute-walk tests were applied at baseline and 6 months. Baseline and 6 month surveys were returned by 70% of patients. On KDQOL, significant improvements in general health (P=0.02) and overall health ratings (P=0.0008), physical function (P=0.003), physical role (P=0.018), and energy and fatigue (P=0.027) were documented. There was a trend toward improvement in burden of kidney disease (P=0.05) and emotional role (P=0.066). There was a significant improvement in distance covered in the 6-minute-walk test from 513 m (420.5-576.4) to 536.5 m (459-609), P=0.007. On Assessment of Quality of Life, there was a trend toward improvement in overall utility score from 0.65 (0.39-0.81) to 0.73 (0.46-0.86), P=0.096. After 86.2 patient-years of observation, 23 patients have discontinued NHD (12 transplanted, 5 deceased, 4 psychosocial problems, 1 dialysis access problem, 1 medically unsuitable). Nocturnal home hemodialysis is a sustainable therapy. In addition to improving general QOL, alternate nightly NHD can significantly improve physical functioning as measured by KDQOL and 6-minute-walk tests.

  8. The Impact of Crime Victimization on Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Rochelle F.; Sawyer, Genelle K.; Begle, Angela M.; Hubel, Grace S.

    2010-01-01

    The authors review the extant literature examining the functional impact of crime victimization on indices of quality of life. They present findings within a conceptual framework comprised of role functioning, life satisfaction, and well-being, and social–material conditions, including crime-related medical, mental health, and employer costs, and health care utilization. The review indicates that crime victimization impacts multiple domains, including parenting skills, impaired occupational functioning, higher rates of unemployment, and problematic intimate relationships. However, data on relationships between crime victimization and overall life satisfaction were mixed, suggesting the need for further investigation. The authors conclude with a brief discussion of directions for future research. PMID:20419728

  9. Pediatric Coccidioidomycosis Patients: Perceptions, Quality of Life and Psychosocial Factors

    PubMed Central

    Gaab, Erin Mary; Naeem, Fouzia

    2015-01-01

    Research investigating the effects of coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) on children and the psychosocial implications of this disease in general is lacking. This study reviews what is known about pediatric coccidioidomycosis patients. It documents the psychological functioning, quality of life, and illness perceptions of a sample of coccidioidomycosis patient families. Primary caregivers of pediatric patients and patients from a major hospital in the San Joaquin Valley of California were interviewed regarding their perceptions of disease detection, access to care and the patient/family experience. PMID:27417796

  10. Health-related quality of life in pituitary diseases.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Iris; Valassi, Elena; Santos, Alicia; Webb, Susan M

    2015-03-01

    In the last 15 years, worse health-related quality of life (QoL) has been reported in patients with pituitary diseases compared with healthy individuals. Different QoL questionnaires have shown incomplete physical and psychological recovery after therapy. Residual impairments often affect QoL even long-term after successful treatment of pituitary adenomas. In this article, knowledge of factors that affect QoL in pituitary diseases is reviewed. The focus is on 5 pituitary diseases: Cushing syndrome, acromegaly, prolactinomas, nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas, and hypopituitarism.

  11. Quality-of-life assessment techniques for veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Alice E

    2011-05-01

    The revised veterinary oath commits the profession to the prevention and relief of animal suffering. There is a professional obligation to properly assess quality of life (QoL) and confront the issues that ruin it, such as undiagnosed suffering. There are no clinical studies in the arena of QoL assessment at the end of life for pets. This author developed a user-friendly QoL scale to help make proper assessments and decisions along the way to the conclusion of a terminal patient's life. This article discusses decision aids and establishes commonsense techniques to assess a pet's QoL.

  12. Quality of life assessment in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Irvine, E J

    2004-05-01

    Health related quality of life (HRQoL) is determined by both disease and non-disease related factors. Several studies have reported significant HRQoL impairment in GORD patients compared with the general population. Disease severity correlates strongly with HRQoL. Non-disease features, such as the presence of anxiety and comorbid conditions, also negatively impact on HRQoL. Combining a generic and disease specific instrument may avoid missing unexpected outcomes and ensure recognition of all clinically important changes. Full validation of assessment tools is critical. Long term, as well as short term, evaluation is important and is critical when undertaking comparative pharmacoeconomic evaluations.

  13. Impact of hyperhidrosis on quality of life and its assessment.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Henning

    2014-10-01

    Hyperhidrosis is an embarrassing condition that may interfere with routine activities, cause emotional distress, and disturb both professional and social lives of patients. Objective examination is variable and unreliable, so efforts have been made in the last 15 years to substantiate the limitations of these patients, especially in primary focal hyperhidrosis. Almost all therapeutic studies use standardized or self-designed instruments to evaluate the impact of the disease on quality of life and the improvement achieved by treatment. This article gives an overview of the difficulties with which patients with hyperhidrosis are confronted and of research investigating the restrictions.

  14. Tools for evaluating oral health and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Bettie, Nirmal F.; Ramachandiran, Hari; Anand, Vijay; Sathiamurthy, Anusha; Sekaran, Preethi

    2015-01-01

    The seven dimensions of quality of life are required for a healthy living. Any impairment or disability affects any one or more of these dimensions resulting in functional impairment or handicap, which indicates the presence of disease. The success of any oral treatment depends on how far the individual is relieved of his disease process. Relief of symptoms provides patient comfort and enable functional activities. This well-being is considered as a measure of oral health and reflects patient satisfaction. This article presents various instruments or tools available in the form of a questionnaire that estimates patient satisfaction and thereby oral health. PMID:26538889

  15. Quality of Life for Young Adults with Severe Intellectual Disability: Mothers' Thoughts and Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Laura Lee; Kraemer, Bonnie R.; Blacher, Jan; Simmerman, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Thirty mothers of transition-aged young adults (18-24 years) with severe intellectual disability were interviewed regarding their son or daughter's quality of life. All mothers completed the standardised Quality of Life Questionnaire and responded to several open-ended questions to further delineate quality of life for their child. Mothers were…

  16. Quality of Life and Motivation to Learn: A Study of Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, Marcus; Krageloh, Christian; Hawken, Susan; Zhao, Yipin; Doherty, Iain

    2010-01-01

    There is growing literature in the area of medical students' quality of life. As far as we know, no qualitative studies have investigated the links between students' quality of life issues and their motivation to learn. The key question that drove the present study was: Is there a correlation between students' quality of life and their motivation…

  17. Apparent Quality-of-Life in Nations: How Long and Happy People Live

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veenhoven, Ruut

    2005-01-01

    Quality-of-life in nations can be measured by how long and happy people live. This is assessed by combining data on life expectancy drawn from civil registration with survey data on subjective enjoyment of life as a whole. This measure of "apparent" quality-of-life is a good alternative to current indexes of "assumed" quality-of-life such as the…

  18. Prospective relationships of physical activity with quality of life among colorectal cancer survivors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical activity can enhance quality of life for cancer survivors. However, few longitudinal studies have examined whether physical activity has a sustained effect on improvements in quality of life. The present study aims to examine the relationships between physical activity and quality of life o...

  19. Asthma severity in children and the quality of life of their parents.

    PubMed

    Cerdan, Noelle S; Alpert, Patricia T; Moonie, Sheniz; Cyrkiel, Dianne; Rue, Shona

    2012-08-01

    This study examines the effect of asthma severity of children aged 7-17 years and sociodemographic characteristics on the caregiver's quality of life. For parents of asthmatic children, there was a negative correlation between overall asthma severity and quality-of-life score. Measuring parental quality of life enables the development of effective asthma programs.

  20. Agreement in Quality of Life Assessment between Adolescents with Intellectual Disability and Their Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golubovic, Spela; Skrbic, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual disability affects different aspects of functioning and quality of life, as well as the ability to independently assess the quality of life itself. The paper examines the agreement in the quality of life assessments made by adolescents with intellectual disability and their parents compared with assessments made by adolescents without…

  1. Quality of Life in Autism across the Lifespan: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Heijst, Barbara F. C.; Geurts, Hilde M.

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a lifelong neurodevelopmental disorder, with a known impact on quality of life. Yet the developmental trajectory of quality of life is not well understood. First, the effect of age on quality of life was studied with a meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis included 10 studies (published between 2004 and 2012) with a combined sample size of…

  2. Examining the Factor Structure and Hierarchical Nature of the Quality of Life Construct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Mian; Schalock, Robert L.; Verdugo, Miguel A.; Jenaro, Christina

    2010-01-01

    There is considerable debate in the area of individual quality of life research regarding the factor structure and hierarchical nature of the quality of life construct. Our purpose in this study was to test via structural equation modeling an a priori quality of life model consisting of eight first-order factors and one second-order factor. Data…

  3. Internet Communication versus Face-to-Face Interaction in Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Paul S. N.; Leung, Louis; Lo, Venhwei; Xiong, Chengyu; Wu, Tingjun

    2011-01-01

    This study seeks to understand the role of the Internet in quality of life (QoL). Specifically, it examines the question of whether Internet communication serves, like face-to-face interactions, to enhance quality of life. It is hypothesized that the use of the Internet for interpersonal communication can improve quality of life among Internet…

  4. A Predictor of Quality of Life of the Mainstreamed Elementary Students: Cognitive Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odaci, Hatice; Kalkan, Melek; Karasu, Pinar

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the cognitive errors as predictor of quality of life of mainstreamed elementary students. Quality of life is the degree of well-being felt by an individual. The functional deficiencies, which occur due to physical, cognitive, sensory, emotional disorders, affect the quality of life of the individuals. In this…

  5. The Quality of Life of Young Men with Asperger Syndrome: A Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennes-Coussens, Marieke; Magill-Evans, Joyce; Koning, Cyndie

    2006-01-01

    Factors influencing quality of life for persons with Asperger syndrome are not yet understood. Men, ages 18 to 21, completed the World Health Organization Quality Of Life measure, the Perceived Support Network Inventory, and a semi-structured interview. Asperger syndrome affects quality of life beyond the obvious social impact. The 12 men with…

  6. Quality of Life in College Students with and without Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaedi, Gholam Hossein; Tavoli, Azadeh; Bakhtiari, Maryam; Melyani, Mahdieh; Sahragard, Mahdi

    2010-01-01

    Prior studies demonstrating quality of life impairment in phobia and anxiety disorders have relied upon epidemiological samples or clinical data. Using the same quality of life scale, the Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36), in Iranian college students allowed us to study the impact of social phobia (SP) on quality of life among the college…

  7. Quality of Life Variables Assessment, Before and After Pancreatoduodenectomy (PD): Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Arvaniti, Μaria; Danias, Νikolaos; Theodosopoulou, Εleni; Smyrniotis, Vassilis; Karaoglou, Μ.; Sarafis, Pavlos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The treatment of pancreatic cancer is a complex problem, due to late diagnosis, the need for specialized surgical treatment, the large number of relapses and poor survival. Objective: To evaluate the quality of life of patients with periampulary pancreatic cancer before and after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD). Material and Method: The sample was collected in the “Attikon” University General Hospital (Chaidari). It consists of 20 subjects with a mean age of 65.9 years (SD = 10,2 years). For the quality of life measurement, we used the (EORTC) QLQ-C30 version 3.0., as well as the EORTC QOL-PAN26. Results: From the sample of 20 patients who participated, full data were collected for 18 of them during the first month, 17 during the third month and 16 during the sixth month. Regarding symptoms, as they were recorded with the QLQ-30 questionnaire, there was a significant increase of fatigue, a significant reduction of pain and constipation, while economic difficulties increased. As for the mean and median values for the dimensions of the PAN-26 questionnaire during monitoring, there was a significant decrease in pancreatic and liver pain symptoms during follow-up, while the gastrointestinal symptoms increased in frequency. In addition, the body image and sexuality worsened. Conclusions: The surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer with pancreatoduodenectomy (PD), according to the early survey data using the (EORTC) QLQ-C30 version3.0, and the EORTC QOL-PAN26 questionnaires, seems to have a favorable impact on quality of life, as evidenced by the improvement of most parameters evaluated during the study period. PMID:26755486

  8. Telehealth: Acceptability, clinical interventions and quality of life in peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Vishal; Jones, Audrey; Spalding, Elaine M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Telehealth technologies are being widely adopted across the globe for management of long-term conditions. There are limited data on its use, effectiveness and patient experience in end-stage renal disease. The aim of this pilot project was to explore patient acceptability of technology and evaluate its effect on clinical interventions and quality of life in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. Methods: Peritoneal dialysis patients were provided with computer tablets (PODs). PODs contained a knowledge database with treatment- and symptom-based questionnaires that generated alerts for the clinical team. Alerts were reviewed daily and followed up by a telephone call or clinic visit. Interventions were at the discretion of clinicians. Data were recorded prospectively and quality of life and Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology questionnaires evaluated at the start and end of the programme. Results: In all, 22 patients have participated over 15 months. The mean age was 61.6 years and PODs were utilised for an average of 341.9 days with 59.1% choosing to continue beyond the study period. We received a total of 1195 alerts with an average of 2.6 alerts per day. A total of 36 admissions were avoided and patients supported to self-manage on 154 occasions. Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology scores remained high throughout the programme although no improvement in quality of life was seen. Discussion: Telehealth is useful to monitor patients with renal failure on peritoneal dialysis. It is acceptable across age groups and provides an additional resource for patients to self-manage. Satisfaction scores and retention rates suggest a high level of acceptability. PMID:27757228

  9. Quality of life following third molar removal under conscious sedation

    PubMed Central

    Sancho-Puchades, Manuel; Berini-Aytés, Leonardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess quality of life (QoL) and degree of satisfaction among outpatients subjected to surgical extraction of all four third molars under conscious sedation. A second objective was to describe the evolution of self-reported pain measured in a visual analogue scale (VAS) in the 7 days after extraction. Study design: Fifty patients received a questionnaire assessing social isolation, working isolation, eating and speaking ability, diet modifications, sleep impairment, changes in physical appearance, discomfort at suture removal and overall satisfaction at days 4 and 7 after surgery. Pain was recorded by patients on a 100-mm pain visual analogue scale (VAS) every day after extraction until day 7. Results: Thirty-nine patients fulfilled correctly the questionnaire. Postoperative pain values suffered small fluctuations until day 5 (range: 23 to 33 mm in a 100-mm VAS), when dicreased significantly. A positive association was observed between difficult ranked surgeries and higher postoperative pain levels. The average number of days for which the patient stopped working was 4.9. Conclusion: The removal of all third molars in a single appointment causes an important deterioration of the patient’s QoL during the first postoperative week, especially due to local pain and eating discomfort. Key words:Third molar removal, quality of life, sedation. PMID:22926461

  10. Factors influencing quality of life in breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Vacek, Pamela M; Winstead-Fry, Patricia; Secker-Walker, Roger H; Hooper, Gloria J; Plante, Dennis A

    2003-08-01

    Longitudinal data from 195 breast cancer survivors were used to identify factors affecting the level and rate of change in quality of life after completion of treatment. Women were interviewed up to four times at approximately yearly intervals using Kaplan and Bush's Quality of Well Being instrument (QWB). Random coefficient regression analysis was used to model QWB as a function of time since diagnosis and personal characteristics. QWB scores decreased over time and the rate of decline increased with age (p = 0.032). This was similar to declines in women with benign breast biopsies, but overall QWB levels were lower in women with breast cancer. Having a spouse tended to slow the rate of decline in breast cancer survivors (p = 0.004). The presence of comorbidity was associated with significantly lower QWB levels (p = 0.037) but did not affect the rate of change over time. Education, family history of breast cancer, cancer stage and treatment modalities were not significantly related to QWB levels or rates of change. Breast cancer survivors experience a reduction in quality of life that persists for years after treatment and is similar in magnitude to that associated with other health problems.

  11. Predictors of quality of life in inpatients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, Koichiro; Morinobu, Shigeru; Yamashita, Hidehisa; Takahashi, Terumichi; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2012-05-30

    Shortening hospital stays has become a key focus in psychiatric care in recent years. However, patients with schizophrenia account for about 60% of inpatients in psychiatry departments in Japan. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between quality of life (QOL) and key indicators for long-term hospital stays among schizophrenia inpatients. A further aim was to elucidate the clinical determinants of QOL among long-stay inpatients. The study sample consisted of 217 inpatients with schizophrenia. Age, duration of illness, duration of hospitalization, years of education, body mass index, neurocognitive function, drug-induced extrapyramidal symptoms, involuntary movements, psychiatric symptoms, and dose equivalents of antipsychotics and anticholinergic agents were used as index factors. Pearson linear correlation and regression analyses were performed to examine the associations between QOL and the above-mentioned factors. Negative symptoms, psychological discomfort, and resistance as rated on the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) were correlated with all subscale scores of the Japanese version of the Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale (JSQLS). Stepwise regression showed that negative symptoms, psychological discomfort, and resistance predicted the dysfunction of psycho-social activity score and the dysfunction of motivation and energy score on the JSQLS. This study shows that active treatment for negative symptoms, psychological discomfort, and resistance should be recommended to improve QOL among inpatients with schizophrenia.

  12. [Quality of life following renal transplantation in childhood].

    PubMed

    Wingen, A M; Feldhoff, C

    1999-01-01

    The goal of renal transplantation is to achieve the best possible quality of life in patients with terminal renal failure. To evaluate some aspects of quality of life in patients with renal grafts during childhood of our center, data on medical, educational and professional rehabilitation were collected retrospectively. Between 1972 and 1997 135 renal transplantations had been performed in 123 patients below the age of 18 years. 12-year graft survival of patients transplanted before 1983 figured at 21% and rose to 62% during the following years, after introduction of cyclosporine A into the immunosuppressive regimen. The proportion of patients in the respective age group attending a secondary school (16%) was lower and of those attending elementary school (71%) or a school for disabled and handicapped children (11%) was higher than usual in the German population. But, 83% of all patients reached a school degree. After school 78% proceeded with a vocational training or university. 89% of patients completing professional training were employed at last observation as compared to only 60% of those who never finished a professional training. Renal replacement therapy starting already during the early phase of education is difficult to coordinate with normal schooling. Considering these health- and time-related obstacles, the degree of educational and professional rehabilitation of the patients is good. But, there is a need for special support accompanying educational and professional training. PMID:10209838

  13. Quality of life issues for South Africans with acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Mosam, A; Vawda, N B; Gordhan, A H; Nkwanyana, N; Aboobaker, J

    2005-01-01

    The adverse effects of acne on the psyche have been established in patients from 'first world' countries. There has been no in depth study in predominantly black patients from Africa addressing this issue. This was a prospective cross-sectional study of acne patients attending a dermatology unit in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. A questionnaire was completed and acne graded by the Global Acne Grading scale. Psychological morbidity and quality of life (QOL) were assessed by the General Health Questionnaire and Dermatology Specific Quality of Life Questionnaires, respectively. We found that clinical severity was not associated with patient perception or psychological distress. The QOL measures such as feelings, social activities, performance at work or school, activities of daily living and overall mental health were found to be associated with distress with associated P-values of 0.0002, 0.0168, 0.0032, 0.033 and < 0.0001, respectively. The severity of acne was not associated with psychological distress. Painful and bleeding lesions were associated with distress levels; P = 0.042 and P = 0.019, respectively. In conclusion, South African patients with acne vulgaris suffer significant psychological distress, which affects the quality of their lives. PMID:15663491

  14. Oral health related quality of life in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Rokhsareh; Taleghani, Ferial; Farhadi, Sareh

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Diabetic patients display an increased risk of oral disorders, and oral health related quality of life (OHRQL) might affect their management and treatment modalities. The aim of the present study was to determine OHRQL and associated parameters in patients with diabetes. Materials and methods. In this study two hundred patients were recruited from the diabetes clinic in Mustafa Khomeini Hospital in Tehran, Iran. OHRQL was assessed using Oral Health Impact Profile Questionnaire (OHIP-20). Also, another questionnaire was designed which contained questions regarding participants' knowledge about oral complications of diabetes and oral health behavior. OHRQL was categorized as low and good. Data were analyzed using logistic regression at P = 0.05. Results. Of the diabetic patients assessed, 77.5% were in good and 22.5% were in low categories of OHRQL. This quality was significantly associated with age (OR = 4.03, 95% CI = 1.63-11.29), knowledge about diabetes oral complications (OR = 18.17 95% CI = 4.42-158.6), educational level (OR = 26.31 95% CI = 4.2-1080.3), referred for dental visit by physician (OR = 3.16 95% CI = 1.48-6.69), frequency of brushing (OR = 10.29 95% CI = 3.96-31.2) and length of time diagnosed with diabetes (OR = 6.21 95% CI = 2.86-13.63). Conclusion. Oral health related quality of life was not negatively affected by diabetes mellitus in the assessed sample. PMID:25587385

  15. Quality of life and cognitive deficits after subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hütter, B O; Gilsbach, J M; Kreitschmann, I

    1995-01-01

    In a retrospective study of 58 patients after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) with a late result either good (GOS = I) or fair (GOS = II), patients were examined 1-5 years after the acute event for their quality of life including a neuropsychological examination. Cognitive deficits were found in visual short-term memory (46%) and in the three parameters of a reaction-time task ranging from 31 to 65%. Further deficits were found in verbal long-term memory (28%), concentration (5-13%) and language (11%). The quality of life was reduced in the SAH patients according to a self-rating scale in motivation (50%), interests (47%), mental capacity (47%), free-time activities (52%), social relationships (39%), concentration (70%), fine motor co-ordination (25%) and sleep (47%). A further 77% of the patients reported more frequent headaches since their SAH. Depression was found in 30% of the SAH patients. Life-satisfaction was significantly reduced in 37%, whereas 48% of the SAH patients suffered from increased emotional lability and in 41% motivation was significantly reduced. Negative job consequences like loss of job or demotion were reported by 16% of the patients investigated and an additional 15% had been retired. PMID:7576273

  16. Importance of Quality of Life for Adherence to Sublingual Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Eberle, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nonperception of efficacy ranks among the most commonly cited causes for nonadherence to sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT). Quality of life (QoL) in patients is a determining factor influencing adherence. We investigated QoL and adherence separately in SLIT patients at one pediatric practice in Germany. Methods. We conducted a noninterventional, cross-sectional, retrospective, quality-of-life survey among pediatric patients treated with SLIT. QoL was assessed using the generic SF-12 health survey in German. The items contained in the SF-12 health survey are weighted, added up, and converted to obtain a physical component score (PCS) and a mental component score (MCS). Each component score ranges from 0 to 100; the higher the score, the better the QoL perceived. Results. 201 surveyed patients who had undergone SLIT showed PCS-12 of 49.3 (± 7.0) and MCS-12 of 52.6 (± 7.2). These figures correlate strongly with those reported for the German general population (n = 2453): PCS-12 of 49.6 (± 8.7) and MCS-12 of 52.3 (± 8.0). 70.2% (73) of 104 patients were adherent at this practice. Conclusions. QoL in the SLIT patients surveyed here appears as good as that of the general population. Adherence to SLIT at this practice was remarkably better than that reported elsewhere. PMID:27504453

  17. Quality of Life in the Trastuzumab for Gastric Cancer Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Yung-Jue; Gotovkin, Evgeny A.; Hamamoto, Yasuo; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Moiseyenko, Vladimir M.; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Van Cutsem, Eric; Al-Sakaff, Nedal; Urspruch, Alexa; Hill, Julie; Weber, Harald A.; Chung, Hyun-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    Background. The Trastuzumab for Gastric Cancer phase III trial demonstrated that combining trastuzumab with chemotherapy significantly improved overall survival compared with chemotherapy alone in HER2-positive advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer. We report health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and quality-adjusted time without symptoms of disease or toxicity (Q-TWiST) results from this trial. Patients and Methods. Patients were randomized to receive six cycles of chemotherapy given every 3 weeks (capecitabine or fluorouracil, plus cisplatin) either alone or combined with administration of trastuzumab every 3 weeks until disease progression. At each clinical visit, HRQoL was assessed using two European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaires, QLQ-C30 and QLQ-STO22. Q-TWiST methodology was applied retrospectively using the clinical data and utility coefficients. Results. Trastuzumab plus chemotherapy prolonged time to 10% definitive deterioration in all QLQ-C30 and QLQ-STO22 scores, including QLQ-C30 global health status versus chemotherapy alone, from 6.4 months to 10.2 months. In addition, trastuzumab plus chemotherapy extended Q-TWiST by 2.42 months compared with chemotherapy alone. Conclusion. Compared with chemotherapy alone, trastuzumab plus chemotherapy prolongs time to deterioration of HRQoL and increases quality-adjusted survival in patients with HER2-positive gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer. PMID:24951609

  18. Quality of life in burn patients in Greece.

    PubMed

    Stampolidis, N; Castana, O; Nikiteas, N; Vlasis, K; Koupidis, S A; Grammatikopoulos, I A; Mantzari, E; Pallantzas, A; Kourakos, P; Papadopoulos, O

    2012-12-31

    The Burn Specific Health Scale - Brief (BSHS-B) is one of the most commonly used instruments for the evaluation of quality of life after burn injury. It can be self-administered, and it is useful in evaluating psychopathological symptoms in burn victims. The aim of this study was to translate and culturally adapt the BSHS-B into Greek, assessing its internal consistency and validity. The cultural adaptation included forward and backward translation, reconciliation, and a pilot study. The Greek version was administered to a sample of 40 adult burn victims admitted to our Burn Centre. Internal consistency was verified using Cronbach's alpha, and construct validity was evaluated through correlation with the Short Form of Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36) using Spearman analysis. The Cronbach alpha coefficient of the questionnaire's total score was 0.954, demonstrating that the internal consistency of the Greek version was very high. The test-retest coefficient using kappa correlation was 0.830 (p < 0.001). Significant correlations were identified between BSHS-B subscales and the SF-36 subscales - Physical and Social Functioning, and Emotional Role. Despite the limited size of the sample, the Greek version of the BSHS-B shows good reliability and construct validity and can be used in clinical practice for further evaluations of burn patients' quality of life.

  19. Does arthroscopic subacromial decompression improve quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Whiteman, A; Wilson, J; Paul, E; Roy, B

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There has been a significant rise in the volume of subacromial decompression surgery performed in the UK. This study aimed to determine whether arthroscopic subacromial decompression improves health related quality of life in a cost effective manner. Methods Patients undergoing arthroscopic subacromial decompression surgery for impingement were enrolled between 2012 and 2014. The Oxford shoulder score and the EQ-5D™ instruments were completed prior to and following surgery. A cost–utility analysis was performed. Results Eighty-three patients were eligible for the study with a mean follow-up duration of 15 months (range: 4–27 months). The mean Oxford shoulder score improved by 13 points (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11–15 points). The mean health utility gain extrapolated from the EQ-5D™ questionnaire improved by 0.23 (95% CI: 0.16–0.30), translating to a minimum cost per QALY of £5,683. Conclusions Subacromial decompression leads to significant improvement in function and quality of life in a cost effective manner. This provides justification for its ongoing practice by appropriately trained shoulder surgeons in correctly selected patients. PMID:26263808

  20. Dietary phosphorus in bone health and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Eiji; Yamamoto, Hironori; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Taketani, Yutaka

    2012-06-01

    Awareness of phosphorus intake is important because both phosphorus deficiency and overloading impair bone health and quality of life. Phosphorus consumption is increasing in many countries. Most dietary phosphorus is contained in protein-rich foods such as meat, milk, cheese, poultry, fish, and processed foods that contain phosphate-based additives to improve their consistency and appearance. Elevation of extracellular phosphorus levels causes endothelial dysfunction and medial calcification, which are closely associated with the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Long-term excessive phosphorus loading, even if it does not cause hyperphosphatemia, can be a risk factor for CVD. In epidemiological studies, higher levels of phosphorus intake have been associated with reduced blood pressure. Interestingly, when examined further, phosphorus from dairy products, but not from other sources, was usually associated with lower blood pressure. A dietary approach to phosphorus reduction is particularly important to prevent bone impairment and CVD in patients with chronic kidney disease. In order to improve bone health and quality of life in the general population, the impact of phosphorous, including in processed foods, should be considered, and measures to indicate the amount of phosphorous in food products should be implemented.

  1. The Relationship Between Focused Attention Meditation Practice Habits, Psychological Symptoms, and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Bilican, F Isil

    2016-12-01

    This study examined the relationship between focused attention meditation practice habits, psychological symptoms, and quality of life. The participants were 30 adults from New York, NY, practicing Ananda Marga spirituality. They were administered the Symptom Check List-90-R and the Quality of Life Index. The findings pointed out while Ananda Marga meditation practice habits were not associated with improvements in psychological symptoms, longer years in meditation practice was associated with improvements in overall, social and psychological/spiritual quality of life. Longer periods of meditation practice per session were related to lower levels of overall quality of life and economic quality of life.

  2. Health-related quality of life in patients with melanoma: overview of instruments and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Janice N; Cromwell, Kate D; Ross, Merrick I

    2012-04-01

    The increasing public health burden of melanoma warrants evaluation of quality-of-life outcomes and the instruments most commonly used to measure quality of life in patients with melanoma. A review of the published literature focusing on quality-of-life outcomes in melanoma patients was performed to appraise the instruments used for assessment and the significant findings. In general, generic instruments continue to be most commonly used in the evaluation of quality of life despite the lack of responsiveness to changes in quality of life in subsets of patients. Cancer-specific and melanoma-specific instruments may be more suited for longitudinal clinical assessments.

  3. How Can We Best Assess the Quality of Life of People with Dementia? The Bath Assessment of Subjective Quality of Life in Dementia (BASQID)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trigg, Richard; Skevington, Suzanne M.; Jones, Roy W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The study aim was to develop a measure of self-reported quality of life (QoL) for people with mild to moderate dementia based on their views--the Bath Assessment of Subjective Quality of Life in Dementia (BASQID). Design and Methods: We developed the measure through multiple stages. Two field tests of the measure (ns = 60 and 150)…

  4. Quality of Life Impairment in Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Social Phobia, and Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Terri L.; Norton, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Interest in the assessment of quality of life in the anxiety disorders is growing. The present study examined quality of life impairments in individuals with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), Social Phobia, and Panic Disorder. Results showed that individuals with these disorders reported less satisfaction with their quality of life than non-anxious adults in the community. However, the degree of quality of life impairment is similar across these three disorders. Additionally, comorbid depression, but not anxiety, was found to negatively impact quality of life in these individuals. Finally, diagnostic symptom severity was not found to influence quality of life, indicating that subjective measures of quality of life offer unique information on the effects of anxiety disorders. PMID:19640675

  5. Cultural and contextual analysis of quality of life among older Nepali women.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Srijana; Zarit, Steven H

    2012-06-01

    The quality-of-life construct can be used to assess how well an individual's needs are met or being met by the society. However, in the dominant narratives of quality of life in old age, exploration of the impact of cultural differences on how older adults define and assess their quality of life has been limited. Moreover, the examination of heterogeneity within one culture and its influence on quality of life has been largely ignored. The present study compares the quality of life as defined by two samples of Nepali elderly women, those who live with their families and those who live in an old-age home, and presents data on factors associated with quality of life in the two samples. The results show that social and cultural norms, informed by religious principles that prescribe familial elder care, impact how quality of life is described by both groups of women.

  6. Dietary fat intake and quality of life: the SUN project

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies have related nutritional factors with quality of life in healthy populations. The purpose of the study was to assess whether dietary fat intake is associated to mental and physical quality of life. Methods This analysis included 8,430 participants from the SUN (Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra) Project. The intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), trans unsaturated fatty acids (TFA), and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) was assessed through a 136-item food frequency questionnaire at baseline. Quality of life was measured with the SF-36 Health Survey after 4 years of follow-up. Generalized Linear Models were fitted to assess the regression coefficients (b) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the 8 domains of the SF-36 according to successive quintiles of each kind of fatty acids intake. Results The multivariate-adjusted models revealed a significant inverse association for SFA intake (in quintiles) and two of the physical domains (physical functioning and general health). E.g. for general health domain: (highest quintile of intake (Q5) vs. lowest quintile (Q1), b = -1.6; 95% CI = -3.1, -0.1. General health also showed a dose-response relationship (p for trend < 0.05). For TFA intake (in quintiles), a significant inverse association was found for most of the mental domains (vitality, social functioning and role emotional). E.g. for vitality domain (Q5) vs. (Q1), b = -2.0, 95% CI = -3.4 to -0.6. We also found an inverse association between TFA intake and the bodily pain domain: (Q5 vs. Q1), b = -2.6; 95% CI = -4.4 to -0.8, with a statistically significant dose-response relationship (p for trend < 0.05). Except for TFA intake and the mental domains, the rest of the associations were attenuated when we repeated the analysis adjusting for adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Conclusions A detrimental relationship between TFA intake at baseline and most of the SF-36 mental domains measured 4 years

  7. The Roles of Embedded Monitoring Requests and Questions in Improving Mental Models of Computer-Based Scientific Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathorn, Lesley G.; Rawson, Katherine A.

    2012-01-01

    Prior research has shown that people are likely to skim information presented digitally with the resultant deleterious effect on accurate mental models of the text. Teaching monitoring strategies and presenting text with adjunct questions are effective strategies for improving the mental models of readers of scientific text, but the two strategies…

  8. Thalassaemia in children: from quality of care to quality of life.

    PubMed

    Amid, Ali; Saliba, Antoine N; Taher, Ali T; Klaassen, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Over the past few decades, there has been a remarkable improvement in the survival of patients with thalassaemia in developed countries. Availability of safe blood transfusions, effective and accessible iron chelating medications, the introduction of new and non-invasive methods of tissue iron assessment and other advances in multidisciplinary care of thalassaemia patients have all contributed to better outcomes. This, however, may not be true for patients who are born in countries where the resources are limited. Unfortunately, transfusion-transmitted infections are still major concerns in these countries where paradoxically thalassaemia is most common. Moreover, oral iron chelators and MRI for monitoring of iron status may not be widely accessible or affordable, which may result in poor compliance and suboptimal iron chelation. All of these limitations will lead to reduced survival and increased thalassaemia-related complications and subsequently will affect the patient's quality of life. In countries with limited resources, together with improvement of clinical care, strategies to control the disease burden, such as public education, screening programmes and appropriate counselling, should be put in place. Much can be done to improve the situation by developing partnerships between developed countries and those with limited resources. Future research should also particularly focus on patient's quality of life as an important outcome of care.

  9. Older People’s Quality of Life and Role of Home-Based Technology

    PubMed Central

    Mckee, Kevin; Matlabi, Hossein; Parker, Stuart G

    2012-01-01

    Background: Household devices may have a positive impact on daily lives by reducing the burden of several tasks and enriching social interaction. There are varieties of assistive devices such as alarms, sensors, detectors, and life style monitoring devices, which can help in compensating for the activity limitations caused by impairments. This study aimed to review the contribution that residential technology devices can make to older people’s lives. Methods: An open-ended literature review following the guidance of the Centre for Review and Dissemination was conducted to establish the current understanding of the topics by using clear and appropriate criteria to select or reject studies. The studies entered into the review were limited by language, topic, and date of publication. Results: The research literature indicated that residential facilities which appropriately are designed and supplied can have many benefits for older people such as increasing in-dependence, maximising physical and mental health, and improving their quality of life. Conclusion: Although most of the literature has explored the positive effects of technology devices on older adults’ social networks, independence, psychological well-being, and social status, the possibilities of negative consequences have been neglected. Keywords: Quality of life, Older people, Residential technology, Computer-mediated communication PMID:24688912

  10. Oral testosterone undecanoate (Andriol) supplement therapy improves the quality of life for men with testosterone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Park, N C; Yan, B Q; Chung, J M; Lee, K M

    2003-06-01

    In a single-blind, placebo-controlled study, the effects of a 3-month oral administration of 160 mg/day testosterone undecanoate (Andriol) on the quality of life of men with testosterone deficiency were evaluated. The subjects included ten men with primary hypogonadism and 29 with andropause with sexual dysfunction as the most common problem. The changes in subjective symptoms were evaluated by the PNUH QoL scoring system and the St. Louis University Questionnaire for androgen deficiency in aging males (ADAM). Digital rectal examination (DRE) was performed and serum testosterone, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and liver profile were monitored. Testosterone undecanoate treatment (n = 33) significantly improved sexual dysfunction and symptom scores of metabolic, cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal and gastrointestinal functions compared to baseline and to placebo (n = 6). ADAM score also significantly improved after 3 months of treatment. Serum testosterone was significantly increased compared to pretreatment levels only in the testosterone undecanoate group. In the placebo group, no significant changes compared to baseline were found for testosterone levels and QoL questionnaires. No abnormal findings were detected on DRE or laboratory findings in either group. Adverse events, such as gastrointestinal problems and fatigue, were mild and self-limiting. It is concluded that androgen supplement therapy with oral testosterone undecanoate (Andriol) restores the quality of life through improvement of general body functions in men with testosterone deficiency. PMID:12898792

  11. Mood disorders and quality of life in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Podfigurna-Stopa, Agnieszka; Luisi, Stefano; Regini, Cristina; Katulski, Krzysztof; Centini, Gabriele; Meczekalski, Blazej; Petraglia, Felice

    2015-06-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 5-10% of the population of women. The exact etiology of PCOS remains unclear, but it is believed to result from complex interactions between genetic, behavioral and environmental factors. The spectrum of its symptoms such as hirsutism, skin problems, obesity and finally infertility has a huge negative impact on the individuals' psychological and interpersonal functioning. PCOS symptoms can lead to significant deterioration in quality of life and be highly stressful negatively affecting psychological well-being and sexuality. Fear symptoms like palpitation, being out of breath and tension might be caused by many somatic diseases. Moreover, detection and continuous thinking about illness can lead to significant negative impact on individual functioning in society. PCOS may be a factor potentially favoring the occurrence of mood disorders and depression. Biological, social and psychological consequences of PCOS among women of reproductive age are opening a new perspective on management of women's health in these patients.

  12. Quality of life after liver transplantation: State of the art

    PubMed Central

    Onghena, Louis; Develtere, Wouter; Poppe, Carine; Geerts, Anja; Troisi, Roberto; Vanlander, Aude; Berrevoet, Frederik; Rogiers, Xavier; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Verhelst, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) after deceased donor liver transplantation is increasingly recognized as a major outcome parameter. We reviewed recent publications in this rapidly evolving field in order to summarize recent achievements in the field and to define opportunities and perspectives for research and improvement of patient care. QoL does improve after liver transplantation according to a typical pattern. During the first year, there is a significant improvement in QoL. After one year, the improvement does stabilise and tends to decline slightly. In addition to the physical condition, different psychological parameters (such as depression, anxiety, sexual function) and sociodemographic elements (professional state, sex, marital state) seem to impact QoL. Opportunities for further research are the use of dedicated questionnaires and identification of influencing factors for QoL. PMID:27366301

  13. Measurement of quality of life in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Kaasa, S

    1992-01-01

    Information on patients' quality of life (QOL) will give a more comprehensive evaluation of the treatment outcome than only measures of tumour response and survival. Psychosocial indicators have rarely been used in clinical trials. This may in part be explained by physicians' lack of familiarity with these measures, methodological insufficiency and a basic philosophical reason, i.e., most doctors tend to focus on curative treatment and not on palliative treatment. A series of QOL questionnaires has been validated in the last decade for use in cancer clinical trials. Selection of the optimal method in the given trial is important. The trial ought to be designed so the proportion of missing data is low. QOL should be used as an end point in selective trials with an optimal study design and with a study coordinator who is willing to collect QOL data.

  14. Quality of life and anxiety and depressive disorder comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Norberg, Melissa M; Diefenbach, Gretchen J; Tolin, David F

    2008-12-01

    The present investigation evaluated the relations among anxiety and depressive disorder comorbidity and quality of life (QOL) by utilizing self-report measures of life satisfaction and functional disability. Participants were 94 individuals who were presented for treatment at an outpatient anxiety disorders clinic and 26 nonclinical participants. Results indicated that participants diagnosed with anxiety disorders reported lower QOL than did nonclinical participants. Anxiety disorder comorbidity did not additionally impact QOL; however, presence of a depressive disorder comorbid with an anxiety disorder did negatively impact QOL as these individuals reported significantly more functional disability and less life satisfaction than did individuals with anxiety disorders alone or those without a psychiatric diagnosis. These results highlight the negative nature of anxiety disorders and improve clarification on the role of diagnostic comorbidity on QOL among those with an anxiety disorder.

  15. Exercise and quality of life: strengthening the connections.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Eileen

    2009-02-01

    Exercise improves quality of life (QOL) in people with cancer. Most oncology healthcare providers recognize the statement to be true because the research literature provides strong support for the physical and psychological benefits of exercise. Because the terms exercise, QOL, and people with cancer have different meanings, the contextual connections in which they are used are important to understanding the relationship between exercise and QOL in people with cancer. This article explores the links between exercise and QOL in people with cancer and examines issues that impact the development, implementation, and evaluation of exercise programs for people with cancer. Issues related to exercise goal development, exercise prescription, exercise testing, exercise adherence, and methods to evaluate the efficacy of exercise in relation to QOL are discussed.

  16. Estimating sign-dependent societal preferences for quality of life.

    PubMed

    Attema, Arthur E; Brouwer, Werner B F; l'Haridon, Olivier; Pinto, Jose Luis

    2015-09-01

    This paper is the first to apply prospect theory to societal health-related decision making. In particular, we allow for utility curvature, equity weighting, sign-dependence, and loss aversion in choices concerning quality of life of other people. We find substantial inequity aversion, both for gains and losses, which can be attributed to both diminishing marginal utility and differential weighting of better-off and worse-off. There are also clear framing effects, which violate expected utility. Moreover, we observe loss aversion, indicating that subjects give more weight to one group's loss than another group's gain of the same absolute magnitude. We also elicited some information on the effect of the age of the studied group. The amount of inequity aversion is to some extent influenced by the age of the considered patients. In particular, more inequity aversion is observed for gains of older people than gains of younger people. PMID:26263893

  17. Estimating sign-dependent societal preferences for quality of life.

    PubMed

    Attema, Arthur E; Brouwer, Werner B F; l'Haridon, Olivier; Pinto, Jose Luis

    2015-09-01

    This paper is the first to apply prospect theory to societal health-related decision making. In particular, we allow for utility curvature, equity weighting, sign-dependence, and loss aversion in choices concerning quality of life of other people. We find substantial inequity aversion, both for gains and losses, which can be attributed to both diminishing marginal utility and differential weighting of better-off and worse-off. There are also clear framing effects, which violate expected utility. Moreover, we observe loss aversion, indicating that subjects give more weight to one group's loss than another group's gain of the same absolute magnitude. We also elicited some information on the effect of the age of the studied group. The amount of inequity aversion is to some extent influenced by the age of the considered patients. In particular, more inequity aversion is observed for gains of older people than gains of younger people.

  18. Automatic quality of life prediction using electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Pakhomov, Sergeui; Shah, Nilay; Hanson, Penny; Balasubramaniam, Saranya; Smith, Steven A; Smith, Steven Allan

    2008-11-06

    Health related quality of life (HRQOL) is an important variable used for prognosis and measuring outcomes in clinical studies and for quality improvement. We explore the use of a general pur-pose natural language processing system Metamap in combination with Support Vector Machines (SVM) for predicting patient responses on standardized HRQOL assessment instruments from text of physicians notes. We surveyed 669 patients in the Mayo Clinic diabetes registry using two instruments designed to assess functioning: EuroQoL5D and SF36/SD6. Clinical notes for these patients were represented as sets of medical concepts using Metamap. SVM classifiers were trained using various feature selection strategies. The best concordance between the HRQOL instruments and automatic classification was achieved along the pain dimension (positive agreement .76, negative agreement .78, kappa .54) using Metamap. We conclude that clinicians notes may be used to develop a surrogate measure of patients HRQOL status.

  19. Quality of Life in Glaucoma: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Luciano; Riva, Ivano; Gerardi, Chiara; Oddone, Francesco; Floriano, Irene; Konstas, Anastasios G P

    2016-06-01

    The ultimate goal of glaucoma management is the preservation of patients' visual function and quality of life (QoL). The disease itself as well as the medical or surgical treatment can have an enormous impact on a patient's QoL. Even the mere diagnosis of a chronic, irreversible, potentially blinding disorder can adversely affect the patient's sense of well-being and QoL by eliciting significant anxiety. Patients with primary open-angle glaucoma rarely present with visual symptoms, at least early in the course of the disease. A better understanding of patient-reported QoL can improve patient-physician interaction and enhance treatment adherence by customizing treatment options based on individual patient profile, thus optimizing long-term prognosis. These aspects are summarized and critically appraised in this article. PMID:27138604

  20. Use, misuse and abuse of questionnaires on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Joyce, C R

    1995-09-01

    Questionnaires quantify formal aspects of unidirectional communication. This definition indicates the major limitations of research based on such techniques: it will be unbalanced and restrictive, and therefore incomplete. The wide use of questionnaires is often unavoidable in medical and scientific research, yet they are often developed with insufficient attention to the needs that they are intended to meet. Their design may be imperfect even in relatively straightforward circumstances such as the reporting of laboratory observations, but inappropriate as well as imperfect in others, such as the study of individual quality of life. This concept and others related to it are defined, together with some major sources of error in questionnaire development and use. Steps that can be taken to improve the situation are also mentioned. PMID:7494744

  1. Quality of life after percutaneous coronary intervention: part 1.

    PubMed

    Cassar, Stephen; R Baldacchino, Donia

    Quality of life (QOL) is a complex concept comprised of biopsychosocial, spiritual and environmental dimensions. However, the majority of research addresses only its physical function perspectives. This two-part series examines the holistic perspective of QOL of patients after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Part 1 explains the research process of a cross-sectional descriptive study and its limitations. Data were collected by a mailed WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire in Maltese from a systematic sample of patients who had undergone PCI; the response rate was 64% (n=228; males n=169, females n=59, age 40-89 years). Part 1 also considers limitations, such as its cross-sectional design and retrospective data collection. The hierarchy of human needs theory (Maslow, 1999) guided the study. Part 2 gives the findings on the holistic view of QOL. Having social and family support, as a characteristic of Maltese culture appeared to contribute towards a better QOL. PMID:23123651

  2. Mood disorders and quality of life in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Podfigurna-Stopa, Agnieszka; Luisi, Stefano; Regini, Cristina; Katulski, Krzysztof; Centini, Gabriele; Meczekalski, Blazej; Petraglia, Felice

    2015-06-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 5-10% of the population of women. The exact etiology of PCOS remains unclear, but it is believed to result from complex interactions between genetic, behavioral and environmental factors. The spectrum of its symptoms such as hirsutism, skin problems, obesity and finally infertility has a huge negative impact on the individuals' psychological and interpersonal functioning. PCOS symptoms can lead to significant deterioration in quality of life and be highly stressful negatively affecting psychological well-being and sexuality. Fear symptoms like palpitation, being out of breath and tension might be caused by many somatic diseases. Moreover, detection and continuous thinking about illness can lead to significant negative impact on individual functioning in society. PCOS may be a factor potentially favoring the occurrence of mood disorders and depression. Biological, social and psychological consequences of PCOS among women of reproductive age are opening a new perspective on management of women's health in these patients. PMID:26204044

  3. Quality of life before and after cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bensoussan, Jean-Charles; Bolton, Michael A; Pi, Sarah; Powell-Hicks, Allycin L; Postolova, Anna; Razani, Bahram; Reyes, Kevin; IsHak, Waguih William

    2014-08-01

    This article reviews the literature regarding the impact of cosmetic surgery on health-related quality of life (QOL). Studies were identified through PubMed/Medline and PsycINFO searches from January 1960 to December 2011. Twenty-eight studies were included in this review, according to specific selection criteria. The procedures and tools employed in cosmetic surgery research studies were remarkably diverse, thus yielding difficulties with data analysis. However, data indicate that individuals undergoing cosmetic surgery began with lower values on aspects of QOL than control subjects, and experienced significant QOL improvement post-procedurally, an effect that appeared to plateau with time. Despite the complexity of measuring QOL in cosmetic surgery patients, most studies showed an improvement in QOL after cosmetic surgery procedures. However, this finding was clouded by measurement precision as well as heterogeneity of procedures and study populations. Future research needs to focus on refining measurement techniques, including developing cosmetic surgery-specific QOL measures.

  4. Organ Damage and Quality of Life in Antiphospholipid Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alba, P; Gómez-Puerta, J A; Goycochea-Robles, M V; Amigo, M C

    2016-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) affects young patients in the most productive years of their life, and the consequences of organic or tissue damage involve a decrease in health-related quality of life (HRQoL). While acute disease manifestations of APS are well known, information on the long-term prognosis and damage in affected patients is still very limited. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients would be expected to experience long-term complications and even die as a consequence of APS. Organ damage in APS has been evaluated using different methods and definitions, including the SLICC/ACR Damage Index (SDI), which tend to underestimate aPL-related damage. A new damage index in APS has been proposed (DIAPS), and it seems to be more accurate than SDI. Given the implications for morbidity and mortality, it is imperative to assess accurately aPL-related damage and HRQoL in patients with APS.

  5. Health-related quality of life assessment in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Meers, C; Singer, M A

    1996-01-01

    Assessment of biochemical responses to therapy is routine in the management of patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). Assessment of health-related quality of life (HRQOL), however, is less common. Previous research indicates that HRQOL is a meaningful indicator that should be integrated into clinical practice. HRQOL is longitudinally evaluated in in-centre hemodialysis patients using the RAND 36-item Health Survey 1.0. Caregivers incorporate scores from this instrument into their assessment of patient functioning and well-being. HRQOL scores can be utilized to evaluate responses to changes in therapy, and to direct clinical decision-making, adding an important dimension to holistic, quality care for ESRD patients. PMID:8900807

  6. Clean intermittent self-catheterisation: improving quality of life.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Sue; Steggal, Martin; Tinhunu, Juliana

    Clean intermittent self-catheterisation (CISC) is often a treatment option for women with urinary incontinence, particularly those with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. When used for appropriate patients it has been shown to promote continence and improve quality of life. There are a range of different products available on prescription for patients and many have been designed specifically with women in mind. Curan Lady is a new catheter that has recently been added to the UK NHS Drug Tariff. Patients suffering from limited/restricted mobility in their hands, found the Curan Lady easy to open and use. CISC can promote privacy and dignity for women with urinary incontinence and patient choice regarding product selection is important. Nurses need to keep up to date with new product availability for patients in order to offer choice to women performing CISC.

  7. Quality of life after percutaneous coronary intervention: part 1.

    PubMed

    Cassar, Stephen; R Baldacchino, Donia

    Quality of life (QOL) is a complex concept comprised of biopsychosocial, spiritual and environmental dimensions. However, the majority of research addresses only its physical function perspectives. This two-part series examines the holistic perspective of QOL of patients after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Part 1 explains the research process of a cross-sectional descriptive study and its limitations. Data were collected by a mailed WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire in Maltese from a systematic sample of patients who had undergone PCI; the response rate was 64% (n=228; males n=169, females n=59, age 40-89 years). Part 1 also considers limitations, such as its cross-sectional design and retrospective data collection. The hierarchy of human needs theory (Maslow, 1999) guided the study. Part 2 gives the findings on the holistic view of QOL. Having social and family support, as a characteristic of Maltese culture appeared to contribute towards a better QOL.

  8. Pain recurrence: a quality of life issue in endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Damario, M A; Rock, J A

    1995-09-01

    Studies reveal endometriosis to be present in 38-51% of women undergoing laparoscopy for chronic pelvic pain. Symptoms attributable to endometriosis include dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, generalized pelvic pain, dyschezia, and radiation of pain to the back or leg. Psychological factors may also contribute to a more intense pain experience. Medical therapy provides symptom relief in 72-93% of patients, although recurrence is common following treatment discontinuation. Surgical therapy has had varying results for long-term pain relief; adequacy of the initial surgical treatment appears to be a critical factor. Important adjunctive measures include presacral neurectomy and excisional techniques to remove deep, fibrotic, retroperitoneal lesions. The quality of life of women with endometriosis will improve with greater focus on achieving the long-term relief of pelvic pain. Limitation of pain recurrence would benefit the patient greatly, by providing symptom relief and preventing the cycle of its probably adverse effects on physical activity, work productivity, sexual fulfilment, and mood.

  9. The terminal quality of life and passive or active euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Daikos, G K

    1990-01-01

    The problems presented by the different categories of dying people are briefly discussed from the point of view of terminal quality of life. Euthanasia is used in its broader meaning, including both passive and active aspects. Passive euthanasia (PE) is exercised by withholding advanced or basic life support measures, the commonest form being do not resuscitate orders (DNR). Some data on its application are presented. Active euthanasia (AE), which has been proposed and being applied to a limited extent lately, is criticized as leading the physician and the Society onto risky ground. A position is being taken against it. Decision making, examples of guidelines, legal, philosophical and spiritual considerations are discussed. Wisdom and loving care should be exercised by the physician to assist people in their terminal phases and to alleviate their suffering. That there is not a single answer to the problem is discussed.

  10. Aircraft noise and quality of life around Frankfurt Airport.

    PubMed

    Schreckenberg, Dirk; Meis, Markus; Kahl, Cara; Peschel, Christin; Eikmann, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    In a survey of 2,312 residents living near Frankfurt Airport aircraft noise annoyance and disturbances as well as environmental (EQoL) and health-related quality of life (HQoL) were assessed and compared with data on exposure due to aircraft, road traffic, and railway noise. Results indicate higher noise annoyance than predicted from general exposure-response curves. Beside aircraft sound levels source-related attitudes were associated with reactions to aircraft noise. Furthermore, aircraft noise affected EQoL in general, although to a much smaller extent. HQoL was associated with aircraft noise annoyance, noise sensitivity and partly with aircraft noise exposure, in particular in the subgroup of multimorbid residents. The results suggest a recursive relationship between noise and health, yet this cannot be tested in cross-sectional studies. Longitudinal studies would be recommendable to get more insight in the causal paths underlying the noise-health relationship.

  11. Assessing quality of life of self-reported rheumatic patients.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Pedro L; Gonçalves, Sónia P; Ferreira, Lara N; Pereira, Luis N; Antunes, Patrícia; Gouveia, Nélia; Rodrigues, Ana; Canhão, Helena; Branco, Jaime

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with self-reported rheumatic diseases (RD), to classify self-reported rheumatic patients in groups according to their health state and to explore the associations between health status and sociodemographic variables. Data came from the Portuguese Epidemiologic study of the RD. A sample of the Portuguese population aged 18 or more (n = 10,661) stratified by region and locality dimension was interviewed by trained interviewers and answered a standardized questionnaire that included the SF-36v1, the EQ-5D-3L, medical history, identification of potential rheumatic diseases, sociodemographic characteristics, among others. Descriptive statistics and parametric tests were used to compare HRQoL of respondents with and without RD. Comparisons with normative data from the Portuguese population were also carried out. A cluster analysis was used to classify respondents into homogeneous groups. Regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with HRQoL. Respondents with self-reported RD assigned a lower self-perception to their health status. The burden of disease was observed mainly in physical function, role physical and bodily pain. The EQ-5D-3L dimensions show similar results: the intensity of problems is significantly more evident in respondents with self-reported RD. HRQoL of respondents with self-reported RD is related to sociodemographic variables and is significantly lower when compared with the Portuguese population. Four clusters of homogeneous respondents with self-reported RD were formed and characterized according to a number of variables. Factors associated with HRQoL were identified. In conclusion, suffering from a self-reported RD has a significant impact on self-perceived health status and on the quality of life. PMID:27378230

  12. Hunting for health, well-being, and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Ove; Hallberg, Lillemor R.-M.

    2011-01-01

    Health, well-being, quality of life, and lifestyle are central concepts within health science, although generally accepted definitions are still lacking. Lifestyle can either be seen as an independent variable and the cause of unhealthy behaviour or as a dependent variable, which is affected by conditions in the society. In the first case, the attention is directed on each individual case: maintaining or improving health requires changes in lifestyle and living habits. In this perspective, diet and physical activity are important features for health promotion. In the second case the attention is rather directed on structural conditions in society, for example the food industry, the lunches for children at school, and the “fast food” industry should be influenced to protect human health. The structural perspective has, so far, received restricted impact when it concerns prevention and promotion of health. Processes of individualisation in the society have to an increasing extent viewed health as an affair for the individual. The benefits of physical activity, healthy food and beverage, social support, and joy are documented scientifically. In general, the trend towards increasing responsibility for one's lifestyle and health is positive, but might reinforce the inequality in health. With an even harder climate in society there might be a risk that individual health projects undermine the solidarity and the will to accept costs for medical treatment and care for people who risk their health through an unhealthy and risk-taking lifestyle. However, we argue that peoples’ well-being and quality of life presupposes a society that stands up for all people. PMID:21629582

  13. Quality of life for chronic psychiatric illnesses and home care

    PubMed Central

    Molu, Nesibe Gunay; Ozkan, Birgul; Icel, Sema

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, mental illnesses are gradually increasing and so does chronic psychiatric patients. As a result of this increase, chronic psychiatric disorders lead the burden of patients and their families. To reduce the burden of mental illnesses on individuals and their families, treatment and care are given including psychosocial, physiological and medical support and social services. To begin with, home care enables both the patient and his or her family to stay at their own houses and not to be bothered with residents or long-term, institutional-based nursing homes. In addition, the home care providers deliver services to the patient’s at their own house. The other advantages of taking care at home is that it eases financial issues in terms of reducing the cost, reduces the patient’s symptoms and improve the individual’s quality of life (QoL). In addition to these, home care also minimizes the burden on outpatient services and provides help for the patient and the family in order to solve their problems and give support. Home care services help patients to get their freedom back and enhance the quality of their lives. Thus, it is necessary to procure and implement these services and supply both the patient and his or her family a high-quality life. Sources of data/ study selection: Literature review was done by using the keywords “home care, patient with chronic mental illness, quality of life, home care nursing” from the sources including PsychINFO, PsychARTICLES, MEDLINE, PubMED, EBSCOHOST and The COCHRANE LIBRARY in the time period of 2005- 2015. PMID:27182272

  14. Quality of life and personality in essential tremor patients.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Delia; Schwieger, Daniel; Moises, Hans; Deuschl, Günther

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of essential tremor (ET) on quality of life and its relation with tremor severity and the personality profile of ET patients. One hundred and five patients with definite or probable ET from an outpatient population were tested with the Short-Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF36) and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-R). Compared to controls, the ET patients scored worse in all eight domains of the SF36. The physical component score (PCS) did not differ significantly from the normal population, whereas ET patients older than 40 years were significantly more affected with regard to the mental domains measured by the mental component score (MCS) with their median below the 20th percentile of the German controls. Tremor severity correlated with some of the physical domains and the PCS as well as with social function of the mental domains. ET patients showed significantly lower scores in the psychoticism (P) scale of the EPQ-R, with a median value on the 11th percentile of normal German population, indicating a more tender-minded personality type. The MCS correlated highly significant with the neuroticism (N) scale and extraversion (E) scale of EPQ-R. Multiple regression analysis identified age as the only predictive factor for the PCS and the N-scale as the only predictive factor for the MCS. Although ET is considered a pure movement disorder, the mental components of quality of life are more affected than the physical dimensions. A more controlled personality type may in part contribute to this.

  15. Electronic Quality of Life Assessment Using Computer-Adaptive Testing

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QoL) questionnaires are desirable for clinical practice but can be time-consuming to administer and interpret, making their widespread adoption difficult. Objective Our aim was to assess the performance of the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-100 questionnaire as four item banks to facilitate adaptive testing using simulated computer adaptive tests (CATs) for physical, psychological, social, and environmental QoL. Methods We used data from the UK WHOQOL-100 questionnaire (N=320) to calibrate item banks using item response theory, which included psychometric assessments of differential item functioning, local dependency, unidimensionality, and reliability. We simulated CATs to assess the number of items administered before prespecified levels of reliability was met. Results The item banks (40 items) all displayed good model fit (P>.01) and were unidimensional (fewer than 5% of t tests significant), reliable (Person Separation Index>.70), and free from differential item functioning (no significant analysis of variance interaction) or local dependency (residual correlations < +.20). When matched for reliability, the item banks were between 45% and 75% shorter than paper-based WHOQOL measures. Across the four domains, a high standard of reliability (alpha>.90) could be gained with a median of 9 items. Conclusions Using CAT, simulated assessments were as reliable as paper-based forms of the WHOQOL with a fraction of the number of items. These properties suggest that these item banks are suitable for computerized adaptive assessment. These item banks have the potential for international development using existing alternative language versions of the WHOQOL items. PMID:27694100

  16. Assessing quality of life of self-reported rheumatic patients.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Pedro L; Gonçalves, Sónia P; Ferreira, Lara N; Pereira, Luis N; Antunes, Patrícia; Gouveia, Nélia; Rodrigues, Ana; Canhão, Helena; Branco, Jaime

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with self-reported rheumatic diseases (RD), to classify self-reported rheumatic patients in groups according to their health state and to explore the associations between health status and sociodemographic variables. Data came from the Portuguese Epidemiologic study of the RD. A sample of the Portuguese population aged 18 or more (n = 10,661) stratified by region and locality dimension was interviewed by trained interviewers and answered a standardized questionnaire that included the SF-36v1, the EQ-5D-3L, medical history, identification of potential rheumatic diseases, sociodemographic characteristics, among others. Descriptive statistics and parametric tests were used to compare HRQoL of respondents with and without RD. Comparisons with normative data from the Portuguese population were also carried out. A cluster analysis was used to classify respondents into homogeneous groups. Regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with HRQoL. Respondents with self-reported RD assigned a lower self-perception to their health status. The burden of disease was observed mainly in physical function, role physical and bodily pain. The EQ-5D-3L dimensions show similar results: the intensity of problems is significantly more evident in respondents with self-reported RD. HRQoL of respondents with self-reported RD is related to sociodemographic variables and is significantly lower when compared with the Portuguese population. Four clusters of homogeneous respondents with self-reported RD were formed and characterized according to a number of variables. Factors associated with HRQoL were identified. In conclusion, suffering from a self-reported RD has a significant impact on self-perceived health status and on the quality of life.

  17. Quality of Life and Functional Impairment in Compulsive Hoarding

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Sanjaya; Ayers, Catherine R.; Maidment, Karron M.; Vapnik, Tanya; Wetherell, Julie L.; Bystritsky, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Compulsive hoarding patients have been found in previous studies to have substantial disability and functional impairment. However, no prior study has examined subjective and objective quality of life (QOL) in patients with compulsive hoarding. This present study compared compulsive hoarders and non-hoarding OCD patients across a variety of QOL domains. Subjects were 171 consecutive adult patients (34 compulsive hoarders, 137 non-hoarding patients with DSM-IV OCD) treated openly between 1998 and 2004 in the UCLA OCD Partial Hospitalization Program (OCD PHP), a specialized, intensive, multi-modal treatment program for treatment-refractory patients. Scores on the Quality of Life Scale and other symptom severity measures on admission were compared between compulsive hoarders and non-hoarding OCD patients. Compulsive hoarders were older and had lower global functioning than non-hoarding OCD patients. Both groups had low overall QOL scores across multiple domains. Compulsive hoarders had significantly lower levels of satisfaction with their safety than non-hoarding OCD patients, were more often the victims of both violent and non-violent crime, felt less safe in their neighborhoods, and felt less protected against attack. Compulsive hoarders were also much less satisfied with their living arrangements than non-hoarding OCD patients. No differences were found on financial variables, but the vast majority of patients in both groups were unemployed. Compulsive hoarders have lower QOL than non-hoarding OCD patients in the domains of safety and living situation. Psychosocial rehabilitation that focuses on problems with victimization, safety, employment, and financial areas may be a beneficial augmentation to treatment for compulsive hoarding. PMID:20822778

  18. Iranian Nurses Perceptions of Cancer Patients Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer is the third main cause of death in Iran only after cardiovascular diseases and accidents. Objectives The main aim of this research study was to identify nurses’ understanding of cancer patients’ Quality of Life (QoL) in an Iranian context. Patients and Methods This descriptive correlational study was conducted in an educative referral oncology center affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran in 2013. 50 pairs of cancer patients and their nurses were conveniently recruited. The sample of nurses were selected based on consensus sampling which included more than 70 percent of eligible nurses in the hospital. Patients and nurses were requested to complete the Farsi version of the world health organization quality of life (WHOQoL-BREF) questionnaire, separately. QoL was measured across four dimensions including physical, psychological, social relationship and environmental. Results The QoL mean domain scores of patients were 10.06, 11.88, 12.76 and 11.96, respectively. The corresponding scores of nurses were 11.6, 11.23, 12.65 and 12.07. Pearson correlations between patients and nurses scores were 0.42, 0.5, 0.25 and 0.58 which revealed a fair to moderate agreement between nurses’ and patients’ scores in different domains. Paired samples t-test values indicated that physical QoL mean domain scores of patients were significantly lower than the corresponding drawings of nurses [t (49) = -3.41, P < 0.001]. Conclusions The main finding of this QoL study was that nurses generally have a moderate understanding of cancer patients’ QoL. Therefore, in order to meet different physio-psycho-social needs of patients, nurses must enhance their understanding of patients’ QoL particularly in more subjective and personal domains like social domain using a holistic approach. PMID:27703641

  19. Hunting for health, well-being, and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Ove; Hallberg, Lillemor R-M

    2011-01-01

    Health, well-being, quality of life, and lifestyle are central concepts within health science, although generally accepted definitions are still lacking. Lifestyle can either be seen as an independent variable and the cause of unhealthy behaviour or as a dependent variable, which is affected by conditions in the society. In the first case, the attention is directed on each individual case: maintaining or improving health requires changes in lifestyle and living habits. In this perspective, diet and physical activity are important features for health promotion. In the second case the attention is rather directed on structural conditions in society, for example the food industry, the lunches for children at school, and the "fast food" industry should be influenced to protect human health. The structural perspective has, so far, received restricted impact when it concerns prevention and promotion of health. Processes of individualisation in the society have to an increasing extent viewed health as an affair for the individual. The benefits of physical activity, healthy food and beverage, social support, and joy are documented scientifically. In general, the trend towards increasing responsibility for one's lifestyle and health is positive, but might reinforce the inequality in health. With an even harder climate in society there might be a risk that individual health projects undermine the solidarity and the will to accept costs for medical treatment and care for people who risk their health through an unhealthy and risk-taking lifestyle. However, we argue that peoples' well-being and quality of life presupposes a society that stands up for all people.

  20. Quality of life of Nigerians living with human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Akinboro, Adeolu Oladayo; Akinyemi, Suliat Omolola; Olaitan, Peter B; Raji, Ajani Adeniyi; Popoola, Adetoun Adetayo; Awoyemi, Opeyemi Roseline; Ayodele, Olugbenga Edward

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Few reports from Nigeria have examined the quality of life (QOL) of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) despite the fact that Nigeria has the second largest number of PLWHA in the world. This study evaluated the QOL of Nigerians living with HIV/AIDS using the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire for HIV-Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF) instrument and assessed the impact of demographic, laboratory and disease-related variables on QOL. Methods This cross-sectional study involved 491 consecutive PLWHA aged ≥ 18 years attending the dedicated clinic to PLWHA in South-west Nigeria. Results The lowest mean QOL scores were recorded in the environment and social domains. Participants aged ≥ 40 years had better QOL in the environment (p = 0.039) and spirituality (p = 0.033) domains and those in relationships had better QOL in the social relationship domain (p = 0.002). Subjects with no or primary education and those who rated their health status as good gave significantly higher ratings in all QOL domains. Participants with AIDS had significant lower QOL in the level of independence domain (p = 0.018) and those with CD4 count ≥ 350 cells /mm3 had better QOL scores in the physical, psychological and level of independence domains. Subjects without tuberculosis co-infection and those on antiretroviral therapy (ART) reported significantly better QOL in the physical, psychological, level of independence and spirituality domains. Conclusion Marital relationship, absence of tuberculosis, CD4 count ≥ 350 cells /mm3 and use of ART positively impacted QOL of our patients. PMID:25426192

  1. Quality of life in spina bifida: importance of parental hope

    PubMed Central

    Kirpalani, H.; Parkin, P.; Willan, A.; Fehlings, D.; Rosenbaum, P.; King, D; Van Nie, A. J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Prognosis in spina bifida (SB) is often based only on neurological deficits present at birth. We hypothesised that both parental hope and the neurophysical examination predict quality of life in children and adolescents with SB.
METHODS—A previously validated disease and age specific health related quality of life (HRQL) instrument was posted to families of children (aged 5-12 years) and adolescents (aged 13-20 years) with SB. We measured parental hope, determined the child's current physical function, and obtained retrospective data on the neonatal neurophysical examination (NPE). Regression analysis modelled HRQL firstly as a dependent variable on parental hope and NPE ("birth status"); and secondly on parental hope and current physical function ("current function").
RESULTS—Response rates were 71% (137 of 194) for families of children, and 54% (74 of 138) for families of adolescents. NPE data were available for 121 children and 60 adolescents. In children, the birth status model predicted 26% of the variability (R2 hope 21%) compared with 23% of the variability (R2 hope 23%)in the adolescents. The current function model explained 47% of the variability (R2 hope 19%) in children compared with 31% of the variability (R2 hope 24%) in the adolescents.
CONCLUSIONS—In both age groups, parental hope was more strongly associated with the HRQL than neonatal or current physical deficits. A prospective study is required to determine whether a causal relation exists between parental hope and HRQL of children and adolescents with SB.

 PMID:10999858

  2. Quality of life in people with Parkinson's disease: the relevance of social relationships and communication.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kayoko; Kamide, Naoto; Suzuki, Makoto; Fukuda, Michinari

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Maintaining high quality of life is crucial for the rehabilitation of patients with Parkinson's disease. The quality of life scales currently in use do not assess all quality of life domains or their importance for each individual. Therefore, a new quality of life measure, the Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life-Direct Weighting, was used to investigate quality of life in people with Parkinson's disease. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen people with idiopathic Parkinson's disaese (average age = 80.0 years, standard deviation = 10.3 years, Hoehn & Yahr stages 1-4) were interviewed using the Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life-Direct Weighting. Its quality of life constructs were tested by comparing them against disease-specific quality of life (39-items Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire), motor functioning (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III), and activities of daily living (Barthel Index). [Results] Social connections such as "family" and "friends" were revealed as important constructs of life satisfaction. The Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life-Direct Weighting was not significantly correlated with the 39-items Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III, or Barthel Index but was significantly correlated with the "communication" dimension of the 39-items Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire. [Conclusion] The Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life-Direct Weighting detected various domains of quality of life, especially social relationships with family and friends. "Being heard" was also revealed as an essential component of life satisfaction, as it provides patients with a feeling of acceptance and assurance, possibly resulting in better quality of life.

  3. [The quality-of-life questionnaire with asthma patients: the Spanish version of the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire].

    PubMed

    Sanjuàs, C; Alonso, J; Sanchís, J; Casan, P; Broquetas, J M; Ferrie, P J; Juniper, E F; Antó, J M

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes the translation to Castilian and adaptation of a quality of life measurement instrument: the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ). The AQLQ, developed by Juniper et al, contains 32 items, 5 of which relate to habitual activities that the patient can choose from among a list of 26 possibilities. Answers are given on a scale of 7 points. To adapt this instrument for use in Spain, we subjected it to a process of translation/back translation by bilingual informants. The translated and original versions of each item, activity and answer option were evaluated as being totally equivalent (A), fairly equivalent but with some questionable wording (B), or of questionable equivalence (C). The naturalness and correctness of the Spanish version were also evaluated on a scale of 1 to 10. Three (9%) items and 1 (4%) activity were considered to be of questionable equivalence (C) and 12 (37%) items and 1 activity (4%) were considered to be of type B equivalence. The questionable aspects of types B and C equivalence were discussed in 2 meetings, along with expressions that were equivalent but unnatural or grammatically incorrect; the first meeting involved researchers and translators and the second was held with a group of 6 asthmatics. Consensus was finally obtained for each item and activity included in the second draft. That draft was then administered to another group of 7 patients in order to check comprehension and equivalence, after which a definitive version was produced by the researchers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7788083

  4. [Quality of life of living kidney donor: a national report].

    PubMed

    Briançon, S; Germain, L; Baudelot, C; Bannay, A; Virion, J-M; Thuong, M

    2011-07-01

    The renal transplantation is nowadays the reference treatment of ESRD. Living donor kidney transplantation is less often performed in France than in other countries. Nevertheless, numerous French and international surveys have evidenced that it provides the recipients a longer life expectancy and a better quality of life. Donors themselves, what do they become? How are they? For the first time in France, a survey has been implemented to investigate the quality of life of living kidney donor to one of their close relations. This study has been undertaken by the Agency of the biomedecine and the service Clinical Epidemiology and Evaluation (EEC), of the University teaching hospital of Nancy. The main objective was to describe the quality of life of the living donors having given a kidney for more than a year and less than 5 years. The secondary objective was to contribute to the knowledge of the main factors associated to the living kidney donor quality of life, one year after the donation. Participants had to be living in France at the time of the donation which had taken place between June 30(th), 2005 and March 1(st), 2009. A folder gathering various self-administrated questionnaires was sent to the place of residence of the donor between March and April, 2010. These data were completed by medical data collected near the transplantation centres by the Agency of biomedecine within the framework of the register CRISTAL. They included the characteristics of the donation and of the donor at the very time of the donation, 3 months after the donation and at the last annual assessment. Three living donors in four, that is 501 persons, agreed to fully participate. They constituted a representative national sample of all the living donors of this period. The non participants were younger (4.5 years on average) and had a less adequate annual follow-up. The women were more represented (61 %) than men. The median age was 53 years. More of 2/3 were employed at the time of the

  5. Quality of Care and Quality of Life: Convergence or Divergence?

    PubMed Central

    Alonazi, Wadi B; Thomas, Shane A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact of quality of care (QoC) on patients’ quality of life (QoL). In a cross-sectional study, two domains of QoC and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Bref questionnaire were combined to collect data from 1,059 pre-discharge patients in four accredited hospitals (ACCHs) and four non-accredited hospitals (NACCHs) in Saudi Arabia. Health and well-being are often restricted to the characterization of sensory qualities in certain settings such as unrestricted access to healthcare, effective treatment, and social welfare. The patients admitted to tertiary health care facilities are generally able to present themselves with a holistic approach as to how they experience the impact of health policy. The statistical results indicated that patients reported a very limited correlation between QoC and QoL in both settings. The model established a positive, but ultimately weak and insignificant, association between QoC (access and effective treatment) and QoL (r = 0.349, P = 0.000; r = 0.161, P = 0.000, respectively). Even though the two settings are theoretically different in terms of being able to conceptualize, adopt, and implement QoC, the outcomes from both settings demonstrated insignificant relationships with QoL as the results were quite similar. Though modern medicine has substantially improved QoL around the world, this paper proposes that health accreditation has a very limited impact on improving QoL. This paper raises awareness of this topic with multiple healthcare professionals who are interested in correlating QoC and QoL. Hopefully, it will stimulate further research from other professional groups that have new and different perspectives. Addressing a transitional health care system that is in the process of endorsing accreditation, investigating the experience of tertiary cases, and analyzing deviated data may limit the generalization of this study. Global interest in applying public health policy

  6. Quality of life assessment by community pharmacists: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Bentley, J P; Smith, M C; Banahan, B F; Frate, D A; Parks, B R

    1998-02-01

    Implicit in the evolving role of pharmacy is that its practitioners embrace the concept of quality of life (QoL). In recent years there has been an increased interest in incorporating health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measures into clinical practice, primarily focusing on the physician as the user of this information. Pharmacists may be able to use these instruments in their practices to provide better pharmaceutical care. To explore the feasibility of such an undertaking, questionnaires were mailed to a national sample of community pharmacies. In addition to the questionnaire, the respondents were provided with examples of two instruments: the Duke Health Profile and the QOLIE-10. A definition of HRQoL was provided to the respondents. After two mailings and a reminder postcard, a usable response rate of 27.2% was achieved. The results revealed that over 80% of the respondents currently discuss HRQoL issues with their patients. In addition, 66% reported that they attempt to assess the HRQoL of their patients, albeit usually on a subjective, informal basis. After viewing examples of HRQoL instruments, over three-quarters of the respondents reported a willingness to use HRQoL assessment tools in their practices. However, only 53.7% of the respondents were familiar with the concept of HRQoL. Less than 5% reported familiarity with formal instruments. The self-reported knowledge of pharmacists concerning HRQoL was low and the respondents recognized a significant gap between their current knowledge and the level of knowledge needed to assess the HRQoL of their patients formally. The results suggest a possible role for the pharmacist in HRQoL assessment. However, the use of HRQoL instruments in community pharmacies will require further training and education on the part of pharmacists concerning the concept of HRQoL, the issues involved in its measurement and how they can use HRQoL information in their practices. In addition, a number of unanswered questions must be

  7. Health-related quality of life in migrant preschool children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Minority groups have a lower health-related quality of life (HRQOL), but there is little information if this finding also applies to children. In this study, we compared HRQOL between young children with and without migrant parents. Methods Two cross-sectional studies of culturally diverse preschool populations in Switzerland: Ballabeina (40 preschools, 258 girls and 232 boys aged 4 to 6 years) and Youp’là Bouge (58 child care centers, 453 girls and 522 boys aged 2 to 4 years). Most children were born in Switzerland (Ballabeina: 92.3%; Youp’là Bouge: 93.7%). Number of migrant parents was considered as the main exposure. HRQOL was measured using the 23-item Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory. Results Children of migrant parents had a significantly lower HRQOL total score (mean ± SD, Ballabeina: 84.2 ± 9.1; 82.7 ± 9.6 and 81.7 ± 11.7 for children with none, one or two migrant parents, respectively; Youp’là Bouge: 83.8 ± 8.6; 82.9 ± 9.5; 80.7 ± 11.7, all p < 0.05). Similar results were found in Ballabeina and Youp’là Bouge for social, school and physical functioning (all p < 0.05), but not for emotional functioning. The differences in HRQOL measures were partly mediated by children’s place of birth, parental education, paternal occupational level, children’s BMI, screen time and physical activity in one study (Ballabeina), but not in the other (Youp’là Bouge). Conclusion In preschoolers, children of migrant parents have lower HRQOL than children of non-migrant parents. These differences are only partly mediated by other sociocultural characteristics or lifestyle behavior. These families may need assistance to prevent further inequalities. PMID:23617686

  8. Quality of care and quality of life: convergence or divergence?

    PubMed

    Alonazi, Wadi B; Thomas, Shane A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact of quality of care (QoC) on patients' quality of life (QoL). In a cross-sectional study, two domains of QoC and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Bref questionnaire were combined to collect data from 1,059 pre-discharge patients in four accredited hospitals (ACCHs) and four non-accredited hospitals (NACCHs) in Saudi Arabia. Health and well-being are often restricted to the characterization of sensory qualities in certain settings such as unrestricted access to healthcare, effective treatment, and social welfare. The patients admitted to tertiary health care facilities are generally able to present themselves with a holistic approach as to how they experience the impact of health policy. The statistical results indicated that patients reported a very limited correlation between QoC and QoL in both settings. The model established a positive, but ultimately weak and insignificant, association between QoC (access and effective treatment) and QoL (r = 0.349, P = 0.000; r = 0.161, P = 0.000, respectively). Even though the two settings are theoretically different in terms of being able to conceptualize, adopt, and implement QoC, the outcomes from both settings demonstrated insignificant relationships with QoL as the results were quite similar. Though modern medicine has substantially improved QoL around the world, this paper proposes that health accreditation has a very limited impact on improving QoL. This paper raises awareness of this topic with multiple healthcare professionals who are interested in correlating QoC and QoL. Hopefully, it will stimulate further research from other professional groups that have new and different perspectives. Addressing a transitional health care system that is in the process of endorsing accreditation, investigating the experience of tertiary cases, and analyzing deviated data may limit the generalization of this study. Global interest in applying public health policy

  9. Clinical factors affecting quality of life of patients with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Uchmanowicz, Bartosz; Panaszek, Bernard; Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent years, there has been increased interest in the subjective quality of life (QoL) of patients with bronchial asthma. QoL is a significant indicator guiding the efforts of professionals caring for patients, especially chronically ill ones. The identification of factors affecting the QoL reported by patients, despite their existing condition, is important and useful to provide multidisciplinary care for these patients. Aim To investigate the clinical factors affecting asthma patients’ QoL. Methods The study comprised 100 patients (73 female, 27 male) aged 18–84 years (mean age was 45.7) treated in the Allergy Clinic of the Wroclaw Medical University Department and Clinic of Internal Diseases, Geriatrics and Allergology. All asthma patients meeting the inclusion criteria were invited to participate. Data on sociodemographic and clinical variables were collected. In this study, we used medical record analysis and two questionnaires: the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) to assess the QoL of patients with asthma and the Asthma Control Test to measure asthma control. Results Active smokers were shown to have a significantly lower QoL in the “Symptoms” domain than nonsmokers (P=0.006). QoL was also demonstrated to decrease significantly as the frequency of asthma exacerbations increased (R=−0.231, P=0.022). QoL in the domain “Activity limitation” was shown to increase significantly along with the number of years of smoking (R=0.404; P=0.004). Time from onset and the dominant symptom of asthma significantly negatively affected QoL in the “Activity limitation” domain of the AQLQ (R=−0.316, P=0.001; P=0.029, respectively). QoL scores in the “Emotional function” and “Environmental stimuli” subscale of the AQLQ decreased significantly as time from onset increased (R=−0.200, P=0.046; R=−0.328, P=0.001, respectively). Conclusion Patients exhibiting better symptom control have higher QoL scores. Asthma patients’ Qo

  10. Health Condition and Quality of Life in Older Adults: Adaptation of QOLIE-89

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efklides, Anastasia; Varsami, Maria; Mitadi, Ioanna; Economidis, Dimitrios

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed at adapting the Questionnaire Quality of Life in Epilepsy (QOLIE-89 version 1.0: Vickrey et al., 1993), Quality of Life in Epilepsy QoLIE-89 RAND (Santa Monica, CA)] so that it may be used to measure quality of life (QoL) of older adults, healthy or suffering from various chronic illnesses. The participants were 202 older adults…

  11. Effects of a Meditation Program on Nurses' Power and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sun Ju; Kwak, Eun Young; Hahm, Bong-Jin; Seo, Se Hee; Lee, Da Woon; Jang, Sun Joo

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the effects of meditation programs on nurses' power and quality of life. In this study, Barrett's power theory derived from Rogers' unitary human being science was used as a theoretical framework. A randomized controlled design with 50 recruited and randomly allocated participants was used. The results demonstrated that the eight-week meditation program significantly improved nurses' power and quality of life. These results suggest that meditation has positive effects on power and quality of life. PMID:27271136

  12. The Non-Economic Quality of Life on a Sub-National Level in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossouw, Stephanie; Naude, Wim

    2008-01-01

    Most research on the non-economic quality of life have been (a) on a national level or performed on cross-country comparisons, and/or (b) used subjective indicators to measure how people perceive their non-economic quality of life. In this paper, our main contribution is to construct objective indicators of the non-economic quality of life for 354…

  13. Body image and college women's quality of life: The importance of being self-compassionate.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Cristiana; Ferreira, Cláudia; Trindade, Inês A; Pinto-Gouveia, José

    2015-06-01

    This study explored self-compassion as a mediator between body dissatisfaction, social comparison based on body image and quality of life in 662 female college students. Path analysis revealed that while controlling for body mass index, self-compassion mediated the impact of body dissatisfaction and unfavourable social comparisons on psychological quality of life. The path model accounted for 33 per cent of psychological quality of life variance. Findings highlight the importance of self-compassion as a mechanism that may operate on the association between negative body image evaluations and young women's quality of life.

  14. Effects of Socio-Demographic, Personality and Medical Factors on Quality of Life of Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Wieder-Huszla, Sylwia; Szkup, Małgorzata; Jurczak, Anna; Samochowiec, Agnieszka; Samochowiec, Jerzy; Stanisławska, Marzanna; Rotter, Iwona; Karakiewicz, Beata; Grochans, Elżbieta

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies show that changes occurring in a woman’s organism during menopause may lower her quality of life. This study involved 630 healthy postmenopausal women from Poland. Its purpose was to assess their quality of life in relation to socio-demographic variables, medical data and personality profiles. The authors used the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) to assess quality of life, the NEO-Five Factor Inventory to measure personality traits, and the Blatt-Kupperman Menopausal Index to estimate severity of climacteric symptoms. The study demonstrated significant relationships between quality of life and variables such as: age, education, employment status, and the use of menopausal hormone therapy. An analysis of personality traits revealed correlations between the openness to experience scores and the quality of life within physical functioning, vitality, and mental health. Neuroticism, agreeableness and extroversion significantly correlated with all quality of life domains. Conclusions: (1) Age, education and employment status have significant effects on the selected quality of life domains after menopause. (2) Quality of life within the general health domain was assessed lower by MHT-users (Menopausal hormone theraphy (MHT)). (3) Health-related quality of life is also influenced by personality traits, which are relatively stable throughout life. PMID:24972032

  15. Absent but Not Gone: Interdependence in Couples' Quality of Life Persists After a Partner's Death.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, Kyle J; Knowles, Lindsey M; Sbarra, David A; O'Connor, Mary-Frances

    2016-02-01

    Spouses influence each other's psychological functioning and quality of life. To explore whether this interdependence continues after a person becomes widowed, we tested whether deceased spouses' characteristics were associated with their widowed partners' later quality of life using couples drawn from a multinational sample of aging adults. Independent subsamples (ns = 221 and 325) were assessed before and after a spouse's death. Regressions revealed that deceased partners' quality of life prior to their death positively predicted their spouses' quality of life after the partners' death, even when we controlled for spouses' prior quality of life to account for environmental factors shared within couples. Further, widowed participants' quality of life was lower than nonwidowed couples' 2 years before and after their partners' death, but was equivalent 4 years prior. Finally, the strength of the association between partners' earlier quality of life and participants' later quality of life did not differ between widowed and nonwidowed participants. These findings suggest that interdependence in quality of life continues after one's partner has passed away. PMID:26710822

  16. Absent but Not Gone: Interdependence in Couples' Quality of Life Persists After a Partner's Death.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, Kyle J; Knowles, Lindsey M; Sbarra, David A; O'Connor, Mary-Frances

    2016-02-01

    Spouses influence each other's psychological functioning and quality of life. To explore whether this interdependence continues after a person becomes widowed, we tested whether deceased spouses' characteristics were associated with their widowed partners' later quality of life using couples drawn from a multinational sample of aging adults. Independent subsamples (ns = 221 and 325) were assessed before and after a spouse's death. Regressions revealed that deceased partners' quality of life prior to their death positively predicted their spouses' quality of life after the partners' death, even when we controlled for spouses' prior quality of life to account for environmental factors shared within couples. Further, widowed participants' quality of life was lower than nonwidowed couples' 2 years before and after their partners' death, but was equivalent 4 years prior. Finally, the strength of the association between partners' earlier quality of life and participants' later quality of life did not differ between widowed and nonwidowed participants. These findings suggest that interdependence in quality of life continues after one's partner has passed away.

  17. Radiological Worker Computer Based Training

    2003-02-06

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed an interactive computer based training (CBT) version of the standardized DOE Radiological Worker training program. This CD-ROM based program utilizes graphics, animation, photographs, sound and video to train users in ten topical areas: radiological fundamentals, biological effects, dose limits, ALARA, personnel monitoring, controls and postings, emergency response, contamination controls, high radiation areas, and lessons learned.

  18. Quality of life in children with well-controlled epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wildrick, D; Parker-Fisher, S; Morales, A

    1996-06-01

    In our pediatric neurology clinic, we noticed that some of the children and adolescents with well-controlled epilepsy seemed to have difficulty in school, social and family life situations. We postulated that having epilepsy and needing to take daily antiepileptic drugs caused occasional problems in these areas. A questionnaire assessing self concept, home life, school life, social activities and medication issues was developed to explore this issue. Sixty patients with mild epilepsy from our pediatric neurology clinic were surveyed. With an age range of 8-18 years, the mean age of the participants was 12.38 years (SD = 2.93). Thirty-five were females and 25 were males. Twenty had generalized tonic-clonic, 7 absence, 30 partial with motor symptoms, 2 partial with sensory symptoms and 1 unspecified type. Preliminary data indicate statistically significant correlations (p < .05) between children's concerns about seizure activity and self-perceived academic and social difficulties. A simple tool like this questionnaire can be used to help nurses assess quality of life issues in children and adolescents with epilepsy. PMID:8818985

  19. Systematic review of health-related quality of life models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A systematic literature review was conducted to (a) identify the most frequently used health-related quality of life (HRQOL) models and (b) critique those models. Methods Online search engines were queried using pre-determined inclusion and exclusion criteria. We reviewed titles, abstracts, and then full-text articles for their relevance to this review. Then the most commonly used models were identified, reviewed in tables, and critiqued using published criteria. Results Of 1,602 titles identified, 100 articles from 21 countries met the inclusion criteria. The most frequently used HRQOL models were: Wilson and Cleary (16%), Ferrans and colleagues (4%), or World Health Organization (WHO) (5%). Ferrans and colleagues’ model was a revision of Wilson and Cleary’s model and appeared to have the greatest potential to guide future HRQOL research and practice. Conclusions Recommendations are for researchers to use one of the three common HRQOL models unless there are compelling and clearly delineated reasons for creating new models. Disease-specific models can be derived from one of the three commonly used HRQOL models. We recommend Ferrans and colleagues’ model because they added individual and environmental characteristics to the popular Wilson and Cleary model to better explain HRQOL. Using a common HRQOL model across studies will promote a coherent body of evidence that will more quickly advance the science in the area of HRQOL. PMID:23158687

  20. Politics drives human functioning, dignity, and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Barber, Brian K; Spellings, Carolyn; McNeely, Clea; Page, Paul D; Giacaman, Rita; Arafat, Cairo; Daher, Mahmoud; El Sarraj, Eyad; Mallouh, Mohammed Abu

    2014-12-01

    Too little is known about human functioning amidst chronic adversity. We addressed that need by studying adult Palestinians in the occupied Palestinian territories (oPt), a population that has experienced longstanding economic and political hardships. Fourteen group interviews were conducted in February, 2010 in Arabic by local fieldworkers with 68 participants representing the main stratifications of Palestinian society: gender, region, refugee status, and political affiliation. Interview tasks included each participant: describing someone doing well and not well, free listing domains of functioning, and prioritizing domains to the three most important. Thematic analyses highlighted the dominating role of the political domain of functioning (e.g., political structures, constraints, effects, identity, and activism) and the degree to which political conditions impacted all other realms of functioning (economic, education, family, psychological, etc.). The discussion links the findings to relevant theory and empirical work that has called attention to the need to include the political in frameworks of quality of life. It also emphasized that values, such as justice, rights, dignity and self-determination, that underlie political structures and policies, are key elements of human functioning. This is the case not only in the oPt, but in any society where power imbalances marginalize segments of the population. PMID:25441321

  1. Quality of life among treatment seeking methamphetamine-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Rachel; Ang, Alfonso; Glik, Deborah C; Rawson, Richard A; Lee, Stella; Iguchi, Martin Y

    2011-01-01

    As the number of men and women entering treatment for substance use disorders continues to increase across the country, it becomes vitally important to understand their quality of life (QOL) or perceived health status, in order to inform treatment efforts for improving such outcomes. To date, QOL assessments among methamphetamine (MA) dependent users are limited. This paper examines QOL health status among a sample of 838 treatment seeking MA users at admission. Using regression analysis, predictors of QOL are examined among MA users. Predictors of poor QOL among MA users at treatment admission included being female, white, high school educated or more, married, experiencing psychosocial dysfunction (lifetime trauma, suicide, social conflict), reporting a high frequency of both MA and polydrugs for 15 days or more in the past month, chronicity of MA and polydrug use, injection use, and having co-morbid medical and psychiatric impairment. Employment status was the only factor related to better health status perceptions. This study expands the scope of scholarly examination of MA-dependent users entering treatment, as there has not been a development of coherent profiles of QOL among representative samples of clinical MA-abusing populations to date. PMID:21679268

  2. Quality of life in fibromyalgia patients with craniomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Di Venere, D; Corsalini, M; Stefanachi, G; Tafuri, S; De Tommaso, M; Cervinara, F; Re, A; Pettini, F

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a rheumatic disease which affects fibrous tissues and muscles; it is characterized by chronic pain and it is often associated with craniomandibular disorders (CMD). 31 patients were assessed from March 2012 to October 2012 through the administration of specific questionnaires and following neurologic and gnatologic assessment. A relevant corre-lation between FM and CMD emerges from the present study, as 80.6% of our patients report CMD symptoms with high prevalence of myofascial pain (84%). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that the patients in the present study did not differ in score of quality of life questionnaires from patients with fibromyalgia. The neuropathic pain diagnostic question-naire (DN4) scores were positively affected by belonging to group II of Research Diagnostic Criteria of Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/ TDM) classification, suggesting the possibility of a neuropathic component in chronic pain in this CMD group, as already speculated in our study on the correlation between burning mouth syndrome and CMD and by other au-thors in studies on chronic low back pain. However, further clinic and instrumental studies are needed in order to test this as-sumption. PMID:25674166

  3. Quality of Life in Children With Asthma: A Developmental Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Everhart, Robin S.; Borschuk, Adrienne P.; Winter, Marcia A.; Fiese, Barbara H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The current study investigated whether factors associated with quality of life (QOL) in children with asthma (e.g., family functioning, asthma routines, asthma severity) differed by child age. Methods Participants included 192 children with asthma (5–12 years) and their caregivers. Both children and caregivers completed questionnaires at an initial research session. Family functioning was determined from a mealtime observation that occurred in family homes. Results Child age moderated the association between asthma severity and child QOL and between routine burden and QOL in children with asthma. Post hoc probing analyses revealed that among older children, QOL levels were lower in the presence of worse asthma severity and more routine burden. Conclusions Findings suggest that associations between asthma severity, routine burden, and QOL may differ by child age. Treatment programs and health-care recommendations addressing QOL in children with asthma may need to be tailored to address differences in factors associated with QOL by child age. PMID:25680363

  4. Children's quality of life in a noisy world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte-Fortkamp, Brigitte

    2001-05-01

    On 30 April 2003 during the International Forum Noise Awareness Day European experts from the fields of medicine, acoustics, sociology, psychology, city planning, and traffic regulation led the current discussion on the risks of noise pollution for children at the Institute of Technical Acoustics at the Berlin Technical University, Germany. Studies probing into the negative effects of noise exposure upon the psychic, cognitive, and emotional functions of children are of a quite recent date. Even the quality of life of children as auto-directed experience and functionality is only now starting to get recognized; of special interest are the changes in self-awareness, performance, and health. The Forum focused upon methodological reflections for the collection of data as well as studies regarding the living conditions of children under sound exposure from different perspectives. In this context the research of sound effects has taken initial tentative steps to break away from the tried-and-true procedures of the last 30 years. Next to applied science, investigating fundamentals will need to be considered. Aiming at a networking process is one of the goals conducting the ``Tag gegen Lrm-International Noise Awareness Day.''

  5. Quality-of-life aspects in idiopathic epilepsy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wessmann, A; Volk, H A; Packer, R M A; Ortega, M; Anderson, T J

    2016-09-01

    Quality of life (QoL) plays a significant role in the treatment of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE), yet is so far understudied. This study describes the outcome evaluation of an online questionnaire based on the carer's perception focusing on 62 QoL questions in 159 dogs with IE. Results showed that seizure frequency, but not seizure severity or presence of cluster seizures, was significantly associated with carer-perceived dog's QoL. Dogs receiving third-line antiepileptic drugs had a significantly lower perceived QoL than those that did not. Generalised linear mixed model analysis demonstrated that severity of the side effects sleeping more and ataxia were significantly associated with carer-perceived dog's QoL, with higher severities predicting lower QoL scores. The degree of carer acceptability of seizure frequency and severity was significantly associated with the dog's reported seizure frequency and severity. Moreover, there was a significant association between IE-related QoL changes of the dog and the carer, with reductions in perceived canine QoL scores associated with reductions in carer QoL, and vice versa. In conclusion, aspects of canine IE can affect both the carer and their dog's QoL. This has implications for the management and requires consideration when treatment options and outcomes are discussed.

  6. Choosing a measure of Health Related Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P G

    2016-06-01

    This paper provides practical advice on the choice of health related quality of life measures. It starts by making explicit a series of underlying assumptions and then advises on selecting a measure as a trade-off between three sets of conditions: The purpose of collecting HQoL information, which considers the objectives of the study, the level of analysis, the population to be studied and the audience to whom the data will be presented. The qualities of the measure, including the need for a strong conceptual basis, pragmatic considerations, face and content validity, adequate psychometric properties and for the measure to be acceptable to the people participating in the study. The use of the measure, including the mode of administration and resource requirements. An earlier version of this paper was published as Robinson, P.G. (2016): Wahl der messinstrumente zur ermittlung der gesundheitsbezogenen lebensqualitat. In: Kovacs, L., Kipke, R., Lutz, R. (eds) Lebensqualitat in der medizin. Wiesbaden: Springer VS, pp201-222. PMID:27352464

  7. Quality of life in eating disorders: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Laura Al-Dakhiel; Christiansen, Erik; Lichtenstein, Mia Beck; Hansen, Nina Beck; Bilenberg, Niels; Støving, René Klinkby

    2014-09-30

    Eating disorders (EDs) comprise a variety of symptoms and have a profound impact on everyday life. They are associated with high morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to analyse published data on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in EDs so as to compare the results to general population norm data and to investigate potential differences between ED diagnostic groups. A systematic review of the current literature was conducted using a keyword-based search in PubMed and PsychInfo. The search covered anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS) and binge eating disorder (BED) and used the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36) as a measure of HRQoL. Of the 102 citations identified, 85 abstracts were reviewed and seven studies were included in the meta-analysis. AN patients were included in five studies (n=227), BN in four studies (n=216), EDNOS in two studies (n=166) and BED in four studies (n=148). We tested for between-study variation and significant differences between the diagnostic groups. The results confirmed a significantly lower level of HRQoL in all EDs compared to a population mean. It was not possible to establish any differences between the diagnostic groups.

  8. Quality of life in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mathai, Stephen C; Ghofrani, Hossein-Ardeschir; Mayer, Eckhard; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Nikkho, Sylvia; Simonneau, Gérald

    2016-08-01

    Patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) experience debilitating symptoms that have a negative impact on their quality of life (QoL) in terms of physical capability, psychological wellbeing and social relationships. The use of QoL measurement tools is important in the assessment of treatment efficacy and in guiding treatment decisions. However, despite the importance of QoL, particularly to the patient, it remains under-reported in clinical studies of CTEPH therapy. CTEPH is unique in pulmonary hypertension in that it is potentially curable by surgery; however, a proportion of patients either have residual PH following surgery or are not operable. Although some patients with CTEPH have been treated off-label with pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific therapies, there have been few randomised controlled trials of these therapies in patients with CTEPH. Moreover, in these trials QoL outcomes are variably assessed, and there is little consistency in the tools used. Here we review the assessment of QoL in patients with CTEPH and the tools that have been used. We also discuss the effect of surgical intervention and medical therapies on QoL. We conclude that further studies of QoL in patients with CTEPH are needed to further validate the optimal QoL tools.

  9. Assessing quality of life in adult cancer survivors (QLACS).

    PubMed

    Avis, Nancy E; Smith, Kevin W; McGraw, Sarah; Smith, Roselyn G; Petronis, Vida M; Carver, Charles S

    2005-05-01

    This article describes development of a quality of life measure designed to assess issues relevant to long-term cancer survivors. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 58 long-term cancer survivors to identify domains most relevant to long-term survivors (> or = 5 years post-diagnosis). Self-report items were developed from these interviews and administered to a second sample of 242 long-term survivors. Domains and items were selected from the item pool by a combination of factor analysis and criterion-based item selection. Five cancer-specific domains were identified (appearance concerns, financial problems, distress over recurrence, family-related distress, and benefits of cancer) along with seven generic QOL domains (negative feelings, positive feelings, cognitive problems, sexual problems, physical pain, fatigue, and social avoidance). Cronbach's alpha was 0.72 or greater for each domain. Correlations between domain scores and criterion measures were 0.72 or higher in all but one generic domain (social avoidance), but somewhat lower on cancer-specific domains. The new multidimensional measure has good internal consistency and validity and is appropriate for comparisons between cancer and non-cancer populations, as well as long-term follow-up of cancer patients.

  10. Quality of life of patients surgically treated for ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Hammed Sikiru; Adebola, Rafel Adetokunbo; Arotiba, Juwon Tunde; Amole, Ibiyinka Olushola; Efunkoya, Akinwale Adeyemi; Omeje, Uchenna Kelvin; Amole, Taiwo Gboluwaga; Adeoye, Joshua Biodun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The surgical management of ameloblastoma can have a profound functional and psychological effect on a patient's quality of life (QoL). The aim of this study was to compare the pre- and post-operative QoL outcomes of patients requiring surgical treatment for ameloblastoma. Patients and Methods: A total number of 30 patients were identified as fulfilling the criteria for this study. They included 18 males and 12 females, aged between 14 and 47 years with a mean of 27.3 years (standard deviation 10.2). Each patient completed a modified version of the University of Washington QoL questionnaire version 4, a day to surgery and postoperatively on the 7th day, 3 months, and 6 months. Results: Following surgical treatment of patients for ameloblastoma, the QoL decreased immediately after surgery. It then gradually improved over time and exceeded the preoperative value at 6 months postoperatively. When analyzed with respect to location, posteriorly placed tumors had the best postoperative QoL outcome. Patients expressed concern more about their appearance preoperatively while postoperative concerns were mostly focused on their ability to chew. Conclusion: Significant improvement occurred in QoL scores following surgical management of ameloblastoma. The small sample size utilized in this study limits a definitive conclusion. A larger multicenter study is therefore recommended. PMID:27226682

  11. Comorbidities, Social Impact, and Quality of Life in Tourette Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eapen, Valsamma; Cavanna, Andrea E; Robertson, Mary M

    2016-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is more than having motor and vocal tics, and this review will examine the varied comorbidities as well as the social impact and quality of life (QoL) in individuals with TS. The relationship between any individual and his/her environment is complex, and this is further exaggerated in the case of a person with TS. For example, tics may play a significant role in shaping the person's experiences, perceptions, and interactions with the environment. Furthermore, associated clinical features, comorbidities, and coexisting psychopathologies may compound or alter this relationship. In this regard, the common comorbidities include attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and disruptive behaviors, obsessive compulsive disorder, and autism spectrum disorder, and coexistent problems include anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem, which can all lead to poorer psychosocial functioning and QoL. Thus, the symptoms of TS and the associated comorbid conditions may interact to result in a vicious cycle or a downward spiraling of negative experiences and poor QoL. The stigma and social maladjustment in TS and the social exclusion, bullying, and discrimination are considered to be caused in large part by misperceptions of the disorder by teachers, peers, and the wider community. Improved community and professional awareness about TS and related comorbidities and other psychopathologies as well as the provision of multidisciplinary services to meet the complex needs of this clinical population are critical. Future research to inform the risk and resilience factors for successful long-term outcomes is also warranted. PMID:27375503

  12. [Multiple sclerosis: socioeconomic effects and impact on quality of life].

    PubMed

    Ayuso, Guillermo Izquierdo

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that affects young adults. Survival is long, more than 35 years, and consequently the disease has a huge socioeconomic impact. The present article discusses the enormous difficulties of carrying out economic assessments in this field but also describes the advances made in research on this topic and the advantages of performing socioeconomic evaluations with increasingly sophisticated tools. We also discuss the need to quantify indirect and intangible costs to translate them into quality of life and subsequently into economic cost, expressed in euros in the case of Spain. The available data indicate that the enormous cost of the disease (1200 million euros per year) is due more to disability-related expenditure than to treatment, which-although expensive-does not represent more than 16-18% of the total expenditure (approximately 200 million euros per year). The increase represented by the cost of MS is not based on higher treatment expenditure but on an increase in the incidence and-especially-the prevalence of the disease. Above all, in the last few years, there has been a considerable rise in the percentage of patients with an indication for treatment. Reflection is therefore needed on the use of drug therapy in MS, since a saving in the most effective products seems to increase the overall cost of MS, while expenditure on these drugs represents a saving in the long-term. PMID:25732943

  13. Quality of life measurement in gastrointestinal and liver disorders

    PubMed Central

    BORGAONKAR, M; IRVINE, E

    2000-01-01

    Modern medicine has had a considerable impact on mortality rates for serious illness. Many chronic diseases which have previously been associated with an increased mortality now have survival rates approaching those of the background population. However, chronic diseases such as cancer, chronic pain syndromes, and chronic inflammatory conditions impose a considerable burden on families, the health care system, and society. Health related quality of life (HRQOL) is a concept that has developed from the need to estimate the impact of such chronic diseases. HRQOL measurement is a conceptual framework which attempts to predict daily function and well being based on subjective attitudes and experiences of physical, social, and emotional health. It has been evaluated predominantly from the patient's viewpoint as proxy respondents appear to underestimate the full effect of chronic illness on functional status. Measuring HRQOL in clinical research is most frequently undertaken using multi-item questionnaires to estimate daily function. Factors which affect HRQOL can be broadly classed as disease related and disease independent. The use of different assessment techniques permits comparisons between and within disorders. Generic and disease specific instruments used together enhance the ability to direct treatment for individuals and patient populations. Psychometrically sound questionnaires must be used. However, the type of instrument and research methods adopted depend on the question of interest. We have attempted to catalogue and critically assess the disease specific instruments used in the assessment of chronic gastrointestinal disease.

 PMID:10940286

  14. Quality of Life in Patients with Thyroid Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bahmani-Kashkouli, Mohsen; Pakdel, Farzad; Astaraki, Arezoo; Hashemi, Masih; Honarbakhsh, Yasamin; Mirarmandehi, Bahareh; Jam, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate quality of life (QOL) before and after corticosteroid therapy for thyroid eye disease (TED) and to determine the impact of the disease on QOL. Methods A modified TED-QOL questionnaire was completed by consecutive patients before and at least 6 months after steroid therapy. All patients were clinically and biochemically euthyroid during the course of the study. QOL was assessed in subscales of visual function, psychosocial, and educational/counseling; TED was classified by severity score (NOSPECS) and Mourits’ clinical activity score. Results Overall, 61 patients including 18 (29.5%) male and 43 (70.5%) female subjects with mean age of 37.3±13.7 (range, 18–33) years were enrolled. Mean duration of thyroid dysfunction and TED were 40.1±44.8 and 26.5±38.2 months, respectively. Mean disease severity and activity significantly decreased, and visual and psychosocial function scores significantly improved following corticosteroid therapy for TED. Psychosocial score was significantly worse than visual function score before but not after steroid treatment. Linear regression analysis and Spearman correlation test showed no significant correlation between duration of thyroid dysfunction, duration of TED, disease severity and activity on one hand, and QOL scores on the other hand, before or after treatment. Conclusion TED seems to adversely affect psychosocial activity more than visual function. Corticosteroid therapy significantly improves QOL. No significant correlation seems to exist between QOL scores and the severity or activity of TED. PMID:23198067

  15. Texercise Effectiveness: Impacts on Physical Functioning and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Ory, Marcia G; Smith, Matthew Lee; Jiang, Luohua; Howell, Doris; Chen, Shuai; Pulczinski, Jairus C; Stevens, Alan B

    2015-10-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of Texercise Select, a 12-week lifestyle program to improve physical functioning (as measured by gait speed) and quality of life. Baseline and 12-week follow-up assessments were collected from 220 enrollees who were older (mean = 75 years), predominantly female (85%), White (82%), and experiencing multiple comorbidities (mean = 2.4). Linear mixed-models were fitted for continuous outcome variables and GEE models with logit link function for binary outcome variables. At baseline, over 52% of participants had Timed Up-and-Go (TUG) test times of 12 s or more, which indicates below-normal performance. On average, participants showed significant reductions in TUG test scores at the postintervention (11% reduction, p < .001). Participants also showed significant improvements in general health status (p = .002), unhealthy physical days (p = .032), combined unhealthy physical and mental days (p = .006), and days limited from usual activity (p = .045). Findings suggest that performance indicators can be objectively collected and integrated into evaluation designs of community-based, activity-rich lifestyle programs.

  16. Quality of Life in Fibromyalgia Patients with Craniomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Di Venere, D; Corsalini, M; Stefanachi, G; Tafuri, S; De Tommaso, M; Cervinara, F; Re, A; Pettini, F

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a rheumatic disease which affects fibrous tissues and muscles; it is characterized by chronic pain and it is often associated with craniomandibular disorders (CMD). 31 patients were assessed from March 2012 to October 2012 through the administration of specific questionnaires and following neurologic and gnatologic assessment. A relevant corre-lation between FM and CMD emerges from the present study, as 80.6% of our patients report CMD symptoms with high prevalence of myofascial pain (84%). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that the patients in the present study did not differ in score of quality of life questionnaires from patients with fibromyalgia. The neuropathic pain diagnostic question-naire (DN4) scores were positively affected by belonging to group II of Research Diagnostic Criteria of Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/ TDM) classification, suggesting the possibility of a neuropathic component in chronic pain in this CMD group, as already speculated in our study on the correlation between burning mouth syndrome and CMD and by other au-thors in studies on chronic low back pain. However, further clinic and instrumental studies are needed in order to test this as-sumption. PMID:25674166

  17. Quality-of-life aspects in idiopathic epilepsy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wessmann, A; Volk, H A; Packer, R M A; Ortega, M; Anderson, T J

    2016-09-01

    Quality of life (QoL) plays a significant role in the treatment of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE), yet is so far understudied. This study describes the outcome evaluation of an online questionnaire based on the carer's perception focusing on 62 QoL questions in 159 dogs with IE. Results showed that seizure frequency, but not seizure severity or presence of cluster seizures, was significantly associated with carer-perceived dog's QoL. Dogs receiving third-line antiepileptic drugs had a significantly lower perceived QoL than those that did not. Generalised linear mixed model analysis demonstrated that severity of the side effects sleeping more and ataxia were significantly associated with carer-perceived dog's QoL, with higher severities predicting lower QoL scores. The degree of carer acceptability of seizure frequency and severity was significantly associated with the dog's reported seizure frequency and severity. Moreover, there was a significant association between IE-related QoL changes of the dog and the carer, with reductions in perceived canine QoL scores associated with reductions in carer QoL, and vice versa. In conclusion, aspects of canine IE can affect both the carer and their dog's QoL. This has implications for the management and requires consideration when treatment options and outcomes are discussed. PMID:27329504

  18. Capitalism, socialism, and the physical quality of life.

    PubMed

    Cereseto, S; Waitzkin, H

    1986-01-01

    This study compared capitalist and socialist countries in measures of the physical quality of life (PQL), taking into account the level of economic development. The World Bank was the principal source of statistical data, which pertained to 123 countries and approximately 97 percent of the world's population. PQL variables included indicators of health, health services, demographic conditions, and nutrition (infant mortality rate, child death rate, life expectancy, crude death rate, crude birth rate, population per physician, population per nursing person, and daily per capita calorie supply); measures of education (adult literacy rate, enrollment in secondary education, and enrollment in higher education); and a composite PQL index. All PQL measures improved as economic development increased. In 30 of 36 comparisons between countries at similar levels of economic development, socialist countries showed more favorable PQL outcomes (p less than .05 by two-tailed t-test). This work with the World Bank's raw data included cross-tabulations, analysis of variance, and regression techniques, which all confirmed the same conclusions. The data indicated that the socialist countries generally have achieved better PQL outcomes than the capitalist countries at equivalent levels of economic development. PMID:2430906

  19. Contemporary Quality of Life Issues Affecting Gynecologic Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jeanne; Penson, Richard; Barakat, Richard; Wenzel, Lari

    2015-01-01

    Gynecologic cancers account for approximately 11% of the newly diagnosed cancers in women in the United States and 18% in the world.1 The most common gynecologic malignancies occur in the uterus and endometrium (53%), ovary (25%), and cervix (14%).2 Cervical cancer is most prevalent in premenopausal women, during their childbearing years, whereas uterine and ovarian cancers tend to present in the perimenopausal or menopausal period. Vaginal and vulvar cancers and malignancies arising from gestation, or gestational trophoblastic neoplasms, occur to a lesser extent. Regardless of cancer origin or age of onset, the disease and its treatment can produce short- and long-term sequelae (ie, sexual dysfunction, infertility, or lymphedema) that adversely affect quality of life (QOL). This article outlines the primary contemporary issues or concerns that may affect QOL and offers strategies to offset or mitigate QOL disruption. These contemporary issues are identified within the domains of sexual functioning, reproductive issues, lymphedema, and the contribution of health-related QOL (HRQOL) in influential gynecologic cancer clinical trials. PMID:22244668

  20. Livestock odours and quality of life of neighbouring residents.

    PubMed

    Radon, Katja; Peters, Astrid; Praml, Georg; Ehrenstein, Vera; Schulze, Anja; Hehl, Oliver; Nowak, Dennis

    2004-01-01

    Neighbours of intensive livestock production facilities frequently complain of odour annoyance. They are also concerned about potential negative health effects of environmental exposures to livestock emissions. Quality of life (QoL) was assessed in residents of a rural community neighbouring an area with high concentration of animal farms. A postal cross-sectional survey was carried out among the 4,537 residents, aged 18-44 years. Of these, 3,112 (69 %) responded to questions on annoyance by livestock odours (4-point scale), on QoL (assessed by the short form 12, SF-12), and on potential confounders (age, gender, respiratory symptoms, smoking, living on or close to a farm, and employment status). SF-12 scores were available for 2745 (88 %) subjects. Sixty-one percent of the respondents complained about unpleasant odours, 91 % of these accused livestock as source of these odours. Physical and emotional SF-12 scores were inversely related to annoyance scores. Better risk communication might improve QoL in concerned neighbours of intensive livestock production facilities. PMID:15236499

  1. Neurofibromatosis: relinquishing the masks; a quest for quality of life.

    PubMed

    Messner, R; Smith, M N

    1986-07-01

    Neurofibromatosis (NF) or von Recklinghausen's disease is mankind's most common neurologic genetic disorder, occurring in one of every 3000 live births. While many individuals with NF suffer disfiguring, disabling, or life-threatening complications, NF is extremely variable in its symptoms, intensity, and progression. For many of its victims, NF is a pseudonym for uncertainty and physical and psychosocial havoc. John Merrick, 'The Elephant Man', endured one of the most severe cases of NF ever recorded. Merrick's rejection by post-Dickensian England forced him to become a sideshow circus attraction just to survive. The essence of nursing intervention with NF patients and their families engaged in the quest for quality of life is to restore them to optimal physical and psychosocial functioning, and, ideally, to help them utilize the experience for growth. Many individuals respond to the frustration of NF and society's reactions to the disorder by the wearing of psychological masks. Likewise, nurses may wear emotional masks as a defence against their own discomfort and fears concerning the disorders. Comprehensive nursing management of NF is realized only as nurses and patients relinquish their respective masks. This article examines the nurse's role in genetic disorders with special considerations presented by NF. Adaptation to NF involves coping with NF and its accompanying sequelae and coping with life as it is affected by NF. The concepts of 'chromosomal coping', 'genetophobia', 'genetic guilt, and 'genetic overload syndrome' are presented and analyzed utilizing the theoretical nursing frameworks of Imogene King and Sister Callista Roy.

  2. Capitalism, socialism, and the physical quality of life.

    PubMed

    Cereseto, S; Waitzkin, H

    1986-01-01

    This study compared capitalist and socialist countries in measures of the physical quality of life (PQL), taking into account the level of economic development. The World Bank was the principal source of statistical data, which pertained to 123 countries and approximately 97 percent of the world's population. PQL variables included indicators of health, health services, demographic conditions, and nutrition (infant mortality rate, child death rate, life expectancy, crude death rate, crude birth rate, population per physician, population per nursing person, and daily per capita calorie supply); measures of education (adult literacy rate, enrollment in secondary education, and enrollment in higher education); and a composite PQL index. All PQL measures improved as economic development increased. In 30 of 36 comparisons between countries at similar levels of economic development, socialist countries showed more favorable PQL outcomes (p less than .05 by two-tailed t-test). This work with the World Bank's raw data included cross-tabulations, analysis of variance, and regression techniques, which all confirmed the same conclusions. The data indicated that the socialist countries generally have achieved better PQL outcomes than the capitalist countries at equivalent levels of economic development.

  3. The impact of atopic dermatitis on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Lifschitz, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 5-20% of children worldwide suffer from atopic dermatitis (AD), a kind of dermatitis characterized as an inflammatory, relapsing, noncontagious and itchy skin disorder. Children often develop AD during their first year of life. An increased rate of sensitization to both food and aeroallergens has been shown to coexist in patients with AD. Sensitization to well-known allergens such as cow's milk protein can occur on average in 50% of children with AD. In general, quality of life (QoL) is perceived as the quality of an individual's daily life, that is, an assessment of their well-being or lack thereof. QoL is a broad concept that includes such things as standard of living, community, and family life. Patients with skin diseases experience a wide range of symptoms ranging from trivial problems to major handicaps which affect their lives. The misery of living with AD cannot be overstated for it may have a profoundly negative effect on the health-related QoL of children and their families in many cases. Physicians taking care of children with AD should consult parents on how their child's illness has impacted their lifestyle and recommend professional intervention if deemed necessary.

  4. Onychophagia is associated with impairment of quality of life.

    PubMed

    Pacan, Przemysław; Reich, Adam; Grzesiak, Magdalena; Szepietowski, Jacek C

    2014-11-01

    Onychophagia is defined as a chronic nail biting behaviour affecting about 20-30% of the general population. However, nail biting seems to be an ignored problem in a daily clinical practice. We have analysed the influence of onychophagia on quality of life (QoL) and stigmatisation level among 339 medical students with and without nail biting. Those with onychophagia demonstrated significantly higher QoL impairment compared to the controls (p < 0.001). Subjects who had been unable to stop nail biting behaviour in the past (p < 0.01) had visible nail abnormalities (p = 0.03), spent more time on nail biting (p = 0.02) and with a higher number of involved fingernails (p = 0.03), demonstrated further impaired QoL. Furthermore, tension before or when trying to resist nail biting (β = 12.5; p < 0.001), suffering due to nail biting (β  =12.6; p = 0.001) and nail eating behaviour (β = -7.5; p < 0.01) were independent variables influencing QoL. Participants with onychophagia also demonstrated higher level of stigmatisation (0.6 ± 1.2 vs. 0.2 ± 0.6 points, p < 0.01), although in both groups the stigmatisation level was low.

  5. Quality of life assessment in patients with neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Sergio Monteiro; Gurjão, Solange Aparecida

    2011-08-01

    Objective of this study to investigate the impact of NCC upon the quality of life (QoL) compared to other chronic neurological diseases, epilepsy and headache. The study group consisted of 114 patients subdivided into four groups: NCC with epilepsy (n = 48), NCC without epilepsy (n = 17), epilepsy without NCC (n = 25) and chronic headache (n = 24). The QoL was evaluated by direct subjective quantification (scale of 0-10) and FACT-HN IV. NCC had impact on QoL, 53.8% patients dependent and needing help. The impact on QoL did not correlate with the classification of NCC, presence of cysts or calcifications and with CSF TP or number of WBCs. The presence of depression had a significant impact on the QoL of patients with NCC. Lack of seizure control tended to produce an adverse effect on the QoL in the group of NCC and epilepsy. NCC is not a benign disease; it has greater adverse effects on QoL of patients than epilepsy and headache, although without statistical significance. The presence of depression and uncontrolled seizures may have impact on QoL. Since asymptomatic patients were not evaluated, the results of this study are not applicable to all individuals with NCC.

  6. Patients' direction, empowerment and quality of life in haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, Davide; Cicognani, Elvira; Laghi, Marinella; Sgarlato, Veronica; Mosconi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of an adequate of quality of life (QoL) represents a critical issue in the management of patients in haemodialysis and is also used to assess the effectiveness of health care programmes. The Consumer Direction Theory of Empowerment (CDTE) implies that greater patient direction in policy formulation and services delivery, together with an increased community integration, endorses a process which leads to a better QOL. The aim of the study was to test a contextualized version of CDTE in an ambulatory for patients in haemodialysis. Sixty-nine patients completed a questionnaire measuring the following variables: Patient direction, family integration, self-efficacy in managing the disease, mental and physical health. The results showed that patient direction and family integration have an indirect effect on QoL, through self-efficacy in managing the disease. The hypotheses were thus confirmed, providing support for the potential of CDTE in the context of health services for haemodialysis patients. Implications for the implementation of health programmes aimed at improving QoL of patients in haemodialysis are discussed, including interventions focused on psychological and contextual factors.

  7. Quality of life in fibromyalgia patients with craniomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Di Venere, D; Corsalini, M; Stefanachi, G; Tafuri, S; De Tommaso, M; Cervinara, F; Re, A; Pettini, F

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a rheumatic disease which affects fibrous tissues and muscles; it is characterized by chronic pain and it is often associated with craniomandibular disorders (CMD). 31 patients were assessed from March 2012 to October 2012 through the administration of specific questionnaires and following neurologic and gnatologic assessment. A relevant corre-lation between FM and CMD emerges from the present study, as 80.6% of our patients report CMD symptoms with high prevalence of myofascial pain (84%). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that the patients in the present study did not differ in score of quality of life questionnaires from patients with fibromyalgia. The neuropathic pain diagnostic question-naire (DN4) scores were positively affected by belonging to group II of Research Diagnostic Criteria of Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/ TDM) classification, suggesting the possibility of a neuropathic component in chronic pain in this CMD group, as already speculated in our study on the correlation between burning mouth syndrome and CMD and by other au-thors in studies on chronic low back pain. However, further clinic and instrumental studies are needed in order to test this as-sumption.

  8. Quality of life among adults with confirmed dengue in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Celina Maria Turchi; Nascimento, Nazareth Elias; Suaya, Jose A; Siqueira, Joao Bosco; Souza, Wayner Vieira; Turchi, Marilia Dalva; Guilarde, Adriana Oliveira; Peres, Joao Borges; Shepard, Donald S

    2011-10-01

    The main objective of this study was to measure the quality of life (QoL) during a dengue episode. We conducted a facility-based survey in central Brazil in 2005 and recruited 372 laboratory-confirmed dengue patients greater than 12 years of age in hospital and ambulatory settings. We administered the World Health Organization QoL instrument approximately 15 days after the onset of symptoms. We used principal component analysis with varimax rotation to identify domains related to QoL. The median age of interviewees was 36 years. Most (85%) reported their general health status as very good or good before the dengue episode. Although ambulatory patients were mainly classified as having dengue fever, 44.8% of hospitalized patients had dengue hemorrhagic fever or intermediate dengue. Principal component analysis identified five principal components related to cognition, sleep and energy, mobility, self-care, pain, and discomfort, which explained 73% of the variability of the data matrix. Hospitalized patients had significantly lower mean scores for dimensions cognition, self-care, and pain than ambulatory patients. This investigation documented the generally poor QoL during a dengue episode caused by the large number of domains affected and significant differences between health care settings.

  9. Quality of life in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ghofrani, Hossein-Ardeschir; Mayer, Eckhard; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Nikkho, Sylvia; Simonneau, Gérald

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) experience debilitating symptoms that have a negative impact on their quality of life (QoL) in terms of physical capability, psychological wellbeing and social relationships. The use of QoL measurement tools is important in the assessment of treatment efficacy and in guiding treatment decisions. However, despite the importance of QoL, particularly to the patient, it remains under-reported in clinical studies of CTEPH therapy. CTEPH is unique in pulmonary hypertension in that it is potentially curable by surgery; however, a proportion of patients either have residual PH following surgery or are not operable. Although some patients with CTEPH have been treated off-label with pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific therapies, there have been few randomised controlled trials of these therapies in patients with CTEPH. Moreover, in these trials QoL outcomes are variably assessed, and there is little consistency in the tools used. Here we review the assessment of QoL in patients with CTEPH and the tools that have been used. We also discuss the effect of surgical intervention and medical therapies on QoL. We conclude that further studies of QoL in patients with CTEPH are needed to further validate the optimal QoL tools. PMID:27076580

  10. Children's perspective of quality of life in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Aileen M.; Streiner, David L.; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Cunningham, Charles E.; Lach, Lucyna M.; Boyle, Michael H.; Ronen, Gabriel M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study child mental health, parental support, and social support of children with epilepsy as these relate to quality of life (QOL) using child self-report, seizure-related variables, and estimated verbal intelligence based on receptive vocabulary. Methods: A cross-sectional structural equation model of baseline data from the QUALITÉ cohort study, which includes 6 Canadian child epilepsy ambulatory programs. A sample of 3,481 children were screened for the following eligibility: 8 to 14 years of age, with active or medication-managed epilepsy. Of 894 eligible children, 506 agreed to participate, of whom 26 were then excluded because of an inability to self-report based on a standard cutoff score of receptive vocabulary lower than 70. The primary outcome of child-reported QOL was measured using the Child Epilepsy QOL Questionnaire. Results: From the child's perspective, epilepsy-specific QOL is strongly related to their mental health and social support but not to their seizures. Specifically, child mental health and peer support exhibit direct associations with QOL; parental support has both direct and indirect associations with QOL (via child mental health); estimated verbal intelligence exerts its strongest association with QOL through mental health; and seizure status exhibits a weak relationship to QOL only through mental health. Conclusions: Among children with epilepsy aged 8 to 14 years, mental health and social support should be areas of focus in the assessment of QOL. Controlling seizures is insufficient care for influencing the child's perception of their life. PMID:25841031

  11. Costs and quality of life in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Lucioni, Carlo; Finelli, Carlo; Mazzi, Silvio; Oliva, Esther N

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) encompass a range of myeloid neoplasms characterised by a defect in haematopoietic stem cell maturation, resulting in peripheral cytopenias. As a major consequence, most MDS patients become anaemic, so as to require red blood cell transfusions. To investigate the costs and the impact on quality of life (QOL) of MDS-separately in transfusion-independent (TI) and -dependent (TD) patients-a literature search was conducted. From Medline and Embase, 742 studies were identified, of which 17 were considered eligible. Total medical costs per patient/year range from $ 9,840 to $ 19,811 for the TI condition and from $ 29,608 to $ 51,066 in the TD condition, more than doubling when moving from the former condition to the latter. With regard to QOL, in the transition from TI to TD, QOL could be reduced by half depending on the studies. The TD condition negatively impacts on costs and the QOL of patients with MDS. Therapeutic strategies that reduce transfusion dependence may lead to broad benefits for patients and the community. PMID:23997987

  12. Quality of life following endonasal skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Pant, Harshita; Bhatki, Amol M; Snyderman, Carl H; Vescan, Allan D; Carrau, Ricardo L; Gardner, Paul; Prevedello, Daniel; Kassam, Amin B

    2010-01-01

    The importance of quality of life (QOL) outcomes following treatments for head and neck tumors are now increasingly appreciated and measured to improve medical and surgical care for these patients. An understanding of the definitions in the setting of health care and the use of appropriate QOL instruments and measures are critical to obtain meaningful information that guides decision making in various aspects of patient health care. QOL outcomes following cranial base surgery is only recently being defined. In this article, we describe the current published data on QOL outcomes following cranial base surgery and provide preliminary prospective data on QOL outcomes and sinonasal morbidity in patients who underwent endonasal cranial base surgery for management of various skull base tumors at our institution. We used a disease-specific multidimensional instrument to measure QOL outcomes in these patients. Our results show that although sinonasal morbidity is increased, this is temporary, and the vast majority of patients have a very good QOL by 4 to 6 months after endonasal approach to the cranial base. PMID:20592856

  13. Politics drives human functioning, dignity, and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Barber, Brian K; Spellings, Carolyn; McNeely, Clea; Page, Paul D; Giacaman, Rita; Arafat, Cairo; Daher, Mahmoud; El Sarraj, Eyad; Mallouh, Mohammed Abu

    2014-12-01

    Too little is known about human functioning amidst chronic adversity. We addressed that need by studying adult Palestinians in the occupied Palestinian territories (oPt), a population that has experienced longstanding economic and political hardships. Fourteen group interviews were conducted in February, 2010 in Arabic by local fieldworkers with 68 participants representing the main stratifications of Palestinian society: gender, region, refugee status, and political affiliation. Interview tasks included each participant: describing someone doing well and not well, free listing domains of functioning, and prioritizing domains to the three most important. Thematic analyses highlighted the dominating role of the political domain of functioning (e.g., political structures, constraints, effects, identity, and activism) and the degree to which political conditions impacted all other realms of functioning (economic, education, family, psychological, etc.). The discussion links the findings to relevant theory and empirical work that has called attention to the need to include the political in frameworks of quality of life. It also emphasized that values, such as justice, rights, dignity and self-determination, that underlie political structures and policies, are key elements of human functioning. This is the case not only in the oPt, but in any society where power imbalances marginalize segments of the population.

  14. ‘Just give me the best quality of life questionnaire’: the Karnofsky scale and the history of quality of life measurements in cancer trials

    PubMed Central

    Timmermann, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To use the history of the Karnofsky Performance Scale as a case study illustrating the emergence of interest in the measurement and standardisation of quality of life; to understand the origins of current-day practices. Methods: Articles referring to the Karnofsky scale and quality of life measurements published from the 1940s to the 1990s were identified by searching databases and screening journals, and analysed using close-reading techniques. Secondary literature was consulted to understand the context in which articles were written. Results: The Karnofsky scale was devised for a different purpose than measuring quality of life: as a standardisation device that helped quantify effects of chemotherapeutic agents less easily measurable than survival time. Interest in measuring quality of life only emerged around 1970. Discussion: When quality of life measurements were increasingly widely discussed in the medical press from the late 1970s onwards, a consensus emerged that the Karnofsky scale was not a very good tool. More sophisticated approaches were developed, but Karnofsky continued to be used. I argue that the scale provided a quick and simple, approximate assessment of the ‘soft’ effects of treatment by physicians, overlapping but not identical with quality of life. PMID:23239756

  15. The relationship between quality of life and coping strategies in polycystic ovary syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Kolahi, Leila; Asemi, Neda; Mirzaei, Mohammadreza; Adibi, Neda; Beiraghdar, Mina; Mehr, Asieh Maghami

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are many factors that affect the quality of life, for example, stress and the coping strategies. Polycystic ovary syndrome is a common hormonal disorder leading to menstrual disorders, hirsutism, acne, obesity, infertility and abortion. In such cases, the patients suffer from a variety of stresses and face problems in their coping strategies with life's problems which can affect the quality of life and cause psychological distress and low the quality of life. The quality of life is a descriptive term which points to health and emotional, social and physical promotion of individuals as well as their ability to perform daily living tasks. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between quality of life and coping strategies in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. Materials and Methods: To perform this study, randomly 200 women who had inclusion criteria and were referred to Ali Shariati Hospital in Isfahan were selected and responded DLQI questionnaire and Carver coping strategies and form of demographic characteristics. Results: The mean score of quality of life in the patients was 4.14 ± 5.57. It was shown that acne has no effective role on quality of life and coping strategies in contrast in hirsute and non-hirsute patients; there was a significant difference in quality of life P value < 0.001). Also there is a significant relationship between the quality of life and coping strategies (problem solving, cognitive, emotional and social support) (P < 0.05) and quality of life has the highest correlation with emotional strategies (r = 0.46). Conclusion: According to results of this study, patients with PCOS are at risk pcychologicla disorders that may be led to decrease of quality of life. Thus this patients need to support by oppositions strategies. Also not only physical treatment but also psychological surveillance especially social support must be done for them. PMID:26436082

  16. The relative contribution of domains of quality of life to overall quality of life for different chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Arnold, R; Ranchor, A V; Sanderman, R; Kempen, G I J M; Ormel, J; Suurmeijer, T P B M

    2004-06-01

    This study examined the contribution of the quality of life (QoL) domains physical, social and psychological functioning to the explanation of overall QoL. Various disorders may differentially affect QoL domains due to disease-specific factors and, consequently, the relationship between QoL domains and overall QoL may vary between diseases. We therefore studied this relationship for several diseases as well as the differential impact of these diseases on QoL. The present study had a cross-sectional design. We selected patients (aged 57 years and older) with one of the following eight chronic medical conditions: lung disorder, heart condition, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, back problems, rheumatoid arthritis, migraine, or dermatological disorders. The total group of respondents included 1457 patients and 1851 healthy subjects. Regression analyses showed that the domain of psychological functioning contributed to overall QoL for all disorders, whereas physical and social functioning contributed to overall QoL for some disorders. Differences were found between most patient groups and healthy subjects with respect to physical functioning; with respect to social and psychological functioning some groups differed from the healthy group. Explanations for the findings and implications for clinical practice are discussed. PMID:15233502

  17. Early Quality of Life in Patients with Localized Prostate Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Eton, David T.; Lepore, Stephen J.; Helgeson, Vicki S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Men with localized prostate carcinoma are faced with important treatment decisions, and quality of life (QoL) information has become a crucial element of decision making. The first objective of this study was to compare the early, health-related QoL (HRQoL) of men with localized prostate carcinoma who were treated with radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy, or brachytherapy. A second objective was to identify demographic and psychosocial variables that predict HRQoL. METHODS Two-hundred fifty-six men with localized prostate carcinoma were interviewed within 7 weeks of treatment initiation. The interview included measures of prostate-specific HRQoL (the University of California—Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index), general HRQoL (the SF-36), and psychosocial variables. RESULTS After adjusting for covariates, treatment group differences were found for both prostate specific HRQoL and general HRQoL. Men who underwent prostatectomy reported more urinary and sexual problems and more general physical dysfunction compared with men who were treated with either form of radiation therapy. Men who were treated with brachytherapy reported the fewest problems in sexual function and the least general physical dysfunction. Few treatment group differences were found in mental functioning. Both demographic factors and psychosocial factors predicted HRQoL. Older men and African-American men reported more physical problems than younger men and Caucasian men, respectively. A supportive social environment, high self-efficacy, and high self-esteem were predictive of better HRQoL. CONCLUSIONS Shortly after undergoing treatment for localized prostate carcinoma, men who underwent radical prostatectomy, older men, and African-American men are at heightened risk for experiencing prostate-specific and general deficits in HRQoL. Having psychosocial resources from which to draw may enhance HRQoL. PMID:11745222

  18. The influence of obesity on falls and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Fjeldstad, Cecilie; Fjeldstad, Anette S; Acree, Luke S; Nickel, Kevin J; Gardner, Andrew W

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine (1) whether obese older adults had higher prevalence of falls and ambulatory stumbling, impaired balance and lower health-related quality of life (HRQL) than their normal weight counterparts, and (2) whether the falls and balance measures were associated with HRQL in obese adults. Methods Subjects who had a body mass index (BMI) greater than 30 kg/m2 were classified into an obese group (n = 128) while those with BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 kg/m2 were included into a normal weight group (n = 88). Functional tests were performed to assess balance, and questionnaires were administered to assess history of falls, ambulatory stumbling, and HRQL. Results The obese group reported a higher prevalence of falls (27% vs. 15%), and ambulatory stumbling (32% vs. 14%) than the normal weight group. Furthermore, the obese group had lower HRQL, (p ≤ 0.05) for physical function (63 ± 27 vs. 75 ± 26; mean ± SD), role-physical (59 ± 40 vs. 74 ± 37), vitality (58 ± 23 vs. 66 ± 20), bodily pain (62 ± 25 vs. 74 ± 21) and general health (64 ± 19 vs. 70 ± 18). In the obese group, a history of falls was related (p ≤ 0.05) to lower scores in 4 domains of HRQL, and ambulatory stumbling was related (p ≤ 0.01) to 7 domains. Conclusion In middle-aged and older adults, obesity was associated with a higher prevalence of falls and stumbling during ambulation, as well as lower values in multiple domains of HRQL. Furthermore, a history of falls and ambulatory stumbling were related to lower measures of HRQL in obese adults. PMID:18304350

  19. Dispositional optimism and terminal decline in global quality of life.

    PubMed

    Zaslavsky, Oleg; Palgi, Yuval; Rillamas-Sun, Eileen; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Schnall, Eliezer; Woods, Nancy F; Cochrane, Barbara B; Garcia, Lorena; Hingle, Melanie; Post, Stephen; Seguin, Rebecca; Tindle, Hilary; Shrira, Amit

    2015-06-01

    We examined whether dispositional optimism relates to change in global quality of life (QOL) as a function of either chronological age or years to impending death. We used a sample of 2,096 deceased postmenopausal women from the Women's Health Initiative clinical trials who were enrolled in the 2005-2010 Extension Study and for whom at least 1 global QOL and optimism measure were analyzed. Growth curve models were examined. Competing models were contrasted using model fit criteria. On average, levels of global QOL decreased with both higher age and closer proximity to death (e.g., M(score) = 7.7 eight years prior to death vs. M(score) = 6.1 one year prior to death). A decline in global QOL was better modeled as a function of distance to death (DtD) than as a function of chronological age (Bayesian information criterion [BIC](DtD) = 22,964.8 vs. BIC(age) = 23,322.6). Optimism was a significant correlate of both linear (estimate(DtD) = -0.01, SE(DtD) = 0.005; ρ = 0.004) and quadratic (estimate(DtD) = -0.006, SE(DtD) = 0.002; ρ = 0.004) terminal decline in global QOL so that death-related decline in global QOL was steeper among those with a high level of optimism than those with a low level of optimism. We found that dispositional optimism helps to maintain positive psychological perspective in the face of age-related decline. Optimists maintain higher QOL compared with pessimists when death-related trajectories were considered; however, the gap between those with high optimism and those with low optimism progressively attenuated with closer proximity to death, to the point that is became nonsignificant at the time of death.

  20. Relationships between quality of life and family function in caregiver

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There are caregivers who see their quality of life (QoL) impaired due to the demands of their caregiving tasks, while others manage to adapt and overcome the crises successfully. The influence of the family function in the main caregiver's situation has not been the subject of much evaluation. The aim of this study is to analyse the relationship between the functionality of the family and the QoL of caregivers of dependent relatives. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study including 153 caregivers. Setting: Two health centers in the city of Salamanca(Spain). Caregiver variables analysed: demographic characteristics, care recipient features; family functionality (Family APGAR-Q) and QoL (Ruiz-Baca-Q) perceived by the caregiver. Five multiple regressions are performed considering global QoL and each of the four QoL dimensions as dependent variables. The Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) was used to study the influence of the family function questionnaire on QoL. Results Family function is the only one of the variables evaluated that presented an association both with global QoL and with each of the four individual dimensions (p < 0.05). Using the CCA, we found that the physical and mental well-being dimensions are the ones which present a closer relationship with family functionality, while social support is the quality dimension that is least influenced by the Family APGAR-Q. Conclusion We find an association between family functionality and the caregiver's QoL. This relation holds for both the global measure of QoL and each of its four individual dimensions. PMID:21496270

  1. Comorbidities, Social Impact, and Quality of Life in Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eapen, Valsamma; Cavanna, Andrea E.; Robertson, Mary M.

    2016-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is more than having motor and vocal tics, and this review will examine the varied comorbidities as well as the social impact and quality of life (QoL) in individuals with TS. The relationship between any individual and his/her environment is complex, and this is further exaggerated in the case of a person with TS. For example, tics may play a significant role in shaping the person’s experiences, perceptions, and interactions with the environment. Furthermore, associated clinical features, comorbidities, and coexisting psychopathologies may compound or alter this relationship. In this regard, the common comorbidities include attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and disruptive behaviors, obsessive compulsive disorder, and autism spectrum disorder, and coexistent problems include anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem, which can all lead to poorer psychosocial functioning and QoL. Thus, the symptoms of TS and the associated comorbid conditions may interact to result in a vicious cycle or a downward spiraling of negative experiences and poor QoL. The stigma and social maladjustment in TS and the social exclusion, bullying, and discrimination are considered to be caused in large part by misperceptions of the disorder by teachers, peers, and the wider community. Improved community and professional awareness about TS and related comorbidities and other psychopathologies as well as the provision of multidisciplinary services to meet the complex needs of this clinical population are critical. Future research to inform the risk and resilience factors for successful long-term outcomes is also warranted. PMID:27375503

  2. Quality of life among pulmonary hypertension patients in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Kukkonen, Merja; Puhakka, Airi; Halme, Maija

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was to examine pulmonary hypertension (PH) patients’ quality of life (QOL) for the first time in Finland. Methods This was a non-interventional, cross-sectional study. The SF-36v2 questionnaire was sent to the PH patients who had been referred to or followed up on at the Helsinki University Central Hospital's pulmonary clinic for idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, associated pulmonary arterial hypertension (APAH), or chronic thromboembolic PH (CTEPH). The patients were on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) – specific drugs, were at least 18 years old, and had signed an informed consent. Results There were 62 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria, and 53% of respondents rated their health as moderate. Similarly, 55% of respondents rated their health status approximately the same compared to their situation 1 year ago. QOL was impaired in all other subscales, except for the mental health and mental component score. A majority of patients suffered from PH symptoms, which worsened their QOL. The greatest impact on their QOL was associated with a high World Health Organization (WHO) functional class (FC), poor performance in a 6-min walking test (6MWT), symptoms, oxygen therapy, elevated pro-brain natriuretic peptide, pericardial effusion, APAH etiology, and being retired from work. Conclusions The respondents had a reduced QOL, compared to the general population, in all other subscales, except for mental health. APAH patients had the worst QOL. Good results in functional capacity measures (WHO FC, 6MWT) were associated with a better QOL. Patients’ QOL can be improved by reducing the symptoms of PAH. PMID:26787306

  3. Quality of life in purely ocular myasthenia in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Since there has been no conclusive evidence regarding the treatment of ocular myasthenia, treatment guidelines were recently issued by the European Federation of Neurological Societies/European Neurological Society (EFNS/ENS). However, the therapeutic outcomes concerning the quality-of-life (QOL) of patients with ocular myasthenia are not yet fully understood. Methods We investigated the therapeutic outcomes of patients with purely ocular myasthenia in a multicenter cross-sectional survey in Japan. To evaluate the severity of ocular symptoms, we used the ocular-quantitative MG (QMG) score advocated by Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America. We used the Japanese translated version of the MG-QOL15, a self-appraised scoring system. Results Of 607 myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with an observation-duration of illness ≥ 2 years, the cases of 123 patients (20%) were limited to ocular muscles (purely ocular myasthenia). During the entire clinical course, 81 patients experienced both ptosis and diplopia, 36 had ptosis alone, and six had diplopia alone. Acetyl-cholinesterase inhibitors and prednisolone were used in 98 and 52 patients, respectively. Treatment improved ocular symptoms, with the mean reduction in ocular-QMG score of 2.3 ± 1.8 points. However, 47 patients (38%) failed to gain minimal manifestation or a better status. Patients with unfavorable outcomes also self-reported severe QOL impairment. Multivariate analyses showed that the pretreatment ocular-QMG score was associated with unfavorable outcomes, but not associated with the patient’s QOL. Conclusion A treatment strategy designed in accord with a patient's ocular presentation must be considered in order to improve ocular symptoms and the patient's QOL. PMID:24996227

  4. Sex differences in quality of life after ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Mathew J.; Zhao, Xin; Pan, Wenqin; Prvu-Bettger, Janet; Zimmer, Louise; Olson, DaiWai; Peterson, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to compare quality of life (QOL) in women and men after ischemic stroke or TIA, and to determine the incremental impact of demographic, socioeconomic, clinical, and stroke-specific effects on longitudinal QOL. Methods: We assessed QOL in patients with ischemic stroke or TIA at 3 and 12 months postdischarge in the Adherence eValuation After Ischemic stroke–Longitudinal Registry using the European Quality of Life–5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) instrument. We generated multivariable linear regression models to evaluate the association between sex and EQ-5D while sequentially adjusting for sociodemographic, clinical, and stroke-related variables. We also used a proportional odds model to assess sex differences in the change in EQ-5D scores from 3 to 12 months. Results: A total of 1,370 patients were included, 53.7% male, median age 65 years (interquartile range 56–77 years). Women had significantly lower QOL at 3 months (unadjusted EQ-5D 0.81 in women vs 0.84 in men; p < 0.001) and 12 months (0.83 vs men 0.84; p < 0.001) poststroke. After multivariable adjustment for sociodemographic, clinical, and stroke-related factors, women continued to have lower QOL at 3 months (mean difference −0.036; p = 0.003) and at 12 months (mean difference −0.022; p = 0.046). Women fared worse in the dimensions of mobility, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression at 3 and 12 months. There were no sex differences in change in EQ-5D score from 3 to 12 months. Conclusion: Women have worse QOL than men up to 12 months after stroke, even after adjusting for important sociodemographic variables, stroke severity, and disability. PMID:24510493

  5. Assessment of quality of life in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Torres-Carranza, Eusebio; Infante-Cossío, Pedro; Hernández-Guisado, José María; Hens-Aumente, Elena; Gutierrez-Pérez, José Luis

    2008-11-01

    Quality of life (QL) in oral cancer patients has become one of the most important parameters to consider in the diagnosis and post-treatment follow-up. The purpose of this article has been to review the papers published that study the QL in oral cancer patients, the different QL questionnaires used, the clinical results obtained, and the systematic revisions available in the indexed literature for the last 10 years. The term QL appears as a keyword in an increasing number of articles throughout the past 10 years; however, few studies focus on oral cancer. Most of them assess all head and neck cancers, which conform to a heterogeneous group with several different features depending on location (oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, hypopharynx, nasopharynx and salivary glands). Most studies evaluate QL in short periods of time, normally within the first year after the diagnosis. Series do not discern between different therapeutic options, and they generally center on Northern European or Northern American populations. There are few instruments translated and validated into Spanish that measure QL, a fundamental characteristic to link QL to own patients' socio-cultural parameters. Data related with QL are mostly related to patient (age, sex, co-morbidity), tumour (location, size), and treatment (surgical treatment, radiotherapy association, reconstruction, cervical dissection, and/or feeding tube). Nowadays QL's assessment is considered an essential component of an oral cancer patient as well as the survival, morbidity and years free of disease. Although many aspects related to QL in oral cancer patients have been published throughout the past 10 years, more systematic research is needed to be able to apply it on a daily basis.

  6. Quality of life and outcomes in African Americans with CKD.

    PubMed

    Porter, Anna; Fischer, Michael J; Wang, Xuelei; Brooks, Deborah; Bruce, Marino; Charleston, Jeanne; Cleveland, William H; Dowie, Donna; Faulkner, Marquetta; Gassman, Jennifer; Hiremath, Leena; Kendrick, Cindy; Kusek, John W; Norris, Keith C; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Greene, Tom; Lash, James P

    2014-08-01

    Low health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has been associated with increased risk for hospitalization and death in ESRD. However, the relationship of HRQOL with outcomes in predialysis CKD is not well understood. We evaluated the association between HRQOL and renal and cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in 1091 African Americans with hypertensive CKD enrolled in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) trial and cohort studies. Outcomes included CKD progression (doubling of serum creatinine/ESRD), CV events/CV death, and a composite of CKD progression or death from any cause (CKD progression/death). We assessed HRQOL, including mental health composite (MHC) and physical health composite (PHC), using the Short Form-36 survey. Cox regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between outcomes and five-point decrements in MHC and PHC scores using measurements at baseline, at the most recent annual visit (time-varying), or averaged from baseline to the most recent visit (cumulative). During approximately 10 years of follow-up, lower mean PHC score was associated with increased risk of CV events/CV death and CKD progression/death across all analytic approaches, but only time-varying and cumulative decrements were associated with CKD progression. Similarly, lower mean MHC score was associated with increased risk of CV events/CV death regardless of analytic approach, while only time-varying and cumulative decrements in mean MHC score was associated with CKD progression and CKD progression or death. In conclusion, lower HRQOL is associated with a range of adverse outcomes in African Americans with hypertensive CKD.

  7. Oral cancer malnutrition impacts weight and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Handschel, Jörg; Holtmann, Henrik; Krüskemper, Gertrud

    2015-04-01

    Diet is important for both quality of life (QoL) and survival of patients with oral cancer. Their intake of food is impeded by functional restrictions in chewing and swallowing. In the DÖSAK REHAB STUDY 1652 patients from 38 hospitals within the German-language area of Germany; Austria and Switzerland were examined with regard to functional and psychological variables having an impact on diet. Chewing and swallowing are correlated with mobility of the tongue and the mandible as well as opening of the mouth. Thirty five percent of the patients lost weight; 41% maintained their weight and 24% gained weight. The QoL of patients who were able to maintain their weight and of those who gained weight was significantly better than that of patients who lost weight. A normal diet was important for maintaining weight. Mashed food; liquid food and loss of appetite were closely associated with loss of weight; although it was possible for nutritional counseling and dietary support to be implemented particularly favorably in this respect. Due to problems with eating patients' strength deteriorated; thus restricting activity. Radiotherapy had a negative impact on diet and weight. It influenced sense of taste; dryness of the mouth; swelling and discomfort when ingesting food. Pain and scars in the region of the operation also cause patients to dislike hard; spicy and sour food. Support from a nutritional counselor in implementing a calorie-rich diet remedied this and such support needs to be integrated into patient management. The fact that a poor nutritional status is of such great importance is well-known; but what is often lacking is the systematic implementation of continued professional nutritional counseling over a long period of time; weight control and psycho-social support of the operated patients; particularly those who also have had radiotherapy. PMID:25825828

  8. Quality of life in epileptic patients compared with healthy people

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Ali; Salarilak, Shaker; Lotfabadi, Pegah; Kiani, Fereshte; Rajabi, Abdolhalim; Mansori, Kamyar; Moosavi Jahromi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is a common chronic neurological disorder that has a great impact on people’s lives. Patients with epilepsy are at increased risk for poor Quality of Life (QoL). The objective of this study was to evaluate the QoL of epileptic patients in comparison to healthy persons. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 52 epileptic patients from Golbu region in Neyshabur (a city in northeast of Iran). Using Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) scale, the data were collected between April and Jun 2012. Every patient were compared with two healthy persons. Epileptic and healthy persons were similar for age, sex and local residence. Pearson’s correlation coefficient and t-independent test applied for data analysis through SPSS v. 16 software. Results: Of 52 epileptic patients, 24 were female (46.2%) and 28 were male (53.8%). The mean±SD age of epileptic patients was 40.92±20.33yr (Rang: 15-86yr). The total mean score of SF- 36 in patient group was 55.88 and in healthy group 68.52and this difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). Among the different subscales of SF-36 in epileptic patients, the highest and the lowest mean scores were found for social functioning and general health subscales, respectively. The mean scores in patient group in comparison to healthy group were lower in all subscales of SF-36 and these differences were statistically significant in all domains (except role limitations due to physical problems domain and role limitations due to emotional problems domain). Conclusion: The study showed that epilepsy disease has an important role in QoL of patients, thus some interventional programs are necessary to improve their QOL. PMID:27493932

  9. Sensory Impairment and Health-Related Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    KWON, Hye-Jin; KIM, Ji-su; KIM, Yoon-jung; KWON, Su-jin; YU, Jin-Na

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sensory impairment is a common condition that exerts negative effects on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in the elderly. This study aimed to determine the relationship between sensory impairment and HRQoL and identify sensory-specific differences in the HRQoL of elderly. Methods: This study used data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey V (2010–2012), analyzing 5,260 subjects over 60 years of age who completed ophthalmic and otologic examinations. Vision and hearing impairment were measured and classified. HRQoL was determined according to the European QoL five dimension test (EQ-5D). Multivariate logistic regression analysis and analysis of covariance were performed to identify relationships between sensory impairment and HRQoL dimensions as well as differences in HRQoL scores. Results: In the final adjusted multivariate model, there was a statistically higher proportion of those with dual sensory impairment who reported problems with mobility (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.45–5.03), usual activities (aOR 2.32, 95% CI 1.16–4.64), and pain/discomfort among EQ-5D subcategories (aOR 1.79, 95% CI 1.07–2.97). In the EQ-5D dimensions, the means and standard deviations of vision impairment (0.86 [0.01]) and dual sensory impairment (0.84 [0.02]) appeared meaningfully lower than those for no sensory impairment (0.88 [0.00]) or hearing impairment (0.88 [0.01]); P = .02). Conclusion: Sensory impairment reduces HRQoL in the elderly. Improvement of HRQoL in the elderly thus requires regular screening and appropriate management of sensory impairment. PMID:26258089

  10. Ethnic Differences in Caregiver Quality of Life in Pediatric Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Everhart, Robin S.; Mitchell, Daphne Koinis; McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Kopel, Sheryl; Seifer, Ronald; Canino, Glorisa; Fritz, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine ethnic and site differences in quality of life (QOL) in a sample of Latino (Puerto Rican and Dominican) and non-Latino White (NLW) caregivers of children with asthma in mainland US and Island PR. We also investigated ethnic and site differences in associations between caregiver QOL and indicators of asthma morbidity. Method Seven-hundred and eighty-seven children with asthma (7–16 years of age) and their primary caregivers participated. Primary caregivers completed a measure of QOL, child asthma control, and emergency department utilization, among other measures. Results Ethnic and site differences were found on total QOL scores (ΔF(1, 783) = 29.46, p < .001). Island PR caregivers reported worse QOL scores than RI Latino and NLW caregivers; RI Latino caregivers reported significantly worse QOL scores than NLW caregivers. In RI Latino and Island PR children, worse caregiver QOL was associated with asthma that was not in control and with 1 or more ED visits. Conclusion Latino caregivers may be experiencing a greater level of burden related to their child’s asthma than NLW caregivers. Caregiver QOL in pediatric asthma may be a reflection of broader, contextual stress that some Latino caregivers experience on a daily basis (e.g., cultural beliefs, acculturation). Future research should continue to investigate mechanisms that explain the burden associated with pediatric asthma in Latino families, as well as whether QOL assessments should consider the impact of everyday stressors on caregiver QOL in pediatric asthma. PMID:23027132

  11. Malocclusion and quality of life in Brazilian preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Raulison V; Clementino, Marayza A; Gomes, Monalisa C; Martins, Carolina C; Granville-Garcia, Ana F; Paiva, Saul M

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of malocclusion on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among preschool children and their families. This study involved 732 preschoolers. Parents/caregivers filled out the Brazilian version of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (B-ECOHIS) and a questionnaire addressing sociodemographic data. Overbite, overjet, and crossbite were recorded during the clinical examination. Bivariate and multiple Poisson regression analyses were performed and prevalence ratio (PR) were calculated (α = 5%). The prevalence of negative impact from malocclusion on OHRQoL was 27.6% among the children and 22.3% among the families. Mother's schooling (PR = 1.37; 95% CI: 1.10-1.70), parent's/caregiver's assessment of child's oral health (PR = 2.07; 95% CI: 1.60-2.58), history of toothache (PR = 3.84; 95% CI: 2.34-6.30), and visits to the dentist (PR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.37-0.94) remained significantly associated with OHRQoL in the final model for the children, whereas parent's/caregiver's assessment of child's oral health (PR = 2.32; 95% CI: 1.71-3.14) and history of toothache (PR = 2.28; 95% CI: 1.69-3.09) remained significantly associated with OHRQoL for the families. Malocclusion was not associated with a negative impact on OHRQoL. In contrast, parents'/caregivers' perceptions regarding the oral health of their children and a history of toothache were predictors of a negative impact on the OHRQoL.

  12. Quality of life impairment in children and adolescents with vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Jonathan I; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-01-01

    Vitiligo significantly affects quality of life (QOL) in adults, but little is known about the effect on QOL of pediatric vitiligo and whether the extent, distribution, and duration of vitiligo are associated with QOL. We performed an online parental questionnaire-based study (N = 350) regarding children ages 0 to 17 years with vitiligo, including validated questions about body surface area (BSA), distribution, and age of onset of vitiligo, associated symptoms, and QOL using the Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI). Vitiligo negatively affected numerous aspects of and total CDLQI score (median 3.0, interquartile range 5.0). Their vitiligo lesions did not bother only 4.1% of teenagers ages 15 to 17 years, versus 45.6% of children ages 0 to 6 years and 50.0% of those ages 7 to 14 years (p < 0.001). There was no association between the child's age and whether the child's vitiligo bothered the parents (p = 0.27). The most bothersome sites of vitiligo lesions for children and parents were the face (25.6% and 37.4%, respectively) and legs (26.2% and 26.2%, respectively). Eighty-two patients (30.1%) reported itching and painful skin within the past week. Using multivariate ordinal logistic regression models, it was found that an affected BSA of more than 25% was associated with self-consciousness, difficulty with friendships and schoolwork, and teasing and bullying. Lesions on the face and arms were associated with teasing and bullying. The extent of vitiligo is associated with QOL impairment in children and adolescents, especially self-consciousness, but also bullying and teasing. Different distributions of vitiligo lesions are associated with different aspects of QOL impairment. Teenagers ages 15 to 17 years seem to experience the most self-consciousness of all pediatric age groups.

  13. Relief of BPO or improvement in quality of life?

    PubMed

    Teillac, P

    1998-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) can cause benign prostatic enlargement with subsequent benign prostatic obstruction (BPO) and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). A reduction in the size of the prostate has long been considered one of the most important treatment goals. However, there is a poor correlation between prostate size and both LUTS and BPO, and between BPO and symptoms. Today, the urologist's primary objectives are to minimize symptoms, relieve BPO and decrease the morbidity associated with BPO. From the patient's point of view, rapid relief of LUTS and immediate improvement in associated quality of life (QOL) are the most important factors. Although there is a good correlation between relief of symptoms (as measured by the International Prostate Symptom Score [I-PSS], for example) and associated improvement in bothersomeness and QOL, particularly that associated with filling ('irritative') symptoms, it is still important to quantify LUTS-related bothersomeness and QOL. Various questionnaires have been developed to measure bothersomeness (e.g. Symptom Problem Index [SPI], Danish PSS [DAN-PSS], International Continence Society BPH Study Group [ICSmale] questionnaire) and QOL (e.g. I-PSS-QOL, BPH Impact Index [BII] and QOL9 BPH-specific questionnaire). In addition, the impact of treatment on sexual function should also be taken into account when judging the overall well being or QOL of the patient. A grading system to evaluate the global improvement in patients following treatment has been established. Patients are either graded as showing 'slight', 'moderate' or 'marked' improvement, with the reduction in I-PSS or BII scores required for each classification dependent on baseline symptom severity. Medical treatment strategies designed to alleviate the symptoms of BPH and consequently improve the patient's QOL are now becoming increasingly important.

  14. Quality of life measurement and outcome in aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Spaccavento, Simona; Craca, Angela; Del Prete, Marina; Falcone, Rosanna; Colucci, Antonia; Di Palma, Angela; Loverre, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QL) can be defined as the individual’s perception of their own well-being. Aphasia is the most important potential consequence of stroke and has a profound effect on a patient’s life, causing emotional distress, depression, and social isolation, due to loss of language functions. Aims To draw up a QL questionnaire for aphasics (QLQA) focusing particularly on difficulties in interpersonal relationships and on the loss of independence as a result of language disorders. We reported the results of a psychometric evaluation of this measure. Moreover, we experimentally focused on the differences in QLQA between patients affected only by neurological motor impairment and hemiparetic patients with aphasia (PWA) in order to verify the specific role of aphasia on QL. We also explored if the QLQA is sensitive to the severity of aphasia and to the time elapsing from the stroke. Methods A total of 146 consecutive PWA and 37 control subjects were enrolled to evaluate the reliability (internal consistency and test–retest reliability) and validity of the QLQA, using standard psychometric methods. Patients were divided into acute (within 3 months since stroke) and chronic (beyond 3 months) groups, and into mild and severe according to the severity of aphasia. The experimental group of only acute PWA was compared to control subjects, with right hemispherical lesion and without aphasia in QLQA total and partial scores. Results The QLQA had good internal consistency and test–retest reliability. Acute and chronic PWA and mild and severe ones differed in QLQA total, communication, and autonomy subscales. No differences were found in psychological condition. Between aphasic and control patients, significant differences were found in all QLQA subscales. Conclusion The QLQA is a valid measure of QL in PWA, contributing to a better distinction between severe and mild aphasia, and it is sensitive also to the variations in QL depending on the time interval

  15. Quality of life of patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Polanski, Jacek; Jankowska-Polanska, Beata; Rosinczuk, Joanna; Chabowski, Mariusz; Szymanska-Chabowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the major cause of oncologic-related death worldwide. Due to delayed diagnosis, 5-year survival rate accounts for only 15%. Treatment includes surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation therapy; however, it is burdened by many side effects. Progress of the disease, severity of its symptoms, and side effects decrease significantly the quality of life (QoL) in those patients. The level of self-assessed QoL helps in predicting survival, which is especially important among patients receiving palliative care. Patients assess their functioning in five dimensions (physical, psychological, cognitive, social, and life roles), severity of symptoms, financial problems, and overall QoL. The QoL in lung cancer patients is lower than in healthy population and patients suffering from other malignancies. It is affected by the severity and the number of symptoms such as fatigue, loss of appetite, dyspnea, cough, pain, and blood in sputum, which are specific for lung tumors. Fatigue and respiratory problems reduce psychological dimension of QoL, while sleep problems reduce cognitive functioning. Physical dimension (related to growing disability) decreases in most of the patients. Also, most of them are unable to play their family and social roles. The disease is a frequent reason of irritation, distress, and depression. Management of the disease symptoms may improve QoL. Controlling the level of fatigue, pulmonary rehabilitation, and social and spiritual support are recommended. Early introduction of tailored palliative treatment is a strategy of choice for improvement of QoL in lung cancer patients. PMID:27013895

  16. Quality of life in idiopathic intracranial hypertension at diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Beau B.; McDermott, Michael P.; Galetta, Kristin M.; Balcer, Laura J.; Wall, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The study purpose was to examine vision-specific and overall health-related quality of life (QOL) at baseline in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial patients who were newly diagnosed and had mild visual loss. We also sought to determine the associations between vision-specific QOL scores and visual symptoms, visual function, pain, headache-related disability, and obesity. Methods: We assessed QOL using the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire–25 (NEI-VFQ-25), and 10-Item NEI-VFQ-25 Neuro-Ophthalmic Supplement. We compared these results with those of previously reported idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) QOL studies. We assessed relationships between QOL and other clinical characteristics. Results: Among 165 participants with IIH (161 women and 4 men with a mean age ± SD of 29.2 ± 7.5 years), vision-specific QOL scores were reduced compared with published values for disease-free controls. Scores of participants were comparable to published results for patients with multiple sclerosis and a history of optic neuritis. A multiple linear regression model for the NEI-VFQ-25 composite score found that perimetric mean deviation in the best eye, visual acuity in the worst eye, visual symptoms, and pain symptoms (headache, neck pain), but not obesity, were independently associated with QOL. Conclusions: IIH affects QOL at time of diagnosis even in patients with mild visual impairment. Vision-specific QOL in patients with newly diagnosed IIH may be as decreased as that for patients with other neuro-ophthalmic disorders. IIH treatment should target visual loss and other symptoms of increased intracranial pressure associated with reduced QOL. Reduced QOL does not simply reflect obesity, an underlying IIH risk factor. PMID:25995055

  17. Oral cancer malnutrition impacts weight and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Handschel, Jörg; Holtmann, Henrik; Krüskemper, Gertrud

    2015-04-01

    Diet is important for both quality of life (QoL) and survival of patients with oral cancer. Their intake of food is impeded by functional restrictions in chewing and swallowing. In the DÖSAK REHAB STUDY 1652 patients from 38 hospitals within the German-language area of Germany; Austria and Switzerland were examined with regard to functional and psychological variables having an impact on diet. Chewing and swallowing are correlated with mobility of the tongue and the mandible as well as opening of the mouth. Thirty five percent of the patients lost weight; 41% maintained their weight and 24% gained weight. The QoL of patients who were able to maintain their weight and of those who gained weight was significantly better than that of patients who lost weight. A normal diet was important for maintaining weight. Mashed food; liquid food and loss of appetite were closely associated with loss of weight; although it was possible for nutritional counseling and dietary support to be implemented particularly favorably in this respect. Due to problems with eating patients' strength deteriorated; thus restricting activity. Radiotherapy had a negative impact on diet and weight. It influenced sense of taste; dryness of the mouth; swelling and discomfort when ingesting food. Pain and scars in the region of the operation also cause patients to dislike hard; spicy and sour food. Support from a nutritional counselor in implementing a calorie-rich diet remedied this and such support needs to be integrated into patient management. The fact that a poor nutritional status is of such great importance is well-known; but what is often lacking is the systematic implementation of continued professional nutritional counseling over a long period of time; weight control and psycho-social support of the operated patients; particularly those who also have had radiotherapy.

  18. Health-related quality of life for chronically ill children.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Mary Ann; Kelly, Michelle M

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 43% of children in the United States (32 million) are currently living with at least 1 of 20 common chronic childhood illnesses. The most common chronic childhood illnesses are asthma, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, obesity, malnutrition, developmental disabilities, cerebral palsy, consequences of low birthweight, and mental illness. For all chronically ill pediatric populations, the outcome of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is particularly important because many of these children have not and will not be cured, and will continue to manage their chronic illness into adulthood. Advances in biomedical science and technology continue to improve efficacy of treatments and care for chronically ill children, adolescents, and their families, which highlight the importance measurement of HRQOL as a treatment and health status outcome. The construct of HRQOL is subjective, multidimensional, dynamic, and unique to each individual. It includes aspects of physical, psychological, social function, and goal attainment. Outcomes of HRQOL now include the financial implications for these children and their families, as well as financial and organizational consequences for healthcare planning and delivery of services.This article reviews the importance of HRQOL as a health outcome for chronically ill children. A historical overview and synthesis of the conceptualization and measurement of HRQOL for the chronically ill pediatric population is provided. Current research investigations that have measured health outcomes using individual scales tailored to children's specific symptoms health outcomes, such as PROMIS®-Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System-are reviewed. The clinical applications of HRQOL outcomes research include facilitation of patient-healthcare provider communication, improved patient satisfaction, identification of hidden morbidities, a positive impact on clinical decision making, and improvement of patient outcomes over time

  19. Quality of life of caregivers and patients on peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Stanley Lin-Sun; Sathick, Insara; McKitty, Khadija; Punzalan, Sally

    2008-05-01

    Peritoneal dialysis is the archetypal home-based therapy and is often favoured by patients. However, as patients with end-stage renal failure become more elderly, with more co-morbidity, their dependence on carers to provide physical, emotional and logistical support increases. The effect of this chronic burden has not been systematically studied. We have prospectively studied patients with end-stage renal failure starting peritoneal dialysis and their carers over a 1-year period. We selected a cohort of caregivers that are actively involved with the care of their partners' dialysis. Quality of Life (QoL) assessed by SF-36 questionnaires showed the patients and carers had impairment of QoL at the start of dialysis. As expected, the baseline QoL Physical Component Scores highly correlated with co-morbidity and assessment of functional capacity. Scores of all QoL domains improved after 1 year and this reached statistical significance for social functioning for both patients and carers. When we compared carers of highly dependent patients (required to perform daily dialysis) with carers of less dependent patients, we noted that the former had a statistically significant worsening of their mental health but other parameters were not different. We have shown that despite increasing the burden for caregivers, with careful selection, education and support, we did not adversely impact on the QoL of carers whilst there was some evidence of improvement, especially in social functioning. This gives reassurance that establishing dependent patients on PD is compatible with a holistic approach to the patients and their families. PMID:18182410

  20. Tooth loss, chewing ability and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Traebert, Jefferson; Lasta, Renata; Da Rosa, Thaiany Naila; Capella, Diogo Lenzi; Presta, Andréia Antoniuk

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to observe the tooth loss over age in a sample of Brazilian patients and analyze their ability to chew, relating it to how much is the loss of oral function impact over the quality of life (QoL). Materials and Methods: This is a single center, observational study and the data were collected through clinical examination followed of questionnaires to obtain sociodemographic information, the ability to chew (through the index of chewing ability [ICA]) and QoL (through Oral Health Impact Profile, OHIP-14). Results: The sample was composed by 171 random volunteers with mean age of 47 (SD 15.2). Low number of natural teeth was associated with an increase of age (Spearman's rho correlation coefficient-0.7, P < 0.001, 2-tailed) and chew disability (ICA: chew's ability vs. disability) (Mann-Whitney U-Test, P < 0.001). Chew disability showed a negative impact over the QoL (overall OHIP; Mann-Whitney U Test P < 0.001) and in five of seven OHIP domains (Functional Limitation, Physical Pain, Psychological Discomfort, Physical Disability, Psychological Disability). Age over than 40 years, was also associated with chewing disability (Pearson Chi-Square P < 0.001) and poorer QoL (Mann-Whitney U test P = 0.01). Conclusion: This study observed that the chewing disability produces a significant and negative impact over oral-health related QoL and both, poor QoL and chewing disability are related with the decrease of the number of natural teeth. PMID:23633796

  1. Effectiveness of Methadone Maintenance Therapy and Improvement in Quality of Life Following a Decade of Implementation.

    PubMed

    Teoh Bing Fei, Joni; Yee, Anne; Habil, Mohamad Hussain Bin; Danaee, Mahmoud

    2016-10-01

    Methadone maintenance therapy has been found to be an effective harm reduction treatment for opioid use disorder. However evidence of its benefits over a longer duration of treatment is limited as most studies focus on its short term benefits. As methadone maintenance therapy reaches a decade since its implementation in Malaysia, this study sought to examine the effectiveness of methadone treatment, change in quality of life among patients since entry to methadone treatment, as well as factors predicting the magnitude of change in quality of life. This study found that methadone maintenance therapy was effective in reducing heroin use, injecting practices and crime, and in improving in social functioning and physical symptoms, but not in reducing sex-related HIV risk-taking behavior. Though patients had a significantly better quality of life at follow-up than at entry to methadone maintenance therapy, the improvement in quality of life was not significantly greater as the duration of treatment increased. Age above 50 years old, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive status and physical symptoms predicted a poorer improvement in quality of life between baseline and follow-up. On the other hand, patients with hepatitis B showed a greater improvement in quality of life in the social relationships domain compared to patients without hepatitis B. In conclusion, methadone maintenance therapy is an effective treatment for opioid use disorder and improves quality of life but its benefits in further improving quality of life beyond a decade of treatment need further evaluation. PMID:27568510

  2. Quality of Life and Coping Strategies in Coronary Heart Disease Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdi, Seyedeh-Monavar; Hosseinian, Simin; Eslami, Mansoure; Fathi-Ashtiani, Ali

    This study aims to find the relationship between quality of life and coping strategies in coronary heart disease patients. Two hundred coronary heart disease patients at Tehran Heart Center, who had been diagnosed with the disease 3 months before, were selected and filled out The Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) and Quality of Life-SF36. Results showed a discrepancy between quality of life indices and coping strategies. Task-oriented strategy had a positive and significant relationship with total quality of life and PF indices while it had a negative and significant relationship with MH, RE and RP indices. Emotional-oriented strategy had a positive and significant relationship with RP and RE indices while it had a negative and significant relationship with PF, GH, PH, total psychological health and total quality of life indices. Avoidance-oriented strategy had a negative and significant relationship only with MH index. Furthermore, quality of life aspects (physical and psychological) had a positive and significant relationship with emotional-oriented strategy, but it did not have a significant relationship with task-oriented and avoidance-oriented strategies. Also, the social aspect of quality of life did not have a significant relationship with any of the strategies. Considering the effect of stress on decreasing the quality of life, we recommend a psychologist train coping strategies to coronary heart disease patients along with medical treatments in order to improve recovery, maintain health and reduce recurrence.

  3. Psychometric Properties of the Portuguese Version of the Quality of Life Questionnaire (QOL-Q)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albuquerque, Cristina P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This study analyzes the psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the Quality of Life Questionnaire (QOL-Q; Quality of Life Questionnaire Manual--1993 Manual and 2004 Revision. 2004, IDS Publishing Company, Worthington, OH; Schalock & Keith 2004). Method: The analysis of the factorial structure was carried out on a sample of…

  4. Family Quality of Life: Adaptation to Spanish Population of Several Family Support Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balcells-Balcells, A.; Gine, C.; Guardia-Olmos, J.; Summers, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The concept of family quality of life has emerged as a decisive construct in the last decades to improve the capabilities of families and to assess the outcomes of the services and supports they get. The goal of this research is to adapt three instruments to the Spanish population: the "Beach Center Family Quality of Life Scale", the…

  5. Predictive and Treatment Validity of Life Satisfaction and the Quality of Life Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisch, Michael B.; Clark, Michelle P.; Rouse, Steven V.; Rudd, M. David; Paweleck, Jennifer K.; Greenstone, Andrew; Kopplin, David A.

    2005-01-01

    The clinical and positive psychology usefulness of quality of life, well-being, and life satisfaction assessments depends on their ability to predict important outcomes and to detect intervention-related change. These issues were explored in the context of a program of instrument validation for the Quality of Life Inventory (QOLI) involving 3,927…

  6. Perceptions of Quality of Life in Rural Open-Country Areas: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieper, Hanns G.; And Others

    Concerned with Southern populations of open-country rural areas, the objectives of this study were: (1) identification of changes in quality of life of the study population since 1960; (2) delineation of those aspects of quality of life considered inadequate by the residents; and (3) testing of the hypothesis that community leaders, due to their…

  7. Race, Ethnicity and the Quality of Life in America, 1972-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coverdill, James E.; Lopez, Carlos A.; Petrie, Michelle A.

    2011-01-01

    We extend research on black-white gaps in the subjective quality of life by exploring recent General Social Survey data, focusing attention on Latinos, and probing the value of partial proportional odds models for ordinal quality-of-life measures. Results indicate a declining but discernable black-white gap for four measures--marital happiness,…

  8. Determinants of quality of life in Brazilian patients with myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Mourão, Aline Mansueto; Gomez, Rodrigo Santiago; Barbosa, Luiz Sergio Mageste; da Silva Freitas, Denise; Comini-Frota, Elizabeth Regina; Kummer, Arthur; Lemos, Stella Maris Aguiar; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aims of the current study were 1) to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Brazilian version of the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Scale and 2) to investigate the quality of life of Brazilian patients with myasthenia gravis and its determinants. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 69 patients with myasthenia gravis who underwent neurological evaluation and completed questionnaires regarding quality of life (the 36-item Short Form of the Medical Outcomes Study and the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Scale), anxiety and depressive symptoms. RESULTS: The Brazilian version of the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Scale showed high internal consistency and good concurrent validity with the 36-item Short Form of the Medical Outcomes Study and its subscales. Determinants of quality of life in Brazilian patients with myasthenia gravis included the current status of myasthenia gravis as assessed by the Myasthenia Gravis Composite, the current prednisone dose and the levels of anxiety and depression. CONCLUSION: The Brazilian version of the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Scale is a valid instrument. Symptom severity, prednisone dosage and anxiety and depression levels impact the quality of life of patients with myasthenia gravis. PMID:27464292

  9. Health-Related Quality of Life among Abused Women One Year after Leaving a Violent Partner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsaker, Kjersti; Moen, Bente E.; Kristoffersen, Kjell

    2008-01-01

    This is the first follow up study measuring quality of life among abused women who have left their abusive partner. The women (n = 22) answered a questionnaire while staying at women's shelter and one year later. The aim was to examine long-term effects of intimate partner violence against women on health-related quality of life. Health-related…

  10. Quality of Life in a City: The Effect of Population Density

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Victoria; Torgersen, Svenn; Kringlen, Einar

    2004-01-01

    There exist a number of concepts and operational definitions of quality of life. In the present study the aim has been to develop a comprehensive, global index of quality of life, and relate the sub-indexes and global index to various socio-demographic variables, somatic health and density of population in the residential area. The sample…

  11. A Family Quality of Life Study of Families with Children with Disabilities in Hawai'i

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranges, Phaedra E.

    2011-01-01

    Research indicates that families of children with disabilities are at risk for a lower quality of life than families of typically developing children, as the impact that a child with a disability has on a family's quality of life (FQOL) is both substantial and complex (Zuna, Selig, Summers, & Turnbull, 2009b; Zuna, Summers, Turnbull, Hu & Xu,…

  12. Critique on the conceptualisation of quality of life: a review and evaluation of different conceptual approaches.

    PubMed

    Moons, Philip; Budts, Werner; De Geest, Sabina

    2006-09-01

    Over the past decades, the concept of quality of life has been of paramount importance for evaluating the quality and outcome of health care. Despite its importance, there is still no consensus on the definition or proper measurement of quality of life. Several concept analyses of quality of life have been published. However, they appear to have had a rather limited impact on how empirical studies are conducted. Therefore, we present an overview and critique of different conceptualisations of quality of life, with the ultimate goal of making quality of life a less ambiguous concept. We also describe six conceptual problems. These problems were used as criteria to evaluate the appropriateness of different conceptualisations. This evaluation suggests that defining quality of life in terms of life satisfaction is most appropriate, because this definition successfully deals with all the conceptual problems discussed. The result of our concept evaluation was not surprising for it corroborated the results of several concept analyses and the findings of a structural equation modelling study. Based on the findings revealed by our review, we propose that the scientific community should revitalise the conceptual discussion on quality of life. Furthermore, our findings can assist researchers in developing more rigourous quality-of-life research.

  13. Effect of Pharmacotherapy for Anxiety Disorders on Quality of Life: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Stefan G.; Wu, Jade Q.; Boettcher, Hannah; Sturm, Jamie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Pharmacotherapy is an effective treatment for anxiety disorders, but its effects on quality of life have not been examined systematically. Our objective was to conduct an effect size analysis of pharmacological interventions on quality of life outcomes in patients with DSM-IV anxiety disorders. Methods Manual and electronic searches using PubMed, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library were conducted for records from the first available date through May 1st, 2013 for trials of pharmacological interventions in patients with anxiety disorders, which had measures of quality of life before and after treatment. Of 1,865 entries, 93 studies were identified as potentially relevant and 32 met inclusion criteria, of which results were examined from 22 studies reporting 27 distinct pharmacological trials, representing data from 4,344 anxiety disorder patients. Data were extracted independently by multiple observers to estimate within-group and placebo-controlled random effects of the treatment changes on quality of life. We hypothesized that pharmacotherapy improves quality of life, which is associated with improvement in anxiety symptoms. Results Pharmacological interventions effectively improved quality of life from before to after treatment (Hedges' g = .59), although the controlled effect size is smaller among those trials with placebo interventions (Hedges' g = .32). These effect sizes were robust, increased with publication year, and increased with reductions in anxiety symptoms. Conclusions Pharmacological therapy is effective for improving quality of life in anxiety disorders, and larger symptom reductions are associated with greater improvement in quality of life. PMID:24241771

  14. Factors influencing parent reports on quality of life for children with asthma.

    PubMed

    Annett, Robert D; Bender, Bruce G; DuHamel, Thomas R; Lapidus, Jodi

    2003-01-01

    Children and parents often differ in their perceptions of a complex disease such as asthma. This ancillary study of children with mild to moderate asthma that was conducted at four of the eight clinics in the Childhood Asthma Management Program had two aims: (1) to relate quality of life to asthma symptoms, sociodemographic characteristics, child psychosocial adjustment and family social support and (2) to relate agreement between child- and parent-reported quality of life to child age. For this study participants completed the Caregiver's Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (C-PAQLQ), Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire, and a battery of psychosocial health outcomes questionnaires at the 12-month follow-up. The average asthma symptom score from diary cards for the 2 weeks before the visit was also collected. Parent-reported family burden was the strongest correlate of C-PAQLQ scores. Although the average asthma symptom score was not associated with parent-reported quality of life, the study had low power to detect a relationship because of the few episodes of asthma reported during the assessment period. The correlation between child and parent reported quality of life improved with increasing age of the child, suggesting increased child-parent agreement about quality of life outcomes was associated with increasing age of the child. Family characteristics, such as degree of cohesion among family members, are not associated with quality of life ratings. PMID:14529108

  15. Change in Quality of Life after Rehabilitation: Prognostic Factors for Visually Impaired Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langelaan, Maaike; de Boer, Michiel R.; van Nispen, Ruth M. A.; Wouters, Bill; Moll, Annette C.; van Rens, Ger H. M. B.

    2009-01-01

    The overall aim of rehabilitation for visually impaired adults is to improve the quality of life and (societal) participation. The objectives of this study were to obtain the short-term and long-term outcome of a comprehensive rehabilitation programme on quality of life for visually impaired adults, and prognostic baseline factors responsible for…

  16. Quality of Life as Medicine: Interventions that Induce Salutogenesis. A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ventegodt, Soren; Omar, Hatim A.; Merrick, Joav

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the medical (salutogenic) effect of interventions that aim to improve quality of life. Review of studies where the global quality of life in chronically ill patients was improved independently of subjective and objective factors (like physical and mental health, yearly income, education, social network, self-esteem, sexual…

  17. Quality of Life in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Who Participate in Diabetes Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Ruth; Cureton, Virginia Young; Canham, Daryl L.

    2006-01-01

    Quality of life in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes is a growing area of interest in pediatric research. The complex diabetes regimen imposes challenges for an adolescent. Adolescents diagnosed with diabetes are a group that appears to be at risk for having a poor health-related quality of life. Although research supports the positive relationship…

  18. Self-Efficacy and Quality of Life of Professionals Caring for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nota, Laura; Ferrari, Lea; Soresi, Salvatore

    2007-01-01

    The quality of life experienced by social and healthcare professionals is among the factors that contribute to the definition of quality of service. Other factors seemingly in relation with experienced quality of life concern one's own efficacy, beliefs, and burnout. The present study intended to verify the relations that existed between these…

  19. A Qualitative Study of the Health-Related Quality of Life of Disabled Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Bridget; Rice, Helen; Dixon-Woods, Mary; Colver, Allan F.; Parkinson, Kathryn N.

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated what disabled children thought most important in their lives and examined how well their priorities are represented in KIDSCREEN, a generic health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instrument. Participants were a subgroup of families who had previously taken part in a study of quality of life and participation in…

  20. Methodological Validation of Quality of Life Questionnaire for Coal Mining Groups-Indian Scenario

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sen, Sayanti; Sen, Goutam; Tewary, B. K.

    2012-01-01

    Maslow's hierarchy-of-needs theory has been used to predict development of Quality of Life (QOL) in countries over time. In this paper an attempt has been taken to derive a methodological validation of quality of life questionnaire which have been prepared for the study area. The objective of the study is to standardize a questionnaire tool to…

  1. A New Malaysian Quality of Life Index Based on Fuzzy Sets and Hierarchical Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazim, M. Abdullah; Abu Osman, M. Tap

    2009-01-01

    The Malaysian Quality of Life Index (MQLI) released by the Economic Planning Unit (EPU), has led authors to search for alternative method of expressing this index. One of the limitations in MQLI computations is the failure to recognise unequal weights for each accounted component. This paper offers a new way of expressing the quality of life index…

  2. Repressive coping, stigmatization, psychological distress, and quality of life among behavioral weight management participants.

    PubMed

    Truong, Erin A K; Olson, KayLoni L; Emery, Charles F

    2016-08-01

    Repressive coping has been associated with elevated risk of disease and negative health outcomes in past studies. Although a prior study of healthy men found that repression was associated with lower body mass index (BMI), no study has examined repressive coping among obese individuals. This study examined the relationship of repressive coping with BMI and obesity-relevant psychosocial factors among 104 overweight and obese participants in a behavioral weight management program. Participants completed questionnaires assessing repressive coping, stigmatization, psychological distress, and quality of life. BMI was objectively measured. Repressors reported lower stigmatization, anxiety, and depression as well as higher emotional and weight-related quality of life. Repressors and non-repressors had equivalent BMI and reported similar impairment in physical quality of life, but stigmatization moderated the relationship between repressive coping and physical quality of life (b=0.31, p=0.039), reflecting better physical quality of life among non-repressors with lower stigmatization. Obese individuals who engage in repressive coping may tend to underreport psychological symptoms, social difficulties, and impairments in quality of life. Higher physical quality of life among non-repressors with lower stigmatization may reflect a combined influence of coping and social processes in physical quality of life among obese individuals. PMID:27304361

  3. Do We Need to Weight Satisfaction Scores with Importance Ratings in Measuring Quality of Life?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Chia-Huei; Yao, Grace

    2006-01-01

    Trauer and Mackinnon (2001; Quality of life research 10, pp. 579-585) recently proposed that weighting satisfaction scores by importance ratings in measuring quality of life is undesirable and unnecessary. However, they didn't use empirical data to support their claim. In this study, different weighting algorithms developed by Cummins (1997;…

  4. Effectiveness of Methadone Maintenance Therapy and Improvement in Quality of Life Following a Decade of Implementation.

    PubMed

    Teoh Bing Fei, Joni; Yee, Anne; Habil, Mohamad Hussain Bin; Danaee, Mahmoud

    2016-10-01

    Methadone maintenance therapy has been found to be an effective harm reduction treatment for opioid use disorder. However evidence of its benefits over a longer duration of treatment is limited as most studies focus on its short term benefits. As methadone maintenance therapy reaches a decade since its implementation in Malaysia, this study sought to examine the effectiveness of methadone treatment, change in quality of life among patients since entry to methadone treatment, as well as factors predicting the magnitude of change in quality of life. This study found that methadone maintenance therapy was effective in reducing heroin use, injecting practices and crime, and in improving in social functioning and physical symptoms, but not in reducing sex-related HIV risk-taking behavior. Though patients had a significantly better quality of life at follow-up than at entry to methadone maintenance therapy, the improvement in quality of life was not significantly greater as the duration of treatment increased. Age above 50 years old, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive status and physical symptoms predicted a poorer improvement in quality of life between baseline and follow-up. On the other hand, patients with hepatitis B showed a greater improvement in quality of life in the social relationships domain compared to patients without hepatitis B. In conclusion, methadone maintenance therapy is an effective treatment for opioid use disorder and improves quality of life but its benefits in further improving quality of life beyond a decade of treatment need further evaluation.

  5. 'Active Surveillance' of Prostate Cancer Doesn't Dampen Quality of Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160131.html 'Active Surveillance' of Prostate Cancer Doesn't Dampen Quality of Life Choosing no ... 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Men with low-risk prostate cancer report a good quality of life after choosing ...

  6. Development and Validation of the Pediatric Oncology Quality of Life Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, David A. J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Development of a parent report measure for assessing the quality of life of children with cancer is described. The Pediatric Oncology Quality of Life Scale assesses physical function and role restriction, emotional distress, and reaction to current medical treatment. Reliability and validity assessments provide preliminary support for the…

  7. Mental health consumers' perceptions of quality of life and mental health care.

    PubMed

    Williams, Emily; Sands, Natisha; Elsom, Stephen; Prematunga, Roshani Kanchana

    2015-09-01

    Research spanning the past decade consistently reports that people with severe mental illnesses experience lower quality of life than the general population, however, little is known about what "quality of life" means to consumers, or how quality of life can be promoted in mental health care. This study measured the Quality of Life of mental health consumers receiving care from a Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program, and examined consumer perceptions of quality of life. The study used an exploratory design incorporating the WHOQOL-brèf survey and four additional qualitative questions for data collection. Data were analysed using descriptive and correlational statistics. Participants (n = 49) reported lower quality of life scores on all four domains of the WHOQOL-brèf and lower overall ratings for "quality of life" than the general population. Having basic needs met, good relationships with family and friends, regular support, and improved social connectedness were identified by consumers as important to their quality of life.

  8. Repressive coping, stigmatization, psychological distress, and quality of life among behavioral weight management participants.

    PubMed

    Truong, Erin A K; Olson, KayLoni L; Emery, Charles F

    2016-08-01

    Repressive coping has been associated with elevated risk of disease and negative health outcomes in past studies. Although a prior study of healthy men found that repression was associated with lower body mass index (BMI), no study has examined repressive coping among obese individuals. This study examined the relationship of repressive coping with BMI and obesity-relevant psychosocial factors among 104 overweight and obese participants in a behavioral weight management program. Participants completed questionnaires assessing repressive coping, stigmatization, psychological distress, and quality of life. BMI was objectively measured. Repressors reported lower stigmatization, anxiety, and depression as well as higher emotional and weight-related quality of life. Repressors and non-repressors had equivalent BMI and reported similar impairment in physical quality of life, but stigmatization moderated the relationship between repressive coping and physical quality of life (b=0.31, p=0.039), reflecting better physical quality of life among non-repressors with lower stigmatization. Obese individuals who engage in repressive coping may tend to underreport psychological symptoms, social difficulties, and impairments in quality of life. Higher physical quality of life among non-repressors with lower stigmatization may reflect a combined influence of coping and social processes in physical quality of life among obese individuals.

  9. The Impact of Globalization on a Country's Quality of Life: Toward an Integrated Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirgy, M. Joseph; Lee, Dong-Jin; Miller, Chad; Littlefield, James E.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to develop a set of theoretical propositions to explain the impact of globalization on a country's quality of life (QOL). In this paper, we describe how globalization impacts the quality of life of residents of a country by first articulating the globalization construct (in terms of inflows and outflows of goods,…

  10. An Initial Look at the Quality of Life of Malaysian Families That Include Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, M.; Brown, R.; Karrapaya, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: While there is a growing body of literature in the quality of life of families that include children with disabilities, the majority of research has been conducted in western countries. The present study provides an initial exploration of the quality of life of Malaysian families that include children with developmental/intellectual…

  11. Perceptions of Neighborhood Problems and Health-Related Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Erin M.; Shepherd, Daniel; Welch, David; Dirks, Kim N.; McBride, David

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the association between perceptions of neighborhood problems and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in a sample of New Zealand residents (n = 692). A modified version of the Neighborhood Problems Scale (originally developed by Steptoe and Feldman, 2001) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) were…

  12. Health, Quality of Care and Quality of Life: A Case of Frail Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Chang-Ming

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between health, quality of care of geriatric case management and quality of life for the purpose of furthering the understanding of the relationship between quality of life and geriatric case management. Using survey data from a group of frail older adults, this study assesses the relative merit of two…

  13. Child Health-Related Quality of Life and Parental Social Capital in Greece: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Dardiry, Giulia; Dimitrakaki, Christine; Tzavara, Chara; Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike; Tountas, Yannis

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we examined dimensions of child health-related quality of life in Greece in relation to parental assessments of neighbourhood social capital and social support networks. For the analysis, two main measures were used: (1) child self-reported health-related quality of life in ten dimensions, as measured by the KIDSCREEN questionnaire;…

  14. The Association between Child Autism Symptomatology, Maternal Quality of Life, and Risk for Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zablotsky, Benjamin; Anderson, Connie; Law, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Parents raising children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have been shown to experience high levels of stress and report a lower quality of life. The current study examined the association between child autism symptomatology, mother's quality of life, and mother's risk for depression in a sample of 1,110 mothers recruited from a…

  15. Grandmothers Raising Grandchildren with Disabilities: Sources of Support and Family Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kresak, Karen E.; Gallagher, Peggy A.; Kelley, Susan J.

    2014-01-01

    Sources of support and quality of life of 50 grandmother-headed families raising grandchildren with and without disabilities were examined. Comparative analyses revealed significant differences between grandmothers raising grandchildren with and without disabilities in regard to sources of support and family quality of life. Informal support was…

  16. Quality of Life and Quality of Support for People with Severe Intellectual Disability and Complex Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beadle-Brown, J.; Leigh, J.; Whelton, B.; Richardson, L.; Beecham, J.; Baumker, T.; Bradshaw, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: People with severe and profound intellectual disabilities often spend substantial time isolated and disengaged. The nature and quality of the support appears to be important in determining quality of life. Methods: Structured observations and staff questionnaires were used to explore the quality of life and quality of support for 110…

  17. Subjective Values of Quality of Life Dimensions in Elderly People. A SEM Preference Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elosua, Paula

    2011-01-01

    This article proposes a Thurstonian model in the framework of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) to assess preferences among quality of life dimensions for the elderly. Data were gathered by a paired comparison design in a sample comprised of 323 people aged from 65 to 94 years old. Five dimensions of quality of life were evaluated: Health,…

  18. Effects of Internet Connectedness and Information Literacy on Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Louis

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this exploratory research is to examine the inter-linkage among Internet connectedness, information literacy, and quality of life. Results from a telephone survey, based on a probability sample of 756 Internet users, found that Internet connectedness is not related to quality of life. However, there is a significant relationship…

  19. School Placement and Perceived Quality of Life in Youth Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schick, Brenda; Skalicky, Anne; Edwards, Todd; Kushalnagar, Poorna; Topolski, Tari; Patrick, Donald

    2013-01-01

    In the education of students who are deaf and hard of hearing (DHH), there is much debate about how placement affects educational outcomes and quality of life. This study examined the relationship between quality of life and educational placement that include and do not include other DHH youth. Participants included 221 DHH youth, ages 11-18 with…

  20. Quality of Life Indicators for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities: Extending Current Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ivan; Hatton, Chris; Emerson, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life is a social construct that is measured by what are considered to be its most appropriate indicators. Quality of life measurement in intellectual disability reflects a variety of indicators, often grouped under life domains. Subjective and objective methods of measuring indicators each have strengths and drawbacks, but it is…

  1. Effects of a Leisure Programme on Quality of Life and Stress of Individuals with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Villamisar, D. A.; Dattilo, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Even though there is research demonstrating a positive relationship between leisure participation and the two constructs of quality of life and stress reduction, current conceptualisation of leisure as a contributor to quality of life is limited. In addition, in spite of improvements in accurate diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder…

  2. The Perceived Quality of Life among School District Superintendents in Illinois Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffernan, Debra J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perception of quality of life among Illinois male and female superintendents, and to determine demographic differences. Frisch's Quality of Life Inventory (QOLI) was used, which measured perceived levels of importance, satisfaction and weighted satisfaction (importance and satisfaction) in…

  3. Relationships between Leisure Participation and Quality of Life of People with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badia, Marta; Orgaz, María Begoña; Verdugo, Miguel Á.; Ullán, Ana M.; Martínez, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Background: Studies of people with developmental disabilities suggest that participation in leisure activities might be a key factor for good quality of life. This study explores the relationships between objective and subjective quality of life and leisure participation of adults with developmental disabilities. Materials and Methods: A…

  4. Predictors of quality of life in pediatric survivors of arterial ischemic stroke and cerebral sinovenous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Friefeld, Sharon J; Westmacott, Robyn; Macgregor, Daune; Deveber, Gabrielle A

    2011-09-01

    Predictors of quality of life can define potentially modifiable factors to increase favorable outcomes after pediatric stroke. Quality of life was measured using the Centre for Health Promotion's Quality of Life Profile (CHP-QOL) in 112 children surviving arterial ischemic stroke or cerebral sinovenous thrombosis at mean 3 years after stroke. Overall quality of life was poor in 17.8% children despite mean scores (3.52) in the "adequate" range. Quality of life related to school and play was most problematic and that related to physical and home environment was least problematic. Female gender, cerebral sinovenous thrombosis stroke, and older age at testing predicted reduced overall and domain-specific quality of life (P < .05), whereas neurological outcome and family socioeconomic status did not. Cognitive/behavioral deficit and low Verbal IQ adversely affected socialization and quality of life, especially among older children and females. Altered cognition/behavior has a major impact on quality of life after pediatric stroke. Implementation of ameliorative strategies warrants further study.

  5. Determinants of Health and the Quality of Life in the Bella Coola Valley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalos, Alex C.; Thommasen, Harvey V.; Read, Rua; Anderson, Nancy; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this investigation is to obtain some baseline self-reported data of the health status and overall quality of life of all residents of the Bella Coola Valley of British Columbia aged 17 years or older, and to measure the impact of a set of designated health determinants on their health and quality of life. In the period from August to…

  6. Family Quality of Life: Adult School Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svraka, E.; Loga, S.; Brown, I.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: This study endeavours to provide initial data on quality of life for families with adult children who have intellectual disabilities (ID) in the Canton of Sarajevo. Methods: The principal measure used was the "Family Quality of life Survey 2006-main caregivers of people with intellectual or developmental disabilities." The sample consisted…

  7. The impact of bariatric surgery on quality of life: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lindekilde, N; Gladstone, B P; Lübeck, M; Nielsen, J; Clausen, L; Vach, W; Jones, A

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to review the obesity literature in order to assess the impact of bariatric surgery on quality of life and the between-study variation by examining the standardized mean magnitude of effect in change in the levels of quality of life. The following databases EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and Web of Science were systematically searched for studies examining change in quality of life in adults receiving bariatric surgery for obesity. Seventy-two studies were included with a total of 9,433 participants treated for obesity with bariatric surgery. The average impact of bariatric surgery on quality of life corresponded to an effect size of 0.88 (95% CI: 0.80-0.96), indicating that bariatric surgery has a significant positive influence on quality of life in general. The impact varied considerably across studies with bariatric surgery showing a significantly greater positive influence on physical quality of life compared to mental quality of life. Bariatric surgery is effective in improving quality of life, especially when looking at physical well-being. Greater focus on the psychological well-being of the person undergoing surgery for obesity may lead to a better post-surgery prognosis for more people.

  8. Self-Efficacy and Quality of Life in People with Spinal Cord Injuries in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Nan Zhang

    2000-01-01

    Explores the relationship between self-efficacy beliefs and the quality of life in Chinese individuals with spinal cord injuries. Also examines whether health status and demographic variables correlated with the quality of life in this population. Results are discussed in line with the Chinese culture and its influences on the psychosocial…

  9. Quality of Life of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy: Perspectives of Adolescents and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elise; Shelly, Amy; Waters, Elizabeth; MacKinnon, Andrew; Reddihough, Dinah; Boyd, Roslyn; Graham, H. Kerr

    2009-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) has emerged over the past 20 years as an outcome for measuring the effectiveness of health-improvement interventions. The Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life Questionnaire for Children (CPQOL-Child) is well regarded and now integrated into research internationally. We describe the results of qualitative research, using grounded…

  10. Family Quality of Life of Chinese Families of Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, X.; Wang, M.; Fei, X.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The concepts of quality of life and family quality of life (FQOL) are increasingly being studied in the field of intellectual disabilities (ID) in China as important frameworks for: (1) assessing families' need for supports and services; (2) guiding organisational and service delivery system changes; and (3) evaluating quality family…

  11. Development of a Japanese Quality of Life Instrument for Older Adults Experiencing Dementia (QLDJ)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Abe, Toshiko; Okita, Yuko; Hayashi, Kunihiko; Sugishita, Chieko; Kamata, Keiko

    2002-01-01

    This study develops a quality of life instrument for older Japanese people experiencing dementia (QLDJ). Quality of life (QL) for these older adults is defined as a three dimensional construct including 1) interacting with surroundings, 2) expressing self, and 3) experiencing minimum negative behaviors. From 53 items in the initial item pool, 24…

  12. Quality of life and seizure outcome after vagus nerve stimulation in children with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Elisabeth M S; Connolly, Mary B; Slick, Daniel J; Eyrl, Kim L; Steinbok, Paul; Farrell, Kevin

    2008-09-01

    This study examined the effect of vagus nerve stimulation on quality of life in children with epilepsy using a validated quality-of-life scale and an empirical technique that accounts for measurement error in assessing individual change (the reliable change index). Participants were 34 children with severe intractable epilepsy who underwent vagus nerve stimulation and 19 children with intractable epilepsy who received medical management. Parent-completed epilepsy-specific and global ratings at baseline and after 1 year indicated that most children had no changes in quality of life following vagus nerve stimulation (52%-77%), similar to the comparison group. There was a trend for decreases to be less common in the vagus nerve stimulation group (14% vs 37%, P < .07), but there was no relation between improved quality of life and seizure control. The results raise questions about the mechanisms that underlie changes in quality of life after vagus nerve stimulation in this group of children. PMID:18474931

  13. Quality of Life, Body Image and Sexual Functioning in Bariatric Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Sarwer, David B; Steffen, Kristine J

    2015-11-01

    This article provides an overview of the literature on quality of life, body image and sexual behaviour in individuals with extreme obesity and who undergo bariatric surgery. Quality of life is a psychosocial construct that includes multiple domains, including health-related quality of life, weight-related quality of life, as well as other psychological constructs such as body image and sexual functioning. A large literature has documented the impairments in quality of life and these other domains in persons with obesity and extreme obesity in particular. These impairments are believed to play an influential role in the decision to undergo bariatric surgery. Individuals who undergo bariatric surgery typically report significant improvements in these and other areas of psychosocial functioning, often before they reach their maximum weight loss. The durability of these changes as patients maintain or regain weight, however, is largely unknown.

  14. Health-Related Quality of Life of Former Lead Workers in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Martha Carvalho Pereira; Carvalho, Fernando Martins; Lins, Liliane

    2015-11-03

    Little is known about the health-related quality of life of former lead workers. Using the Short-Form 36 Questionnaire (SF-36), a cross-section design study evaluated the health-related quality of life of 186 former workers of a lead smelter that operated in Santo Amaro da Purificação, Brazil, from 1960 to 1993, when it closed down. The smelter had very poor occupational and environmental hygiene standards. The health-related quality of life of former lead workers was low, compared to population-based and other nosological groups from Brazil. Former lead workers who indicated metal poisoning, difficulty getting another job and who could not get another job after dismissal by the smelter presented poorer health-related quality of life. Former lead workers with poor health-related quality of life form part of the huge occupational liability left by the Santo Amaro lead smelter.

  15. Depression, anxiety and stress among patients with dialysis and the association with quality of life.

    PubMed

    Bujang, Mohamad A; Musa, Ramli; Liu, Wen J; Chew, Thian F; Lim, Christopher T S; Morad, Zaki

    2015-12-01

    Studies addressing the nature of relationship between psychological symptoms and quality of life among dialysis patients in Malaysia are scarce. Hence, this study is intended to investigate the association between psychological symptoms such as depression, anxiety and stress on the quality of life in dialysis patients. A cross sectional multicentre study was conducted from May to October 2012 at 15 centres that provide haemodialysis and/or peritoneal dialysis. Apart from socio-demographic profile data collection, WHOQOL-BREF and DASS21 questionnaires were administered to study subjects. All three psychological symptoms had significant impact on quality of life domains of physical health, psychological health, social impact, perceived environment and overall quality of life. These findings suggest that subjects with symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress had poorer quality of life than those without, highlighting the negative impact of psychological symptoms.

  16. Quality of Life, Body Image and Sexual Functioning in Bariatric Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Sarwer, David B; Steffen, Kristine J

    2015-11-01

    This article provides an overview of the literature on quality of life, body image and sexual behaviour in individuals with extreme obesity and who undergo bariatric surgery. Quality of life is a psychosocial construct that includes multiple domains, including health-related quality of life, weight-related quality of life, as well as other psychological constructs such as body image and sexual functioning. A large literature has documented the impairments in quality of life and these other domains in persons with obesity and extreme obesity in particular. These impairments are believed to play an influential role in the decision to undergo bariatric surgery. Individuals who undergo bariatric surgery typically report significant improvements in these and other areas of psychosocial functioning, often before they reach their maximum weight loss. The durability of these changes as patients maintain or regain weight, however, is largely unknown. PMID:26608946

  17. Health-Related Quality of Life of Former Lead Workers in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Martha Carvalho Pereira; Carvalho, Fernando Martins; Lins, Liliane

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the health-related quality of life of former lead workers. Using the Short-Form 36 Questionnaire (SF-36), a cross-section design study evaluated the health-related quality of life of 186 former workers of a lead smelter that operated in Santo Amaro da Purificação, Brazil, from 1960 to 1993, when it closed down. The smelter had very poor occupational and environmental hygiene standards. The health-related quality of life of former lead workers was low, compared to population-based and other nosological groups from Brazil. Former lead workers who indicated metal poisoning, difficulty getting another job and who could not get another job after dismissal by the smelter presented poorer health-related quality of life. Former lead workers with poor health-related quality of life form part of the huge occupational liability left by the Santo Amaro lead smelter. PMID:26540067

  18. Health-related quality of life and the transformation of symptoms.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, David; Lilford, Richard; Ogden, Jane; Wessely, Simon

    2007-05-01

    This paper traces the development of health-related Quality of Life instruments over the last half century. It identifies the emergence of key components of quality of life measurement in other health status questionnaires between about 1950 and 1980 and their formalization in Quality of Life instruments in the mid 1980s. The common developmental thread that linked these Quality of Life instruments and their precursors was the identification of 'distal symptoms' that represented the impact of illness beyond its immediate bodily manifestations. The measurement of distal symptoms through Quality of Life instruments also served to detach symptoms from their customary patho-physiological referent. Other contemporary examples of these free-floating symptoms reinforce the argument that the nature and meaning of symptoms has been transformed over recent decades. PMID:17498169

  19. Evaluation of patients' quality of life aspects after cardiac pacemaker implantation

    PubMed Central

    de Barros, Rubens Tofano; de Carvalho, Sebastião Marcos Ribeiro; Silva, Marcos Augusto de Moraes; Borges, Juliana Bassalobre Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate patients' quality of life aspects after pacemaker implantation, relating it to gender, age, and implantation timespan. Methods A total of 107 clinically stable patients of both genders (49.5% women and 50.5% men) over 18 years old (average 69.3±12.6 years) and presenting an implantation timespan of three to 12 months (average 6.36±2.99 months) were evaluated. The evaluation included personal, clinical, and implant data as well as quality of life questionnaires (AQUAREL and SF-36). Statistical analysis was conducted using the t test and Pearson correlation, with a 5% significance level. Results The lowest SF-36 score referred to physical aspects, and the highest score referred to social aspects. In AQUAREL, the lowest score referred to dyspnea, and the highest referred to discomfort. There was a significant association between gender and quality of life in SF-36 (physical functioning and emotional aspects) and in AQUAREL (dyspnea). A negative correlation was observed between age and quality of life (functional capacity in SF-36, and discomfort in AQUAREL) in relation to implantation timespan, a correlation with vitality from SF-36. Conclusion Lower quality of life scores were found in physical aspects and dyspnea; and higher scores in social aspects and discomfort. Men presented higher quality of life scores related to physical functioning, emotional aspects and dyspnea. As age increases, quality of life worsens regarding functional capacity and discomfort; and the longer the pacemaker implantation timespan, the worse quality of life when it comes to vitality. Gender, age, and implantation timespan influence quality of life; thus, these variables must be considered in strategies for improving quality of life of patients with pacemakers. PMID:24896161

  20. Design and development of an automated, portable and handheld tablet personal computer-based data acquisition system for monitoring electromyography signals during rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, Nizam U; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Poo, Tarn S

    2013-03-01

    This article describes the design of a robust, inexpensive, easy-to-use, small, and portable online electromyography acquisition system for monitoring electromyography signals during rehabilitation. This single-channel (one-muscle) system was connected via the universal serial bus port to a programmable Windows operating system handheld tablet personal computer for storage and analysis of the data by the end user. The raw electromyography signals were amplified in order to convert them to an observable scale. The inherent noise of 50 Hz (Malaysia) from power lines electromagnetic interference was then eliminated using a single-hybrid IC notch filter. These signals were sampled by a signal processing module and converted into 24-bit digital data. An algorithm was developed and programmed to transmit the digital data to the computer, where it was reassembled and displayed in the computer using software. Finally, the following device was furnished with the graphical user interface to display the online muscle strength streaming signal in a handheld tablet personal computer. This battery-operated system was tested on the biceps brachii muscles of 20 healthy subjects, and the results were compared to those obtained with a commercial single-channel (one-muscle) electromyography acquisition system. The results obtained using the developed device when compared to those obtained from a commercially available physiological signal monitoring system for activities involving muscle contractions were found to be comparable (the comparison of various statistical parameters) between male and female subjects. In addition, the key advantage of this developed system over the conventional desktop personal computer-based acquisition systems is its portability due to the use of a tablet personal computer in which the results are accessible graphically as well as stored in text (comma-separated value) form. PMID:23662342